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Volume 96, Number 49

Court overturns parts of collective bargaining law Restrictions on dues, reccertification elections removed By Allison Kruschke allison.kruschke@marquette.edu

A federal judge overturned two portions of Wisconsin Act 10 last Friday, earning a partial victory for the opponents of the controversial law, which ended collective bargaining for Wisconsin unions. The two sections struck down would have banned public

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workers from allowing union dues to be taken out of paychecks and simultaneously required annual recertification votes that needed all members of the union to agree to stay organized. The remainder of the law, however, has been upheld. Seven major unions, including the AFL-CIO and the American Federation of Teachers, brought a lawsuit against the law — ushered through the legislature with the backing of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker — last summer after the Wisconsin legislature passed the bill.

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

GOP race comes to Wisconsin

Photo by Chris Usher / Associated Press/CBS News

Photo by Jae C. Hong/Associated Press

See Collective, page 5

Watumishi library nears completion Photo by Craig Schreiner/Associated Press/Wisconsin State Journal

Photo by Steve Senne/Associated Press

(Clockwise): Gingrich, Santorum, Romney and Paul prepare for a Wisconsin delegates showdown Tuesday.

It’s voting day in Wisconsin, and primary contenders Mitt Romney, Ron Paul, Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum are all on the ballot, along with candidates in local elections. While Rick Santorum had been gaining ground in Wisconsin, according to polls taken by Marquette’s Law School in February, Mitt Romney has climbed to the number one spot, according to the school’s most recent March poll. The winner of the Wisconsin primary could potentially earn an additional 42 delegates to their total. While this is more than the Washington, D.C. (19) and Maryland (37) primaries taking place today, earning all of Wisconsin’s delegates alone would not be enough to change

the ranking of the candidates. makes a part of me want to vote All four of the Republican for Ron Paul, because I agree presidental candidates have with his positions the most, esbeen in Wisconsin over the pecially in regards to economic past week, and ads from each policy.” of them have flooded radio Romney has outspent the and television airwaves. Newt other candidates on advertising Gingrich made an appearance over the past several weeks. He on Marquette’s campus Thurs- also has the backing of popuday evening lar Wisconas the guest of sin Rep. and the College Re- “Since the beginning, we’ve been chairman of publicans, and hearing that Mitt Romney was going the House Romney, San- to be the nominee, and I don’t like Budget Comtorum and Paul being told what to do.” mittee Paul have made the Ryan (Rrounds speakWis.), which Tyler Martell gives him aning at meetings Sophomore, College of Arts & Sciences other edge. of conservative groups around As the prithe state. mary season drags on much Tyler Martell, a sophomore in longer than usual, losing in the College of Arts & Sciences, Wisconsin may deter the other will be voting in tomorrow’s candidates from continuing in primary. He said that he is still the race until the next round of on the fence about which candi- primaries on April 24th. date he will vote for. Voting is open from 7 a.m to “Since the beginning, we’ve 8 p.m. Polling locations can be been hearing that Mitt Romney found at http://city.milwaukee. was going to be the nominee, gov/election. and I don’t like being told what to do,” Martell said. “And not liking being told what to do

News

Viewpoints

SPORTS

Massage

WHITE

GRESKA

Candidates fight for portion of 42 state delegates up for grabs By Allison Kruschke allison.kruscke@marquette.edu

Photo courtesy of Colleen O’Connor

Men work on the roof slabs of the store and Library Learning Center.

Students spent eight years raising funds for project in Africa By Andrea Anderson andrea.anderson@marquette.edu

Most Marquette student organizations stay local, but one group is making an impact across the ocean in a village of 60,000 people. Marquette social awareness group Watumishi: People of Service recently finished a project eight years in the making — building a Library Learning Center at

St. Joseph Shelter of Hope in Voi, Kenya. Beginning in 2004, a group of students traveled with Karen Ivantic-Doucette, former clinical assistant professor of Marquette, to the Shelter of Hope to assess the HIV and AIDS epidemic in the area. Upon the students’ return, three of the students, Greg Saint Arnold, Conor Sweeney and Timothy Kummer, wanted to continue their relationship with the people of Voi. Colleen O’Conor, a senior in the college of Arts & Sciences, traveled to Kenya in January 2010 and spent four months in the community of Voi helping in any way she could. See Watumishi, page 5

INDEX

DPS REPORTS.....................2 CALENDAR.......................2 VIEWPOINTS........................6 CLOSER LOOK....................8

STUDY BREAK....................10 SPORTS..........................12 CLASSIFIEDS..................14

Massage-A-Thon is back and helping students relax. See, PAGE 3

Where your food comes from matters more than you think. See PAGE 7

Senior Olga Fischer has come a long way in her four years. See PAGE 12


2 Tribune

NEWS

A cure for heavy backpacks Fundraiser provides hands-on practice for masseuses By Eric Oliver eric.oliver@marquette.edu

The College of Health Sciences’ semi-annual Massage-AThon, currently being held on the third floor of the Schroeder Complex and ending April 13, offers participants the opportunity to both fund a graduation ceremony and provide professional experience for the masseuses. The college’s fundraiser takes Photo by Eric Oliver/eric.oliver@marquette.edu place once each semester and Physical therapy students offer massages in the Schroeder Complex as helps to pay for the physical part of an annual event to raise funds for graduation expenses. therapists’ graduation ceremony. It’s become a tradition for focus on just trying to help the anatomy so it’s really a learnthe students to raise their own person relax and work their tense ing experience.” While the masmoney for their ceremony, and tissues,” Laurenzi said. “There is seuses are still students, Lutsch the Massage-A-Thon is their so- nice music playing in the back- and Bush both said they had ground, so it’s just a relaxing at- never heard of anyone getting a lution. bad massage at the Massage-AThis year proves no different. mosphere.” Laurenzi said she also enjoys Thon. The Massage-A-Thon allows “We are experienced and we students to apply the concepts giving massages because she likes to make have had training, so we know they learned people feel bet- what we are doing,” Bush said. in class to real “It’s actually kind of relaxing giving ter. After the three masseuses life. the massage as well, just because “I like the graduate, they are all hoping to Three of the ability to help go into the physical therapy field. masseuses for you can zone out and focus on just people and to Bush hopes to work in pediatthis semes- trying to help the person relax and try, through dif- rics, while Lutsch and Laurenzi ter’s event, work their tense tissues.” Natalie Bush, Kristi Laurenzi ferent things are both aiming for outpatient Kristi Laurenzi Graduate Student, College of Heealth Sciences that we learned therapy settings. in class, to Laurenzi said a massage can and Brittney implement that improve anyone’s day. Lutsch, all “It’s really relaxing no matter graduate students in the College and make them feel better,” Lauwhat time you decide to come of Health Sciences, are ready renzi said. Bush agreed, saying the Mas- in,” Laurenzi said. “It helps to and excited to give massages. Laurenzi said she looks for- sage-A-Thon offers her an op- make your day a little bit better.” To learn more about the event, ward to going to work, as it gives portunity to apply what she go to room 397 of the Schroeder her time to relax and focus on the learned in class in real life. “It’s not really that bad,” Bush Complex or massage-a-thon12. massages. “It’s actually kind of relaxing said. “Your hands get a little bit genbook.com. giving the massage as well, just tired sometimes, but you get because you can zone out and to see some really interesting

GSA hosts panel discussion Event meant to promote inclusivity, acceptance at MU By Sarah Hauer sarah.hauer@marquette.edu

Marquette’s Gender Sexuality Alliance declared their mission to end silence on campus at a panel discussion last Wednesday in the Raynor Library. Students, faculty and administration from Marquette attended along with GSA members from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the Milwaukee School of Engineering. “We want to show the university there are people who care about LGBTQ issues at Marquette,” Matthew Bin Han Ong, a senior in the College of Communication, said in the discussion. The focus of the panel was to discuss what members learned at the Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference (MBLGTACC) at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa in February. More than 2,100 students came together to learn about LGBTQplus issues at the conference. Ed de St. Aubin, faculty advisor of GSA and associate professor of psychology, said the students wanted to continue on with what they learned at the conference when they returned to campus. The GSA panel said the two

goals they took back from the requirement for a class on gencampus were to end both gender der and sexuality issues in the binarism and heteronormativity Core of Common Studies, havon Marquette’s campus. Gender ing a presentation of gender binarism is viewing gender as and sexuality during freshman consisting of only two distinct orientation and requiring ally categories: masculine and femi- training for RAs and other leadnine. Heteronormativity is the ers. cultural bias in favor of hetero“Progress takes time–we still sexuality and heterosexual re- have a long way to go, and it lationships and the assumption always feels like there is more that all human beings are either talk than action,” Sarra said. male or female, both in sex and All members expressed that gender, and that sexual and ro- the conference was a lifemantic thoughts and relations changing experience. are normal only when between Kerri Byers, a sophomore people of different sexes. in the College of Engineering, Marie Sarra, a senior in the said, “I’ve never been in a place College of Health Sciences, is where it was so okay to just be the president of GSA. yourself.” “You don’t notice how pervaByers said the lessons learned sive heteronormativity is until it expanded beyond gender and is gone,” Sarra said. sexuality. The administration improve “(MBLGTACC) allowed me their attitudes and policies have to appreciate how different peochanged during her ple are,” she said. time on campus but “We want to show Colleen Heitlage, wants to see more. the university there a sophomore in the Sarra said the adCollege of Arts & ministration has are people who care Sciences, said the become more vocal about LGBTQ issues at biggest lesson she about their desire Marquette.” learned was respect to make Marquette and inclusion. more LGBTQ-plus “They are still Matthew Bin Han friendly, although Senior, trying to include College of Communication everyone in the the group had to present a disclaimer LGBTQ communiat the beginning of ty,” Heitlage said. the discussion to say the views “Equality is the common goal.” expressed during the event do GSA will hold a march around not necessarily represent those campus for the Day of Silence of Marquette. on April 20, which will start at A number of ideas to im- the St. Joan of Arc Chapel at 4 prove Marquette’s handling p.m. of LGBT issues discussed at the forum include adding a

