Issuu on Google+

Marquette

Nurse

2011

Having a local and global impact 75 years of caring and innovation


TA BL E O F C ON T E N T S 2 3

FROM THE DEAN COLLEGE NEWS

Dr. Bob Topp: new associate dean for research

Big learning, small patients at La Rabida

Blankets bring hope to hospitalized kids

5

FIRST PERSON

Dr. Kristin Haglund’s Fulbright semester

6

RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

Study reveals the high cost of understaffing

Junior researchers with major impact

8

ALUMNI PROFILES

Catherine Rick: the VA’s driven top nursing officer

Peggy Troy runs the site of her first clinical rotation

Tony Guzzardo: “bedside nurse” back in Honduras

10

75 YEARS OF CARING AND INNOVATION

12 16

BEING THE DIFFERENCE — LOCALLY AND GLOBALLY

College mission Through a transformational Catholic, Jesuit education, the mission of the Marquette University College of Nursing is to prepare nurse leaders to promote health, healing and social justice for all people through clinical practice and development of nursing knowledge. The faculty, students and staff of the college are committed to: • Providing high-quality, compassionate care focused on individuals, families and communities. • Advocating for social justice to eliminate health inequities. • Engaging community partners to promote health care for all. • Generating, evaluating and applying knowledge to improve health and education outcomes. • Creating a dynamic, innovative learning community. • Leading change to improve the health care environment.

Contributing writers: Jessica Bazan, Ruth Ann Belknap, Kathleen Bobay, Margaret Faut Callahan, Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, Tony Guzzardo, Mary Ann Lough, Maureen O’Brien, Bridget O’Meara, Tim Olsen, Madeline Wake, Marianne Weiss Editorial team: Margaret Faut Callahan, Stephen Filmanowicz, Bridget O’Meara and Tim Olsen. Graphic design: Joan Holcomb Contact: Share comments or ideas for future issues with Bridget O’Meara at bridget.omeara@marquette.edu. On the cover: Joshua Makinen is examined by Sara Peitzmeier, Nurs ’11, at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin.

Dan Johnson

NOTABLE SCHOLARLY ACCOMPLISHMENTS


During Family Weekend each fall, sophomore undergraduate nursing students and direct-entry master’s students gather with faculty in the Church of the Gesu for the cherished Commitment to the Profession Ceremony, at which they have their hands blessed as they join the nursing community.

2 011 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

1


F ROM THE DEAN

Introducing Marquette Nurse Moving the profession forward with a sense of mission

Ben Smidt

As we complete the 75th anniversary year of the Marquette University College of Nursing, it is a fitting time to begin a new tradition. Welcome to the first edition of Marquette Nurse. This annual publication brings to you the accomplishments our students, faculty, administrators and alumni are making in academic innovation, research, scholarship and community service. Each of these is an essential component of the mission of the college, which is to prepare nurse leaders to promote health, healing and social justice for all people through clinical practice and development of nursing knowledge. Earlier this year I was touched by how uniquely the College of Nursing carries out this mission when I visited the Marquette Neighborhood Health Center and asked a patient how she was. She said, “I’m fine because I am here.” I looked at her quizzically, and she clearly knew I was puzzled. She said, “Because they care about me here.” Marquette nurses and students take care of our world’s most vulnerable individuals, whether it is in our clinic, in community agencies or in our partner hospitals. As I prepared for May 2011 Commencement and read through the accomplishments of each of our graduates, I was reminded again of how our students, like all Marquette nurses, provide so much volunteer service throughout this community and around the world. These values are what have guided the college throughout its 75-year history. During that time, the college and Marquette nurses around the world have made significant contributions to the profession and to health care. A Marquette nurse must be uniquely skilled not only to meet the needs of today’s increasingly complex health care industry, but to carry forth the very essence of what it is to be a graduate of this college. As we look toward the future, the next generation of Marquette nurses will be even more prepared than in the past. As we implement a new nursing curriculum in fall 2012, we will focus on key areas of patient safety, quality improvement and care across the entire health care continuum. We will share with you in future issues of Marquette Nurse the exciting, innovative approach our faculty is taking to lead dramatic changes in nursing education. Everywhere we turn, we see Marquette nurses making a difference in the lives of others. Countless numbers of health care system leaders, nursing faculty and staff nurses go to work every day to solve the critical issues that face society. I hope you enjoy Marquette Nurse and better understand the contributions that are being made locally, nationally and globally by our faculty, students and alumni. Marquette blessings! Margaret Faut Callahan, C.R.N.A., Ph.D., F.N.A.P., F.A.A.N. Dean and Professor Marquette University College of Nursing

2

MARQUETT E UNIV ERSITY


Topp signs on to expand nursing research at Marquette Accomplished nursing researcher and research administrator Dr. Robert Topp joined the College of Nursing this summer with the mission of leading the already-active faculty and student research efforts of the college. As associate dean for research, a new position in the college, Topp will take on the leadership role of advancing the college’s faculty and doctoral student research and scholarship. “Dr. Topp brings tremendous expertise in nursing research through his own research and his work at the federal level with funding agencies,” says Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan, dean of nursing. “His commitment to interdisciplinary research will better position us to collaborate in increasing ways with colleagues at Marquette, in the community and across the country.” Topp comes to Marquette from the School of Nursing at the University of Louisville, where he was associate dean for research, the Shirley B. Powers Endowed Chair for Health Systems Research and a distinguished university professor. Seeking in particular to better understand interventions to address childhood obesity and the effects of various forms of exercise on older adults, he has been the principal or co-investigator on more than $2.5 million of extramurally supported research projects in the past 10 years, resulting in more than 100 publications in peerreviewed journals and 200 presentations at professional scientific

Ben Smidt

NEW S BRI EF S

Aiming high:

meetings. Topp has been associated with the Nursing Study Section in the Center for Scientific Review at the National Institutes of Health since 1997 as a regular and temporary member. The search committee highlighted his leadership abilities and experience, his mentorship of graduate students and faculty, and his well-established record of research and funding for his interdisciplinary research program in exercise and rehabilitation.

Small patients, big scholarship opportunities In 2006, Susan and Dan Real found a way to merge their philanthropic passions — Marquette University and LaRabida Children’s Hospital — through a mutually beneficial arrangement. LaRabida is a small, specialty hospital on the South Side of Chicago that serves primarily low-income children with chronic illness, developmental disabilities or histories of abuse or trauma. Because it is a small hospital, it does not attract as many new nursing graduates as larger acute-care pediatric hospitals do. As a trustee for LaRabida, Dan, Bus Ad ’81, was concerned about this recruitment challenge in light of the larger national nursing shortage. In fall 2006, he and Susan, Bus Ad ’81, established a scholarship and externship program that would provide critical tuition support to Marquette nursing students while exposing them to the clinical programs and career opportunities at LaRabida. Originally named in honor of Susan’s father, a man known for his lifetime commitment to serving others, the Mark A. Cronin, Jr., Scholarship (now the Daniel Real and Susan Cronin Real Endowed Scholarship) has provided a sizable, partial one- or two-year academic scholarship and a paid externship opportunity for two to four students annually in the past four years. For many recipients, it has also proved to be a life-changing experience.

The care Caroline Tomala, Nurs ’12, provides for Sade Starling and other patients at LaRabida Children’s Hospital in Chicago is made possible by a work-study scholarship that has benefited a number of Marquette nursing students.

“As a nursing student, I walked into the doors of LaRabida unaware of the change I had coming,” says Jessie Kramer, Nurs ’11, a LaRabida nurse extern and scholarship recipient in summer 2010. “I left LaRabida changed, inspired and focused, wanting to affect my community the way it has affected me.” 2 011 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

3


Courtesy of Marquette College of Nursing

NEW S BRI EF S

In the third year of their Christmastime project, Marquette student nurses such as Annie Gallagher (left) and Ashley Wickey made 122 blankets that were distributed to hospitalized children.

Helping hospitalized children through the holidays

“ Doing the blanket project for Children’s Hospital is so meaningful because it really turns a child’s hospital stay around.

4

MARQUETT E UNIV ERSITY

When Katie Sanders’ 19-monthold son had to spend Christmas 2010 and the days leading up to it at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin with pneumonia and other upper respiratory problems, the family had its stay brightened by a Christmas Eve visit from a gifts-carrying Santa Claus. One of the favorite presents left behind was a blue fleece blanket with a note that read, “Happy holidays from Marquette Nursing.” The blanket was one of 122 made by members of the Marquette University Student Nurses Association and distributed to young patients at the hospital, the association’s third year performing this service. “Anyone who has ever been in the hospital knows it kind of stinks, especially around the holidays,”

says project originator and last year’s association president Jamie Mochel, Nurs ’11. “Doing the blanket project for Children’s Hospital is so meaningful because it really turns a child’s hospital stay around. For some kids, it’s their first real blanket. For others, it’s the thing that they squeeze really tight when they are having a procedure done.” Families agree. “This was a very thoughtful and special way to share the gift of Christmas with families that spent their holidays in the hospital, and I sincerely appreciated it,” wrote Sanders (who works as a director in Marquette’s University Advancement department) in a thank you note. “That moment made me very proud to be a Marquette employee.” — Bridget O’Meara


First Person

The Fulbright was also a learning experience for Haglund’s daughter Paige, son Alan and husband Tim (not pictured), with visits to southern France (left) and northern England (right).

