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WHITE: No excuses: Stop complaining and spark some change – Viewpoints, page 8

The Marquette Tribune SPJ’s 2010 Best All-Around Non-Daily Student Newspaper

Check getting comfortable Marquee recaps the Milwaukee Film Festival with his backline PAGE 16

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Since 1916 www.marquettetribune.org

Volume 96, Number 12

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Media goes wild over Knox verdict change The media went wild, plastering headlines about the case across the Internet and in print the next day. The Huffington Post put together a slideshow of Twitter reactions shortly after the verdict was released. The Telegraph, a By Katie Doherty British newspaper, wrote one conkathleen.doherty@marquette.edu stantly updated story; one section even followed her plane from EuNews broke Monday on what rope to the United States via GPS. The Knox case bore more than had been one of the biggest stories set before the American public. It a passing resemblance to another wasn’t about the financial crisis. case from this summer: that of No wars were ended or begun. Casey Anthony, who was charged with the murder of her Bipartisan comprotwo-year-old daughter mise still remained “The driving factor Caylee but found inelusive. on selecting what to nocent in July. AnthoThe news was that ny and Knox dominatAmanda Knox, found report is driven by ed the headlines while guilty in 2009 for the economics ... what news on the financial 2007 killing of her news sells.” British roommate in Janine Geske crisis and other pressProfessor of Law ing issues were an afPerugia, Italy, had terthought. that verdict overJanine Geske, former turned by an Italian appellate court, freeing her and Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice, her Italian boyfriend, also con- current Marquette professor of law, and leader of the law school’s victed in the case.

American woman released after four years in Italian jail

restorative justice program, watched coverage of the Knox case in Belgium where she is teaching restorative justice at the Catholic University of Leuven. She said the fact that Knox took precedence over other worthy stories was lamentable. “Issues of genocide, war, torture, hunger, poverty, sickness, world economies, education, politics etc., all impact many more people and relationships than do these (cases),” Geske said in an email. “Unfortunately, I think most people would agree that the driving factor on selecting what to report is driven by economics... what news sells.” Bonnie Brennen, a professor of journalism at Marquette, questioned the media’s obsession with these cases. “Why is there such an interest with the lives of these women and their court cases when other court cases (and news stories) don’t See Media, page 7

Visionary Jobs dead at 56 Technology pioneer leaves legacy of success, simplicity andrew.phillips@marquette.edu

By Matt Gozun benjaminmatthew.gozun@marquette.edu

Photo by Paul Sakuma/Associated Press

Steve Jobs introduces the third-generation iPod Nano in 2007. Jobs died Wednesday after a long and public battle with pancreatic cancer.

high school friend Steve Wozniak in 1976 in a suburban California garage, and eight years later revo-

INDEX

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MU expands ethics hotline options Little-known reporting system also includes website

By Andrew Phillips Steve Jobs, the co-founder and former CEO of Apple who repeatedly transformed the way people use and think about technology, died Wednesday at the age of 56. His death was announced by Apple, which did not give a specific cause. Jobs had fought a long and public battle with pancreatic cancer, undergoing surgery in 2004 and receiving a liver transplant in 2009. He took three leaves of absence from Apple for medical reasons before resigning as CEO in August. Tim Cook, Jobs’ successor as CEO, announced Jobs’ death to Apple employees in an email Wednesday. “Apple has lost a visionary and creative genius, and the world has lost an amazing human being,” Cook said in the email, which was released by Apple. “Those of us who have been fortunate enough to know and work with Steve have lost a dear friend and an inspiring mentor. Steve leaves behind a company that only he could have built, and his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple.” Jobs founded Apple with his

Photo by Ted S. Warren/Associated Press

Amanda Knox reacts to an Italian appellate court’s overturuning of her 2009 guilty verdict for the 2007 kiling of her British roommate in Italy.

CLASSIFIEDS..................13 STUDY BREAK....................14 SPORTS..........................16

lutionized personal technology See Jobs, page 7

Marquette recently expanded its financial misconduct reporting service, allowing students, faculty and staff to anonymously provide tips about possible violations against university policies in a broader range of categories. But despite the expansion, some doubts have been raised about whether the hotline’s usage will increase. Individuals will now be able to call or report online possible cases of misconduct in academic, financial, athletic, human resources, information technology and safety matters. The service was initiated in 2006 and is run by Oregon-based EthicsPoint, Inc., a corporation specializing in compliance and policy management. Both the phone line and the website are run and operated by EthicsPoint, but the company says it is Marquette that decides what to do with the information received. “We’re a software company,” said Bob Conlin, EthicsPoint’s

senior vice president of business strategy, in an email. “We have no input on the specific policies each of our customers manages within our system.” Marquette hired EthicsPoint in order to allow employees to report cases of financial misconduct, with the expectation that the number of reportable subjects would increase in time. Of the few cases reported to the university since then, none involved serious dollar amounts, said Ruth Shock, director of the office of internal audit at Marquette. And despite the cost associated with running the program, Shock said she considers working with EthicsPoint an investment in maintaining high ethical standards on campus. “Increasing the reportable subjects on the hotline provides the university a way in which to be better informed about misconduct and reflects the university’s commitment to compliance issues,” Shock said in an email. Even though EthicsPoint was targeted toward university employees until recently, Shock said the administration is working to increase community awareness of the program over the next few weeks. Nick Kubit, a junior in the See Hotline, page 7

News

VIEWPOINTS

NEws

SAT

EDITORIAL

Budget

Pressure motivates students to cheat on entrance exam. See PAGE 3

We need more choices to truly be basketball ‘Fanatics.’ See PAGE 8

Mental health care reform key to Abele’s Milwaukee budget See PAGE 7


NEWS

2 Tribune

New iPhone revealed Tech consumers disappointed by partial upgrade

patrick.simonaitis@marquette.edu

By Katie Doherty kathleen.doherty@marquette.edu

Robert Bishop, Opus dean of engineering, announced Monday that the College of Engineering received a $5 million endowment to establish a chair in electrical engineering. Clay and Beverly Lafferty, both 1950 Marquette graduates, donated the money for the endowment. “Clay and Beverly Lafferty are

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Thursday 6 Graduate and Professional School Exam Prep, AMU room 163, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Law School Barrock Lecture: ”RealityChallenged Philosophies of Punishment,” Eckstein Hall, 12:15 p.m. Photo by Paul Sakuma/Associated Press

New Apple CEO TIm Cook unveils the company’s iPhone 4S Tuesday. The device features a dual core processor, a better camera and voice control.

graphical performance than the processor in the iPhone 4. “It’s a whole new phone under the hood,” said Erica Sadun, a writer for The Unofficial Apple Weblog. Along with the enhanced speeds, the 4S can shoot full high-definition (1080p) video and 8 megapixel still photos. An enhanced voice reminder and control system called Siri is also one of the major additions. Sadun said she was planning to buy the new iPhone, adding she hoped Apple would offer it on her old contract. With a two-year contract, the 16 GB 4S will cost $199. Apple is offering a 32 GB version for $299 and a 64 GB version for $399. Unlike many, Sadun said she had expected the company to

present an upgrade rather than a new model, similar to the way the company offered an iPhone 3S before the iPhone 4. The 4S will be now be offered on the Sprint network, a change that makes T-Mobile the only major service provider not offering the iPhone. George Cady, a junior in the College of Business Administration and self-proclaimed Apple enthusiast, said while he was disappointed an iPhone 5 was not released, he finds some of the features of the 4S enticing enough to try it out. “I think a lot of people will buy it just because it’s an Apple product,” he said. “But if you can get a jailbroken one without the contract, that would be a good deal.”

benefactors who understand the full scope of the college’s mission — research, a strong faculty, student support and a facility that encourages innovation and learning,” Bishop said in a press release. “Their gifts touch every facet of the college.” The Laffertys have six children, three of whom are also Marquette graduates, according to the press release. Bishop said the endowment will go towards support in teaching and funding research for a faculty member once the search is completed for the newly-created Lafferty chair in the department of electrical and computer engineering.

The endowment could allow for the study of smart sensors in environmental challenges. “Renewable resources, water contamination, health ... these are areas that we as a human family face major challenges (in),” Bishop said. He said the college will search for a chair with experience in smart sensor systems. “Sensors are critical for detecting toxic agents in water, monitoring the safety of infrastructures, measuring the efficacy of implantable monitoring devices, and tracking pollution, among so many other things,” Bishop said.

life is a maze. it is full of

Mon., Oct. 3 At 5:41 p.m. a student reported that an unknown person(s) removed his secured, unattended property, estimated at $90, from O’Donnell Hall. MPD was contacted.

outside of Eckstein Hall. MPD was contacted. Tues., Oct. 4 At 12:37 a.m. a person not affiliated with Marquette was reported removing property from a business in the 1600 block of West Wells Street. DPS located and detained the suspect, who was taken into custody by MPD.

Events Calendar

Engineering gets $5M Alumni fund new chair position, study of environment

DPS Reports

At 11:45 p.m. a student reported observing two unidentified suspects removing a student’s unsecured, unattended moped, estimated at $1,100,

By Pat Simonaitis Tuesday, Apple unveiled the iPhone 4S, a souped-up offspring of their highly popular iPhone 4. The touchscreen smartphone, which will be on the market a week from Friday, has been met with mixed criticism and praise since its unveiling. The announcement marked Apple’s first major product event since the resignation of longtime CEO Steve Jobs, who passed away Wednesday. Some criticism of the phone stems from speculation prior to the announcement that Apple would be introducing a newly designed iPhone 5 instead. The company opted for an update rather than an overhaul, disappointing those looking for a next generation phone from Apple. Ginny Mies, an associate editor for PCWorld.com, said she found the release of the 4S to be “underwhelming.” “The main thing about Apple events is that there are all sorts of rumors and speculation coming into it,” Mies said. “So when a new edition iPhone 5 wasn’t introduced there was a feeling of a letdown.” Mies said buzz in the technological world was that Apple may have been planning to release a 4G iPhone. 4G phones, including some Google-powered Android phones, run on a network capable of faster streaming and downloading. Mies said the 4S could download at speeds comparable to 4G phones, but only on the AT&T network. While the outer design and exterior of the iPhone 4S remain unchanged from the earlier iPhone 4, the inside has been modified to work at higher speeds through the use of a dual core processor. Apple said the new processor will provide up to seven times better

Thursday, October 6, 2011

e overcome, xperiences t orev to s e l el in c a t s ... twists and turns, ob

embrace it.

On the Road to Your Career: Powered by Kohl’s, AMU 157, 12 p.m. to 12:50 p.m. Trailer Park Boys, The Pabst, 7 p.m.

Saturday 7 J. Cole, The Rave, 8 p.m. Minus the Bear, The Rave, 9 p.m. Alton Brown, The Pabst, 6 p.m. Milwaukee Empty Bowls, Milwaukee Area Technical College, 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Head and The Heart, Turner Hall Ballroom, 7 p.m. Target First Free Thursday, free admission to the Milwaukee Art Museum, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Friday 6 Pretty Lights, The Rave, 8 p.m.

Sunday 8 Los Bondadosos, The Rave, 4 p.m. Fire Safety Activities & Firehouse Cook Off, Harley-Davidson Museum, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Green Bay Packers at Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Dome, 7:20 p.m.

Contact Us and Corrections The article “Local leaders work towards improved education” on Page 4 of the Tuesday, Oct. 3 issue, incorrectly stated the Greater Milwaukee Foundation received a $1 million grant for the education reform program “Milwaukee Succeeds.” The foundation dedicated the $1 million to Milwaukee Succeeds, but did not receive a grant. The Tribune regrets the error. The Marquette Tribune welcomes questions, comments, suggestions and notification of errors that appear in the newspaper. Contact us at (414) 288-5610 or editor@marquettetribune.org.