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

DPS Reports Wednesday, March 28 At 8:56 p.m. the Department of Public Safety assisted the Milwaukee Police Department in detaining two people not affiliated with Marquette who had removed city property from a lot in the 1500 block of W. Canal St. MPD took the suspects into custody. Thursday, March 29 Between 4:16 p.m. and 5:40 p.m. a student reported receiving harassing text messages from another student. MPD was contacted. Friday, March 30 At 12:34 p.m. two students walking in the 1600 block of W. Kilbourn Ave. were approached by two subjects not affiliated with Marquette. One of the subjects snatched a purse from one of the students. The subjects fled the scene but were later located by MPD and taken into custody. The student’s property was recovered. Saturday, March 31 At 5:30 p.m. a person not affiliated with Marquette removed property from a

business in the 1600 block of W. Wells St. and was detained by DPS. MPD was contacted, and the subject was cited. At 11:30 p.m. a student reported that another student vandalized his secured, unattended bicycle in the 900 block of N. 15th St. and fled the scene. DPS located the student subject. MPD was contacted, and the subject agreed to make restitution for the vandalism. Sunday, April 1 At 1:36 a.m. two students were involved in a physical altercation in the 1600 block of W. Wells St. MPD was contacted, and medical assistance was declined. At 1:49 a.m. a student reported being battered by an unidentified suspect in a residence in the 1700 block of W. Kilbourn Ave. MPD was contacted, and medical assistance was declined. At 2:42 a.m. a student acted in a disorderly manner in Campus Town West.

Events Calendar April 2012 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Tuesday 3 “Blue and Gold” Blood Drive, Alumni Memorial Union Room 157, 1 to 6 p.m.

Gabriel Iglesias, Riverside Theater, 7 p.m. Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds, Pabst Theater, 7 p.m.

Wednesday 4 Human Nature, Riverside Theater, 7 p.m. Milwaukee Bucks vs. Cleveland Cavaliers, Bradley Center, 7 p.m.

Contact Us and Corrections The Marquette Tribune welcomes questions, comments, suggestions and notification of errors that appear in the newspaper. Contact us at (414) 288-5610 or editor@marquettetribune.org.

The Marquette Tribune Editorial

Editor-in-Chief Matthew Reddin (414) 288-7246 Managing Editor Tori Dykes (414) 288-6969 NEWS (414) 288-5610 Editor Marissa Evans Assistant Editors Andrew Phillips, Patrick Simonaitis Closer Look Editor Caroline Campbell Assistant Closer Look Editor Leah Todd Investigative Reporters Erica Breunlin, Olivia Morrissey Administration Erin Caughey Campus Community/MUSG Simone Smith College Life Sarah Hauer Consumer Monique Collins Crime/DPS Matt Gozun Metro Joe Kaiser Politics Allison Kruschke Religion & Social Justice Andrea Anderson Science & Health Elise Angelopulos COPY DESK Copy Editors Alec Brooks, Travis Wood, Zach Buchheit VIEWPOINTS (414) 288-7940 Viewpoints Editor Kara Chiuchiarelli Assistant Editor Kelly White Editorial Writer Tessa Fox Columnists Bridget Gamble, Ian Yakob, Kelly White MARQUEE (414) 288-3976 Editor Sarah Elms Assistant Editor Matthew Mueller Reporters Liz McGovern, Vanessa Harris, Heather Ronaldson SPORTS (414) 288-6964 Editor Michael LoCicero Assistant Editor Andrei Greska Copy Editors Trey Killian, Erin Caughey Reporters Trey Killian, Mark Strotman, Christopher Chavez Sports Columnists Andrei Greska, Matt Trebby

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Tuesday, April 3, 2012

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4 Tribune

MUSG looks at sexual assault

Gringrich stresses Wis. roots

Marquette joins list of candidate’s campaign stops By Robert Gebelhoff rob.gebelhoff@marquette.edu

By Matt Gozun benjaminmatthew.gozun@marquette.edu

Photo by Rebecca Rebholz/rebecca.rebholz@marquette.edu

Arica Van Boxtel and Bill Niedhardt are sworn in as the new President and Vice President of MUSG, who were chosen in Wednesday’s elections.

Speakers describe efforts to address on-campus problem By Simone Smith simone.smith@marquette.edu

Bergen said the university has concentrated its efforts on education and prevention. Bergen said there is a focus on freshman students, especially those in their first six weeks of college, because they are at the greatest risk. Bergen said 95 percent of the residence hall population was reached through the 77 programs presented. Bergen said the university plans to continue these efforts into the fall. “We have every intention of doing that again this year,” Bergen said. Non-first-year students were targeted as well through student leaders. Bergen said much of that reach included discussions, which he said saw 100 percent participation. The four speakers said they are working hard on the issue with other dedicated staff members and know they have a long way to go to eradicate sexual assaults on campus. Marquette is continuing to develop bystander prevention awareness initiatives to address how the campus should act and respond in cases of sexual assault. Daood said Marquette must hold itself responsible for a respectful and inclusive community and help students look out for each other. O’Brien said the website on sexual misconduct is up and running with updated policies and procedures and information for victims.

At last Thursday’s MUSG meeting, members saw a presentation on campus sexual assault awareness and education. The presentation was given by Dan Bergen, assistant dean for university apartments and off campus student services; Sue Cooper, coordinator of sexual violence and advocacy services; Chris Daood, assistant director of the Counseling Center; and Lynn O’ Brien, sexual violence prevention coordinator at the Counseling Center. The presentation included information about Marquette’s past efforts to decrease campus sexual assaults and raise awareness about sexual assault prevention. It also covered new initiatives the university is using to educate students, staff, faculty and administrators about proper reporting procedures in the event of a sexual assault. “Anyone on campus that becomes aware of sexual assault is required to contact (the Department of Public Safety), which must contact the Milwaukee Police Department,” O’Brien said. MUSG Notes

President Joey Ciccone said he met with Roby Blust, dean of admissions and enrollment

planning, to talk about diversity in admissions, including the university’s outreach to underrepresented students and university retainment rates.

Executive Vice President Trent Carlson announced that University Committee Student Representative positions are now open for all students to apply.

The Senate unanimously passed the recommendation, “Supporting a Neighborhood Grocery Store,” which suggests that the Marquette administration collaborate with community groups to bring a grocery store to the area.

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

In a campaign rally at the Weasler Auditorium Thursday night, GOP presidential candidate and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich emphasized his relationship to Wisconsin, stressing the Whitehall roots of his wife, Callista, and avoiding any mention of his GOP rivals. Gingrich has been struggling in recent Republican contests, lagging behind the frontrunners, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum. In a Marquette Law School poll released March 27, Gingrich placed last among the major candidates, receiving the support of only five percent of potential voters. Gingrich announced March 27 that he would scale back his campaign due to financial constraints,

and would instead focus on winning the nomination at the GOP convention in August. “Our only opponent is Barack Obama, and we are committed to removing him from the White House,” Callista Gingrich said. Gingrich spoke on a variety of topics ranging from the role of religion in America to what he described as the incompetence of the federal government. Recalling the first flight of the Wright Brothers, he stressed that it was not the government and congressional funding that created aviation, but rather the work of private individuals. “You have a government (today) dedicated to the avoidance of innovation,” Gingrich said. He concluded with a call for the introduction of private investment accounts as a an alternative to the current Social Security system, an idea that has been one of the focal points of his campaign. Gingrich said that had these accounts been introduced during the 1970s, the revenue generated would be enough to pay off the current national debt. ­­ After the speech, he answered questions from students and other members of the Milwaukee community. In response to questions

regarding education, Gingrich said he supported a Pell Grant or voucher system for elementary and secondary education and denounced affirmative action policies. “I believe people should be judged as individuals,” he said. The audience left the speech divided, with politically active students’ minds seemingly unchanged. According to College Republican chairman and College of Business Administration junior Ethan Hollenberger, Gingrich was able to stand up to the occasionally hostile questions presented to him. “He did a good job and was able to defend his positions well,” Hollenberger said. But Rachel Contos, a freshman in the College of Arts & Sciences and a member of the College Democrats, remained opposed to Gingrich’s conservative proposals and denounced the candidate’s use of American history and religion in promoting his message. “I think he distorted the message of the Bible and of the foundin­­ g fathers,” Contos said. “I think he has no sense of the people being born into a society.”

