Page 1

M A RT I N R A N D A L L T R AV E L

A Festival of Music in

Rome 4–9 November 2012


A Festival of Music in

Rome 4–9 November 2012

music, in appropriate and glorious architectural settings, with some of the world’s leading specialists in the genre – among them the Gabrieli Consort & Players, La Venexiana, Accademia Bizantina and Modo Antiquo – will provide an experience of exceptional aesthetic richness.

Magnificence is the key to understanding Renaissance and Baroque Rome. Splendid buildings and great art were marshalled to assert the supremacy of the papacy and the triumph of Roman Catholicism during one of the most turbulent periods in the history of Christendom. Popes, cardinals, the indigenous nobility and assorted fortune seekers vied with each other to demonstrate their wealth, power and taste. Rome became the goal for ambitious artists from all over Europe and the most influential cultural centre on the continent.

Much of this splendour and beauty can still be seen by the modern visitor. But one ingredient is usually missing: music. For three centuries Rome was as much a centre of music as of the other arts. Music was the crowning glory, the most potent ingredient in sacred liturgy, the ultimate embellishment of secular life. This third edition of the Rome festival, inaugurated in 2002, restores music to some of the greatest palaces and churches in Rome with a brilliance and authenticity which is unprecedented in modern times. Six private performances of Roman

Martin Randall Travel Ltd Voysey House, Barley Mow Passage London W4 4GF Telephone 020 8742 3355 Fax 020 8742 7766 info@martinrandall.co.uk

www.martinrandall.com

The concerts are effectively private, admission being exclusive to those who book a package which includes a hotel in Rome, flights from the UK (optional), some coach travel within Rome, dinners, receptions and lectures. While the festival is musically intensive, there is plenty of free time in which to explore Rome independently, to relax, or to join some of the walks and visits with art historians which are being offered to participants. Many of the venues are relatively small, limiting the audience to around 220, but nevertheless in a couple of places only half this number can be accommodated so the concerts will be repeated. This leads to an informality and intimacy which engenders a rare intensity of musical communication.

From Australia and New Zealand you can contact: Martin Randall Marketing, Telephone 1300 55 95 95 From New Zealand +61 7 3377 0141 Fax 07 3377 0142 anz@martinrandall.com.au From Canada you can contact: Telephone 647 382 1644 Fax 416 925 2670 canada@martinrandall.ca

5085

From the USA you can call our UK office toll-free on: 1 800 988 6168


The festival package

Access to the concerts is exclusive to those who take the festival package, the price for which includes: Six concerts. These are essentially private, and tickets to individual events will not be available. Accommodation for five nights in one of five carefully selected hotels within the historic centre of Rome. Flights between London and Rome, from Heathrow or Gatwick to Fiumicino, with either British Airways or Alitalia. Coach transfers from Rome Fiumicino airport to the hotels and vice versa. If you have booked your own flights, we can provide transfers provided your flights coincide with one of the festival flight options. Meals: three dinners, all with wine, water and coffee, and all breakfasts. Two meals will be in selected restaurants close to the hotels or venues, the final one of which will be in the pavilion which sits atop Palazzo Colonna. Lectures on the music and on aspects of the art history of Rome by five experts. All tips for restaurant staff, porters, drivers, etc.

All state and airport taxes and obligatory charges. During the festival there will be a team of Italian-speaking staff to ensure that everything runs smoothly. Every participant is provided with comprehensive information in a printed programme. In addition, there are extra services which can be booked: The option of arriving a day early to spend some free time in Rome. An optional package of two dinners, which means each evening is spent in the company of other festival participants. A range of visits and short walks led by art historians and appropriate experts.

Private view

Exclusively for participants on this festival, we have arranged a private visit to the Sistine Chapel, which with Michelangelo’s ceiling fresco, his Last Judgement and the quattrocento wall frescoes, is Italy’s greatest artistic monument. Usually it has to be seen in the company of hundreds, but we have arranged private visits for half the audience at a time, with talks by our team of art historians. Raphael’s Stanze frescoes, his greatest achievement, can also be seen in this relative quietness.

Art History walks

Festival participants have the opportunity to select from a range of walks led by art historians who have a specialist knowledge of Rome. An opportunity to deepen the enjoyment of the festival by seeing the music in a broader cultural context, each walk looks at a particular aspect of art and architecture or explores a particular district. Caravaggio, Borromini and Bernini, and the Trastevere district are among the themes. Among the art historians whom we have engaged are Dr Helen Langdon, Christopher Newall, Dr Roberto Cobianchi, Dr Michael Douglas-Scott and Angus Haldane. Biographies can be found on page 9. The numbers on each walk will be restricted to eighteen. Full details of the walks can be found on page 12.