The Marquette Tribune Editorial

Editor-in-Chief Matthew Reddin (414) 288-7246 Managing Editor Tori Dykes (414) 288-6969 NEWS (414) 288-5610 Editor Brooke Goodman Assistant Editors Dominic Tortorice, Andrew Phillips Closer Look Editor Caroline Campbell Assistant Closer Look Editor Leah Todd Investigative Reporters Zach Buchheit Administration Katie Doherty Campus Community Simone Smith College Life Sarah Hauer Consumer Patrick Simonaitis Crime/DPS Matt Gozun Metro Olivia Morrissey MUSG/Online Elise Angelopulos Religion & Social Justice Andrea Anderson General Assignment Allison Kruschke COPY DESK (414) 288-5198 Copy Chief Marissa Evans Copy Editors Alec Brooks, Sarah Butler VIEWPOINTS (414) 288-6969 Editor Kara Chiuchiarelli Editorial Writer Maria Tsikalas Columnists Bridget Gamble, Kelly White, Ian Yakob MARQUEE (414) 288-3976 Editor Sarah Elms Assistant Editor Jennifer Jorgensen Reporters Matthew Mueller, Liz McGovern, Vanessa Harris SPORTS (414) 288-6964 Editor Mike Nelson Assistant Editor Andrei Greska Copy Editor Michael LoCicero, Erin Caughey Reporters Trey Killian, Mark Strotman, Michael LoCicero, A. Wesley Herndon Sports Columnists Andrei Greska, Erik Schmidt

VISUAL CONTENT (414) 288-7940 Editor Zach Hubbard Closer Look Designer Katherine Lau Viewpoints Designer Zach Hubbard Sports Designers Monica Lawton, Martina Ibanez-Baldor News Designers Kaitlin Moon, Haley Fry Marquee Designer Rob Gebelhoff Photo Editor Aaron Ledesma Assistant Photo Editor Elise Krivit Photographers Brittany McGrail, Amanda Frank, Erin Caughey ----

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(414) 288-1738 Advertising Director Courtney Johnson Sales Manager Leonardo Portela-Blanco Art Director Joe Buzzelli Production Manager Lauren Krawczyk Classified Manager Erin LaHood Account Coordinator Manager Maude Kingsbury

The Marquette Tribune is a wholly owned property of Marquette University, the publisher. The Tribune serves as a student voice for the university and gives students publishing experience and practice in journalism, advertising, and management and allied disciplines. The Tribune is written, edited, produced and operated solely by students with the encouragement and advice of the advisor and business manager, who are university employees. The banner typeface, Ingleby, is designed by David Engelby and is available at dafont.com. David Engelby has the creative, intellectual ownership of the original design of Ingleby. The Tribune is normally published Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, during the academic year by Marquette Student Media, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881. First copy of paper is free; additional copies are $1 each. Subscription rate: $50 annually. Phone: (414) 288-7246. Fax: (414) 288-3998. E-mail: editor@marquettetribune.org

KEEP IT CLASSY


Thursday, October 6, 2011

NEWS

Tribune 3

SAT pressures spur six students to cheat N.Y. high schoolers pay undergrad to take entrance exam By Elise Angelopulos elise.angelopulos@marquette.edu

SAT training classes: $300. Private tutored sessions: $50. Ducking out of taking the SAT college entrance exam like many high school students dream of? Priceless. This was the plan for six high school teenagers from Long Island, N.Y. who paid Sam Eshaghoff, 19, a freshman at Emory University in Atlanta, between $1,500 and $2,000 to take their SAT exams for them, according to Fox News. Eshaghoff was arraigned on charges of planned fraud, criminal impersonation and falsifying business records, according to the Nassau County (Long Island) District Attorney’s Office. His bail was set at a $1,000 bond or $500 cash, but his attorney Matin Emouna, said his client has “cooperated with investigation and denied the charges,” according to Fox News. The District Attorney’s Office said the identities of the six students who paid Eshaghoff have not been released due to the fact they are minors, but Eshaghoff is scheduled for a court hearing within the next few weeks. The six

students involved in the SAT scam were released on their own recognizance, according to Fox News. Robert Blust, dean of the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at Marquette, said many students are consumed with the idea that only one university is their perfect fit. Blust also recognized other pressures. “I think a lot of pressure is selfinflicted,” Blust said. “But many times, it is a result of family pressures or students trying to keep up with their peers.” Blust said that in the past, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions has pulled acceptances based on test scores that were deemed invalid as a result of dishonesty or other unknown causes. “There is a range of academic misconduct steps we take in admissions” he said. “At Marquette, if such an instance occurred, we have the right to deny the student.” However, Blust stressed the importance of suspected students’ rights. He said situations involving criminal charges and court cases are subject to different appeals, and waiting to see how situations “play out” is valuable since students do have the right to appeal. Laura Kestner, director of the Career Services Center, said that although the students’ reputations may be tarnished, they are young and the opportunity still exists to rebuild themselves.

Photo by Elise Krivit/elise.krivit@marquette.edu

Nancy Younan, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, studies for the LSAT, the law school admissions test.

“If a student came into my office, I would do anything possible to help them communicate to a possible employer,” Kestner said, referring to the students’ postscandal career options. “Such actions do not reflect well on them or their futures, however.”

Marquette students like Ansel Bodelson, a freshman in the College of Arts & Sciences, recognize the pressures high school students feel to achieve high standardized test scores. “Most students view these tests as the determining factor for what

colleges they can get into,” Bodelson said in an email. “They spend countless hours and large sums of money to ensure that they do well on them.”

Worst hospitals treat larger share of poor

Study shows bigger risk of bankrupcy; Medicare data used By Carla K. Johnson Associated Press

The nation’s worst hospitals treat twice the proportion of elderly black patients and poor patients than the best hospitals, and their patients are more likely to die of heart attacks and pneumonia, new research shows. Now, these hospitals, mostly in the South, may be at higher risk of financial failure, too. That’s because the nation’s new health care law punishes bad care by withholding some money, says the lead author of the study published Wednesday in the journal Health Affairs. “These hospitals are going to have a much harder time in the new funding environment,” said Dr. Ashish Jha of the Harvard School of Public Health, who led the study. “I worry they’re going to get worse over time and possibly even fail. I worry that we’re going to see a bunch of that happening over the next three to five years.” Under the Affordable Care Act, hospitals that fail to improve will see their Medicare payments shrink by 1 percent starting October 2012. That could jeopardize some hospitals already on the brink of closure, Jha said. That unintended consequence of the health overhaul could increase health disparities for minorities, Jha said. “We have to make sure we pay attention to what the results of those policies are and be ready to change directions if they’re causing harm in the marketplace,” Jha said. The study doesn’t name the 178 hospitals the researchers rated as “worst” because of their low

quality of care and high costs. A data use agreement with Medicare prevented the researchers from identifying the hospitals publicly. The study, funded by the Commonwealth Fund, found 122 “best” hospitals with high quality and low costs. Those best hospitals were more likely to be in the Northeast, to be nonprofit and to have cardiac intensive care units compared to the worst hospitals. Elderly blacks made up 15 percent of patients in the worst hospitals and about 7 percent in the best hospitals. There were similar differences for people on Medicaid, the state-federal health program for the poor. Worst-hospital patients with heart attacks or pneumonia were more likely to die than similar patients at the

best hospitals. “value-based purchasing” reMedicare chief Don Berwick wards hospitals for their rate of called the study “valuable, but improvement, not just for attainnot completely new.” He said the ing goals, Berwick said. So hosfederal government is working to pitals that start farther behind can help all hospiget rewarded for tals improve. “These hospitals are going to have a making efforts “We know to catch up. And much harder time in the new they can imthe law provides prove,” even funding environment. I worry they’re money for hospiif they treat going to get worse over time and tal improvement sicker or dis- possibly even fail. ” programs. advantaged “If I were talkAshish Jha patients, Bering to safety net Harvard School of Public Health wick said. hospitals, I would “There are exsay, ‘I know it’s amples of safety net hospitals that hard. Here’s some help, and if are some of the best in the coun- you start (improving), you’ll get try.” He cited Denver Health, rewarded for starting,’” Berwick which has low death rates despite said. treating a large share of poor paFor the study, the researchers tients. used data from six sources to The health law’s so-called determine which hospitals were

worst and best. They divided the hospitals into four ranked groups for quality of care and divided them again into four ranked groups for cost. Of 3,229 hospitals analyzed, 122 were in the top group for quality and also in the group that had the lowest costs. The researchers compared those hospitals to the 178 that were in the bottom group for quality and had the highest costs. “What can we do to take the lessons from the high-performing institutions and help the low performers improve?” Jha asked. In markets outside of health care, business closures don’t so directly affect people’s survival, he said, but “here, there are tens of thousands of lives at stake.”


NEWS

4 Tribune

Thursday, October 6, 2011

MKE Bridges closed 4th

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2nd Eastbound Routes 10, 30, 44, 49, 79, 90 Eastbound Routes 12, 14, 23, 31,40, 43, 46, 48, 137

Traffic directed via Wells Street and Michigan Avenue By Simone Smith simone.smithw@marquette.edu

Drivers have felt the pain at the gas pump for some time, but this week introduced another possible pain at the wheel for Milwaukeeans. Monday marked the beginning of construction on the Wisconsin Avenue and Juneau Street bridges. The bridges are now closed and set to reopen in August and and November 2012, respectively. According to Craig Liberto, structural design manager for the City of Milwaukee, both bridges had advanced structural deterioration, although each has its own specific problems to repair. Liberto said the Juneau Street bridge will be completely reconstructed, with workers removing the entire bridge and replacing it. The Wisconsin Avenue bridge, on the other hand, will not be completely replaced. However, there will be major rehabilitation involved, including

Jackson

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By Phillip Rawls Associated Press

Wisconsin

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Legal immigrants fleeing state due to negative tone

Broadway

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MCTS Detour During Wisconsin Ave. Bridge Closure

Ala. law drives away workers

Source: Milwaukee County Transit System Graphic by Katy Moon/kaitlin.moon@marquette.edu

updating mechanical, electrical and hydraulic components to ensure the bridge is reliable for both river and pedestrian traffic. Liberto compared Milwaukee construction to a car, saying that it requires potentially expensive maintenance to keep it operating. The city is repairing both bridges at the same time with the help of federal funding. Milwaukee received a $21.5 million grant from the Obama administration to rehabilitate and replace the bridges. Though the construction may make the morning commute for those who use the bridges a hassle, Liberto said it could be worse. “If the city did not do this work, there would be a point where traffic would be detoured permanently or the bridge would close completely,” he said. “This would hurt the navigation industry in Milwaukee, which would not be able to serve its function.” Milwaukee’s Department of Public Works has made a number of changes to traffic routes in the downtown area as a way of helping commuters. “Wells Street is now a twoway to help drivers get from one place in the city to anoth-

er,” said Cecilia Gilbert, permits and communications manager for the DPW. “That’s one thing we do to accommodate them during ongoing projects.” Gilbert said businesses located around the project are also updated weekly on the construction’s progress. Signs are also placed around the area to inform drivers the businesses will remain open during construction. The DPW has been working on ways to help pedestrians avoid the construction as well, Gilbert said, including brochures that show how they can get across downtown through the skywalks. While the construction is inconvenient for many Marquette students, commuter students may feel the pain worst. Rebecca Marin, a sophomore in the College of Nursing and commuter student, said Milwaukee construction is useful, but annoying, especially depending on the season. “In winter it can be frustrating because you have the snow, and construction makes it even more irritating,” Marin said. “For people who (travel) an hour every day though, it could be a hassle ... but in general, construction is worth it.”

CheCk out the

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MU T V

99

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Channel 99 in the dorms and University apartments. Watch online at mutv.mu.edu

Alabama’s strict new immigration law may be backfiring. Intended to force illegal workers out of jobs, it is also driving away many construction workers, roofers and field hands in the country legally who do backbreaking jobs that Americans generally won’t. The vacancies have created a void that will surely deal a blow to the state’s economy and could slow the rebuilding of Tuscaloosa and other tornado-damaged cities. Employers believe they can carry on because of the dismal economy, but when things do turn around, they worry there won’t be anyone around to hire. Many legal Hispanic workers are fleeing the state because their family and friends don’t have the proper papers and they fear they will be jailed. Rick Pate, the owner of a commercial landscaping company in Montgomery, lost two of his most experienced workers, who were in the country legally. He spent thousands of dollars training them to install irrigation systems at places like the Hyundai plant. “They just feel like there is a negative atmosphere for them here. They don’t feel welcome. I don’t begrudge them. I’d feel nervous, too,” Pate said. While it’s not clear how many of an estimated 185,000 Hispanic people in the state have fled, one estimate figured as much one-fourth of the commercial building work force had left since the law was upheld last week, said Bill Caton, president of Associated General Contractors of Alabama. Commercial construction is a more than $7 billion-a-year industry in Alabama. Legislators said the law would help legal residents suffering from nearly 10 percent unemployment. One of the bill’s authors, Republican Sen. Scott Beason, said he expected short-term problems, but he has received “thank you” calls from two people who replaced illegal immigrants who fled their jobs. Beason predicts that trickle will become a rush. “We have the best law in the country and I stand by what we’ve done,” Beason said. Some farmers disagreed. On Chandler Mountain in north Alabama, tomato farmer Lana Boatwright said only eight of the 48 Hispanic workers she needed for harvest showed up after the law took effect. Those who did were frightened. “My husband and I take them to the grocery store at night and shop for them because they are afraid they will be arrested,” she said. Farmer Chad Smith said his family farm stands to lose up to $150,000 because there are not enough workers to pick tomatoes spoiling in the fields. “We will be lucky to be in business next year,” he said. The financial toll will vary by

area, and experts said it’s too early to make predictions. The law allows police to detain people indefinitely if they are suspected of being in the country illegally and requires schools to check the status of new students when they enroll. Those elements make it perhaps the toughest law in nation. The law targets employers by forbidding drivers from stopping along a road to hire temporary workers. It also bars businesses from taking tax deductions for wages paid to illegal workers and makes it a crime for an illegal immigrant to solicit work. A federal judge has temporarily blocked those sections of the law so she can study them more. Cristian Gonzalez, an illegal immigrant from Mexico, is a stay-at-home mother of four who lives in a mobile home in suburban Birmingham with her husband. They sneaked across the border in 2009 and planned to save money and eventually return to their home country. “We’re afraid to go to Walmart. I’m afraid to walk the kids up there to get the bus. I am afraid to drive,” Gonzalez said. Her husband worked as a brick mason and cook, but was recently unemployed. Now they have decided they probably will return to Mexico. “We’re just trying to be here one more year, but with this law ...” she said, her voice trailing off as she shook her head. In Tuscaloosa, there is still a lot of rebuilding to be done after Alabama’s killer tornadoes in April. Without the Hispanic workers to help out, it will take even longer for neighborhoods to be fixed up. Blake Corder, the president of the Home Builders Association of Tuscaloosa, noted that the workers had left the area and he even lost a few renters in the past week. Likewise, schools are worried about their students who have suddenly stopped showing up for class. Out of 34,000 Hispanic students, 2,285 were absent Monday. That number increased from Friday by a few hundred. The figures show seven out of every 100 Hispanic children were out of school, even though state school officials have tried to assure parents that they won’t release their names to police and that no child will be denied an education due to legal status. At Gonzalez’ mobile home community, driveways were full of cars and trucks at midday Tuesday, a time when most residents used to be at work. A resident who didn’t want to be identified out of fear of the law said people are afraid to venture out during daylight. “People are just not going to work. They don’t want to be arrested,” the woman said. Builders have complained they can’t find replacement workers and delays in projects are expected. Once the economy picks up and construction returns to normal, the impact will increase, said Russell Davis, executive vice president of the Home Builders Association of Alabama. “There is going to be a void. No question,” Davis said.