Women of MU highlighted Annual ceremony awards student, faculty, staff leaders By Simone Smith simone.smith@marquette.edu

Marquette’s Multicultural Affairs held its third annual Golden Roses ceremony last Thursday, which honors female members of the Marquette community who contribute to making Marquette more inclusive. The ceremony was held in the Haggerty Museum of Art. In his address during the ceremony, Vice President for Student Affairs Chris Miller talked about how he has been influenced by women similar to those being honored. “I think about how they have shaped and molded me just as you are shaping and molding students,” Miller said. Carla Cadet, assistant dean for Multicultural Affairs, noted that the event coincided with March

being Women’s History month. She said it is important that as Marquette seeks to become more inclusive, the university recognizes the staff who make that happen. Cadet said there were over 60 nominees, including faculty, administrative and dining hall staff. Women from different academic colleges, Admissions, Residence Life, Sodexo, the Office of Student Development and Student Educational Services were honored. Cadet said Multicultural Affairs started planning the event in October and opened up the nominating process in January. The nomination process ended in March prior to Spring Break. Some nominees were nominated by their colleagues and students, Cadet said, sometimes even more than once by different students. “I’m excited to see participation from those who nominated recipients,” Cadet said. “The support for women we’re recognizing says a lot about our campus.”

Jaqueline Walker, a financial aid counselor for the Educational Opportunity Program and one of the women honored, said it was a privilege to be recognized. “I just want to let everyone know that as much as they think I give, I get it back,” Walker said. Ri’ana Johnson, a student speaker at the event and president of the Black Student Council, said some of the women honored have affected her leadership. “The support, knowledge and experiences given … is definitely a great asset to any student leader who wants to be effective and make a difference,” Johnson said. Cadet said Golden Roses sends a distinct message. “It may not be clear while they’re busy doing everyday work how they contribute to student life,” Cadet said. “We hope the ceremony highlights that. Looking at how many women were nominated is an example of how much influence and support on campus there continues to be.”


NEWS

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 Continued from page 1:

Continued from page 1:

Watumishi: Library to double as clinic She said the three students who founded Watumishi really enjoyed their time there but wanted to make an impact. “When they left they wanted to continue to build their relationship when they returned to Milwaukee,” O’Conor said. “They talked to Sister Gen, the founder of St. Joseph Shelter of Hope, and this is what she recommended.” Sister Gen came to Marquette in 1998, where Ivantic-Doucette worked with her to receive a specialized certificate program in health management that she could apply all of her skills and knowledge to the situation facing Kenya. O’Conor said there are two primary goals of the library: improving literacy, and treating HIV and AIDS, which includes eliminating the negative connotations surrounding the diseases. “At St. Joseph they are treating about 600 people at a time,” O’Conor said. “Having a library right next to the treatment center allows people to be comfortable with their circumstances and ignore the stigma. They could easily say, ‘I’m going to the library and to read but (I’m going to) actually seek treatment.’” The organization sent its last wire transfer of approximately $6,000 in February. Construction will be completed in early May as the contractors can only work when money is sent so they do not go into debt. Each year the organization wires close to the same amount to the Shelter of Hope. Currently, workers are completing finishing touches like electricity and plumbing. Carissa Molina, a graduate student in the School of Dentistry, has been involved in Watumishi since her sophomore year in 2007, and traveled to Kenya for two weeks during summer 2009 with five other

Photo courtesy of Colleen O’Connor

The Library Learning Center will also be a resource for HIV/AIDS patients.

Marquette students (now alumni), Allison Berg, Pamela Livorsi, Micaela Robb-McGrath, Patrick Duffey and Sumeet Uttamchandani. Molina’s trip was a way for the students to understand what was happening at the Shelter of Hope, since students had not traveled to Voi since 2007. “Two main goals we had were to reestablish the relationship between Marquette and the Shelter of Hope and to learn more about the progress and development of the Library Learning Center so that together we could come up with strategies to complete the project,” Molina said. While there, Molina worked with the Sisters of St. Joseph and the staff. The students assisted the staff and accompanied them on outreach and patient home visits. “We also dedicated much of our time to the project that has been the central focus of Watumishi since its inception — the Library Learning Center. … To gain a better understanding of how the LLC may benefit the Voi community, we met with different groups of children, youth and school teachers.”

According to Molina, the most inspiring people she met with were in the youth group from Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Parish, who explained to her how the library would benefit them physically and mentally. “They feel that the town is losing some of its most brilliant minds to the big cities because they leave Voi to gain better opportunities and few return,” Molina said. “They all agreed that the LLC, with books and Internet access, would provide them with the valuable tools necessary to achieve their goals.” Watumishi is hosting a ceremony to publicly announce the results of the eight-year project. But Molina said she could already sum up the project in one word she learned in Kenya: “harambee,” meaning “all pull together.” “To me, it also sums up what Watumishi and the SJSH is all about. The dedicated men and women at SJSH, Watu members past and present, and generous donors have all pulled together for the common goal of providing access to education to the Voi community.”

MKE gas prices on the rise EPA regulations have local pump prices at their peak By Joe Kaiser joseph.kaiser@marquette.edu

Milwaukee gasoline prices reached an all-time high last week, with the average price of regular, unleaded gas hitting $4.20 per gallon on March 28, according to the AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report. Prices have since slightly decreased, to $4.14 per gallon, but they remain significantly higher than those in the metro areas of Madison, La Crosse, JanesvilleBeloit, Green Bay and Eau Claire, which all have average prices of regular gasoline under $4. AAA Wisconsin Vice President of Public Affairs Pam Moen said the regulatory policy applied to Milwaukee’s gas is a major reason for the higher prices. “Milwaukee is required to use reformulated blends,” Moen said. “The rest of the state uses conventional gasoline, which is a different formula. Years ago there was an EPA act that required certain areas of the country to use formulas that limit emissions.” Moen said the quantity of these reformulated blends is what drives up prices in the

Milwaukee area. “What’s happened the past couple of weeks is that the supply for the reformulated gasoline in the Milwaukee area has been a bit tighter due to some shortages in the refineries, which has caused the price to be so much higher,” Moen said. Marquette adjunct economics professor Heather Kohls agreed that the regulatory impact is a large factor for differences in gas prices in different regions. She also noted that during warmer weather, Milwaukee is required to use a different blend that costs even more. “Most of the regional disparity in oil prices is government regulation driven,” Kohls said. “In California they have requirements about what gasoline can have in it, so they have special refineries to make their gas. In Illinois they have higher taxes. The EPA has mandated that any month when it gets hot, we have to use this special formulated gas.” Pat Garrett, a sophomore in the College of Arts & Sciences who has a car on campus, has noticed the spike in gas prices in Milwaukee. However, it has not hindered his driving tendencies, even when he travels to work in Racine or returns home to Illinois. “It would probably cost less to take the train (when I go home) or something, but it’s worth (having the car here),” Garrett said. “I usually fill up in Racine because

Tribune 5

the prices in Milwaukee are higher.” Garrett said if prices continue to climb, his driving habits still will not be affected – but other spending will. “It’s going to get to a point where I’m not going to spend money on other things because I need the car,” Garrett said. According to the AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report, the national average for regular gas stands at $3.92 per gallon, only $0.189 behind the record national average that occurred in July 2008. Kohls pointed to two main factors for the high gas prices nationwide. “First is the U.S. dollar,” Kohls said. “When there is all the uncertainty and debt crisis in Europe, people want to hold dollars, not Euros. The price of the dollar then goes up.” “The second big unknown is Iran,” she continued. “As a country, (we) don’t buy any oil from Iran, but Europe does. If someone were to declare war on Iran, it would make things even more uncertain. That makes speculators nervous. When people expect prices to go up, they actually do go up.” Despite Milwaukee’s record highs, prices are even steeper elsewhere. Wailuku, Hawaii has prices hitting $4.78 per gallon, while nearby Chicago tops the U.S. mainland at $4.65 per gallon.

Collective: Despite judge’s decision, fight not over yet The unions argued that the law violated the equal protection clause of the constitution because it took away collective bargaining rights from most public workers in Wisconsin, exempting police and firefighters only. It was this exemption that led U.S. District Judge William M. Conley to overturn those two sections of the act, as the law was not being applied evenly across all Wisconsin unions. Conley ordered that the “automatic dues withdrawal” be reinstated by the end of May. Patrick Garrett, chair of Marquette’s College Republicans and a sophomore in the College of Arts & Sciences, said this doesn’t necessarily mean the end of the law. “It is important to remember that this one judge will not be the last one to speak on the matter,” Garrett said. “It is unfortunate that people who work hard for their money are going to be forced to give a portion back in union dues even if they prefer not to associate with a union. I believe that those dues should be voluntary.” The passing of the law in early 2011 caused an uproar across the state and resulted in the collection of almost a million signatures advocating for Walker’s recall. In the face of a recall election, Walker will now likely have to defend the parts of the law

being overturned. Andy Suchorski, chair of the College Democrats of Wisconsin and a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, said the ruling is a step in the right direction for employees in Wisconsin. “Collective bargaining rights are fundamental worker’s rights, and the elimination of collective bargaining has hurt the quality of K-12 education and higher education in Wisconsin,” Suchorski said. “The ruling will allow public sector unions to continue receiving dues and it will change their certification process, making it easier for workers to join a union and allow the union to more effectively advocate on their behalf.” Feelings about the ruling have been split along party lines. While many Democrats have applauded the ruling, some Republicans have disagreed. Mike Tate, chair of the Wisconsin Democratic party, said in a statement that the federal judge made the right decision for Wisconsin workers. “Scott Walker’s so-called budget repair bill has been divisive, unfair, radical and offensive to the values of Wisconsin,” Tate said. “Now it’s been found to be offensive to the Constitution. Wisconsin deserved better than this bill, just as it deserves better than Scott Walker.”

