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Hagerty exhibit takes artful approach to history PAGE 10

EDITORIAL: Sexual assault Men’s soccer response improves but faces tough needs further thought opponents this PAGE 14 weekend PAGE 16

SPJ’s 2010 Best All-Around Non-Daily Student Newspaper

Volume 97, Number 2

Thursday, August 30, 2012

www.marquettetribune.org

Milwaukee sheriff offers to aid campus security

Marquette to revise emergency policy DPS updating safety procedures in light of recent gun violence By Jenny Zahn jennifer.zahn@marquette.edu

The satire of The Onion’s article from last week entitled “Nation celebrates full week without mass shooting,” was replaced with tragic irony some days later when a man opened fire on a coworker and pedestrians in front of the Empire State Building. The latest in a slew of summer slayings, the shooting served as a stark reminder of the violent headlines that dominated the last few months and hit close to Marquette in August with the Sikh temple

shooting in Oak Creek. In the aftermath, companies, universities, and other organizations are re-examining their emergency response and support procedures. Marquette’s Emergency Procedures Guide has not been updated since 2007 – the year of the first Virginia Tech shooting – but it is in the process of being revised and should be complete within the next month, according to Senior Lieutenant Paul Mascari, the assistant director of the Department of Public Safety. The core of the university’s overall response strategy, the Critical Incident Management Plan, contains protocol for announcing a state of emergency on campus, establishing an Emergency Operations Center, See Policy, page 8

Permanent homes for all freshmen Photo by Alyce Peterson/alyce.peterson@marquette.edu

Milwaukee Police Sargeant Todd Smolen stands beside his cruiser at the corner of N. 21st St. and W. Wells St.

40 writeups, 27 for alcohol: first weekend causes alarm for DPS By Nick Biggi nicholas.biggi@marquette.edu

Every year before students return to campus, Marquette’s Department of Public Safety reaches out to alternative agencies in hope of receiving additional force. This year, the Milwaukee Sheriff’s Department offered its

extra services to the university. “We were pleasantly surprised when the sheriff’s office actually responded,” said Cpt. Russell Shaw. “I know (the Milwaukee Police Department) is certainly going to try and help us as much as they possibly can. It’s not something I would say is so out of the ordinary; it just so happens that county sheriffs are probably able to help us more than they have been able to in the past.” Shaw said that the extra presence was needed once students started arriving back on campus. MPD and Sheriff David

It just so happens that county sheriffs are probably able to help us more than they have been able to in the past.

Clarke provided help during move-in and other activities over the course of the week. During the first weekend, DPS wrote up 40 incident reports. Of the of 40, 27 pertained to an alcohol-related incident. “That’s a very large number, a very concerning number,” Shaw said. “I think our goal has always been to keep the students safe and students have to realize that when they are walking out on the streets with open intoxicants they are breaking the law.” Marquette’s LIMO system also works with DPS to make campus a safer place. The help from the Milwaukee sheriff adds a new element for LIMO drivers. Liz Heinrich, a LIMO driver and a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, said in order to See MPD, page 7

Russell Shaw, Captain, Department of Public Safety

INDEX

DPS REPORTS.....................2 CALENDAR.......................2 STUDY BREAK.....................5

VIEWPOINTS......................14 SPORTS..........................16 CLASSIFIEDS..................18

Changes made, dropping enrollment account for space By Jacob Born jacob.born@marquette.edu

Every member of the class of 2016 will have a permanent home this semester due to changes Marquette made after problems it had accommodating last

year’s large freshman class. Last year, lounges and common rooms in McCormick Hall, Abbottsford Hall and O’Donnell Hall were converted into permanent rooms to accommodate the freshman class. But the Office of Residence Life was able to house every student this year in permanent housing. “This year we have no students in temporary housing,” said Sean Berthold, assistant dean of housing services. “We planned from the See Housing, page 7

Tribune File Photo

Freshmen in McCormick moved into their permanent housing last week.

News

Viewpoints

SPORTS

Dean

MANNO

TREBBY

Two colleges now have interim deans after a summer promotion. PAGE 3

Why doing nothing over the summer is actually okay. PAGE 15

Luke Strotman’s battle against cancer an inspiration for all. PAGE 16


News

2 Tribune

Thursday, August 30, 2012

DPS Reports

News in Brief VICTIMS AND FAMILY members of those killed or wounded in the July 20 shooting at a theater in Aurora, Colo., asked for answers about $5 million raised in the victims’ names at a news conference Tuesday. The money raised by the Community First Foundation using pictures and names of “murdered loved ones” is now being denied to the family members, according to group spokesman Tom Teves, whose son was fatally shot. Teves said those touched most by the tragedy had not been consulted in deciding how the millions of dollars raised would be spent. So far, about $100,000 was given to 10 nonprofit organizations around Aurora and $350,000 was given to the Colorado Organization for Victim Assistance, of which $5,000 each was provided to the families of the dozen killed and 57 injured, according to USA Today. ---------------------WEST NILE VIRUS cases in the U.S. increased another 40 percent in the past week the director of the Centers of Disease Control’s division of vector-borne diseases Lyle R. Petersen said in a news teleconference Wednesday. A total of 1,590 cases of West Nile in people have been reported in 48 states. Petersen said 66 people have died this year from complications of the virus, and last week’s death toll of 41 represented a 61 percent increase from the week before. More than 70 percent of all the cases have been in six states: Texas, South Dakota, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Louisiana and Michigan. Petersen urged people to follow precautions against mosquito bites by wearing long sleeves and pants and using insect repellents while outdoors.

more than 12,000 comments on the post in less than an hour. Wrote Obama: “Hey everybody - this is (B)arack. Just finished a great rally in Charlottesville, and am looking forward to your questions. … I want to thank everybody at reddit for participating – this is an example of how technology and the internet can empower the sorts of conversations that strengthen our democracy over the long run.” Questions the president fielded ranged from topics including Internet freedom, which Obama said he supported, to funding for the space program (“Making sure we stay at the forefront of space exploration is a big priority for my administration.”), to how Obama would help recent college grads, which he said he would do by expanding the economy. Obama also said the most difficult decision he made during his first term was the choice to “surge… forces in Afghanistan” ---------------------THE CITY OF New Orleans has imposed a dusk-to-dawn curfew to combat the arrival of Hurricane Isaac as the tropical storm continues to batter the Gulf coast. The curfew began last night and has no end date planned. The state of Louisiana has also ordered the evacuation of about 3,000 people in a parish outside New Orleans and is rescuing many others trapped in the area. Winds have blown at speeds as high as 80 miles per hour in southeast Louisiana, accompanied by water levels as high as 12 feet and more than 700,000 households and businesses reportedly losing power. Energy officials have said it may be days before service is restored to some areas. ----------------------

THE CHICAGO TEACHERS Union filed a 10-day strike notice on Wednesday, the Chicago Tribune PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA has reported. The Tribune wrote entertained questions from the that the notice does not necessarily web for a half hour Wednesday mean the teachers will strike at the afternoon on Reddit.com, drawing end of 10 days, but it could mean ----------------------

that teachers would begin their strike after the first week of school for a majority of students. From the Tribune: “The teachers have remained angry with (the Chicago Public Schools) administration and Mayor Rahm Emanuel even after a deal on the longer school day in which the district agreed to hire 477 teachers who had been laid off. That allowed teachers to work the same number of hours even though students are in school longer.” ---------------------OF 36 CITIES studied, the New York boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn rank as the first and second cities, respectively, with the most “spoiled” kids. The data, compiled by Bundle. com, examined spending habits on young children against the national average of $12,000. The information did not include food and health care, but rather focused on items such as toys, clothing and other dispensable children’s items. Milwaukee was third from last on the list, spending 144 percent less on its kids on average than the leader. Coming in third on the list was Miami, Fla., followed by Minneapolis, though twin city St. Paul, Minn., was near the bottom of the list, just bellow Milwaukee. Madison was dead last, while Chicago was 14th. Only 12 of the cities studied were above the national average. ----------------------

ORGANIZATION FEST, held by the Marquette Office of Student Development, will take place today from 1 to 4 p.m. in the Central Mall located behind Raynor Memorial Libraries. According to OSD’s website, O-Fest is designed to “(offer) students the opportunity to explore Marquette’s student organizations by talking to organization representatives and signing up for organizations of interest.” Each year at O-Fest, hundreds of organizations along with university offices and departments set up booths and hold various giveaways and informational sessions on how to get involved on campus.

Saturday, Aug. 25 Between 1:00 a.m. and 1:07 a.m. a person not affiliated with Marquette removed property from another person not affiliated with Marquette in a business in the 1600 block of W. Wells St. DPS verbally detained the suspect and he was taken into custody by MPD. The victim’s property was recovered. Sunday, Aug. 26 At 1:43 a.m. DPS observed three students acting in a suspicious manner in 1200 block of W. Wells St. Upon investigation, a controlled substance was found in one of the student’s room in McCormick Hall. MPD was contacted and took the student into custody. The student was cited and released. Monday, Aug. 27

At 4:00 p.m. a student reported that unknown person(s) removed her secured, unattended bicycle estimated at $140 in the 800 block of N. 15th St. MPD was contacted. Tuesday, Aug. 28 At 3:26 a.m. an employee of a business in the 1600 block of W. Wells St. reported that an unidentified suspect removed property estimated at $20 from the business and fled the scene without paying for it. Wednesday, Aug. 29 At 5:44 a.m. a person not affiliated with Marquette reported being kicked by an unidentified suspect who fled the scene in the 1600 block of W. Wells St. The victim was not injured. MPD was contacted.

Events Calendar AugUST 2012 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Kelly Hogan, The Pabst Theater, 7 p.m. The Caffeinated Comedy Hour, Sherman Park, 7:30 p.m. MU Mania Block Party, Westowne Square, 9 p.m.

Thursday 30 Organization Fest and Community Service Fair, Central Mall, 1 p.m. Lynyrd Skynyrd, Riverside Theater, 7 p.m. Outdoor Movie: The Avengers, Central Mall, 9 p.m.

Saturday 1 Brewers vs. Pirates, Miller Park, 6:10 p.m. Annex Mania, Union Sports Annex, 9 p.m. Bye Bye Liver, Comedy Sportz, 9:30 p.m.

Miltown Beatdown Preliminary Rounds, Jackalope Lounj, 9 p.m.

Friday 31 Fish Fry & a Flick: Darkside of Oz, Discovery World, 6 p.m. Back-To-School Brewers Game: Brewers vs. Pirates, Miller Park, Bus leaves Shamu (Between the Alumni Memorial Union and Schroeder Hall) at 6:30 p.m.

Sunday 2 Bloody Mary Brunch Tour, Third Ward, 10:30 a.m. Brewers vs. Pirates, Miller Park, 1:10 p.m.

Contact Us and Corrections The Marquette Tribune welcomes questions, comments, suggestions and notification of errors that appear in the newspaper. Contact us at (414) 288-5610 or editor@marquettetribune.org.