Illustrations. Front cover: Basilica and Piazzo di S. Pietro, a mid-18th-cent. engraving. Opposite: S. Pietro from the Strada delle Mura, after a drawing by Fred Richards, 1914. Above: panoramic view of Rome, copper engraving c. 1830.

The Programme...................................................................4–9

Hotels..............................................................................11–12

The Speakers............................................................................9

Extra meals............................................................................12

More about the concerts..........................................................6 Martin Randall Travel.............................................................9 Travelling to Rome................................................................10 Fitness for the Festival...........................................................10

Optional Walks & Visits.......................................................12 Booking Form.................................................................13–14 Booking Details.....................................................................15


The Programme

Piazza Navona, wood engraving c. 1880.

The Seventeenth Century before Corelli Musica Antiqua Roma Oratorio del Gonfalone Composers working in Rome in the early seventeenth century, after Palestrina and his peers and before Corelli, are today largely ignored. Although he published little, Matteo Simonelli was known as ‘the Palestrina of the seventeenth century’. Contemporaneously, Carlo Caprioli’s impressive lyricism and unique combinations of recitative, aria and arioso made him the leading Italian cantata composer of his day. Vulpio, Mannelli, Colista, all were illustrious musicians in their day. Founded in 2007 by violinist Riccardo Minasi, Musica Antiqua Roma unite the solo, chamber music and orchestral experiences of some of the most active young musicians on the international scene today. Thanks to rigorous study and continuous musicological research, the group maintains a particular attention to the vast, and partly forgotten repertoire of music by Roman composers from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Musica Antiqua Roma have performed at the Ravenna Festival, Birmingham Early Music Festival, Festival of Utrecht, Valencia, Festival de Santander and the Innsbruck Festival.

mar t i n ran d a l l t ra v e l

Built and decorated in the 1580s, and powerfully suggestive of the mixed currents of Counter-Reformation piety, the Oratorio del Gonfalone is an intimate chapel intended for the devotions of a lay brotherhood founded in the thirteenth century. The oratory has an outstanding Mannerist fresco cycle of the Life of Christ by a team of painters headed by Federico Zuccari.

4

w w w. m a r t i n r a n d a l l . c o m


‘There were extraordinary high points where music, execution and surroundings came together unforgettably.’ D. L., Oxfordshire, participant on a recent MRT festival.

In Excelsis: Handel & Vivaldi in Rome Modo Antiquo Santi Apostoli Handel first travelled to Italy from his native Germany in 1706 and it was in Rome, where he spent several years, that some of his earliest sacred music was performed, including Laudate Pueri, the F-major setting of Psalm 113. Vivaldi visited Rome on several occasions in the 1720s, and In furore iustissimae irae is one of three surviving solo motets for soprano that Vivaldi composed while there. The only Baroque ensemble with two Grammy nominations, Modo Antiquo is one of the finest early music groups in the world today. Here they are conducted by their founder, composer, flautist and musicologist Federico Maria Sardelli. In 2009 he was awarded the highest medal of honour for the Region of Tuscany, the Gonfalone d’Argento. The Church of the Twelve Apostles (or Santi Apostoli), originated in the sixth century but was rebuilt in 1417 by Pope Martin V, a member of the powerful Colonna family which would later patronise Handel’s work. The seventeenth-century interior, with its twelve richly decorated chapels and sumptuous frescoes, is a masterpiece of the Baroque. The vault frescoes were finished in 1707, the same year that Handel completed Laudate Pueri. The church houses a monument to Michelangelo, who was briefly buried here, as well as the tomb of Pope Clement XIV (1769–1774) by Antonio Canova.

Above right: ceiling of the Palazzo Berberini, engraving c. 1750. A F E S TIV A L O F M U S I C I N R O M E

5

Te l e p h o n e 0 2 0 8 7 4 2 3 3 5 5


The Programme

More about the concerts

Exclusive access. The concerts are private, being planned and administered by Martin Randall Travel exclusively for an audience consisting of those who have taken the full festival package.  Seating. Specific seats are not reserved. You sit where you want.  Comfort. Seats in two of the venues are church pews; consider bringing a cushion. Heating in churches is sometimes inadequate; expect to wear a warm coat during those concerts. Acoustics. This festival is more concerned with authenticity than acoustical perfection. Some venues have idiosyncrasies or reverberations of the sort which are not found in modern purpose-built concert halls.  

Venere, Adone e Amore, Alessandro Scarlatti La Venexiana Villa Farnesina Alessandro Scarlatti (1660–1725), father of Baroque opera, is equally renowned for his cantatas and serenatas. These highly expressive works, with their chamber-sized accompaniment, were usually performed without staging. Venus was a popular subject in seventeenth-century music, embodying both heavenly and bodily love, and often reflected a connection with political and social harmony.

