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Soccer kicks off season with solid stable of seniors

EDITORIAL: University’s new alcohol policy lacks necessary details

Tyler Brewster tells the story of his balcony fall

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SPJ’s 2010 Best All-Around Non-Daily Student Newspaper

Volume 97, Number 1

Monday, August 27, 2012

www.marquettetribune.org

Summer assaults rekindle familiar discussions, concerns

MU toughens up alcohol policies New rules add fines for drinking, drug use around campus By Melanie Lawder melanie.lawder@marquette.edu

Tribune File Photo

Two Marquette women were allegedly assaulted while studying abroad in Cagli, Italy in a journalism program.

Journalism trip the latest in a series of similar incidents By Allison Kruschke and Pat Simonaitis allison.kruscke@marquette.edu patrick.simonaitis@marquette.edu

The Marquette community was shaken this summer by its third high profile sexual assault incident in two years when two students were allegedly assaulted while on a Marquette-sponsored study abroad

program in Cagli, Italy. The assaults allegedly occurred between May 25 and June 9 while students were participating in a digital storytelling program through the College of Communication. According to William Thorn, an associate professor of journalism and the program’s director, both cases involved fe-

male Marquette student victims and known, non-Marquette affiliated acquaintances and occurred at a local restaurant and bar. Upon learning of the alleged assaults, administrators in charge of the trip took immediate See Abroad, page 8

Upon learning of the alleged assaults, administrators in charge of the trip took immediate action, informing parents of the allegations.

Monetary fines for conduct violations were implemented as part of an updated alcohol policy by the Division of Student Affairs this semester. Christopher Miller, vice president of student affairs, sent an email Tuesday notifying students of the policy change, stating that fines were enacted to reduce damage done on campus due to alcohol and drugs. “The safety, security and wellbeing of all our students remains our highest priority,” Miller said in the email. The new alcohol policy categorizes offenses by severity into four categories from least severe, A, to most severe, D. Fines range from $50 to $750 and increase with the seriousness of the offense and the number of times a student has already violated the alcohol policy. Students will also receive a university warning, probation or suspension, depending on the offense committed. The funds collected from the fines will be used for the university’s drug and alcohol prevention programming. Erin Lazzar, assistant dean of students, said the purpose of the fines is to deter high-risk alcohol use through “clearly articulated and consistently enforced policy with published sanctions that students can anticipate.”

The university has also added a complicity policy, which requires that students leave situations in which rules are being broken. Penalties for complicit students are unspecified. When restructuring the policy, Marquette studied the successes of other universities which have used fines in their alcohol policies. Specifically, Lazzar said Marquette consulted with administrators at Boston College, Georgetown University, Loyola University at Chicago, St. Louis University, Santa Clara University and the University of San Francisco. “The new policy is only part of a continuous, comprehensive approach to addressing and responding to and preventing high-risk alcohol use,” Lazzar said. She emphasized the importance of having a uniform penalty that all students can expect. The majority of the offenses listed in the new policy apply to those who are under 21 or live in university–owned housing, however several of the offenses are applicable to students of legal drinking age who live off-campus. The two violations that affect those over 21 are “intoxication of a person, regardless of legal drinking age” and “providing or selling alcohol to a person under 21.” Lazzar said students who are of age and consuming alcohol are at risk of violating the policy only if their behavior puts themselves or others at risk. Students hosting an off-campus party or gathering with younger students present and consuming alcohol may be in violation of the new See Alcohol, page 7

So long, Father Naus! Beloved Jesuit now retired Campus-wide celebration to honor 49 years of service By Elise Angelopulos elise.angelopulos@marquette.edu

Though the Rev. John Naus will retire from Marquette this year after working at the university for nearly 50 years, his presence on campus will be well

remembered by students. There will be a campus-wide celebration tomorrow at 11 a.m. in the Alumni Memorial Union ballrooms to honor Naus’s retirement, according to a university press release. Naus was an ethics professor, as well as both the director and dean of students of Campus Ministry. He also served as the hall minister of Schroeder Hall for 28 years. After attending Marquette University High School, Naus

INDEX

DPS REPORTS.....................2 CALENDAR.......................2 STUDY BREAK....................5

VIEWPOINTS......................10 SPORTS..........................14 CLASSIFIEDS..................16

was ordained a priest in 1955. He graduated from the Gregorian University in Rome, Italy, in 1955, where he received a doctorate in philosophy. He was diagnosed with polio in 1944 after coming into contact with polluted water. In 2004, he had a stroke, which confined him to a wheelchair. Students like Elizabeth Thalanany, a junior in the College of Nursing, said they see Naus as a Tribune File Photo

See Naus, page 7

Naus was best known for his Tuesday night Mass at St. Joan of Arc Chapel.

News

Viewpoints

SPORTS

Shooting

CAMPBELL

Monarch

One Sikh victim’s nephew remembers his uncle. PAGE 4

Caroline gives real advice to the Class of 2016. PAGE 10

A men’s basketball assistant coach was relieved of his duties. PAGE 14


News

2 Tribune

Monday, August 27, 2012

DPS Reports

News in Brief PRESIDENTIAL HOPEFUL Mitt Romney and Janesville native Paul Ryan will wait to begin events at the Republican National Convention while Tampa, Fla. is under a tropical storm watch. The GOP made the announcement late Saturday evening and convention spokesman James Davis said organizers were closely monitoring the storm’s path. The opening night party Sunday was not affected by the delay, but convention organizers canceled a night performance of Lynyrd Skynyrd. Monday’s events postponed and will resume Tuesday, reducing length of the convention. Heavy wind and rain is forecast to hit the Florida Keys and the Gulf Coast Monday. Florida Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican, declared a state of emergency and canceled his plans to attend convention events Sunday and Monday. ---------------------DR. RALPH DEL COLLE, a Marquette associate professor of theology, passed away July 29 at age 57. He is survived by his wife and two children. Del Colle served in the department of theology for 17 years and specialized in the study of Jesus, the Holy Spirit, grace and the Trinity. His scholarly work, especially on the Holy Spirit, made significant contributions to the field of systematic theology, which attempts to create an organized and coherent account of the Christian faith and beliefs. Del Colle served as a representative for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops to the CatholicPentecostal Dialogue for the Pontifical Council on Christian Unity for 12 years.

THE U.S. ANTI-DOPING Agency issued Lance Armstrong a lifetime ban from professional cycling and vacated the champion biker’s seven Tour de France victories last Thursday. According to ESPN.com, the USADA based the decision on prepared testimony by more than a dozen witnesses who claimed to have “firsthand experience and/ or knowledge” of performanceenhancing activity in which Armstrong and teammates participated throughout his career. In a statement released Thursday night, Armstrong remained adamant that he has always abided by the rules in place by the governing bodies of professional cycling but that he would cease fighting against the allegations brought against him to focus on his charity work. ---------------------NEIL ARMSTRONG, the Apollo 11 commander who became the first man to walk on the moon July 21, 1969, died Saturday at age 82. Armstrong died from “complications resulting from cardiovascular procedures,” according to a statement released by his family. President Barack Obama issued a statement Saturday calling Armstrong “among the greatest American heroes, not just of his time, but of all time.” Armstrong was known as a quiet and reserved man, described in a USA Today obituary as “a self-described nerd (who) downplayed his celebrity status.” A Navy fighter pilot in the Korean War, Armstrong will be most remembered for his epic statement upon stepping down on the moon: “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

APPLE WAS AWARDED more than a billion dollars in damages from Samsung Friday when the latter company was found to have infringed on “a series of popular smartphone and tablet features — from the rounded rectangle shape to the way screens slide and bounce to the touch — (which) are proprietary Apple innovations,” according to an Aug. 24 Washington Post article. According to multiple sources, Apple is likely to file an injunction against Samsung’s continued sale of infringing devices in the coming days, with a hearing on the issue in the coming months. ----------------------

CHICAGO’S GUN violence has taken a back seat, despite harrowing numbers in recent days, to several shooting sprees dominating national headlines in recent weeks and months. But the Huffington Post reported Saturday that 19 people were shot and injured last Thursday night and into early Friday morning across the city. Those numbers included 13 shootings during a 30-minute stretch, which included a drive-by shooting that wounded seven men and one woman ranging from 1420 years old. One Saturday, multiple news sources — including the Chicago Tribune and the Huffington Post — reported that four people were killed and another 13 were wounded overnight Friday and into Saturday morning. One victim, the Tribune reported, was a 15-year-old girl who was listed in critical condition Saturday. The Huffington Post wrote on Aug. 24 that “authorities have been battling an increase in homicides in the city, where some aldermen complain gangs have no fear of the police.”

Trib 2.0

Wednesday, Aug. 22 Between 1:50 a.m. and 2:05 a.m. DPS observed a suspicious vehicle in the 1500 block of W. Wells St. MPD was contacted and stated that the vehicle was reported as stolen. MPD is investigating. At 9:36 a.m. an employee reported that unknown person(s) removed unsecured, unattended university property estimated at $1,000 from Valley Fields. MPD was contacted. At 10:40 a.m. an employee reported that unknown person(s) removed her secured, unattended property estimated at $12 from McCormick Hall. Thursday, Aug. 23 At 12:05 a.m. an underage student was in possession of alcohol in the 900 block of N. 15th St. and was cited by MPD.