Since alcohol use and sexual involvement among young people are recognized problems in both the United States and United Kingdom, we hope that our research benefits youths in nations and leads to further research in this area. I learned much about sexual health service delivery from the faculty, nurses and other professionals that I encountered through lectures, seminars and site visits. Most profoundly, my experiences deepened my understanding of how vulnerability, within a sexual health context, contributes to issues such as sexual exploitation, human trafficking and HIV transmission. In sexual health, vulnerability is intensified by poverty, lack of access to services, lack of sexual health education, and lack of health care volition for many women and children around the world. Dr. Kristin Haglund’s Fulbright Scholarship exposed her to health care delivery challenges in the United Kingdom, Europe and beyond.

My Fulbright semester Broadening a teacher-scholar’s horizons on sexual health and service delivery By Dr. Kristin Haglund After being named associate professor in the College of Nursing in 2010, I began planning the sabbatical that comes with promotion. I had long harbored a dream to teach abroad and so sought a Fulbright Scholarship.

It is an extraordinary era of politics in the U.K. I found many aspects of the political landscape intriguing, such as their coalition government, existence of a viable third party and a federal austerity campaign to reduce their deficit that includes efforts to privatize the National Health System. It was fascinating to experience how the U.S. role in global events such as the conflict in Libya and the assassination of Osama bin Laden is perceived by the citizens of the U.K. and by their government. I loved discussing current events informally with U.K. citizens. I also attended formal events and had exchanges with U.K. legislators, academics, entrepreneurs, business people, social service workers, and others who were all striving to change and improve life in the U.K. through inclusion, engagement and sustainability.

To my delight, I became a Fulbright Scholar this spring at the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Sheffield, a program that had attracted me with the reputation of its faculty for high-quality nursing research along with personal accessibility, friendliness and congeniality.

A wonderful university in a livable city, Sheffield is a city bus ride from a magnificent national park, the Peak District. My family and I spent our Saturdays climbing the peaks and being rewarded with views of peaks, expansive valleys, moors and heath. We interspersed our adventures in the outdoors with various city breaks and cultural experiences.

At Marquette, my research program focuses on sexual health among adolescents, specifically helping young people decrease their risks by avoiding sexual activity. At Sheffield, I built on this research by leading a collaborative study, “The Relationship between Alcohol Use and Sexual Involvement among Adolescents: Perspectives of Youth Workers.”

My visit has been a transformative experience personally and professionally. I am looking forward to applying and sharing what I have learned about research, teaching, service delivery and sexual health with students and colleagues. I am very grateful for the support from my colleagues at Marquette and the University of Sheffield for helping me to achieve a dream. 2 011 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

5


Higher nurse staffing levels reduce readmission rates and emergency room visits, researchers find Research conducted by Marquette faculty and published this spring found that having more registered nurses working on a hospital unit and reducing the overtime hours of R.N.s are correlated with fewer patient readmissions and follow-up emergency department visits within 30 days of hospital discharge. The study revealed important cost savings as well. The study also found a positive correlation between R.N. staffing hours and patients’ perceptions of the quality of discharge teaching and subsequent readiness to go home. Two College of Nursing faculty members — Dr. Marianne Weiss, associate professor of nursing and Wheaton-Franciscan Healthcare/Sister Rosalie Klein professor of women’s health, and Dr. Kathleen Bobay, associate professor and research scientist at Aurora Health Care — collaborated with Dr. Olga Yakusheva, assistant professor of economics in the College of Business Administration, to conduct the study. It was published online in the journal Health Services Research. The team studied nurse staffing levels, patients’ discharge evaluations and post-discharge hospital care for 16 medicalsurgical units at four hospitals in a single Midwestern health care system. They found that when R.N. non-overtime staffing was higher, the likelihood of patient readmission was lower, and when R.N. overtime hours were higher, emergency department use was also higher. “We know that if nurses have more hours allocated to work with patients, they have more time to perform critical functions that require R.N.-level expertise, like discharge teaching,” says Weiss. Using a cost analysis projection for the 16 nursing units in the study, the researchers estimated a potential annual

6

MARQUETT E UNIVERSITY

net savings of $11.64 million associated with increasing non-overtime hours and an annual net savings of $544,000 associated with decreasing overtime hours. “Investing in nursing care hours could potentially be offset by the savings that could be realized from reducing readmissions and ED use,” says Weiss. “But, in current payment structures, the costs of higher nursing staff levels would be borne by hospitals, while the savings from fewer readmissions and ED visits would be achieved by payers. That may be changing. There is a lot of discussion at the national policy level about how to realign payments to incentivize appropriate high-quality care that leads to improved patient outcomes and lower costs of care.”

Kat Berger

RESEARCH AND I NNOVATI ON

The high cost of understaffing

Research team members Dr. Jane Nosbusch, Grad ’09, Dr. Kathy Bobay and Dr. Marianne Weiss of the College of Nursing (all seated), with Dr. Olga Yakusheva of the College of Business Administration.


Junior faculty, major impact

Being part of a well-run nurse residency program can make all the difference for a young nurse. Dr. Marilyn Bratt, assistant professor of nursing, understands the importance of these programs in preparing nursing’s next generation, which explains her commitment to researching how more effectively to transition newly licensed nurses into professional practice. Funded by approximately $2 million in grants from the Health Resources and Services Administration, Bratt’s work helped initiate the Wisconsin Nurse Residency Program and broader best practices for preceptor education. Bratt was especially impressed when the college formed the Wisconsin Nursing Redesign Consortium to help build a sustainable, competent nurse workforce. She says two new nurse transition-to-practice projects that evolved from the consortium were the catalysts for her pursuit of funding to further evolve evidence-based strategies around nurse residency programs. “Through collaboration with health care practice partners,” Bratt explains, “we have a shared agenda to provide a competent nursing workforce to meet the health care needs of society.”

Dan Johnson

In the eyes of Dr. Abir Bekhet, mental health nurse and assistant professor of nursing, the positives matter. Bekhet’s research focuses primarily on the strengths and assets of individuals, specifically the concepts of positive cognitions and resourcefulness. Bekhet’s research shows that these positive mental practices, many of them teachable, are associated with improved outcomes for those facing challenging situations, such as relocation to an assisted living facility. Of her 24 published papers since 2007 (with three more accepted and awaiting publication), two were recognized as outstanding papers by the Midwest Nursing Research Society. With its proximity to the Alzheimer’s Association, supportive faculty and holistic approach toward learning, Marquette was the “perfect match” to help develop her own personal, spiritual and professional missions, says Bekhet. In the near future, she will investigate the role of positive thinking and resourcefulness in reducing stress among caregivers of those with dementia or autism.

Ben Smidt

Junior faculty members are contributing to a new surge of research and scholarship in the College of Nursing. And true to the college’s unique mission, the research is impressing peer reviewers while leading the way in effective and ethical health care.

As a parent of a child with autism spectrum disorder, Dr. Norah Johnson, Grad ’01, Grad ’09, knows how difficult hospital visits are for families dealing with that medical condition. Through her research, Johnson has made these trips easier for families like hers by developing and testing interventions that decrease anxiety, length of appointments, cost and challenging behaviors of children with ASD. Johnson, a pediatric nurse practitioner and assistant professor of nursing, won the Center for Disease Control Creativity Award in 2008. Among other endeavors, she heads a multidisciplinary committee that develops staff training for those working with children with ASD. Johnson received a faculty fellowship and research grant from Marquette’s Committee on Research in 2011 to further her studies. Inspired by St. Ignatius and his exchange of dreams of war heroism for aspirations to provide heroic service to others, Johnson says, “I’d like to be a hero for children with ASD by easing the hospitalization experience for them and their families.” For Dr. Karen Robinson, Nurs ’97, Grad ’01, Grad ’10, promoting breastfeeding among African-American women is more than just a professional duty; it’s a personal calling. After being questioned by some family members about breastfeeding her own children, the assistant professor and AfricanAmerican mother of two began to look more closely at racial and ethnic breastfeeding disparities. Because breastfeeding provides life-saving benefits to infants and research indicates that twice as many African-American infants die before their first birthday compared with overall national rates, Robinson has made it her mission to “unlock breastfeeding barriers” by developing culturally appropriate interventions. Although there are many causes of this disparity, Robinson has made great strides in the field thanks, in part, she says, to her College of Nursing education. She not only sees Milwaukee as an opportune setting to address existing breastfeeding disparities because of its large African American population, but with her trifecta of degrees from the College of Nursing, she sees an especially good fit for her research at Marquette. “As a Marquette nurse, I know very well of the college’s commitment to vulnerable populations and social justice.” — Jessica Bazan