Concert times. Three of the six venues are too small to accommodate all 220 participants and so these concerts are repeated. All participants are provided with a programme which ensures they can attend all the concerts and other events for which they have booked.  Changes. Musicians fall ill, venues close for repair, airlines alter schedules: there are many possible unpredictable circumstances which could necessitate changes to the programme. We ask you to be understanding should they occur.

La Venexiana, founded by Claudio Cavina, is one of the world’s leading madrigal groups, and in its ten year history has created a distinctive style based on warmth, colour and finely worked harmony. Famed for its sensitive and nuanced interpretation, particularly of Monteverdi, it has recorded with the Spanish label Glossa since 1998 and its recent release of L’Incoronazione di Poppea has been met with widespread acclaim. The Villa Farnesina is considered one of the finest suburban retreats of the High Renaissance. Built 1508–1511 by the immensely wealthy Sienese banker Agostino Chigi, it was designed by Sienese architect and painter Baldassare Peruzzi. The interior is particularly renowned for its frescoes, the most notable of which are Raphael’s Triumph of Galatea and his depiction of Cupid and Psyche, mythological themes similar to those found in Scarlatti’s serenata. Peruzzi himself painted the famous first-floor Sala delle Prospettive, a dramatic trompel’oeil perspective of an open loggia with the city and countryside beyond.

mar t i n ran d a l l t ra v e l

6

w w w. m a r t i n r a n d a l l . c o m


‘The musical experience of my life. It was indescribably marvellous.’ H.D. & M.D., Jersey, participants on a recent MRT festival.

Tu es Petrus: Polyphony for the new Pontiff Odhecaton Sant’ Agostino During the sixteenth century, composers of the papal chapel wrote motets appointed for various liturgical occasions, but particularly for the creation of the new pontiff, to mark the consecration, the coronation or the anniversary of its creation. The polyphonic music of composers such as Morales, Victoria and Nanino was written to match both the solemnity and the bombast of such occasions. Ultimately it was Giovanni Pierluigi di Palestrina whose emergence on the scene caused a sensation, much of his repertoire fast becoming obligatory in papal ceremonies.

The church of Sant’ Agostino, one of the first classicising churches built in Rome during the Renaissance, is home to a number of significant artworks, including the Madonna di Loreto by Caravaggio (1605), Raphael’s fresco of the Prophet Isaiah (1512) and the Madonna del Parto by Jacopo Sansovino (1521). The church also contains the tomb of St Monica, mother of St Augustine.

The vocal group Odhecaton dedicates itself to music of the Renaissance and pre-Classical period. Their first and prizewinning CD ‘The Coronation Mass of Charles V’ was released in 2000 and has been followed by a steady stream of highly acclaimed recordings and tours. Paolo Da Col leads the ensemble. He is both musician and musicologist and is currently Maestro di Capella at San Petronio in Bologna (Italy’s largest mediaeval church).

A F E S TIV A L O F M U S I C I N R O M E

Illustration: Piazzo del Popolo, engraving c. 1840. Opposite page: engraving from ‘The Magazine of Art’, 1883. 7

Te l e p h o n e 0 2 0 8 7 4 2 3 3 5 5


The Programme

‘A wonderfully well planned, organized, presented series of concerts and programme of music.’ R.O., London, participant on a recent MRT festival.

18th-century engraving after a drawing by Guercino.

Il Trionfo del Tempo e del Disinganno Gabrieli Consort & Players, Paul McCreesh (director) Palazzo Colonna

‘The Triumph of Time and Disillusion’ was Handel’s very first oratorio, composed to a libretto by Cardinal Benedetto Pamphilj. It premiered in Rome in 1707, and the celebrated aria Lascia la spina was later re-used by Handel as Lascia ch’io pianga in his 1711 opera Rinaldo.

Top: The Gabrieli Players. Clockwise from above: Paul McCreesh; Renata Pokupic; Romina Basso; Jeremy Ovenden; Rebecca Bottone. mar t i n ran d a l l t ra v e l

The magnificent great hall of the Palazzo Colonna provides a suitable setting for this dramatic moral allegory in which Beauty is lectured by Pleasure, Enlightenment and Father Time, each of whom tries to convince her to follow his or her path. Eventually Beauty renounces Pleasure and goes down the road of Enlightenment. Founded by Paul McCreesh in 1982, Gabrieli Consort & 8

Players are world-renowned interpreters of great choral and instrumental repertoire from the Renaissance to the present day. Their performances encompass major works from the oratorio tradition, virtuosic a cappella programmes and mould-breaking reconstructions of music for historical events. They are regular visitors to the world’s most prestigious concert halls, and their recordings have garnered numerous international awards. Paul McCreesh leads a fine cast of Baroque soloists: Romina Basso, Renata Pokupic, Jeremy Ovenden and Rebecca Bottone (to be confirmed). Created in the 1640s, the hall was highly influential in European palace architecture, though few imitations achieved such grandeur and richness of effect with its giant Corinthian columns, dramatic ceiling fresco and close-hung easel pictures.

