Page 1

YAKOB: The conspiracy colleges don’t want you to think about – Viewpoints, page 6

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Freshman flips into the starting lineup for MU

One day, six acts, no waste at Rock the Green PAGE 8

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Since 1916 www.marquettetribune.org

Volume 96, Number 6

Thursday, September 15, 2011

MCTS planning to eliminate bus routes

Popular 30 Route affected by budget reduction measures By Sarah Hauer sarah.hauer@marquette.edu

Due to continuing budget challenges, the Milwaukee County Transit System has recommended a historic 12.5 percent service reduction for 2012. The 2012-2013 state budget passed this summer reduces state aid to MCTS by $6.8 million a year, which is 10 percent of its funding, according to a press release from MCTS. Subsequently, MCTS projected it will need to cut as much as $9.8 million in bus services to make up for the cut and lost passenger revenue. The reduction in service would result in the system’s largest restructuring in its 150-year history, with changes to affect nearly all routes.

Key elements of the proposal include eliminating all Summerfest, Brewers, State Fair and special event transportation, as well as seven other traditional routes. There are also plans to restructure and reduce frequency to routes, including the studentpopular 30 Sherman-Wisconsin. The 12 Teutonia-Hampton and the 23 Fond du Lac Avenue buses will also be affected. Harold Mester, public information manager for the Milwaukee County Board, said the changes are not final but services will definitely be cut. Mester said county supervisors will have to decide how important transit is to Milwaukee before they make the final decision. Kerry Thomas, executive director of Transit Now — a non-profit organization providing local, regional and public transportation and resources — said MCTS is in a “vicious circle of declining ridership and Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu funding.” The Milwaukee County Transit System lost 10 percent of its funding in 2011 due to budget cuts. In addition to See Transit, page 5

seven routes, the reduction proposal includes the elimination all Summerfest, Brewers and event transportation.

Missoni hits ‘Target’

UWM, MU take on crime

prints, vibrant knitwear and trademark zigzag pattern. The Missoni for Target collection, with about 400 items, features women’s, men’s and children’s clothing, as well as housewares. At Target.com, a preview of the collection highlighted items such By Elise Angelopulos elise.angelopulos@marquette.edu as vibrantly-colored rain boots, wrap-around headscarves, knit Even in the world of high fash- cardigans and plush throw pilion, a $500 price tag could eas- lows. The line’s release was so ily send many shoppers into eco- highly anticipated, however, that nomic shock. By comparison, a the website crashed and was not $30 tag is not only fair, it’s a great fully functional until Wednesday morning. bargain. Most Target apparel is designed That’s the idea behind Target’s newest designer collaboration for the average shopper. But the with Missoni — creating iconic Missoni at Target collection has celebrity appeal, with singer Riand expensive looks for less. hanna and acThe collection hit stores “I spent a lot of time with (Target). I tresses Emma and n a t i o n w i d e went to Minneapolis. I put my hands Roberts Mindy Kaling Tuesday and wearing and sold out at most on every piece of this collection.” promoting the stores and online. line in less than And this cea day, accordAngela Missoni lebrity prestige ing to Target Creative Designer, Missoni comes without officials. The celebrity price promotion was supposed to last for six weeks at tags. Most items sold by Missoni 1,762 locations across the coun- proper are well over $400, and only high-end retailers like Saks try. Missoni, a high-end Italian Fifth Avenue, Bergdorf Goodman clothing and accessory company, and independent boutiques carry is most famous for its psychedelic the line. At Target, however, all

items (excluding a $400 bike) are under $60, with most in the $30 range. Angela Missoni, creative designer for the company, expressed her love for the collection in an interview with The Wall Street Journal. She said Missoni pushed Target for maximum quality — more than it has ever done. “I spent a lot of time with them,” Missoni said. “I went to Minneapolis. I put my hands on every piece of this collection.” When Target announced the collection last spring, fashioncentered hysteria hit blogs, news and top style magazines like Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar. The craze seems to have sustained itself since then. Last Friday, a “pop-up” store opened in New York City to offer a preview of the collection in a first-come, first-serve basis. The store, however, was forced to close the same morning due to its entire inventory selling out within an hour, according to New York Magazine. Many Marquette students are interested in the collaboration as well. “I think that there will be good pieces,” said Mary Carlson, a sophomore in the College of

INDEX

NEWS

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE

Sports

MUSG

Flashback: 9/11

SCHMIDT

Italian designer pairs with retailer, aims for low prices

DPS REPORTS.....................2 CALENDAR.......................2 VIEWPOINTS........................6 MARQUEE........................8

CLASSIFIEDS..................11 STUDY BREAK....................12 SPORTS..........................14

See Target, page 5

Hall Senator elections begin, some halls lack candidates. See, PAGE 4

Schools take different approaches to recent robberies By Ben Stanley benjamin.stanley@marquette.edu

With some students alarmed by robberies reported on and near Milwaukee college campuses this summer, Marquette and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee have taken two different approaches to communicating with students about crime. Steve Garrison, a student at UWM and the news editor at the UWM Post, said the university’s methods of communicating crimes to students could be improved. Garrison said students are able to view off-campus police reports on incidents like muggings in a small booklet located in the UWM police station. “(The booklet) is obviously not the best method,” he said. Garrison said notices of major crimes near campus are sometimes reported to students through

Visit our website for video interviews with students and faculty remembering Sept. 11.

email, but other information is often more difficult to come by. According to an article published by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in February 2010, the student newspaper and one of its editors filed a lawsuit against the university for refusing to cooperate with open records law. The school had withheld information about Union Policy Board meetings, which allocate space to student organizations, in order to protect the identities of students who were voting members of the board. The UWM Post won the case and obtained the documents it had requested. The University is fairly transparent with crime, Garrison said. But UWM Police Department Chief Michael Marzion said he often refers people with questions about crime to the Milwaukee Police Department website for information. “That’s all MPD District 1,” he said. “We have a really safe campus. Once you step into the neighborhoods, though, then you’re in Milwaukee.” See UWM, page 5

NBA lockout a Mexican standoff of excruciating futility. See PAGE 14


NEWS

2 Tribune

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Farmers market brings fall produce to MU

DPS Reports Sept. 14 At 12:01 a.m. two underage students were caught consuming alcohol outside of O’Donnell Hall. Sept. 13 At 1:40 p.m. a student reported that between Sunday at 10 p.m. and Monday at 8 p.m. an unknown person(s) removed her unsecured, unattended property estimated at $200 from McCormick Hall.

Sept. 12 At 10:19 a.m. a student was in possession of a controlled substance and drug paraphernalia in McCormick Hall. MPD was contacted and took the accused student into custody. At 2:08 p.m. a person not affiliated with Marquette trespassed in the AMU and was cited by MPD.

Events Calendar September 2011 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

“Yo Gabba Gabba! Live! It’s Time To Dance!,” Riverside Theatre, 3 p.m. and 6 p.m.

Saturday 17 Fools for Rowan, The Rave, 8 p.m.

Thursday 15

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Students select produce at the first Fresh Fall Farmers Market of the year, held Tuesday outside McCormick Hall. Hosted by MUSG, the Center for Health Education and Promotion and other campus organizations, future markets will be held Sept. 27 and Oct. 11 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

GOP debates heat up Candidates trade accusations and attacks in Florida By Olivia Morrissey olivia.morrissey@marquette.edu

If the debate this Monday was any indication, the race for the presidential nomination in the GOP is heating up. The candidates vying for the Republican nomination discussed and argued about everything from job creation to vaccines for sexually transmitted diseases in a debate sponsored by CNN and the Tea Party Express. For the second time in six days, the eight Republican candidates for the presidency gathered on the debate stage at the Florida State fairgrounds in Tampa, Fla. The debate featured Texas Gov. Rick Perry, Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, Rep. Ron Paul of Texas, former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum and former Godfather’s Pizza CEO Herman Cain. Recent polls show Gov. Perry ahead of rival GOP candidates in the race for the White House. The governor has built his platform on inspiring economic growth, preserving national security and reforming President Obama’s health care law, according to his website. Ethan Hollenberger, a senior in the College of Business Administration and chairman of

the Marquette University Col- Huntsman said, is “pretty much lege Republicans, said Gov. a treasonous comment.” Perry has been an effective Near the end of the debate, leader in Texas. mediator Wolf Blitzer of CNN “He has balanced budgets for posed a hypothetical question several years and knows how to Paul, who opposes Obama’s to keep the Texas economy go- health care policy. ing,” Hollenberger said. “What do you tell a guy who Close behind Perry in the race is sick, goes into a coma and is Romney, who is focusing on doesn’t have health insurance?” job creation and economic com- Blitzer asked. “Who pays for petitiveness, according to his his coverage? Are you saying website. society should just let him die?” “When it comes to taxes “Yeah!” a handful of crowd and the economy, Romney is members yelled. brilliant,” Hollenberger said. Paul, who is known for his “While he is more moderate libertarian positions on most than most conservatives like, political and social issues, inRomney is electable and in my terjected to explain for what belief will govern as he believes is a core a moderate.” choice of free so“When it comes Highlights from ciety, adding that the debate include to taxes and the communities and an attack by Rep. economy, Romney is non-government inBachmann against brilliant.” stitutions can help Gov. Perry, an accufill the void. Ethan Hollenberger sation of treason and Still, the enthusidisturbing shouts President, College Republicans astic cheers of the from the audience. crowd overshadBachmann, the owed Paul’s answer Tea Party favorite who has for some. gained national attention for “I was pretty shocked when condemning tax hikes and the people cheered for letting the health care law, said an execu- hypothetical uninsured guy tive order signed by Gov. Perry die,” said Julia Azari, an assisforced young girls to take the tant professor of political sci“potentially dangerous” vac- ence at Marquette. “I’m hoping cine against the human papillo- someone else can help me make ma virus, or HPV, although the sense of that.” Food and Drug Administration The nature of the debate demhas deemed vaccines Gardasil onstrated the candidates are and Cervarix safe to use in pro- aiming to please conservatives, tecting against HPV. but no matter the audience, they In a moment of uncharacter- need more than just inflammaistic aggression, Huntsman ac- tory accusations, Azari said. cused Gov. Perry of treason. “To win, you just need people Perry is Texas’ longest serving to dislike you less than they disgovernor, having won reelec- like your opponent,” she said. tion twice since 2000. “To govern, you need someFor Perry to say the Mexican thing resembling a plan.” border cannot be controlled,

d a e R

e ONLINE!! n u b i r T Th e .org e

etribun

tt marque

Applications for “The Void,” a campuswide lip sync and dance competition, will be available in the MUSG office Thurs., Sept. 15 through Thurs., Oct. 6. Marquette Career Services Center’s “On the Road to Your Career” BBQ, AMU 227, 12:30 p.m. to 1:20 p.m.