2 011 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

7


As chief nursing officer for the Department of Veterans Affairs, Catherine Rick, Grad ’87, is the voice of more than 80,000 nursing personnel in the world’s largest integrated health care system. Her pioneering efforts in the past decade are cited as a national model for the public and private sectors, setting the stage for health care improvement for all of us. Since leaving an associate chief of staff position at the Milwaukee VA Medical Center in 2000 to become the VA’s top nurse executive, Rick has created and implemented a comprehensive governance model that has transformed the Veterans Health System, ensuring that the care provided to our nation’s veterans is thorough, compassionate and of the highest quality. Innovative changes include pioneering nurse-sensitive information systems, new nursing roles and elevated nursing education standards. The model created the structures for data-driven inquiry and the ability for nurses to act at the point of care, concurrently identifying and spreading innovation throughout the entire VA system. During a recent transformational initiative, many of Rick’s innovations were credited with bending the cost curve and achieving quality across a full continuum of care. A mainstay of national health care panels and advisory boards, Rick influences the next generation of nurses as adjunct professor at Uniformed Services University and lecturer at Marquette and the George Mason Public Policy Institute. She also serves on the editorial board of Nursing Administration Quarterly.

Ben Smidt

AL UM NI PROF I L ES

Innovating at one of the world’s largest health care systems

At the Milwaukee VA Medical Center, Catherine Rick confers with Frank Schlaefer, an Air Force veteran who has logged more than 30,000 volunteer hours there.

Rick’s record of service and leadership earned her a 2004 Presidential Meritorious Rank Award and 2005 McGovern Award from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. She received an honorary doctorate from Marquette in May during the 75th anniversary year of the College of Nursing. She acknowledges this kind of recognition can be a “motivator to stay the course for continuous improvement,” but for her, the bottom line is improved patient care outcomes. “My strongest personal motivator is seeing results in truly tackling tough issues for patients and the nursing staff who serve those patients. “I often rely on my challenging and fun learning experience at Marquette, where I developed a core skill set that evolved into a spirit of inquiry,” says Rick of her studies that culminated in a master of science degree in nursing administration. “The Marquette approach to prepare adult learners for robust debate led me to always ask and wonder ‘Why?’ This helped me develop an innovative nature with a solid reliance on evidence.”

Mission trips prepared “bedside nurse” for return to Honduras By Tony Guzzardo, Nurs ’09 Although I studied at Marquette envisioning working in critical care after graduation, I was ultimately in store for an entirely different future. After a short stretch at a Milwaukee research hospital, I set off with the Peace Corps to try community health work in Ethiopia — perhaps the most influential experience of my life. Without having been there, I may never have been led here: Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

introduced me to Central America and primed me for community health work.

You could say I’ve returned to a place, and a people, that I’ve come to love. After all, it was several medical mission trips to Honduras while at Marquette that

Although I don’t provide direct care regularly, I periodically clean out wounds (machetes can be a dangerous work tool) and frequently serve as a health resource to community members. It may not be bedside nursing, but it’s carrying out the mission of the Marquette nurse.

8 M A RQUETT E UNIVERSITY

As the public health program lead at Global Brigades, an organization that promotes sustainable health solutions in developing countries, I’m privileged to oversee health development work in rural communities. The construction of sanitary latrines, water storage units, clean-burning stoves and concrete floors — amenities we take for granted in the United States — helps prevent common illnesses. We also educate children about health topics because their existing school curriculum omits health education.


Back to where it all began Alumna Peggy Troy is president of Children’s Hospital and Health System, where she completed her undergraduate clinical rotation As an undergraduate student in a pediatric clinical rotation at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Peggy Troy, Nurs ’74, had no way of knowing that her journey to become president of that very same hospital had just begun. “I had a fabulous nursing professor who taught me not only to provide care for those kids but to have fun with them and recognize the importance of that dimension too,” she says about her rotation at Children’s Hospital. “I discovered that I loved caring for kids and their families. With that experience, I was hooked.” When Troy graduated from the College of Nursing, she knew she wanted her career to include work with children and their families. She took a position as a staff nurse at Children’s after graduation and worked there for two years. Then after decades earning valuable experience in nursing and hospital administration — most recently as executive vice president and chief operating officer of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare in Memphis — Troy returned to the place she began her nursing career, although in a very different capacity. As president and chief executive officer of the Children’s System since 2009, Troy directs 12 health care entities,

Troy thinks the vision of Children’s Hospital and Health System can be achieved in collaboration with community partners despite multiple

challenges. “We really believe that we can have our population of children in the state of Wisconsin be the healthiest in the nation,” she says. Troy received the Distinguished Alumna of the Year Award from the College of Nursing in 2010 and was elected to Marquette’s Board of Trustees in May 2011. “Marquette teaches students to Be The Difference through excellence, faith, leadership and service,” she says. “I don’t think my career would have taken the path it did if these values weren’t part of what I had learned at Marquette.”

Dan Johnson

“We really believe that we can have our population of children in the state of Wisconsin be the healthiest in the nation.”

working to improve the lives of children through caregiving, advocacy, research and education. The hospital was ranked the nation’s third best children’s hospital by Parents Magazine and has been named one of America’s best children’s hospitals by U.S. News and World Report. It also is designated a magnet hospital by the American Nurses Credentialing Center, a national honor that recognizes nursing excellence.

Peggy Troy gave the keynote address at the Toward Greater Excellence Conference held in conjunction with the celebration of the College of Nursing’s 75th anniversary in July. She also recently joined the Board of Trustees.

2 011 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

9


Dan Dry

The 75 Years of Caring Anniversary Celebration at Milwaukee’s Pfister Hotel brought together alumni, faculty and generations of leadership, including Dr. Margaret Faut Callahan, dean of the college, and former dean Sister Rosalie Klein. Above right, members of the College of Nursing’s class of 1961 gather during the celebration to commemorate their 50th anniversary.

INNOVATIVE YEAR S The College of Nursing celebrates a remarkable milestone

T

10

M ARQUET TE UNI VERSITY

he celebration of 75 years of baccalaureate nursing education at Marquette prompts us to envision an exciting future while reflecting on the past and the unique relationship formed in the early 1930s that resulted in the creation of the Marquette University College of Nursing. Through its partnership with St. Joseph’s Hospital and the Franciscan Sisters who managed that hospital,


Marquette nursing over three quarters of a century: a student checks a woman’s temperature in a nursing lab around 1960; faculty member Diane Dressler consults with a nursing student before the college moved from quarters near St. Joseph’s Hospital to campus in 1982; a contemporary clinical rotation at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin.

Marquette elevated nursing to college status in 1936. Sister Mary Berenice Beck, OSF, was named dean of the college, the first female academic dean at Marquette. The college was housed in St. Joseph’s Hall on 51st and Burleigh streets, with students traveling through a tunnel underneath the street to one of the region’s significant medical facilities and an exceptionally rich source of clinical opportunities. Although the College of Nursing moved to its current home in Emory T. Clark Hall on the university campus in 1982, the strong working relationship with St. Joseph’s Hospital and the Wheaton Franciscan Sisters continues to this day. Several important themes emerge from reflection on our storied history, helping to demonstrate the College of Nursing’s contributions to nursing and society. Educational innovation has been an important part of the college’s history, dating back to the remarkable transition to a four-year, bachelor of science degree education model in 1936 and the addition of a master’s degree program just three years later. The curricular innovation of the college’s role-oriented master’s program was described in a 1980 book by Dr. Lorraine Machan, The Practitioner-Teacher Role: Practice What You Teach. The college also pioneered the use of technology in nursing education with a 1966 federal grant for closed-circuit television. All nurse-midwifery theory courses were offered online in 1998, long before this technology was used in advanced practice nursing education. The innovation continued in this century, with the establishment of a doctorate in nursing practice in 2008, the first such program in Wisconsin. In keeping with this tradition of innovation, Marquette’s Ph.D. in nursing program includes a teacher preparation component, as well as a focus on vulnerable populations. Future nurse educators learn educational theory, instructional technology, innovative methods and the skills needed to become successful nurse scientists. Commitment to clinical excellence is another theme, exemplified in Marquette nursing faculty working to advance practice in acute care, long-term care and community settings such as parish nursing, a specialty practice area developed at Marquette. In the Catholic tradition of social justice, Marquette faculty and students demonstrate a preferential option for the poor. They have chosen to teach and learn where they could also serve — in homeless shelters and low-income housing units, for example. Faculty operate two nurse-managed clinics that serve, in particular, under-

