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Jacqueline Ann Martinez

MARCH + MLA PennDesign graduate + undergrad portfolio


graduate work LARP 501 • PennDesign Fall 2012 • Traversing Landscapes_Bartram’s Garden • The River + The Rail critic_Dilip da Cunha ARCH 502 • PennDesign Spring 2012 • Breadboarding the City • Uncovering the Invisible System critic_Mark Kroeckel LARP 502 • PennDesign Spring 2013 • Gateway National Park Masterplan • Intensifying Identities critic_Ellen Neises LARP 502 • PennDesign Spring 2013 • Coastal Park • Going with the Flow critic_Ellen Neises LARP 502 • PennDesign Spring 2013 • Land-Water Interface • Pocket Ecologies critic_Ellen Neises LARP 511 • PennDesign Fall 2012 • Ecology Workshop • Pine Barrens Cycle + Adaption instructors_Sally Willig + Nick Pevzner LARP 502 • PennDesign Spring 2013 • Urban Water Farm (Schenk Woodmen Competition_2ND PLACE) ARCH 502 • PennDesign Spring 2012 • Re-Energizing The Urban Agriculture Cycle (Schenk Woodmen Competition_HONORABLE MENTION) ARCH 501 • PennDesign Fall 2011 • Concept Context Content • Transition: Perception Distortion critic_Philipp von Dalwig

undergraduate work Design Studio 5 • NU Spring 2009 • Comprehensive Design Studio • BSA Design Center critics_David Stern, Kiel Moe


The River + The Rail

emergent symbiotic machine by process of system splicing + reactionionary opposition Traversing Landscape_Bartram’s Garden LARP 501 • PennDesign Fall 2012 • critic_Dilip da Cunha Published in Process 17

Industrial cities characteristicaly exhibit infrastructural networks along rivers. Although traveling adjacent to eachother through the fabric, systems are separate with no interaction. The River and The Rail proposes a deliberate juxstaposition, celebrating the 2 systems while creating new symbiotic infrastructure remediating each system’s weaknesses through a progession of splicing, reactions, and armistice.


A

PROJECTIVE NETWORK_TRIANGULATED

SYSTEM A_wetland • vegetation/water • river SYSTEM B_rubble mound • industrial • rail

stage 01ªª   

Raillines and industrial lots interwoven working symbiotically as a network. Bartram’s garden acting as a seeder for remediation plants for industrial site reconnecting with the garden’s historic role.

B


A

SPLICED SPINE_JUXSTPOSED SYSTEMS

Bisecting the two worls of the natural and the industrial by 54th street, the two systems stage 01ÂŞÂŞ    splice into eachother by their prominent edge conditions. Through the three stages of 01_splicing, 02_opposing reactions, and 03_emergent armistice, the systems act characteristic to their inherent properties.

B


RIPARIAN SYSTEMS: MIGRANT CORRIDORS wealth of nest sites, shelter, food and water

Quails (Odontophoridae)

Turkeys and Grouse (Phasianidae)

Loons (Gaviidae)

Bitterns, Herons and Egrets (Ardeidae)

Geese and Ducks (Anatidae)

headwaters Booby and Gannets (Sulidae) Cormorants (Phalacrocoracidae)

watershed boundry

MATURE valley is less steep, stream begins to meander

OLD AGE

flood plain

valley has wide flood plain; stream meanders

YOUNG valley is steep, V shaped

4'.#6+105*+2/1&'.':2'4+/'06ª9#6'4˜2'22'4˜&+5*51#2˜911&&19'.

eo n s se hort ta no ria s viri e stu dis rg

lo se ngn ta os ria e viri gar dis

eo n s se hort ta no ria s viri e stu dis rg

ra se inb ta ow ria s viri me dis lt

n se orth ta ern ria viri pik dis e

a se tlan ta tic ria s viri turg dis eo n

er te se sse ta lla ria te viri d d dis art

b se and ta ed ria k viri illifis dis h

s se limy ta s ria cu viri lpin dis

ra se inb ta ow ria tr viri ou dis t

w se hite ta c ria atf viri ish dis

b se lueb ta ac ria k viri herr dis in g

fo se urs ta pin ria e viri sti dis ckle

g se izza ta rd ria s viri had dis

w se hite ta s ria uc viri ker dis

q se uillb ta ac ria k viri dis

ro se ck ta ba ria ss viri dis

w se hite ta p ria erc viri h dis

ba

ck

agent_RUBBLE

groundwater (aquifier)

s

percolation

splice_GABION WALL

SYSTEM B__ %#26+#0/170&

tributary

FISH LADDERS: TIDAL UPSTREAM TRAFFIC the tidal Schuylkill River is home to more than 40 species of fish that can migrate up the Schuylkill River to spawn