w w w. m a r t i n r a n d a l l . c o m


The Speakers The Concerto Grosso in Rome Accademia Bizantina Palazzo della Cancelleria

The concerto grosso, developed in the late seventeenth century, is a Baroque form in which the music is passed between a small group of soloists and a full orchestra. Arcangelo Corelli was the first major exponent of the form and a collection of his concerti grossi published after his death was of widespread influence. This concert puts Corelli’s works in the context of those who preceded and followed him. Accademia Bizantina, founded in 1983, is one of the world’s leading period ensembles, celebrated for their colourful interpretation of seventeenth and eighteenth-century Italian music. In this concert they are conducted by founding member, violinist and violist Alessandro Tampieri, among Italy’s most distinguished Baroque musicians. Begun in 1485, the imposing Palazzo della Cancelleria is the masterpiece of Early Renaissance architecture in Rome. The Hall of a Hundred Days was decorated by Vasari in 1546. The original patron was a nephew of Pope Sixtus IV but it was confiscated by Pope Leo X and became the papal chancery. It remains Vatican property.

John Bryan is Professor of Music and Head of Music and Drama at the University of Huddersfield and a contributor to BBC Radio 3’s early music programmes. He introduces the music in four morning lectures in a seventeenthcentury oratory. Dr Michael Douglas-Scott discusses urban renewal in Renaissance Rome. Associate lecturer in History of Art at Birkbeck College, specialising in sixteenth-century Italian art and architecture, he has lectured widely for the V&A and the Art Fund as well as for MRT. Dr Helen Langdon talks on Caravaggio in Rome. Author of several books, including The Gallery Goers Guide, Claude Lorrain, Holbein, and Caravaggio: a Life, the best book on the artist, she has been Assistant Director at the British School in Rome and is now a Research Fellow there.

Christopher Newall looks at the city’s Baroque architecture. A graduate of the Courtauld Institute, he has curated exhibitions in Britain, the USA, Italy, Mexico, Japan, Germany and Spain. He is the author of books on Frederick Leighton, the Grosvenor Gallery and Victorian Watercolours and he organised the 2004 Tate Britain exhibition, Pre-Raphaelite Vision: Truth to Nature. He has lectured for many years on the Baroque in Rome and Sicily. Angus Haldane covers Ancient Rome. He studied Classics at Oxford University with a particular emphasis on Roman history, literature and art. He subsequently studied for a post-graduate degree in Byzantine and Renaissance art at the Courtauld Institute and has taught Greek and Latin and lectured on the ancient world in Italy and in Greece. Also accompanying the festival is Dr Roberto Cobianchi, art historian and lecturer at the University of Messina. He studied at universities in Parma and Milan, completed his PhD at Warwick and has been a Scholar at The British School in Rome­. His research includes iconography and patronage of the Mendicant Orders.

Top to bottom: Accademia Bizantina; Alessandro Tempieri.

Martin Randall Travel

At Martin Randall Travel (MRT) we aim to provide the best planned, best led and altogether the most fulfilling and enjoyable cultural tours available. Within Europe and the Middle East we offer an unsurpassed range of events focusing primarily on art, architecture and music, and also on archaeology, history and gastronomy. MRT has for over two decades led the cultural tours market through incessant innovation and improvement, setting the benchmarks for itinerary planning, operational systems and service standards. There are two kinds of holiday, small-group tours and large-group events. Smallgroup tours, all accompanied by an expert lecturer, have 22 participants or fewer. There are now around two hundred a year in nearly forty countries. Events for between 50 and 300 participants include our famous all-inclusive music festivals, of which there have been about sixty since 1994, and chamber music and literary weekends in the UK.

A F E S TIV A L O F M U S I C I N R O M E

9

Te l e p h o n e 0 2 0 8 7 4 2 3 3 5 5


Travelling to Rome Flights from London to Rome are included in the price of the festival. You can choose to join one of these or make your own flight arrangements (in which case there is a reduction in the price).

Regional airports

It may be possible to arrange connecting flights from regional airports for the British Airways options. Please request this on the booking form.

The no-flights option

There is a reduction of £200 per person for the package without flights. Should you decide to join the festival at Rome Fiumicino airport to coincide with one of our flight arrivals, you are welcome to join a coach transfer to your hotel. If you arrive at another time you will have to make your own way to your hotel.

Arrive a day early

Festival flights

Arriving 3rd November, leaving 9th:

Arriving 4th November, leaving 9th:

Option 1. 3rd November: depart Heathrow 10.35, arrive Rome Fiumicino 14.05 (BA 554). 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 11.55, arrive Heathrow 13.40 (BA 549).