The Marquette Tribune Editorial

Editor-in-Chief Andrew Phillips (414) 288-7246 Managing Editor Maria Tsikalas (414) 288-6969 NEWS (414) 288-5610 Editor Pat Simonaitis Projects Editor Allison Kruschke Assistant Editors Sarah Hauer, Joe Kaiser, Matt Gozun Investigative Reporters Jenny Zahn Administration Melanie Lawder College Life Elise Angelopulos Consumer Ryan Ellerbusch Crime/DPS Nick Biggi Metro Monique Collins MUSG/Student Orgs. Ben Greene Politics Alexandra Whittaker Science & Health Eric Oliver General Assignment Jacob Born COPY DESK Copy Chief Alec Brooks Copy Editors Ashley Nickel, Patrick Leary, Erin Miller, Jacob Born VIEWPOINTS (414) 288-7940 Viewpoints Editor Tessa Fox Editorial Writers Katie Doherty, Tessa Fox Columnists Carlie Campbell, Brooke Goodman, Tony Manno MARQUEE (414) 288-3976 Editor Matt Mueller Assistant Editor Erin Heffernan Reporters Claire Nowak, Peter Setter, Eva Sotomayor SPORTS (414) 288-6964 Editor Michael LoCicero Assistant Editor Trey Killian Reporters Chris Chavez, Kyle Doubrava, Patrick Leary, Matt Trebby Sports Columnists Mike LoCicero, Matt Trebby

VISUAL CONTENT Design Editor Rob Gebelhoff Photo Editor Alyce Peterson News Designers Martina Ibanez, Kaitlin Moon Sports Designers Haley Fry, Taylor Lee Marquee Designer Maddy Kennedy Photographers Danny Alfonzo, Rebecca Rebholz ----

STUDENT MEDIA INTERACTIVE

Director Erin Caughey Content Manager Alex Busbee Technical Manager Michael Andre Reporters Stephanie Grahm, Victor Jacobo, Brynne Ramella, Eric Ricafrente, Ben Sheehan Designer Eric Ricafrente Programmer Jake Tarnow Study Abroad Blogger Andrea Anderson ----

Advertising

(414) 288-1738 Advertising Director Anthony Virgilio Sales Manager Jonathan Ducett Creative Director Joe Buzzelli Classified Manager Grace Linden

The Marquette Tribune is a wholly owned property of Marquette University, the publisher. The Tribune serves as a student voice for the university and gives students publishing experience and practice in journalism, advertising, and management and allied disciplines. The Tribune is written, edited, produced and operated solely by students with the encouragement and advice of the advisor and business manager, who are university employees. The banner typeface, Ingleby, is designed by David Engelby and is available at dafont.com. David Engelby has the creative, intellectual ownership of the original design of Ingleby. The Tribune is normally published Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, during the academic year by Marquette Student Media, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881. First copy of paper is free; additional copies are $1 each. Subscription rate: $50 annually. Phone: (414) 288-7246. Fax: (414) 2883998.


Thursday, August 30, 2012

News

Salchenberger joins provost New position filled by former Business Administration dean By Melanie Lawder melanie.lawder@marquette.edu

Among the multiple personnel changes in the Marquette administration this summer, the most prominent was the promotion of former College of Business Administration Dean Linda Salchenberger to the newly created position of associate provost for academic planning and budgeting. Mark Eppli, a professor of finance and the Bell Chair of real estate, will serve as the interim dean until the university selects a permanent candidate. He becomes the university’s second current interim dean, joining Philip Rossi of the College of Arts & Sciences. The change was announced in a university news brief on July 30. Salchenberger’s new role will require her to work alongside the provost, the vice president of finance, the executive vice president and the strategic planning coordinating committee with the intention of aligning the university’s academic priorities and goals with the financial planning process. She is currently meeting with the university’s academic leaders, including the deans, to gather their positions on what they believe are the most urgent issues and themes related to financial planning. “I am very optimistic that this will be a collaborative effort across campus, engaging students, faculty and the community, in the process of translating

these themes into actions,” Salchenberger said. In a note on the business school’s website, Salchenberger assured that she “will work closely with Interim Dean Mark Eppli to ensure a smooth transition.” Eppli has been part of the Marquette faculty since 2002 and is an academic expert in commercial mortgage finance, new urbanism and commercial real estate development, shopping center economics and singlefamily housing evaluation. Eppli is also the author of several widely read publications and has been recognized for his endeavors to extend the real estate profession to minorities. He plans to collaboratively teach an undergraduate real estate development course this fall. “I’m grateful for Professor Eppli’s willingness to step in as interim dean,” John Pauly, the university’s provost, said. “He has built strong relationships with many stakeholders, including faculty, students, staff, alumni and the business community.” According to Pauly, the search for the permanent dean will begin in spring 2013. The new dean is expected to begin July 1, 2014. Eppli said the new dean will likely use the summer before the fall 2014 semester begins as a transition period. Pauly said the processes for recruiting an academic appointment, such as dean, tend to follow a “rhythm of their own.” Potential candidates normally seek openings in the fall, interview during the winter and are chosen by spring. The university postponed this recruitment cycle until spring 2013 to ensure that it acquires the most competitive pool of prospective candidates for the college.

“We need to have the best chief academic officer executive that we can get for this college,” Eppli said. “That’s what we need for leadership.” Details about the search for the new dean have not yet been determined. However, the search committee will be composed of faculty members, a dean from another college, a university trustee and one or two alumni. Eppli, who led the six-month search in 2007 that led to Salchenberger’s appointment as dean, said it will likely take that same amount of time to find the appropriate fit for the position this time around. In the meantime, Eppli hopes to take a “servant-leader” approach in his tasks as dean. His goal is to support the students, faculty and administration in “doing what they see needs to be done for the College of Business (Administration).” For Eppli, a first-generation college graduate, attaining a college degree and Ph.D was “a big deal.” But acting as the dean of the business college, in his opinion, is not just a big deal – he said he perceives this feat as both an honor and responsibility that he looks forward to fulfilling this year. “It is very exciting,” Eppli said. “It’s an honor to say it is you who are leading and needing to inspire the class of 2016.” Marquette also announced new chairs in three departments Monday, including Spanish Professor Anne Pasero of the department of foreign languages and literatures, Military Science Professor Lt. Col. Michael Gibson of the department of military sciences and associate professor of political science Lowell Barrington.

building’s normal usage. “None of the improvements had any negative impact on our operations,” Vicker said. Other minor campus renovations include new front desks at Mashuda and Humphrey Halls, said Straz Tower Residence Hall Director Andrew Levy, with O’Donnell and McCormick Halls being the main recipients of Marquette funded facelifts. Associate Dean for Administration Services Rick Arcuri said campus buildings are in need of touch ups at the end of every school year. Such improvements included the addition of a new fire alarm and sprinkler system in McCormick to replace the building’s original system. Arcuri added that O’Donnell’s old fire alarm system was replaced after “age had worn it down.” Other projects included the painting of all residential halls and the purchase of 600 new mattresses for various buildings to replace old ones, which were then donated. A large whiteboard in Arcuri’s office lists the necessary tasks his summer crew was charged with completing before students returned to campus. His crew is comprised of about 40 individuals, mostly students, who began work in late May and are still finishing tasks such as washing mattresses and cleaning elevator tracks to ensure residential halls are properly prepared for students. Arcuri admits the work is strenuous considering the number of rooms there are to tend over the summer.

“It’s really like a hotel,” Arcuri said. “Except there are eight hotels to care for. It’s just a lot to do in very little time.” Although unsure of the exact amount spent on campus renovations, Arcuri estimates it to be in the millions. For example, three million dollars were spent on Carpenter and Cobeen halls, according to Arcuri. He said the money was well spent as he has heard positive reactions regarding the work. Arcuri added that every year, certain buildings may appear more rundown than others simply because of the behavior of the individuals who previously occupied the space. “Each building will need different care,” Arcuri said. “We try to visit a room seven or eight times (before a resident’s arrival) to make sure we don’t miss anything.” While Arcuri said that most Marquette students appreciate the space and improvements his team completes, he added that some residents’ actions are disappointing. “It’s your home,” Arcuri said. “I don’t understand the lack of pride or care for your living space.” Regardless, Arcuri added that unveiling renovations across campus is always enjoyable. “It’s great to see people react to that ‘wow factor,’” Arcuri said. “We knew we had done the right thing.” Johnston Hall also received extensive renovations, with several study tables and chairs now dotting the new flooring on the third and fourth floors.

Campus gets a light makeover AMU, Mashuda, McCormick among places renovated By Elise Angelopulos elise.angelopulos@marquette.edu

As part of yearly renovations, some buildings on campus underwent facelifts over the summer, resulting in both minor fixes and major updates. Alumni Memorial Union Executive Director Todd Vicker said that his facility received only small, yet necessary, updates. In addition to freshly shampooed carpets and a new coat of paint, permanent outlets along the building’s main staircase were installed to replace old extension cords. Further changes were made to Marquette Place in order to increase the food court’s capacity and efficiency. Additional tables and chairs were placed to increase space for diners, while the kitchen equipment at the Grill was expanded in order to better accommodate students in expediting the ordering process. Vicker said that the addition of the equipment saved Marquette over $18,000 because Sodexo was able to reclaim the equipment from another account. In all, the building’s new furniture totaled $30,000. Vicker said the changes were discussed with Marquette’s advisory board last spring and did not interfere with the

Tribune 3

Romney to accept nomination in Fla.

Photo by Evan Vucci/Associated Press

Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks at the American Legion National Convention, Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012, in Indianapolis.

Gov. Walker gives Romney full endorsement By Alexandra Whittaker alexandra.whittaker@marquette.edu

The Republican National Convention, which was forced to reschedule many of its activities due to the threat of Hurricane Isaac, concludes tonight in Tampa, Fla. with former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney scheduled to formally accept the party’s nomination for president. On Tuesday, Romney secured the nomination after the majority of delegates to the convention voted in favor of his candidacy. Romney will outline his vision for the presidency in his acceptance speech tonight at 9 p.m. The Democratic National Convention will be held in Charlotte, North Carolina next week. Romney’s nomination follows a recent Marquette law poll taken from a pool of likely voters on August 16 to 19. The poll reported that 49 percent of Wisconsin voters plan to vote for President Barack Obama and 46 percent plan to vote for Romney. In a previous poll taken on August 2 to 5, Obama led 50 to 45 percent, showing a slight 2-point shift in Romney’s direction in the most recent poll. While this shift could be a result of the addition of Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Janesville) as Romney’s running mate, Marquette political science professor John McAdams said people should be careful of over-interpreting the poll. “It is certainly possible that there is a small Ryan bounce in Wisconsin,” McAdams said. “It is plausible, but I would want to see more data before coming to that conclusion. Even with a very good poll, I would want to see more data, because even though the statistical margin of error in polls like this tends to be on the conservative side, other margins of error do come into play.” The poll is part of an ongoing polling project by the Marquette Law School that will document voter trends throughout the election season. While Mitt Romney has certainly been central to discussion surrounding both voting polls and the Republican National Convention, it is his wife, Ann Romney, who stole the show Tuesday night with

her convention speech. Amid a storm of political speeches, Ann Romney chose to refrain from talking about politics or the election, speaking instead about her family. Haley Carter, sophomore in the College of Communication and member of the College Republicans, said the strength of Ann Romney’s speech was that it allowed Americans to get acquainted with the Romney family. “America is very familiar with the Obama family,” Carter said. “We’re so familiar with seeing the daughters and Michelle, and while Mitt Romney could be seen as ambiguous, his family might be seen this way even more so because we see even less of them. So to actually hear Ann Romney’s words and get her point of view helps to put his family and his family values into the spotlight.” While Ann Romney’s speech gave America a peek into the Romney family, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s speech went another direction, emphasizing both Wisconsin’s dropping unemployment rate and praise for Romney’s choice of Ryan as his running mate. “With this pick, (Romney) showed us that the ‘R’ next to his name doesn’t just stand for Republican,” Walker said. “It stands for reformer.” Andy Suchorski, chair of College Democrats of Wisconsin and senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, said that he didn’t think the convention speakers would be received well by college voters. “When you look at the line up of speakers, you can see that their platforms are so extreme that they don’t resonate with the people of Wisconsin,” he said. “This is an extreme republican party that doesn’t resonate with young people.” The Marquette Law Poll for August 16 to 19 echoed this approval of Governor Walker, with results demonstrating a job approval rating of 50 percent and 46 percent disapproval. Walker’s ratings in the Marquette polls have been similar all year, even in the face of the recall election, and he has mostly come out of the polls with more approval than disapproval ratings. McAdams suggested that this could be the result of polarization. It is not surprising to get this kind of stability with polarization, and I think we have a polarized situation with Gov. Walker’s approval and disapproval ratings,” McAdams said.