a

b

cirs ull iu this m vu tle lg are

s nsi

je

im we pa lw tie ee ns d ca pe

c

ari s

m

art ug em wa isia rt vu lg

co sia m tic m eli da na yfl co ow m e m r un is

008

009

010

011

012

013

01

ris

d

m

eri ais ge y fl ro e n ab st rig an osu e s

c

art ug em wo esi rt a vu lga

b

am om bro mo sia n r art ag em we isii ed fo lia

ae gr m as um s

c isch ra

ria

sm o ita oth dig

g

h co ors nyz ew a ca eed na de nsi

s

se ree ta n ria fo viri xta dis il

c ch om en m op on od la iu m m b alb sq um ua r

te

rs

007

˜57//'4#007#. ˜&+5674$#0%'#&#261461$#4' ground

5;56'/ª+06475+10

006

˜'8'4)4''0$+'00+#. ˜&+567$#0%'g#&#26'&%1.10+<'4 of bare ground

005

˜57//'4#007#. ˜564'#/x4+8'4$#0-56#$+.+<'4Y nutrient absorption in wetlands

004

˜57//'4#007#. ˜#%%7/#.#6'5.'#&(41/51+. ˜(11&(149+.&.+('j'52T$+4&5k

003

˜*'4$#%'1752'4'00+#. ˜2*;614'/'&+#6+10$;#$514$+0)*'#8; metals (zinc, cooper, lead, cadmium) ˜61.'4#061(41#&5#.6f%1/2#%6'&51+. ˜'415+10%10641.105.12'5

002

˜*'4$#%'1752'4'00+#. ˜0764+'06#$51426+10+09'6.#0&5 ˜564'#/f4+8'4$#0-56#$.+<'4 ˜(11&(149+.&.+('

˜*'4$#%'1752'4'00+#. ˜0764+'06#$51426+10+09'6.#0&5 ˜(11&(149+.&.+('

001

c ty om ph m a on la tifo ca lia tt a

s nu patt ph e ar rd ad oc ve k na

il

am om bro mo sia n r art ag em we isii ed fo lia

stage 02ªª   

5;56'/ª24'+06475+10

4#&+#.&+55+2#6+10

5;56'/ª+06475+10 537''<'&&'05+6;#6/+&21+06 ˜9+06'4f57//'4#007#. ˜&+5674$#0%'#&#2614%1.10+<'4 of bare grounds

˜*'4$#%'1752'4'00+#. ˜2*;614'/'&+#6+10$;#$514$+0) heavy metals (zinc, cooper, lead, cadmium) ˜'415+10%10641.105.12'5

˜57//'4#007#. ˜#%%7/#.#6'5.'#&(41/51+. ˜(11&(149+.&.+('j'52T$+4&5k

˜57//'4#007#. ˜&+5674$#0%'#&#2614%1.10+<'41($#4' grounds, tolerant of contaminated soils

˜9+06'4f57//'4#007#. ˜&+5674$#0%'#&#2614%1.10+<'4 of bare grounds

˜57//'4#007#. ˜(11&x*#$+6#62418+&14

˜57//'4#007#. ˜2*;614'/'&+#6+10$;#$514$+0) heavy metals (zinc, cooper, lead)

5;56'/ª4'#%614

5;56'/ª2156+06475+10

     

007

SYSTEM A REACTION STUDY_DENSITY DISSIPATION 4'.#6+105*+2/1&'.':2'4+/'06ª9#6'4˜2'22'4˜&+5*51#2˜911&&19'.

thick forest created between gabion insertions

SYSTEM B INTRUSION

47$$.'4'#224124+#6'&+061)#$+105

SYSTEM A REACTION TO INTRUSION 2.#065&+52'45'&612'4+2*'4;

new plants contribute to diversity along wetland

wetland edge opened up


splice_GABION WALL

agent_RUBBLE

SYSTEM B__ %#26+#0/170&

4'.#6+105*+2/1&'.':2'4+/'06ª9#6'4˜2'22'4˜&+5*51#2˜911&&19'.

splicing agent_WATER

SYSTEM A Reaction Study_Density Dissipation ( water • pepper • dishsoap • wood dowel )

system B_ intrusion

splice_CANAL

SYSTEM A__ %#26+#09'6.#0&

stage 02ªª   

radial dissipation

squeezed density at midpoint

system A_ reactor

)4#8'.˜911&&19'.

001

002

003

004

005

006

007

008

009

010

011

012

013

014

007

A RADIAL DISSIPATION SYSTEM B Reaction Study_Surface Displacement ( gravel • wood dowel ) 001

002

003

004

005

006

007

008

009

010

011

012

013

system B_ intrusion

01

displacement collected at terminus

5;56'/ª+06475+10

system A_ intrusion radial dissipation

5;56'/ª24'+06475+10 4#&+#.&+55+2#6+10

squeezed density at midpoint displaced sectionally at perimeter

5;56'/ª+06475+10 001

14

537''<'&&'05+6;#6/+&21+06 003

002

004

005

006

007

008

system A_ reactor

009

010

011

012

013

system B_ reactor

014

5;56'/ª4'#%614 001

002

003

004

005

006

007

008

009

010

011

012

013

&+52.#%'/'06%1..'%6'&#66'4/+075

5;56'/ª24'+06475+10

014 007

007

B PERIMETER ACCRETION

5;56'/ª2156+06475+10

5;56'/ª+06475+10

     

007

SYSTEM A REACTION STUDY_DENSITY DISSIPATION 4'.#6+105*+2/1&'.':2'4+/'06ª9#6'4˜2'22'4˜&+5*51#2˜911&&19'.