Thursday, October 6, 2011

NEWS

Tribune 5

Cost of health benefits to rise in 2012 Workers could pay more; MKE above national average By Pat Simonaitis patrick.simonaitis@marquette.edu

The cost of living across the U.S. has been steadily rising as the amount of disposable income families have on average has been falling. And another financial hit to consumers is coming in 2012, when the cost of health benefits are predicted to rise about 7 percent nationally, according to a report by Aon Hewitt. The company, a consulting firm based in Chicago, released a report Monday estimating a 6.7 percent increase in the costs of health benefits next year in Milwaukee, on par with the 7 percent national average. The group surveyed 371 employers that provide 13 million people with coverage nationally. In a Monday press release, the firm said a number of factors account for the increased cost projections, including a slowed hiring rate, which has led to an older

workforce. The rising prices are especially ominous given the current economic climate, said John Zern, executive vice president of Aon Hewitt. “In what continues to be an uncertain economic environment, organizations cannot afford health care costs growing at 7 percent each year,” Zern said in the press release, adding that employees will continue to see rising co-pays and deductibles. The firm said the increase means those companies could be adding the additional 7 percent of expenses to their balance sheets, an action which will affect employees and consumers alike. Jim McGibany, executive associate dean of the College of Business Administration and an economics professor, said this causes a complex dynamic for companies and their employees. McGibany said in an email that companies looking to keep cost levels about the same will pass on the expenses to their employees. “Since all employers do this differently, the amount of increase seen by (employees) will be different,” he said. “Some

employees may take the risk to go for a plan that has smaller increases in the benefit premiums they pay, but in return they will have to cover more of a deductible if they have some relatively major medical care.” The rise in costs has meant an increase in the cost borne by employees to offset the large increase. The amount an individual is on average expected to have to pay will be $2,306, or about 22 percent of the whole premium asked to be paid by the employers, according to Aon Hewitt. The firm projected premiums for an individual at a large company to be $10,475 next year, up from $9,792 in 2011. In Milwaukee, however, the average individual cost is projected to be higher than the national average, at $12,151. Marilyn Frenn, a professor in the College of Nursing and an expert on health care costs, said part of the reason for higher Milwaukee costs is the lack of masters and doctoral-educated nurses, which means higher-paid physicians often have to perform jobs nurses could have done. “In the Greater Milwaukee

area, our costs are higher than other regions, both because we have a somewhat older

population and because physicians charge higher fees,” she said.

Health Care Out-of-pocket costs employees will incur:

$3,150

$2,275

nationally

in Milwaukee area

Number of people with health insurance:

2009

2010 256.2 million

255.3 million

Sources: Aon Hewitt Press Release & National Conference of the State Legislatures Graphic by Katy Moon/kaitlin.moon@marquette.edu

Homicides tied to domestic violence

encouraged by the decrease in homicides related to domestic violence. Cooper said she hopes the public does not take its eyes off the issue. “We need to keep this in mind as the city’s domestic violence By Andrea Anderson agencies continue to assist vicandrea.anderson@marquette.edu tims at a steady pace,” she said. According to an annual report “One domestic violence homicide released Wednesday by the Wis- a year is too many.” WCADV’s report also shows consin Coalition Against Domestic Violence, an average of one that those subjected to domeshomicide per week in Wisconsin tic violence in lesbian, bisexual, is related to domestic violence – gay and transgender communiaccounting for 29 percent of ho- ties have a particularly difficult time seeking and getting the micides in the state. help or support A ten-year they need. To record high in “To be attacked by someone you combat this, domestic viothe Milwaukee lence homicides know well ... is absolutely horrifying. broke last year For that victim, someone who should LGBT Community Center has when the num- have made the victim feel safe and made a point ber decreased loved instead harmed her.” by 13.4 percent Rebecca Blemberg to serve as a from 2009. In Associate Professor of Law resource to any victims through 2010, 58 people its Anti-Viowere killed in 39 homicides. In 2009, 67 people lence Project. Cooper said there are many facwere murdered. The report states that 21 of the tors that contribute to violence 39 homicides occurred in Mil- within relationships. She said it waukee County. The other deaths is important to remember that this spanned across 17 counties, with type of violence affects everyone, victims ranging from infancy to regardless of age, marital status, race, cultural background, ecoage 87. Sue Cooper, an outreach and nomic status or sexual orientaadvocacy coordinator from the tion. According to the Centers for Student Health Service at Marquette, said she was not sur- Disease Control and Prevenprised by the statistics and was tion, one in four women and

Wis. murder cases down overall from 2009 to 2010

adolescents will be subject to domestic, verbal, sexual or emotional abuse. Rebecca Blemberg, former prosecutor in the Milwaukee County district attorney’s domestic violence unit and associate professor of law at Marquette, said she was not surprised by the statistics. “For female crime victims especially, the perpetrators are usually intimate partners,” Blemberg said in an email. “The prevalence of domestic violence in Wisconsin and around the world is heartbreaking.” Blemberg said many people perceive an attack by a stranger to be more terrifying than by someone they know, but that might not always be the case. “To be attacked by someone you know well ... is absolutely horrifying,” she said in an email. “For that victim, someone who should have made the victim feel safe and loved instead harmed her.” Organizations on campus like Empowerment work to reduce the stigma and negative connotations surrounding domestic abuse. According to a statement from Empowerment’s executive board, “As the feminist organization at Marquette we believe that domestic violence perpetuates the inequality between women and men. Domestic violence tends to be an unspoken issue in our society that deserves

Comparison of 2009 to 2010 Domestic Violence Incidents 2009

47

Homicides relating to domestic violence Homicides relating to domestic violence

39

2009

51

Victims of domestic violence homicide Victims of domestic violence homicide

45

2009

67

Total deaths Total deaths

58

2010

2010

2010

Source: Wisconsin Domestic Violence Homicide Report 2010 Graphic by Katy Moon/kaitlin.moon@marquette.edu

a greater amount of attention.” Among Empowerment’s awareness events is its annual promotion of the Vagina Monologues, performed as part of the V-Day Movement. The play was written by Eve Ensler and portrays testimonies from young women who have been abused. Empowerment donates the proceeds to organizations that

work to end violence against women. Marquette is currently working on enhancing its student education regarding domestic abuse and relationship violence. Milwaukee already has several organizations, such as the Sojourner Family Peace Center, WCADV and the Milwaukee LGBT Center.

ENJOY THIS WEEK’S BEAUTIFUL WEATHER!


NEWS

6 Tribune

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Palin not running for GOP nomination Former Alaska gov. ends months of pundit speculation By Charles Babington Associated Press

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin said Wednesday she will not run for president, leaving little doubt that the eventual Republican nominee will come from the current field of contenders. After months of leaving her fans guessing, Palin said in a statement that she and her husband Todd “devote ourselves to God, family and country.” She said her decision maintains that order. Palin sent the statement to supporters. She told conservative radio host Mark Levin that she would not consider a third party candidacy because it would assure President Barack Obama’s reelection. In a video posted on Youtube, Palin said, “you don’t need an office or a title to make a difference.” Sen. John McCain plucked Palin from relative obscurity in 2008 by naming her as his running mate. She electrified Republican

activists for a while, delivering a well-received speech at the GOP national convention. But Palin later seemed overwhelmed by the national spotlight, faltering at times in televised interviews even when asked straightforward questions. Palin’s announcement Wednesday was much anticipated but not greatly surprising. Her popularity had plummeted in polls lately, even though she remained a darling to many hard-core conservatives. Some Republicans felt she waited and teased too long about a presidential candidacy. Some remained perplexed by her decision to quit her job as governor with more than a year left in her single term. Palin also angered some Americans with a defensive speech shortly after a Democratic congresswoman was gravely wounded in an Arizona shooting in January that killed six people. Palin’s announcement came one day after New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said he would not run. Republican insiders say the field is set. It includes former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry, whom party insiders see as the strongest contenders. Libertarian-leaning Rep. Ron Paul of Texas continues

to draw a devoted following and former pizza company executive Herman Cain has gained in recent polls. Voting in the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary will start in about three months. Because Palin’s star had faded, it’s not clear that her decision will have a big impact on the Republican race. Some analysts said Palin might have drawn significant conservative support, especially in Iowa. If so, she might have split that constituency with Perry, Cain, Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann and others, possibly giving Romney a chance to win the caucus with a relatively modest plurality. Others felt Perry benefits from Palin’s decision because it helps him portray himself as the bestknown conservative alternative to Romney. Republican adviser Matt Mackowiak said Romney benefits from Christie’s decision, and Perry benefits fromPalin’s, so it’s “a wash.” In a statement, Perry called Palin “a good friend, a great American and a true patriot.” “I respect her decision and know she will continue to be a strong voice for conservative values and needed change in Washington,” he said.

McCain, whose staff often clashed with Palin, said he was confident “she’ll continue to play an important role in our party and for our nation.” Bachmann in a statement called Palin “an important voice in the conservative movement” with “a lifetime of opportunities ahead of her.” Palin fans expressed frustration and disbelief on conservatives4palin.com, a supporter Web site. “Oh! Big mistake, Sarah, for the country and for you. And why wait so long? Geez,” wrote a poster identified as militantfeather. Another, identified as Mark Dormann, said: “Sarah I feel betrayed. You are the one we are waiting for. No one else will reform America. ... you have broken my heart :(“ Palin repeatedly stoked speculation about a presidential bid, in part by visiting Iowa, home of the leadoff nominating caucuses, seven times since leaving the governorship in 2009. Last month, she gave a campaign-themed speech at a tea party rally that drew thousands to a town south of Des Moines. “I’ve said all along she’s a force in her own right,” said Des Moines Republican Becky Beach, who became a friend and

part of Palin’s small circle as her key planning contact in Iowa. “In this capacity, however it takes shape, she’ll be someone who has an impact on the 2012 election.” Palin loses the opportunity to seize a network of organized supporters in Iowa, put together by California lawyer Peter Singleton, who has spent the better part of the year in the state. He said there is no one candidate who can lay claim to the voter database, mailing list and team of campaign volunteers he put together in Iowa. In her statement, Palin said, “my decision is based upon a review of what common-sense conservatives and independents have accomplished, especially over the last year. I believe that at this time I can be more effective in a decisive role to help elect other true public servants to office — from the nation’s governors to congressional seats and the presidency. We need to continue to actively and aggressively help those who will stop the ‘fundamental transformation’ of our nation and instead seek the restoration of our greatness, our goodness and our constitutional republic based on the rule of law.”

greed,” said Mike Pellegrino, an NYC Transit bus mechanic from Rye Brook. “They should pay their fair share of taxes. We’re just working and looking for decent lives for our families.” Of the camping protesters, he said, “We feel kinship with them. We’re both looking for the same things.” People gathered in front of the courthouses that encircle Foley Square, then marched to Zuccotti Park, where they refueled with snacks and hurriedly painted new signs as the strong scent of burning sage wafted through the plaza. Previous marches have resulted in mass arrests. Police said there were about a dozen arrests on Wednesday night, mostly for disorderly conduct. But at least one arrest was for assaulting a police officer; authorities said a demonstrator knocked an officer off his scooter.