At 9:20 a.m. a student reported that unknown person(s) removed his unsecured, unattended property estimated at $155 from O’Donnell Hall. At 3:55 p.m. a person not affiliated with Marquette trespassed outside the Alumni Memorial Union and was cited by MPD. At 11:38 p.m. two underage students hosted a party where alcohol was served in the 1500 block of W. Kilbourn Ave. MPD was contacted. Friday, Aug. 24 At 2:33 a.m. a person not affiliated with Marquette battered another person not affiliated with Marquette in the 2000 block of W. Wisconsin Ave. DPS detained the suspect, who was taken into custody by MPD.

Events Calendar AugUST 2012 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday 27 Brady Street Food Tour, Brady Street, 11:45 a.m.

“Gutenberg! The Musical!” Milwaukee Repertory Theater, 6:30 p.m. “Live at Peck Pavilion- Frank Da’Ambrosio’s Broadway,” Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m. The Erotic Adventures of the Static Chicken, The Jazz Estate, 10 p.m.

Wednesday 29

“The Lucky 13 Open Mic Comedy Show,” Carte Blanche Studies, 8 p.m.

Clam Bake, Motor Bar & Restaurant, 5 p.m.

“Open Mic Night with Misha Siegfried,” Up and Under Pub, 9 p.m.

“Nights On The Nines,” River Club of Mequon, 5:30 p.m.

Tuesday 28 Father Naus Retirement Celebration, AMU Monaghan Ballroom, 11 a.m.

Tosa Tonight Concert: “Calli Dollinger & The Dusters,” Rotary Performance Pavilion, 6 p.m.

Contact Us and Corrections The Marquette Tribune welcomes questions, comments, suggestions and notification of errors that appear in the newspaper. Contact us at (414) 288-5610 or editor@marquettetribune.org.

Happy first day of classes!

THE

TRIB Unbelievabubble.


Monday, August 27, 2012

News

Tribune 3

MU to debut new Turning licenses into jobs Attendees offered LGBT resources chance to repay fines, New center to offer dialogue on gender, will open Sept. 11 By Eric Oliver eric.oliver@marquette.edu

Marquette’s Gender and Sexuality Center will celebrate its opening on September 11, featuring remarks by University President, the Rev. Scott Pilarz and the center’s director, Susannah Bartlow. It will also be open for all students to use. The center is a product of the Gender Resource Task Force, headed by university Provost John Pauly. The center has been in development since 2008, when the idea was brought to Pauly by faculty members during his first semester as provost. The mission statement of the center explains its purpose in providing dialogue, empowerment and education on gender, sex and sexuality. Bartlow said the mission statement’s meaning is up to interpretation. Bartlow sees a significant part of her job as working with the Marquette community to give it what it wants to see out of the center. She hopes the center will be a place of discussion and support for every type of student. Bartlow said the center’s staff believes it will pull the various events that are happening around campus together for the LGBTQ community and provide a centralized place where students can come together to learn about and celebrate diversity. “People are really looking for someone to help pull together all the different things that are already happening,” Bartlow said. “One thing people have said they wanted is a bridge space, someone to help coordinate and kind of pull things together. So my job is to get to know what those things are and build partnerships so I can do that effectively.” After working with various task forces and with the support of both former and current university presidents, Pauly watched the center become the place it is today. “People are very excited about this,” Pauly said. “This is an important moment for Marquette.” Pauly added that the center could provide solutions to many of the problems the Gender Resource Task Force faced. “When the task force was doing its work they said we need to find more direct ways to deal with

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issues such as sexual violence,” Pauly said. “We need to find ways to affirm and support LGBTQ students (on) issues of identity and to pay attention to climate issues as those students and faculty experience them. And then just in general to see if we can put more energy into the study of gender and sexuality as a topic.” Ed de St. Aubin, a Marquette associate professor of psychology, has been working with the center since its conception and said he thinks the center will play a crucial role in the development of a more inclusive environment at Marquette. “What they need today may not be the same as what they’ll need 12 years from now,” de St. Aubin said. Bartlow, de St. Aubin and Pauly all say support for the center is high and that they’ve met very little resistance along the way. De St. Aubin said it was not an easy task trying to open the center on a Jesuit campus, but he was impressed by the administration’s readiness for this change.

get driver’s education By Moni que Collins monique.collins@marquette.edu

The Center for Driver’s License Recovery and Employability held a driver’s license recovery event at Goodwill Industries of Southeastern Wisconsin last Saturday. The event was also sponsored by state and private organizations such as Wisconsin Community Services, Legal Action of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Area Technical College and the City of Milwaukee Municipal Court. The organizations’ goals are to assist low-income individuals in finding resources that can help them recover their driver’s licenses, to restore free driver’s education for low-income individuals, to improve public policy and to increase community awareness about the barriers created by revoked or suspended driver’s licenses. “The state is working together to give the people resources,” said Reginald Newson, secretary of the Wisconsin Department of

Workforce Development. “When people don’t know what resources they have, they can’t do what they need to do.” The latest event helped individuals figure out what transportationrelated fines they had on their record through the Department of Transportation and the Milwaukee Municipal Court. After determining an amount, individuals were put on the track toward payment. Newson said he believes revoked and suspended driver’s licenses are the biggest barrier to employment in Wisconsin. “Not only do people need their license to get to work, a lot of the time jobs require you to have a driver’s license before they’ll even consider hiring you,” Newson said. “When we help the people, they help the community, which helps the city, which is beneficial for the state. It’s all connected.” Cheryl Lightholder, manager of communication for one of Goodwill’s Workforce Connection Centers and volunteer at the event, agrees with Newson and believes events such as this one are a step in the right direction. “The best part is being able to help people get jobs so they can contribute to the community,” Lightholder said.

With over 500 individuals attending the event, Lightholder said she believes it was a success. According to Lightholder, there were about 350 pre-registered attendees and about 220 walk-ins. Those that came after capacity were given additional information and resources to help. Richard McKenzie, one of the pre-registered attendees, was enrolled by his parole officer. “Some people, like me, don’t know what to do,” McKenzie said. “I thought my fines were a lot higher than they turned out to be, and without this event, I wouldn’t have known at all.” McKenzie said he thinks many Wisconsin residents neglect to pay their fines for various reasons. “We’ve got bills to pay, children to take care of,” McKenzie said. “This is going to make it easier for people to do those things and still get their licenses back.” The center will hold another event in October when many of the walk-ins that were turned away can come and get the process started. “We’re constantly learning,” Newson said. “We’re learning what works and what doesn’t so we can make it better for Milwaukee residents the next time we do it.”


News

4 Tribune

Monday, August 27, 2012

Four months later, fallen student still recovering Tyler Brewster improving after months of therapy By Jacob Born jacob.born@marquette.edu

Photo by Alyce Peterson/alyce.peterson@marquette.edu

Brewster fell three stories from his 1504 W. Kilbourn Ave. apartment.

In the early morning hours Friday, May 4, Tyler Brewster was on his third floor apartment’s balcony at 1504 W. Kilbourn Ave. with his roommate. Neither of them had been drinking alcohol. Brewster took a piece of rotting wood from the balcony and tossed it into a dumpster below. As he did, the balcony’s railing gave out, and Brewster toppled more than 30 feet onto the concrete sidewalk, narrowly missing a set of concrete steps. The now-senior in the College of Nursing was rushed by ambulance to the Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, where doctors pronounced him in critical condition. He was suffering from a epidural hematoma, which is bleeding between the brain and the skull, and had broken vertebrae and a fractured jaw. “I don’t remember any of it,” Brewster said. “I remember waking up in the hospital, but the first few days are foggy.” Brewster spent three days in the intensive care unit and a week in the

hospital. He continues to recover today, aided by months of physical therapy. Brewster can easily walk and sit down to talk, but he still has nerve damage in his neck and shoulder. “I’m obviously doing pretty good, but I do have therapy that I’m still doing,” Brewster said. “I was in therapy for six weeks this summer, and a lot if it has been on my own. Now it’s just stretching and (loosening) up my muscles.” Brewster’s insurance paid for his hospital bills, and his parents are currently suing Shovers Realty, the owner of the Balcony Apartments building where he lived, for compensation. In an email, a spokesperson for the company said the company is glad to hear Brewster is recovering well but declined to comment further. Shovers has taken steps to fix up the apartments. The company put steel bars on the balconies overlooking Kilbourn Avenue, but some current residents of apartments are not pleased by the overall effort for tenants. “Shover will not come over and fix my broken door knob, but they will come over and tell us how many people we can have in our apartment,” said Nathan Bilodeau, a junior in the College of Business and a tenant of Brewster’s former apartment. ”There’s not a

communication problem; there’s a getting stuff done problem.” The city of Milwaukee sends inspectors to all properties that house students around the city, according to its website. Specifically, inspectors look for many potentially defective aspects of the properties, including porch supports, guardrails or handrails and porch floors. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported on May 4 that Shovers said its building was up to code. There are still, however, planks of wood rotting away on the balconies, just like the one Brewster tossed into the dumpster before he fell. And in place of the collapsed railing there now rests a plank of wood screwed into the balcony ledges, and a bigger piece of wood to cover the hole that used to be the rest of the railing. “We try to be careful out here. This really isn’t the best fix-up,” said Taylor Baxa, a junior in the College of Business Administration and Bilodeau’s roommate. Bilodeau agreed, saying he does not feel safe being on the balcony. “Everyone (who) lives in these off-campus houses knows it’s not going to be the nicest place you’ve ever lived,” Bilodeau said. “I’ve got to expect there are going to be some problems. I’m not really affected by it, but I am glad that Tyler is doing OK.”