&+52.#%'&5'%6+10#..;#62'4+/'6'4

5;56'/ª2156+06475+10

5;56'/ª4'#%614

5;56'/ª+06475+10

thick forest created between gabion insertions

007

     

SYSTEM B REACTION STUDY_SURFACE DISPLACEMENT

SYSTEM B INTRUSION

SYSTEM A REACTION TO INTRUSION

47$$.'4'#224124+#6'&+061)#$+105

4'.#6+105*+2/1&'.':2'4+/'06ª)4#8'.˜911&&19'.

2.#065&+52'45'&612'4+2*'4;

new plants contribute to diversity along wetland

wetland edge opened up

deep rooted tree to absorb toxins

SYSTEM A INTRUSION %#0#.5&7)(41/9'6.#0&

mound planted with erosion control plants water supplied for phytotransformation

SYSTEM B REACTION TO INTRUSION ':#%#6'&57$574(#%'4'#224124+#6'&+061/170&

habitat refuge post remediation


canals dug from wetland

stage 02 ___

SYSTEM A INTRUSION UPON SYSTEM B

subsurface removed reappropriated along canal

stage 03 ___

SYSTEM B REACTION TO INTRUSION

EMERGENT ARMISTICE

plantings for soil remediation + erosion control

A SYSTEM A_deployable seeding harvest structure

stage 01 ___

B SYSTEM B_wetland canal with hard + soft edges

EMERGENT SYMBIOTIC MACHINE

    Â&#x2DC;    salix babylonica

The deployable seeding structure created by the re-appropriated rubbles acts as a dynamic machine cultivating remediation plants to be used in the remediation of the industrial sites and to be seeded out to other contaiminated industrial sites. The wetland canals cut into the industrialscape with both soft and hard edges creating habitat refuge for the river ecologies and social amnetiy to the adjacent neighbrhood.

tanacetum vulgare

ardea herodias

      Â&#x2DC;      alosa sapidissima gabion wall cell infrastruce

helianthus annuus


 ˜  ˜  

N

MA

o wetland

     


Uncovering the Invisible System

the intertwining of building and site creating a new symbiotic architecture with water as mediator Breadboarding the City ARCH 502 • PennDesign Spring 2012 • critic_Mark Kroeckel Published in Workbook

Acknowledging the city of Philadelphia’s drastically overflowing combined sewer outfalls into the Delaware River, my project attempts to alleviate the issue by revitalizing the city’s water system to create a new urban realm in which buildings and sites become 1 entity with water acting as the mediating agent resulting in a new symbiotic architecture that is tightly woven into the urban fabric remediating the city’s blasé attitude by the soft transitions from exterior into interior.


INFILTRATION POTENTIONAL: Vacant Lots Along Historic Streams

water intake heavy near historic streams

TJUFIBTIJHIJOmMUSBUJPOQPUFOUJBM

SITE STRATEGY

The site sits at a crux of 4 different street types which all have corresponding water strategies. The strategies transition through the site creating new intersections. The site is thus embedded into the fabric of the city, inviograting the buildings program at the emergence of the capillary strategies flowing through the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s volume.

outfalls into Delaware River

CSO: combined sewer outfall 50 - 200 million gallons yearly overflow SSO: stormwater sewer outfall vacant lots

PERFORMATIVE MODELS_WATER ABSORPTION: MOVEMENT + DISTORTION 1

2 8

9

4

10 11

3 5

6

7

0 min

1/2 min

1. pigment displacement routed to water edge

5 min

2. pigment dispersed from route 3. pigment attraction to intersection at water edge

10 min

4. initial grid ghosted with lack of any pigment

15 min

5. pigment collected along route

20 min

6. displaced pigment soaking into paper

25 min

7. pigment collected at paper edge

30 min

8. majority of grid ghosted with pigment soaked through paper

35 min

9. paper deformed along intial water puddles

3

40 min

10. pigment spots 11. majority of pigment displaced evenly around paper edges

7 8

2 5

4

6

1

0 min

1/2 min

1. sugar dissolving

5 min

2. sugar particals breaking down

15 min

3. purer water migrating away from sugar

20 min

25 min

4. sugar particals re-distributed

30 min

5. clear distinction between re-crystalizing sugar and purer water

35 min

6. re-formalized sugar mass 7. purer water absorbing into water

40 min

8. water absorbing at edges


FORMAL JUXSTAPOSITION + PURIFICATION SYSTEM

DIURNAL + SEASONAL METAMORPHOSIS IMPLICATIONS

soft, free-form organic language

programatic shift

J

+ water level 001 + water level 002 + water level 003 emergent connections

angular, constructed man-made language

3

a

3

a 2

a

R

IVE

W LA

3

DE

2

a a

2

ER AR

a

3 2

a

DIURNAL METAMORPHOSIS

confluence b J

emergent surface

3

2

programatic shift SEASONAL METAMORPHOSIS

a

v

v

v

v

v

v

v

v

b

2

3


FILTER PHASE 001

WATER PURIFICATION STSTEMS

FILTER FEEDERS a

Rainwater that falls onto the site is directed along the valleys of the roof through the operative exterior structure filtering the water with filter feeders contained within the structure that eat bacteria. The water is then collected on the lowest point and channeled through a crevice that slices through the volume, spewing the water out into the next phase of filtration. Joining the storm water that is collected from the city, the water is then collectively further filtered in the hardscape and softscape purification zones by fish and plants.