The protesters have varied causes but have spoken largely about unemployment and economic inequality and reserved most of their criticism for Wall Street. “We are the 99 percent,” they chanted, contrasting themselves with the wealthiest 1 percent of Americans. Susan Henoch, 63, of Manhattan said she was a “child of the ‘60s” and came out to the park for the first time Wednesday. She held a sign that read, “Enough.” “It’s time for the people to speak up,” she said. “Nobody’s listening to us, nobody’s representing us. Politics is dead. “This is no longer a recognizable democracy. This is a disaster,” she said. Some of the union members traveled from other states to march. Karen Higgins, a co-president of National Nurses United, came down with a group of colleagues from Boston. She said they had

seen patients who skipped important medical tests because they couldn’t afford them. “Tax Wall Street,” she said. “Those who make all the money need to start paying their fair share.” The Occupy Wall Street protests started Sept. 17 with a few dozen demonstrators who tried to pitch tents in front of the New York Stock Exchange. Since then, hundreds have set up camp nearby in Zuccotti Park and have become increasingly organized, lining up medical aid and legal help and printing their own newspaper. Several Democratic lawmakers have expressed support for the protesters, but some Republican presidential candidates have rebuked them. Herman Cain, called the activists “un-American” Wednesday at a book signing in St. Petersburg, Fla. “They’re basically saying that somehow the government is supposed to take from those that have succeeded and give to those who want to protest,” the former pizzacompany executive said. “That’s not the way America was built.” On Tuesday, CBS reported that former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney called the protest “class warfare” at an appearance at a Florida retirement community. Activists have been showing solidarity with movement in many cities: Occupy Providence. Occupy Los Angeles. Occupy Boise. More than 100 people withstood an afternoon downpour in Idaho’s capital to protest, including Judy Taylor, a retired property manager. “I want change. I’m tired of things being taken away from those that need help,” she said. In Seattle, at least four demonstrators who had been camping out since the weekend in a downtown park were arrested after they refused orders from city park rangers to pack up. The reception was warmer in Los Angeles, where the City Council approved a resolution of support and Mayor Antonia Villaraigosa’s office distributed 100 rain ponchos to activists at another

dayslong demonstration, according to City News Service. In Boston, hundreds of nurses and Northeastern University students rallied together to condemn what they called corporate control of government and the spiraling costs of their education. The students banged on drums made of water jugs and chanted, “Banks got bailed out, and we got sold out.” “This is an organic process. This is a process of grassroot people coming together. It’s a beautiful thing,” said David Schildmeier, spokesman for the Massachusetts Nurses Association. Many of those protesting are college students. Hundreds walked out of classes in New York, some in a show of solidarity for the Wall Street movement but many more concerned with worries closer to home. Protests were scheduled at State University of New York campuses including Albany, Buffalo, Binghamton, New Paltz and Purchase. Danielle Kingsbury, a 21-yearold senior from New Paltz, said she walked out of an American literature class to show support for some of her professors who she said have had their workloads increased because of budget cuts. “The state of education in our country is ridiculous,” said Kingsbury, who plans to teach. “The state doesn’t care about it and we need to fight back about that.” Not every campus appeared to feel the rumblings of dissent. At the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, there were students publicizing breast cancer awareness and National Coming Out Week, students crawling on their elbows in an apparent fraternity hazing ritual, quarreling evangelicals and even a flash mob to promote physical fitness, but no sign of the Wall Street protests. Senior Alex Brown tried to promote an event on Facebook, but said students’ disgust with the government and wealth inequality was “not enough to reach a fever pitch.”

Unions add to Wall Street occupation

Activists continue weeks-long protest, plagued by arrests By Deepti Hajela and Verena Dobnik Associated Press

Unions lent their muscle to the long-running protest against Wall Street and economic inequality Wednesday, with their members joining thousands of protesters in a lower Manhattan march as smaller demonstrations flourished across the country. Protesters in suits and T-shirts with union slogans left work early to march with activists who have been camped out in Zuccotti Park for days. Some marchers brought along their children, hoisting them onto their shoulders as they walked down Broadway. “We’re here to stop corporate


NEWS

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Tribune 7

Continued from page 1:

Media: Cases sexualized

get as much attention?” Brennen Brennen said. asked. Victor Jacobo, a sophomore in Brennen said while it may seem the College of Communication, like the media’s fascination with said he followed the Knox case these cases is a recent trend, such on Twitter, but the overcoverage widespread coverage has been made the Knox and Anthony casseen before in both the O.J. Simp- es seem like “soap operas.” son murder case and the disap“I think live-tweeting ... made pearance of Natalee you feel like you Holloway, the Ameri- “These were crimes were actually in the can teenager who dis- that were committed court room,” Jacobo appeared on a trip to said. by someone ... I think Aruba with friends. Jacobo said social Nancy Grace, an these (the crimes media also allowed American legal com- and victims) do get people to give their mentator, has had lost in all the opinions on the aca significant role in craziness.” quittal verdict much highlighting the stoVictor Jacobo more easily and prories of Holloway and Sophomore, College of Comm. vided a “global foboth the Knox and rum” for the case, but Anthony cases, aclost in the constant cording to Brennen. overcoverage was the crime itself. Brennen said Grace “seemed “These were crimes that were to make it a personal issue” committed by someone .. I think to draw media attention to these (the crimes and victims) do these stories. get lost in all the craziness,” Ja“In both cases they (Knox cobo said. and Anthony) were painted as bad, horrific ... and sexualized,”

Photo by Mario Anzoni/Associated Press

Dr. Conrad Murray, seen here during his trial for the death of pop star Michael Jackson, is another media target.

Mental health key in budget Abele focuses on community, not institutional, care

run by Transitional Living Ser- by advocacy groups like Active vices Inc., a local organization Minds. The Marquette chapter of that provides various mental the group hosts bimonthly meethealth services and advocacy. ings to present information on President and CEO Peg DuBord mental health disorders and inisaid she is extremely grateful for tiate healthy discussions about Abele’s praise of the center, but mental health, said Anne SpinBy Olivia Morrissey realizes the contents of the budget dler, Active Minds at Marquette olivia.morrissey@marquette.edu publicity director. are not certain. “Our main focus is Milwaukee County Execu“We are hopeful tive Chris Abele’s budget for the that more crisis re- “We are hopeful that reducing and completely wiping out the county, announced Sept. 29, pro- source centers mod- more crisis resource poses significant strides toward eled after ours will centers modeled after stigma that surrounds mental illness,” said the improvement of mental health be built in the county, facilities in Milwaukee County. It but there are still a ours will be built.” Peg DuBord Spindler, a senior in the College of Comaddresses public transportation, few more hurdles,” CEO,Transitional Living health care coverage for county DuBord said, noting Services Inc. munication. Active Minds at employees and the county sher- that Abele’s budget Marquette hosts camiff’s budget. has yet to be appus-wide events, such as the NaIn the address announcing his proved. 2012 budget, Abele said the focus The Crisis Resource Center fo- tional Day Without Stigma, that of mental health care in the coun- cuses on community-based psy- promote mental health awareness ty needs to be in the community, chiatric care and utilizes “peer- and demonstrate the prevalence rather than in an institutional set- recovery specialists,” who have of mental health disorders. The promotion of mental illness ting. His budget takes the $3 mil- also suffered from mental illness lion emergency medical and can help others with awareness and the best available services subsidy in the their first-hand experi- resources is also a main objective Behavioral Health Dience. The center is not at the Crisis Resource Center. “We want people to know that vision budget and puts affiliated with any hospiit into devoting more tal or government agen- the Crisis Resource Center is a resources to building cy, which DuBord said more integrative, communitycommunity-based mengives those seeking help based setting where people get tal health services. specialized attention and their immediate needs met,” DuBord said. The budget calls for fewer expenses. Abele’s budget also asks county crisis resource centers, “In a typical hospiAbele which focus on commutal, people seeking help employees to pay more toward nity support and reintefor a mental illness wait their health care coverage and degration to help people overcome endlessly behind those who need votes 49 percent of the property their mental illnesses, to be built treatment for other illnesses,” tax levy to public safety. He said on the north side of Milwaukee DuBord said. “At the Crisis Re- most of Milwaukee’s existing bus as well as in other parts of the source Center, we bring them in services will be preserved withcounty. The South Side Crisis and try to meet their immediate out raising general fares, despite Resource Center at 2057 S. 14th needs and help them plan a recov- a $15 million transit funding deficit. These proposals, along with Street is a model that needs to be ery.” replicated, Abele said in his adThe issue of mental illness, those concerning mental health dress. especially among young adults, in the county, will go before the The Crisis Resource Center is has been brought to the forefront County Board for approval.

comes the sun. heerenjoy.

here comes the sun, here comes the sun, and i say itʼs all right. little darling, itʼs been a long cold lonely winter. little darling, it feel like years since itʼs been here. here comes the sun, here comes the sun and i say itʼs all right. little darling, the smiles returning to the faces. little darling, it seems like years since itʼs been here. here comes the sun, here comes the sun and i say itʼs all right. sun, sun, sun, here it comes...sun, sun, sun, here it comes...little darling, i feel that ice is slowly melting. little darling, it seems like years since itʼs been clear. here comes the sun, friends theallmarquette here sincerely, comes the your sun, and i sayatitʼs right. itʼs tribune. all right

Continued from page 1:

Hotline: Students unsure College of Business Administration, said he did not previously know about EthicsPoint, but said he expected some students to hesitate before using the hotline. “I think some might want to use it,” Kubit said. “But some might feel intimidated to use it even if they wanted to.” He said students could spread rumors of “who reported on who,” even if the process is anonymous.

Although EthicsPoint can now be used to report types of criminal misconduct, the Department of Public Safety is advising students to continue contacting DPS directly when faced with safety issues, said Lt. Paul Mascari. “The best thing to do would be to contact us so it could be addressed in a timely fashion,” Mascari said.

Continued from page 1:

Jobs: Career of success with the Macintosh computer. He left Apple in 1985 in a fallingout with then-CEO John Sculley, and during a 12-year period away from Apple bought what would become Pixar Animation Studios. He would go on to serve as chairman and CEO of the company before selling it to Disney in 2006 for $7.4 billion. Jobs returned as Apple CEO in 1997, and enjoyed a remarkable string of successes over the rest of his tenure with the creations of the iPod, iPhone and iPad. He was known throughout his career for his ability to fuse technology and art, making products that were as beautiful as they were simple to use. But his life also centered around a constant desire to make the most of every opportunity, which he told

Stanford University graduates in their 2005 commencement speech. “For the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: ‘If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?’” Jobs said. “And whenever the answer has been ‘No’for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.” Jobs’s death marks the passing of one of America’s great innovators, in the eyes of many. But Jobs himself sought to keep his inventions in perspective. “We’re born, we live for a brief instant, and we die,” he said in the February 1996 edition of Wired magazine. “It’s been happening for a long time. Technology is not changing it much — if at all.”

BREAKING news www.marquettetribune.org


Viewpoints

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 8

The Marquette Tribune Editorial Board:

Kara Chiuchiarelli, Viewpoints Editor Maria Tsikalas, Editorial Writer Matthew Reddin, Editor-in-Chief Tori Dykes, Managing Editor Brooke Goodman, News Editor Caroline Campbell, Closer Look Editor

Mike Nelson, Sports Editor Sarah Elms, Marquee Editor Marissa Evans, Copy Chief Zachary Hubbard, Visual Content Editor

STAFF EDITORIAL

Offer basketball tickets at non-fanatical prices

Thursday, October 6, 2011

TRIBUNE TRIBUTES MAKING EVERYONE’S DAY THAT MUCH BETTER

To: KC ... Keep up the good work! You makin’ momma proud!

To: Jack’s Mannequin ... Hey, hey. hey, you never let us down.

To: Steve Jobs ... You did it. You put a ding in the universe.

To: The College of Comm ... So long and thanks for all the fish.

To: GLil ... Stay adorable :)

To: Frank Warren ... It’s no secret how excited we are. We moved our staff meeting for you.