Nephew of Sikh temple pres. remembers uncle

Photo by Alyce Peterson/alyce.peterson@marquette.edu

Many public figures have offered their support to the Sikh community, including Michelle Obama, who visited Thursday.

Local community still showing support after Aug. 5 shooting By Joe Kaiser joseph.kaiser@marquette.edu

Members of the Milwaukee community are helping victims of the Aug. 5 shooting at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek move forward after a gunman killed seven, including himself, and injured four more. Among the victims was the founder of the temple, Satwant

Singh Kaleka, 65, whose nephew, Shehbaz Kaleka, is a Marquette sophomore in the College of Communication. “(Our family is) doing pretty good,” Kaleka said. “My mom and my aunt took it the hardest. We tried not to think about it. We tried to divert our attention.”

Kaleka said there have been many functions to remember his uncle and that the Milwaukee community has been helpful through the entire grieving process. “(The Milwaukee community) has been really supportive,” Kaleka said. Shrinivas Joshi, a Marquette professor of electrical and computer engineering, is part of the effort to help the victims’ families, which includes support through fundraising. “We had a meeting where all the community people came together and began to raise funds,” Joshi said. “We have raised $25,000 so far.” Joshi pointed out one family in particular that had recently moved from India and is in need of financial assistance. “One of the priests (and victims) was about 39 years old,” Joshi said. “His wife and son and daughter had come here two months ago from India and they are left helpless now. (But) they are holding up very well – they are very courageous (and) very composed. Everybody has rallied together.” Though he is not a Sikh, Joshi, a Hindu, said all Indian-Americans were affected by the shooting because of the close relation between the Hindu and Sikh faiths. Joshi said the community support is an ongoing process and that the Sikh people are generally “a very hardworking, very courageous and very generous people.”

Kaleka said he has positive memories of his uncle. “He was a really caring guy,” Kaleka said. “He was always at the temple. Even the day he died he was there early, praying.” He also noted that the entire Milwaukee area felt the effects of the event, citing the quick response and support from locals. “(The shooting) started at about 10:30 in the morning,” Joshi said. “By that evening, there was a vigil downtown. Everybody from Milwaukee (was supportive). Not just people from India, no matter what color or race. It’s very heartwarming.” University President the Rev. Scott Pilarz issued a statement on behalf of the university on Aug. 6 including a prayer that reads, “May our spirit of respect, tolerance, civility and unity be strengthened as we come together this day.” Other notable public figures to offer their support include President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama, Gov. Scott Walker, and former Gov. and current U.S. Senate candidate Tommy Thompson. Oak Creek police had previously said they did not know gunman Wade Michael Page’s motives, though NBC News has reported that Page, who shot himself in the head after being shot in the stomach by a police officer during the incident, had connections to white supremacy and neo-Nazi groups.

The Marquette Tribune Editorial

Editor-in-Chief Andrew Phillips (414) 288-7246 Managing Editor Maria Tsikalas (414) 288-6969 NEWS (414) 288-5610 News Editor Pat Simonaitis Projects Editor Allison Kruschke Assistant Editors Sarah Hauer, Joe Kaiser, Matt Gozun Investigative Reporter Jenny Zahn Administration Melanie Lawder College Life Elise Angelopulos Consumer Ryan Ellerbusch Crime/DPS Nick Biggi Metro Monique Collins MUSG/Student Orgs. Ben Greene Politics Alexandra Whittaker

Science & Health Eric Oliver General Assignment Jacob Born COPY DESK Copy Chief Alec Brooks Copy Editors Jacob Born, Patrick Leary, Erin Miller, Ashley Nickel VIEWPOINTS (414) 288-7940 Viewpoints Editor Tessa Fox Editorial Writers Katie Doherty, Tessa Fox Columnists Caroline Campbell, Brooke Goodman, Tony Manno MARQUEE (414) 288-3976 Editor Matt Mueller Assistant Editor Erin Heffernan Reporters Claire Nowak, Peter Setter, Eva Sotomayor

SPORTS (414) 288-6964 Editor Michael LoCicero Assistant Editor Trey Killian Reporters Matt Trebby, Chris Chavez, Patrick Leary, Kyle Doubrava Sports Columnists Matt Trebby, Mike LoCicero VISUAL CONTENT Design Editor Rob Gebelhoff Photo Editor Alyce Peterson News Designers Martina Ibanez, Kaitlin Moon Sports Designers Haley Fry, Taylor Lee Marquee Designer Maddy Kennedy Photographers Danny Alfonzo, Rebecca Rebholz

STUDENT MEDIA INTERACTIVE

Director Erin Caughey Content Manager Alex Busbee Technical Manager Michael Andre Reporters Stephanie Grahm, Victor Jacobo, Brynne Ramella, Eric Ricafrente, Ben Sheehan Designer Eric Ricafrente Programmer Jake Tarnow Study Abroad Blogger Andrea Anderson

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(414) 288-1738 Advertising Director Anthony Virgilio Sales Manager Jonathan Ducett Creative Director Joe Buzzelli Classified Manager Grace Linden

The Marquette Tribune is a wholly owned property of Marquette University, the publisher. The Tribune serves as a student voice for the university and gives students publishing experience and practice in journalism, advertising, and management and allied disciplines. The Tribune is written, edited, produced and operated solely by students with the encouragement and advice of the advisor and business manager, who are university employees. The banner typeface, Ingleby, is designed by David Engelby and is available at dafont.com. David Engelby has the creative, intellectual ownership of the original design of Ingleby. The Tribune is normally published Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, during the academic year by Marquette Student Media, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881. First copy of paper is free; additional copies are $1 each. Subscription rate: $50 annually. Phone: (414) 288-7246. Fax: (414) 2883998.


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Monday, August 27, 2012

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Monday, august 27, 2012

ACROSS

CARMEN SANDIEGO CARMEN SANDIEGO

Tribune 5

  1 Pacific Island group   6 More than impressed 10 Some add it to the fire 14 Praise to the skies 15 Oliver Twist’s entreaty 16 Actress Bancroft 17 Jargon of a particular field 18 “___ go bragh” ACROSS 1  9 1  Fawn’s father Pacific Island group 2  0 6  Outdoor bazaar More than impressed 2 12 with a long tail 0  Monkey Some add it to the fire 2 13 in one part of a triath4  Participate Praise to the skies  15  lon Oliver Twist’s entreaty 2 14 6  Biceps band Actress Bancroft 2 16 7  Tick off Jargon of a particular field 3 10 hole card 8  Good “___ go bragh” 3 11 9  Asian tongue Fawn’s father 3 22 with “high pressure” 0  Word Outdoor bazaar 3 23 temperature (was feverish) 2  ___ Monkey with a long tail 3 25 for pigs 3  Digs Participate in one part of a triath 39 Gain lon wisdom (with “up”) 4 21 around the bend 4  Send Biceps band 4 23 Injures 6  Tick off 4 34 Verdi opera 0  1871 Good hole card 4 36 awful smell 1  An Asian tongue 4 37 down with 2  Came Word with “high pressure” 4 39 with “understanding” 3  Prefix ___ temperature (was feverish) 5 30 5  Proboscis Digs for pigs  39  Gain wisdom (with “up”)  41  Send around the bend  43  Injures  44  1871 Verdi opera  46  An awful smell  47  Came down with  49  Prefix with “understanding”  50  Proboscis

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1 How seaweed might be washed 5 54 Extinct New Zealand birds 56 Beach ball? 57 Feature of a dim-witted person 63 Stops waffling 64 Edible Pacific tuber 6 55 with ropers and riders 1  Event How seaweed might be washed 6 56 4  Complimentary Extinct New Zealand birds 6 57 a tiger in your tank” gas 6  “Put Beach ball?  57  brand Feature of a dim-witted person 6 68 3  Collect Stops little by little 69 Small amounts waffling 7 60 4  Cause Edible a stench 71 Make happy Pacific tuber  65  Event with ropers and riders  66  Complimentary  67  “Put a tiger in your tank” gas  DOWN brand   61 (popular book genre) 8  ___-help Collect little by little   62 between a stem and a 9  Angle Small amounts  70  branch Cause a stench   73 of beasts’ crowning glory 1  King Make happy   4 One of Chekhov’s “three sisters”   5 Molecule parts   6 Bits and pieces of U.S. history  7 Laborers DOWN    8 of the Great Lakes 1  One ___-help (popular book genre)    9 of hygiene 2  Type Angle between a stem and a  branch   3  King of beasts’ crowning glory   4  One of Chekhov’s “three sisters”   5  Molecule parts   6  Bits and pieces of U.S. history   7  Laborers   8  One of the Great Lakes   9  Type of hygiene