purification by consuming rain water bacteria and small decomposing matter performative exterior structure operative exterior structure

ate nw

rai r

Dorsal Acartia tranteri

inw

ate

r

Water Flea Bosmina longirostris

ra

Conepod Cyclops strenuus

filter feeders

rainwater storage

wa

te

rc

ha

nn

ele

dt

of ilte

rin

FILTER PHASES 002/003

ha

se

00

2

common rudd

common roach

surface Yellow Iris Iris pseudacorus

48 cm

Common rudd Scardinius erythrophthalmus

littoral

middle

Water Soldier Stratiotes aloides 35 cm

limnetic

Peach Glow Nymphea alba

bottom

Spiked watermilfoil Myriophyllum spicatum

PLANTS

gp

tench 2 purification by consuming excess nutrients and de-acidification by removing carbon dioxide

84 cm

FISH

Common Roach Rutilus rutilus

Tench Tinca tinca

3 purification by consuming un-desired plankton, algae, insects, larvae, snails, etc.


a

2

b 3

J

HYDROLOGICAL SYSTEM TYPOLOGIES 2

3

hardscape

2

3

softscape

b infrastructure

a architecture


STITCHING LANDSCAPE + ARCHITECTURE TOGETHER WITH WATER market park hydrological system co-lab

1

CONTEXT

CONTEXT

CIRCULATION_market park

INTER-PROGRAMATIC LOGIC + FORMAL ORGANIZATION WORKING

collaborative individual

PLAYING

social recreational

MAKING

service shop

rain water crevice delineates volumne

density of glass facets dictated by programatic lighting needs

SM. STUDIOS

DN SHARED WORKSPACE

KITCHEN

UP SHARED WORKSPACE

DN SM. MEETING ROOM

DN MEDIA CENTER

RETAIL

DN GALLERY

DN

UP DN

BAR/CAFE

UP

LOUNGE


07

C JAMAICA BAY

03

06

A 02

STATEN ISLAND

05

+

01

PROPOSED FERRY CONNECTIONS

+

EL. 14’ CURRENT FLOOD ZONE

+

EL. 14’ PROPOSED SOFTENED EDGE

08

SANDYHOOK

B

04

ICONIC LANDMARK PROPOSED COMMERCIAL HUB


Intensifying Identities

elevated urban waterfront living: re-imagined coastal Gateway Parks climate resilience masterplan Variable Energy Systems_Infrastructure for Open Waters_Gateway National Park Masterplan LARP 502 â&#x20AC;˘ PennDesign Spring 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ critic_Ellen Neises Exhibited at the Future of Staten Island Forum (2 week project)

Gateway National Park, composed of a collection of unique parks all have distinct ecologies, iconic landmarks, contextual fabrics, and each a different position in the Lower New York Bay. Instead of re-branding these entities or blanketing them with the same park strategy, Going With The Flow intensifies identities responding to their adjancies creating parasitic relationships with architecture, water, and the urban fabric.


PARASITIC RELATIONSHIPS

FORT WADSWORTH staten island icon commercial nucleus

+

 ÂŞ5#0&;*11-.+)*6*175'Â&#x2DC;(146*#0%1%-Â&#x2DC;0#8'5+0-

  ÂŞ)4'#6-+..5Â&#x2DC;/+..'4(+'.&Â&#x2DC;(1469#&59146*

New high density housing floats above the varied ecologies of Gateway Park with the landscape weaving in and around it. Creating a new typology for a multi-authored approach the towers are sliced with lightwells that collect water and can support maximum storage during times of high energy scenarios.

+

freshwater emergent

estuary marine

SOFTENED EDGE/MARSHES staten island water strategy

dunescape

thicket


 ÂŞ(1466+.&'0Â&#x2DC;(.1;&$'00'6(+'.&Â&#x2DC;$4''<;21+066+2

SANDYHOOK LIGHTHOUSE sandyhook icon commercial nucleus

FLOYD BENNET FIELD jamaica bay icon commercial nucleus

+

bog

maritime forest

exposed tidal flats

BUFFERING_DUNESCAPE sandyhook water strategy

sheltered tidal flats

estuary marine

DEFLECTING_ISLANDS jamaica bay strategy


GREATKILLS CASE STUDY_TOPOGRAPHIC TIMELINE STUDIES

light well

+

solar collector/distributor

PROPOSED_greatkills case study

water storage

+

PRESENT CONDITION_greatkills case study

flood line current sea level present topography historic topography water collection emergency water storage

+

+

HISTORIC CONDITION_greatkills case study

freshwater wetlands • tidal marsh STATEN ISLAND_greatkills • miller field • fort wadsworth


GREATKILLS URBAN LIVING

ARCHITECTURE SEAWALL

NEIGHBORHOOD CONNECTIONS

WATERFRONT COMMERCIAL HUB

HABITAT SANCUARY

CONTROLLABLE WATER FLOW


Going With The Flow

a re-imagined coastal park + housing living symbiotically with water adjusting to systems of flux Variable Energy Systems_Infrastructure for Open Waters_Coastal Park LARP 502 • PennDesign Spring 2013 • critic_Ellen Neises (in progress)