News

4 Tribune

Alums start driving service MYDriver aims to improve road safety around Milwaukee By Monique Collins monique.collins@marquette.edu

MYDriver, a designated driving service started by two Marquette alumni, is making it a lot easier to enjoy a night out on the town. “You can use our services whenever,” Monica Kuhnert, Arts & Sciences ’07 and coowner of MYDriver, said. “Whether you’ve been out partying with your friends or you’re just getting done with Happy Hour, we’re there.” MYDriver offers a range of services that go beyond designated driving. Customers can opt to be picked up from their location and have their car dropped off at home, rent a driver or provide elderly relatives with transportation. Kuhnert thought of the

business after living in St. Louis, Mo., and becoming familiar with one of the city’s own services, ScooterGuy. “Having grown up in Milwaukee – between all the festivals and Brewers games – it seemed liked the perfect place to start,” Kuhnert said. Marcus Kuhnert, Engineering ‘10 and Monica’s brother, said he knew starting a business with his sister was a good idea. “I’ve always wanted to start my own business,” Marcus said. “Now, six months later, it’s a reality.” According to Marcus, MYDriver is geared toward working adults living in Milwaukee’s suburbs. “A lot of people don’t realize that if you get a DUI, you could be stripped of your professional title, whether you’re a doctor, a lawyer or whatever else,” Monica Kunnert said. Marcus expects their business will achieve great success. “We’re so much cheaper than renting a party bus or a limo,” he said. “It gives us

a leg up on everyone else.” Courtney Carter, a Carden Group Communications, LLC employee and public relations representative for MYdriver said the service deserves recognition. “It’s a great service, and we need to get information out there for the people,” Carter said. Kuhnert’s business is one of many that hopes to keep drunk drivers off the road. The Wisconsin Department of Transportation’s “Zero in Wisconsin” campaign encourages Wisconsin drivers to drive responsibly, in order to achieve zero deaths on Wisconsin roads. “We want to get as many of these people off the streets,” Monica said. “No one ever realizes how that glass or two of wine affects them.” With increased use of designated driving services, the Department of Transportation’s goal could be achieved. “Our goal is to drastically reduce the number of people drinking and driving, as well as getting them and their cars home safely,” Marcus Kunnert said.

Thursday, August 30, 2012 NEWS BRIEF

Student Health This semester, students on Marquette’s optional health insurance program can expect some new benefits after a switch to Student Assurance Services from previous provider UnitedHealthcare. Executive Director of Student Health Service Carolyn Smith said the new plan is similar to last year’s option but now includes coverage for wellness and preventative care. In addition, physical therapy services received at the Marquette Sports Rehabilitation Clinic are now paid in full, and students no longer have a maximum prescription drug benefit. “Marquette wanted to provide a plan that was

comprehensive, affordable and met the needs of college-aged students,” Smith said. “The insurance vendor they selected met those requirements.” The school-sponsored health insurance plan is an option for students without health insurance coverage or for those who are inadequately covered by a high-deductible plan. “While Student Health is available to provide primary care, urgent care and preventive health care,” Smith said, “health insurance, such as the Student Health Insurance Plan, can facilitate access to specialist, emergency care and hospitalization, when necessary.”

MUSG president, vice president promise chemistry Van Boxtel and Niedhardt say they’re ready for new year By Ben Greene benjamin.greene@marquette.edu

One is naturally businessminded, the other knows politics. One worked as an RA for two years and was a part of numerous student groups, the other spent nine months at Marquette’s Les Aspin Center for Government and served on a senatorial campaign. One is the Marquette Student Government President Arica Van Boxtel, the other is Executive Vice President Bill Neidhardt. Last March, Van Boxtel, a senior in the College of Communication, and Neidhardt, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, were elected to their current positions after spending only a combined two years working in MUSG. Neidhardt said the experiences he and Van Boxtel gained before joining MUSG culminated into one of their biggest strengths. “(Working outside of MUSG) gave us this ability to really take a student’s perspective and apply it to student government, which is what it’s all about,” Neidhardt said. Both Neidhardt and VanBoxtel also said their radically different experiences will complement each other nicely as they

work together in the coming year. “I can see how Arica is going to be more business-focused and I can see how I’m going to think of the political ramifications. I think that will work well,” Neidhardt said. Van Boxtel agreed. “You just have two different perspectives and then you come to this consensus and you’re like, ‘wow,’” Van Boxtel said. “It’s fascinating to see how that merges together.” Van Boxtel and Neidhardt are hoping to use their chemistry and experience to accomplish the goals laid out during their campaign last spring. One of their primary platforms was the creation of a tuition receipt that would help students better understand their personal financial situation. Van Boxtel said that it is too soon to lay out a full plan, but the necessary steps are being taken toward the establishment of a tuition receipt program. “We’ve been having that research gathering portion of things, and now that it’s the beginning of the year, we’re looking toward how we can navigate through that and come to provide more rationale for students behind tuition,” Van Boxtel said. Another of their campaign promises was to build upon the progress made in last year’s diversity roundtables by creating a diversity taskforce. Van Boxtel described the taskforce as a

15-member board, led by herself and Niedhardt, dedicated to accomplishing three goals that were highlighted during last year’s roundtable discussions. Those three goals, according to Neidhardt and Van Boxtel, are to develop a campus climate survey to see how Marquette students of all races and ethnicities really feel about their experience, to review the Core of Common Studies to see how well diversity is represented and to develop a reporting process for those who have been discriminated against. Van Boxtel and Neidhardt also said one of their goals was to set up a way for students to view faculty evaluations, possibly on CheckMarq. Neidhardt said this proposition has been met with resistance multiple times over the past few years. “That’s an issue that students feel very strongly about and that faculty feel very strongly about,” Neidhardt said. “And what we’re trying to do is find a way to bridge that gap. It’s all about coming up with new and original ways to bring people together.” Although Van Boxtel and Neidhardt’s terms are still in their infancy, both leaders said they are confident in their plans for the year and are excited to get as many students as possible involved with MUSG. “If you want your voice to be heard on campus,” Neidhardt said, “we want to help.”

Tribune File Photo

Van Boxtel (left) and Niedhardt (right) embrace their new roles in the AMU.

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Tuesday, April 19, 2012

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MPD: DPS unsure aid will continue

Housing: Study says

do her job more effectively, she will have to be in closer contact with the patrolling officers. “We have to work together a lot more because there are so many more officers,” Heinrich said. “I can understand why they are doing it, but it can sometimes make it more difficult, and I don’t think we are actually seeing a change yet because it is so early in the year.” Though there were more citations than average this past

weekend, some students have not noticed much of a difference in enforcement on campus, Lindsay Bartel, a senior in the College of Education said. Now that classes have started, whether the university will need the extra presence is still unknown. Ultimately, the additional aid from the county sheriff and MPD will depend on scheduling. “We will always take any support we can,” Shaw said. “Do I

expect them to be in force like they were this past weekend? That would be fantastic if they were, but in reality it is probably not going to happen.” The Milwaukee sheriff’s department and MPD will continue to have a presence on campus, but that presence will vary throughout the year. DPS still has a strong presence every weekend with 12 to 14 squad cars on campus Fridays and Saturdays from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m.

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dorm living raises GPA beginning to accommodate about a class of 2,000. A lot of those changes that we made (last year) were made to make sure that every student had a permanent space.” The class of 2015 enrolled 2,056 students in 2011-2012, while the class of 2016 has 1,943 students. This year, the Office of Residence Life has taken steps to make sure the freshman class will not have to change rooms in the middle of the semester. Another alteration that the Office of Residence Life made was to change the rooms assigned to resident assistants. “We relocated some of the (RAs) into traditional single rooms,” Berthold said. “Some of the rooms were in a more traditional double sized space, so we put them into a traditional single room so we could use the double room to increase our capacity.” Carpenter Tower, Straz Tower, Cobeen Hall and O’Donnell Hall moved RAs into single rooms,

which led to about 50 more students being able to live in the dorms. Cobeen Hall and McCormick have received new furniture, Carpenter Tower now has common rooms and other dorms have had new sprinkler systems installed. There is no current plan for the university to build a new dorm. Marquette policy requires students to live in resident halls for the first two years of their undergraduate degrees, an attempt to promote better grade point averages for students in their first two years. Studies show that students who live in dorms generally have a better GPA than students who do not. One study, published by University of Wisconsin-La Crosse professor James Murray in 2010, showed an increase of 0.19 to 0.97 in GPA for those who lived on campus. “It’s not convenient for a student to get settled into a space and six weeks later have to move to a different location,” Berthold said.


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Policy: Concealed carry laws create new campus safety concerns emergency notification and communication procedures and mutual aid agreements, according to Marquette’s website. “Emergency planning is a universitywide effort that includes many departments across campus,” Mascari said. “Marquette has an Event and Emergency Management Plan that conforms with the National Incident Management System – the national standard for emergency preparedness and incident response. Earlier this summer, we conducted a tabletop exercise with representatives across the university, including the senior administration.” The Department of Public Safety’s staff of armed officers received its initial training for responding to an active shooter several years ago from the Milwaukee Police Department’s Tactical Enforcement Unit, according to Mascari. DPS reviews these exercises in resolving various emergency scenarios several times a year. “You can be sure that all available officers would respond to this type of incident,” said Mas-

cari. “We work very closely with Milwaukee police and other local law enforcement.” CIMP is shared with local law enforcement and emergency management agencies nearby. The Milwaukee Police Department’s Police Administration Building and Aurora Sinai Medical Center are both just a couple of blocks away from campus and are capable of responding within minutes. “DPS has one of MPD’s radios,” said an MPD officer who spoke on the condition of anonymity. “They would contact us and set up a command center. Then, we’d team up with them and they’d guide us to where we need to go – we’d take it from there.” To alert students of any emergency, CIMP would use all available means of communication – email, text messaging, the university website, university voice mail, Access TV message boards, postings in buildings both on and off campus and megaphones, among other things, according to the university website.