Column

Capitalize on complaints, create change

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

As of last Wednesday, Marquette stu- a reduced parking rate. DePaul’s method seems to speak to what dents can purchase Fanatics basketball tickets for the 2011-2012 season. Ac- many Marquette students might find more cording to the email sent to students, the reasonable: options. We currently have no other student tickstudent season ticket package includes admission to all 16 home games and the et option but the Fanatics package. Thus, official Fanatics t-shirt for $110. Unfor- Golden Eagle fans who know they can tunately, the package also comes with a only attend a few games find themselves excluded from the fun. Students studying number of headaches. There’s the perennial problem of win- abroad for one semester or the other have ter sports: seven of these games take place little incentive to buy the package either The season ticket package does not take over winter break. So while Fanatics get admission to all 16 home games, most will into account that students sometimes have many tests or papers due on a day after a likely not make it to at least half of these. Also, if a Fanatics season ticket holder home game, or that they may get sick or forgets to print her or his ticket before the otherwise have to unwillingly miss a game game, the Bradley Center box office charg- they’ve already paid for. These scenarios es $5 to print it. This is over 70 percent the may sound like buyer’s remorse, but in entire ticket value. Hardly the type of grati- a market where students’ only option is tude a loyal fan would hope to be shown. to purchase season tickets, they are very But these are all minor in comparison to real concerns. While Marquette may not have trouble the greater problem: the price itself. Sophomores, juniors and seniors will selling the Fanatics tickets — they sell out likely note that the cost of tickets is $10 or come close to it every year — it would higher than the price last season. While this seem more sensible to offer a few more does not seem overly expensive, evening options to its students. Maybe the nonconference game tickets could out to $6.88 per ticket, be sold separately with a spethe 2010-2011 basketball schedule included While Marquette may cial discount. Perhaps tickets could be sold in packs of four 19 home games, meannot have trouble selling the or six, with a higher at-face ing students get three less games for more Fanatics tickets — they sell value but greater appeal. Marquette is not unfamiliar money — per game and out or come close to it every overall. year — it would seem more with different packages. There Basketball ticket sensible to offer a few more are a variety of ticket options for the public, albeit more exprices for students have options to its students. pensive than the student price, continued to go up, including a create-your-own with no increase in valfive game package and a vaue apparent. From the riety of price options based 2000-2001 season to the 2006-2007 season, student ticket pack- on seating. So, offering different options ages only cost $55. Every season since — to basketball fans wouldn’t be something save the 2010-2011 season — ticket prices entirely new. Let’s get creative, Marquette. After all, have increased, jumping first to $75, then even if the Fanatics tickets sell out, there to $85, $100 and now $110. And those prices seem to be unreason- is still a very real possibility that many seaably high when compared with other son ticket holders will not show up on a given day. When this happens, it only hurts schools in the Big East Conference. The University of Notre Dame charges the team and makes Marquette students $65 for student season tickets, which in- look spiritless. If the spirit exhibited at the big rivalry cludes a t-shirt and 15 home games. It does not include games over the semester break, games carries over into the less-anticipatbut students have the option of purchasing ed, weekday games because more students are in attendance, the games will become tickets for those games for $5 each. DePaul University’s athletics website that much more fun. And if the games are increasingclaims that its athletic fee is the lowest in the conference. This fee is $25 a quarter for ly more fun, it’s easier to justify the fall, winter and spring quarters, and it cov- increasing prices. ers all DePaul athletic events and provides

unorganized grumbles, no matter how valid, will not result in progress. This is not about the administration not doing their job — they’re doing fine. The issue here lies with the student body. At some point, we have to do something. That’s how the people participating in Occupy Wall Street and similar proKelly White tests nationwide are feeling. They are acting based on frustrations — frustrations which are widely held but rarely Marquette students are apathetic. It is not that we don’t care. We care, addressed. Occupy Wall Street might not have or, at least, we complain enough to a particular agenda (protesters argue make it seem like we care. Our complaints are wide-ranging. against everything from corporate inFrom the quality of our food to the fluence, social inequality and wealth strength of our internet to the amount disparity) but they are taking to the of work to the lack of sleep, we rou- street to try to affect some sort of tinely report on the sorry state of our change. As my mom says, “You have to lives. We gripe about our administra- appreciate them for trying.” Nothing may be accomplished, but tion, our teachers, our student governthese members of society feel marginment. Whatever the issue, we are good alized and largely ignored. They feel this is their opportunity about vocalizing it. Or upto stand up and create a dating our Facebook stavoice for themselves. tuses about it. Or tweeting When was the last Countless times, such about it. Can anyone say time you saw any of activism has worked: #privilegedproblems? Vocalizing frustrations, our common complaints the peace protests of India under Gandhi; no matter how trivial the lead to real change? the civil rights moveproblem may seem, is imment in the 1960s; the portant. As I pointed out feminist Movement in in my column a few weeks the 1970s; the Middle ago, language is the first East riots this past spring; the Chilean step to change. But when was the last time you saw student protest of this past month. It any of our common complaints lead to is proven that change occurs if people care deeply enough and are willing to real change? Sodexo is still our food provider, make it happen. I’m not saying we need to stage a and Meal Exchanges are still confusing. Four-hour classes in the College coup. I’m not even saying that we have of Communication still count for only anything to revolt against. But we have three credits. We still pay for most of the power to affect our community and our extracurricular activities out of actually make a change, instead of just pocket, even with rising tuition rates. filling the air and our time with chatter. Maybe we have nothing to change. And there is still an interim dean in the Maybe there is no interest valid enough College of Arts & Sciences. And why should any of these be rem- to drop our routine and pick up a cause. edied? I regularly overhear conversa- But if there is something that needs to tions that begin with “I just wish that be changed, we need to be the ones to they would change…” and end with the do it. We can — and we should — be usual. I participate in them sometimes. the difference. Not indifferent. But why can’t we be the “they?” Why kelly.white@marquette.edu can’t we just make the change? Students grumble all the time. But those

Statement of Opinion Policy The opinions expressed on the Viewpoints page reflect the opinions of the Viewpoints staff. The editorials do not represent the opinions of Marquette University nor its administrators, but those of the editorial board. The Marquette Tribune prints guest submissions at its discretion. The Tribune strives to give all sides of an issue an equal voice over the course of a reasonable time period. An author’s contribution will not be published more than once in a four-week period. Submissions with obvious relevance to the Marquette community will be given priority consideration. Full Viewpoint submissions should be limited to 500 words. Letters to the editor should be between 50 to 150 words. The Tribune reserves the right to edit submissions for length and content. Please e-mail submissions to: viewpoints@marquettetribune.org. If you are a current student, include the college in which you are enrolled and your year in school. If not, please note any affliations to Marquette or your current city of residence.


VIEWPOINTS

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Tribune 9

COLUMN

Keep the ‘dream’ in your dream job suing them. But that’s perfectly fine, because most of us have embraced our “want” jobs. Take, for example, accounting majors. No offense to them, especially my roommate, but they’ve already given up completely on whatever their dream jobs may have been, and I commend them for it. Unless my roomate is absolutely bonkers Ian Yakob about doing taxes and it’s somehow slipped under my radar. I don’t blame him though. I think it’s If you think you’re studying to become what you “dream” to be, you’re not. You’re smart to have moved on without getting his actually preparing for what you currently hopes up. I mean, my great-grandparents already blew my dream job of being a trust“want” to be. There is a definite fund baby, but difference. at least I didn’t So when someone asks you For better or for worse, it’s a have to let mywhat your dream job is, you matter of fact none of us will ever self down since have to think beyond your limiit was a prenatal tations, outside of present pos- become a super spy, or a fashion impossibility sibilities. I’m talking far-out police officer, or a stormtrooper or for me. jobs you already know you will the president. Still, I wish I never be. (Sorry Bieber, I have didn’t have to to say never.) rule my dream For better or for worse, it’s a matter of fact none of us will ever become out already – which is why, as of Monday, I a super spy, or a fashion police officer, or a have a new dream job. I dream to take over for Alex Trebek as stormtrooper or the president. The reason why dream jobs are called the host of “Jeopardy!” (Note to readers: “dream jobs” is because they aren’t realis- the exclamation point is the required style tic. They aren’t something covered by your for the name of the show, so I have no academic field, and you aren’t actively pur- choice but to be ecstatic about it.)

leaves

Assuming Trebek’s role, which has of the alphabet several times. Trust me, he graced the world for a long time, would be knows the answers for tomorrow’s episode nothing short of phantasmagoric. already – it’s like counting cards at PotowaSeriously, in 2001, the guy shaved his tomi for him. mustache of 30 Thus, the only thing that can years, and evstop Trebek from hosting the show eryone went baThus, the only thing that can is him getting bored with it and nanas. stop Trebek from hosting the quitting. That’s where I come in. The job itAnd here’s why I think it’s fated show is him getting bored with self can’t be for me to replace Trebek: accordthat hard, but I it and quitting. That’s where I ing to Wikipedia (probably for don’t even care come in. about ten minutes after I submit if it’s gruelingly this column), it already says that difficult. It’s I, Ian Yakob, will be his successor. my dream job. The quote reads, “In an OctoDon’t hate. ber 2011 issue of the Marquette Tribune, The only obstacle to this dream of mine it postulates Ian Yakob to be the next host is what I have dubbed as “the Trebek para- of “Jeopardy!” effective upon Trebek’s undox.” Even though the guy is getting older, foreseen resignation.” he does not age. For him, getting plastic Self-fulfilling prophecy, here I come. surgery means adding years to the shelf-life Wish me luck, but don’t follow my lead. of the tools used by the surgeon. If everyone actually wound up with their He began hosting decades before I was a dream jobs, the world would be full of pukey-pants baby. And if he wanted to, he ballerina-rock stars, astronauts, cheetah ridcould easily outlast my lifetime. ers and Disney princesses. And two Alex But ask yourself one question: How does Trebeks. Trebek know every answer to every quesTo your relief, I’m not dishing out yet antion on the show? It’s not because they give other life lesson. There’s no moral to this him the answers. It’s because he’s been story. I just want Trebek’s job. around so long he knows everything. He’s been around long enough to go ian.yakob@marquette.edu through the encyclopedia for every letter

fall autumn leaves cold sunny cloudy thanksgiving orIN THE ange fall autumn yellow leaves trees branches crunchy walks brisk crisp autumn november orange red october yellow sunny crisp thanksgiving family friends october november yellow sunny leaves trees branches fall “We’re the kind of team that other orange sunny crisp brisk thanksgiving crunchy chilly teams don’t like, and I’m pretty brisk orange leaves red fall autumn yellow november sure of that. I’m pretty sure if I was on the other team I wouldn’t like october walk autumnthrough sunny treesthe branches friends october some of the antics we have.” november yellow sunny leaves branches fall orange– Brewers’ pitcher Randy Wolf on crisp thanksgiving family fall autumn leaves cold the team’s “beast mode” antics during playoffs sunny orange autumn yellow red october november fall sutumn leaves sunny yellow crisp brisk walks

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NEWS

“Apple has lost a visionary and creative genius, and the world has lost an amazing human being.” -Apple’s statement on the death of co-founder Steve Jobs

“It taught me that a good scientist is a humble scientist, somebody who is willing to listen to news in science which are not expected.” – Dan Shechtman, Nobel Prize winner for chemistry on his discovery of quasicrystals “I am not what they say I am – perverse, violent. ... I haven’t murdered. I haven’t raped. I haven’t stolen.” – Amanda Knox’s final statement before an Italian jury overturned her conviction “I hired Sarah Palin because she was hot and got ratings.” – Roger Ailes, Fox News president

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Helen Way Klingler College of Arts and Sciences

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adventures

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e inDiscovery a city

Presents

Transformation in Modern China Lectur e and book signing by

Jianying Zha

Monday, October 10, 2011, 6:30 p.m. Weasler Auditorium on the Marquette Campus 1506 West Wisconsin Avenue Free and Open to the Public

For event infor mation, Call (414) 288-5991 or email h.r.friman@mar quette.edu

you live inTideaPlayers: cityThe Movers and Shakers Of a Rising China

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Author of and China Pop: How Soap Operas, Tabloids, and Bestsellers are Transforming a Culture. Jianying Zha is a widely published writer and media critic in both Chinese and English, and China representative of the India China Institute at the The New School in New York City.

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Thursday, October 6, 2011

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PAGE 10

The Marquette Tribune

Four highs and lows from this year’s Milwaukee Film Festival By Matt Mueller matthew.mueller@marquette.edu

Another year is in the books at the Milwaukee Film Festival. What started in 2008 as a small celebration of film has now grown into a cultural event for the entire city. North Shore and Ridge Cinemas have increased their participation in the festival, which has also helped increase the popularity of the event. Milwaukee Film, the organization behind the festival, recently announced that ticket sales increased 17 percent this year, and the total attendance soared over 35,000. With over 175 films in its 11day run, it’s almost impossible to see everything at the festival. I did my best, and after several nights and afternoons I was able to see an exciting variety of selections. Some were good, some were bad and some were almost indescribable.

PAGE ONE: INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES There’s no sugarcoating the fact that in as soon as five years, you may be reading an article like this exclusively on the internet. Despite this ominous future, newspapers continue to publish and hope to stay alive. One of the most notable publications still surviving is the New York Times, the subject of Andrew Rossi’s ambitious documentary “Page One.” The film tackles almost every issue pertaining to the world of print and online media, ranging from the WikiLeaks controversy to the growth of online blogs and aggregators. Watergate gets a name drop, as well as Judith Miller and Jayson Blair. “Page One” is full of content almost to a fault. The film is like a first grader returning home from the first day of school, breathlessly anxious to tell the audience everything that happened in his or her day. Luckily for the movie, all of the storylines are fascinating, and the surplus of information discussed makes “Page One” a must see for any journalism junkie.