Instead of conceding to the water and running scared to high ground, or arrogantly thinking we can control water with our high tech engineering, “Going With The Flow” takes on the bigger challenge to find a way to symbiotically exist together. Using the existing network of wetlands and waterways as a catalyst for strategic invasions into the fabric, the coastal park will grow in flux with the phasing of demolished and vacated housing.


historic state_1900

present day_2013

GREATKILLS CREEK SYSTEM_mix of estuary + fresh water systems

DONGAN HILLS SITE_graphing studies of existing systems

historic state_1900

present day_2013

DONGAN HILLS CREEK SYSTEM_fresh water system with dense settlement


GREATKILLS CREEK SYSTEM_mix of estuary + fresh water systems

GREATKILLS SITE_80% estuary + 20% freshwater systems

DONGAN HILLS CREEK SYSTEM_fresh water system with dense settlement DONGAN HILLS SITE_100% freshwater system interwoven in fabric

ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS_%'064#.+<'&˜(+'.&˜)4#+0˜0'6914INTIAL

A PARK OF LAYERED SYSTEMS IN TENSION ˜9#6'4ª5#.6x(4'5* ˜.#0&5%#2'ª4'5614'&f*'+)*6'0'&'%1.1); ˜2#4-ª4'%4'#6+10f241)4#/ ˜*175+0)564#6');ª2*#5'&+08#5+10 ˜%+4%7.#6+10

forces infl

SEA WATER sm cells


ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS_%'064#.+<'&˜(+'.&˜)4#+0˜0'6914A PARK OF LAYERED SYSTEMS IN TENSION ˜9#6'4ª5#.6x(4'5* ˜.#0&5%#2'ª4'5614'&f*'+)*6'0'&'%1.1); ˜2#4-ª4'%4'#6+10f241)4#/ ˜*175+0)564#6');ª2*#5'&+08#5+10 ˜%+4%7.#6+10


Water Machine: Pocket Ecologies

dynamic small patch/large patch transformative system: land/water interface infrastructure system Variable Energy Systems_Infrastructure for Open Waters_Land + Water Interface LARP 502 â&#x20AC;˘ PennDesign Spring 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ critic_Ellen Neises (1 week project with partner)

Pocket Ecologies, a hard tectonic infrastructure, is a hybrid machine acting as a jetty, wave attenuation, artificial dune and polder network. The system can morph to site specific particularities, connecting patches and creating future ecology corridors. Composed of varying triangular modules, Pocket Ecologies is strategically planted with specific ecologic types acting as seeder cells which would propagate into the other cells over time.


LOW ENERGY SCENARIO emergent tide pools_increased shore line

LOW ENERGY + HIGH ENERGY PERFORMANCE TIDAL FLUX POOL CATCHMENTS LOW ENERGY SCENARIO emergent tide pools_increased shore line

TIDAL FLUX POOL CATCHMENTS

tidal

tidal

off

run

ter

wa

sh

fre

TYPICAL SYSTEM OPERATIONS_FORCES + VARIABLE INFLUENCES

off

un

rr

ate

hw

s fre

INTIAL GRID

DEFORMED GRID

forces influence

PRIMARY RIB STRUCUTURE

ecological zoning

eolian accretion ribs

flux

GRAVITY FED INUNDATION MANAGEMENT INFRASTRUCTURE

flux

LONG DRIFT ACCUMULATION

variable pocket sizes

SEA WATER

FRESH WATER lg cells

sm cells

GRAVITY FED INUNDATION MANAGEMENT INFRASTRUCTURE

LONGSHORE DRIFT

LONG DRIFT ACCUMULATION

sm + lg cells

reef

tidal pool salt marsh

primary dune

back dune thicket

freshwater marsh maritime forest

HIGH ENERGY SCENARIO emergent fresh water basins_wave attenuation

tch

men

t

HIGH ENERGY SCENARIO emergent fresh water basins_wave attenuation

t ca

DEFORMED GRID

PRIMARY RIB STRUCUTURE eolian accretion ribs

off

rm

sto

run

direc

t ca

tch

men

t

direc

ecological zoning

off

rm

en u

sto

run

ation

wave a t t

en u

STORM SURGE + STORM RUNOFF CATCHMENT

reef

tidal pool salt marsh

primary dune

wave a t t

ation

back dune thicket

freshwater marsh ROUGHENING SURFACE maritime forest

LOW ENERGY SCENARIO emergent tide pools_increased shore line LOW ENERGY SCENARIO emergent tide pools_increased shore line

ROUGHENING SURFACE

STORM SURGE + STORM RUNOFF CATCHMENT

SEEDER CELLS + PROPOGATION spread through wind, birds, runoff

MICROCLIMATE SOLAR STUDY zones 7b + 8a

CIRCULATION navigable ribs

SEEDER CELLS + P

spread through wind, bird


SAND ACCUMULATION blackjack oak black poplar

sassafras

widgeon grass

white cedar

pitch pine

beach heather

pin oak

white oak

american holly

high bush blueberry

panic grass

black blackberry

swamp sedge

black alder

virginia creeper

beach plum

american holly

wild black cherry

tall blackberry

japanese sedge

seaside goldenrod

zones 7b + 8a

beach grass

MICROCLIMATE SOLAR STUDY

sea rocket

PROPOGATION

eel grass

ds, runoff

CIRCULATION

navigable ribs

EMERGENT MICROCLIMATE NEAR THERMAL MASS

SEED PROPAGATION BY WAY OF WIND + BIRDS

shrub layer

canopy

grasses


heat activated cone opening

pine beatle 5 mm snip and skid

+

80 ft

RIPARIAN EDGE

pinus rigida

PINE BEATLE ATTACK

p

FOREST FIRE CYCLE

majority of forest burns with the exception of pitch pines beacuse of their thick bark. the comination of a cleaned forest floor from the fire, along with the heat from the fire activating the cone opening process, new pines are germinated creating a pine dominated forest.