Option 5. 4th November: depart Heathrow 10.35, arrive Rome Fiumicino 14.05 (BA 554). 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 11.55, arrive Heathrow 13.40 (BA 549).

Option 2. 3rd November: depart Heathrow 12.20, arrive Rome Fiumicino 15.55 (Alitalia, AZ 203). 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 13.35, arrive Heathrow 15.25 (Alitalia, AZ 204).

Option 6. 4th November: depart Heathrow 12.20, arrive Rome Fiumicino 15.55 (Alitalia, AZ 203). 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 13.35, arrive Heathrow 15.25 (Alitalia, AZ 204).

Option 3. 3rd November: depart Heathrow 12.40, arrive Rome Fiumicino 16.15 (BA 560). 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 15.00, arrive Heathrow 16.45 (BA 555).

Option 7. 4th November: depart Heathrow 12.40, arrive Rome Fiumicino 16.15 (BA 560). 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 17.05, arrive Heathrow 18.55 (BA 559).

Option 4. 3rd November: depart Gatwick 14.20, arrive Rome Fiumicino 17.40 (BA 2540). 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 18.25, arrive Gatwick 20.00 (BA 2541).

We offer a package for those wishing to arrive on 3rd November with a night in the hotel of your choice. Please see individual hotels for prices.

Below left: the Tiber, St Peter’s and Castel Sant’Angelo, engraving c. 1770. Right, from ‘Brown, Jones and Robinson’ by from Richard Doyle, 1850. Smith Brown and Jones, 1859.

Fit for the festival

To be able to participate in this festival, you should have no difficulties with everyday walking and stair climbing. You should be able to walk unaided for at least thirty minutes. Much of central Rome is inaccessible to traffic, certainly to coaches. Even when coaches are provided between hotel and venue it is likely that they will have to park some distance away. Pavements are often uneven, traffic can be unpredictable, some venues are on an upper floor and do not have lifts. Festival staff will not be able to assist individuals with walking difficulties or disabilities. Most of the concerts are within thirty minutes on foot from most of the hotels, though some are much closer. Taxis are an option, but may be difficult to obtain after an evening event. mar t i n ran d a l l t ra v e l

10

w w w. m a r t i n r a n d a l l . c o m


Hotels Hotel accommodation for five nights is included. Having visited Rome repeatedly and inspected numerous hotels, we have selected five which we believe to be the best within their price category.

the concerts. The hotel is the only determinant of the different prices for the festival package.

Location, comfort, character and quality of service are among our criteria. All are four- or five-star, and all are within the historic centre and within walking distance of at least some of

The prices given below are all per person. All rooms for single occupancy are doubles. As is inevitable in historic buildings, rooms within any one hotel may vary in size, furnishings and outlook. Upgrades are available on request. The room categories cited are the hotel’s own.

Residenza di Ripetta, 4-star

Hotel Borgognoni, 4-star

Just south of Piazza del Popolo, this recently renovated, former seventeenth-century convent is ideally located. Both the rooms and public areas mix traditional and contemporary styles very successfully. Rooms are spacious and comfortable and service is efficient and welcoming. There is a restaurant serving modern, international cuisine and an expansive, peaceful inner courtyard.

Close to the Trevi fountain and yet away from the hordes of tourists, the hotel was recently completely refurbished. The reception and public areas are smart, modern and bright. Rooms are of a good size, with attractive, contemporary furnishings. There is no restaurant. Room category: Standard.

Room category: Standard.

Price: £2,840 or £2,970 if arriving 3rd November. Price without flights: subtract £200. Double for single occupancy supplement: £520 or £630 if arriving 3rd November.

Price: £2,630 or £2,720 if arriving 3rd November. Price without flights: subtract £200. Double for single occupancy supplement: £260 or £320 if arriving 3rd November.

www.hotelborgognoni.com

www.ripetta it

Hotel D’Inghilterra, 5-star

A delightful hotel in a seventeenth-century palazzo in a wonderful location just off the Via Condotti at the bottom of the Spanish Steps. Public rooms are relatively small but very stylish and comfortable, while bedrooms are furnished in traditional style with antiques. The hotel has a warm atmosphere and staff are helpful and friendly. There is a restaurant. Room category: Classic. Price: £2,960 or £3,100 if arriving 3rd November. Price without flights: subtract £200. Double for single occupancy supplement: £340 or £420 arriving 3rd November. hoteldinghilterra.warwickhotels.com

Hotels continued overleaf... A F E S TIV A L O F M U S I C I N R O M E

11

Te l e p h o n e 0 2 0 8 7 4 2 3 3 5 5


Hotels

Optional walks & visits

Grand Hotel de la Minerve, 5-star

Participants can select from eight walks and visits, all of which are led by one of our lecturers with a special knowledge of the city.