and uninsured patient populations. The Marquette Neighborhood Health Center now averages nearly 7,000 patient visits annually — with nearly 27,000 patient visits since it opened in 2007 — while the Marquette Clinic for Women and Children provided 451 patient care visits for uninsured women and children in 2010. The commitment to vulnerable populations also extends far beyond campus, to Kenya, Peru, Mexico and other countries where Marquette faculty and students have provided education and direct patient care to countless people. This range of care opportunities, along with more than 90 other clinical sites in southeastern Wisconsin, creates a very rich network of clinical learning experiences for Marquette nursing students. The very nature of a university demands that faculty in all disciplines advance knowledge. Marquette nursing faculty were leaders in nursing classification through efforts on nursing diagnosis and the International Classification for Nursing Practice in the 1990s. They have been recognized for their research in chronic illness, dementia, health promotion and health services, as well as developing the scientific basis for natural family planning. The college also established its Institute for End-of-Life Care Education in 2003 to advance the quality of end-of-life care, which will be a topic of increased emphasis for the college in the coming years. The most powerful evidence of the contributions that Marquette nurses have made, however, is found in the care that more than 9,000 alumni have provided in this country and around the world. Among our alumni are at least five current hospital/system presidents, dozens of chief nursing officers and college deans, and hundreds of advanced practice nurses who have transformed the care patients receive at the point of care. Marquette alumni also serve in the critically needed role of nurse faculty. These types of accomplishments are what drew more than 260 College of Nursing alumni and friends back to Marquette on July 29, 2011, for a professional conference and anniversary dinner. Their sharing of nursing knowledge, celebration of the college’s legacy, and excitement for the future of the college serve as shining examples of how each and every nursing alum has lived the Marquette values and exemplified the vision of what it means to be a Marquette nurse. — prepared with the assistance of Dr. Madeline Wake, former dean and professor

2 011 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

11


Courtesy of Ma

Nursing rquette College of

rquette College

Courtesy of Ma

of Nursing

Courtesy of Marquette

College of Nursing

Kat Berger

t

Ben Smid

Kat Berger


Bringing care where called —

locally and globally

Through nursing and health programs in South and Central America, and the two clinics it runs in Milwaukee, Marquette’s College of Nursing demonstrates a mission that joins excellence with purpose Bedsores and babies — student nurses gain valuable experience in Peru For Leah Taugher, providing care to impoverished Peruvians as a student nurse this summer only reinforced her desire to be a pediatric nurse. Taugher was one of nine Marquette nursing students who completed a community health course in Peru in June and July. Mentored by Dr. Darlene Weis, associate professor emerita of nursing, and Dr. Ruth Ann Belknap, associate professor of nursing, the students spent a month in Piura, providing care to local residents. The students worked primarily in a local clinic, an emergency room and in a hospice, which was founded by Kay Redmond, Nurs ’77. They also conducted home visits and taught illness prevention and health-related information to elementary school children. Extending their learning beyond the Peruvian health care system, students were introduced to an alcohol and drug abuse clinic and a women’s domestic violence group. Taugher, a senior from Hartland, Wis., particularly enjoyed the home visits and feeling that she made a difference in each local resident’s health, life and day. “It is a very humbling experience to be welcomed in the homes of these patients and see the conditions they live in,” she says. “The patients … truly appreciate everything that you do for them, from taking a blood pressure to giving a bed bath and to dropping off new medications. They are filled with gratitude.” She recalls one patient in particular, a bed-bound amputee whose daughter was unaware that she had to turn her mother to prevent pressure ulcers from forming. “We

provided the daughter with information of how to treat the ulcer and how to prevent ulcers in the future,” says Taugher. Perhaps the highlight of her trip — chronicled on her blog, leahnursingperu.blogspot.com — was a tour of a hospital surgical unit in nearby Santa Rosa, where Taugher was invited to participate in a newborn assessment after a C-section. “Someone handed me a mask, gown, footies and gloves and rambled off something in Spanish that I did not understand,” she recalls. “But next thing I knew I was standing next to the neonatologist with the newborn in the assessment room. He even let me hold the precious little newborn!” This was the fourth group of student nurses that Weis has taken to Peru. She took 10 in each of the past three years as well. In fact, one of the local families named their daughter Jessica Stephanie, after two Marquette nursing students who visited in 2010.

Face to face with the needs of women and children in Mexico’s impoverished crossroads “Where’s your tan?” students are sometimes asked when they return to Marquette after a trip to Mexico’s southernmost state of Chiapas with their classmates. But there is little time for tanning when visiting the mountainous region known for tremendous natural resources and extreme poverty.

Sponsored by the College of Nursing as an interdisciplinary health course, Immigration and Health: Mexico and the U.S. has brought two groups of students in two years to the highlands near San Cristobal de las Casas for an immersive 10-day experience. It focuses on women’s issues,

2 011 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

13


“The patients … truly appreciate everything that you do for them, from taking a blood pressure to giving a bed bath and to dropping off new medications.” immigration and health. The region has a significant indigenous population but also acts as a conduit for those trekking north from Guatemala in search of a better life. Students meet with women’s groups, non-governmental organizations and representatives of the local Catholic diocese to learn about work that addresses the needs of both populations. A visit with a bishop’s assistant at the cathedral in San Cristobal provides the group with the 500-year history of the church in Chiapas, including its work in recent decades toward justice and protection of human rights for the indigenous people.

learn that in poor marginalized families even the economic contributions of small children shining shoes and selling candy are necessary for survival. The workers at Meliel describe what it takes to protect the dignity and human rights of children in this situation. In reflection sessions during and after the trip, students have revealed new understanding of the impact of globalization on the lives of indigenous people and others who live in poverty. “I learned how dire the circumstances are there, seeing firsthand why people [migrate],” recalled one student. “It raised the question, ‘Do we as Americans not know what is happening because we choose not to know?’ It turned what we learned in class into reality.”

Experiences during the trip bring students into the world of the women of Chiapas, including a stay in the only space in Mexico designated exclusively for women by the church. Casa de las Mujeres (House of the Women) is a diocesan-supported dormitory and meeting space where women from remote rural areas come for formation and reflection twice a year. With the only warmth of the day coming from the January sun shining briefly through a window, students get the opportunity to lie in bunks and contemplate the lives of the women who occupied that space before them.

14

MARQUET TE UNI VERSITY

Associate Professor Dr. Ruth Ann Belknap will spend two months of a sabbatical this fall in Chiapas.

Courtesy of Marquette College of Nursing

A tour guided by the director of a home for pregnant women, who are without housing and family support, highlights the strengths of marginalized indigenous women in San Cristobal. We see the rooftop, windowless rooms where women from the home grow delicate mushrooms with slender stalks on piles of corn cobs to sell in the market. We buy exquisite beaded earrings, pottery and embroidery made by the women to help support the center. Women leave this home with their new baby, perhaps other children and a plan for the future. Another visit takes us to Meliel Xojobal, an agency that assists families with children who work on the streets of San Cristobal after traveling with their parents to the city from rural areas where adverse trade and economic policies have devastated subsistence farms. We observe humble, yet lively, day care facilities for toddlers and afternoon study sessions for older children. And we

Students return with an increased commitment to global citizenship, an understanding of ways of life based on values other than their own and an enthusiasm for making cross-cultural connections. — Dr. Ruth Ann Belknap

Alicia Crowe, Nurs ’10, assesses the vital signs of a patient in Piura, Peru.


When Chavonne Perkins walked through the door of the Marquette Neighborhood Health Center with complaints of fatigue, weight gain and excessive thirst, nurse practitioner Deb Schwallie immediately ordered tests that confirmed Perkins had diabetes. “They saved my life,” says Perkins. She expresses great gratitude for the diagnosis, prescribed diet and exercise changes, and follow-up care provided by Schwallie and fellow nurse Patti Sobchak at the clinic, which is operated by the College of Nursing at 19th Street and Wisconsin Avenue. “Patti and Deb told me that I have to take care of myself to live long for my kids,” says Perkins. The MNHC is one of two nurse-managed clinics sponsored by the college. The other is the Marquette Clinic for Women and Children, which operates one very busy day per week on North 16th Street just north of campus. Both clinics meet critical gaps in services available to low-income residents of Milwaukee, enhancing access to health care services that are based on a concern for ethical values, cultural competence and a holistic approach to patient care. A majority of the MNHC’s clients are enrolled in Medicaid or Medicare; the clients of the women and children’s clinic are all uninsured. The MNHC opened as a nurse-managed clinic in 2007 and allows the college to offer health care services to diverse populations. The center offers services five days a week and many Saturdays and accepts a variety of private insurance plans and Medicare and Medicaid. The nurse practitioners provide a wide range of primary health care and minor acute care services to adults, children, infants and families and can order imaging tests and make referrals for specialized medical care, physical therapy, emergency care and hospitalization. The clinics also enhance the clinical learning opportunities for the more than 750 undergraduate and graduate students of the College of Nursing. Student nurses assist in the care of patients such as Perkins. The Marquette Clinic for Women and Children gave Liz Heth, Nurs ’11, an opportunity to participate in the longterm management of chronic illnesses for those who struggle to pay for doctors’ visits or prescription medications. “The biggest impact the clinic has had on me is the constant