oaks emerge dominate post beatle blight

s ine

oaks

+

pines dominate post fire

+

beatles lay eggs under the bark, introducing a fungus into the sapwood that prevents the tree from repelling and killing the attacking beetles. normally, the beatle plays an important role in the forest cycle attacking old or weakened trees to start the development of a succesional younger forest.

white pine

white pine

scirpus subterminalis

atlantic cedar red maple

insect-nitrogen source

removing groups of infested trees scattered over a large area. 4 ft

dionaea muscipula

because the soil is so acidic, there is no nitrogen and iron that most plants survive on. in order to get nitrogen and iron, carnivorous plants, typically found in acidic ecologies get their nutrients from insects

canopy

sub-canopy

scirpus subterminalis

nymphoides cordata

atlantic cedar

white pine

pitch pine

herbaceous layer

bayonet rush

floating heart

swaying rush

pondweed

+

pickerelweed

ACIDIC SWAMP

red maple

pickerelweed large cranberry

atlantic cedar white pine

sweet pepperbush

viburnum

jointweed

inkberry

sourgum

blackoak

atlantic cedar

shrub layer pennsylvania sedge

PINE BARRENS CYCLE + ADAPTION examining the natural and human hand adaption to disturbances

+

floodplain

emergents white pine

post oak

black huckleberry

white pine

atlantic cedar

soil is extremely sandy and acidic with little to no nitrogen and iron due to the loss of decomposion from the lack of bacteria in the acidic serlizing soil. because of the well drained and super moist sand, the barrens act as a swamp with unique plantlife that can tolerate the acidicy.

pitch dine

quartz sand- cohansey formation

pine-barren heather

canopy

PINE BARREN UPLANDS

pitch pine

black jack oak

black jack oak

pitch pine

shrub layer


Pine Barrens Cycle + Adaption examing the natural and human hand adaption to disturbances

Ecology Workshop_Week 3: Pine Barrens New Jersey LARP 511 â&#x20AC;˘ PennDesign Fall 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ instructors_Sally Willig + Nick Pevzner Published in Process 17

The Pine Barrens of New Jersey are an extremely unique ecology of the coastal plains. Situated on the Kirkwood-Cohansey formation, the soil is extremely sandy and acidic with little to no nitrogen and iron due to the loss of decomposion from the lack of bacteria in the acidic sterilizing soil. Because of the well-drained and super sandy soil, the barrens act as a swamp with unique plant life that can tolerate the acidity.


Urban Water Farm

flood emergency refuge/aquatic recreation + culture center Base Ops/Emergency Field Operations Schenk Woodmen Competition LARP 502 • PennDesign Spring 2013 (1 week group competition) AWARDED 2ND PLACE

Weaving the site into the urban fabric with connective armatures dynamicaly functioning as water transportation, stormwater absorption, strategies, and deployable pod tracks. Urban Water Farm creates deployment of interconnected motherships along schuykill river through stormwater management infrastructure connecting parks and people back to the “hidden river”.


Weaving the site into the urban fabric with connective armatures dynamicaly funtioning as water transportation, stormwater absorption strategies, and deployable pod tracks

CSO_201-550

a

CONNECTIVE ARMATURES

U1

U3

rainfall

X2

groundwater zone

C2

d runoff water

solidago sempervirens

seaside goldenrod

maritime saltbush

atriplex acadiensis

ambrosia artemisifolia

ragweed

wood duck

aix sponsa

achmophorus

grebe

xanthocephalus

blackbird

sweet clover

melilotus officinalis

red clover

white clover

trifolium repens

trochilidae

trifolium pratense

RIVER WATER

hummingbird

yucca moth

prodoxidae

bombus

bumblebee

betula nigra

riverbirch

artemisia vulgaris

mugwart

phytolacca americana

pokeweed

american shad

alosa sapidissima

ardea herodias

great blue heron

trochilidae

sandpiper

achillea millifolium

wild carrot

yarrow

daucus carota

phytolacca americana

pokeweed

anisoptera

cistothorus palustris

marsh wren

danaus plexippus

FILTERED

}

salt contaminate

WATER FILTERED RUNOFF

monarch

U2 x1 ground water flow

(1-U2) x1

surface zone soil zone

C1

soil flow direct runoff flow

stormwater from road kerbing diverted into bioswale

LEGEND - TYPICAL OPERATIONS Bringing the culture + habitat of the river into the community to create a refuge for both people and wildlife year-round and through the crisis