0 On-screen effect 1 11 Up to the time that 12 Related on Mom’s side 13 On the up-and-up 21 Fully up-to-date 25 Poison-ivy reaction 26 Pulverize potatoes 2 17 Friend ___” (Martin-Lewis 0  “My On-screen effect  11  film) Up to the time that 2 18 2  Bully’s weapon Related on Mom’s side 2 19 3  Rural abodes On the 34 Novel that isn’t read up-and-up 3 26 1  “European” opening Fully up-to-date 3 27 5  Film Poison-ivy reaction headaches  26  director’s Pulverize potatoes 3 28 7  Dusty dry “My Friend ___” (Martin-Lewis  40 Old film)Russian monarch 4 22 of spray for allergies 8  Kind Bully’s weapon 4 25 Involve deeply 9  Rural abodes 4 38 4  More adroit Novel that isn’t read 5 31 above the rooftops 6  Floating “European” opening 5 32 7  Old FilmToyota model 53 Despised director’s headaches 5 35 8  Twilled fabric Dusty dry 5 48 ___, private!” 0  “At Old Russian monarch 5 49 2  “___ Flanders” Kind of spray for allergies 6 40 5  Concept Involve deeply 6 41 ice, as a drink 8  Without More adroit 6 52 1  Over Floating above the rooftops  52  Old Toyota model  53  Despised  55  Twilled fabric  58  “At ___, private!”  59  “___ Flanders”  60  Concept  61  Without ice, as a drink  62  Over

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stay cool!


Monday, August 27, 2012 Continued from page 1:

Naus: always promoted

‘caring community’ friendly and honest man. “Everyone seems to love him here,” Thalanany said. “Anytime I’m at the AMU, he pulls up his chair to some students and everyone is just laughing and all smiles. I think students will really miss that.” Trevor Gundlach, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, knows Naus well, as he has participated in campus ministry since his freshman year. “Without Fr. Naus, Marquette will miss one of its greatest icons of true Ignatian spirituality,” Gundlach said. “Whether it be Tuesday night Masses or sporadic encounters with Fr. Naus around campus, he will be greatly missed.” Naus celebrated the 10 p.m. Tuesday night Mass at the Joan of Arc Chapel for more than 25 years, making it perhaps the most recognized and attended Mass on campus. Meghan Mountin, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, loves frequenting the Tuesday night Mass and appreciates Naus’ devotion to Marquette and love for its students. Gundlach agreed, and said Naus’ Mass was simply the “most joyous occasion.” “Being able to witness Fr.

Naus celebrating the Mass every week and hearing his simple yet love-provoking homilies will remain in the minds and hearts of students,” Gundlach said. Mountin added that Naus’s Mass and persona are uplifting and have helped her escape the hectic nature of the school week by providing time for reflection, good music and valuable conversations with friends. While Naus is no longer on campus, Gundlach said the facility in which Naus now resides, the St. Camillus nursing home in Wauwatosa, promotes a “caring community.” Thalanany, who never shared a connection with Naus as intimate as Gundlach’s, said she wishes the best for the retiree. “Whether you knew him or not, Naus was a familiar face at Marquette, and that will never change,” Thalanany said. Gundlach expects Naus’s spirit to continue to thrive at Marquette this fall. “His ideas of love and genuine joy will remain present on campus,” Gundlach said. “Students will always be able to see him in these simple yet beautiful actions.”

Whether you knew him or not, Naus was a familiar face at Marquette, and that will never change. Elizabeth Thalanany, Junior, College of Communication

News

Tribune 7

New website links student orgs to students in cyberspace Involvement Link will feature calendar, links to social media By Ben Greene benjamin.greene@marquette.edu

One of the most valuable, albeit cliché, pieces of advice that every college student is guaranteed to hear is the simple phrase “get involved.” This year, Marquette Student Government is teaming up with the Office of Student Development to make it easier for students to do just that. For the past year, OSD has been working to bring all 257 student organizations on campus together using the new Involvement Link website, according to Matt Lengen, Marquette’s coordinator for student organizations and leadership. “We have all of our organizations on the page, so now we’re actually starting to have them register their events and use the site as a resource,” Lengen said. He said Involvement Link is “a student’s one-stop-shop for involvement opportunities on campus, as well as events that are happening.” Johanna Anderson, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences and the president of Marquette’s Yoga Club, praised the site’s consolidation efforts.

“It’s a good central location for all of the information for everyone on the E-board and members of the club,” she said. “You don’t have six different people receiving emails from four different places and trying to communicate it all. It’s right there.” Along with OSD, MUSG has played a major role in the launching of Involvement Link by funding half of the project. MUSG’s financial vice president, Brittany Riesenbeck, a junior in the College of Business Administration, likened the new website to “a social networking site specifically for Marquette students who want to be involved.” Like many other social networks, Involvement Link offers its users the ability to link their page to Facebook, Twitter, and their own organization’s website. Meghann Rosenwald, the president of Active Minds, a campus group that hopes to remove the stigma surrounding mental health issues, expects this feature to help her group spread its message. Rosenwald is a junior in the College of Health Sciences. “We’re changing the conversation about mental health,” she said, “and (students) can check out all of our Facebook and Twitter stuff through this one website, so you don’t need to go to a million different websites to go see what we do.”

Both Rosenwald and Riesenbeck said they are pleased with the OSD’s utilization of the new platform, which should help the university stay current and offer a more convenient alternative to traditional methods. “We’re all moving towards the cyber age; everything is moving online ... and so we learned that Involvement Link will help Marquette (better) connect with student organizations,” Riesenbeck said. One of the website’s key features is its interactive event calendar, which shows a digital bulletin board with event flyers highlighting upcoming campus events. “Students can see what’s happening on a weekly basis, or even a monthly basis,” Lengen said. “They can sort by event, they can sort by event type, event category, even organization if you just wanted to know what a certain organization was doing.” With more than 2,000 Marquette students on the rosters for 257 student organizations according to Lengen, Involvement Link is poised to be the predominant resource for student involvement in the upcoming year. “Some people can’t always make it to O-Fest,” Rosenwald said, “but (Involvement Link) is like a virtual O-Fest all the time.” Check out the website at marquette.collegiatelink.net.

Continued from page 1:

Alcohol: Concerns raised by former student conduct board member policy and could incur a $500 fine and probation or suspension. Dean of Students Stephanie Quade said the new policy arose from the university’s annual revision of school policies and as a response to the feedback the administrators have received from Marquette students asking for a stricter and more consistent response to drug and alcohol use. High-risk alcohol and drug use among Marquette students has been on the rise since 2009, according to the 2011 Campus Crime Statistics Report. There was a 7.5 percent increase in drug- or alcohol-related campus disciplinary referrals from 2009 to 2010. Educational assignments and the course “Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students” will continue to be used by the student conduct board when applicable. The university also updated its drug policy with a similar but stricter, three-category system. Penalties also increase

Illustrator by Taylor Lee and Maddy Kennedy/taylor.lee@marquette.edu, madeline.kennedy@marquette.edu

with multiple offenses. Some students believe the fines will taint the educational aspect of the process. Anthony Fabris, a senior in the College of Business Administra-

tion, has served as a chair facilitator on the student conduct board for two years. Fabris is concerned that students will be less likely to use university resources, such as the Department of Public Safety,

because of the new penalties. He also believes the new fines will both shift the environment of the student conduct board hearings from educational and rehabilitative to hostile and penalizing.

“When you put a fine (in the new policy), you completely change the educational nature of it and make it punitive,” Fabris said.


News

8 Tribune

Monday, August 27, 2012

Continued from page 1:

Abroad: Past actions by MU officials have raised numerous concerns action, including informing parents of all the students on the trip of the allegations and placing a restriction on where students on the trip were allowed to go within the town. Additionally, College of Communication Dean Lori Bergen traveled to Cagli to evaluate the program’s safety and its future. Marquette worked closely with Italian authorities and offered to reimburse any student wishing to return to the U.S. before the official end of the trip. Counseling services became available onsite for students on June 16. According to a June 14 email from Terence Miller, the director of the Office of International Education, to the parents of students on the trip, Italian officials also temporarily closed the establishment where the alleged incidents took place. A student who attended the program and spoke on the condition of anonymity said that after the first alleged assault occurred, participants were informed that an assault had taken place and asked to sign a document confirming their awareness, though it was not made clear whether the incident specifically involved a Marquette student. While university admininstrators took steps immediately after learning of the alleged assaults this summer, Marquette has been questioned in recent history on its record when it comes to situations involving sexual assault — both on and off campus. Such questioning of Marquette came to a head in late 2010 and throughout 2011, coinciding with a series of Chicago Tribune articles detailing Marquette’s non-compliance with Wisconsin law in its failure to immediately notify police after learning of alleged sexual assaults on campus committed by

several student athletes. A federal investigation of the situation by the Department of Education began in November 2011. On May 13, 2011, a student participating in a Marquettesponsored service learning program in South Africa was raped in an alley just outside housing provided by the university. That incident resulted in criticism of the university’s response and a push from a former participant to improve the program’s security. A Feb. 28 Tribune article stated that after the incident was reported, the extra safety precautions taken included instating a temporary security guard, who was removed after that group of students left. A new security camera was also installed in the alley where the incident allegedly occurred. The security guard’s removal prompted an alumna of the program, Molly Arenberg, to push the university to install a permanent security guard outside the home where students participating in the Marquette program live. She argued that normal security measures such as security cameras and walking in pairs were not enough. Arenberg’s efforts received mixed reactions from this year’s students partipcating in the program, who told the Tribune through a spokesperson in February that they felt safe in their home in South Africa. “Marquette told them that the buddy system is enough, and as students with faith in their program, they agreed,” Arenberg said in a previous interview with the Tribune. “This is another reason why I am concerned not just about the product, but the process of Marquette taking appropriate action.” Nick Biggi also contributed reporting.