Ben Smidt

Nurse-managed clinics support the Marquette mission

Dr. Mary Ann Lough, assistant professor, advises student nurses Emily Rucker, Nurs ’10, and Margaret Quick, Nurs ’10, while directing care at the Marquette Clinic for Women and Children.

reminder that it is very possible for the working poor to receive safe, consistent and effective treatment for their illnesses,” she says. MCWC began offering no-cost primary care services to under- and uninsured women and children in 1997. Nursing faculty members Dr. Mary Ann Lough and Dr. Chris Shaw, along with their students, provide services one-half day per week and are routinely booked to capacity. A clinic coordinator provides office support and maintains frequent contact with the faculty on non-clinic days. The services include physical examinations and diagnosis and treatment for common illnesses and chronic diseases, with ongoing management for selected chronic diseases. The staff also promotes early intervention for clients through these services and education and counseling about ways to reduce health risks and prevent disease. The MCWC is part of the Free Clinic Collaborative in Milwaukee, which is working to improve the delivery of health services to those in need and obtain needed resources such as medications, educational materials, shared computer programming for tracking and measuring outcomes, and access to medical specialists. Both clinics are living Marquette’s mission of Be The Difference and filling a critical void delivering high-quality, personalized care in an urban setting. Faculty and clinic staff serve as role models for graduate and undergraduate students, who benefit from real-world experiences provided in the Jesuit tradition of women and men serving others. — Dr. Mary Ann Lough

2 011 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

15


NOTABL E ACCOM PL I SHM ENTS

Prominent honors, grants, publications and presentations from the 2010–11 academic year AWARDS/MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., assistant professor Awarded Midwest Nursing Research Society Outstanding Faculty Paper Award: “The role of positive cognitions in Egyptian elders’ relocation adjustment,” Western Journal of Nursing Research. Awarded second place for “Psychometric Properties of the Pressure to Move Scale in Relocated American Elders,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference, Milwaukee. Marilyn Bratt, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor Appointed, Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education Residency Accreditation Committee. Margaret Bull, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor Appointed faculty liaison to Minnesota Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence.

Elected as fellow, John A. Hartford Foundation, Faculty Learning About Geriatrics, Minnesota Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing and the University of Minnesota School of Nursing. Margaret Faut Callahan, C.R.N.A., Ph.D., F.N.A.P., F.A.A.N., dean Received Helen Lamb Outstanding Educator Award, American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor Inducted as fellow, American Academy of Nursing. Named Up and Coming New Innovator, American Academy of Nursing.

Kristin Haglund, Ph.D., P.N.P., F.N.P., A.P.R.N., associate professor Awarded Fulbright U.S. Scholar Award, spring 2011. Maureen O’Brien, Ph.D., R.N., P.C.N.S.-B.C., associate dean for graduate programs and clinical associate professor Inducted as fellow, Leadership for Academic Nursing Programs, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2010–11. Karen Robinson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., assistant professor Received Midwest Nursing Research Society Childbearing Related Research Section New Investigator Award.

Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F., associate professor Inducted as fellow, National League for Nursing, Academy of Nursing Education.

Margaret Sebern, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor Elected as fellow, John A. Hartford Foundation, Faculty Learning About Geriatrics, Minnesota Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing and the University of

Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., assistant professor $1,000, “MNRS Mentorship,” Midwest Nursing Research Society.

$7,500, “Sanofi Pasteur/ANF Scholar,” American Nurses Foundation.

Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.

Minnesota School of Nursing. Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor Received the Wisconsin Women in Higher Education Leadership Outstanding Achievement Award.

GRANTS

$4,161, “The Role of Positive Cognitions and Resourcefulness on Dementia Caregivers’ Burden: An Application of Resilience Theory,” Marquette University Regular Research Grant and Summer Faculty Fellowship.

Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F. Lea Acord, Ph.D., R.N., professor $300,000, “Wisconsin Health Workforce Data Collaborative Project,” Healthier Wisconsin Partnership Program — Medical College of Wisconsin.

$5,000, “Effects of Positive Cognitions and Resourcefulness on Autism Spectrum Disorder Caregiver’s Burden,” American Psychiatric Nurses Association. Ruth Ann Belknap, Ph.D., R.N., P.M.H.C.N.S.-B.C., associate professor $3,000, “Perceptions of Interpersonal Dating Relationships and Violence Among Latino Adolescents and Parents,” Sigma Theta Tau Research Award. $7,500, “Interrupting and Preventing Interpersonal Violence: A Theatre Based Action Research Intervention for Latino Adolescents,” American Nurses Foundation.

16

MARQUET TE UNI VERSITY

Marilyn Bratt, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor $1,034,391, “Wisconsin Nurse Residency Program: Continuing Partnerships to Support New Nurses’ Seamless Transition into Practice,” Division of Nursing, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources Services Administration, Department of Health and Human Services. $3,000, “Validation of an Instrument to Assess Preceptor Role Competency,” Sigma Theta Tau Research Award. Margaret Bull, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor $81,450, “Nurse Faculty Loan Program Grant,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Margaret Faut Callahan, Ph.D., C.R.N.A., F.N.A.P., F.A.A.N., dean $1,359,526, “Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Education Program,” National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute.

Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., research director and professor $198,206, “Randomized Comparison of Two Internet-Based Methods of Natural Family Planning,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Public Health and Science. $100,000, “Institute for Natural Family Planning,” Boland Foundation. Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F., associate professor $4,372, “Regner Research Award to Advance Faculty Research with High Potential: Pilot Testing of the Project FUN with Parents’ Online Intervention,” Marquette University College of Nursing. $31,000, “Improving Health through Support for Nursing Education among Highly Qualified Nursing Students: LPN through Doctoral Levels,” Wellpoint Foundation.


GRANTS continued Terrie Garcia, M.S.N., R.N., project coordinator $297,302, “Creating Nursing Workforce Diversity,” HRSA Nursing Workforce Diversity. $269,161, “Promoting Minority BSN Student Success,” HRSA Nurse Education, Practice, Quality and Retention. Kristin Haglund, Ph.D., R.N., F.N.P., P.N.P., B.C., associate professor $37,500, “Advancing International Exchange in Nursing Education. The Social & Cultural Contexts of Alcohol Use and Subsequent Sexual Involvement among Adolescents and Young Adults,” Fulbright Commission. $3,000, “Perceptions of Interpersonal Dating Relationships and Violence Among Latino Adolescents and Parents,” Sigma Theta Tau. Lisa Hanson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., A.P.N.P., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor $10,000, “Effects of Probiotic Use During Pregnancy on Lactobacillus and Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization,” American Lifelines, Inc. See also entry for Leona VandeVusse. Norah Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., assistant professor $5,500, “Effect of a Social Story for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Undergoing Medical Imaging (X-ray) Procedures,” Marquette University Committee on Research Summer Faculty Fellowship.

$5,756, “Effect of a Social Story for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Undergoing Medical Imaging (X-ray) Procedures,” Marquette University Committee on Research.

Mary Ann Lough, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor $68,000, “Professional Nurse Traineeship,” Health Resources and Services Administration.

$5,000, “Effects of Positive Cognitions and Resourcefulness on Autism Spectrum Disorder Caregiver’s Burden,” American Psychiatric Nurse Foundation.

$3,000, “MCWC Care for Uninsured Women,” Racine Dominicans.

Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, Ph.D., R.N., associate dean of undergraduate programs and clinical associate professor $15,000, “The Redesign of the Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum,” Way Klingler Teaching Enhancement Award. $1,200, “Life with Dignity: Beliefs, Practices, and Economic Diversity,” Edward D. Simmons Religious Commitment Award; proposal developed in conjunction with Kim Halula, College of Health Sciences, and Albert Abena, School of Dentistry. $296,263, “Equipment to Enhance Training for Health Professionals,” HRSA – American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Stacee Lerret, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P.A.C./P.C., C.C.T.C., clinical instructor $23,000, “Parents of Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: Transition From Hospital to Home and Chronic Illness Care,” Children’s Research Institute.

Maureen O’Brien, Ph.D., R.N., P.C.N.S.-B.C., associate dean for graduate programs and clinical associate professor $50,000, “Increasing Work Force Diversity through New Careers in Nursing at Marquette University,” Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Karen Robinson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., assistant professor $4,470, “Infant Feeding Decision Making Among African American Women,” Marquette University Committee on Research. Margaret Sebern, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor $800, “Faculty Learning About Geriatrics Fellowship,” John A. Hartford Foundation.

Maureen O’Brien, Ph.D., R.N., P.C.N.S.-B.C.