WILDLIFE HABITAT_urban wetland

WILDLIFE HABITAT_riparian edge

DROUGHT + WATER INUNDATION TOLERANT PLANT STRATEGY

EROSION CONTROL/STABILIZATION PLANT STRATEGY

FLOOD WATER ALLEVATION

STORMWATER INFRASTRUCTURE STRATEGY

landscape infrastructure network

WILDLIFE HABITAT_agriculture pollinators

SOIL NUTRIENT BUILDING PLANT STRATEGY

SALT TOLERANT PLANT STRATEGY

WILDLIFE HABITAT_typical wetland

SITE RUNOFF BIO-SWALE STRATGEY

FILTERED WATER RETENTON BASIN + HYDROPONIC FARM

4

• connecting urban parks to the riverfront

REFUGE RECREATION + WILDLIFE HABITAT

1

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES

2

RESEARCH LABS

3

ARCHIVAL STORAGE

4

FOOD COURT

3

CSO_51-200 Alleviating drastic CSO overflows into the Schuykill River by collecting and filtering both river and runoff flood waters through a system of wetlands and an additional crisis storage doubling the collected water volume

CSO_1001-1800

runoff

river

FLOOD EMERGENCY/URBAN WATER FARM

FLOOD MANAGEMENT

• linking landscapes through stormwater infrastructure • refuge recreation + wildlife habitat • flood management: river + runoff storage + filtration • drinking water purification • aquatic research • filtered water hydroponic community farm

additional crisis storage

50%

more flood water storage in hollow earthforms

b

2 1

CSO_0-50

clean water act 2013

river polluted from industrial revolution 1972

river supplied clean water to philadelphia

1909

AQUATIC RESEARCH

1822

Deploying motherships along the river to moniter and test the water quality and wildlife habitat along with ongoing research at the wetland, hydroponic farm, and drinking water purification process on site river progressively getting cleaner: • 40 species of fish • otters, crabs, migratory birds • emergent riparian buffer

80 - 90% river pollution from stormwater runoff

Serving one of Philadelphia’s poorest neighborhoods, hydroponic farming is an economical method of feeding the neighborhood and conserving water usage while also alleviating nutrition pollution

hydroponic system over time

soil system

hydroponic 1/20th

0

400

cafe

$

• stormwater filtration+absorption • overflow water circulated back to mothership

flood water alleviation

$$ soil system over time AQUATIC FARMING

c

stormwater management


WILDLIFE HABITAT_agriculture pollinators

FILTERED WATER RETENTON BASIN + HYDROPONIC FARM

EXISTING SUPERMARKET SOIL NUTRIENT BUILDING PLANT STRATEGY

c WILDLIFE HABITAT_typical wetland

SITE RUNOFF BIO-SWALE STRATGEY

soil flow

ground water flow

rainfall

} U2 x1

U1 U3

seaside goldenrod

direct runoff flow

solidago sempervirens

(1-U2) x1

atriplex acadiensis

ER RUNOFF WAT

maritime saltbush

ragweed

ambrosia artemisifolia

aix sponsa

wood duck

achmophorus

grebe

xanthocephalus

blackbird

melilotus officinalis

sweet clover

trifolium pratense

red clover

white clover trifolium repens

trochilidae

hummingbird

prodoxidae

yucca moth

bombus

bumblebee

betula nigra

riverbirch

artemisia vulgaris

mugwart

pokeweed

phytolacca americana

alosa sapidissima

american shad

ardea herodias

blue heron

trochilidae

sandpiper

FILTERED

site runoff bio-swales

b

hydroponic farm

EROSION CONTROL/STABILIZATION PLANT STRATEGY

research lab

FLOOD WATER ALLEVATION

medical center

corridor

WILDLIFE HABITAT_riparian edge

lobby

water pump room

a

supply storage room

upper lobby

WATER STORAGE + FILTRATION STRATEGIES TYPOLOGIES

C1

surface zone soil zone

X2

C2

groundwater zone

FILTERED RIVE R WATER

SALT TOLERANT PLANT STRATEGY


elevated orchard

gray water storage

gray water pipes

filtered gray water rain for irrigation + garden shower


Re-Energizing The Urban Agriculture Cycle connecting landscapes through graywater collection + filtration repurposing existing structures Re-Visioning the Food Truck Route in Old City Schenk Woodmen Competition LARP 502 â&#x20AC;˘ PennDesign Spring 2012 (1 week competition) HONORABLE MENTION

Re-energizing the urban agriculture cycle in Old City Philadelphia promotes a more sustainable approach to the food truck typology. Food truck stops are connected throughout the neighborhood creating an urban running trail path that connects within the larger landscape infrastructure. The path is inserted into the existing fabric allowing for flexible responses to the context.


FOOD TRUCK ROUTE: Connecting Landscapes existing billboard structure

filtered graywater fed orchard

filtered graywater storage

M

M

graywater pipes


LANDSCAPE STRATEGIES ALONG TRAIL PATH a

c

b

building edge pedestrian way seating + agriculture planter gray water trough + drain running trail tree alle road

building edge pedestrian way gray water trough + drain running trail + tree corridor road

d

building edge pedestrian way agriculture planter gray water trough + drain running trail tree alle road

building edge pedestrian way GPS/runner tracker/info board gray water trough + drain running trail tree alle road


Transition: Perception Distortion

an exploration of episodic memory retrieval through the lens of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind Concept Context Content ARCH 501 • PennDesign Fall 2011 • critic_Philipp von Dalwig

The Arts Pavilion acts as a gateway transition between the 2 contrasting site conditions: Wild Natural Landscape + Urban Hardscape. Transitions become distorted according to adjacent conditions through the progression of the building. Through distortion, the user’s perception becomes heightened, leaving the user in the programmatic action space in state of “awareness” to further concentrate on the given task of the space.