Friday 16

Maximum Dance: The Neptune Jam, The Rave, 8 p.m. Michael Ian Black, Turner Hall Ballroom, 7 p.m.

Sunday 18 Erasure, The Pabst, 7 p.m. Rock the Green: Midwest’s Premier Near-Zero Waste Music Festival, featuring The Fray, Veterans Park 1010 N. Lincoln Memorial Dr., 11 a.m.

Molotov, The Rave, 8 p.m.

Contact Us and Corrections The Marquette Tribune wrongly attributed a number of photos in our Tuesday, Sept. 13 issue. The photo for “9/11 artifact comes to MKE” was taken by Amanda Frank, the photo for “Teach for America hopeful in final interviews” was taken by Erin Caughey, and the photo for “Bike ride held to raise money for churches” is courtesy of Barbara Hammer. The Tribune regrets the errors. The Marquette Tribune welcomes questions, comments, suggestions and notification of errors that appear in the newspaper. Contact us at (414) 288-5610 or editor@marquettetribune.org.

The Marquette Tribune Editorial

Editor-in-Chief Matthew Reddin (414) 288-7246 Managing Editor Tori Dykes (414) 288-6969 NEWS (414) 288-5610 Editor Brooke Goodman Assistant Editors Dominic Tortorice, Andrew Phillips Closer Look Editor Caroline Campbell Investigative Reporters Zach Buchheit, Leah Todd Administration Tony Manno Campus Community Simone Smith College Life Sarah Hauer Consumer Patrick Simonaitis Crime/DPS Benjamin Stanley Metro Olivia Morrissey MUSG/Online Katie Doherty Religion & Social Justice Andrea Anderson General Assignment Allison Kruschke, Elise Angelopulos COPY DESK (414) 288-5198 Copy Chief Marissa Evans Copy Editors Alec Brooks, Sarah Butler VIEWPOINTS (414) 288-6969 Viewpoints Editor Kara Chiuchiarelli Editorial Writer Maria Tsikalas Columnists Bridget Gamble, Kelly White, Ian Yakob MARQUEE (414) 288-3976 Editor Sarah Elms Assistant Editor Jennifer Jorgensen Reporters Matthew Mueller, Liz McGovern, Vanessa Harris SPORTS (414) 288-6964 Editor Mike Nelson Assistant Editor Andrei Greska Copy Editor Michael LoCicero, Erin Caughey Reporters Trey Killian, Mark Strotman, Michael LoCicero, A. Wesley Herndon Sports Columnists Andrei Greska, Erik Schmidt

VISUAL CONTENT (414) 288-7940 Editor Zach Hubbard Closer Look Designer Katherine Lau Viewpoints Designer Zach Hubbard Sports Designers Monica Lawton,Martina Ibanez-Baldor News Designers Kaitlin Moon, Haley Fry Marquee Designer Rob Gebelhoff Photo Editor Aaron Ledesma Assistant Photo Editor Elise Krivit Photographers Brittany McGrail, Amanda Frank, Erin Caughey ----

Advertising

(414) 288-1738 Advertising Director Courtney Johnson Sales Manager Leonardo Portela-Blanco Art Director Joe Buzzelli Production Manager Lauren Krawczyk Classified Manager Erin LaHood Account Coordinator Manager Maude Kingsbury

The Marquette Tribune is a wholly owned property of Marquette University, the publisher. The Tribune serves as a student voice for the university and gives students publishing experience and practice in journalism, advertising, and management and allied disciplines. The Tribune is written, edited, produced and operated solely by students with the encouragement and advice of the advisor and business manager, who are university employees. The banner typeface, Ingleby, is designed by David Engelby and is available at dafont.com. David Engelby has the creative, intellectual ownership of the original design of Ingleby. The Tribune is normally published Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, during the academic year by Marquette Student Media, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881. First copy of paper is free; additional copies are $1 each. Subscription rate: $50 annually. Phone: (414) 288-7246. Fax: (414) 288-3998. E-mail: editor@marquettetribune.org

What are you going to be for Halloween?!?


Thursday, September 15, 2011

NEWS

Tribune 3

Teachers retiring in record numbers Wis. union leaders blame collective bargaining loss By Pat Simonaitis patrick.simonaitis@marquette.edu

Teachers are retiring from schools across the state of Wisconsin en masse, with the Milwaukee Public School system being hit especially hard, according to one local education leader. Bob Peterson, president of the Milwaukee Teachers’ Education Association, said since the end of last year, the city’s school district has lost 408 teachers, substitutes and teacher assistants to retirement. MTEA is an union made up of 6,000 Milwaukee educators. Statewide, nearly 5,000 teachers are reported to have retired in the last year, twice the amount of retirements in the state from the entire two years prior. Peterson, who said he personally knew a number of the recently retired teachers, said he believes the main factor invoking record retirement numbers is fearfulness surrounding the law passed in March limiting

collective bargaining rights for public employees. “The (law) limits — eliminates to some degree — our teachers’ voices to push for school improvement,” Peterson said. “My belief is that in order to attract and retain quality educators, especially in urban areas, those educators should get adequate compensation and benefits.” Peterson said he feels it may get worse before it gets better, and he expects another round of budget cuts before seeing new hires. He said he expects cuts to begin to extend into suburban schools. Don Hietpas, chief financial officer of the Appleton Area School District, said his district has also seen a jump in retirements since last year, with 90 retirements this year as opposed to the normal 40 to 60. “We lost a lot of experience and quality teachers,” Hietpas said. He also said the increase came as a result of uncertainty regarding the new collective bargaining agreement, but he was optimistic about hiring new, young teachers. Lori Blakeslee, assistant director of the Green Bay Education Association (GBEA), said Green Bay public schools will have lost

140 of their teachers by January 2012 — by far the most in her 12 years of experience. The GBEA is an advocate group for teachers and public schools in Green Bay affiliated with the Wisconsin Education Association Council, a Madisonbased union. Blakeslee also said the chief reason for increased retirement in Green Bay is uncertainty revolving around the effects of the new law. “When you work somewhere for 27, 28 years with certain promised benefits in mind for when you retire, and then all of the sudden there’s the thought that it might not be there, it causes concern,” Blakeslee said. At the same time, Blakeslee said the current prevailing concern of teachers around the state is less about pension plans and health insurance, which she predicted to remain relatively stable, and more about issues such as the hours in a teacher work day, the number of students in a class and the number of sick days available, all of which could be changed with little interference by unions. “When there’s the conception that teachers are somehow getting more than they deserve or that there may be additional work

2011 Teacher Retirements by the Numbers Number of Milwaukee Teachers’ Education Association teachers, substitutes and education assistants who have retired in the last year.

140

Number of Green Bay Education Association teachers who have retired or will retire in 2011.

90

408

Number of Appleton Area School District retirements in the last year.

4,935

Number of Wisconsin teachers who have retired in the last year.

9,933

Total number of Wisconsin public workers who retired by the end of June 2011.

Sources: Milwaukee Teachers’ Education Association, Appleton Area School District, Green Bay Education Association, Huffington Post

hours or days for teachers without any additional compensation, it causes unease for the teachers,” Blakeslee said. Blakeslee also said the increase in retirements has resulted in a loss of quality individuals in the classroom who would love to

Graphic by Zach Hubbard zachary.hubbard@marquette.edu

keep teaching. “There’s an unfair attitude of the people in the legislature,” Peterson said. “People argue out one side of their mouth, ‘let’s improve education,’ and out the other side, ‘cut, cut, cut.’ It’s hypocritical.”

MU honored by college ranking organization

simone.smith@marquette.edu

Marquette has received a lot of national attention in the last few years, both good and bad. In the eyes of one organization, though, the university’s reputation couldn’t be higher. Marquette was recently named a college of distinction by Student Horizons, a group of parents and 25,000 guidance counselors, putting it in the ranks of previously cited colleges like Fordham and St. Norbert’s. The Austin-based group used four tenets as its criteria: engagement, teaching, community and outcomes. The organization helps high

Though the organization is not accredited, the ranked schools receive a certificate of participation, a school profile in the e-newsletter sent to high school seniors and an icon to be used on marketing materials. The university is proud of the recognition, said Kate Venne, director of university communication. “Marquette is justifiably proud when others recognize the quality of our academic programs,” Venne said in an email. “At the same time, such rankings are just one factor that should be used in assessing a program or university.” Students like Megan Dabney, a fifth-year senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, feel the accolade is earned. “I feel that education-wise, (Marquette is) excellent,” Dabney said. “I like the small classes and quality of professors.”

Student Horizons’ four qualifications

Vibrant Communities Engaged Students

By Simone Smith

school seniors make the transition to college by identifying schools that are strong academically. “We felt that Marquette offered an exemplary undergraduate experience,” said Wesley Creel, founder and CEO of Student Horizons. Student Horizons puts out the list through a newsletter and e-guide book for students to serve as an alternative ranking system to the popular rankings provided by U.S. News & World Report. The process of choosing which schools go on the list, however, is long. “It’s a yearlong process on our part,” Creel said. “In September or early October, schools are nominated. We then spend the rest of the time deciding on which schools to choose, and in May invite schools to participate (in the rankings).” The vetting process takes into account, among other factors, studentteacher ratios and overall retention and graduation statistics.

Marquette students interact through service learning, internships and can study abroad on six continents.

Students come from all 50 states and 80 different countries, with 94 percent of students living on or near campus. Marquette also has over 250 student organizations.

Source: Student Horizons

University Core of Common Studies mandates students take 11 courses from nine subject areas. Student to teacher ratio 15:1; average class size 25. Many Marquette students work for multinational firms in Milwaukee after graduating, and a substantial number of students leave to begin careers in cities like Chicago, New York, Atlanta and Washington, D.C. 1 in 3 go to graduate school.