Marquette has been questioned in recent history on its record when it comes to situations involving sexual assault. Tribune File Photos

Cagli, pictured above, below left and below right, is a town of more than 9,000 people in north-central Italy.


Monday, August 27, 2012

News

Tribune 9


Viewpoints PAGE 10

The Marquette Tribune Monday, August 27, 2012

The Marquette Tribune Editorial Board:

Tessa Fox, Viewpoints Editor and Editorial Writer Katie Doherty, Editorial Writer Andrew Phillips, Editor-in-Chief Maria Tsikalas, Managing Editor Mike LoCicero, Sports Editor Pat Simonaitis, News Editor Alec Brooks, Copy Chief Allison Kruschke, Projects Editor Rob Gebelhoff, Visual Content Editor Matt Mueller, Marquee Editor Alyce Peterson, Photo Editor

STAFF EDITORIAL

Alcohol policy impaired by ambiguous language

ROll call Thumbs Up

Thumbs Down

-Being back on campus -Catching up with friends -Seeing new faces on campus -Syllabus week is easy -You’re closer to graduation

-No Welcome Back BBQ -Summer vacation is over -Not seeing Fr. Naus - Buying textbooks is expensive -You’re closer to graduation

COLUMN

Things I wish I knew as a freshman

Illustration by Rob Gebelhoff/robert.gebelhoff@marquette.edu

Each school year births new traditions. For most of us during Orientation Week, we saw, heard about, or perhaps were, one of the freshmen who got a little too rowdy the first night out. But those students from the Class of 2016 will experience a new tradition: they will return from the hospital with hundreds of dollars in fines waiting for them. The major change to Marquette’s alcohol policy this year is the addition of these student fines. However, fines are not just limited to underage students. The university can fine students of legal drinking age if it is deemed appropriate. The fines, which vary in amount based on the severity and frequency of offense, will go toward funding alcohol and drug prevention programs and activities for students. We understand that the new alcohol policy is meant to promote student safety by deterring binge drinking. This, realistically, isn’t such a bad thing. Milwaukee and Wisconsin in general are known for a drinking culture, and we commend the administration for wanting to distance the university from that reputation. We are part of an educational institution and, to some level, our rules and behavior need to reflect that. Furthermore, we live on a very urban campus where crime is not neccessarily a stranger. Intoxicated students are easy targets for robberies and other violence. If the stricter rules make students think a little harder before drinking and stay a little more sober, these sorts of incidents might decrease, which would, of course, be a good thing. But let’s look at the other potential consequences of the new policy. If students were to find themselves in a situation in which they had to choose between calling DPS for medical attention or getting fined, they could very well risk their lives or the lives of

others in order to save the hundreds of dollars they would be assessed. It’s no secret that most college kids don’t have that kind of money to throw around each time they make a mistake. This new policy is very fear-oriented, and we are worried that it could cause more harm than good in many situations, especially as freshmen try to adjust to the college setting. What does this new policy mean for DPS officers? Are they going to be too preoccupied trying to enforce these new rules to monitor the rest of campus safety to the quality level we know and love them for? Another problem with the new policy is its ambiguity. The money from student fines will supposedly be used for non-alcoholic activities for students, but what exactly are those? Late Night? Guest speakers? We want to know precisely where the money is going, how much it is and who is responsible for allocating and overseeing it. But the details of where the fines go aren’t the only questions that need clarification. The alcohol policy explicitly says that each situation is specific and open to interpretation, but that’s the problem. Yes, each situation is unique, but when the guidelines and procedures appear purposefully left open-ended to be arbitrarily enforced, there is clearly an issue. When is it deemed appropriate to fine a student of legal drinking age? Is any sort of safety guaranteed for a student seeking medical attention on behalf of another? What are the penalties for students who are deemed to be complicit in rule-breaking incidents? We need more stability in what offense deserves which punishment. We don’t want any more of this “unwritten rule” nonsense. We want transparent rules with consistent consequences.

IF THE FREEDOM OF SPEECH IS TAKEN AWAY THEN

DUMB AND SILENT WE MAY BE LEAD,

LIKE SHEEP TO THE SLAUGHTER.

-GEORGE WASHINGTON

Caroline Campbell There are a few things I wish I had known at the beginning of my freshman year at Marquette. These include the correct pronunciation of “Schroeder,” “Lalumiere,” and “Cudahy,” along with a few deeper pieces of advice. And actually, someone probably did tell me the things I am about to tell you, but anything you hear the first two or three weeks of college tends to go in one ear and out the other. I really wish I had been given advice like this about a month or so into the school year. So freshmen, read this, don’t absorb any of it, cut it out and stick it in your planner so you can stumble upon it around the end of September. The thing I really wish I’d been told way back in 2009 (wow, I’m old) is that it’s OK to be sad and homesick. Calling your mom crying is nothing to be ashamed of, and, honestly, it’s probably going to happen in the very near future. On a similar note, the number to the Counseling Center is 414-288-7172. It is not a sign of weakness to call or just walk in. Talking to someone is sometimes the very best thing you can do for yourself. Change your major! It may seem like you have your life mapped out five, 10, even 15 years past graduation right now, but if you find yourself unhappy with that plan, or dreading it, now is the time you can do something about it. You may find yourself wishing you had studied philosophy instead of biomedical

engineering or Spanish instead of business. So take that leap of faith now because you are literally the only person in charge of your own future. You never know, you could change your major multiple times and end up right back where you started. It might take a year away from something to realize how much you love it and can’t live without it. On the subject of change, don’t be afraid of it. You are not set as the adult you will be at age 18. Change is good and normal. Change your political views. Change your religious views, your philosophy on life. The one thing you probably will not change is your sports affiliations, and I totally respect that. I told this to a group of freshmen in the honors program the other day, but they aren’t the only studious freshmen at Marquette: Don’t forget to have fun! That seems like a silly thing to say at this school, but if you are similar to my freshman-year self, you may get caught up with your classes and overstress about your grades. Don’t get me wrong; grades are important, but so is the rest of college life. Join the organization that catches your eye at the Organization Fest. Accept the invitations to hang out on Tuesday nights instead of studying. My final piece of advice is to not listen to anything I’ve said if it doesn’t work for you. College (and life) is a learn-asyou-go sort of thing. You are going to make mistakes and try new things, some you like and some you don’t. If you find something that really makes you happy, keep it up. Everyone is different and you’ll find a lifestyle that works for you, eventually. It’s a process, but it’s a fun one. Tough it out through the hard times, and ask for help if you need it. Enjoy every second of your time in college and here at Marquette – it flies by. caroline.campbell@marquette.edu

Statement of Opinion Policy The opinions expressed on the Viewpoints page reflect the opinions of the Viewpoints staff. The editorials do not represent the opinions of Marquette University nor its administrators, but those of the editorial board. The Marquette Tribune prints guest submissions at its discretion. The Tribune strives to give all sides of an issue an equal voice over the course of a reasonable time period. An author’s contribution will not be published more than once in a four-week period. Submissions with obvious relevance to the Marquette community will be given priority consideration. Full Viewpoint submissions should be limited to 500 words. Letters to the editor should be between 50 to 150 words. The Tribune reserves the right to edit submissions for length and content. Please e-mail submissions to: viewpoints@marquettetribune.org. If you are a current student, include the college in which you are enrolled and your year in school. If not, please note any affliations to Marquette or your current city of residence.