EPISODIC MEMORY PROCESS 1 2 3 4 5

time place emotions senses people

WILD NATURAL LANDSCAPE

From an information processing perspective there are 3 stages in the formation and retrieval of memory: ENCODING receiving, processing and combining of received information STORAGE creation of a permanent record of the encoded information RETRIEVAL calling back the stored information in response to some cue for use in a process or activity

c3

5 1

1

b2

3 3 4 4

5

2

a 1

2 2 3

4

3

5

5

1

PROGRAM CONNECTIONS

1

4

2

a

performance auditorium

b

installation exhibit

c

exterior lounge

2

3

URBAN HARDSCAPE

1

4 5

Flat Topography Impervious Surface No Plantings

URBAN HARDSCAPE

1

Flat Topography Impervious Surface Contained Plantings

2

Flat Topography Porous Pavement Contained Plantings

3

Flat Topography Porous Pavement + Groundcover Contained Plantings

4

Flat Topography Groundcover Contained Plantings

5

Flat Topographhy Manicured Grasses Shifting Plantings

6

Uneven Topographhy Wild Understory Unordered Plantings

Sloping Topographhy Wild Understory Dense Natural Plantings

WILD NATURAL LANDSCAPE


SEQUENCE OF TRANSITION

RECEPTION

1 garden

INSTALLATION EXHIBIT

2 garden

RECIEVE Progression of Containment

a

3 garden

PERFORMANCE AUDITORIUM

4 garden

EXTERIOR LOUNGE

5 garden

6 garden

RELEASE Progression of Exterior

c

d


INSTANCES OF DISTORTION

a

SUBJECT

Installation Exhibit • Viewing

3

Being Viewed

5

EXTERIOR LOUNGE d

c

INSTALLATION EXHIBITION

6

b

2

ORIENTATION Ramp • Floor

a

Wall

RECEPTION

1

c

CONTEXT

Exterior Lounge • Exterior

d

Interior

SCALE

Thresholds • Exterior

Containment


a

SUBJECT

c

CONTEXT


BSA Design Center Comprehensive Design Studio Design Studio 5 • Northeastern University Spring 2009 • critics: David Stern, Kiel Moe (partner project)

The BSA Design Center, situated along the Fort Point Channel in South Boston, follows the movement of layers created by the Channel and the Harborwalk, the building sits as part of the continuum while also book-ending the site and marking its presence as an iconic symbol on the Boston Waterfrront. The BSA Design Center extends the educational component of the adjacent Children’s Museum by exhibiting the systems, structure, and passive strategies.


l

b j i

4

k c

1 d

f

9

5

e

7

h

2

g

6

8 a

3 BSA GROUND FLOORPLAN a. b. c. d. e. f. g.

HARBORWALK BOOKSTORE CAFE EXTERIOR SEATING LOBBY RECEPTION GALLERY/EXHIBIT SPACE

h. i. j. k. l.

BAR + LOUNGE AUDITORIUM HYGRO FABRICATION SHOP FABRICATION ASSEMBLY LOADING DOCK

DIDACTIC ARCHITECTURE 4. HYGRO TESTING 5. EXTERIOR YARD 6. WATER CHANNEL 7. FILTRATION WETLANDS 8. DRIP EDGE 9. EXPOSED STRUCTURE

EDUCATION EXTENED 1. CHILDRENS MUSEUM 2. BIRD CALLS 3. REGIONAL BIRD DIAGRAM


CONCEPTUAL STUDY MODELS_Massing, Program, Context, Concept


4 5


INTEGRATED BUILDING SYSTEMS

RAIN WATER CYCLE

1 VEGETATED ROOF 2 DRIP EDGE 3 WATER RUNNEL 4 FILTRATION WETLANDS 5 WATER CHANNEL

Utilizing a typical parking garage structure, the concrete beams act as an air duct circulating the airflow from the low fenestration system out into the atrium where the air is sucked up and released at the top. By embedding the beams with radiant tubes, the surface area of the T shape is exploited to maximize the thermal active components of the concrete. Running along the atrium separating the private offices from the open offices, is a thick rammed earth wall which contributes to the stack effect with its inherent thermal activity.

1

2

3


BUILDING ENVELOPE SECTION PERSPECTIVE

1

4

2

8

5

6 7

1

site cast concrete beam

2

site cast concrete column

3

batt insulation in light weight stl stud

4

gyp. board interior finish wall

5

exterior grade dens glass

6

water proofing membreane

7

rigid insulation

8

tube stl strongback system

9

light weight stl stud sill

3 9 15

13

11

10

12 14

16

17

10

diffuse overhead lighting

11

cast in place hydronics

12

raised floor stl pedestal support

13

raised floor panels

14

site cast double T floor slabs

15

stl clip angle with dowel bolted to stongback frame

16

stone rainscreen

17

operable ventilation window

18

glass curtain wall with stone rainscreen

19

double layer glass

18

19


Jacqueline Ann Martinez Selected Works Portfolio  

MLA + MARCH PennDesign graduate work + selected undergraduate architecture work