A hotel since the late eighteenth century, the Grand Hotel de la Minerve is in an excellent location 50 metres from the Pantheon. Public rooms are spacious and imposing. Bedrooms have been recently redecorated in contemporary style. Unlike some of Rome’s grand historic hotels the Minerve has been well maintained, and though grand it feels comfortable and relaxed. There is a restaurant and roof terrace. Room category: Superior. Price: £3,340 or £3,520 if arriving 3rd November. Price without flights: subtract £200. Double for single occupancy supplement: £540 or £660 if arriving 3rd November. www.grandhoteldelaminerve.it

Hotel Eden, 5-star

Understated elegance and high standards of service are the hallmarks of this former private residence, a member of The Leading Hotels of the World group. The location is central yet tranquil, behind the Spanish Steps and overlooking the Borghese Gardens. Bedrooms are stylishly decorated though vary in size and outlook. There are spectacular views of the city from the roof-top Michelin-starred restaurant and bar. Room category: Superior. Studio rooms and suites are available on request. Price: £3,800 or £4,030 if arriving 3rd November. Price without flights: subtract £200. Double for single occupancy supplement: £730 or £890 if arriving 3rd November. Studio room, two people sharing. Supplement, per person: £640 or £760 if arriving 3rd November. Suite, two people sharing. Supplement, per person: £670 or £800 if arriving 3rd November. www.edenroma.com

mar t i n ran d a l l t ra v e l

They last between one and two and a half hours. In addition time is needed to reach the starting points. They will be scheduled to avoid clashing with concerts and lectures and to allow adequate time before the next event. We recommend you limit yourself to three walks. You would have to be more than usually energetic to be able to cope with more, especially if they include some of the longer ones. You may not be allocated all of your choices due to the complexity of the week’s programme, limited time and the likely imbalance between demand and supply. We shall confirm which walks have been assigned to you about ten weeks before the festival. It is not possible at this stage to specify the name of the lecturer leading each walk. How strenuous? All visits involve quite a lot of walking and standing around in churches and museums. They would not be suitable for anyone with any difficulties with everyday walking or stair-climbing. Small groups: no more than 18 participants. The price of £20, £25 or £30 includes any admission fees, tips and donations and a contribution towards the fees and expenses of the lecturers.

Extra meals

There is the option of booking two additional dinners which ensures you eat in the company of other festival participants on all evenings. The price for this is £120. and includes wine, water and coffee and the gratuity. 12

The walks

Caravaggio. San Luigi dei Francesi, Santa Maria del Popolo and places where he lived and worked (and fought). Led by Helen Langdon, author of Caravaggio: a life. Duration: c. 1 hour 20 minutes. £20. The Palatine. Starting at the Forum, the civic, religious and social centre of Ancient Rome, and ending on the Palatine Hill, site of the luxurious palaces of many Roman emperors. Duration: c. 1 hour 30 minutes. £25. The Colosseum. Largest of ancient amphitheatres, and the Arch of Constantine, sculpturally the richest of triumphal arches. Duration: c. 1 hour 30 minutes. £25. Trastevere. Starting at Santa Maria in Trastevere which has wonderful twelfth and thirteenth-century mosaics. Also visits Santa Cecilia which contains fragments of frescoes by Cavallini, one of the precursors of the Renaissance. Duration: c. 1 hour 30 minutes. £20. Baroque on the Quirinale. Two beautiful but small-scale Baroque churches: Sant’Andrea al Quirinale (Bernini) and San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane (Borromini) and Santa Maria della Vittoria with Bernini’s The Ecstasy of St Teresa. Duration: c. 1 hour 30 minutes. £20. Villa Medici. Seat of the French Academy in Rome for the last two centuries this sixteenth-century villa has fine Renaissance gardens. Duration: c. 1 hour. £25. By special appointment. Castel Sant’ Angelo. Originally built by Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum for himself and his family, it was converted into a castle by the papacy in the 14th century and was subsequently endowed with rich papal apartments. Duration: c. 1 hour 30 minutes. £25. Galleria Borghese. One of the finest collections of paintings and sculpture in Italy, including works by Lotto, Raphael, Caravaggio and Bernini. Duration: c. 2 hours. £30. w w w. m a r t i n r a n d a l l . c o m


Booking Form: A Festival of Music in Rome, 4–9 November 2012 TRAVELLERS’ NAMES Give your name as you would like it to appear on documents issued to other participants.

HOTEL OPTIONS. See pages 11–12. Please tick: Hotel

1.

Residenza di Ripetta (4-star)

2.

Hotel Borgognoni (4-star) Hotel D’Inghilterra (5-star)

ADDRESS for correspondence.