Great Teaching Successful Outcomes

Selected universities must qualify in four areas of distinction

Graphic by Katy Moon/kaitlin.moon@marquette.edu


NEWS

4 Tribune

Thursday, September 15, 2011

LGBT center reaches community with gallery Profits from art exhibits support center, programs By Andrea Anderson andrea.anderson@marquette.edu

Community centers are commonplace in Milwaukee. But one in particular, the Milwaukee LGBT Community Center at 252 E. Highland Ave., exhibits a little more than meets the eye. The community center’s art gallery opened in January 2011 in an effort to complement its outreach programs. Gallery curator Jeremy Hanson is hopeful that the space will continue to provide a safe welcoming place for people of all walks from life. “We started this gallery over one year ago mainly to start ‘friendraising’ rather than fundraising,” Hanson said. The art gallery has raised approximately $500, according to Hanson, but money is not his main focus. “We are happy that we have been raising money to support our programs, but our focus is to bring people into the center that we don’t necessarily see,” Hanson said. “We want everyone, gay or straight, to feel free to come in and enjoy the art.”

Patrick Price, director of philanthropy and chief financial adviser of the community center, is also very impressed with the recognition the art gallery has seen, as well as how it benefits everyone in the community. “Within the first show I was shocked to see how many people had shown up,” Price said. “We didn’t expect to have over 80 people at the grand opening. It was great to see all the support.” When the art gallery sells a piece of art, it receives 20 percent of the commission. Portions of the profits go to keeping the center open and running various programs such as the Anti-Violence Project, which focuses on violence against the LGBT community, and Project Q, an after-school program for community youth. Price and Hanson both said the center would like to give each program as much money as needed, but their desired allocation of equal funds to each is not feasible. As a result, they are forced to direct the money to those programs that receive the least state and federal funding. The mission of the LGBT Community Center is “providing culturally sensitive and competent educational, social, and health and wellness services that meet the needs of LGBT youth, adults and their allies,”

MUSG senator elections begin Some hall ballots lack registered candidates this year By Katie Doherty kathleen.doherty@marquette.edu

Marquette Student Government polls open online today for the election of all hall, off-campus and commuter senators, except for three halls with no registered candidates. Trent Carlson, a senior in the College of Business Administration and MUSG executive vice president, said the senator elections are an important component of the success of MUSG as a whole. “The senate works to improve and analyze new and/or current issues on campus, which is why the senator position is important and affects all students,” Carlson said in an email. “While MUSG strives to continue to improve all aspects of campus, it is imperative that all students to be represented in these meetings.” Carpenter Tower and McCabe and Schroeder Halls have no registered candidates for the MUSG senator elections, according to MUSG’s website. Justin Alexander, a freshman in the College of Arts & Sciences, is running for O’Donnell Hall senator. “I am very excited for the election because it is great to see that the students of Marquette have a voice about their education and life on campus,” Alexander said.

He said his goal is to make a difference for everyone on campus, especially those in O’Donnell. Kyle Whelton, a freshman in the College of Arts & Sciences and Alexander’s opponent in the race for O’Donnell Hall senator, said he feels positive, but it is his job to get everyone to the polls to cast their vote. “All I can count on is a fair election and hope for the best,” Whelton said. Tommy Hayes, a freshman in the College of Business Administration and candidate for McCormick Hall Senator, has already made it through the primary elections, which are held when a large enough number of candidates are running for the senate seats. Four candidates remain in the race at McCormick. Hayes said he is excited to still be in the running. “I hope the residents of McCormick will vote for me of course, but I understand (that) whoever the two winners are, they will do a great job,” he said. Katie Simoncic, a senior in the College of Communication, is running for MUSG senator for the fourth year in a row, this time for off-campus senator. Simoncic has previously served as Abbottsford Hall senator, the College of Communication senator and off-campus senator. “I’m excited for the elections because they give me another chance to represent my constituents while voting on important legislation that improves our school and time spent here,” Simoncic said. She is running for off-campus senator alongside only one other

according to its website. Exhibits have varied in style, and have included a series of photographs of same-sex couples, artwork representing the feelings and emotions of spring and an upcoming showcase of art made from fibrous materials. The current exhibition is entitled “Print and Mixed Media,” and showcases work “made in collage, mixed media, assemblage, etc. works that incorporate multiple mediums,” according to the community center’s website. The show ends Sept. 30. “Our first show was the inaugural opening, where we had the biggest attendance of 80 people,” Hanson said. “Our Spring Fling show raised the most money but had a decent turnout as well.” Kristen Gaffey, a sophomore in the College of Arts & Sciences, said she is intrigued by art and loves the complexity of what it can show. “I would be open to going to this art gallery,” Gaffey said. “It doesn’t matter what building it is in; art is art and I think it is great that this community center has a gallery that could bring in both people and income.” Julie Pope, a sophomore in the College of Health Sciences, said she would not be deterred by the fact that the art gallery was in an LGBT community center, but candidate. Simoncic said they are running basically unopposed because there are six seats available for off-campus senator, and residents can vote for up to two candidates. Simoncic said although she is unopposed, she hopes more students vote this election season. Carlson said MUSG encourages students to vote. “Voting is easy to do and takes only a few minutes, which is about the same amount of time it takes to update a status on Facebook,” Carlson said. “Students are encouraged to take those extra couple minutes to vote and make their voices heard in the selection of a senator.”

Photo by Elise Krivit/elise.krivit@marquette.edu

The Milwaukee LGBT Community Center, 252 E. Highland Ave., features an art gallery that supports the Anti-Violence Project and Project Q.

rather more interested. “I think that a lot of different art would be shown and

CANDIDATES

Cobeen Senator Candidates Natalie Pinkney Alexandra Whittaker McCormick Senator Candidates Tommy Hayes Monica Raciti Thomas Schick Meredith Zoltan Abbottsford Senator Candidates Jessie Sandoval Charlie Mau Mashuda Senator Candidates Natasha Hansen Michael Molenaar O’Donnell Senator Candidates Justin Alexander Kyle Whelton Straz Senator Candidates Mallory Daily Andrew Valiquette Off-Campus Senator Candidates Stephanie Marecki Katie Simoncic Commuter Senator Candidate Evan Umpir

CALL YOUR MOTHER! SHE MISSES YOU!

accepted at the venue,” Pope said. “I would go.”


NEWS

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Tribune 5

Continued from page 1:

Continued from page 1:

Target: Shoppers jump at low prices

Transit: Staff also affected

Communication, about the women’s clothing line. “Based on the prints shown in the commercials, everything looks fun – I may have to go check it out.” Other students eyed specific items as they anxiously awaited Missoni’s release. “I am most excited for Missoni housewares like the vases and accessories,” said Jessica Papilla, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences. “Really, Missoni for Target is genius.” However, not everyone thinks Missoni’s inexpensive collaboration with Target is beneficial. Victor Jacobo, a sophomore in the College of Communication, said the line might result in a number of people pretending to be something they are not. “(Consumers) are buying and wearing clothes that they can’t really afford in real life,” Jacobo said. “Sometimes it is just better to get things of quality.”

She said disinvesting in the transit system would not solve the problem because when there are fewer routes, there are fewer riders and less revenue to be made. “Unfortunately, the last eight to 10 years of cuts put us in a poor position to be able to handle a 10 percent cut in transit aid,” Thomas said. Lee Holloway, chairman of the county board of supervisors, will present the final budget and changes on Sept. 29. Despite its faltering, the system is not inefficient, Thomas said. Thomas said the transit system is actually very cost effective compared to others across the country. She also pointed out that MCTS has the lowest administration costs nationwide, along with a very high fare-box return. Mester said Milwaukee is experiencing this financial trouble because MCTS has no dedicated source of funding. Most cities have a sales tax in which revenues go directly to the transit system. In 2008, residents voted in favor of an advisory referendum to increase the sales tax to fund the transit system. But the only entity that can create a sales tax is

Photo by Amanda Frank/amanda.frank@marquette.edu

Items from the Missoni for Target line sold out within hours of its release.

Continued from page 1:

UWM: Transparency key in school safety MPD encourages people to file open records requests to obtain detailed crime information, which can cost money and take up to 10 days to process. Marquette’s Department of Public Safety operates differently, said DPS Captain Russell Shaw. “We try to be as transparent as possible with students about what is going on around campus,” Shaw said.

The DPS station on campus puts out a morning report, much like UWM’s booklet log, but also posts the information online. Email notifications are sent to students for every violent crime report filed on campus and in the surrounding neighborhoods — where nearly all muggings committed against students occur, according the university’s annual Campus Crime Statistics report.

As the Marquette Tribune reported in an article published on Aug. 29, though, DPS operates as a private security company owned by Marquette. This means it has different rules and regulations than the UWM police department, which is a sworn police force part of MPD.

the state government, which did not pass the legislation. Denise Williams, a food service worker at the Straz Tower Dining Hall, takes the 23 bus to and from work every day. Under the current proposal, the 23 will have certain segments eliminated from its route, along with a decreased frequency. Williams said she will not worry about the decreased frequency as long as the 23 remains in service. “All I need to do is get home,” she said. Although Milwaukee is struggling, public transit is thriving nationally. In the last five years, transit ridership increased four percent, according the Public Transportation Association. It also succeeds in the rest of Wisconsin. Ridership outside Milwaukee increased by 7 percent in the last five years, while in-city ridership decreased by 20 percent to an all-time low of 37.5 million, according to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation. Thomas said this is due to cities putting more money into transit and adding buses, trains and other services.

Embrace your youth.

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Viewpoints

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 6

The Marquette Tribune Editorial Board:

Kara Chiuchiarelli, Viewpoints Editor Maria Tsikalas, Editorial Writer Matthew Reddin, Editor-in-Chief Tori Dykes, Managing Editor Brooke Goodman, News Editor Caroline Campbell, Closer Look Editor

Mike Nelson, Sports Editor Sarah Elms, Marquee Editor Marissa Evans, Copy Chief Zachary Hubbard, Visual Content Editor

STAFF EDITORIAL

Pay attention to transit

Thursday, September 15, 2011

TRIBUNE TRIBUTES MAKING EVERYONE’S DAY THAT MUCH BETTER

To ... The Club: You know who you are. To ... The girls in yoga pants and heels: Really? To ... The super-functional Johnston Hall vending machine: Oh wait, just kidding.