DPS also controls an electronic lock system that can instantly secure all academic buildings, and all residence halls have a lock-down mechanism at the front desks. But Wisconsin’s concealed carry law, which passed last year, raises new concerns. Regardless of licenses or legal obtainment, Marquette students are not allowed to carry weapons on university property. “Weapons have never been allowed on Marquette’s campus,” Mascari said. “Marquette University maintains a ‘no weapons allowed’ policy to the extent permitted under 2011 Wisconsin Act 35.” But Andrew Kohn, a senior in the College of Business Administration, said that doesn’t make him feel any less safe. “(Most) people who have guns have gone through the proper channels and training and are exercising their constitutional right,” said Kohn. “I feel like people who want guns for the wrong reason will find a way to get them without a license.”

David Poggi, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, said he doesn’t mind the rule restricting guns at Marquette and would rather leave it to professionals to handle an active shooter on campus. “I probably wouldn’t feel comfortable knowing that other students are carrying weapons around on campus,” Poggi said. “I don’t believe that just because you own a gun and go to the range and shoot you would also know what to do in a situation with an active shooter.” Kohn added that he would either hide or run away in the presence of an active shooter, but admitted that determining the appropriate response in a state of panic could be problematic.

“It is important to quickly determine the most reasonable way to protect your own life. Depending on the circumstances, it might be necessary for you to evacuate the area, hide out or take action,” Mascari said. “If you cannot safely evacuate the building, hide in an area out of view and lock or block the doors. As a last resort, and only when your life is in imminent danger, act with physical aggression and attempt to incapacitate the shooter.” You can find more information about Marquette’s emergency response protocol at http://www.marquette.edu/publicsafety/emergency-preparedness.shtml.

DPS has one of MPD’s radios. They would contact us and set up a command center ... We’d take it from there. Anonymous MPD Officer

Photo by Alyce Peterson/alyce.peterson@marquette.edu

A young girl mourns those lost in the Sikh temple shooting in Oak Creek on Aug. 5, the latest in a series of shooting sprees that have prompted changes in Marquette’s policy.

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THENCEFORWARD AND

Thursday, August 30, 2012

FOREVER FREE New Haggerty exhibit celebrates art, freedom and history By Peter Setter peter.setter@marquette.edu

One hundred and fifty years after the Civil War and the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, Marquette still commemorates and explores the themes of the deadliest war in U.S. history. This academic year, Marquette hosts the Freedom Project, a commemoration of the sesquicentennial (150th) anniversary of the Civil War. It is a venture that seeks to discover the meanings of emancipation and freedom in the United States, as well as around the globe. Mark Wagner’s “Liberty” is just one of the many pieces on display in the Haggerty’s “Thenceforth, and Forever Free” exhibition. Photo courtesy of Lynne Shumow. Correlating with the project comes “Thenceforward, and Forever Free,” the latest exhibition from the Haggerty Museum of Art. The exhibition, which opened August 22nd and runs through the rest of the semester, “features seven contemporary artists whose work deals with issues of race, gender, privilege, identity, and more broadly conveys interpreta-

tions of the notion of freedom,” said Lynne Shumow, curator of education at the Haggerty. The nationally and internationally known artists featured in the exhibit include Laylah Ali, Michael Ray Charles, Elisabeth Subrin, Kara Walker, Mark Wagner, Willie Birch and Gary Simmons. While the group exhibition is cohesive in its theme, each artist explores freedom using different forms of art. Video, photography, acrylic paint, chalks, lithography and screenprint, and even dollar bills are used to convey each artist’s interpretation of freedom. “Thenceforward, and Forever Free” is one of three exhibitions in the museum dedicated solely to the Freedom Project. The museum is currently also exhibiting a collection of photos from the museum’s permanent collection entitled “Freedom/Of/For/ To” and a collection of historic objects and descriptions in “The Freedom Project: Text/Context.” The title of the exhibition, Shumow noted, is fittingly taken from the Emancipation Proclamation. In the famous document, Abraham Lincoln stated “that on the 1st day of January, A.D. 1863, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.” The quotation Shumow lifted perfectly describes the meaning and purpose of the exhibition,

The pieces are both celebrating and questioning freedom, with most harboring a deeper meaning hidden behind the surface.

which Shumow created and developed over the last two years. Echoing the words of Lincoln, the museum perpetuates the idea of freedom in the United States. As for the origins of the exhibit itself, Shumow did not develop the idea of doing an exhibition about the meanings of freedom. Rather, she took note of what the university was doing as a whole: Marquette will be hosting a series of lectures, exhibitions, and events surrounding the topic of freedom, including a “Forbidden Film Festival” and several speakers on the Civil War throughout the semester. “A long time ago, we knew that Marquette was going to be involved in the Freedom Project, so we wanted to do an exhibition that also dealt with that theme,” Shumow said. “It was the university’s initiative about focusing on the theme of freedom that made us think about it.” Throughout the two-year period that Shumow used to develop the exhibition, many tasks needed completing. Shumow contacted the artists as far back as a year ago and even had artist Gary Simmons travel to the museum this month to create his work on site. “It takes a lot of time to put an exhibition together and to get all the pieces here. You have to go through a galleryist, you have to go through the collector. It’s complicated getting all this stuff here,” Shumow explained. In addition to compiling all the artwork and contacting the artists, Shumow also had the duty of creating a catalogue for the exhibit. Included in the catalogue are examples of art found in the exhibit, as well as biographies of each artist and a summary of the

exhibition as a whole. “It takes a long time; just to do this (the catalogue) takes a lot of writing,” Shumow said. “There are two essayists, and I wrote all the bios and all the descriptions.” While the exhibit is part of a project to celebrate the anniversary of the Civil War, no grand paintings depicting gruesome battle scenes will be found in the gallery. Antique rifles and ancient battle cannons are nonexistent, and displays portraying the unhealthy conditions of the camps, as possibly seen in other museums, are not found here. In their place, provocative and stirring images depicting themes of freedom reside. Although this exhibit is in commemoration of the Civil War, most of the exhibits do not portray scenes from the time period. Some works do tie in to the war, but others portray scenes of New York City after 9/11, neighborhoods in New Orleans and a wall-sized Statue of Liberty made from dollar bills. The pieces are both celebrating and questioning freedom, with most harboring a deeper meaning hidden behind the surface. “I think this exhibition, and art in general, poses important questions, and some of the work is very, very challenging,” Shumow said. And while this exhibition is a special one, the main goal of the museum is not disrupted. “We offer some challenging ways to think about things, maybe things you hadn’t thought about before, and to think about things you thought you knew about in a new way. That’s really a big part of what the museum does here.”

Shumow, in her role as curator, focuses on visual literacy in the museum. Visual literacy is defined as the ability to recognize and understand ideas conveyed through visible actions or images. “Our students go to school, and they read books,” Shumow said. “There isn’t as much an emphasis on visual literacy, so we really offer that. It’s very different to look at an image than it is to read a page in a book.” She believes this type of literacy is important in understanding the Civil War. “I think it’s really going to ask students to think about what freedom means, and what the Civil War was all about,” Shumow noted. “There’s a lot of questioning about how people have been treated and issues dealing with slavery.” The exhibit is riveting, provocative and well worth the short trip to the museum.

Haggerty Museum of Art Where: It’s on campus.The Haggerty Museum of Art is located on 13th and Clybourn. When: The Haggerty is open Monday–Saturday 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,Thursday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sunday noon to 5 p.m. What: The Freedom Project, Robert Rauschenberg Prints, and other pieces of the permanent collection. Photos courtesy of Lynne Shumow

The Haggerty’s exhibit is a part of the university-wide project celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

Price: Admission is free.


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Thursday, August 30, 2012

Tribune 11

Rising star Gotye proves he’s somebody to know Indie artist charms Riverside crowd with unique sound, visuals By Claire Nowak claire.nowak@marquette.edu

Most would be quick to label Gotye as a one-hit wonder. His chart-topping single “Somebody That I Used To Know” took the Internet by storm this past year, selling more that seven million downloads and becoming one of YouTube’s most watched videos with more than 308 million views. What many music lovers fail to appreciate, though, is the individuality in his approach to music, a trait he prominently displayed Saturday night at the Riverside Theater. There was a certain theatric element to the first half of the performance. Complex light sequences flashed on the drum beats while Wally De Backer, the Australia native better known as Gotye, walked out for the first number. These lights were accompanied by animations projected on a large screen in the back of the stage. Gotye fans immediately recognized them from the musician’s music videos, which more often than not feature animated shorts as opposed to live action film clips. Gotye was able to use these videos to convey the meaning behind his music in a way that is overlooked by most conventional artists. These deeper meanings varied from calls for help in “Easy Way Out” to protecting the environment from

our own actions in “Eyes Wide Open.” His movements on stage were also synchronized with the animations behind him, which looked natural and fit well with the songs. The music itself was also unique, a blend of different genres and musical techniques. Some songs, like “Bronte,” were slow and soft, more along the lines of traditional singer/songwriter tunes. Others involved multiple synth keyboards and samples. For “State of the Art,” he used an auto-tuned microphone to personify a magical music-making machine. Throughout the show, Gotye openly expressed his love of performing. He ran between the instruments on stage, playing a drum kit for part of one song, then other percussion instruments for another. In nearly every song, he kept time with two wooden mallets. His performance overall seemed like a combination of the two opening acts, Jonti and Missy Higgins. Jonti, an Australian arranger, producer and vocalist, played original mixes off his MacBook Pro and mini synth keyboard. When he sang, he had a good, clear voice but overall came across as awkward and out of place. Missy Higgins, on the other hand, obviously had more recording and touring experience. The singer/songwriter, yet another Australia native, wowed the crowd with her personal songs and confident voice. She accompanied herself on the piano for several songs and sounded like an Australian Norah Jones. Gotye’s personality fell

somewhere in between. He had the confidence of Missy Higgins but distanced himself from the crowd like Jonti, at least for the first half of the show. The performance ultimately climaxed after ten songs, when the singer played the first notes of his smash hit, “Somebody That I Used To Know.” It was a crowd favorite that had everyone singing along. Missy Higgins joined Gotye halfway through to sing the verse originally sung by Kimbra. The audience was more than happy to hear her again, and the song ended with a standing ovation. After his hit, it seemed a barrier was broken, and Gotye connected even more with the audience. “I’m going to need your help for this next song,” he said, inviting the audience to get out of their seats and come closer to the stage. Only a select few remained seated. He taught the audience a simple background vocal for “Save Me” and pointed to them when it was their turn to sing. For the rest of the show, the musicians and listeners alike became more engaged with the music and each other. The screams for an encore brought the singer back with two more songs after he had finished his set. It may be difficult to create another hit as successful as his first single, but Gotye has the individuality needed to survive in the music business. If listeners don’t judge him on one song and see him live for more than just “Somebody That I Used To Know,” they may find a lot to enjoy in his diverse music.

Photos by Claire Nowak/claire.nowak@marquette.edu

A variety of background animations and videos provided the perfect accompaniment to Gotye’s lively concert.

Coming up at the Riverside... Lynyrd Skynyrd: August 30 at 7:00 p.m. Lewis Black: September 4 at 7:00 p.m. Norah Jones: October 8 at 6:30 p.m. Brandi Carlile: October 17 at 7:00 p.m.