Aimee Woda, M.S.N., R.N., B.C., clinical instructor $4,996, “Motivation in African Americans with Heart Failure: A Photovoice Intervention,” Sigma Theta Tau International Grant.

Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor $10,000, “Effects of Probiotic Use During Pregnancy on Lactobacillus and Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization [CoPIs: Drs. Lisa Hanson and Nasia Safdar],” American Lifeline Inc., Madison, Wis.

PUBLICATIONS Lea Acord, Ph.D., R.N., professor “Charting the future of Wisconsin nursing: The work continues,” Nursing Matters, Vol. 22, No. 2, 3, 7 (2011), with J. Hanse, S. Schuler and Marilyn Frenn. “Vision, grit and collaboration: How the Wisconsin Center for Nursing achieved both sustainable funding and established itself as a state health care workforce leader,” Policy, Politics and Nursing Practice, Vol. 11, No. 2 (2010), pp 126-131, with G. Dennick-Champion, S. Lundeen and S. Schuler. Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., assistant professor “Developing a screening measure for early detection of depressive symptoms: The depressive cognition scale,” Western Journal of Nursing Research, (2011) PMID: 21282458, with J.A. Zauszniewski.

“The effects of positive cognitions on the relationship between alienation and resourcefulness in nursing students in Egypt,” Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 32 (2011), pp 35-41, with M. El Geunidi and J.A. Zauszniewski. “The role of positive cognitions in Egyptian elders’ relocation adjustment,” Western Journal of Nursing Research, Vol. 33, No. 1 (2011), pp 121-135, with R. Fouad and J.A. Zauszniewski. “Creating a therapeutic milieu in retirement communities,” Issues in Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 32, No. 5 (May 2011), pp 327334, with J.A. Zauszniewski. “Psychometric properties of the Arabic version of the depressive cognition scale in first year adolescent Egyptian nursing students,” Journal of Nursing Measurements, Vol. 18, No. 3 (2010), pp 143-152, with J.A. Zauszniewski.

“Resilience in family members of persons with serious mental illness,” Nursing Clinics of North America, Vol. 45, No. 4 (December 2010), pp 613-626, with J.A. Zauszniewski and M.J. Suresky. “Psychometric testing of the children’s resourcefulness scale,” Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, Vol. 23, No. 3 (August 2010), pp 181-188, with J.A. Zauszniewski and B. Bonham. “Cultural comparison of chronic conditions, functional status, and acceptance in older African-American and white adults,” Journal of the National Black Nurses Association, Vol. 21, No. 1 (July 2010), pp 1-6, with P.E. McDonald and J.A. Zauszniewski.

Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I.

2 011 | MA R Q U ETT E N U RSE

17


NOTABL E ACCOM PL I SHM ENTS

“Pilot evaluation of an internet-based Natural Family Planning education and service program,” Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 40, No. 3 (2011), pp 281-91, with Mary Schneider and K. Raviele. “Promoting Natural Family Planning, The Linacre Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 1 (2011), pp 82-86. “Current Medical Research in Natural Family Planning,” The Linacre Quarterly, Vol. 77 (November 2010), pp 484-494. See also entries for Kristin Haglund. Ruth Ann Belknap, Ph.D., R.N., P.M.H.C.N.S.-B.C.

Ruth Ann Belknap, Ph.D., R.N., P.M.H.C.N.S.-B.C., associate professor “As time goes by we improve a little more: Relationship expectations as described by young women in Mexico,” Health Care for Women International, Vol. 31, No. 10 (2010), pp 873-890. “Listening sessions with Latinas: Documenting life contexts and creating connections,” Public Health Nursing, Vol. 27, No. 4 (2010), pp 337-346, with Leona VandeVusse. “The relationship of two types of trauma exposure to current physical and psychological symptom distress in a community sample of Colombian women: Why interpersonal violence deserves more attention,” Health Care for Women International, Vol. 31, No. 10 (2010), pp 946-961, with A. Schumacher, D. Jaramillo, T. Uribe, P. DePheils, W. Holzemaer, D. Taylor, A. Tiwari, G. Canaval, M. Flores and J. Humphries. Martty Berner, M.S.N., C.N.M., A.P.N.P., project director — nurse mid-wifery grant See entry for Leona VandeVusse. Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.B.C., associate professor “Outcomes and cost analysis of the impact of unit-level nurse staffing on post-discharge utilization,” Nursing Economics, Vol. 29, No. 2 (2011), pp 69-87, with Marianne Weiss and O. Yakusheva. “Age-related differences in perception of quality of discharge teaching and readiness for hospital discharge,” Geriatric Nursing, Vol. 31, No. 3 (2010), pp 178-187, with T. Jerofke, Marianne Weiss and O. Yakusheva. See also entries for Marianne Weiss.

18

MARQUET TE UNI VERSITY

Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.-B.C

Margaret Bull, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor “Delirium in older adults attending adult day care and family caregiver distress,” International Journal of Older People Nursing, Vol. 6, No. 2 (2011), pp 85-92.

Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F., associate professor “Advancing nursing education science: An analysis of NLN’s grant program 2008–2010,” Nursing Education Perspectives, Vol. 32, No. 1 (2011), pp 1013, with J. Duffy and B. Patterson. See also entry for Lea Acord.

See also entry for Mary Paquette.

Kristin Haglund, Ph.D., P.N.P., F.N.P., A.P.R.N., associate professor “Religiosity and sexual risk behaviors among Latina adolescents: Trends from 1995-2008,” Journal of Women’s Health, Vol. 20, No. 6 (2011), pp 871-877, with L. Edwards, Richard Fehring and J. Pruzynski.

Margaret Faut Callahan, C.R.N.A., Ph.D., F.N.A.P., F.A.A.N., dean “Reimbursement for expanded professional nursing practice services,” Advanced practice nursing: Emphasizing Common Roles, (2011) with M. Kremer.

“The association of religiosity, sexual education, and parental factors with risky sexual behaviors among adolescents and young adults,” Journal of Religion and Health, Vol. 49 (2010), pp 460-472, with Richard Fehring.

Diane Dressler, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., clinical assistant professor “Hematologic and immune systems,” AACN essentials of progressive care nursing (2nd ed.), (2010).

Lisa Hanson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., A.P.N.P., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor “Balancing the scale: Directions for future research for perinatal advanced practice nurses,” Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 25, No. 2 (2011), pp 133-138, with Leona VandeVusse and Heidi Paquette.

“The challenge of detecting delirium in older adults [guest editorial],” International Journal of Older People Nursing, Vol. 6, No. 2 (2011), pp 83-84.

“Hematologic and immune systems,” AACN essentials of critical care nursing (2nd ed.), (2010). Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor “Characteristics of the menstrual cycle after discontinuation of oral contraceptives,” Journal of Women’s Health, Vol. 20, No. 2 (2011), pp 169-177, with C.L. Nassaralla, J.B. Stanford, K.D. Daly, Mary Schneider and K.C. Schliep. “Current Medical Research in Natural Family Planning,” The Linacre Quarterly, Vol. 78 (2011), pp 216-231. “Is it possible for NFP to be used (immorally) with contraceptive intent?” The Linacre Quarterly, Vol. 79, No. 1 (2011), pp 86-90, with K. Miller.

“Low-technology clinical interventions to promote labor progress, Chapter 8” Labor Progress Handbook (3rd ed.), (2011). “Optimal newborn transitions and third and fourth stage labor management, Chapter 7” Labor Progress Handbook (3rd ed.), (2011), with P. Simkin. “Conference proceedings: Abstracts of research forums presented at the 54th ACNM annual meeting 2009,” Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health, Vol. 54, No. 5 (2010), pp 423-425. “Conference proceedings: Abstracts of research forums presented at the 55th ACNM annual meeting 2010,” Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health, Vol. 55, No. 5 (2010), pp 481-482.

“Expert opinion risk management in intrapartum fetal monitoring: Accidental recording of the maternal heart rate,” Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 24, No. 1 (2010), pp 7-9. “Group B Strep protocol adherence: A risk management issue for perinatal nurses,” Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 24, No. 2 (2010), pp 1-4, with Leona VandeVusse. “Probiotics are food and herbs are flowers, what’s the risk? Informed consent for complimentary and integrative therapies,” Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 24, No. 3 (2010), pp 201-204, with Leona VandeVusse. See also entry for Leona VandeVusse. Norah Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., assistant professor “Here we go to the dentist,” maxishare. com, (2011), with D. Watson and B. Herteen. Maureen O’Brien, Ph.D., R.N., P.C.N.S.-B.C., associate dean for graduate programs and clinical associate professor “Nurse researchers in children’s hospitals,” Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 25, No. 5 (2010), pp 408-417, with K.J. Sawin, K.S. Gralton, T.M. Harrison, S. Malin, M.K. Balchunas, L.A. Brock, B. Cavegn, L. Cisler-Cahill, S.M. Graves, K.A. Mussatto, E.C. Sherburne and R.F. Schiffman. Heidi Paquette, R.N., M.S., C.N.N.P., clinical instructor See entry for Lisa Hanson. Mary Paquette, M.S.N., R.N., simulation technology and learning resource center director “A complex elder simulation using improvisational actors,” Nurse Educator, Vol. 35, No. 6 (2010), pp 254-258, with Margaret Bull, S. Wilson and L. Dreyfus. Linda Piacentine, Ph.D., R.N., A.P.R.N.-B.C., C.N.R.N., assistant professor “Repeated N-acetyl cysteine reduces cocaine seeking in rodents and craving in cocaine-dependent humans,” Neuropsychopharmacology, Vol. 36 (2011), pp 871-878, with S.L. Amen, M.E. Ahmad, S-J Li, J.R. Mantsch, R.C. Risinger and D.A. Baker. “Complex regional pain syndrome,” AANN Core Curriculum for Neuroscience Nursing (5th ed.), (2010). See also entry for Marianne Weiss.