OUTRAGE

There’s a moment near the beginning of Takeshi Kitano’s “Outrage” where a member of a Yakuza clan punches a member of a different clan. (Yakuza are members of traditional Japanese organized crime syndicates.) Then that moment is repeated, albeit with different characters and different horribly violent things, for almost two hours. If you prefer your movies to be monotonous, then “Outrage” is for you. And your opinion on movies is quite suspect. In the beginning, there is a sick joy in watching the ties of the Japanese mafia slowly fall apart in an absurdly bloody fashion. But it soon becomes very clear that Kitano has nothing else to offer besides gruesome deaths and brutality. The plot starts off as an incomprehensible mess of back stabbings and only gets more convoluted from there. With the kills and confrontations becoming the brief flickers of interest, “Outrage” quickly devolves into a dull, Yakuza-tinged version of “Saw.” As a commentary on the soulless bruise-filled world of the mafia, the film may work for some. However, as a seamless combination of story and emotion, “Outrage” has no story and no emotion to offer other than bored contempt.

THE REDEMPTION OF GENERAL BUTT NAKED “The Redemption of General Butt Naked” sounds like the subplot to a Captain Underpants children’s book, not an emotionally intense documentary. Goofy title aside, directors Daniele Anastasion and Eric Strauss tell the gripping story of Joshua Milton Blahyi, the vicious Liberian war general who now roams Liberia preaching the gospel and finding those he has wronged in the past. The film realizes that it can’t paint Blahyi as a remarkable redemption story, especially after

a war crime hearing in which he takes credit for approximately 20,000 war casualties. Instead, the directors ask the audience to decide for themselves whether the man’s conversion is genuine or a carefully crafted stay-outof-jail card. Blahyi himself makes things even more complicated by fleeing the country; abandoning the projects and people he began to help. It’s a complex documentary about a complex figure – history has yet to decide whether he deserves redemption or not.

THE PRUITT-IGOE MYTH A great documentary should be able to take a seemingly boring topic and turn it into something fascinating. Anybody can make an interesting documentary about politics, the environment, or Justin Bieber. It takes a true filmmaker to make a movie about public housing projects in St. Louis the most riveting film I’ve seen in 2011. Director Chad Freidrichs uses heartbreakingly honest interviews with old residents of the famed public housing area to provide an in-depth and thorough analysis of why the project failed so spectacularly. Over the years, much of the blame has been placed on the most convenient scapegoat: the poor tenants. Freidrich finds the cause of the collapse is much deeper than that: Lackluster maintenance, poor planning and the rise of the suburbs all contributed to the project’s demise. It’s a harrowing tale of good intentions gone wrong. Yes, “The Pruitt-Igoe Myth” may serve as a cautionary piece, but it’s also a love story to home, no matter how broken it may be. When the film’s interview subjects begin to wax nostalgic for their crumbling homes of the past, it’s hard not to shed a tear and think about your own childhood.

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Photos via Participant Media, Bandai Visual Company, Part2 Pictures and Unicorn Stencil. Photo Illustration by Rob Gebelhoff/robert.gebelhoff@marquette.edu

Check out the Tribune website for additional MFF reviews and a web-exclusive story on Milwaukee’s top theaters.


Thursday, October 6, 2011

Tribune 11

MARQUEE

The Alchemist Theatre brings new spin to ‘Faust’ Production set in Milwaukee during Prohibition days

By Liz McGovern elizabeth.mcgovern@marquette.edu

While purchasing theater tickets, it is not common to receive a follow-up email requesting audience members to wear all black and bring a masquerade mask to the performance. However, The Alchemist Theater, 2569 S. Kinnickinnic Ave., made this dress code a requirement for their production of “Faust: An Evening At The Mephisto Theatre.” This memorable first impression introduced a unique rendition of the legend of “Faust.” The story of “Faust” sets the foundation for various artistic renditions of humanity’s struggle with good versus evil. The original tale is one of a man named Faust who makes a deal with the devil, selling his soul for temporary power and success. The Alchemist’s version focuses on a Milwaukee theater company during the Prohibition days of the 1920s. The company Photo courtesy of Aaron Kopec puts on a production of “Faust,” The Alchemist Theatre’s production takes place all throughout the venue, not just on the main stage. Audience members are free to roam as they please. and the play becomes wildly The musty, dimly-lit base- moving in between rooms. Most matter what order they view the The dynamic of the show comsuccessful. The characters struggle with pletely changes from this mo- ment setting really enhances of the actors do not engage with scenes in. This way of storytelling can success and temptations of al- ment on. At this point, almost the show, generating a dark and the audience, except for the barevery space in tantalizing mood. Even the un- tenders at the speakeasies, who be confusing, but also intercohol and The Alchemist intentional old basement smell bridged the gap between ac- esting. Each audience member lust in their tors and audience members by sees the show in a unique perbecomes a stage. adds character to the show. lives offstage The audience is not guided by The audience is not guided by tempting them with drinks from spective. Everyone witnesses The audience is as they rise a specific chronological order of different scenes, so no one has to stardom events or scenes but is encouraged encouraged to a specific chronological order the Prohibition era. The show is not meant to take the same viewing experience. with promis- to explore the characters’ lives on move into the of events or scenes but is enbasement, where couraged to explore the charac- place in chronological order, Anything left unexplained is up es of Broad- their own. to the viewer’s interpretation. the show un- ters’ lives on their own. The au- but rather to feel like a dream. way and the “Faust: An Evening At The There is no way that an audifolds across all dience members walk around, potential to viewing scenes at their own ence member can know every- Manifesto Theatre” runs Oct. 6 broadcast the show on the radio. 6,000 square feet of the venue. From speakeasies and al- pace. Even if the scene is not thing that is happening, as so to 29 Thursdays through SaturThe show begins on the Alchemist’s main stage with the leys to a chapel and more, each over, audience members are al- many scenes are taking place days at 8 p.m. at the Alchemist characters of the Mephisto The- room in the basement is set as lowed to travel between rooms all at once. Some of the major Theater, 2569 S. Kinnickinnic scenes were repeated, and the Ave. Tickets are $17 online and atre in rehearsal. Eventually, a different location in the same and move as they please. The actors also move around important points were incorpo- $19 at the door. For tickets and the actors leave the stage and go 1920s Milwaukee neighbortheir separate ways, returning to hood where all the characters the space and engage in scenes rated into more than one scene, info, visit alchemisttheater.com. with all characters while so the audience is never lost, no their lives outside of the theater. live.

The boys of Blink-182 are back together again ‘Neighborhoods’ is band’s most recent album since 2003 By Jennifer Harpham Special to the Tribune

It has been eight years since the world has heard from Blink-182, and it is clear that they have done a lot of growing up since then. “Neighborhoods,” released Sept. 27, is an emotional roller coaster that picks up where they left off in 2003 with their self-titled album. It is not surprising how much more angsty their sound has become after a plane crash nearly claimed the life of drummer Travis Barker in 2008. This is the same plane crash Barker’s close friend DJ AM survived just months before he died of a drug overdose. Although no one ever wishes for the grief and heartache a tragedy brings, tough times do have a knack for bringing people together. Tom DeLonge, Blink-182’s

lead singer and guitarist, told radio station KROQ in Denver, CO, “But then that plane crash happened, then you realize how stupid you’re acting and how petty things are, and then I started thinking ‘Oh my God.’ I like the idea of choosing not to do it, but I didn’t like the idea of God and nature choosing for me.” The plane crash was obviously a pivotal moment for the band’s reunion. “Neighborhoods” opens with “Ghost on the Dance Floor,” a song popular on Blink-182’s Honda Civic Tour with My Chemical Romance this summer. It could be seen as a continuation or a nostalgic reminiscence of their 2003 hit “I Miss You” with lyrics like, “I saw your ghost tonight/The moment felt so real/If your eyes stay right on mine/My wounds would start to heal.” DeLonge took lead on this track but failed to convey the raw emotion needed to measure up to the lyrics, something bassist and secondary vocalist Mark Hoppus could have brought if given the chance. Even so, it sets the tone for the darker and edgier sound the band has

evolved to. “After Midnight” was constructed in typical Blink fashion. DeLonge wrote the verses while Hoppus wrote the chorus without telling each other what they were writing about. The technique seems to work. “Neighborhoods” would not be complete without a love song, and this one seems to be wrapped around the message that no matter how bad things get, two people will find their way back to each other in the end. Might this refer to the band’s own reunion? Other tracks each seem to own very distinctive qualities while still remaining true to Blink-like sound and practice. “Snake Charmer” (on the deluxe edition) contains a twisting of the biblical story of Adam and Eve. “Natives” opens with a powerful and looping drum beat that the rest of the song seems to settle around. “Wishing Well” echoes the band’s older songs with uplifting rhythms but with self-deprecating lyrics: “I went to a wishing well and sank to the ocean floor/Cut up by sharper rocks and washed up along the shore.” No longer is Blink-182 the

Photo via David Geffen Company

Blink-182 went on tour this summer in anticipation of their new album.

group of outlandish and inappropriate kids we fell in love with 15 years ago. With this album, the band shows their growth and ability to tackle life’s bigger problems.

“Neighborhoods” feels like a healing process for Blink-182. It’s good to see the boys back together again.


12 Tribune

MARQUEE

Chromeo doesn’t disappoint

Thursday, October 6, 2011

COLUMN

How did I ever miss St. Vincent?

Sarah Elms

Photo via Chromeo

The pair proclaimes themselves “the only successful Arab/Jew partnership since the dawn of human culture.”

address to the crowd. He just took the stage and started spinning in the corner. Sammy Bananas wasn’t a bad opening act, but the stage presence was lacking. During the middle of his set, he did bust out a saxophone, which was the By Vanessa Harris most exciting thing he did that vanessa.harris@marquette.edu night. His mixes sampled from Stevie Wonder, Rose Royce “We’re getting pretty sexy for and many ’90s up-tempo dance a Monday night in Milwaukee,” songs, but if you left to use the Chromeo’s Dave 1 said on- bathroom you probably would stage at his concert earlier this not have missed much. week. The Night Falls Tour, Mayer Hawthorne and his with special guest Sammy Ba- band, on the other hand, oozed nanas and soul crooners Mayer cool. Hawthorne & The County, defiHailing from Detroit, Hawnitely brought thorne’s mua party through sic is remithe Turner Hall Dave 1 and P-Thugg were able niscent of the Ballroom Oct 3. to keep the crowd’s energy up Motor City’s Where other throughout the entire set list. Motown past large venues in in a big way. the city seem His retro vibe crowded and gives him a underwhelming as far as sound different angle when it comes to and atmosphere, Turner Hall the current white guy soul genre is beautiful on the inside with made popular by Justin Timberits rustic charm and amazing lake and Robin Thicke. acoustics. It never sounded like Hawthorne does not have the the music was being scraped same sex appeal JT and Thicke out of the speakers. Everything have – mostly because he looks was clear and enjoyable. like a nerdy history TA with a The show was at its slowest bowtie and hoodie – but he is when Sammy Bananas hit the still quite the front man. He is stage, and propelled to its high- extremely charismatic on stage, est energy when Chromeo start- which lets his catchy throwed their set. back melodies shine through Sammy Bananas, a Brook- his raspy range and swoon-inlyn DJ who has remixed artists ducing falsettos. He was even like Passion Pit, Kid Cudi and charming while cursing like a tour mates Chromeo, opened sailor. the show almost secretly. There After Hawthorne’s set, was no announcement, no the crowd seemed to be

Electro-funk duo energizes crowd at Turner Hall

preparing for the headliners – almost like they were stretching all their dancing muscles. With stage names like Dave 1 and P-Thugg, it would be disappointing if they didn’t make sweet ’80s inspired beats, marinating in excessive amounts of cowbells, synthesizers and keyboards to dance to. Chromeo, the electro-funk duo who have proclaimed themselves as “the only successful Arab/Jew partnership since the dawn of human culture,” didn’t disappoint the crowd. Simply put, Chromeo is fun to watch. Playing fan favorites like “Bonafied Lovin,” “Tenderoni” and “Night By Night,” Dave 1 and P-Thugg were able to keep the crowd’s energy up throughout the entire set list. When you weren’t distracted by the lady legs attached to the keyboards on stage, you were probably dancing to Dave 1’s guitar solos or P-Thugg’s amazingly smooth Auto-Tuned ad-libs. Chromeo shockingly doesn’t sound much different from their albums, partially because an Apple computer joins them on stage playing parts of their tracks. Regardless, live instruments are included and the music still makes the crowd dance, which is the most important part of their performance, after all. The Night Falls Tour meshed dance, soul and funk together and left concertgoers bouncing to a steady groove throughout the night. Mondays may never be as sexy again.