HAPPY EASTER

FROM THE MARQUETTE TRIBUNE


Viewpoints

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 6

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

The Marquette Tribune Editorial Board:

Kara Chiuchiarelli, Viewpoints Editor Tessa Fox, Editorial Writer Matthew Reddin, Editor-in-Chief Michael LoCicero, Sports Editor Tori Dykes, Managing Editor Sarah Elms, Marquee Editor Marissa Evans, News Editor Elise Krivit, Photo Editor Caroline Campbell, Closer Look Editor Zachary Hubbard, Visual Content Editor

STAFF EDITORIAL

Watch out for others when drinking Remember that time last semester when you can’t stand, walk or even sleep on your you got completely messed up at a party, own without someone watching you? Why spent $20 at Real Chili and almost got hit should it be normal to have no idea who by a car as you wondered across Wells you’re with or no idea where you were? Street? Actually, The truth is, it shouldn’t be. you probably Drinking excessive amounts don’t remember, of alcohol to the point of blackAre college students spending too ing out or puking is just like but we’re sure that your friend much time “having fun” and not a drug overdose. Actually, it who walked you enough time being smart about it? is a drug overdose. If one of home does. your friends overdosed on coMarquette caine, heroine or any other ilhas a drinking legal drug, we think (and hope) culture — the you’d be pretty concerned. So whole state of Wisconsin does, really. why is it encouraged and laughed off by But are college students spending too the majority of college students when peomuch time “having fun” and not enough ple overdose on alcohol? Drunk people can time being smart about it? The first few be pretty entertaining, but when someone’s months of the year have already resulted in life is on the line, it is no joking manner. multiple alcohol-induced drownings among We’ve all had that one night where we college students. could have ended up anywhere without the In January, the body of Michael T. Philbin, help of our friends or a kind stranger. What 21, was found in the Fox River. Michael, if those people wouldn’t have been there? son of the Green Bay Packers’ offensive What if the “mom” in your friend group coordinator Joe Philbin, fell into the river went home that weekend? Would you have after a night of partying with friends at UW- made it home safely? Oshkosh. The body of UW-Stevens Point You’re not untouchable just because student Eric Duffey was found in the Wis- you’re in college; situations like Hecht’s consin River near Madison after celebrating could happen to anyone. his 21st birthday early the first We’re not sayweek of March. We’re sure ing don’t drink. You’re not untouchable just We at the Tribune you all remember seeing missing posters for Tom Hecht, 28, because you’re in college; situations are all about havplastered around campus a few like Hecht’s could happen to any- ing a good time. weeks ago. Hecht’s body was one. We just urge you found in the Milwaukee River to be responsible. after disappearing one night When you’re out after a pub crawl. with friends, stay The reality of these cases is the same: It with them. If someone needs to head back was just an ordinary night. There was noth- early, go with them. Use the buddy system. ing exceptional about these cases other Have your phone fully charged and actualthan the devastation they caused Wisconsin ly answer it when someone calls you. Little families. These three men were normal guys things like this add up and could eventually doing normal things. But that’s the problem end up saving a life. — it’s normal. Why should it be normal to drink so much

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Reader’s Submission

Maybe we’re the problem with sexual health In the recent Marquette Tribune article on sexual health and education, Jennifer Beste of Xavier University suggests, “we don’t live in a social context where people are respected for waiting (to have sex).” It is quite discouraging that society seems to respect, and even encourages, sleeping with someone else’s future spouse. (No wonder divorce rates are skyrocketing.) Beste seems to welcome the hook-up culture on many Catholic campuses as morally acceptable because it is a cultural “norm” for many students. Is something morally justified simply because it is popular and “everyone is doing it?” If everyone took up smoking, would it be healthy for our lungs? I agree with Beste that discussions should go beyond abstinence, but her suggestion of sex outside of marriage as a form of empowerment is far from the truth. If I can’t say no to sex, then how much does my “yes” really mean? Having sex outside of marriage and using contraception does not give us the “sexual freedom” society promises; rather, it does the exact opposite. We become enslaved to our own feelings and desires, which is not a good foundation for a lasting relationship or marriage. Many argue the Catholic Church needs to change its stance on contraception, abortion and premarital sex. Perhaps the problem is not with the Church, but rather with us. Our human sinfulness, perpetuated by messages from the media, can blind us from the truth of Christ, whose light shines through the Church. There is nothing wrong with questioning the Church’s teachings in order to deepen our understanding of the faith and grow in holiness. However, questioning the Church’s teachings

because they differ from our own desires reflects our lack of trust in God’s design of human sexuality. The Roman Catholic Church does not seek to impose rules on us to limit our freedom, but rather to free us from the devastating effects of premarital sex, including broken relationships, abortion and divorce. Our bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit and not made purely for finite things. When God created us he put His signature on our hearts, proclaiming that we are made for Him in His own image. We were made to seek more than the pleasures of this world, we were made to desire eternal life with God in heaven. When we act on our sexual desires outside the covenant of marriage, our desires turn to emptiness and our “freedom” enslaves us. Saving yourself for the one person with whom you will spend the rest of your life is far more empowering than settling for uncommitted hook-ups and self-serving sexual relationships that deceive us from the meaning of true love. This premise is the foundation for “Theology of the Body,” a series of talks on God’s purpose for our human sexuality given by the late Pope John Paul II. The talks are an exploration into human sexuality and the purpose for the human body. I would encourage everyone at Marquette (and beyond) to read “Theology of the Body” and further explore these topics. If we can work to understand this theology, we will begin to see that “cura personalis” is directed towards glorifying God rather than our own sexual desires. Andrew J. Axt Senior, College of Engineering

Statement of Opinion Policy The opinions expressed on the Viewpoints page reflect the opinions of the Viewpoints staff. The editorials do not represent the opinions of Marquette University nor its administrators, but those of the editorial board. The Marquette Tribune prints guest submissions at its discretion. The Tribune strives to give all sides of an issue an equal voice over the course of a reasonable time period. An author’s contribution will not be published more than once in a four-week period. Submissions with obvious relevance to the Marquette community will be given priority consideration. Full Viewpoint submissions should be limited to 500 words. Letters to the editor should be between 50 to 150 words. The Tribune reserves the right to edit submissions for length and content. Please e-mail submissions to: viewpoints@marquettetribune.org. If you are a current student, include the college in which you are enrolled and your year in school. If not, please note any affliations to Marquette or your current city of residence.

I never get tired of the blue sky. - Vincent van Gogh


VIEWPOINTS

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Tribune 7

COLUMN

Buy groceries with a purpose

Kelly White Where did your last meal come from? If you’re an underclassmen, it was probably a dining hall, in which case don’t think any more about that question, for your own well-being. If you’re an upperclassman, however, you have some opportunity for variety in healthy and nutritious dieting outside Sodexo’s restrictive fare. My last meal came straight from my pantry, which my roommates and I recently fully stocked. We, luckily, have a couple of cars between us to drive two miles to the downtown Pick n’ Save, giving us a robust pantry and full fridge. That Pick n’ Save, located on Ogden and Lyon, is one of the only downtown grocers in Milwaukee. Although the produce is not always great, it is acceptable. The store is easy to maneuver

and they keep shelves well-stocked. The prices are more affordable than Metro Market, let alone Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s. Still, if not having a grocery store convenient enough to walk to is a pain for us, and our best options for cheap produce are mediocre, imagine how difficult it is to raise a healthy family in downtown Milwaukee with a tight budget. It can’t be easy, that’s for sure. With few major grocery stores in the most urban and poorest areas, options are incredibly limited. Our campus is situated in such a neighborhood, with the two nearest Pick n’ Saves each two miles away. We live in a food desert. There are an estimated 23 million people living in food deserts in America. The Department of Agriculture has defined these areas as low-income census tracts where a substantial number of residents has limited access to a supermarket or larger grocery store. As students, we have options to find an oasis in the food desert that others do not. We have the opportunity to purchase a meal plan, borrow a car, be creative with bus routes and the ability to borrow money from our parents. Even in our most stressed and busiest of moments,

Marquette students are able to eat. But we must acknowledge that we live in a city divided: by race, by wealth and by food. Honorary alumni Will Allen is on a mission to eliminate Milwaukee’s food desert. He founded Growing Power, an urban farm and education center in north Milwaukee, next to a low-income housing development miles away from any grocery store. The urban garden offers citizens a healthy diet, feeding more than 10,000 people with fresh produce, meat and fish. Independent grocery stores are also combating the issue. Pete’s Fruit Market on the South Side offers truly quality produce at an amazing price. After hearing rave reviews, some friends and I decided to check it out — and it lived up to the hype. The store was clean and organized and there was plenty of fresh produce, as well as other necessary groceries. For less than $15, I got a week’s worth of fruit and vegetables — a virtually impossible task at any chain grocery store. Pete Tsiritidis started out with just a small stand in 1993, but he recently upgraded to a larger store, featuring a full grocery section, complete meat

department and specialty Hispanic groceries. On a chilly spring Sunday morning, the store was filled with people, as Pete himself stood handing free samples with Spanish music filling the air. Piling back into our car with bags of fresh food, we could not believe how much we got for how little we spent and agreed this would be our spot for produce from now on. We are lucky that we do not have to worry much about where our next meal comes from. But as people with the means to shop where we choose, have a responsibility to shop at places that promote equity. By shopping at small and locallyowned markets, Marquette students can promote places like Growing Power and Pete’s Fruit Market, and thus encourage low prices and good quality. Plus, it’s a great deal for us as college students, who are conscious of where our money goes — because we don’t have much, and we want to spend it on fun, not groceries. Supporting alternative grocery stores is an easy way to support our community — and it’s a delightful way to spend a Sunday morning. kelly.white@marquette.edu

ARE YOU A

Natural born leader and visionary? Would you like to be a “game changer” and alter how Media is viewed at Marquette?