To ... all you worring about lease agreements: It’s only September! To ... my roommate : Thanks for taking the trash. To ... Verizon Thanks for getting me back on the grid.

Column

Sorry if you tried to reach me last week...

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

So, the question burns: Why should Another school year is under way — another semester of tuition to pay, an- we care? For one, not only will such cuts affect other meal plan begun and another bus routes that students use daily and for regupass received. These things are usually second nature lar entertainment, but if ridership continues for us, a checklist of basic items neces- to decrease because we aren’t taking the sary for life at Marquette. But due to recent buses, who’s to say what other routes will budget cuts and a decrease in ridership, it get cut due to lack of funding? The 30 and 10 are the most familiar bus may not be long before that last item hits routes that run through campus; if the 30 the highway. The Milwaukee County Transit System is already being considered for “frequency is among the 30 largest U.S. bus systems, reduction,” why not the 10 as well? And while route cuts are certainly threatbut has no regional or state transit authorening to students, they take on ity governing a larger issue for Milwaukee it, and is losing funding from The 30 and 10 are the most in general. This question of why we its few sources familiar bus routes that run through should care is essential, whethof revenue. campus; if the 30 is already er we’re here in Milwaukee MCTS made service cuts and being considered for “frequency for four years or the rest of fare increases reduction,” why not the 10 as well? our lives. It boils down to the deeper issue at the root of the this year for cuts: economics. its 2011-2013 The Wisconsin budget cuts plan. This may eliminate at least nine bus routes and servic- will further reduce available funds for pubes and decrease service to nine more routes lic transit by 10 percent, leading to the possible loss of route quality and convenience. across Milwaukee County. Those losses can negatively impact the While this may not seem pertinent to students, we should really take note of what’s average consumer, who would ideally turn going on — because it hits closer to home to public transit as a way to combat high gas prices. Choosing the bus would inthan we think. Every Marquette student is required to crease transit revenues, but it becomes an purchase a U-Pass transit card in their stu- impossible choice when routes are cut or dent fees. This may seem like an inconve- their frequency is reduced. Taking such things into consideration, nient waste of money for students with a car or those who rarely travel within the county students must be aware of the proposed However, it can be a lifesaver for those transit system alterations. We should all be taking public transit without a car or access to one — a way to buy groceries, catch a Brewers game, go to help the environment and save on gas money. But that’s shopping or get to work. According to the MCTS website, Those who have the not possible for among the routes being reviewed for ability should make an everyone. Those who “service frequency reductions” is the favored 30 Route that runs down Wis- effort to use public transit have the abilconsin Avenue. and straight through and prove to MCTS that our ity should make campus. The “special event” buses routes are worth keeping, an effort to use public transit and that take students to Brewers games, not cutting or reducing. prove to MCTS Summerfest, the State Fair and other that our routes festivals could potentially be elimiare worth keepnated altogether in 2012. The budget cuts that led to such propos- ing, not cutting or reducing. For those who are concerned, don’t sit als coincide with a 21 percent drop in ridership on such routes in the past five years. back and let the routes slip by. While MCTS can’t control what funding This drop is in contrast with the 7 percent growth statewide and 4 percent growth it does or does not get, if we take advantage nationally of public transportation use, ac- of those 10 and 30 routes on campus, just cording to the American Public Transporta- maybe the next routes to be cut won’t be tion Association and the state Department those we use most. of Transportation.

anything at all. “No big deal,” I would reply instinctively, shuffling my feet and picking at my nails. After a minute, conversation resumed, but it left me feeling awkward, and more often than not, entirely unimportant. I noticed how often I wanted my cell just because others were using theirs in my presence. It happened in class, it Kelly White happened at parties, it happened over meals. While I was the only one purLast week I did the unthinkable. I posely cellphone-less, it seemed no took a break from the thing I spend the one I knew could go longer than 15 most time with. It is the first thing in minutes without checking messages. my hand every morning, and I find myClearly, we are consumed by our self checking it every chance I get. phones. It’s hard not to be. We natuThat’s right — I cut off the near-phys- rally crave human interaction, and ical appendage known as a cellphone. with the world at our fingertips, who Just like how my Lenten promise to can resist the urge to be in constant give up Diet Coke last year alerted me contact? to how serious my soda pop addiction That being said, I think resistance is was, my week without a cellphone left worth a shot. While our connections me in such severe withdrawal I felt like are perpetual, they are also vast and I could relate to Lindsay Lohan. vapid. Mass texting is quick and easy, My Verizon LG Voyager, I discovered, but much can be lost through our inis a tremendous crutch. It’s in my hand cessant tapping of messages. as I walk between classes, when I’m out Although I missed out on some things with friends and and didn’t see many of my if my mind ever My week without a friends, it was refreshing to starts to wander cellphone left me in such a actually speak with others. during converI had conversations with sations. I have severe withdrawal I felt like I people who I usually only trained myself to could relate to Lindsay Lohan. waved hello to in between reach for my cellclasses. My roommates and phone whenever I had plenty of things to I change locations, a conditioning that fill each other in about over dinner. I could make Pavlov himself drool. never knew where anyone was sitting I started to realize that my dependen- in the library, so I actually got work cy was quite unhealthy — I don’t even done. And whenever it was my turn in have a data plan. But in my time of iso- line, I was actually paying attention. lation, I began to see that it wasn’t just Sure enough, my time seemed to me who had a dangerous reliance. multiply. I’d be mid-conversation with a friend Still, as soon as my week was up, I when our chat would be rudely inter- turned my phone back on. As refreshrupted by a buzzing which could not ing as it was, it’s unrealistic to not be — and never was — ignored. Atten- have that constant connectivity. But tion would shift from the face-to-face it did make me realize that I don’t interaction to the rectangular gadget’s need to use my phone as often as I do. promise of better stimulation. Without I would think my attachment issues my phone, I was unable to retaliate with have subsided. other contacts and connections of my But, for the record, I checked my own. phone for messages at least 19 times This happened several times with while writing this column. several friends, and each time was more uncomfortable than the last. “Sorry, I kelly.white@marquette.edu just have to respond to this real quick,” my friend would mutter, if she said

Statement of Opinion Policy The opinions expressed on the Viewpoints page reflect the opinions of the Viewpoints staff. The editorials do not represent the opinions of Marquette University nor its administrators, but those of the editorial board. The Marquette Tribune prints guest submissions at its discretion. The Tribune strives to give all sides of an issue an equal voice over the course of a reasonable time period. An author’s contribution will not be published more than once in a four-week period. Submissions with obvious relevance to the Marquette community will be given priority consideration. Full Viewpoint submissions should be limited to 500 words. Letters to the editor should be between 50 to 150 words. The Tribune reserves the right to edit submissions for length and content. Please e-mail submissions to: viewpoints@marquettetribune.org. If you are a current student, include the college in which you are enrolled and your year in school. If not, please note any affliations to Marquette or your current city of residence.


Thursday, September 15, 2011

VIEWPOINTS

Tribune 7

COLUMN

The college conspiracy Ian Yakob There are some things in life that will always be cool. Examples: fast cars, finding money in your pockets and light-up shoes. Yep, always cool. I’ve also heard that sticking it to the man is always cool. For me, the only “man” I can call out at the moment is college. Biting the hand that feeds me is risky, but having a column grants me the writing right. And my future child will have the middle name Danger, so I’m prospectively off the hook. It’s simple logic. Now down to brass tacks. Look, I love my Marquette experience completely (or maybe just enough that I hope nobody with power or authority takes this column the wrong way). If I didn’t love it here, I wouldn’t have traveled 822 miles for it. I’m just pointing out a teeny tiny crime that most, if not all, universities are guilty of, to some degree. So what’s the big conspiracy? That college education is a phony tradition and a scam? That parents willingly jettison their kids off the houseboat to a place where they’ll certainly break down their moral virtues to survive their peer environment until a new person finally emerges just to be thrown into a rat race society? Nope. Financial aid. That’s the conspiracy. For starters, just ignore all personal circumstances and all notions of actual need. That may sound like I’m ignoring the purpose of financial aid, but stick with me, because I am. For this conspiracy to work, we have to realize that need-based aid is only a student body’s conception, and not necessarily a university’s purpose. Imagine a university accountant concludes that the actual amount of tuition

needed to accommodate students and make reasonably expedient progress toward university goals is $5,000. Next, suppose the university posts the going tuition rate at $15,000. Now imagine a runaway train with wheels on I-94 is going 145 mph during a monsoon race. Now forget that part, but keep your adrenaline pumping. The kicker is the university then gives 90 percent of students a “scholarship” of some amount. Potential students will either think, “They’re giving me a lot of money, so I should go,” or “Tuition is expensive, it must be worth it.” It’s a simple concept: Jack up the price, then give everyone a “discount.” Now we’re left with every student paying more than the original average rate needed in the first place. Meanwhile, the university proclaims it’s honorable for having such a high percentage of students receiving aid, as if it’s tried ever so hard to accommodate individual needs. The good news is we are led to believe the Marquette mothership would not deliberately betray our trust — understanding we aren’t complete imbeciles. Otherwise we’d be crashing into DPS squad cars, banging our heads into concrete walls and having Pauly D escort us to Aurora Sinai Medical Center. Regardless, universities aim to promote positive images. We attend college to become the smart ones who later rise above the idiocy. Still, universities want to look good during the present and the future even if to some extent it’s at the expense of their students. Can we blame them if it’s ultimately for the sake of those students? Yes — but we don’t want to. We like the scam. We like it so much that we keep the conspiracy going, by complaining about paying for college. Yes, deep down in the pockets, paying for college hurts. And no matter how we pay or will pay for it, we demonstrate that we aren’t OK with it. But in our minds, going to college means so much more to us than

IN THE

the cost of financing it. I am not suggesting a tuition increase, please, dear, sweet Society of Jesus. Just because we’ll end up paying doesn’t make it fair to exploit that. Still, scam or no scam, we take financial aid wherever we can get it. How else could we budget for fast cars and light-up sneakers, since surprise money pockets don’t go above $20. Think I’ve accomplished nothing here? Think twice. I’ve proven that sticking it to the man is not always cool. (Hashtag twist ending.) ian.yakob@marquette.edu