Monday, August 27, 2012

Viewpoints

Tribune 11

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

For those of you who followed Aaron Sorkin’s new series “The Newsroom” over the summer, you’ve no doubt seen the widespread denunciation of the show’s blunt idealism in its portrayal of the journalism industry. But despite his writing’s flaws, Sorkin’s idealism does serve a purpose for journalists, one that applies very well to the newspaper you now hold. Because I have a confession to make on behalf of the Marquette Tribune: After being named the Society of Professional Journalists’ Best All-Around Non-Daily Student Newspaper in 2010, we failed to repeat that success in 2011. As much as I’d like to say that the SPJ simply picked another paper out of some arbitrary sense of fairness, I have to admit that the Trib had its shortcomings last year. Too often, our news coverage fell into a tired rhythm of writing the same kind of stories to the same length, issue after issue. Communication issues on staff sometimes prevented us from doing our best work. And yet again, we failed to follow through on our promises of an increased online presence. On that note, however, let me be very clear: this letter is not intended in any way to be a rebuke of Matthew Reddin, my predecessor as editor-in-chief, or of Tori Dykes, last year’s managing editor. On the contrary, I have learned more from both of them than I can recount here and consider them dear friends and mentors. The reason we didn’t repeat our success is simple: while other student

publications across the country continued their evolutions last year, we focused more on continuing traditions that, in some cases, were far outdated. So when Maria Tsikalas, this year’s managing editor, and I took the helm this spring, we began with the mindset that any part of the Trib was fair game for change. While in many cases we’re hoping to continue the Trib’s successful traditions, in some we went back to the drawing board. In any case, starting with the attitude that we could change anything allowed us to step back and evaluate what works and what doesn’t. We give you, then, a brand new Tribune, one we affectionately call Tribune 2.0 (another Newsroom reference). And our changes begin from page one, where we now feature more investigative reporting after we folded our Closer Look section into News, a change that gives our reporters more flexibility and freedom to pursue stories as they are rather than fit them to some historical inch count. Our copy desk has also undergone a unification, as we now have four all-purpose copy editors rather than two dedicated solely to sports. On the visual side of things, visual content editor and resident wizard Rob Gebelhoff has given the Tribune a complete redesign from the ground up, and our website will soon follow suit with a facelift of its own. In an effort to finally fulfill that promise of a better presence online, we’ve completely re-evaluated our web efforts as well. Our news desk will now be ready

Marquette should fully live up to its Jesuit ideals, should put the concerns of its current students before the university’s public relations.

at all hours to cover breaking news online, thanks to a rotating team of reporters we call the First Responders. We’ve also created Twitter accounts for each of our desks in an effort to improve our social media interaction, and we’re excited to have six new blogs in the works, four of which will cover politics, viewpoints, arts and sports. One of the remaining two will provide satirical alternatives to our regular stories, in the spirit of The Onion. It’s the last one, however, that we’re perhaps most excited about: a behind-the-scenes view of the Trib’s inner workings that, in its transparency, allows readers to hold us accountable for the promises made above. That transparency will go deeper than merely publishing corrections or posting pictures from our newsroom; we will be open in our behind-the-scenes blog, and throughout our publication, about not only our process, but our stances and objectives. And the first of those, now displayed proudly on our new nameplate (that sun behind the Q is actually the Jesuit symbol), is that Marquette should fully live up to its Jesuit ideals, should put the concerns of its current students before the university’s public relations or how Marquette looks to prospective students. That position is reflected throughout our first issue, from our editorial on the university’s new alcohol policy to our investigation into its sexual assault response protocol. To the reader, then: Please hold us accountable to these promises. The first step in solving any problem, after all, is recognizing there is one. And to the Trib staff: We’re not the best non-daily student paper in the country anymore. But we can be. Andrew Phillips Editor-in-Chief andrew.phillips@marquette.edu

THE STATEMENT BELOW IS FALSE

THE STATEMENT ABOVE IS True

TRIBUNE:

THE

Welcome to Tribune 2.0

MAKING YOU THINK.

THE TRIB We’re on fire.


12 Tribune

Viewpoints

Monday, August 27, 2012


Monday, August 27, 2012

Blog: Justice on a Jesuit campus By Maria Tsikalas maria.tsikalas@marquette.edu

Late last Friday night, a man named Larry stole my purse. I had carelessly left it on a stool in Caffrey’s as I danced happily among my friends a couple of feet away, glancing back every minute or two to check on it. Larry, whose name was unbeknownst to me at the time, approached our group and began dancing with us. Assuming he was a typical “bar creeper,” my friends and I politely steered clear but didn’t think anything more of his presence. Ten minutes later, Larry sprinted out, and my yellow handbag was naught to be seen again.

Viewpoints

Coming Soon! New Tribune Blogs: Politics Sports Behind The Scenes

Tribune 13 Blog: Vander Blue is not a crayon By Anonymous A transfer junior, Stu Pidass, recently came to the realization that fellow junior and starting guard on the men’s basketball team Vander Blue is in fact not a crayon. Pidass said the realization came while attending his first basketball game and hearing Blue’s name over the loudspeaker. “I always assumed he was a crayon, possibly a variation of blue-green,” Pidass said. “I only have a 24 pack of Crayola so I figured it, or now I should say he, was in the 64 pack.”

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Sports

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 14

Monday, August 27, 2012

woMen’s SOCCER

Sloan and seniors lead Golden Eagles into fall MU faces tough road in pursuit of fourth straight NCAA trip By Michael LoCicero michael.locicero@marquette.edu

Rachael Sloan says her knee feels “great” and she is back to 100 percent. It’s hard to argue with her after a pair of goals in two contests and no glaring holes in her game. The return of the senior forward is critical for the Marquette women’s soccer team (2-0-0), which is aiming to win its fourth consecutive American Division title and make its fourth straight NCAA Tournament appearance. Sloan missed all but six games last year and was granted a redshirt after earning AllBig East First Team honors in 2009 and 2010. “Part of the reason why we are where we are is (that) we have a lot of experience,” coach Markus Roeders said. “(Sloan) stretches the defense with her speed, and that was on display against Milwaukee.” The senior Elk Grove, Ill., native tallied the first goal of a 4-0 whitewashing of crosstown rival Wisconsin-Milwaukee on Friday for her 18th career goal and also scored first in a 4-0 win over St. Bonaventure on Aug. 17. Junior forward Maegan Kelly is glad her teammate is back on the

field to help dictate the pace for the offense. “It’s always awesome to have Rachael Sloan back,” Kelly said. “We work off each other really nicely.” Kelly says the team’s ultimate goal every year is making the Final Four, and the two teams she has played on both came up just two wins short of that lofty goal. “We want to show everyone else in the country what we can bring,” Kelly said. “We’ve learned from our mistakes even from games we already played this year and we’re just trying to improve every day.” With one of the program’s toughest nonconference slates in its history this year, Roeders will have to look to players like Sloan and Kelly to shoulder the scoring load and try to keep up with teams like No. 1 Duke and No. 19 North Carolina. “That road trip in itself is going to be two of the toughest games we’ve played,” Roeders said. “We just have to keep (our players) at a point where they’re believing and keep getting better.” Not to be overlooked before the Duke/Nike Classic on Sept. 7 and 9 is a road game at Northwestern on Aug. 31. The Wildcats hired former Milwaukee coach Michael Moynihan this year to salvage a struggling program. “They’ll be ready for us, there’s no doubt,” Roeders said. “They See Soccer, page 19

Photo by Becca Rebholz/rebecca.rebholz@marquette.edu

Rachael Sloan’s much anticipated return will be a big boost as she looks to lead this year’s Marquette squad.

Men’s Basketball

Column

Monarch relieved of position Jansson’s finish as Assistant coach let go good as it gets to both our team and the entire values that underpin this very university. Our commitment has unique program – among the always been and will always be elite in the nation,” said Wilto operate this program at the liams. “It was our obligation to highest level of integrity in the take strong decisive steps as we Marquette and Jesuit tradition.” took this matter extremely seriThe problem stems from an in- ously. The NCAA has made the cident with Monarch giving ath- role of institutions quite clear in By Matt Trebby letic apparel and providing trans- its proposed legislative changes allison.kruscke@marquette.edu portation to at least to the penalty structure.” Men’s basketball assistant one recruit durThe relationship coach Scott Monarch has been ing campus visits. between Monarch dismissed from the program after When questioned and Buzz Williams it was discovered he lied about about his actions, “prostarted when the duo his activity with recruits while Monarch worked together at on campus, head coach Buzz vided misleading information about New Orleans during Williams announced Friday. the 2006-’07 season. Williams will also be sus- the matter multiple Monarch was an pended for the team’s Big East times,” according assistant coach and opener this season for his role to the release. Monarch’s disthe recruiting coorin the matter. Williams made a dinator at New Orstatement in a press release sent missal and the leans, a role he filled out on Friday night expressing suspension of Wilwhile an employee his disappointment in regards to liams were self-adat Marquette since the matter and took full responsi- ministered by MarMonarch quette in its report Williams became the bility for it. head coach. “When I was allowed to re- to the NCAA. Athletic Director Larry WilPrior to that, Monarch also view the report earlier this week, I was deeply saddened to learn liams noted his disappointment worked at Tyler Community Colof an error in judgment of one because this matter went against lege, where he coached former of my assistants and closest the ideals of Marquette athletics. Golden Eagles Jimmy Butler and “This situation reinforces the Joe Fulce. He was also the main friends,” Williams said. “I take personal responsibility for what need to be focused not only on recruiter of last season’s Big East happens in this program and our rich competitive history but Player of the Year, Jae Crowder. With the dismissal of Monarch, realize we must be role models most importantly on the core the Golden Eagles have now lost “This situation reinforces the need to be focused not only four assistant coaches from last season’s staff. Tony Benford beon our rich competitive history but most importantly on came the head coach at North the core values that underpin this very unique program – Texas, and former Marquette among the elite in the nation.” assistant Bart Lundy joined his staff, while Aki Collins left to Larry Williams, Marquette Athletic Director join the University of Memphis coaching staff.

for involvement in recruiting violation

Michael LoCicero I almost feel bad for the Marquette freshman class. Not because of the donations many of them will be forced to give to the university over the next four years because of some interesting new policies. Not because they’ll never see DJO beat his defender with an ankle-breaking crossover in “The Best Student Section in the Country.” But because they’ll never see a better ending to a Marquette sporting event than the one in the men’s soccer game Friday night that gave the Golden Eagles an improbable 3-2 victory. Sophomore forward Sebastian Jansson’s bicycle kick that would’ve made Wayne Rooney proud found the back of the net with literally no time remaining, and the freshmen – and 1,892 others at a packed Valley Fields – witnessed a buzzer beater on the pitch. I was standing next to Matt Trebby, whose call may have caused my eardrums to rupture. “THE CLOCK SAYS 90!