Photo via pitchfork.com


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12 Tribune COLUMN

Watching movies in a post-Aurora world

Matt Mueller Anyone who knows me, or has even just glanced at one of my articles here at the Tribune, knows that movies are my life. I write about movies. I watch an excessive amount of movies. I work at a movie theater. There is still no greater rush than walking out of a great movie and racing around, needing desperately to talk to somebody about what you’ve just seen. This summer, a horrible act during a midnight showing in Aurora,

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Colo. tried to ruin that spirit-raising feeling. A building made for dreams was turned into a building of nightmares as a young man opened fire on a crowded premiere showing of “The Dark Knight Rises.” Twelve were killed, fiftyeight were injured and an entire nation was left disturbed, puzzled and deeply saddened. The nation mourned, and the gunman was caught and arrested (I will not use his name and give him the attention he almost certainly desired after committing his crime against humanity and imaginations everywhere). Immediately, the questions began flying about how we can stop future tragedies like Aurora from happening. The easy answer is more gun regulation. It’s a noble idea but flawed. Though more information is coming out about his mental health struggles, the gunman bought and possessed all of his weapons legally. Another attempt at prevention discussed was adding more security at movie theaters. It’s another understandable idea but one that screams of overcompensating. Metal detectors and enough extra staff to secure every auditorium – up to 20 in some theaters – would be too costly for any cinema to stay in business. For those who hear the gunman’s description – he was dressed as the Joker with the red hair included, hints of which can still be seen in his mugshot – and ask how no one could have considered him suspicious - it was a midnight showing. Dressing up is a midnight showing tradition and one of the elements that make them such entertaining events. At the theater where I work, one young audience member arrived dressed as a Stormtrooper from “Star Wars.” Excited enthusiasm for a movie should be appreciated, not punished. In this age, it’s easy to want easy solutions, but the tragedy in Aurora doesn’t come with easy answers. Would added security really make one feel better, es-

pecially knowing both metal detectors and added movie theater staff in the seats wouldn’t have even stopped the gunman in this instance? It’s a sad thing to admit, but sometimes, bad things will happen. Even with all of our regulations and attempts to make society the safest and best for the human kind, tragedy finds its way in. The important thing, then, is how we react to it and how we move forward. A few people have chosen the embarrassing tact of using humor. The day after the tragic shooting, I was working at the theater, and a customer told me that “The Dark Knight Rises” was “to die for.” We kicked him out of the building. To make snide attempts at comedy about the tragedy is an insult to those innocent people whose only crime was wanting to let their imaginations go wild for a few hours. The event could have happened to anyone anywhere, and to make fun of their loss shines a tragic light on our culture’s plague-like “as long as it’s not me” mentality. No, the best way to react, to move forward and to honor those lost, is to keep going to the theater. The art of cinema is one of society’s greatest creations. It’s a way for people to communicate, to share emotions and feelings that words alone could never come close to doing. It’s a communal experience that brings people of all cultures and ideals together. As goofy as this may sound, a movie theater is like a church for me. It’s a sacred place where, for a couple hours, we give ourselves over to our feelings and imaginations and let them soar. It’s where dreams are made and shared. The events in Aurora may have briefly violated that precious place, but as a society, we cannot let it shake our faith in the cinema. matthew.mueller@marquette. edu, Matt’s movie reviews can be found at onmilwaukee.com

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Beck’s latest album isn’t an album at all By Erin Heffernan erin.heffernan@marquette.edu

We live in a world of music instant gratification. If I want to hear a song, it usually takes fewer than 30 seconds. I can blast an Old Crow Medicine Show album through my headphones in less time than it takes to say the band’s name. But earlier this month, alternative music darling Beck announced his plan to slow down the way we consume and listen to music. He plans to release his new album, “The Beck Hanson’s Song Reader” as sheet music. With no digital file to be downloaded, pirated and remixed, the album is simply a song book in print, an idea so old, it’s new. The album, consisting of twenty as-of-yet unreleased and unrecorded tracks, will debut this December by the independent publisher McSweeney’s and will be filled with fullcolor illustrations. A purchase of the song book also includes a carrying case. The song book’s artwork, including one illustration by Marcel Dzama, creator of the album art for Beck’s 2005 album, “Guero,” is reminiscent of the song books of classic American standards. It looks like the kind of book sitting on 1920s pianos as smiling families sing in unison. Perhaps that is the vision Beck is trying to capture with this unconventional release. The decision evokes a time when the only way to listen to music was to create it yourself, when the artist who recorded the song didn’t define the style of the performance, and when music couldn’t be obtained and consumed in an instant. With this release, Beck issues a challenge. The only way to experience the music is for musicians to bring the songs to life. It promises to generate countless versions of each song and keep the blogosphere abuzz as new artists take on Beck’s work. This presents an exciting new format that challenges what constitutes an album and how music can be distributed. Beck is not the first artist to stray from a conventional al-

bum release. In fact, a growing trend of artists are finding interesting ways of getting their music to fans. In 2007, Radiohead released its seventh studio album, “In Rainbows,” on its website, bypassing the control of record labels. The band made news by letting its fans decide what they wanted to pay for the digital download, which prompted praise from fans and critics alike. In many ways, Radiohead’s method is the opposite of what Beck plans to do in December. By giving fans instant access to the music and focusing on the album in its digital form, Radiohead’s digital-age choice seems far removed from Beck’s nostalgic book. Both releases, however, share a new take on how to distribute music where musicians take control, not just of the music they create but of how it’s distributed and consumed. They have found new ways to spread their art, unbound by the conventions of CDs at Barnes and Noble and cheap downloads on iTunes. While Radiohead and Beck’s decisions were big news in the music industry, they are far from the most unusual methods of releasing new music. In 2011, The Flaming Lips announced that they were going to encase a USB holding four new songs in a gummy skull. Yes, a translucent, jiggly skull. Wayne Coyne, the psychedelic band’s frontman, told Pitchfork “it’s a life-sized human skull completely made out of edible gummy bear stuff. It also has a gummy brain inside of it and, inside of that, there’s a USB flash drive.” The lighthearted decision encapsulates the bands trippy, unconventional style and provides fans with a snack while they listen to the songs. These innovative albums promise to bring something new for music fans to hear, and maybe even eat. The format that musicians use to get their music to listeners is itself becoming yet another way to for bands to assert identity and show people exactly what it is they love and value about music.

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Frodo lives on at Marquette thanks to class, lectures

Photos by Danny Alfonzo/daniel.alfonzo@marquette.edu

William Fliss is the interim curator of Marquette’s Tolkien Collection.

One does not simply take a class on J.R.R. Tolkien’s famed books By Erin Heffernan erin.heffernan@marquette.edu

“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.” The story goes that this line inexplicably occurred to J.R.R. Tolkien one day in 1930, thus marking the beginning of Tolkien’s first published fantasy novel, “The Hobbit.” Tolkien’s works have since garnered generations of loyal fans, ingraining themselves into fantasy entertainment and becoming a staple of any self-proclaimed nerd’s bookshelf. This September marks the 75th anniversary of the original publication of “The Hobbit.” As home to the manuscripts of several of the author’s preeminent works including “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings” - Marquette is commemorating the occasion by offering a Tolkien course and hosting a series of lectures on the author. The combination is sure to elicit Gollum-esque mutterings of “my precious” from Marquette’s Tolkienophiles. Tim Machan, a professor in the English department, will be the first full-time Marquette faculty member to teach the Tolkien course. Machan comes well equipped to understand the famed English author. He specializes in

linguistics and has led classes on Old Norse and medieval literature, subjects that Tolkien himself taught at Oxford during his academic career. “The course will explore how Tolkien could go from lecturing on ‘Beowulf’ during the day to, at home, writing about Frodo and creating a whole new universe at night,” Machan said. In addition to reading the popular tales of Frodo and Bilbo Baggins, Machan will cover Tolkien’s academic writing, poetry and translation work. The professor’s goal is for students to experience Tolkien as a whole author, to explore his intricate and meticulous writing methods and to follow the process of how the manuscripts in the university’s archives were developed into bestselling favorites. According to Machan, one of the things that makes Tolkien unique as a writer and deserving of further study is the level of precision and detail in his work. “(Tolkien) spent his life fashioning the notion that there is another whole world out there,” Machan said. In order to make this world seem vivid to readers, Tolkien wrote moon charts, devised systems of measurement, drew maps and characters, and even

made several original languages, such as Elvish and Entish, specifically for Middle-earth. The class will visit Raynor Library to study copies of the more than 11,000 manuscript pages in the J.R.R. Tolkien Collection, allowing students to observe the process of what Machan described as an “obsessive revisor.” The archives are filled with Tolkien’s extensive edits, including seven different versions of the first chapter of “The Lord of the Rings.” In addition to the documents themselves, the Tolkien course will incorporate the series of upcoming events sponsored by the Raynor Memorial Libraries. In early October, John D. Rateliff, who studied Marquette’s Tolkien collection for more than 30 years, will be speaking on “How the Hobbit Came to Milwaukee” and will guest lecture a section of the Tolkien course. In addition, this November, the libraries will host a lecture by Tolkien scholars Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull entitled “J.R.R Tolkien and the Art of Middle Earth.” The lectures are open to all Marquette students. William Fliss, interim curator of the Tolkien Collection, said this upcoming

(Tolkien) spent his life fashioning the notion that there is another whole world out there. Tim Machan, professor in the English department

anniversary of “The Hobbit” is a “great opportunity to publicize the fact that Marquette has this wonderful collection.” Along with the draw of the lecture series, Fliss anticipates a surge of Tolkien enthusiasts visiting campus after the December release of the first movie installment of “The Hobbit,” directed by Peter Jackson. In February, the libraries will host a roundtable discussion of Jackson’s latest film adaptation, featuring four Tolkien scholars from around the

country. Tolkien fans may also want to stop by the archives reading room on the third floor of Raynor Library to view a permanent exhibit of reproductions from the manuscript collection. In addition, one Friday afternoon every month this fall, Fliss will present selected originals for viewing. With all these upcoming events, Milwaukee may begin to seem closer to Middle-earth.


Viewpoints PAGE 14

The Marquette Tribune Thursday, August 30, 2012

The Marquette Tribune Editorial Board:

Tessa Fox, Viewpoints Editor and Editorial Writer Katie Doherty, Editorial Writer Andrew Phillips, Editor-in-Chief Maria Tsikalas, Managing Editor Mike LoCicero, Sports Editor Pat Simonaitis, News Editor Alec Brooks, Copy Chief Allison Kruschke, Projects Editor Rob Gebelhoff, Visual Content Editor Matt Mueller, Marquee Editor Alyce Peterson, Photo Editor

#Tr ibTwee ts @DwayneWade

(Because they chose me) RT @NickEspo96: @ DwyaneWade why did you pick Marquette?

@MarquetteU

STAFF EDITORIAL

When it comes to assault, prioritize safety over image

Happy birthday Father Naus! http://go.mu. edu/OpXmvl

@lauren_engel94

@MarquetteU Being here is the best feeling ever! You promised change and delivered. This is already home #mu16 #TotalHappiness

COLUMN

It may not be funny, but it’s the truth Tribune File Photo

Two incidents in the small town of Cagli, Italy have prompted further scrutiny of Marquette’s policy.