NEWS

“Instead of just talking about America’s jobs creators, let’s actually do something for America’s jobs creators,“ -President Obama, introducing the jobs bill to Congress

Reader submission

Not enough men on altar

In response to an article by Leah Todd on Tuesday, I would have to say instead there are simply not enough men on that altar. Leah makes great points about her experiences with Mass and the disparity of gender presiding at Mass. Despite the fact that only priests can be men, there are some very good reasons for this. Mass is a celebration of our faith, a thanksgiving to God who created us out of His divine unconditional love for creation and the only point on earth where we can become one with the Eucharist. This seems all very deep and theological, and that’s because it is. The Eucharist is the source and summit of our faith and the Church does not take this lightly. When Jesus instituted the Last Supper, which would form the basis for the Mass, he set a very simple guideline for his apostles: “Do this in memory of me.” In an attempt for priests to replicate Christ at the last supper, they seek to be in “Persona Cristi,” or in the person of Christ. In order to imitate Jesus in the best way possible, being male helps tremendously. During their vows priests in a sense marry the feminine Church in the same way a

man marries a woman. There are many theological reasons that call for only men to be priests, even though it may seem like women get slammed in the gut with “the cold shoulder of institutionalized exclusion.” If you perceive this issue to be a problem of gender inequality the same way homophobia, racism and sexism are, you’re missing the magnitude of this matter. It’s a greater and complex issue than many believe. I think it is our duty as Catholics to discern our call from God, whether it’s religious, married or single. It is an injustice to not consider where He is beckoning you, in the same way that you had to decide what major or college would best fit you. There needs to be inquiry with the “uncanny organism we call the Church.” Not giving proper discernment to your calling is a disservice to yourself. I think if those called to be priests truly sought to follow Christ in His teachings, we would have a lot more men on the altar. Tom Nass Senior, College of Arts & Sciences


Marquee

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 8

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Photos courtesy of Ricky Stoll

Festival patrons will receive free water bottles that can be refilled at stations like the ones pictured above.

THE FRAY

The Fray was rejected by the Colorado radio station KTCL eight times before finally submitting their piano rock demo, “Over My Head (Cable Car).” This power ballad single, along with “How to Save a Life,” eventually hit the American Top 40 charts, rocketing the band to stardom. The Fray was nominated for both the 2010 Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album and Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals. Ben Folds is best known for his work as the frontman and pianist of Ben Folds Five and now as a solo artist. Folds’ clever lyrics and piano stylings have made him a household name for music lovers across the world. His next album, “The Best Imitation of Myself: A Retrospective” is slated for release in October.

BEN FOLDS

With the looming threat of global warming approaching, scientists question how we can simplify our waste without drastically changing our lifestyles. The call for such fast change can seem overwhelmingly difficult, consuming a lot of time and effort. Rock the Green, the Midwest’s first annual near-zero waste music festival, proves that going green doesn’t have to feel stressful. In fact, it can be a lot of fun. Rock the Green, an all-day, outdoor concert festival, takes place Sept. 18 on the lakefront of Veterans Park. The festival’s lineup includes The Fray, Fitz and The Tantrums, Ben Folds, Parachute, Michelle Branch and local musician Evan Christian. Admission before Sept. 18 is $25 and $35 the day of the show. Lindsay Stevens Gardner,

BANDS

FITZ AND THE TANTRUMS

elizabeth.mcgovern@marquette.edu

For example, the “earth” showcase features gardening items and material goods, including T-shirts donated by 43 Goodwill shops around the nation. The shirts were “upcycled,” which remakes the material into a higher quality product — in this case, new T-shirts. Similarly, the “air” showcase features sports-related vendors and music equipment, “water” tents highlight products dealing with water sustainability and efficiency and “fire” hubs focus on solar and battery powered energy solutions. Retailers aren’t the only ones getting involved. Local food and beverage companies will offer produce and other organic food and drinks for sale as well. Sprecher Brewing Co. partnered with Rock the Green to create its own private label version of their Special Amber beer for the event. Rock the Green’s efforts don’t end with the last concert of the evening, though. The website will feature frequent updates throughout the year, including blogs and tips about how to continuously live an ecofriendly lifestyle. “This is not your typical one-stop festival. Especially in Milwaukee, this movement is gaining momentum,” Stevens Gardner said. “Our festival comes full circle.” Rock the Green takes place Sunday, Sept. 18 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Veterans Park, 1010 N. Lincoln Memorial Dr. Advance tickets are $25 or $35 on event day. For specific concert times and other info, visit rockthegreen.com.

Frontman Michael Fitzpatrick’s ex-girlfriend called him up one day and offered him an organ. He took it, put together a band and found their sound within the night. Playing their first show in 2008, Fitz & The Tantrums has since toured with Maroon 5 and released their debut album “Pickin’ Up the Pieces” last year. After a hiatus from her solo career, Michelle Branch, famous for early ’00s tunes like “Everywhere,” “All You Wanted” and “Goodbye to You,” is back with a new genre: country. Last August, she released an EP titled “Everything Comes and Goes,” and is currently working on a new, soon-to-be-released album called “West Coast Time.”

MICHELLE BRANCH

By Liz McGovern

The free water bottles are defounder and executive director of Rock the Green, originally signed to counter the American worked in the music industry tendency to buy bottled water producing events in Golden from stores. According to the Gate Park, Calif. After organiz- Rock the Green website, Amering numerous music festivals, icans buy half a billion plastic she noticed how much waste water bottles per week, but taste was created. Inspired, the Mil- tests around the country have waukee native decided to create established that people consisa festival unique to the Mid- tently prefer the taste of tap water to bottled water. west. Most importantly, the festi“Anything I am looking at from A to Z, I am looking to val hopes to educate the public make greener,” Stevens Gard- about environmental awareness. But that does not mean the fesner said. The goal of a near-zero waste tival applies only to the niche of environfestival is to create the smallest “This is not your typical one-stop m e n t a l l y conscious carbon footprint festival. Especially in Milwaukee, folks. possible while this movement is gaining “I wanted still putting on a momentum. Our festival comes to bring killer show. Rock full circle.” the green the Green aims to Lindsay Stevens Gardner m o v e m e n t do this in a few Founder, Rock the Green to the mainways. First, all of stream, to the sound, lights people who and interactive areas will run on generators using don’t normally go to environmentally friendly festivals,” biodiesel fuel. Second, the festival will pro- Stevens Gardner said. The festival will also showvide complimentary, BPA-free, recyclable water bottles to fes- case interactive areas that distival guests. These bottles go play new eco-friendly products. above and beyond normal recy- The products will be matched clability, created with fair trade with a corresponding classipractices and designed so you cal element – earth, air, fire or can roll them up to fit in your water – and its interactive ecofriendly mission. pocket.

Since graduating college in 2008, this rock band from Virginia has toured with O.A.R., Matt Nathanson, the Goo Goo Dolls and Michelle Branch. Starting this October, Parachute will begin a North American tour with singer-songwriter Kate Voegele.

PARACHUTE

Near-zero waste festival hits MKE lakefront Sunday

The only local in the bunch, this self-taught musician makes things interesting by mixing Spanish guitar with hip-hop and has even toured in Spain with top flamenco players. He's a Milwaukee regular, though, with frequent performances at The Jazz Estate.

EVAN CHRISTIAN

the Green

Sources: fitzandthetantrums.com, michellebranch.com, thefraytickets.com, rockthegreen.com.


Thursday, September 15, 2011

Tribune 9

MARQUEE

MKE’s version of world’s largest food fight

Photo courtesy of Monica Baer

A tomato romper raises her arms in victory after last year’s fight. About 5,000 pounds of tomatoes were thrown.

Tomato festival graces East Side for fifth year By Jennie Jorgensen jennifer.jorgensen@marquette.edu

In 1944 in the small Valencian town of Buñol, Spain, a

tomatoey tradition was born: “La Tomatina.” At this annual festival, 30,000 people from around the world make their way to the streets of Buñol to throw more than one hundred metric tons of overripe tomatoes at each other. Thanks to the East Side Association, Milwaukee now has its own version of the world’s

biggest food fight. The East Side will host its fifth annual Tomato Romp! festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 17 on North Avenue between Prospect and Oakland Avenues. Inspired by Buñol’s La Tomatina festival, the East Side created Tomato Romp! as a free, fall harvest-type festival to keep

Jim Plaisted, executive direcpeople interested in the neightor of the East Side Business borhood. Tomato Romp! features a Improvement District, said 200 bloody mary competition, a people ages 16 to 60 participatspecial East Side Green Market ed in the fight last year. While highlighting tomatoes, a salsa 200 participate, more than 500 tasting, live performances by lo- gather along the other side of cal flamenco artist Evan Chris- the fence to serve as eager spectian, and, of course, the infa- tators. “What’s interesting to watch mous rotten tomato fight. is how people From 11 a.m. walk out,” he to 3 p.m., those “The best thing about Tomato said. “It’s like of legal drinking (Romp!) is that we do get people you’re watchage can purchase from all over who are not regular ing them finan official Toma- visitors. It’s one afternoon to show ish their first to Romp! bloody them what Milwaukee’s East Side marathon. mary competihas to offer.” They’re hugtion ballot at the each East Side Green Jim Plaisted ging other and sayMarket for $15 Executive Director, East Side BID ing they can’t and receive a believe how bloody mary sample and beer chaser from 13 good they feel.” Maglio & Company sponsors participating East Side establishments, including Hotch-A- the fight each year by providing Do, Hooligan’s, Replay Sports about 5,000 pounds of tomatoes — about 25 pounds per person. Bar and Cans Bar and Canteen. Maglio & Company’s daily Judging will begin at 3 p.m. and end with the crowning of produce process requires the rethe East Side’s bloody mary moval of 5,000 to 6,000 pounds champion and fan favorite. of inedible tomatoes daily, Reigning 2010 fan favorite, Vi- said Sam Maglio, president of tucci’s, hopes to win over a few Maglio & Company. These inmore taste buds with the same edible and unsellable tomatoes age-old family recipe as always. are used for the Tomato Romp! “We like to show off our fight instead of being thrown bloody mary,” said Frank away. Plaisted said it usually only Vetucci, general manager of Vitcucci’s. “We’ll put ours against takes about five minutes for 200 people to turn all 5,000 pounds anybody’s.” Vetucci said the secret to vic- of tomato into a layer of sauce tory is in preparation of the on the ground. In addition to covering peocompetition: Make sure to be fully staffed and ready to pour ple with tomato sauce, he said as many bloodies as possible. the festival aims to bring these A valid secret, considering the people together for a common East Side sold 1,000 bloody cause. “The best thing about Tomato mary ballots at last year’s com(It’s one afternoon to show them petition. And what better way to what Milwaukee’s East Side has work off a bloody buzz but to offer. Romp!) is that we do by throwing around a few get people from all over who are pounds of tomatoes? The rot- not regular visitors,” Plaisted ten tomato fight starts at 4 p.m., said. “It’s one afternoon to show with required waivers avail- them what Milwaukee’s East able to fill out beginning at 10 Side has to offer.” Tomato Romp! takes place a.m. at the East Side Green Market. The cost to fight is $5 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Satand comes with a free T-shirt. urday, Sept. 17 on North Avenue All proceeds are donated to one between Prospect and Oakland or more organizations to help Avenues. For more info, visit theeastside.org. fight hunger.