If so, STUDENT MEDIA INTERACTIVE IS looking for YOU APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE POSITION OF GENERAL MANAGER, SMI The Marquette department of Student Media Interactive is currently looking for a General Manager to lead the digital department to the next level of electronic media dissemination. Working closely with managers from six distinct media outlets, the GM will oversee the operations and quality control of all Student Media websites. The GM’s staff consists of a technical manager, designers, programmers and a reporting staff that creates multimedia stories. The ideal candidate will have an understanding of the computer operations used in Student Media’s websites, although direct operations fall under the responsibility of the technical manager. The GM’s day-to-day responsibilities include the supervision of multimedia content, coordination of training needs, coordination of content efforts, project & resource estimates, detailed project work plans and task assignments. Candidates must possess a general understanding in the areas of website development, user

experience, interactive design and development.

THIS POSITION IS OPEN TO ALL MARQUETTE STUDENTS Marquette

STUDENT MEDIA We Build Careers

Student Media is responsible for the production and operations of The Marquette Tribune, The Marquette Journal , the broadcasting operations of Marquette Radio and MUTV and the services of MSM Advertising. Aside from providing the Marquette community with news, opinion and entertainment, this department has the added responsibility of functioning as a leadership facility for student staff members.

Applications can be picked up in Johnston Hall, Room 112 Application deadline is Wednesday, April 11, at 3 p.m., Johnston Hall, Room 112 Interviews will take place Saturday, April 13, at 10:30 a.m. in Zilber Hall, Room 025 For further information or to obtain an electronic application please contact: Dr. Stephen Byers

Assistant Professor, Journalism Student Publications Adviser Johnston Hall, Room 308 (414) 288-5772 Phone stephen.byers@marquette.edu


Closer Look

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 8

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

On tap: Milwaukee’s sewage struggle Sewerage District dumps waste into Lake Michigan By Sarah Butler sarah.butler@marquette.edu

Dave Frymark remembers a 1993 trip to Walgreens well. It wasn’t pleasant. He was looking for Imodium. “They were out of it,” said Frymark, a Milwaukee native and circulation supervisor at Raynor Memorial Libraries. “The Walgreens manager said it was really strange, that a rush of people had come in looking for (Imodium). That’s when I knew something weird was going on.” Soon, news broke. People panicked. Cryptosporidium — a parasite that grows on fecal matter and causes gastrointestinal illness in humans — had contaminated Milwaukee drinking water, sickening Frymark and an estimated 400,000 other Milwaukee area residents. That year, the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) released 9 billion gallons of raw sewage into Lake Michigan — Milwaukee’s primary source of drinking water. By 1994, when MMSD opened its 20-mile underground “Deep Tunnel” wastewater storage system, the number of gallons of untreated raw sewage

dumped swiftly dropped to 176 million — an amount that could fill about 11.4 million beer kegs — and has remained at a similar number every year since. But today the question still lingers in the minds of the uneasy Milwaukee residents who cautiously boiled their tap water during the 1993 scare — how much is too much? “I’m always concerned about water quality, even though it goes through all that filtration,” Frymark said. “I mean, who shouldn’t be? Everybody has to drink water.” Jenelle Joset, a media law instructor with a particular interest in the issue, said she neither drinks tap water nor swims in Lake Michigan. “We need to know how much (sewage) they are dumping and what are the long term effects, not only for us as people but for the environment,” Joset said. “The people who lived through Cryptosporidium here will always wonder, ‘Is (the water) safe?’” And for those residents, finger-pointing is easy to do. MMSD controls the release valve that dumps raw sewage into the lake when rainwater overflows Milwaukee sewers. The facility does this to prevent raw sewage backups into Milwaukee basements. “You either have raw sewage in your basement, or you have raw sewage dumped into your lake, which is your source of drinking water,” Joset said.

“Which is the lesser of the two evils? You can see (MMSD is) between a rock and a hard place.” According to MMSD’s spokesman Bill Graffin, the amount the facility can dump per year is measured by events, not gallons. The facility is allowed four to six overflow sewage dump events every year. But MMSD is neither the sole — nor the worst — polluter of the lake, Graffin said. He told the Tribune that several other Midwestern cities like Chicago and Indianapolis all have larger annual wastewater overflows than Milwaukee. And although MMSD dumps billions of gallons less than it did in 1993, many still debate the long-term effects. A study conducted by the Medical College of Wisconsin from 2002-2004 aimed to determine if gastrointestinal illnesses in children increased after overflow sewage was dumped into Lake Michigan. The researchers concluded sewage release into the lake is “potentially harmful” because hospital visits increased only for those drinking Lake Michigan water after two of the largest sewage dumps during the study. Another study published by researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin and the Medical College of Wisconsin links heavy rainfall and an increase in gastrointestinal disease in children, identifying 17,357 hospital visits for such

Photo by Elise Krivit /elise.krivit@marquette.edu

MMSD makes an effort to conserve water but also has to dispose of several million gallons of sewage yearly.

diseases from 2002-2007. Any rainfall four days prior was associated with an 11 percent increase in gastrointestinal disease visits, and more rainfall was linked to greater increases. Whether or not the damage is long-term, contaminated water harms the environment as well, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. A 2011 report published by the council includes two Wisconsin beaches — one of which is South Shore Park Beach in Milwaukee — on a list of 13 U.S. beaches with 25 percent of beach samples repeatedly exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum bacteria limit. But other factors can interfere with water and beach quality, too. The Great Lakes WATER Institute debunked myths that beach advisories and closings in Milwaukee are caused by sewer overflows, as well as myths that closings and advisories in Chicago are caused by Milwaukee sewage. Instead, the institute attributes this to seagull populations and stormwater runoff from roads and urban areas. And this is not just a concern for recreational use, but also for drinking water. Frymark said after the Cryptosporidium outbreak in 1993, he bought a carbon filter for his tap water. But common household pitcher and faucetmount filters do not necessarily address the bacteria issue, as many filter out minerals to give consumers water that tastes better but is not necessarily cleaner, according to NSF International, a nonprofit public health and safety company. Joset said she only drinks bottled water. Milwaukee Water Works treats and filters the Lake Michigan water distributed to residents as tap water. The MWW website maintains that their filtration process destroys disease-causing bacteria like Cryptosporidium. But according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ordinary disinfection methods should — but cannot always — kill Cryptosporidium and other parasites. Even the best filtration systems cannot

guarantee disease-causing bacteria will always stay out of filtered drinking water. Still, a report from the Environmental Working Group recommends consumers drink filtered tap water, as it states most of the 173 bottled water brands tested fill labels with “vague claims of pristine source or perfect purity — but no real facts.” In 2009 and 2010, 30 of the brands tested failed to provide any information about their water treatment processes at all. Among those were popular brands like Fiji, Trader Joe’s, Evian and Nestle’s Ice Mountain. The Environmental Working Group does, however, report that treated sewage is often still contaminated when released into the lake. A 2007 report says Phthalates, bisphenol-a and triclosan — three hormonemeddling chemicals found in common household products — were all present at low levels in the California sewage they tested, even though it was treated. “We know (contamination is) going in, we know at least some of it is going out, and we know that’s not good,” said Bill Walker, Environmental Working Group’s West Coast president, in the report. In addition to the chemicals detected by Environmental Working Group, overflow sewage is often contaminated with environmentally harmful toxins, bacteria and trash. These affect Lake Michigan drinking water supply, fish consumption, shellfish harvesting and recreation. The EPA, however, notes impacts from sewage overflows are often combined with impacts from other sources of pollution. This makes it difficult to identify cause-and-effect relationships between overflow sewage releases and health or environmental issues. Regardless of the causes, Graffin said Milwaukee residents can decrease the amount of wastewater entering the lake if they conserve water. If less water is used and in the system, sewer overflows are less of a threat, which then reduces the amount of untreated sewage

Photo by Elise Krivit /elise.krivit@marquette.edu Photo by Elise Krivit /elise.krivit@marquette.edu

The shores of Lake Michigan are popular summer destinations for families. MMSD also dumps millions of gallons of sewage waste into the lake yearly, depending on annual rainfall and sewer overflow.

MMSD had to prevent sewage from backing up into Milwaukeeans’ basements. Its solution was to dump overflow into Lake Michigan.


CLOSER LOOK

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Tribune 9 Years 1990

8 Billion 9 Billion

1991

7 Billion 9 Billion

1992 1993 176 million 1994 1995 846 Million

MMSD is responsible for the disposal of waste, including raw sewage, for the city of Milwaukee.