Karen Robinson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., assistant professor “Neither White nor male: Female faculty of color [Review of the book, Neither White nor male: Female faculty of color, by K.G. Hendrix].” The ABNF Journal, Vol. 21, No. 3 (2010), pp 66-67. Mary Schneider, natural family planning assistant to director See entry for Richard Fehring. Kathryn Schroeter, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.O.R., clinical assistant professor “Preoperative, intraoperative, postoperative nursing management,” Contemporary medical surgical nursing (2nd ed.), Chapters 20, 21 and 22, (2011). “Leadership and organizational behavior module in certificate program for surgical services educators,” CCI, (2010), with J. Mower. “Perioperative specialty certification: The CNOR as evidence for Magnet excellence,” AORN Journal, Vol. 91, No. 5 (2010), pp 618-622, with M. Byrne and J. Mower. “Structural empowerment: The Magnet Model applied to perioperative nursing,” AORN Journal, Vol. 92, No. 2 (2010), pp 220-223.

Margaret Sebern, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Technology-enhanced practice for patients with chronic cardiac disease home implementation and evaluation,” Heart & Lung: The Journal of Acute and Critical Care, Vol. 39 (2010), with P. Brennan, G. Casper, L. Burke, K. Johnson, R. Brown, R. Valdez, O. Perez and B. Sturgeon. Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor “Impact of self-hypnosis in women on select physiologic and psychologic parameters,” JOGNN: Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 39, No. 2 (2010), pp 159168, with Martty Berner, Lisa Hanson and J.M.W. Winters. See also entries for Ruth Ann Belknap, Lisa Hanson and Karen Robinson. Marianne Weiss, D.N.S.C., R.N., associate professor “An integrated review of the literature on challenges confronting the acute care staff nurse in discharge planning,” Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 20, No. 5-6 (2011), pp 754-774, with Kathleen Bobay and J.M. Nosbusch.

“Peer effects and the freshman 15: Evidence from a natural experiment,” Economics and Human Biology, Vol. 9, No. 2 (2011), pp 119-132, with O. Yakusheva and K. Kapinos. “Testing the integrated theory of health behavior change for postpartum weight self-management,” Journal of Advanced Nursing, (2011) doi:10.1111/j.13652648.2011.05648.x, 2011, with P. Ryan, N. Traxel and M. Brondino. “Nurse and patient perceptions of discharge readiness in relation to postdischarge utilization,” Medical Care, Vol. 48, No. 5 (2010), pp 482-486, with Kathleen Bobay and O. Yakusheva.

Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M.

“Nurse staffing, readiness for hospital discharge and post-discharge utilization,” Health Services Research, (2011), doi: 10.1111/j.1475-6773.2011.01267.x, with Kathleen Bobay and O. Yakusheva. “Perceived readiness for hospital discharge in adult medical-surgical patients,” Transitions theory: Middle range and situation specific theories in nursing research and practice, (2010) pp. 153-169, with L. Lokken, J. Ancona, J. Archer, S. Gresser, S.B. Holmes, Linda Piacentine, S. Toman, A. Toy and T. Vega-Stromberg. See also entries for Kathleen Bobay.

PRESENTATIONS Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., assistant professor “The best practices of integrating teaching and research in undergraduate classrooms: How can you keep a large class engaged in a three hour class?” A Celebration of Teaching & Learning, Marquette University, Milwaukee, May 2011.

“Psychometric Properties of the Arabic version of the Depressive Cognition Scale,” International Society of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses Annual Conference – The Art, Science and Diversity of Psychiatric Nursing, Tucson, Ariz., March/April 2011, with J.A. Zauszniewski.

“Psychometric Properties of the Index of Relocation Adjustment in Relocated American Elders,” Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Conference, Milwaukee, May 2011.

“Resilience in family members of persons with serious mental illness,” International Society of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses Conference: The Art, Science and Diversity of Psychiatric Nursing, Tucson, Ariz., March/April 2011, with J.A. Zauszniewski and M.J. Suresky.

“Psychometric Properties of the Pressure to Move Scale in Relocated American Elders,” Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Conference, May 2011, with J.A. Zauszniewski, received second-place award.

“Resourcefulness training: Group versus individualized approaches,” The 2011 International Society of PsychiatricMental Health Nurses Annual Conference – The Art, Science and Diversity of Psychiatric Nursing, Tucson, Ariz., March/ April 2011, with J.A. Zauszniewski.

“Psychometric Properties of the Index of Relocation Adjustment in Relocated American Elders,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Research Conference, Columbus, Ohio, March 2011, with J.A. Zauszniewski.

“Variables affecting resourcefulness in nursing students,” The 2010 State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research, Washington, D.C., September 2010, with M. El Geunidi, W. Nakhla and J.A. Zauszniewski.

“Psychometric Properties of the Pressure to Move Scale in Relocated American Elders,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Research Conference, Columbus, Ohio, March 2011, with J.A. Zauszniewski.

“The effect of a resourcefulness training intervention on relocation adjustment and adaptive functioning among relocated older adults,” Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Research Congress, Orlando, Fla., July 2010, with J.A. Zausziewski.

“The effect of a resourcefulness training intervention on relocation adjustment and adaptive functioning among relocated older adults,” An Evening of Research sponsored by Delta Gamma Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International, Marquette University, Milwaukee, December 2010. “Effects of resourcefulness training in relocated elders,” State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research, Washington, D.C., September 2010, with J.A. Zausziewski.

“The mediator and the moderator effects of positive cognition on the relationship between alienation and resourcefulness in nursing students in Alexandria,” Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Research Congress, Orlando, Fla., July 2010, with J.A. Zausziewski.

2 011 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

19


NOTABL E ACCOM PL I SHM ENTS

Tracy Blair, M.S.N., R.N., clinical course coordinator “Creative Clinical,” Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin Pediatric Conference, Milwaukee, November 2010. “Creative Clinical,” Conference for Teachers of Nursing Practice, Milwaukee, November 2010. Lesley Boaz, Ph.D., R.N., F.N.P., A.P.N.P., clinical assistant professor “Online learning environments: Do they identify at-risk students and promote sound clinical reasoning,” Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Conference — Dispelling Myths with Research Evidence, Milwaukee, May 2011, with Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert. Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.B.C., associate professor “Failure to rescue: Implications for CNSs,” Wisconsin Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists, Pewaukee, Wis., October 2010. “Predictive value of an instrument to measure readiness for hospital discharge and relationship to post-discharge readmissions and Emergency Department visits,” American Nurses Credentialing Center Research Symposium, Phoenix, October 2010. Susan Breakwell, D.N.P., A.P.H.N.B.C., clinical instructor See entry for Margaret Faut Callahan. Margaret Bull, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor “Use of resiliency model of family stress, adjustment, and adaptation in analysis of family caregiver reaction among families of older people with congestive heart failure,” Sigma Theta Tau International Conference, Orlando, Fla., July 2010, with P. Yeh. Margaret Faut Callahan, C.R.N.A., Ph.D., F.N.A.P., F.A.A.N., dean “A university administrator’s perspective of financing health education programs,” American Association of Nurse Anesthetists, Assembly of School Faculty, New Orleans, 2011. “Transitioning simulation laboratory experiences into a distance learning format for an interdisciplinary palliative care course,” American Association of Colleges of Nursing Master’s Conference, Orlando, Fla., 2010, with Susan Breakwell and M. Phillips. “Incorporating palliative care education into interdisciplinary education: From the bottom up,” Annual Congress, Oncology Nursing Society, San Diego, 2010, with R. Wickham, J. Paice and M. Gorbien. 20