Poundstone brings unpredictability to the Pabst Audience plays key role in comic’s live performance By Matt Mueller matthew.mueller@marquette.edu

Paula Poundstone is everywhere. She can be heard as a panelist on National Public Radio’s popular news quiz show, “Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me,” released a CD in 2009 called “I Heart Jokes: Paula Tells Them In Maine,” and regularly appears as a guest on “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson.” If there’s a medium for comedy out there, Paula Poundstone has found a way to bend her comedic stylings around it. And now, those stylings can be found in Milwaukee. On Friday, Sept. 16, Poundstone will bring her unique brand of hilarious standup to the Pabst Theater at 7 p.m. The comedienne plans to riff on topics ranging all the way from Abraham Lincoln to the Hardy Boys, while also taking on

popular news stories “in order to be a decent voter.” A large chunk of her routine is also autobiographical and features stories about her family, which includes three children, sixteen cats, a dog, a lizard, a bunny and an ant farm. “I’m a very unproductive farmer,” Poundstone joked. “Not one animal in my house does anything useful.” Poundstone’s most famous standup element, however, is her ability to interact with the audience. As the night goes on, the performer hears small stories from the crowd and then interweaves those biographies into her routine. These improvised and unplanned crowd conversations are a large part of why the comedienne was named one of the 100 greatest comics of all time by Comedy Central and interviewed for The Comedy Hall of Fame. Even without the awards, though, Poundstone enjoys the unpredictable interactions on their own merit. “That’s really the joy of the night,” Poundstone said. “I have material, and I think its

good material, but what dictates work. For instance, on NPR’s where I go and what I do is the “Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me,” Poundstone has unscripted concrowd in front of me.” Poundstone’s reliance on the versations with her other panelists about the crowd during her standup “That’s really the joy of the night. various questions and anshows was I have material, and I think its swers given on an important good material, but what dictates the show. Acreason why where I go and what I do is the cording to the the comic did crowd in front of me.” comic, the pannot release Paula Poundstone elists were once her first CD Comedienne asked about until 2009. moving towards While many more scripted comedians released CDs long before her responses, but they all rejected debut album, Poundstone want- the notion. “Sometimes that means that ed to wait for the microphone technology to improve so they there will be a swing and miss,” would not feel intrusive to the Poundstone said. “But the audience enjoys knowing that we audience. “During the first HBO spe- don’t know what is next and cial I did, it was a great issue that it is all spontaneous.” This comedic freedom is also whether or not I would be allowed to talk to the audience,” what draws Poundstone to apPoundstone said. “It ended up pear on “The Late Late Show working very well, but it was with Craig Ferguson” instead of a big ball of contention. I kept other talk shows. “Sometimes you’ll have prosaying ‘Then why did you hire me?’ It’d be like hiring Houdini ducers come in and tell you what you can or cannot say,” but saying no tricks.” The comedienne’s emphasis Poundstone said. “They don’t on unplanned content extends really do that on ‘Craig Ferguinto much of her other comedic son.’”

Photo courtesy of Derek Rudy

Paula Poundstone is known for her spontaneous comedy.

Whatever medium she works in, whether it is TV, radio or live performance, Paula Poundstone’s unscripted comedic style is the star. Friday’s routine at the Pabst Theater should be no different. In fact, the only predictable thing about the evening is that it will be unpredictable. Paula Poundstone will be at the Pabst Theater on Friday, Sept. 16. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets range from $24.50 to $42.50. For more info, visit pabsttheater.org.


MARQUEE

10 Tribune

Thursday, September 15, 2011

COLUMN

What does your home design say about you?

Sarah Elms I am obsessed with HGTV. For those of you who are not in your 40s or one of my poor roommates who has to share a TV with me, HGTV stands for Home and Garden Television. The channel covers everything from interior design to house hunting to landscaping to home inspections, and I can’t get enough of it. Although I enjoy the design tips, gardening demos and homeowner advice (I mean, I’ll own a home someday, right?),

I’ve come to the realization that what I really tune in for is the opportunity to take a peek inside other people’s houses – and not in a creepy, snoopy sort of way. I like HGTV because it gives me a glimpse into people’s lives. A home says a lot about the person or people who live there. The flooring, furniture and paint colors say as much about someone as the personal items they choose to display and the ways in which they display them. I am without a doubt a people person. When I meet someone, I want to know everything about them. I want to know what makes them tick, their likes, their dislikes and what’s important to them. For me, HGTV is as much about people watching as it is home design. While I’m not particularly picky about my people watching, my favorite shows are the ones set in Milwaukee or the surrounding area. I connect to

these episodes more because the I am captivated by Home homeowners live in the same Again because the featured incity as I do. We likely eat at the dividuals are young, hip and same restaurants, walk through live in neighboring areas like the same parks and shop at the Bay View, Walker’s Point and same malls, and I think that Riverwest. That, and the décor connection is pretty neat. of their homes make it clear So when I came across Home they lead creative lives. Again, a blog by MilwaukeeI imagine they embrace the based marketkind of lifeing freelancer “I’ve come to the realization style I hope I Ghazal Sheei, that what I really tune in for is will have in I was ecstatic. the opportunity to take a peek five years or Sheei seems to so – living on share my inter- inside other people’s houses a budget, givest in learning – and not in a creepy, snoopy ing back to the about people sort of way.” city and doing and families something I by how they love for a livchoose to design their personal ing. Who knew you could infer spaces, and she uses her blog so much just from the way a as a platform to contribute her house is decorated? thoughts and findings. She phoAfter visiting the blog several tographs the homes of Milwau- times, I got to thinking that you kee creatives — artists, musi- don’t have to be an incredibly cians, designers and the like creative mind to make a state— and posts them with a brief ment with your living space. I write-up to bring in context and am by no means an artist, and I incorporate her interpretation of think my room in my apartment each space. says a lot about me. It is bright,

clean and an organized mess, with artwork, trinkets and photos that I have collected over the years on display. My room speaks to my person, my interests, values and passions, and I hope that translates to people when they visit. So take a look at your home, your dorm, apartment, house or whatever space you live in, and figure out what you want it to say about you. If you feel like it’s missing something, then personalize it! Are you organized? Eclectic? Traditional? Let your space reflect who you are. Your home doesn’t only have to be the place where you eat and sleep. It should be a place where you express yourself. If you don’t know where to start, visit the Home Again blog or turn on HGTV to get those ideas rolling. But be warned, you might just get hooked. sarah.elms@marquette.edu

Milwaukee becomes a stage

Photo courtesy of Wild Space Dance Company

The Pritzlaff Building is the site of Wild Space Dance Company’s latest performance, “In the Space Between.”

Wild Space brings modern dance to Pritzlaff Building By Vanessa Harris vanessa.harris@marquette.edu

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Wild Space Dance Company’s name is only a small indication of their dynamic approach to contemporary dance. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, the Milwaukee-based dance group has been creating emotionally charged and site-specific choreography for all types of audiences since the 1980s. Their productions resemble pictures in motion rather than traditional dance performances. Founded in 1986 by artistic director Debra Loewen, recently named 2011 Milwaukee Arts Board Artist of the Year, Wild Space’s biggest mission is to expand contemporary dance and its appeal to audiences in Wisconsin and beyond. Loewen believes they’ve been successful so far. “We’re still around making work today and the work is still outside the mainstream,” she said. Many of Wild Space’s performances over the past 25 years have been with artists from many different, non-dance art mediums, including published poets, sculptors and photographers, and with visual art organizations like the Milwaukee Art Museum and Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design. With each new collaboration, Wild Space

takes advantage of the opportunity in the works since June, will highto expose their audience to new and light intimate dances in unusual places, accompanied by Bambergexciting spaces and scenery. Loewen sees Milwaukee as er’s art. Audiences will experience a great inspiration for her work an interactive and creative piece and the performances Wild Space while exploring the historic Pritzlaff Dance creates. To her, Milwaukee Building as they watch Wild Space dancers appear in window seals and is full of fascinating backdrops. “I’ve been doing this for years peeking around corners. Bamberger’s photography for “In and Milwaukee has been my muse,” she said. “I’m proud of bringing up the Space Between” changes every places and spaces that audiences second, manipulating reality and memories as the images shift and had no idea exist.” Recognizable landmarks like alter throughout the piece. Performthe Milwaukee Art Museum and ers develop a partnership and move the historic Turner Hall Ballroom, in sync with the images as they along with the more obscure city dance through the Pritzlaff. Unlike most dance concerts, autreasures like the Holton Viaduct Marsupial Bridge, a pedestrian and diences will be able to move in groups and watch bicycle path site-specific dances that crosses “I’ve been doing this for years and throughout the buildthe Milwauing. “In the Space kee River Milwaukee has been my muse. I’m Between” will aland con- proud of bringing up places and low the dancers to nects to the spaces that audiences had no idea be seen in different Brady Street exist.” n e i g h b o rDebra Loewen spaces at different hood, have 2011 Milwaukee Arts Board Artist of the Year times, making the performance more all funcrealistic and personal tioned as stages for Wild Space’s dancers. In to viewers. “I like to put the human element addition, the group has performed both across the country, in places in performances,” said Loewen. “I like New York, Minneapolis and want dancers to look real. It won’t Chicago, and internationally in Ja- look like ‘So You Think You Can pan and South Korea. Dance.’” The company’s latest perfor“In the Space Between” takes mance, “In the Space Between,” place Sept. 15-17 at the Pritzlaff will kick off their 25th anniver- Building, 325 N. Plankinton Ave., sary season at the historic Pritzlaff at 8 p.m. Admission prices are $25 Building Sept. 15. The performance for premium tickets, $20 for general is a collaborative effort with inter- admission and $18 for students and nationally known photographer seniors. Tickets can be purchased Tom Bamberger. by calling 414-271-0712 or online The performance, which has been at wildspacedance.org.