1997

Sewage over the years

in gallons

1999 2000 521 million 2001 2002

4 Million

2006

516 Million

2007

3.98 Billion

2008

1.23 Billion 2.84 Billion

Source: MMSD.com

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0

0 2,0

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0

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(millions)

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.09 Million 2003 2004 1.56 Billion 221 Million 2005

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Celebrate Diversity @ Marquette University rssity

2.24 billion 709 million

441 Million

0 8,0

Born This Way

Wild Crea said. “Conservation is the best way to positively impact the Earth … We can do small things to ensure we keep our planet healthy for everyone.” Tyler Atkinson, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, also encourages Marquette to do its part. Atkinson is an intern for Project H2Oscore, a business that helps residential homeowners and small business owners understand their water usage by allowing them to track the amount used — as well as the money they save by conserving. “Marquette has made some progress on the issue as seen with things such as the dualflow toilets in newer buildings like Zilber Hall,” Atkinson said. “If the entire campus were to install even something as simple as faucet aerators in the restrooms, it would make a bigger difference than you think.” But regardless of who and what pollutes water the most, Joset and Frymark agree pointing fingers isn’t the way to solve the problem. “Everybody needs fresh water — it’s absolutely critical to life,” Frymark said. “And it’s everybody’s problem. If you use water, it’s your problem.”

1996

4.38 Billion 3.63 Billion

Photo by Elise Krivit /elise.krivit@marquette.edu

MMSD has to dump into the lake. “Anytime there’s heavy rain, try to use less water,” Graffin said. “You can cut down by some, help the lake and save some money.” According to the MMSD website, if their 1.1 million customers used 10 gallons less water on a day with heavy rain, basement backups and sewer overflows could be reduced by 11 million gallons. Simple changes like not doing laundry when it’s raining or taking shorter showers, in the end, affect the water in which Milwaukee residents swim and drink. “If we don’t have excess water in the system, (MMSD has) the capability to clean it and treat it before it’s dumped, which is what we want,” Joset said. Conserving individual water use is something student organizations like Students for an Environmentally Active Campus encourage. Claire Wild Crea, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences and vice president of SEAC, said the organization will sponsor Earth Week April 23 to 27 to promote conservation awareness on campus. “SEAC definitely encourages (Marquette) to conserve water, food really in every aspect,”

743 Million

Illustration and Graphic by Katherine Lau/katherine.lau@marquette.edu


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Down 1 Melee memento 2 First-class 3 Kismet 4 QB Manning 5 Icon 6 Medicinal amount 7 Court ruling? 8 WW II command 9 Musical notations 10 Vegetarian fare 11 Encourage 12 Casting need 15 Airport conveyance 17 Melon-like tropical fruits 21 Close-knit group 22 Physicians’ org. 23 Fluid container 24 Salespersons 25 Kenyan tribesman 26 Oranjestad’s island 27 Tossed course 28 Minimum 30 Imperial decree 31 Kind of box 34 Polish or Russian dish 38 Trojan War epic 43 German resort 45 Fully anesthetized 47 Pine tree 51 Sabbath activity 52 Indian state 53 Ragout or burgoo 54 Picker-upper 55 Swiss river 56 Baja bread 57 Broil 58 In doubt 60 Density symbol 61 “___ the glad waters of the dark blue sea”: Byron 62 Flower starter


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Sports

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 12

Women’s Volleyball

The adjustment bureau Read and co. look to fill in outside hitter vacancy By Mark Strotman mark.strotman@marquette.edu

Expected growing pains at the outside position were evident in Marquette’s five-set home loss to Wisconsin-Milwaukee on Thursday. But there were stretches of promise that have the Golden Eagles hopeful that chemistry will continue to improve throughout the spring season. The Golden Eagles took the first two sets but struggled the rest of the night due to a combination of inexperience and players seeing time at new positions. “We have been playing really hard in practices, and spring is a time to get after it. But we know what we have to work on,” junior middle hitter Carol Henney said. “We definitely have so much potential, and we just have to get it out of ourselves.” One player who impressed was sophomore outside hitter Casey Read, who finished with a team-high 13 kills. Through two sets, Read racked

up six kills and three blocks. Like the rest of the team, she showed fatigue late in the match as Marquette struggled to find an offensive rhythm. Shymansky said he was impressed with her continued improvement. “She’s going to get a lot of reps in the spring,” Shymansky said. “And we have to do what we can to find out where her limitations are, where her strengths are and really find out how we can capitalize on her skill set.” Read only saw action in eight matches last fall, playing behind senior team leaders Ashley Beyer and Ciara Jones on the outside. Shymansky said some of Read’s tendencies remind him of Beyer, specifically her vertical leap and powerful swing. Next year, however, Read will be asked to fill the shoes of two of the program’s most successful outside hitters. But she said the examples set by both teammates taught her how to play and will have her ready to succeed in a larger role. “She wanted to win all the time and that was evident in games and practices,” Read said of Beyer. “And now it’s up to me to adapt to that attitude because,

in the past, I’ve been more of a calm, quiet confident player. But now I have to be bolder as a player, and I have to pick up my game.” Junior Middle hitter Kelsey Mattai and freshman right side Lindsey Gosh have also seen time on the outside as Shymansky attempts to complete his rotation. “The spring is certainly a time of growth in a lot of ways, and you want young players and new players in different positions to get a lot of reps and experience,” Shymansky said. “And some of that experience is going to be failure as much as it’s going to be success.” The Golden Eagles’ potential was evident through the first two sets Thursday night, but the next two weeks to close out the spring season will test the team’s ability to not lose focus down the stretch as new players step into new roles. “We want to make it a learning time for our group,” Shymansky said. “We’ll spend time watching videos and work on individual technique, but overall we have to have that competitive desire.”

Column

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Fischer finds home across the pond Andrei Greska Imagine you’re a 17-year-old girl in a new country, without your parents and speaking limited English. Now imagine having to add becoming an NCAA Division I athlete to your to-do list. Tough isn’t it? That was senior Olga Fischer’s world four years ago as she settled into Milwaukee from her native Germany. She wasn’t used to the “grind,” though she would become much more comfortable with it as the time passed. … It’s 3-1 in the first set and the Marquette senior tandem of Fischer and Gillian Hush is in control, having already broken their Louisville counterparts once. Up 40-15, it appears Fischer and Hush are about ready to go into cruise control. Two points later, it’s 40 all as an unforced error and a Louisville winner has put the breaks on the runaway victory parade. Marquette needs this point. Up a break, they can’t afford to give it back so easily. And as this is

doubles, one set to eight decides the winner. Holding serve and getting it to 4-1 puts you firmly in the driver’s seat. … As a sentimental senior, I made the trudge down to the Helfaer Tennis Center early Sunday morning — 9:45 a.m. is early in my book — to see off seniors Fischer, Hush and Kristina Radan on the women’s tennis team as they play in their final home match. This is my fifth senior day this school year, having already taken in the men’s and women’s soccer and basketball teams’ festivities. What can I say, I’m a sucker for goodbyes — and the iPad they were giving away. But Sunday was different than the previous four I had seen. One of the three seniors being celebrated prior to the matches wasn’t escorted by parents or family at all. Instead Jennifer Solorio, a senior in the College of Communication and master tweeter, was by her side. Having missed the boat on the whole Jimmy Butler story, I wasn’t about to let this potential scoop pass on by. Just as I expected, Solorio was not Fischer’s mother. She was not family at all, at least in the genetic sense. But in some ways, she was much more than that. Solorio was Fischer’s roommate and cultural See Greska, page 13

women’s Soccer

Schunk has some big gloves to fill

Redshirt freshman replaces a legend between the pipes

Tribune File Photo

Junior middle hitter Carol Henney knows what her team has to do in the spring to make the most of its potential.

challenge her for playing time. Junior defender Megan Jaskowiak believes that Schunk’s two years of experience in the program will be beneficial to her seeing more time in goal next year. “Sophie is a hard worker and By Michael LoCicero she knows what is expected of her, michael.locicero@marquette.edu whereas the freshman won’t have The comparisons to Natalie Kul- that yet,” Jaskowiak said. la, justified or not, will begin for Schunk will be a sophomore in redshirt freshman goalkeeper Sofie the fall after redshirting two years Schunk when she takes the pitch in ago and appearing in games against the fall. Saint Louis and North Dakota Kulla ended her career as argu- last fall. She also gained valuable ably the most experience by successful goalwatching Kulla keeper in Mar- “It’s been a while since I’ve been in a for two years quette history, real game before the last couple, but and trying to inwinning back- it’s fun getting back into it.” corporate some to-back Big East lessons into Goalkeeper of her game this the Year awards spring. Sofie Schunk and also being “I’ve learned Redshirt Freshman a lot about learnnamed an AllBig East First ing to direct Team player her final two seasons, players in the back, and that’s still among many other honors. something that I’m trying to get betSchunk isn’t worried about the ter at,” Schunk said. “I think that’s pressure of taking over in net, something that (Kulla) was really however, as she has gotten off to a good at, just owning everything strong start this spring and believes that was around her and make sure her play will pick up in the fall. everything is flowing.” “It’s been awhile since I’ve been Schunk was a two-sport athlete in a real game before the last cou- at La Cueva High School in Albuple, but it’s fun getting back into it,” querque, N.M., and earned a nomiSchunk said. “It’s more challenging nation for both the all-state player than I thought it would be, but I’m of the year and the Wendy’s High learning and it’s fun playing with School Heisman, in addition to begirls my age now.” ing named to the ESPN RISE girls Schunk is the only goalkeeper soccer second team. on the roster, but that will change See Gloves, page 15 in the fall when two freshmen will


SPORTS

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Tribune 13 TRIBUNE Game of the Week

Sports Calendar

Sunday 8

Men’s Tennis vs. Northern Illinois - 1 p.m

Sat.