This summer, in what seems to be an ongoing problem in the Marquette community, another high profile sexual assault incident occurred on a Marquette study abroad program. In June, two Marquette students were allegedly the victims of sexual assault while participating in a Digital Journalism study abroad program in Cagli, Italy. Unlike those in the past, these allegations, were met with a swift response from Marquette’s faculty and administration. The university’s reaction included sending an email to the parents of the students on the trip, flying the dean of the College of Communication to Italy and planning to move the students from Cagli to Rome four days earlier than scheduled (a decision that was reversed after a strong negative reaction from students in the program). Although we commend Marquette for addressing these alleged sexual assaults in a strong and timely manner, we can’t help but think the university’s reaction seems a bit like an overcompensated public relations attempt to make up for past mishandlings of similar incidents. The alleged assaults this summer represent the third high profile incident of sexual assault involving Marquette in the last two years. In May 2011, a student participating in Marquette’s South Africa Service Learning Program was raped in an alley behind the student residence provided by Marquette. The university responded to the situation by installing a security camera and placing a night guard outside of the student residence for the remainder of the program. However, the service of the guard was discontinued after that semester’s group left. Despite criticism of this removal from one of that semester’s program participants, the university did not re-install a night guard, citing feedback from this year’s program participants, who felt such a guard was not necessary once they had arrived. While it may be commendable that officials heeded student feedback, we have to ask whether the students in the spring 2011 program would have said they felt a security guard was necessary before the rape occurred. It’s not likely, and yet such a service may have prevented the crime from occurring. This was not the only time Marquette seemed to mishandle cases of sexual assault accusations. In the spring of 2011, Marquette was scrutinized for its non-compliance in reporting two sexual assaults involving student athletes and female student victims. These allegations were reported to the Department of Public Safety, but the university failed to report the information to local authorities. Marquette is currently under investigation by the U.S. Department

of Education under the Clery Act for its failure to follow reporting protocol. In Italy this summer, Marquette followed that protocol and handled the allegations with a much stronger response than in past years. But we still are uncertain that the university handled the situation in the best way. First, we want to emphasize that there was much the university did right. Officials involved in the program informed the students immediately of the alleged incident and made it very clear that they were trying to protect the students. They offered to reimburse students wishing to return to the U.S. early. They worked with Italian authorities to go after those responsible and prevent future incidents. They followed proper procedures for reporting the alleged assaults, and they provided counseling services, albeit a week after informing the participants of the incidents. For these responses, we say thank you. But it seems that when Marquette administrators in Milwaukee learned of the incident, they, to put it most accurately, began a panicked effort to prevent or curb criticism without thoroughly thinking everything through. The students on the trip did not need College of Communication Dean Lori Bergen to fly out to Italy to “provide support.” We have to ask how her presence made the students safer than the presence of other staff and faculty already there and whether it just elevated the level of chaos surrounding the situation. While we know she cares deeply about students’ safety, it very much appeared to be a publicity stunt to offer to the media and the parents of the students on the trip. Finally, the decision to move the students to Rome early was the most unnecessary of them all. To pretend that the nightlife in Cagli (population: 9,100) was somehow more dangerous than the nightlife in Rome (population: 2,800,000) is laughable. We do applaud the officials for eventually listening to the students’ protests that the move really would not have been in their best interests. The events in Cagli demonstrate that the university is taking the need to respond to sexual assault allegations much more seriously than it has in recent past. At the same time, officials need to stop trying to overcompensate for past errors. There was nothing the university could have done to prevent the alleged attacks in Cagli, and we fully understand that. But we would hope that, should another similar incident occur, the administration will more thoroughly think through its response and do what is truly best for the students in each and every circumstance.

Brooke Goodman Hello, my name is Brooke, and no, I am not funny. I might look kind of funny — my hair has been compared to a poodle’s tail far too many times to count, and when I finally turn 21, I’ll probably get turned away from Murphy’s for appearing to be 15 years old. I might act kind of funny — my personal food guide pyramid consists of cereal and granola bars, and any mention of Bon Iver being a “new artist” will cause me to actually hyperventilate out of frustration. I might like kind of funny things — nothing makes me happier than finding an obscure court trial I can stream online, and if I ever discover a class on icebreakers, I’ll be the first to take it. Basically, I’m quirky teetering on the edge of weird. But not funny. There’s a huge difference. And guess what? I’m more than OK with that. Admitting it is the first step, after all. Every year, there seems to be that one column that attempts to make readers burst into giggle fits all across campus. Sometimes it’s successful, sometimes it’s not. Success was the Brian Harper dinner invitation to Father Wild of two years ago – absolute genius right there. I won’t be that columnist, though, because I can’t be. It would be forced, fake and nothing more than a big, fat fail. I’d much rather be honest. People don’t always like honesty, but at least it’s better than trying to make up jokes in my writing. To do that, I’d have to Google what a “good joke” is, and that would be plagiarism, my friends. So let us have a lesson in honesty. The first week of classes each year is absolutely fascinating. Exhilarating, really. Like the thrill of casually acting surprised when someone you secretly stalk strolls in to a class

you already knew he or she would be in. Don’t be embarrassed; we all stay up until midnight to check those class lists. But seriously, the first week is when everyone gets a feel for what the campus dynamic is going to be like for the next nine months. Even those who don’t typically spend time people-watching catch themselves glancing around classrooms and across the street to see what’s up with the new student body. Everyone, in case you haven’t noticed, we have an Invasion of the Bros on our hands. I tried to tally up the number of bro tanks I saw on Monday but quickly lost count and stopped — the bright colors and variety of striped and zigzag patterns were playing optical illusions on my eyes. Since then, I’ve done some research on what exactly a bro tank is. I haven’t found much. According to Urban Dictionary (no, this is not a reliable source, and no, it is not being used as a reliable source), a bro tank is defined as a male tank top, but NOT a wife beater. The definition further states that the males who wear these tank tops are fellow bros with decent sized muscles. “Fellow bros with decent sized muscles”? Here, I could launch into a deep discussion as to what constitutes a “decent sized muscle,” but that would probably result in a riot, so I’ll save it for another time. It’s all right, though. Bros are bros and that’s ... chill. By no means do I have anything against the newfound species that is taking over campus. In fact, I’d be willing to pay five dollars for someone to find the legitimate origin of the bro tank and enlighten me on how this trend sweeping across Marquette began. See? That’s honesty. It’s not necessarily funny, but it’s what we all have been thinking this week. That, and how awesome it is not to have received an influx of email DPS reports yet. Bottom line — I’m not going to use this column to be something I’m not. I’m not inherently funny. And I won’t try to be. I’m honest. My honesty might occasionally be funny, but I’m not promising anything. I will promise, though, that I’ll keep it interesting, and hopefully my quirkiness will win you over. Only time will tell. So, as the bros would say, deuces. brooke.goodman@marquette.edu

Statement of Opinion Policy The opinions expressed on the Viewpoints page reflect the opinions of the Viewpoints staff. The editorials do not represent the opinions of Marquette University nor its administrators, but those of the editorial board. The Marquette Tribune prints guest submissions at its discretion. The Tribune strives to give all sides of an issue an equal voice over the course of a reasonable time period. An author’s contribution will not be published more than once in a four-week period. Submissions with obvious relevance to the Marquette community will be given priority consideration. Full Viewpoint submissions should be limited to 500 words. Letters to the editor should be between 50 to 150 words. The Tribune reserves the right to edit submissions for length and content. Please e-mail submissions to: viewpoints@marquettetribune.org. If you are a current student, include the college in which you are enrolled and your year in school. If not, please note any affliations to Marquette or your current city of residence.


Thursday, August 30, 2012

Viewpoints

Tribune 15

COLUMN

Don’t sweat your summer bucket list

Tony Manno How far did you get on that summer bucket list? I for one had big plans. This was going to be a summer of elaborate selfdiscovery, infinite knowledge, breaking barriers and exploring new horizons. I’d ride my bike 10 miles to Milwaukee’s hidden culinary gems. I’d spend a week to get through Howard Zinn’s “A People’s History of the United States.” Maybe I’d even take the fabled road trip out west that I’d thought about the past couple years. Instead I sat with my laptop on my stomach most of the time watching Netflix. In fact, nothing turned out how I’d

imagined. The 10-mile bike ride turned into Chinese food delivery, “A People’s History of the United States” became a few episodes of Arrested Development and that trip out west became two extra days home in Cleveland. Cleveland! The punch line of the Midwest, not exactly the bastion of exploration I had hoped for. So what happened here, exactly? I asked Kristy Nielson, associate professor of psychology, who specializes in memory, attention and dementia, among other subjects. She gave me advice I wish I’d had at the beginning of summer: to treat the brain the way you would treat a muscle. “Brain circuits, and especially learned patterns, are formed through repeated use,” she said. “Continued repeated use hones them, makes them more and more efficient. Lack of use? Well, they weaken quickly, just as muscles do.” Mental exercise? The only thing I spent less time on this summer was regular exercise. How could I have let motivation fly out the window? Guilt and paranoia ensue. The biggest problem with this lack of motivation is the way it has spilled over

into the semester with class time in the crosshairs. Now, when we really need it, our brains still can’t break through and function at full capacity. This phenomenon hit for me on Tuesday, when I fumbled to conjugate basic verb tenses in French class. Practice, practice, practice. But apparently, all is not lost. Fortunately, Nielson said, our good study habits are still in there somewhere – it just takes some effort to bring them back, as difficult as it may seem at first. Perhaps an idle mind isn’t really the devil’s workshop. That said, we should forgive ourselves for our sloth. Regardless of practice, it’s tough to have a class wide political discussion during syllabus week — it seems like we should learn our phone numbers, play a round of duck-duck-goose and call it a day. So what, my bucket list went mostly uncrossed off (I guess it may have

helped if I had written it down). With a little effort and “brain exercise,” we can all spend the next couple weeks getting our minds back on track. Besides, maybe that lack of summer motivation wasn’t as bad as it feels. Sure, I was glued to Netflix, but I had a good handful of classic films thrown in there. And I did hit at least a few great Milwaukee eateries. Didn’t get around to that road trip, but maybe next summer, right? There’s a time and place for everything. I had my “Summer of George,” and I shouldn’t be ashamed about one second of it — even if that means relearning how to conjugate “être.” So give yourself a little credit, Marquette. Before you know it, the studying will catch up to you, and you’ll be wishing you were back doing nothing in Cleveland. anothy.manno@marquette.edu

Mental exercise? The only thing I spent less time on this summer was regular exercise. How could I have let motivation fly out the window?