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Study Break

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Tribune 13

Edited by Timothy E. Parker August 15 DOWN ENTERTAINING BOUQUET By Paul 1 300 in old Rome ACROSS 2 Malcolm’s TV dad 1 Currently fashionable 3 “... rose ___ rose” (Gertrude Stein) 5 Walk laboriously 4 Certain Mexican-American 11 Animal of the Zodiac 5 Cone on the plains 14 Carry’s partner 6 “___ Without a Cause” 15 Even more spooky 7 Internet addresses 16 ___ y plata (Montana’s motto) 8 Roman historian Cassius 17 “Mighty Aphrodite” actress 9 Earth study (Abbr.) 19 Prefix with “hazard” 10 Regal fur 20 Gear for bullfighters 11 Led Zeppelin star 21 Narrow and elongated 12 Diva’s repertoire 23 Clothing 13 “A Visit from St. Nicholas” poet 26 Scandinavian 18 Impatient (to go) 27 ’90s fad: ___ Babies 22 Poor dog’s portion, in rhyme 28 Invention protection 23 Coptic bishops 31 Noble Englishman 24 Bead on a string, perhaps 32 Java’s place 25 “A Mighty Wind” actress 33 Larger-than-life 28 Prefix meaning “false” 36 Craft measured in cubits 29 Makes public, as grievances 37 Not a brand name 30 “___-Pan” (1966 James Clavell novel) 40 Baton Rouge inst. 32 “Green Gables” girl 41 Whole bunch 34 Question for discussion 50 Fancy ice cream design 43 African antelopes 35 Crescent moon features 51 Impatient 44 Accumulate 38 “Which came first?” option 53 Kind of hoop 46 Tattered 39 Hostage taker 54 Hunt and peck 48 Talk freely 42 City on the Brazos 57 Boston’s DiMaggio 49 Humane org. 45 Childhood illness 58 Be indisposed 51 Landed properties 47 Nozzle connected to a Bunsen burner 59 Gun-owners’ org. 52 Nike logo 48 Tom Hanks has two 60 Short girl at a society ball? 54 Mexican dishes 49 Phoenix nest? 55 Common possessive 56 “The Wizard of Oz” star CAFFREY’S & MURPHY’S PUB PREPARE YOU FOR THE BIG DAY! 61 Obsolete preposition 62 One running away to get married 63 Dublin’s country 64 “You ___ dog, you!” 65 Lion handlers 66 Broad, thick piece Previous Issue Answers

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Sports

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 14

Thursday, September 15, 2011

women’s Volleyball

Mrotek helps restore power

Golden Eagles dropped first set since Sept. 3 By Mark Strotman

mark.strotman@marquette.edu

Entering Tuesday night’s intra-state rival match with the Wisconsin-Green Bay Phoenix, the Marquette Golden Eagles (83) had won four straight contests at home. Sophomores Courtney Mrotek and Julie Jeziorowski ensured the streak made it to five. After a sluggish first set, the Golden Eagles rebounded and used a 10-0 run to open the third set to take down the Phoenix in four sets (21-25, 25-13, 25-20, 25-15) at the Al McGuire Center. The Golden Eagles last had dropped a set on Sept. 3, but that streak ended quickly Tuesday as three service errors and a handful of sloppy plays that lacked offensive rhythm led to a .030 hit percentage in the first frame and a lost set. Junior middle hitter Dani Carlson, who finished with 12 kills and two assisted blocks, said the team lacked energy early, taking each play one at a time instead of building momentum. “Things just weren’t clicking and it seemed like we weren’t riding off each other’s momentum,” Carlson said. The Golden Eagles had been strong in the first set before Tuesday night. In seven wins prior to Tuesday they owned a 6-1 record in the first set. Coach Bond Shymansky attributed the rebound in the first set to a focused group of players who are able to “turn the light switch on.” “We’ve really turned a corner because, last year, if our team came out without turning the light switch on, they couldn’t turn it on mid-match,” Shymansky said. “And tonight, we came out flat, and we didn’t have the light switch turned on, but we turned it on.” After right side hitter Courtney Mrotek ended the second set with two kills and a solo block, Carlson said the team was calm because it was still very much in the game and had not opened up its playbook at all. In the third set, the Golden Eagles reeled off 10 straight points to pull away from the Phoenix (3-8) in the third set. Mrotek, who finished with a career-high 12 kills and a blistering .524 hit percentage, said the team relaxed after the second set and went back to the basics, keeping the

momentum and pressure on Green Bay. The Golden Eagles improved their hit percentage in each set, while Jeziorowski played the role of electrician with her defensive play in the latter portion of the match. The sophomore libero finished with 30 digs, one off her career-high, and covered all areas of the floor. Her play woke up the defense, which put the offense back into rhythm and completed the momentum shift. “That’s what turned the tide for us because then our physicality outlasted them

through the course of the match,” Shymansky said. As impressive as it is for the team to be able to rebound after a poor set, Mrotek said the team’s goal is to begin the game with the light switch on, rather than having to “turn it on” mid-match. “We’re past the freakout, and we’re past the overexcitement or overamped kind of mentality,” Shymansky said. “And I see our team being able to focus in when the competition gets really tight.”

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Sophomore right side hitter Courtney Mrotek led Marquette with 12 kills against the Phoenix.

Not everyone can ‘C’ him dance

By Mike Nelson

michael.e.nelson@marquette.edu

When older drinkers encounter younger, overly intoxicated individuals, the saying “I remember my first beer,” springs quickly to mind. Because it stood out from the crowd, much like inebriated college students, the new hip saying at Marquette will soon be “I remember James “C” Nortey’s first collegiate goal.” The infamous goal was earned Sept. 2, during a tense, double-overtime game against Western Michigan, which Marquette ultimately won. After drilling the ball past the Western Michigan keeper and into the back left corner of the net, the freshman midfielder proceeded to roll off five consecutive backflips. Coach Louis Bennett had some advice for Nortey after the goal. “The first thing he said was, ‘C, you need to spend more energy playing the game than doing backflips,’” Nortey said. “(Bennett) said, ‘Next time, if you score, just do two of those rather than 10

Futile NBA locks out its fans Erik Schmidt

men’s soccer

Nortey still shy about breaking out dance moves for teammates

Column

of those.”’ Nortey, currently tied for the team lead in goals (two) with junior forward Andy Huftlain, learned how to do backflips as a child growing up in Ghana. “The backflip has been my (goal) celebration since high school,” Nortey said. “I learned it when I was five because it’s part of culture in Ghana. All of your friends are doing it when you’re very little. You’re the odd one if you’re not doing it, so I learned it when I was very little, and it’s been part of me for a while now.” In addition to backflips and soccer, Nortey showcases his athleticism as a dancer. Nortey participated in a modern dance class — which requires participants to learn ballet techniques — all four years at the Hotchkiss School in Connecticut. He initially did it to improve his flexibility for soccer, but eventually, it became a passion. “Some people make fun of me for it, but I want to learn it,” Nortey said. “I don’t care if people laugh about it. I’m from a different culture and I’m used to just doing stuff and not caring what others think. I just said, ‘Why not?’” Nortey has yet to show off the moves in front of his teammates, but that hasn’t stopped them from asking for a show.

“In the locker room they’ll play music that sounds like hip-hop music, and I tell them that I cannot (dance to) that,” Nortey said. “Every time a song is on they ask, ‘Where’s C? Let’s see him dance.’ But I’ve never done it.” That doesn’t mean Nortey doesn’t bust a move in front of close friends. “I’m sure he’ll open up to the team,” said DJ Schillinger, a freshman midfielder and one of Nortey’s two roommates. “There are individuals he’ll do it in front of. In the room, he’s a handful once he starts dancing.” Also participating in the dance class at Hotchkiss was freshman guard Derrick Wilson of the men’s basketball team. The two spent four years together at Hotchkiss where they were track and field teammates all four years and members of the same dormitory floor for two years. Wilson said Nortey is “definitely” the better dancer of the two. He added that Nortey “took it to the next level” in a classroom filled with fellow Hotchkiss athletes. “At first I wasn’t sure if I wanted to do it, but I decided I wanted to figure out what it is about dance that everybody liked. When I did that I found out I really liked it,” Nortey said.