This week I decided to do something I’ve never done: attend a concert of an artist I’ve never listened to before. Live music is one of my favorite things in this world, and I’m always down to check out new bands or musicians. That being said, I usually don’t go see an artist live until I’ve really familiarized myself with their music. This week was different. Annie Clark, the brilliant mind behind musical outfit St. Vincent, was in town. I’d heard so much about her and her music, but for some reason had never made the effort to download any (or all) of her three albums and take a listen for myself. Curiosity got the best of me, and I decided to see her show at the Pabst Theater Monday night. Now that I know what I’ve been missing, I don’t know how I’ve gone so long without it. Clark, 29, grew up in Dallas, Texas and attended Berklee College of Music in Boston, Mass., the largest independent college of contemporary music in the world. She was no novice to the music scene when she began performing solo. Clark was a member of the Polyphonic Spree and also part of Sufjan Stevens’ touring band before St. Vincent was established. In 2007, Clark released her debut album “Marry Me,” garnering positive feedback from influential critics like Pitchfork. In 2008, she was nominated for three PLUG Independent Music Awards for the album: New Artist of the Year, Female Artist of the Year and Music Video of the Year. She took home the award for Female Artist of the Year and has continued to hone her talents and grow in popularity. Clark released her second album, “Actor,” in 2009, which peaked at no. 9 on Billboard’s Independent Albums Chart. Her

third album, “Strange Mercy,” came out just last month. I haven’t read or heard anything negative about it yet, and I don’t expect to. Monday’s concert was a hell of a show. Clark and her band took the stage in utter darkness and launched into “Cruel” off her new album as soon as the lights went up. I was immediately captivated. Clark’s voice is powerful yet soft and has impressive range, and the emotion with which she performs is gripping. Not only are her vocals beautiful, but she puts many other indie-pop guitarists to shame. Clark plays quick and intricate riffs with such style and ease, often distorting her instrument for a darker sound. Her backup band is essential to St. Vincent’s sound, but it is clear the real talent lies with Clark. Strong instrumentals paired with personal lyrics made the show even more compelling. Each song felt like Clark was giving you a glimpse into her own life. Her stage presence was also wonderful. She didn’t talk too much, but just enough to let the crowd feel connected with her. About midway through the show, Clark made a comment about “Arrested Development” returning to TV and possibly hitting the big screen, which was met by substantial excitement from the crowd. “I feel oddly bonded to you guys now,” Clark said smiling. “But really oddly.” Each song of her set felt more powerful than the last. I often gauge concerts by their momentum, and St. Vincent’s just kept building and building. “I’m feeling you guys tonight,” Clark said as she returned for her encore. “The Party” was the only song she sang without her guitar. It was truly a testament to her vocal talents and a beautiful performance. The crowd was at its best for the last encore song, “Your Lips are Red.” It seemingly captured the energy from the entire night and was the perfect song to end on. I left the Pabst wondering how I lasted so long without listening to St. Vincent. I can’t get her music out of my head. Needless to say, I’m glad I gave her a shot – I’m going to have to do this more often. sarah.elms@marquette.edu

Photo via St. Vincent

St. Vincent is currently on tour promoting her third album, “Strange Mercy.”


Thursday, October 6, 2011

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Tribune 13

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Edited by Timothy E. Parker August 26, 2011 NOT SO WELL-DEFINED By Kelly Noone ACROSS 1 Bats flies? 6 Casual conversation 10 Arabian gulf or sultanate 14 Daphnis’ love 15 “___! The Herald Angels Sing” 16 NASCAR legend Earnhardt 17 Become ready to eat 18 Capital punishment? 20 Combustion residue 21 Bit of footwear 23 Balance sheet listing 24 Exodus tyrant 26 Rowing equipment 28 Woman worth wading for? 33 Sharp mountain spur 35 Bullfight cheers 36 Prefix with “conservative” or “colonial” 37 Handy bag 38 Auctioneer’s tool 40 Wine holder 41 Mai ___ (cocktail) 42 Tree trunk 43 Rhode Island’s is “Hope” 44 His work is in ruins? 48 Fairy tale monster 49 Prepare for use, as software 52 Spouting flames 55 Certain astringent 56 Dove call 57 When actions creak louder than words? 60 Genus of garden pests 62 Fashion mag 63 Something fishy? 64 “And ___ you have it!” 65 Doesn’t raise or fold 66 Brothers’ nephews 67 Diving duck DOWN 1 Metal to be recycled 2 Curtain-in-the-breeze sound 3 Certain letter arrangement 4 Tub temperature tester 5 Perceived by sight, sound, touch, e.g. 6 Rodriguez of the links 7 Legendary country singer Williams 8 Joan of ___ 9 Boxing match outcome, sometimes 10 Black Sea port 11 They may be left on doorsteps 12 Wings, to Ovid 13 Barber’s word 19 Foals’ mothers 22 Crowd’s response to a fireworks display 25 Hotel room fee 26 Leer at 27 One of Seth’s brothers 29 Source for a movie, often 30 Single 31 New driver’s hurdle 32 John Lennon’s wife Ono 33 Princess in “A Bug’s Life” 34 Surf’s sound 38 Word with “movie” or “party” 39 Moisturizer ingredient 40 Part of a profit calculation 42 Lox partner 43 Join wrongly 45 Swarming crowds 46 Old NFL team 47 Wildebeest 50 Tours river 51 Person faking a smile at an awards show

Thursday, October 6, 2011

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The Marquette Tribune so good you want to lick it.

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Sports

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 16

Thursday, October 6, 2011

men’s Soccer

Check gets comfortable with backline

Second shutout just out of reach with 1-0 loss in overtime By Mike Nelson michael.e.nelson@marquette.edu

It was a goal placed in the “perfect spot” that stopped junior goalkeeper David Check from posting back-to-back shutouts for the first time in 2011. He and the Marquette men’s soccer team (4-5-2, 2-0 Big East) lost to a No. 23 Northern Illinois team, according to Soccer America polls, 1-0 in double overtime Tuesday night. In the 107th minute, Northern Illinois freshman midfielder Jayson LeSeth threw a cross in towards the goal from the top left corner of the 18-yard box that hooked into the upper right hand corner of the goal, just past the leaping Check’s fingers. Check said the only thing that could have been done to prevent the goal was to prevent the shot itself. The loss negated a string of backto-back shutouts. It immediately followed a 2-0 victory over Rutgers Saturday night in which Check posted his first shutout of the 2011 campaign after posting back-toback shutouts his first two starts of 2010 and six that season. “I think Check’s done well in some aspects. It’s tough to place any blame or any credit on a goalkeeper when you don’t have shutouts and lose games,” coach Louis Bennett said. “I don’t for one minute think the goal (Tuesday) was his fault, but it’s hard to pass judgment. It would be hypocritical to say, ‘Check’s been fantastic,’ but he’s been good.” Sophomore defender Eric Pothast said Marquette’s backline has implemented what the coaching staff has wanted the it to do in the past two games. “Coach has been saying to practice the ‘rules of engagement,’

which basically means that as defenders we don’t want their forwards or any of their attacking players to get their head or tails up and start feeling comfortable going at our backline,” Pothast said. “So I thought we played a much tougher, more physical game.” Pothast would like to take positives away from the Northern Illinois game, but it’ll be difficult for him despite shutting out a top-25 opponent for 106-plus minutes. “It’s a game of soccer and we play to win. To not get the win after that much hard work is disappointing,” Pothast said. “I’d say soccer is a game like that. You can play for however long, but if there’s time left on the clock there’s still an opportunity to win. Or in our case lose (Tuesday).” Prior to these last two games, it’s been a battle for Check and the backline to find continuity. Marquette has used seven different starting defensive units since game three against Western Illinois, when

freshman defender Axel Sjoberg broke his right foot at the end of the first half. But the starting defensive unit in these two matches was the same — t h e first time that’s happened i n backto-back games since the second and third matches of the season. “I love the four guys that are there. There’s good cohesion between us,” Check said. “We know how each other work. It takes a while to get used to it. It’s a great thing to have especially for the goalie. “The communication is huge, between me, the backline and Ryan Robb, our defensive midfielder. Them trusting me to tell them the proper information — where people are, what to do — is big to keeping zeros on the board.”

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Column

Women’s Volleyball

Connection begins to grow

Heier and Carlson propel team to 3-0 start in Big East By A.W. Herndon astead.herndon@marquette.edu

The Utah Jazz had John Stockton to Karl Malone. The San Francisco 49ers had Joe Montana to Jerry Rice. And the Marquette women’s volleyball team has Chelsea Heier to Danielle Carlson. Get used to the connection. Marquette (13-4, 3-0 Big East) has used the success of its freshman setter, Heier, and junior middle hitter, Carlson, as a catalyst to a 3-0 start in the Big East season. Coach Bond Shymansky said Heier — who leads the Big East in assists (747) — is, “a legitimate contender for Big East freshman of the Year.” “Chelsea does a good job of getting us the sets we need,” Carlson said. “And (that) connection we established has gotten stronger in the last few weeks, but a lot of it just staying aggressive.”

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Junior goalkeeper David Check (left), and sophomore defender Eric Pothast held a top-25 opponent scoreless for 106 minutes, letting one in 57 seconds later.

Not to be outdone, Carlson has been named to two consecutive Big East Honor Rolls, in part for her .412 hitting percentage, good for 10th in Division I. That growing connection is evident, as Carlson led the Golden Eagles with 13 kills in wins over Sacred Heart (135) and St. John’s (9-12, 0-4 Big East), while hitting .545 and .571, respectively, in those matches. Shymansky and the women take the confidence of an unbeaten road trip into this weekend but will also benefit from the valuable experience Heier received. “It was fun,” Heier said of her first Big East road trip. “I’ve been looking forward to conference play and that experience, but definitely winning has a lot to do with it.” In the program’s second victory ever at Connecticut’s Gampel Pavillion, Carlson used her success to open up offensive opportunities for senior outside hitters Ciara Jones and Ashley Beyer. “We’ll watch teams send two blockers after Dani in the middle and leave a one-on-one for

someone like Jones,” Shymansky said. “That’s a bad idea for them.” This weekend the team faces two more Big East opponents at home when Georgetown (98, 1-3 Big East) and Villanova (12-5, 4-0 Big East) roll through the Al McGuire Center. The latter, which takes place Sunday afternoon, pits Marquette’s offensive attack that ranks second in the Big East in hitting percentage (.265) against Villanova’s tough defense. The Wildcats lead the Big East in both opponent hitting percentage (.148) and digs per set (17.78). However, Shymansky is confident that Carlson can still be effective against Villanova. “Dani is so dynamic as a middle attacker — very fluid, sneaky and a high efficiency hitter,” he said. “It’s not a surprise for us that she is atop the conference in hitting efficiency and is one of the best in the country.” Winning has certainly come, but the team will continue to play with the same hunger as it See Grow, page 19

Three letters, one championship chin Erik Schmidt If basketball players were measured in chin girth, Darius Johnson-Odom would be the king of the world. If they were measured in menacing, lip-protruding scowls or being built like a mailbox with legs, he’d be Michael Jordan’s heir apparent, a lock for the Hall of Fame, a god among thunderstruck mortals. Instead, players are measured by talent. But it turns out Johnson-Odom ranks pretty highly when it comes to that, too. On Monday the senior guard with the three-foot vertical and dump truck build was named to the John R. Wooden Award Preseason Top-50, which essentially puts him on the fast track to be a finalist for the award come April. It’s a distinction he shares with

nine other Big East players. There are some colossal names on this list, names that have weight and gravity and a certain air of validity. These names are more than names. They are college basketball. North Carolina sophomore forward Harrison Barnes. Ohio State sophomore forward Jared Sullinger. Syracuse senior guard Scoop Jardine. Connecticut junior forward Alex Oriakhi. North Carolina senior forward Tyler Zeller. It’s the Mount Rushmore of hoops. It’s only fitting that Johnson-Odom’s granite face be chiseled in stone right beside them. He really is a star of the highest caliber. A face and talent that begs to be remembered. He has the look, the fearsome gaze that could burn a hole through Superman’s chest. The prodigious athleticism. The smooth gait that he glides across the floor with. The thunderous See Chin, page 19


SPORTS

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Player of the Week

Sports Calendar

The Keeper

Friday 7

Friday 7

Tribune 17

Natalie Kulla the stats

Shutouts.............................6 Goals Against Average.... .81 Save Percentage............67.6 Women’s Volleyball vs. Georgetown – 7 p.m.

Sat.

8 Men’s Soccer at Providence - 12 p.m.

Sun.

Women’s Soccer vs. Providence – 7 p.m.

Sat.

8 Men’s Golf at John Dallio Memorial

9

Women’s Volleyball vs. Villanova - 2 p.m.

Sun.

Sun.

the facts: Senior goalkeeper has been one of the best

9 Women’s Soccer vs. Connecticut - 1 p.m.

9

Men’s Golf at John Dallio Memorial

Tues.