Grand Hotel de la Minerve (5-star) Hotel Eden (5-star) Room-type

Postcode

Double room

Telephone (home)

Twin room

Mobile

Arrive in Rome a day early

Telephone (work)

Please tick if you require accommodation on 3rd November.

Fax

FLIGHTS. See page 10. Please tick:

E-mail Tick if you do NOT want to receive updates on our range of cultural tours and music festivals by email.

Tick if you do NOT want to receive any more brochures from us.

EXTRA MEALS. See page 12.

OPTIONAL WALKS & VISITS. See page 12. Please tick the walks you would like to book. Participant 1

The Palatine (£25) The Colosseum (£25) Trastevere (£20) Baroque on the Quirinale (£20) Villa Medici (£25) Castel Sant’ Angelo (£25) Galleria Borghese (£30)

Arrive in Rome on 3rd November, depart on 9th: Option 1. 3rd November: depart Heathrow 10.35, arrive Rome Fiumicino 14.05. 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 11.55, arrive Heathrow 13.40. Option 2. 3rd November: depart Heathrow 12.20, arrive Rome Fiumicino 15.55. 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 13.35, arrive Heathrow 15.25.

Please tick to book (£120 per person).

Caravaggio (£20)

Double room for single occupancy

Participant 2

Option 3. 3rd November: depart Heathrow 12.40, arrive Rome Fiumicino 16.15. 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 15.00, arrive Heathrow 16.45. Option 4. 3rd November: depart Gatwick 14.20, arrive Rome Fiumicino 17.40. 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 18.25, arrive Gatwick 20.00. Arrive in Rome on 4th November, depart on 9th: Option 5. 4th November: depart Heathrow 10.35, arrive Rome Fiumicino 14.05. 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 11.55, arrive Heathrow 13.40. Option 6. 4th November: depart Heathrow 12.20, arrive Rome Fiumicino 15.55. 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 13.35, arrive Heathrow 15.25. Option 7. 4th November: depart Heathrow 12.40, arrive Rome Fiumicino 16.15. 9th November: depart Rome Fiumicino 17.05, arrive Heathrow 18.55.


Booking Form:

A Festival of Music in Rome, 4–9 November 2012 PASSPORT DETAILS. In block capitals please. Essential for airlines and in case of emergency during the festival. Traveller 1:

Traveller 2:

Title, surname

Title, surname

Forename(s)

Forename(s)

Date of birth (dd/mm/yy)

Date of birth (dd/mm/yy)

Passport number

Passport number

Place of birth

Place of birth

Place of issue

Place of issue

Nationality

Nationality

Date of issue (dd/mm/yy)

Date of issue (dd/mm/yy)

Date of expiry (dd/mm/yy)

Date of expiry (dd/mm/yy)

NEXT OF KIN or contact incase of emergency.

PAYMENT

Name

EITHER Deposit(s) at £300 per person

£

Address

OR Full payment Required if you are booking within 10 weeks of the festival

£

Telephone Relation to you

We prefer payment by cheque, debit card or bank transfer. We do also accept payment by credit card.

FURTHER INFORMATION including dietary requirements, special requests or anything else you think we should know.

EITHER by cheque. I enclose a cheque made payable to Martin Randall Travel Ltd. Please write the festival code (mz 422) on the back. OR by credit or debit card. I wish to pay by Visa credit/ Visa debit/ Mastercard/ Amex. Card number Start date

I have read and agree to the Booking Conditions on behalf of all listed on this form.

OR by bank transfer. Please use your surname and the festival code (mz 422) as a reference and please allow for all bank charges. Account name: Martin Randall Travel Ltd. Bank: Royal Bank of Scotland, Drummonds, 49 Charing Cross, London SW1A 2DX. Account number: 0019 6050. Sort code: 16-00-38. IBAN: GB71 RBOS 1600 3800 1960 50. Swift/BIC: RBOS GB2L

Signature Date

Martin Randall Travel Ltd

Voysey House, Barley Mow Passage London W4 4GF Telephone 020 8742 3355 Fax 020 8742 7766 info@martinrandall.co.uk 5085

Expiry date

www.martinrandall.com

From Australia and New Zealand you can contact: Martin Randall Marketing, Telephone 1300 55 95 95 From New Zealand +61 7 3377 0141 Fax 07 3377 0142 anz@martinrandall.com.au From Canada you can contact: Telephone 647 382 1644 Fax 416 925 2670 canada@martinrandall.ca From the USA you can call our UK office toll-free on: 1 800 988 6168


Booking Details Making a Booking 1. Provisional booking

We recommend that you contact us first to ascertain that your preferred hotel and room type is still available. Then you can make a provisional booking which we will hold for one week (longer if necessary) pending receipt of your completed booking form and deposit.