7

Sun.

8 Women’s Tennis vs. USF - 2 p.m.

14

Track & Field Lee Calhoun Invitational

Sat.

14 Women’s Tennis at DePaul - 1 p.m.

Making it big time By Trey Killian robert.killian@marquette.edu

The Marquette club hockey team got its own little piece of the big time Friday as it took the ice at the Bradley Center for a friendly against rival Wisconsin-Milwaukee. The result was a 12-4 routing of the Panthers in which Marquette never trailed. The Golden Eagles held a ten-goal advantage for most of the third period before Milwaukee tacked on two goals in the final two minutes. It was the first time the Golden Eagles had played at the Bradley Center, and for the team’s lone senior, goaltender R.J. Bennett, it was a special way to end a career between the pipes. “Everyone was pretty excited, especially the freshman who got the opportunity to play on a professional rink in front of a bigger crowd,” Bennett said. The scoring began with freshman David Fabris, who beat Milwaukee goalie Trevor Collins off a rebound right in front. Milwaukee junior Nick Burgette came right back with the answer for the Panthers, however, getting his own rebound and putting the puck right between Marquette starter Steve Dreher’s legs to knot the score at 1-1. That was the closest the Panthers would get to catching the Golden Eagles as freshman Tyler Schwichtenberg put another rebound past Collins and less than a minute later, sophomore Kevin Dolan scored off a deke in front of the net to give Marquette a quick 3-1 lead. The award for sweetest goal

probably went to sophomore Sam Nader who took the puck in his own zone, carried it coast-tocoast, skated past two Milwaukee defenders, and lifted the puck over Collin’s right shoulder to put Marquette up 4-1. The Golden Eagles would get one more goal from both Fabris and Nader while sophomore and freshman brothers Ryan and Tyler Zanon, junior and team captain Will Jurgensen, and freshman Sam DePaz picked up goals of their own. While the Milwaukee bench maintained a quiet, somber tone throughout most of the contest, the Marquette bench got a little louder and rowdier with every goal scored. Dreher was mockheckled by his teammates from the sidelines and one Golden Eagle received a round of joking boos from his bench as he skated past in celebration of a late goal. “We had beaten them soundly in the past so we knew a little of what to expect,” Bennett said. “We weren’t going to take any chances and pulled away quick, and then we kind of pulled the throttle back a little bit. We started at full intensity, but as the game progressed it became more of an all-star game kind of atmosphere.” The fun didn’t end there as later that evening, after the scheduled Milwaukee Admirals game, the teams returned to the ice for a shootout competition. This event proved to be a bit closer, although Marquette still prevailed 2-1 and Bennett finished his career at Marquette with a glove save to ice the victory. “There wasn’t much pressure to the environment, it was more of a just-for-fun kind of event,” Bennett said. “It was nice to get out there and play one more time with the guys and to make my final save in the shootout.”

Men’s Tennis The Marquette men’s tennis team was only able to get one victory against the 69th-ranked South Florida Bulls over the weekend in Tampa Bay. Senior Jonathan Schwerin was the lone Golden Eagle to earn a point. Schwerin defeated Ravi Patel 6-2, 3-6, 1-0 (10-3) in the No. 5 singles spot. Marquette was forced to play without the services of No. 1 singles player Jose Carlos Gutierrez Crowley. The Mexican native is 31-16 on the season and is currently out of the lineup with an injury. The Bulls swept the three doubles matches to start the afternoon as

Fri.

13 Track & Field Lee Calhoun Invitational

Club Hockey

MU club hockey downs UWM at Bradley Center

April 5-7 - Kansas City, MO

Track & Field vs. Milwaukee - 11 a.m.

Women’s Tennis at VCU - 10 a.m.

Sat.

Women’s Club Volleyball at NCVF National Tournament

Thursday 5

Marquette lost the first two matches before the duo of freshman Cameron Tehrani and Schwerin came close to pulling off an upset. Tehrani and Schwerin lost a tiebreaker to Guillermo De Vilchez and Sebastian Hagn 8-7 (7-5). South Florida won the top four single spots with straight set victories over the Golden Eagles. Drake Kakar lost a close match to Oliver Pramming 6-0, 4-6, 6-0 in the sixth position. Marquette will host Northern Illinois on April 8 and will conclude their regular season slate with a road trip to DePaul on April 14.

Sun.

21

the facts After finishing second and fifth at nationals last year for Division I and Division II, respectively, Marquette’s Women’s Club Volleyball team is heading into this year’s tournament ranked first nationally after winning the National Tune-Up Ranking Tournament— hosted by Marquette —on Saturday, March 24. Marquette has finished in the top ten nationally for the last twelve years, but hasn’t won it all since 2008.

Men’s Tennis at DePaul - 6 p.m.

Continued from page 12:

Greska: Cultural immersion

liaison in McCormick 831. excited to dance with my friends. “I was 17, and it was the first Once I walked in, the people were time I was in the U.S. and in a grinding, and I was just like, no, new school system,” Fischer said this is not dancing. That was my of the first time she met Solorio. first culture shock.” “It was a new culture, but she reSolorio remembers seeing ally helped me out with adopting Fischer’s puzzled expression and to everything. She’s awesome.” said her roommate was appalled … at what was taking place. Hush and Fischer have been So much for dance being the battling to hold serve in the fifth world’s language. game, staving off two game points … already, while not capitalizing on It’s game point for the Marquette two game points of their own. duo, but for all intents and purHush has been tremendous at the poses, it might as well be match net this match, making the Cardi- point. Fischer misses her first nals pay for any weak shots with serve and is forced to send over a a pair of tenasoftball, having cious overhead already doubleslams. Fischer “Once I walked in, the people were faulted once in has been rock grinding, and I was just like, no, this is this game. solid herself, not dancing.That was my first culture Back and controlling the shock.” forth the little tempo from yellow ball goes the back line until Hush deOlga Fischer cides she’s had and dominating Senior Tennis Player play with her quite enough. ground strokes. She takes two You can tell how badly they steps, winds up the racket and want this, their final doubles smashes home the winner at the match at Helfaer. They gather net to give Marquette the comafter every point, good or bad, manding 4-1 lead. to talk shop and keep each other Ball game. motivated. They know what this Marquette rolls the next four game means, and they refuse to games to win 8-1 and give the two give up or give in. seniors a happy farewell from the ... doubles game. Adjusting to a new culture can … be an intimidating task. SomeThat’s the beauty of sports right times you just need to let loose there. Two people on different and participate in the world’s lan- sides of the planet brought togethguage: dance. er to forge an everlasting bond. That is until you see what con“It’s been such a road,” Solorio stitutes as dancing in this coun- said. “I thought I’d get a roomtry. Fischer laughed as she told mate from the suburbs of Wisconme the story of her first Snow sin or Illinios, and I get one from Ball experience. Germany instead. I loved it.” “Oh my God, yes. I was so andrei.greska@marquette.edu

woMen’s Tennis The Marquette women’s tennis team will be playing the rest of its matches on the road after losing 6-1 to Louisville on Sunday afternoon during Senior Day at the Helfaer Tennis Stadium. Seniors Olga Fischer and Gillian Hush won on the No. 1 doubles court to end their careers with one final victory together. Graduate student Tina Radan was also honored with her teammates prior to their matches. Louisville would take the No. 2 and No. 3 courts in the doubles matches to win the doubles point. Marquette’s duo of freshmen Ana Pimienta and Ali Dawson went down to Julia Fellerhoff and Sarah Miller 8-3 for the first loss. After Hush and Fischer topped their opponents 8-1, it was up to Radan and sophomore Rocio Diaz on the No. 2 court. Marquette was up with a 7-4 advantage before the lead and match slipped from their hands. Manuela Velasquez and Rebecca Shine of Louisville came back with five unanswered points for the 9-7 comeback win. Louisville sealed the match after wins on the No. 4, 5 and 6 courts in singles play. Marquette will travel to Tampa, Fla. to face Virginia Commonwealth and South Florida before a quick stop at DePaul. Those matches will conclude the regular season, and the Big East Championship will bring them back to Tampa for another four days of play.

! o o h c h A Itʼs flu season. Use a tissue.


14 Tribune

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SPORTS

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

WOMEN’S LACROSSE

Get to know the MU walk-ons

Continued from page 12:

Tribune 15

Gloves: Stepping in the right direction

Schunk led La Cueva to backto-back district championships and the New Mexico Big School 5A runner-up in 2009 in addition to winning the 4x400-meter relay state championship as a track athlete in 2007. How her performance in high school will translate to success on the pitch remains to be seen,

but a 2-1-1 start in the spring season is certainly a step in the right direction. Schunk posted a 2-0 win against Northwestern on Saturday night after drawing 2-2 with Illinois earlier in the day. Coach Markus Roeders has seen improvement with Schunk’s game so far in the spring after getting off

to a tough start in a 4-2 loss to Illinois State two weeks ago. “I think Sofie is getting better each day,” Roeders said. “It’s all about getting more experience out there and those kinds of things take time, but we’re certainly happy to have her, and I think she can do some great things.”