M ARQUET TE UNI VERSITY

Jennifer Drake, M.S., R.N., clinical nursing instructor “Supporting families with children with special needs: The least dangerous assumption,” Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin’s Pediatric Nursing Conference, Milwaukee, November 2010. Diane Dressler, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., clinical assistant professor “Coagulopathy in the ICU,” American Association of Critical Care Nurses, Milwaukee, April 2011. Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor “The influence of contraception on abortion among U.S. women of reproductive age,” 21st Life and Learning Conference sponsored by the Center for Culture and Ethics, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Ind., June 2011. “The Marquette Model Fertility Awareness Based Methods,” Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C., May 2011. “Natural family planning: Efficacy and application,” Bioethics Symposium, sponsored by the Integritas Institute for Ethics, the University of Illinois–Chicago and Region VII of the Catholic Medical Association, Chicago, May 2011. “Patterns of abnormal uterine bleeding among women using an online fertility charting system,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Research Conference, Columbus, Ohio, March 2011. “Empowering women through an online nurse-managed fertility health monitoring and support system,” American Academy of Nursing, Washington, D.C., November 2010. “Efficacy of a protocol for avoiding pregnancy during the breast-feeding transition,” Education Conference of the Catholic Medical Association, Seattle, October 2010. “Randomized comparison of two Internet supported natural family planning methods,” Education Conference of the Catholic Medical Association, Seattle, October 2010. “Comparison of two Internet-based family planning methods,” State of the Science Congress on Nursing Research, Washington, D.C., September 2010. “Randomized comparison of two Internetsupported natural family planning methods: Preliminary findings,” Human Fertility: Where Faith and Science Meet II Conference, Milwaukee, July 2010.

Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, Ph.D., R.N.

Diane Dressler, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N.

Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F., associate professor “Family issues in weight control: What about the parents?” Midwest Nursing Research Society, Columbus, Ohio, March 2011.

“On my own: Mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder and children’s challenging behaviors,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Columbus, Ohio, March 2011, with P. Simpson and M. Nugent.

“Certified Nurse Educator Preparation Webinar,” National League for Nursing, October 2010, with D. Billings.

“Challenging behaviors: Parent and hospital staff experience of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” Forward Thinking Colloquy, Marquette University, Milwaukee, December 2010, with D. Rodriguez.

“Tips for success,” National League Nursing grants program, Las Vegas, September 2010, with D. Breckenridge. “What should parents do to reduce youth obesity?” Council on Advancing Nursing Science, Washington, D.C., September 2010, with A. Heinrich and C. Schmidt. “Certified nurse educator preparation webinar,” Wisconsin League for Nursing, August 2010, with D. Billings. See also entry for Michele Polfuss. Kristin Haglund, Ph.D., P.N.P., F.N.P., A.P.R.N., associate professor “A qualitative study of the sexuality of adolescent males,” Delta Gamma Chapter, Milwaukee, November 2010, with D. Jones, T. Prince and T. Darby. Lynn Heise, M.S.N., R.N., A.C.N.P.B.C., clinical instructor “Use of therapeutic hypothermia post cardiac arrest in community hospitals,” Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Conference — Dispelling Myths with Research Evidence, Milwaukee, May 2011. Norah Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., assistant professor “Parenting stress and family functioning among mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder grouped by marital status,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Conference, Milwaukee, May 2011, with P. Simpson and M. Nugent.

Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, Ph.D., R.N., associate dean of undergraduate programs and clinical associate professor See entries for Lesley Boaz, Heidi Paquette and Tracy Schweitzer. Stacee Lerret, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P.A.C./P.C., C.C.T.C., clinical instructor “The transition from hospital to home: Parents of pediatric solid organ transplant recipients,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference, Milwaukee, May 2011. “Pediatric solid organ transplant patients: When to worry and what to do,” National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners Annual Conference on Pediatric Health Care, Baltimore, March 2011. “What’s new in donation and transplantation literature?” NATCO Symposium for Advanced Transplant Professionals, Hollywood, Fla., January 2011, with T. Abdelnour and K. Ryan. “Transition from hospital to home: Parents of pediatric solid organ transplant recipients,” Sigma Theta Tau Delta Gamma Chapter, Milwaukee, December 2010. “EBV and post-transplant proliferative disease in pediatrics,” International Transplant Nursing Society Wisconsin Chapter, Milwaukee, October 2010.


Maureen O’Brien, Ph.D., R.N., P.C.N.S.-B.C., associate dean for graduate programs and clinical associate professor See entry for Christine Schindler. Linda Piacentine, Ph.D., R.N., A.P.R.N.-B.C., C.N.R.N., assistant professor “Direct cortical stimulation for major depressive disorder: An investigational device study,” American Association of Neuroscience Nurses, Kansas City, Mo., March 2011, with S. Claesges. “Spirituality, religiosity, depression, and anxiety in addiction,” Mayo Spiritual Care Research Conference, Rochester, Minn., November 2010. Jennifer Ohlendorf, M.S., R.N., part-time clinical instructor “Weight management information needs of postpartum women,” Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Conference — Dispelling Myths with Research Evidence, Milwaukee, May 2011, with Marianne Weiss. Heidi Paquette, R.N., M.S., C.N.N.P., clinical instructor “Getting students up and running quickly: Decreasing the time from student hospital/clinical unit orientation to first patient encounter,” Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Conference — Dispelling Myths with Research Evidence, Milwaukee, May 2011, with Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert.

Michele Polfuss, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P.A.C./P.C., clinical instructor “Parenting behaviors and their relationship with a child’s weight status,” Council on Advancing Nursing Science, Washington, D.C., September 2010, with Marilyn Frenn. Karen Robinson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., assistant professor “African American women and breastfeeding: Closing the gap,” Milwaukee County Breastfeeding Coalition, Wauwatosa, Wis., May 2011. “African American women and breastfeeding: Closing the gap,” Statewide Perinatal Conference, Stevens Point, Wis., April 2011. “The late pre-term infant: Issues with breastfeeding,” Statewide Perinatal Conference, Stevens Point, Wis., April 2011. “Prenatal breastfeeding self-efficacy, intention, and breastfeeding initiation in African American women,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Columbus, Ohio, March 2011. Christine Schindler, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P.-P.C., A.C., clinical instructor “Filling the void: Innovative solutions for the critical healthcare shortage,” National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, Baltimore, March 2011, with Maureen O’Brien and Bonnie Stojadinovic. Kathryn Schroeter, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.O.R., clinical assistant professor “Ethical decision making in trauma care & research in trauma,” Peri-Operative/ Trauma Conference, St. Louis, October 2010.

Madeline Wake, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., Raynor Chair and university professor “Leadership and vision for the organization of progressive youth for the development of Duchity, Haiti,” Organization of Progressive Youth for the Development of Duchity, Duchity, Haiti, July 2011.

“Research in trauma patient care,” Course in Advanced Trauma Nursing, Milwaukee, October 2010. “Futility: When is enough, enough?” Southeastern Wisconsin Oncology Nursing Society, Brookfield, Wis., September 2010.

Marianne Weiss, D.N.S.C., R.N., associate professor “Quality and cost analysis of nurse staffing, discharge preparation, and postdischarge utilization,” Annual Nursing Research Conference, University College, Cork, Ireland, October 2010.

Tracy Schweitzer, Ph.D., M.A., R.N., clinical assistant professor “Improving patient safety and quality of care: Enhancing baccalaureate nursing student clinical reasoning through web-based learning and simulation,” Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Conference — Dispelling Myths with Research Evidence, Milwaukee, May 2011, with Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert.

“Quality and cost analysis of nurse staffing, discharge preparation, and postdischarge utilization,” Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science: State of the Science Conference, Washington, D.C., September 2010.

Mary Stauber, D.N.P., R.N., A.C.N.P., clinical instructor “Advanced nursing interventions effect on length of stay in ED,” Southeastern Wisconsin Nursing Research Conference — Dispelling Myths with Research Evidence, Milwaukee, May 2011.

See also entry for Jennifer Ohlendorf.

Bonnie Stojadinovic, D.N.P., R.N., C.P.N.P., clinical instructor ­ See entry for Christine Schindler. Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor “Certified nurse-midwives: Changing health care for the better,” Wisconsin Legislative Council: Special Committee on Infant Mortality, Beloit Memorial Hospital, Beloit, Wis., October 2010, with J. Tillett.

John Nienhuis

“The adult coordinator perspective: Transitioning from pediatric to adult care,” NATCO, The Organization for Transplant Professionals, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., August 2010.

2 011 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

21


Pre-sorted College of Nursing

Non-profit Org.

P.O. Box 1881

U.S. Postage

Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881

PAID

Milwaukee, WI Permit No. 628

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Marquette University, Office of Marketing and Communication, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881, USA.

A LOOK AHEAD: The College of Nursing is planning now for an innovative, dynamic learning environment, the Marquette Center for Clinical Simulation, which will replace the skills and simulation laboratory. Using the latest technology, the center will offer students a state-of-the-art learning environment providing realistic practice settings for them to develop advanced clinical skills. Expect to hear more about this exciting project in coming months and in next year’s edition of Marquette Nurse.


Marquette Nurse 2011