2. Definite booking

3. Our confirmation

for medical treatment, repatriation, loss of property and cancellation charges must be included. Insurance can be obtained from most insurance companies, banks, travel agencies and (in the UK) many retail outlets including post offices.

the itinerary to avoid the risky area. In the event of cancellation before the festival commenced we would give you a full refund.

Fill in the booking form and send it to us with the deposit (£300). It is important that you read the Booking Conditions at this stage, and that you sign the booking form. Full payment is required if you are booking within ten weeks of the festival.

Upon receipt of your booking form and deposit we shall send you confirmation of your booking. After this your deposit is non-returnable except in the special circumstances mentioned in the Booking Conditions. Further details of the festival will also be sent at this stage.

Booking Conditions Please read these.

You need to sign your assent to these booking conditions on the booking form.

Our promises to you.

We aim to be fair, reasonable and sympathetic in all our dealings with clients, and to act always with integrity. We will meet all our legal and regulatory responsibilities, often going beyond the minimum obligations. We aim to provide full and accurate information about our tours and festivals. If there are changes, we will tell you promptly. If something does go wrong, we will try to put it right. Our overriding aim is to ensure that every client is satisfied with our services.

All we ask of you.

We ask that you read the information we send to you.

Specific terms.

Our contract with you From the time we receive your signed booking form and initial payment, a contract exists between you and Martin Randall Travel Ltd. Eligibility We reserve the right to refuse to accept a booking without necessarily giving a reason. It is essential to be able to cope with the walking and stair-climbing required to get to the concert venues. See ‘Fitness for the festival’. If for any stage, including the airport, you would like the use of a wheelchair, then this festival is unlikely to be suitable for you. Insurance It is a requirement of booking that you have adequate holiday insurance. Cover

Passports and visas Participants must have passports, valid for at least six months beyond the date of the festival. No visas are required for Italy for UK or other EU citizens, or for citizens of the USA, Canada, Australia or New Zealand. Nationals of other countries should ascertain whether visas are required in their case, and obtain them if they are. If you cancel If you have to cancel your participation in the festival, there would be a charge which varies according to the period of notice you give. Up to 57 days before departure the deposit only is forfeited. Thereafter a percentage of the total cost will be due:

from 56 to 29 days: 40% from 28 to 15 days: 60% from 14 to 3 days (inclusive): 80% within 48 hours: 100%

We take as the day of cancellation that on which we receive written confirmation of cancellation. If we cancel the festival We might decide to cancel the festival if at any time up to eight weeks before there were insufficient bookings for it to be viable. We would refund everything you had paid to us. We might also cancel if hostilities, civil unrest, natural disaster or other circumstances amounting to force majeure affect the region. Safety and security If the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office advises against travel to Rome or the wider region, we would cancel or adjust

Consumer protection Holidays in this brochure are protected by the ATOL scheme because we hold an Air Travel Organiser’s Licence granted by the Civil Aviation Authority. This means that in the unlikely event of our insolvency, the CAA will ensure that you are not stranded abroad and will arrange to refund any money you have paid to us for an advance booking. Holidays which do not include flights are similarly protected by the AITO Trust. The limits of our liabilities As principal, we accept responsibility for all ingredients of the festival or tour, except those in which the principle of force majeure prevails. Our obligations and responsibilities are also limited where international conventions apply in respect of air, sea or rail carriers, including the Warsaw Convention and its various updates. If we make changes Circumstances might arise which prevent us from operating the festival exactly as advertised. We would try to devise a satisfactory alternative, but if the change represents a significant loss to the festival we would offer compensation. If you decide to cancel because the alternative we offer is not acceptable we would give a full refund. English Law These conditions form part of your contract with Martin Randall Travel Ltd and are governed by English law. All proceedings shall be within the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales.


M A RT I N R A N D A L L T R AV E L A R T • A R C H I T E C T U R E • G A S T R O N O M Y • A R C H A E O L O G Y • H I S T O R Y • M U S I C • L I T E R AT U R E

Voysey House, Barley Mow Passage, London, United Kingdom W4 4GF Telephone 020 8742 3355 Fax 020 8742 7766 info@martinrandall.co.uk From Australia and New Zealand you can contact: Martin Randall Marketing, PO Box 537, Toowong, Queensland 4066 Telephone 1300 55 95 95 Fom New Zealand +61 7 3377 0141 Fax 07 3377 0142 anz@martinrandall.com.au From Canada, you can contact: Telephone 647 382 1644 Fax 416 925 2670 canada@martinrandall.ca From the USA there is a toll-free telephone number: 1 800 988 6168

www.martinrandall.com 5085

A Festival of Music in Rome  

This third edition of the Rome festival, inaugurated in 2002, restores music to some of the greatest palaces and churches in Rome witha bril...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you