THIS GAME IS OVER! MARQUETTE WINS!” I asked soccer aficionado Andrei Greska, who was calling the game with Trebby, if he had ever seen anything like it. He said you can watch millions of soccer matches in your life and you will never see a finish like that. If Andrei says it, I believe it. Add in that it was a game-winner against a crosstown rival and some vindication after losing the last two Milwaukee Cups and you get the finish of a lifetime. I began thinking of the best finishes to a Marquette sporting event I’ve seen over my four years here and couldn’t think of one that even comes close. Jimmy Butler’s fadeaway with 2.8 seconds left to beat a ranked Connecticut team on the road on Jan. 30, 2010 was impressive. His buzzer beater on the road against St. John’s less than a month later was even better. But even those shots didn’t have the ramifications of Jansson’s goal. This is a men’s soccer team that took a program-altering turn for the better last year by winning the Blue division in the Big East for the first time ever. It returns many of its core players from a year ago, save for the departure of See LoCicero, page 19


Sports

Monday, August 27, 2012

Tribune 15 TRIBUNE Game of the Week

Sports Calendar

Women’s Soccer at Northwestern

Friday 31

Women’s Soccer at Northwestern – 7 p.m.

31

Fri.

Sat.

Women’s Volleyball at Tennessee Tech - 4 p.m.

Women’s Volleyball at Ole Miss - 9 a.m.

Sun.

31

2

Mon.

Men’s Soccer at Drake - 2 p.m.

1 Women’s Volleyball at Xavier - 3 p.m.

3

Women’s Soccer vs. Central Michigan - 1 p.m.

Fri.

7 Women’s Soccer at North Carolina - 4 p.m.

Men’s Cross country

Balance and depth big for MU Injured seniors a small speed bump for well rounded roster By Chris Chavez christopher.chavez@marquette.edu

After a summer of running 80 to 90 miles a week, the men’s crosscountry team has its sights set on making the NCAA Cross Country Championship for the first time in school history this year. Entering the first week of the season, injuries to some of its more experienced runners will provide an early obstacle on the team’s road to Louisville in November. Senior captain Patrick Maag spent his summer in New York and ran daily before heading to work at an internship. But towards the end of his summer, he suffered a sprained ankle. Similarly, the team’s other senior captain, Jack Senefeld, is suffering from a stress fracture after running in Milwaukee with some of his teammates. The injuries to the two captains are a hit for a team with no standout runner. Several runners are vying for the top spot, as five of the team’s top seven runners from 2011 return this season. Coach Mike Nelson is entering his sixth season with the team and has no problem with the lack of an initial superstar on his roster.

“I can really see us being the type of team that puts five guys within 20 to 25 seconds between each other as opposed to one runner being a full minute ahead of the next. We don’t necessarily have that, but we definitely do have some quality frontrunners.” The captains are expected to make a full recovery in the coming weeks and compete with the faster runners on the team by the middle of the season. Aside from Maag and Senefeld, senior Jack Hackett is expected to break out in 2012. Hackett has the fastest personal best in the 5,000-meter on the track, but some of his teammates are faster when racing on the hills. His transition from running on the track to hill running will be tested for the first time this season at the NIU Huskie Invitational on Sept. 7. Bob Guthrie may not be a senior, but as a junior he is exceeding expectations and could go from not being in the team’s top seven a year ago to surprisingly leading the pack. After a top 8,000-meter run time of 26:22.72, he should see more time during championship season. Senior Connor Callahan finished fourth on the team at the Big East Championships and the NCAA Great Lakes Regional in 2011. After the graduation of Peter Bolgert and Blake Johnson, Callahan could lead the team in the first few meets depending on how quickly Sene-

the facts The Golden Eagles will travel down I-94 this Friday to take on the Wildcats and face off against former Wisconsin-Milwaukee coach Michael Moynihan. Northwestern is 2-1 so far under Moynihan and is paced offensively by midfielder Georgia Waddle. Waddle has scored two goals and picked up an assist in three games played. Marquette counters with an offense that exploded with eight goals against St. Bonaventure and Milwaukee and shutout goaltending so far.

feld recovers. “Callahan has been one of the most consistent runners since he’s been at Marquette,” Senefeld said. “He’s another guy that has a personal best under 25 minutes (for the 8,000-meter). He had a pretty good season on the track leading into this cross-country season.” The freshman class includes state champions, high school captains and multiple varsity letter winners. The seniors have practiced with them and believe the future looks promising. “It seems like (the freshmen) are fitting in pretty nicely. The Alumni Race should be a good test to see how their fitness is doing,” Maag said. “I’m excited to see what they can do. They’re willing to put in the work and are talented enough to carry on that Marquette excellence.” The Golden Eagles have two weeks before their quest to prove they are among the 32 best crosscountry teams in the country begins at the NIU Huskie Invitational. The journey will be filled with many workouts, races and obstacles. Coach Nelson preaches that they should not enter the season with their heads held too high. “Every day is just about getting better. Coming into the season too fired up is not a good thing,” Nelson said. “The season is long. You want to come in with this calm and cool confidence. That’s what our seniors have.”

ere h W A re Th ey o N

?

Men’s Soccer vs. UIC - 7:05 p.m.

Fri.

7 p.m. - Evanston, Ill.

w

Friday 31

One of the greatest players in Marquette men’s soccer history is just getting started in the professional ranks. Calum Mallace was drafted by the Montreal Impact as the 20th overall pick in the 2012 MLS SuperDraft, becoming the first Marquette player ever to be drafted into the MLS. So far he’s only started one official MLS game, but in a friendly against the French team Olympique Lyonnais, Mallace scored a penalty in the shootout. Mallace had a storied career at Marquette and a landmark 2011 season in which he took home Big East Midfielder of the Year honors and was named a

first team All-American. Mallace was also Marquette’s 2011 MVP, as he led the men’s team to its first Big East Blue Division title. He finished his college career with 39 points, including 13 goals and 13 assists. Mallace had a knack for the clutch, as eight of the goals were game-winners. Mallace set a new standard for Marquette midfielders and he’ll look to keep his scoring touch as he tackles life in the MLS. When he gets his chance, he will hopefully make good on it, just as he did many times in his career as a Golden Eagle. robert.killian@marquette.edu

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16 Tribune

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Monday, August 27, 2012

Sports

Tribune 17

Men’s Soccer

‘Harry Potter moments’ keep coming for men’s soccer Golden Eagles off to solid 2-0 start for the first time since 2000 By Matt Trebby matthew.trebby@marquette.edu

Last season, Marquette’s men’s soccer team didn’t play in the NCAA Tournament because of its non-conference schedule, even though it won the Blue Division in the Big East. This season, the Golden Eagles are 2-0-0 after a stunning 3-2 win over Wisconsin-Milwaukee in the Milwaukee Cup on Friday night and a 1-0 victory at WisconsinGreen Bay on Sunday afternoon and are set on avoiding a repeat of last season’s events. Even though the Golden Eagles didn’t necessarily play their best in either game, coach Louis Bennett said they have to learn how to win ugly. He said this season’s team is very capable of doing so. “I think we’re a lot more resilient,” Bennett said. “There are a lot of people on the squad who have won in close games, and I think that gives us a stability and calmness when we’re in pressure situations. “A win is a win, and there are going to be games where we’ll have to grind it out,” junior midfielder Eric Pothast said. “We

aren’t going to play the best soccer and we’re going to be off a little bit. But it is big to come here on the road and get the result we want.” On Friday night, Milwaukee took the lead twice in the second half, but junior midfielder Bryan Ciesiulka and redshirt junior forward Adam Lysak equalized. Then, sophomore midfielder Sebastian Jansson scored in the 90th minute, with no time left on the clock. Jansson said moments like the one after his goal are the reasons he plays soccer and are unparalleled. After the goal, the Swedish winger took off his jersey, ran to the sidelines, and was mobbed by fans and teammates. He described the goal as magical, and “one of those Harry Potter moments.” “I didn’t have a good second half, myself. I’ve been sick the last two days, downing ibuprofen and stuff, so there was a lot of frustration that came out after I scored,” said Jansson. This was the first time Marquette won the Milwaukee Cup since 2009 and just the third time since the start of the 2000 season that the team scored three or more goals in its opening match. Then on Sunday, the Golden Eagles pulled out a victory against Green Bay thanks to Eric Pothast’s 30th minute strike from a free kick delivered in by junior