I AM VERY LITTLE INCLINED on any occasion TO SAY ANYTHING OD BY IT. UNLESS I HOPE TO PRODUCE SOME- AGO BRAHAM LINCOLN


Sports

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 16

Thursday, August 30, 2012

woMen’s SOCCER

Healthy Luba carving a niche off the bench The two weren’t the best of friends in high school, but Luba said she talked with the Jacobsons before deciding to commit to Marquette. “When I was getting recruited I talked to the Jacobsons because they were really helpful and open about their recruitment,” Luba said. “Marquette was a good choice because of the family environment, and it’s close to home

Sophomore already close to her goal total from last season By Michael LoCicero michael.locicero@marquette.edu

Last season, sophomore midfielder Mary Luba appeared in 19 games off the bench, scoring three goals and tallying three assists. If the beginning of this season is any indication, Luba could far exceed those numbers while also wowing fans with her technical skills. “She’s very creative with the ball,” junior defender Emily Jacobson said. “I think as a freshman you’re overwhelmed a little bit, obviously, but we’re finally getting a little more of that creativity out of her.” Through two official games, Luba has scored once and is one of the first options off the bench for coach Markus Roeders. “Her main strengths are on the offensive end, but the big thing we’ve seen is the maturity on both sides of the ball,” Roeders said. “It’s just a matter of living in an environment where she has a lot of older players around her. But it’s also her doing her part and really pushing herself, saying ‘Hey, I should be out there more than I am right now.’” Jacobson, along with her sister Cara, went to nearby Shorewood High School with Luba, and they played together with FC Milwaukee when Luba was a junior.

but not too close.” According to Jacobson, Luba is “quirky, but in the best way possible,” which likely explains how she can do some crazy things with the ball. Luba is “outstanding” at chess and with Rubik’s Cubes, she said. “She can’t be compared to anyone else, in a very good way,” Jacobson said. “She’s able to put some bend on the ball and do some things with the ball that

she didn’t do last year.” Neither Jacobson nor Roeders indicated Luba’s role would be similar to Lindsey Page’s role last season, however. Page appeared in 21 games, starting just three of them. She ranked third on the team in scoring with five goals and six assists. Roeders said Page was more of a spark plug, but Luba is more versatile in the midfield.

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Sophomore midfielder Mary Luba posseses creativity unlike most soccer players, according to coach Markus Roeders.

“With her versatility, we’re still trying to sort out what is maybe going to work best for us,” Roeders said. “The two canceled matches we’ve had probably hasn’t helped get us into a flow.” Roeders said Luba has the chance to become a deadly passer who can spring a forward into an open position to score. “In the Milwaukee game, she lofted one over the back line and hit Sloan on the other end,” Roeders said. “It’s beautiful to watch because it’s a level of creativity that you really only see in the best of players.” Luba’s fresh legs off the bench will be vital for a team with an increasingly daunting schedule the next four games. On Friday, Marquette travels to an already improved Northwestern team who finished 2-16-1 overall last year. Through three games, the Wildcats own a 2-1-0 mark, with wins over Kansas and Miami (Ohio) on the road before dropping a 5-2 decision at Dayton on Aug. 26. Golden Eagles fans will see a familiar face on the Northwestern sidelines in coach Michael Moynihan, who spent the past 15 years as the head coach of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Moynihan brought assistant coach David Nikolic with him to Evanston, Ill. Nikolic spent 18 years with Moynihan, and the duo is familiar with how Marquette runs its team. “We know what they like to do, and the same goes for them,” Roeders said. “It should be a battle.”

Column

WOmen’s Lacrosse

Wait nearly through for MU Luke Strotman an Coaches, players inspiration to all not concerned with number of wins By Kyle Doubrava kyle.doubrava@marquette.edu

After months of preparation, it would be an understatement to say the Marquette women’s lacrosse squad is ready for its inaugural season. The Golden Eagles needed all the practice they could muster after learning they would be playing Big East competition this coming spring. But Coach Meredith Black, who has had coaching and playing experience at Notre Dame, is eager for action to begin. “It’s a great conference and it’s very competitive,” Black said. “There are top teams in that conference, so for us to be able to play them year in and year out will be awesome for us.” Black added that playing against difficult teams consistently will benefit the team in the long run and, in the short run it will determine for the players at what level they need to play to stay in the game. Players have been taking part

in individual and group exercises over the summer to ensure they’ll be in top condition for the challenging schedule. “We held a camp here this summer and we got to watch a lot of the incoming play,” freshman midfielder Anna Muzika said. “They’re incredible. Just watching them, I think we can really compete this year and we can hang with the big dogs.” Sophomore goalie Jennifer Zandlo, who came to Marquette from Niagara University, spent time this summer running sprints. She also tuned her goalkeeping skills by playing plenty of wallball, a handball-like sport that requires quick reflexes and sharp coordination, both of which Zandlo will need to be proficient at this season. Determining a benchmark for the number of wins this season is still hazy for the team at this point, but Zandlo believes everything must start with developing team chemistry. “Our goals are really to come together as a team and really work together and work hard,” Zandlo said. “I always put 100 percent in and no matter what the outcome is, good or bad. (We) just need to really be there for each other and make sure that we’re all on an upward slope.”

“I think instead our goals are going to be about building confidence in the team and in the program and our work ethic.” Meredith Black, Women’s Lacrosse Coach

Like Zandlo, Black is not as concerned with wins right now as she is with ensuring that all players are ready and willing to compete. “I think instead our goals are going to be about building confidence in the team and in the program and our work ethic,” Black said. “For me, hustle is a top thing. Our goal will be to out-hustle our opponents each and every game, work harder and keep confident in what our abilities are and what we can do.” The coaches and players know how important sports are to Marquette culture. Since the addition of lacrosse to the list of Marquette’s varsity sports, the team has seen plenty of support from students and fans of the game. “I can already tell that we have a few fans because in classes I’ve seen people wearing Marquette lacrosse gear, so it’s really exciting that people actually enjoy the sport,” Muzika said. “You see a lot of people with their high school lacrosse stuff on. We have a lot of people trying out or just interested and waiting to see how we do.” Although the first game is not for some time, Black enjoys the enthusiasm the Marquette community has had in support of the new lacrosse program. “I’ve seen the fans and they love their teams; they love the school,” Black said. “The alumni love everything about it. They’re die-hard and they’re committed to the program and I think adding lacrosse is going to give them one more team to show that commitment and love for.”

Matt Trebby First pitches at Major League Baseball games are always fun, but none was sweeter than the one thrown out on Tuesday night at Wrigley Field. Whenever someone throws one right over the plate, you think to yourself, “Oh, that’s nice.” There aren’t many people, though, who are allowed to do something like that because of something they’ve done, endured and survived. Luke Strotman has been diagnosed with leukemia three times, and has survived each one. He’s earned it. After being visited by current Cubs players Tony Campana and Anthony Rizzo during his most recent fight, the Cubs sent him a video featuring Campana, Rizzo and the team’s owner, Tom Ricketts, inviting him to sit in the seat closest to the Cubs dugout and to throw out the first pitch at any game he wanted after he was cancer-free. After being diagnosed as cancerfree earlier this week, Luke, along with his brother, and co-founder of the Marquette basketball blog

“Paint Touches” Mark Strotman, and the rest of his family, headed to Wrigley for his ceremonial first pitch. Ironically, Luke is a Cubs fan and his brother is a Brewers fan, so the matchup between the two was perfect for the Strotman family. Mark’s work in making people aware of Luke’s situation has been absolutely incredible. Luke’s page has 1,373 likes on Facebook, and through Mark’s personal Twitter account and Paint Touches, he raised even more awareness. Also, through Marquette basketball message boards like Marquette Hoops and MU Scoop, Mark introduced even more people to Luke, and in the process got more and more people to start praying for his brother as he fought leukemia. On Luke’s Facebook page in mid- to late July, many people were posting their messages of encouragement. I don’t know if everyone knew him, and I doubt all of them did. I am sure there are many who heard about the fight Luke was up against and wanted to send their support. Someone like Luke who is up against something as awful as he was deserves as much support as he can gather, and thanks to his brother he got a whole lot more than he probably expected. I tweeted about the situation a few weeks ago expressing how amazing the work Mark has done for his brother is, but I didn’t think See Strotman, page 17


Sports

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Tribune 17

TRIBUNE Player of the Week

Sports Calendar

Friday 31

Sebastian Jansson

Friday 31

Women’s Soccer at Northwestern – 7 p.m.

Men’s Soccer vs. UIC - 7:05 p.m.

Fri.

31

Fri.

31

Sat.

Women’s Volleyball at Tennessee Tech - 4 p.m.

Women’s Volleyball at Ole Miss - 9 a.m.

Sun.

Sophomore Mid Fielder

2 Men’s Soccer at Drake - 2 p.m.

Mon.

1 Women’s Volleyball at Xavier - 3 p.m.

3

Women’s Soccer vs. Central Michigan - 1 p.m.

Fri.

7 Women’s Soccer at North Carolina - 4 p.m.

cross country

Juniors seem ready to step up All but one of 15 members healthy and able to run By Christopher Chavez christopher.chavez@marquette.edu

While Marquette’s crosscountry squad finished short of its goal of placing in the top 15 teams at the NCAA Great Lakes Regional in 2011 with a 17th place finish, this year’s team will have a similar goal and will be led by seniors Melissa Budelier and Christina Sliepka. Sliepka was among the faster runners for the women’s team in 2011. After running 40 to 60 miles per week over the summer, she is in good shape to stay at the front of the pack when the team lines up for its first meet at the NIU Huskie Invitational on Sept. 7. As a junior, Sliepka managed to to stay in the team’s top five at all seven of its meets. Budelier’s improvement over the years shows she is one of the hardest workers on the team. She arrived at Marquette in 2009 and ran a 5K — 3.1 miles — time of 21:08.9 and dropped it to 19.14.6 as a junior. “Her improvement rate has been outstanding,” coach Mike Nelson said. “She has improved leaps and bounds.”

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Both captains may have a lot to manage as leaders of the team, but in the classroom they are both in the process of applying to medical school. The seniors made their season debut at the Alumni Run on Aug. 25 with Budelier finishing 10th and Sliepka right behind her in 11th. With only a handful of practices with the team, the freshmen showed off their fitness after their summer workouts by having three freshmen in the team’s top five. The seniors have no issues with letting the underclassmen contribute to the team right away. “You don’t want that mentality from them thinking they can’t be as good as us, because they can be,” Sliepka said. “You want to encourage that, because there’s no reason why they can’t run with us.” The Alumni Run was only two miles, much shorter than the 5,000-meter and the 8,000-meter races coming up in the long season ahead. Budelier looked at the race as a tune-up and assessment after the summer. “It is a good starting point even though it’s not the same distances that we will be racing,” Budelier said. “It’s good to see where we’re at now, but that’s all it really is.” The juniors fared well in the race, and Nelson feels they are doing a good job of moving right

the facts Jansson’s miraculous goal with no time remaining gave Marquette a 3-2 win over Wisconsin-Milwaukee on Friday. It was Jansson’s third career game-winning goal and the first win over the Panthers since 2009. The Golden Eagles followed up that game with a 1-0 win over Green Bay on Sunday, snapping the Phoenix’s eight-game home winning streak.

up in the ranks and filling in for last year’s class. “I’ve really been impressed with the improvements of the junior class,” Nelson said. “All of them have moved up whether it’s 10 seconds faster or 20 seconds faster, they have all made improvements. I feel very good about their development.” From that class, Sarah Ball ran the fastest time at the 2011 Alumni Run with a time of 11:24. This year as juniors, the fastest time for their class was Holly Robertson with a time of 11:17. Four of the five members of that class started off 2012 with a faster start. At the moment, the team is looking very healthy with 14 of its 15 members running. Nelson reminds the team that at meets, sometimes it is not about which team has the fastest runners, but which can line up the most healthy ones. “If you line up seven healthy girls or guys, you’re automatically at an advantage. That’s a hard thing to do.” Nelson said. “That’s one of our main goals throughout the year is to stay healthy, progress and get to that regional meet healthy and full of fight.” As the Golden Eagles head into the season, they are in for several weeks of competition and challenging themselves, whether it is in workouts or at a championship meet.