Tribune Photo File

Junior midfielder Megan Jaskowiak (16) said Schunk’s experience will serve her well come the fall season.

Q&A

with the women’s lacrosse team

?

Celebrity Crush: “Ryan Reynolds and Channing Tatum. They’re cute.” - Caroline Collins

Cry: e You Top Songs On Your iPod: To Mak Incredibly ie v o “Anything by Taylor Swift.” Last M ely Loud and s out.” m ye “‘Extre d my e - Katie Bathon I sobbe Close’! onovan D Celebrity Look-A-Like: Bucket List: - Emily “I got a weird one the other day, where “1. Swim with dolphins, 2. someone said I look like Alexis Bledel from Hang out with monkeys, 3. ‘Gilmore Girls’.” Go to the Caribbean.” - Emily Donovan - Caroline Collins

?

?

Teammates adapt to new players and changing roles By Christopher Chavez christopher.chavez@marquette.edu

As the Marquette’s women’s lacrosse team practiced at Valley Fields on Friday afternoon, the sight of sophomore Caroline Collins running up and down the field was likely to stand out. Standing at 4-foot-11 as a collegiate attack wing, Collins is one of four walk-on players on the team hoping to get some playing time once competitive play begins in the fall. What the coaches noticed during Collins’ try-out was her agility and speed when it came to the drills they were working on. The tallest player on the team is a foot taller than Collins, but the sophomore does not see her size as a disadvantage to her style of play. “Working on quickness will be the key for me. Add to that trying to get through people and dodging.” Collins said. “I’m going to be a little bit behind on strength just because I’m not as big.” Collins played a year of Marquette club lacrosse as a freshman with the likes of senior Lisa Beltramello and junior Katie Bathon. Bathon played for Pleasantville (NY) High School’s inaugural women’s lacrosse team before making her way to Milwaukee. Her family is no stranger to hard work in order to get onto a Division I team. Her brother, Chris Bathon, walked onto the Notre Dame football team as a safety. Achieving playing time is the ultimate goal for walk-ons, and Beltramello believes that family is a motivating factor that keeps them going.

?

“Having my family around me for support is great. I’m Italian, and my family is over all the time for big family functions,” Beltramello said. “When we go play at Connecticut, my entire family is going to be there. If anything, that’s the game I want to get into.” Beltramello played three years of club lacrosse and served as the club president in 2010-’11. She will be graduating from Marquette in June but will gain another year of eligibility if she decides to attend graduate school next year. She attended Suffield (CT) High School, which is an hour and a half from freshman teammate Emily Donovan’s Ludlowe High School in Fairfield, Conn. Donovan shares an East Coast connection with her fellow walk-on. As for the rest of the team, it took a while in the fall, but the recruits and walk-ons are on the same page. “At first it was pretty awkward and difficult, because it just took a while for all of us click. A lot of the recruits were already friends,” Donovan said. “Once they lightened up, they got to know all the recruits really well and now some of them are my best friends.” The chemistry is down pat and as for potential, Donovan spoke loudly when she said she could see them being a threat once competition starts in the Big East. “Lacrosse is really big on the East coast. I’ve seen how far you can push yourself, as well as how fast and competitive the game really is,” Donovan said. “We work so hard every day. If we can just keep it up, I can see us being a threat in the Big East once we get the program going and recruits come for next year.”

Track & Field

The Marquette track and field team returned to action at the Oliver Nickoloff Invitational in Cincinnati, Ohio last weekend. The women’s team saw eight members pick up Big East outdoor qualifying marks, while the men scored 10. Freshman thrower Samantha Kennedy set a new Marquette freshman record in the hammer throw with a toss of 177 feet, 3 inches to finish fourth. Sophomore thrower Kathryn Koeck finished third with a throw of 180 feet, 3 inches. Both Koeck

and Kennedy moved up to fifth and sixth, respectively on the all-time Marquette list in the event. Seniors Blake Johnson and Peter Bolgert ran the steeplechase, finishing second and third, respectively, with times of 9:07.43 and 9:08.56. Junior Cheldon Brown won the high jump with a leap of 6-feet-8 inches, while sophomore Michael Saindon who leaped 5-feet-6 inches finished third. Another senior runner, Jack Hackett, recorded the sixth-fastest time in Marquette history in the 5,000-meter run, finishing third

with a mark of 14:29.75. Connor Callahan (30:54.22) and Patrick Maag (31:23.92) recorded personal bests in the 10,000-meter to finish second and third, respectively. The Marquette women swept the first four places in the 10,000-meter run Friday when junior Carly Windt finished in 36:43.74 to win the event. Sophomore Hannah Frett (37:29.70) was second, followed by junior Christina Sliepka (37:32.04) and senior Alyssa Beste (37:36.03).


SPORTS

16 Tribune

BIG EAST NOTEBOOK

michael.wottreng@marquette.edu

Cardinals postseason run comes to an end Kentucky has been the most talented team in the country, and it would’ve taken a nearperfect game from its opponent to upset them. Louisville (30-10, 10-8 Big East) was not perfect against Kentucky, but the Cardinals were able to keep it close in a 69-61 loss on Saturday. Kentucky shot 57 percent from the floor, which normally results in the Wildcats winning by double figures. However, Louisville forced 14 turnovers and corralled 16 offensive rebounds, scoring 27 points off turnovers and on second-chance points combined. Without those two statistics, Louisville may not have been close late in the game. The Big East Tournament champions were not known to shoot at a high percentage all season, but they were able to attempt 20 more shots than Kentucky on Saturday. The Cardinals shot just 35 percent from the floor as their season came to an end. Louisville suffered a multitude of injuries throughout the season, yielding some inconsistency. The Cardinals were as healthy as they were all season heading into postseason play. Louisville won eight straight until their loss in the national semifinals. Rick Pitino will be in great shape to contend for the top spot in the Big East next season. The Cardinals lose Kyle Kuric and Chris Smith to graduation. It will be difficult to replace their scoring, but Louisville may be more consistent next year. Louisville returns Big East Tournament MVP Peyton Siva and West Regional MVP Chane Behanan next season. Include Gorgui Dieng, the Big East’s leader in blocks this season, and uber-talented freshman Wayne Blackshear, and the Cardinals

may find themselves back in the Final Four. Notre Dame, Cincinnati Expect to Battle Louisville for Big East Title A lot of people thought Notre Dame would finish near the bottom of the Big East standings when preseason All-Big East selection Tim Abromaitis suffered a torn ACL in November. The Fighting Irish were able to bounce back and finish third in the conference standings. Expectations for Mike Brey’s club will be to replicate that finish in the Big East next season. Second team All-Big East selection Jack Cooley will return in the middle. Cooley finished first in the conference in field goal percentage, shooting 63 percent from the floor. If he continues to improve, Cooley could put up double-double averages. Notre Dame also returns a backcourt of budding stars. Big East All-Rookie team selection Jerian Grant returns with the look of a player that can rank in the top-ten in scoring. Sophomore Eric Atkins averaged the fourth-most minutes in the conference last season and will be a premier point guard. The Fighting Irish will ask the NCAA for a sixth year of eligibility for Tim Abromaitis and Scott Martin. If the NCAA complies, the Irish could start the season as a top five team in the nation. Cincinnati will lose Yancy Gates and Dion Dixon from a team that went to the Sweet 16, but the Bearcats will return four of their top six scorers. Mick Cronin’s group will be led by leading scorer Sean Kilpatrick. The second team AllBig East selection should be a preseason first team All-Big East selection and could be near the top of the league in scoring. Cashmere Wright returns to run the point and if the Bearcats can get some post presence, Cincinnati should contend for the league title.

This Week in Marquette

Player of the Week:

Gorgui Dieng

Sports History

Sophomore Center

There are many coaching changes happening in college basketball around this time of the year, as Marquette fans know well from their experiences four years ago. On April 2, 2008, Golden Eagles faithful were hit hard by Tom Crean’s departure for the head coaching job at Indiana. Crean had been rumored for other jobs in the past, but nothing ever materialized. So when he was on his way to Bloomington, it was a big surprise. Much was made of his departure, with his players finding out on ESPN instead of hearing it from Crean himself. Because of that, among other things, Crean is now thought of in a primarily negative light among Marquette fans, although he is only one of two coaches to take the program to a Final Four, a feat he accomplished in 2003. During his introductory press conference at Indiana, “Crean in Crimson” became famous quickly, and Marquette fans felt betrayed. Little did they know a young upstart and unknown Texan would quickly make Crean a thing of the past. matthew.trebby@marquette.edu

Week’s Stats 7 points 12 rebounds 4 blocks

Dieng had the toughest task of any Louisville player in its matchup with Kentucky. Anthony Davis had the kind of game a national player of the year is supposed to have on the big stage, but Dieng

Photo via photobucket.com

By Michael Wottreng

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

The Marquette Tribune

Sweeter than

HONEY

played admirably against Davis. The Senegal native had eight offensive rebounds for a Cardinal team that shot just 35 percent from the floor, keeping the Cardinals in the game.

ette rqu Ma The ne

u Trib

Apr. 3rd, 2012 : The Marquette Tribune  

The student newpaper of Marquette University.

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