Where, oh where, is the NBA? Is it ever coming back? Locked out, locked up, locked away in some hard to reach tower like a forlorn fairytale princess. That’s where the NBA is. And the chances of it being rescued look morbid. Bleak. Doomed. As in, no basketball until 2012. If the Mayans have their way, maybe no basketball ever. You can tell your kids you witnessed the end of the world. The Apocalypse. It was on a Friday in early July. That’s when the collective bargaining agreement ended and the NBA joined the NFL as the second pro-sports organization shut down by labor strife this year. It was a sad day. Red Auerbach’s ghost shoved a lit stogie into its eye. Deron Williams packed up and moved to Turkey. David Stern cackled and high-fived the devil. Of course, the NFL’s lockout ended months ago, and the season started on schedule last week, the result of good, old-fashioned hard work and sagacity. Comparatively, it’s been over two months, and we’re still not even remotely in the ballpark to getting professional basketball this year. The players and owners, it appears, are deliberately trying to screw each other out of millions of dollars, which seems counterproductive but makes sense when you consider that owners, despite their fortunes, are cheap and selfish, and players have egos that need to be fed every hour, or they wilt and die. That’s understandable; it comes with the territory of being rich and famous and corrupted by power. But honestly, does it seem like they’re even trying to get a deal done? There was a meeting on Tuesday, and it seems like things only got worse. Meanwhile, players are jumping ship to European and Asian leagues in what appears to be some sort of collaborated mass diaspora, gobbling up lucrative contracts and basically telling the NBA it can eff itself with its low-balling flex salary cap proposal. The owners are probably off in Wonderland swimming in Stern’s caviar Jacuzzi and smoking rolled up hundreds. It’s not like they’re rational with their money, anyway. The projected loss of not having a season is over a billion dollars, yet they refuse to cave and pay the players what they want. And, of course, the players don’t want to compromise and accept anything less than what they’ve already been making. Mortgages on Lamborghini’s don’t pay themselves off, after all. So here we are, two sides on complete opposite ends of the spectrum, staring, waiting for the other to blink first. It’s a Mexican standoff of excruciating futility. All the while, the fans suffer. Of course the fans suffer. Who else would? The players can always play somewhere. The owners can always own something. But if there’s no NBA, then what exactly do basketball fans cheer for? There’s probably a tasteless joke about the WNBA in here somewhere, but let’s just move on. The fans are caught in the crossfire here, in this vituperative, seething war that we’re helpless to stop. Confusing terms See Fans, page 16


SPORTS

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Tribune 15 Player of the Week

Sports Calendar

The Killer

Women’s Soccer vs. Pittsburgh - 7 p.m.

Ashley Beyer Men’s Soccer at Michigan - 1 p.m.

Sunday 18

Thursday 15 Fri.

16

Women’s Volleyball vs. Middle Tennessee State - 7 p.m.

Sat.

17

Women’s Tennis at Milwaukee Tennis Classic - All Day

Fri.

16

Fri.

16

Men’s Soccer vs. Michigan State - 7:05 p.m.

Cross Country at National Catholic Championship - 2:30 p.m.

Sat.

Sun.

17

Men’s Tennis at Milwaukee Tennis Classic - All Day

women’s Soccer

18

Volleyball vs. Minnesota 1 p.m.

the stats Kills.......................110 Digs........................87 Aces.......................19 the facts Ashley Beyer has bounced back from injury to tear the cover off the volleyball lately. The senior was named MVP of the Marquette/Milwaukee Invitational and followed that up by being tagged as the Big East Player of the Week. Beyer averaged 4.22 kills per set over the weekend and continued her torrid pace on Tuesday with a double-double (10 kills, 11 digs) against in-state rival Wisconsin-Green Bay Phoenix.

MU begins title defense Big East opener tonight against Pitt By Michael LoCicero michael.locicero@marquette.edu

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Junior defender Megan Jaskowiak has the team ready for the Big East.

It’s tough to question a team that has lost once in its first eight games (7-1-0), while outscoring opponents 22-5. Is the Marquette women’s soccer team prepared both mentally and physically to enter the grueling 11-game Big East portion of its schedule? “We have some things to take care of, but that is just going to come with some more time,” junior defender Megan Jaskowiak said. “But we had a really good nonconference part of the season so hopefully we can keep that going throughout the Big East.” The No. 8/9 Golden Eagles host the Pittsburgh Panthers (1-5-2) in their Big East opener tonight, a team they defeated 2-1 on the road to open the

conference slate last year. “I think the team is very well-rounded considering we’ve had a loss, and we’ve had a comeback win this past weekend,” sophomore forward Maegan Kelly said. Marquette’s only setback came at the hands of thenNo. 7/10 Florida State, 3-1. Beyond that, it has picked up impressive nonconference victories over Long Beach State, then-No. 14 Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Indiana, with the latter two coming on the road. Now, however, thoughts of repeating last year’s perfect conference mark 11-0-0 in conference play are far back in the mind of the Golden Eagles. “The Big East is a really hard conference, so it’s tough to say where we’ll finish,” Jaskowiak said. “If we play our game, we should be OK.” The team can’t afford to look ahead to crucial matchups at West Virginia (4-3-0)

this Sunday and Notre Dame (3-3-1), the defending national champion, at home on Sept. 25, without first taking care of business against Pittsburgh. The Panthers’ only win this season came on Aug. 28 against Delaware in the second game of the James Madison Tournament, and they have not scored a goal since a 2-2 draw against Colorado College on Sept. 2, a span of four games. Pittsburgh has been outscored 20-5 this season, with four of those goals coming from junior forward Ashley Cuba. If Marquette’s backline can contain Cuba and the Panthers, it will head to Morgantown, W.V., with a chip on its shoulder. The Mountaineers were picked to finish first in the American Division of the Big East by the media despite the Golden Eagles’ perfect mark in See Title, page 16

women’s Tennis

Retooled roster ready to go Diaz, Fischer, Hush only women back By Trey Killian robert.killian@marquette.edu

Marquette women’s tennis closed the 2010-11 season with a fourth-place finish in the Big East Championship Tournament after losing 4-3 to third-seeded DePaul. The team ended up with a winning record overall (19-11), but failed to qualify for the NCAA Championships. This year’s squad looks much different and will be looking for a different result. After losing Rachael Hush and Christina Ruiz to graduation, and after three players were dismissed from the team for violating team rules, the Golden Eagles welcome four new faces: junior Ashley Grafton, freshmen Ali Dawson and Ana Pimienta, and graduate student Kristina Radan. Seniors Gillian Hush and Olga Fischer and sophomore Rocio Diaz are the only remaining players from last year’s squad but emerged last year as potential team leaders. Hush was second on the team in singles wins with 22 and teamed with Chelsea Utting for a 21-10 doubles record. Fischer recorded a 21-18 record last season and experienced the most success in doubles when paired with Diaz, with the duo finishing 11-4.

Though only playing in 16 singles matches during the spring semester, Diaz impressed with a 12-4 record and finished the season on a seven-match win streak. Grafton comes to Marquette as a transfer from the U.S. Naval Academy but played most of her tennis at Marian Military Institute, where she qualified for national tournaments in both the spring and fall seasons. The Oklahoma native will be unable to play for the Golden Eagles this season due to her transfer status. Radan graduated from the University of Oklahoma where she spent 2008-2010 on the tennis team. By not competing at Oklahoma for the full four years, Radan was allowed by the NCAA to compete with the Golden Eagles this season. Dawson, from Irvine, Calif., and Pimienta out of La Herradura, Mexico, have already impressed coach Jody Bronson in practice. “We’re very impressed with Ali (Dawson). She was nationally ranked in high school and has a lot of tournament experience,” Bronson said. “Ana (Pimienta) played at a very high level in Mexico and is a very aggressive player who really attacks the ball.” “I’m hoping to go out there and do my best on the court but also grow into the team aspect,” Dawson said. “Tennis has usually been a more individual sport for me, but being on this team is a totally

different atmosphere. I’m really looking forward to seeing where I stand on the team.” Bronson said that doubles play is her chief concern going into the season with a relatively new squad. She is looking to determine who plays well with who based on singles results. The Milwaukee Tennis Classic this weekend, Bronson said, will be a good opportunity to engage in the necessary mixing and matching. “The good thing about this tournament is we can put anybody anywhere,” Bronson said. “We can throw a number four player into a match if we want to see how she will do against a really good player, and we can also change our doubles teams every day, so we can look at different combinations.” Fischer is looking forward to the tournament as a chance for the new faces to become more familiar with the members of last year’s roster, as well as a chance to play in from of a friendly crowd. “Right now we are focused on getting to know one another with all the new additions,” Fischer said. “We’re really excited (for the Milwaukee Classic) because it’s our home tournament, and people can come and support us, especially our friends and family.”

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Senior Olga Fischer went 21-18 last year in singles play and 11-4 in doubles.

If you haven’t seen the video clip of junior guard Junior Cadougan singing his sweet little heart out to Mariah Carey’s “You’ll Always be my Baby,” stop whatever you’re doing, go on to the Tribune website and check it out. I mean it. This is the stuff of legend you will tell your grandchildren about in 40 years. I’m not one to criticize bad singing, seeing as we make William Hung look like Andrea Bocelli. But what Cadougan was doing right there was not singing. Singing involves some sort of melodic tones. Singing does not incapacitate dogs living in

a two mile radius. Singing does not make eardrums curl up in the fetal position. And if you thought that 30-second snippet was bad, wait until you get treated to the full version on the surround sound speakers at the Bradley Center. The best part of the whole story though, was Cadougan actually felt good about his performance and thought he had done well. You have to hand it to him though, if there’s one thing you want in your point guard leader, it’s confidence. Judging by that clip, Junior has that in spades.


16 Tribune

SPORTS

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Live In The Now

Continued from page 14:

Fans: Owners, players at fault

are being thrown around, hollow words like “decertification” and “profit-sharing” are used like they mean something important. Fingers are cocked and pointed in every direction. Everyone is blaming the guy on his right. Blame the players. Blame the owners. Blame the small market teams for not being able to carry their own weight. Blame Dr. James Naismith for inventing this silly game in the first place. Blame everyone. And do nothing. That’s how this seems to work. So the players will play overseas and make their millions anyway. And the owners will rest on their haunches and stack their billions anyway. And the fans? Well, we get screwed, don’t we? And we get no basketball until 2012. Personally, I think the Mayans were right. erik.schmidt@marquett.edu

Continued from page 14:

Title: Chip on team’s shoulder conference play last season. “Playing both West Virginia and Notre Dame is difficult no matter when you play them because they’re both quality teams” Jaskowiak said. Despite West Virginia’s three losses, it may provide Marquette with its biggest road test of the season and could determine whether the Golden Eagles win its division for the third consecutive season. In addition to the West Virginia and Notre Dame contests, road games against Cincinnati (4-2-2) on Oct. 2 and St. John’s (4-2-1) on Oct. 14 should go a long way in determining whether Marquette earns a first-round bye and gets to play at home in the quarterfinals of the Big East Championship Tournament. “I think the returning players know that the season is a marathon, so we need to take care of business at home,” coach Markus Roeders said. “A quarterfinal match (in the Big East Championship Tournament) at home would be awesome. “We know that there are no easy games in our conference,” Roeders said. “We have to take care of business against Pittsburgh (tonight) before we can worry about the next game.”

Sept 15th, 2011 : The Marquette Tribune  

The Marquette Tribune

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