Continued from page 16:

Strotman: Threw out first pitch at Wrigley on Tuesday I did it justice. So many people we all know are affected by some sort of cancer, so to hear about Luke’s third fight against leukemia and his success yet again is refreshing and puts a big smile on your face. A story of perseverance and determination like this would make anyone feel better. I’m by no means a Cubs fan, but it was absolutely phenomenal how the team got in contact with Luke and let him do something we all have dreamed about

doing. He more than earned it. If there’s one thing you should remember about this story, it should be to remain extremely grateful for those around you and those who are there for you when things get rough. And always stay strong when things get rough. There are people going through experiences like Luke’s who demonstrate true strength and determination and whom we all should admire. matthew.trebby@marquette.edu

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Thursday, August 30, 2012

Sports

Tribune 19

women’s volleyball

Experienced squad has sights set on Big East title

Photo by Rebecca Rebholz/rebecca.rebholz@marquette.edu

Junior libero Julie Jeziorowski, who had 20 digs in both matches against Bowling Green and Northwestern last weekend, believes the team’s plethora of home matches will help keep momentum going.

MU still looking to properly blend vets, newcomers By Patrick Leary patrick.leary@marquette.edu

In 2011, the Marquette women’s volleyball team shocked Western Kentucky in the first round of the NCAA tournament, recording its first tourney win in program history. But even after its best season, the team still wants to step forward in 2012. “The win at the NCAA tournament really lit a fire under our butts,” said senior middle hitter Dani Carlson. “We remember that, and we know we can do more. We see all of our teammates in the gym doing things that they didn’t do last year, and that just makes us more excited and brings more momentum to every game.” One of the trickiest tasks in

Things have been pretty ugly for the Sacramento Kings the last few years. Ever since Robert Horry knocked the life out of the Kings in the 2002 Western Conference Finals, the team has spiraled into irrelevance. The team was very close to moving to Anaheim before the beginning of last season, and its owners, Joe and Gavin Maloof, have proven to be more aloof than profitable the last few years. But that’s no excuse to allow your team’s website to go down for more than two months. That’s right. On June 15, kingsteamstore.com went dark, and fans that went to the “Shop” link on the Kings’ home

2012 for the Golden Eagles, picked second in the Big East preseason, will be replacing the powerful combination of outside hitters Ashley Beyer and Ciara Jones. But Carlson says that the team can overcome those tough losses with a new style. “We’re a different team this year in that we can grind out points,“ she said. “Last year it was really flashy, and that was awesome. Ciara and Beyer really took care of it and we could lean on them, but there are players stepping up.” Those players include freshman outside hitter Erin Lehman and junior setter Elizabeth Koberstein, who transferred from Kentucky to replace 2011 Big East setter of the year Chelsea Heier. So far in 2012, Lehman leads the team in kills, while Koberstein has relished in setting her up. “[Having Erin] is amazing, said junior libero Julie Jeziorowski. “I already feel like I can rely on

page got a black page with a phone number. “We had a company that was helping us with our website, and these are lean times in the economy,” Kings spokesman Chris Clark said. “They’re in business one day; the next day they’re gone.” Blaming the economy. Really original. It wasn’t until Wednesday, when CBS Sacramento reported the outage, that the team decided to send shoppers to the Kings section of the NBA.com store. The team promises that a new web store will be up within two weeks. michael.locicero@marquette.edu

her and it’s game one. She’s not a flashy player, but she’s not afraid. She’s very stable, and it’s important to be stable as an outside (hitter).” Coach Bond Shymansky compared Koberstein to Brett Favre because of how she “threads the needle” with her sets and makes plays nobody else would think to make. However, the key for the Golden Eagles in 2012 will be consistency across the backline. Jeziorowski and fellow junior defensive specialist Rachel Stier will need to play solidly and help bring along the younger players joining them in the back this year, like jack-of-all-trades player Lindsey Gosh (a sophomore) and freshman defensive specialist Ellie Rauch. “Rachel and I have been back there for so long,” Jeziorowski said, “that when we make a mistake or when someone gets an ace, we’re not going to let that

bring us down … the next play we’re going to make them pay for it.” Shymansky agreed that his leaders in the back will be especially important, since his coaching staff implemented some new tactics for this season. “Our new defensive system puts a lot of balls back up and creates a lot of scramble plays,” Shymansky said. “You have to learn to communicate through that and move on.” Across the frontline, the Golden Eagles have two solid veterans in Carlson and fifth-year senior right side hitter Holly Mertens. Those two are joined by Lehman, senior middle hitter Kelsey Mattai, and occasionally Gosh stepping up from the back. So far, Lehman has been the star, but she can thank her teammates for that. “Having them in the front row with me,” Lehman said, “they take a lot of the focus off of me so it makes it way easier for me

to get those kills … they’re just as big a part of my success as I am right now.” Marquette started well, sweeping Bowling Green on Friday before dropping a Sunday afternoon match to Northwestern. Shymansky isn’t worried though, saying games like Sundays are just part of the maturation process. “It just didn’t click right today,” Shymansky said. “Those tight two point games can expose some of your youth, and at times it can expose that this is where you’re at the beginning of the season.” However, Shymansky loves that he has young players stepping up around his veteran core. “That’s the good news,” Shymansky said. “We have new players in the lineup who are asserting themselves and are performing really well … as we keep going further in the season, they’re going to get more experienced and more comfortable.”

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Sports

20 Tribune

Thursday, August 30, 2012

golf

Swift ready to break out after successful summer

Sophomore was one of 156 who qualified for U.S. Amateur By Trey Killian robert.killian@marquette.edu

Summer is often looked at as a time of rest and relaxation before the trials of the school year return in the fall. But for sophomore golfer CJ Swift, it was a time for taking steps toward greatness. Swift competed amongst some of the best amateur golfers in the nation in several tournaments, the most prestigious being the 112th U.S. Amateur Championship at Cherry Hills Country Club in Cherry Hills Village, Colo., in August. Swift also made the cut by finishing in the runner-up spot at the TPC River Highlands qualifier after winning the New England Amateur Championship four days earlier. Spending a summer on the links is often connotated with recreation, but for Swift it meant adding accolades to not only his own name, but to the entire Marquette golf program. By qualifying for the Amateur Championship, the New Canaan, Conn., native’s name is now added to a list that includes former Marquette great Mike Van Sickle and legends of the game like Tiger Woods, Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus. “It’s really exciting and obviously

gives him a ton of confidence coming into the year,” coach Steve Bailey said. “(Swift) showed a lot of talent in his freshman year, but it was mostly spotty, and for him to have a summer like that, it’s very exciting for the program. The U.S. Amateur is the premier amateur event in the country and possibly the world.” Despite finishing first in the New England Championship with a 2-under-par 283, Swift said the U.S. Amateur provided the “coolest” experience. “Walking up to the first tee having my name called at the championship was pretty special,” Swift said. “Some pretty big names have won that trophy, and I was glad to be a part of that tournament. I hope to make it back for the rest of my career.” With Swift returning to compete for a team that struggled his freshman year, he and Bailey are both aware that his experiences have elevated him to a leadership position on the squad. “I think especially with four new guys coming in, they’re going to look up to him,” Bailey said. “It elevates everyone’s games as they’re all going to want to work to get to the level that he’s at.” Swift has already earned the envy of the Golden Eagles’ lone senior Ryan Prickette, who said Swift had done something that “we all have dreamed of.” “The fact he’s been somewhere where none of us have gives him a lot of respect

from us,” Prickette said. But while many would be boastful of such accomplishments, Swift keeps a level head. Prickette describes him as “really, really laid back” and more calm than most of the players on the team. To go with that cool demeanor is a smooth swing that Bailey compared

to that of pro golfer Fred Couples, minus the loafers. “If he can fine tune some stuff with his short game and get a lot more comfortable with a putter he’s in for a big year,” Bailey said. Swift’s off-season may have been phenomenal, but with the always challenging slate of fall

tournaments looming ahead, his skill will continue to be put to the test. With a burst of confidence and a knowledge of his own talent, however, Swift could be on the verge of one of the better seasons in recent memory by a Marquette golfer.

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Junior CJ Swift won the New England Amateur Championship just four days before qualifying for U.S. Amateur.

Men’s Soccer

UIC, Drake may prove difficult this weekend MU looking to avenge loss to Flames last year By Matt Trebby

matthew.trebby@marquette.edu

Photo by Danny Alfonzo/daniel.alfonzo@marquette.edu

Senior midfielder Anthony Selvaggi says the team has yet to reach its full potential and that more chances need to be taken.

While Marquette is 2-0-0 for the first time since 2000, the team knows there is plenty for it to improve upon. In victories against WisconsinMilwaukee and Wisconsin-Green Bay, there were periods in which the team was on its back foot. Marquette might be giving the ball away a bit more than it would like, and that is something it can improve upon. “What we’ve been talking about lately is just keeping the ball,” redshirt junior Adam Lysak said. “We kind of put ourselves in a hole when we give away the ball and have to chase, and the thing we can improve upon the most is definitely keeping the ball, especially in the offensive third.” One way to do that in the mind of the team’s head coach, Louis Bennett, is to get the ball to junior midfielder Bryan Ciesiulka more. Ciesiulka scored the first goal against Milwaukee and controlled the tempo against Green Bay. Bennett says there’s much more to Ciesiulka than most see and that he is one

of the country’s best. “He is a fantastic player,” Bennett said. “A lot of people see a quick, explosive guy but they don’t realize that he’s tactically very savvy and he has the ability, because he has a low center of gravity, of keeping the ball under pressure and playing simple.” One way to make the results a bit more assured is to take more chances. Marquette has out-shot its opponents in both games this season, and while it has scored four goals, there are still plenty left unscored. Senior winger Anthony Selvaggi has been one of the positives of the season so far and has been a consistent menace on the right wing. He says the team has yet to reach its potential and more chances need to be taken. “I think we haven’t had the best game yet that we can have,” Selvaggi said. “Attacking-wise we definitely need to put the ball in the back of the net more. As a team offensively, the chances are there, and it’s just a matter of capitalizing on them.” This weekend, Marquette starts its weekend off by hosting Illinois-Chicago. The Flames beat the Golden Eagles last season in the team’s first game of the season, 2-1 in Chicago. The Flames have a few impressive players, including senior midfield playmaker Ivan

Stanisavljevic, who has been predicted by many to be the Horizon League’s player of the year. Bennett expects a tough challenge from the Flames and says he has an idea of what type of style his team will be up against. “They like to get separation,” Bennett said. “The minute they lose it, they drop back to keep you in front of them. Then as soon as they’ve got you in front of them, they try to keep you there, and then they’ll break.” On Sunday, the team heads to Des Moines, Iowa to take on Drake. Bennett says the team will be challenged on the trip. “Going to Drake and winning at Drake will be very difficult,” Bennett said. “It will be high energy. They play off campus at a community field. It’s fast and furious and will be very difficult.” One huge difference for the team this season is that all of its players are fit. Unlike last season, they all can train together, a huge difference from barely having enough for training last season. Now, the team can get play together more and be even better than last season. “It makes a world of difference,” Lysak said. “You can go into practice and everyone is fit and no one is leaving because of a cramp or leaving games early because they’re running out of air or their muscles just can’t handle it.”

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The Marquette Tribune, Aug. 30, 2012