11

Women’s Volleyball at Middle Tennessee State - 7 p.m.

in Marquette history, and now the nation’s recognizing her talents. On the back of her sixth shutout of the season Sunday in a 4-0 win over Cincinnati, Kulla was named as a finalist for the Lowe’s Senior CLASS Award. She was one of 10 players nominated for the award Wednesday. If Kulla records eight more shutouts then she’ll be the NCAA’s all-time leader in shutouts by a goalkeeper.

Women’s soccer

Legault-Cordisco to join Canadian national team Quebec native looks forward to gaining experience for team

stage advance to the semifinal stage on Oct. 25, with the championship match slated for Oct. 27. The national team features stars like Christine Sinclair, a 28-year-old forward who plays By Michael LoCicero for the Western New York Flash michael.locicero@marquette.edu of Women’s Professional SocSophomore midfielder Van- cer. Sinclair participated in the essa Legault-Cordisco will leave 2003 and 2007 World Cups and the Marquette women’s soccer is Canada’s all-time leading goal team on Friday. Have no fear, scorer (117). Golden Eagle fans. Legault-CorSophomore midfielder Kate disco will return Oct. 28, just in Reigle expects Legault-Cordistime for the second round of the co to perform well and is happy Big East Championship tourna- that she has a chance to further ment. develop her The Quebec “We’re all really excited about career. native was called her going to play at a higher up to the Canadi- level, particularly on a national “We’re all an national team really excited to participate scene..” Kate Reigle about her goin the 2011 Pan ing to play at Sophomore midfielder American Games a higher level, in Guadalajara, particularly Mexico that run on a national scene. It’s a really Oct. 18-27. big step (for her),” Reigle said. For Legault-Cordisco, it was “To get someone on our team an opportunity that was too good with that experience, in addition to pass up, despite Marquette to (senior goalkeeper) Natalie entering its stretch run, with five Kulla, it does help our team, and games remaining until the Big I think she will learn a lot from East tournament. it and come back from it with “My personal goal would be of some advice.” course playing, because I’m just Legault-Cordisco’s departure 19 (and) it’s pretty much just 21 comes at a time when she had and over (that are invited and get become a regular contributor off to play). So I was pretty excited the Marquette bench, even scorjust to be invited,” Legault-Cor- ing her first goal in a Golden Eadisco said. gle uniform in Sunday’s 4-0 win Canada placed third in the over Cincinnati. 2007 games and will begin play In order for Legault-Cordisco against Costa Rica, Argentina to crack the rotation on the Caand Brazil in three group match- nadian national team, she will es. The top two teams from each have to impress new coach John

Herdman by building off the experience she acquired playing with the team last April in China, when she appeared in two friendly matches. Additionally, Legault-Cordisco has previous experience with Canada’s Under-20 team, scoring the game-winning goal against Guatemala in a U-20 World Cup qualifier on Jan. 24, 2010. If Legault-Cordisco performs well, she may be asked

to again compete for the national team when it begins the CONCACAF (Confederation of North, Central America, and Caribbean Association Football) qualifier for the 2012 Olympics in January. As for the experience LegaultCordisco will gain from playing at a higher level, coach Markus Roeders said it is invaluable. “It’s great for her personally to have a chance to further develop

her career and playing in an even more competitive environment,” Roeders said. “And when she gets back, we’ll be glad to have her and hear about the experiences she had.” The No. 9/13 Golden Eagles will play their first game without Legault-Cordisco on Friday night at Valley Fields against Providence, followed by a home contest against Connecticut on Sunday afternoon.

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Sophomore midfielder Vanessa Legault-Cordisco will be one of the youngest players on the Canadian national team.


SPORTS

18 Tribune

Thursday, October 6, 2011

men’s Basketball

Mayo breaks from brother’s shadow Face it, we’ve all been in this situation before. It’s imperative we change the channel to the big playoff game or the latest episode of “Wizards of Waverly Place,” only the remote is nowhere to be found. Maybe your dog decided to use it as this week’s chew toy, or your little brother thought it would be funny to have you ripping apart couches in search of it. No matter, the dilemma is usually resolved within minutes

either by dangling said brother by his toes or realizing you can change the channel manually on the TV set. It may be a pain, but it gets the job done nonetheless. Or you could call 911 and report your remote control missing. That is exactly what a 97-yearold Greenfield, Wis., resident did when he wanted to watch the Brewers play on Sept. 26, yet had no idea where his remote might be. He reported the remote was

stolen from his home and had police come to his home to aid in the “investigation.” This story has a happy ending though, as the police were able to recover the missing remote and the near-centenarian was able to watch his beloved Brewers after all. That right there is fandom at its best. andrei.greska@marquette.edu

Who let the dog out?

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

A dog stormed the field during halftime of Tuesday night’s Marquette men’s soccer game against Northern Illinois.

Guard’s first choice based on academic focus and strength By Mark Strotman mark.strotman@marquette.edu

When someone hears the last name “Mayo” in a basketball setting, odds are the first name attached to it is “O.J.,” the shooting guard on the Memphis Grizzlies. But his half-brother, Marquette freshman guard Todd Mayo, hopes to add his name to the list. Taking on the challenge of following in O.J.’s large footsteps had never been easy for Todd, and there were times he didn’t even want his half-brother to show up to his games. But O.J.’s words of encouragement, advice and outstanding work ethic made it easier for him to become his own player. “I’m not trying to be better than him, and he’s pretty good, but he’s not trying to be better than me,” Todd said. “We just want to be on the same path and get to our dreams and take care of our family.” Mayo bounced around high schools before landing at Notre Dame Preparatory (Mass.) his senior season. There he averaged 22 points and six assists per game and helped his team to a 33-4 record and a National Prep Championship. Assistant coach Aki Collins, who was an assistant coach at Marshall from 2003 to 2006, has known Mayo — a Huntington, W.Va., native — since the guard was in seventh grade. Kansas, Connecticut, Providence and Baylor were among the other schools on the recruiting trail interested in Mayo, and home state West Virginia also made a late push for his services. But it was Collins’ long-lasting relationship with Mayo that was instrumental in helping bring him to Marquette.

That and Marquette’s strong push toward the finish line in the recruiting process sold Mayo on his decision. “Marquette sent all four assistants to come watch me, and I thought that was something to look into with a college,” Mayo said. “And I said if that ever happened, that would be the school for me.” The Golden Eagles’ commitment to academics also played a major role in his decision. Mayo took his official visit to Marquette the weekend of Feb. 25, and watched Marquette take down Providence 86-62. What was special to Mayo, however, was that just hours after the game, the players headed back to the Al McGuire Center for a study hall session. “I liked that Marquette put school first,” he said. Recent trends have shown that freshmen are hard-pressed to find minutes in coach Buzz Williams’ rotation. But sophomore redshirt forward Jamil Wilson has given advice to Mayo, telling him to continue taking in every minute of action to become a better player, regardless of game minutes. “You don’t know whether you’re going to get 30 minutes or four minutes, but take what you can get and try to build off it,” Wilson told Mayo. “Don’t try to be too greedy at once. Everyone knows you’re good or you wouldn’t be playing here.” Collins said Mayo’s contributions this season may be limited because of Marquette’s talented and deep back court. However, Collins said the guard depth will help him as he goes through typical freshman adjustments. “He’s not going to have to carry a heavy load,” Collins said. “He’s going to have to be a part of what we do, but he won’t have to be a focal point of anything we’re doing. He just has to keep getting better every day.”

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

After a lengthy scramble on Valley Fields, the dog was captured and returned to its owner (woman in middle).

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Assistant coach Aki Collins helped lure freshman guard Todd Mayo to MU.


Thursday, October 6, 2011

SPORTS men’s golf

Tribune 19

New lineup for MU this weekend Tournament style practices helped determine changes By Trey Killian robert.killian@marquette.edu

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Junior Ryan Prickette will showcase his putting skills for the first time this year at the John Dallio Memorial tournament.

Continued from page 16:

Chin: DJO worthy of buzz jams, arm cocked back way past his head, ball grasped tightly in his massive mitts, then thrown through the terrified rim with ill contempt for all things round and orange. And he has that name, the calling card of three letters that is singular in purpose, that only the truly worthy can don, like Cher, Bono, LeBron, Kobe, Tiger. DJO. If you’ve watched him play for the last two years, you have to be proud – but also very unsurprised – that he made it here, to the top of the heap, in the same breath as college ball’s big boys. In his sophomore season he was the less talked about in a tandem of junior college transfers, with guard Dwight Buycks garnering much of the attention. Buycks was supposed to be the scoring machine, the instant offense, the future star. But from very early on it was obvious that Johnson-Odom — we still called him that back then — was the real prize. He was dripping with raw, unchecked talent. We saw what he could do that first year in inconsistent but dazzling spades. We marveled in his ability. We feared his chin. And he earned his name. The junior campaign brought more highlights and tantalizing splendor, capped by one of the biggest shots in coach Buzz

Williams’ tenure, a long, fearless 3-pointer with 22 seconds left against Syracuse in the third round of the NCAA Tournament. We marveled at his courage. We feared his roar. And we chanted his name. Which brings us to now. Johnson-Odom is a senior and the unquestioned star of this team. He’s easily one of the best players in the country. He’s proved that he belongs on that Wooden list. On Mount Rushmore. This could quite possibly be a precursor to one of the most invigorating, mind-blowing seasons in Marquette history. The team has all the makings of greatness. The tough coach, firmly entrenched in his role as the team’s leader. The deep bench with a healthy mix of savvy vets and fresh-legged underclassmen. The pre-season hype. The national ranking. And then there’s him. You could call him a lot of things. Explosive, incendiary, gritty, clutch, tough, one of the most unique talents in college basketball. But here at Marquette he’s simply known by three letters: DJO. And that spells greatness. erik.schmidt@marquette.edu

The Marquette men’s golf team will head to Lemont, Ill., this weekend for the John Dallio Memorial tournament with a retooled lineup and high hopes for a strong placing. Among the new faces in the lineup are junior Ryan Prickette and freshman Austin Wilson. Prickette will make his first start of the fall season and hopes his skill in the short game will help turn the team’s struggles on the green around. “I think I’m one of the best putters on the team, and even though I’ll have rounds where I strike the ball terribly, I’m able to make quite a few good putts to keep the score under control,” Prickette said. “If I strike it well like I have been over the past couple of days, and if I do still putt well at that point, I feel like I can put together some special rounds.” Senior Matt Haase said that Prickette’s experience will help shake things up this week and bring some balance to the lineup. “Ryan’s one of the most experienced players on the team, and he’s a good leader and a good guy to have around,” Haase said. “With him out there we are going to have an older, more experienced team.” Coach Steve Bailey made changes to the lineup based on a series of qualifying rounds the team played over the last week and a half. This style of practice, he said, not only helps determine who

will go to tournaments but keeps up a high level of competitiveness within the team. “This past week we took the top two qualifiers as automatic bids for the tournament and as coaches we selected the other three,” Bailey said. “It gives guys who didn’t make the last tournament a chance, and it also keeps it competitive. It’s really hard to simulate the competitiveness of a tournament in practice, and the qualifiers we play do a good job of that.” Bailey said the Golden Eagles have mostly focused on their short game this week, as they’ve already proven they can strike the ball well enough. He said putting would be key this weekend, and their success will come down to converting up and down opportunities. “(Tuesday) we set up nine different putts from 12 to 20 feet and the guys would go around that rotation and hit until they made each one of those putts,” Bailey said. “We also had three, five and sixfooters that they had to partner up with and make six in a row at each distance. In that case you’re putting pressure not only on yourself but on your teammate as well to make the putts so you don’t have to start all over again.” Though this will be the first time Marquette will play in the Memorial, it will play a practice round on Friday at Ruffed Feathers G.C. and make use of aerial maps and yardage books of each hole and green. “Every guy has a book,” Bailey said, “and they are making notes and going over every hole to strategize whether we should be aggressive or conservative on each hole.”


20 Tribune

SPORTS

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Continued from page 16:

Grow: MU out for revenge always has. Shymanksy ensured that ego would not play a role against weaker opponents, such as Georgetown. He characterized that game specifically as a “revenge match” after Georgetown defeated Marquette 3-2 (22-25, 26-24, 25-17, 11-15) in the team’s lone meeting in 2010. “We want to win matches so badly we haven’t recognized

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

that there is a target on our back,” Shymansky said. But Marquette will be ready for Georgetown and Villanova this weekend. “Having the success just boosts the team’s confidence,” Heier said. “But we know what we need to do. No matter the opponent, we need to play Marquette volleyball.”

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Junior middle hitter Danielle Carlson is 10th in all of Division I women’s volleyball with a .412 hitting percentage. She’s also been named to the Big East Honor Roll for two consecutive weeks.


Oct. 6th, 2011: The Marquette Tribune