Paul Dillon. Marquette snapped the Phoenix’s eight game home winning streak with the victory, and got off to the program’s first 2-0-0 start since 2000. Bennett thought his team actually defended better on Friday night, even though they kept a clean sheet on Sunday. He pointed straight to his new goalkeeper, redshirt sophomore Charlie Lyon, as to why. “Defensively I think we played better against UWM, and we gave two goals up. I think Charlie Lyon came up big, forcing two breakaways to go wide,” Bennett said. “I thought he was very, very good today, and we needed him to be good.” While the team has won both its games, there is still plenty to improve upon. “We have spurts where we keep the ball (and) move it wide, getting crosses to prime target areas,” Pothast said. “But, there are times where we settle for the long ball too much, and we’re stuck defending on our heels for a good portion of the game. If we can just keep the ball and find our guys who make plays for us, we’ll be fine.” Marquette continues its season Friday at Valley Fields against Illinois-Chicago, then travels to Drake for a Sunday afternoon match.

Men’s Lacrosse

Men’s lax ready for fall action Hofstra transfers look to add stability to Marquette’s roster By Kyle Doubrava kyle.doubrava@marquette.edu

When you’re the new team at a school like Marquette, it’s safe to say that all eyes will be on you. The men’s lacrosse squad is up for the attention and the challenges it will face in its inaugural season. Regular season play will begin for Marquette’s newest team in the spring after it patiently served its two-year moratorium. The Golden Eagles will be playing independently for one season before moving up to play in the Big East in 2014. Head coach Joe Amplo, formerly an assistant coach at Hofstra, is eager to move forward with practices and developing his players. Although it’s still early to determine exact expectations for the team on the field this season, Amplo would like to see his team give everything it has. “It’s tough to put a tangible number or goal out there, but just very simply trying to get better every day,” Amplo said. “I think

we’ve got to build a foundation for success and our success is just going to be trying to surpass our individual expectations and for ourselves. If we can do that every day, that to me is a tangible goal we can reach.” Amplo has three Hofstra transfers joining him at Marquette. One of them, sophomore midfielder James Raveret, spent most of his summer in Calgary, Alberta playing in an indoor lacrosse league. His team advanced to play in the championship rounds in Toronto. Raveret said the experience has vastly improved his skills and that he is now looking ahead to helping Marquette become a force. “As a team, I want to do the best we can,” said Raveret, a native of Glen Ellyn, Ill. “The number one thing I always look for is working hard, always doing your best, never giving up. Even if we’re up or down I want to keep playing our best game and hopefully that’ll do it for us and we’ll get some Ws.” Amplo is hoping the Hofstra transfers will help the younger players progress in addition to providing leadership and a certain level of comfort. “The management from Hofstra here isn’t going to be much

different in terms of the way we want to do things and what my expectations are on the field as well as off the field,” Amplo said. “My hope is that those guys continue to help the young guys grow in the culture that we’re trying to (create).” Freshman midfielder Tyler Gilligan played for the Canadian U-19 world championship team this summer and was glad to have the opportunity to face the world’s top players in preparation for the spring. “I got to see what the competition was like out there,” Gilligan said. “I was fortunate enough to play against all of the best players and see what the level of competition was like. I figure that will help me this coming season.” Playing against Big East teams in the future will be a tall task for an infant Marquette lacrosse program, but Gilligan views the challenge as a chance for all players to improve quicker. “I think that’s what everyone comes to college for, to play the best teams and see what the level of competition is like,” Gilligan said. “You only get better by playing the better teams and I feel that we are fortunate enough to have that opportunity to play the better teams.”

life is a maze. it is full of

e overcome, xperiences t orev to s e l el in c a t s ... twists and turns, ob

embrace it.

Photo by Danny Alfonzo/daniel.alfonzo@marquette.com

The men’s soccer team is off to its best start in 12 years after winning its first Milwaukee Cup in two years and beating Green Bay on the road 1-0.


Sports

18 Tribune

Monday, August 27, 2012

WOmen’s Volleyball

Developing team chemistry leads to Challenge split ‘Bond Squad’ still needs to work out some early kinks By Pat Leary patrick.leary@marquette.edu

The Marquette women’s volleyball team kicked off its 201213 campaign with a 1-1 start in the Marquette Challenge at the Al McGuire Center Friday and Sunday. The women swept their season opener over Bowling Green (25-20, 25-21, 25-19) before dropping a four-setter to Northwestern (25-22, 21-25, 26-28, 1825) two days later. On-court communication issues

that occasionally showed up in the opening win stalled the Golden Eagles against the Wildcats in the tournament finale. Most of the mistakes seemed to come from glitches between the established core of veterans and the newer, less experienced players. “The communication stuff will come,” Marquette head coach Bond Shymansky said. “We have a lot of new players playing next to each other. It’ll just take a little bit of time to develop that.” Even veteran captain and senior middle hitter Dani Carlson acknowledged that some of the kinks take time to work out. “Young players will have consistency issues,” Carlson said. “I had that as a young player, and what we need to do is continue to encourage (the younger players)

Right now I’m not focusing on being the big ‘kaboom’ killer, because we have those on our team already. Erin Lehman, Freshman Outside Hitter

… we’re looking for them to do big things and I think they know they can do it.” Some of the newcomers played like seasoned veterans over the weekend. In her first two collegiate matches, freshman outside hitter Erin Lehman led the team in kills. She recorded 12 against Bowling Green and 14 against Northwestern, but took a humble approach to her dazzling performances. “Right now I’m really just focusing on minimizing my errors and doing what I can to keep the game rolling,” Lehman said. “Right now I’m not focusing on being the big ‘kaboom’ killer, because we have those on our team already.” On a team that showed inconsistencies in its first two matches, Lehman provided incredible touch and power from the outside in every set and Shymansky is all for that. “Lehman was great, steady and didn’t get rattled,” he said. “Those are things you don’t often say about freshman, day one, in their first match.”

Shymansky was also impressed by his newest transfer, junior setter Elizabeth Koberstein. A native of Madison, Wis., Koberstein played two seasons at Kentucky before transferring back home. She had 83 assists in her first two matches with the Golden Eagles. “Brett Favre used to thread the needle and make throws that no one else thought he should make and they would result in Super Bowls,” Shymansky said. “I saw Elizabeth make sets like that tonight.” Ultimately though, if Marquette can string together wins with consistent play, its core of veteran leaders will be responsible. Shymansky stressed the importance of his captains and older players stepping up following Sunday’s loss. “Senior leadership is great,” he said. “Experienced leadership is great. They (provide) the calm during the storm. They are the people who know how to smile through the chaos and know how to put a little more grit into their look on the next play.” Shymansky entrusts those

L

Mertens overcomes injury with positivity

By Trey Killian robert.killian@marquette.edu

It’s been a long journey for Holly Mertens. Entering her fifth season as a member of Marquette’s volleyball team as a redshirt senior, her time with the Golden Eagles has been a rollercoaster ride of injuries and accolades. Mertens’s passion for the game has been tested time and time again and she, along with coach Bond Shymansky and the rest of the team, hope that the 2012 season will be the culmination of a great comeback story.

The Stanley, Wis., native was a four-year letter winner in basketball, track and volleyball at Stanley-Boyd High School, helping the volleyball team to a Division 3 state championship in 2006. “We always tease her and ask her if she came from the good side or the bad side, the Stanley side or the Boyd side,” Shymansky said. Mertens was selected to the first team all-state roster and named Chippewa County Player of the Year in ’06 and ’07 before choosing to come to Marquette. “The first time I came here I just loved the campus,” Mertens said. “It was a smaller Division 1 school, which was great for me, and the facilities at the Al McGuire Center are amazing. Being able to play on one of the best arenas in the Big East was definitely an aspect I looked at.”

Unfortunately, Mertens’s career as a Golden Eagle began with an ACL tear that sidelined her for her freshman season. When Shymansky became head coach in 2009, he wasn’t sure where to play Mertens and was uncertain about her skill set, as she was one of the players he inherited. “She was rehabbing her knee, so I had literally no idea what she could do,” Shymansky said. “We got a few of her high school videos and I thought, ‘OK, she has fast arms, so let’s see what she can do.’” After making 14 starts in 2009, Mertens suffered yet another knee injury the following spring, putting the future of her volleyball career in jeopardy. “At that point we really thought it was the end for her,” Shymansky said. “We had a long conversation one night about it may-

t

Redshirt senior rightside hitter rises from PUP to All-Big East

be being time to hang it up. There were a lot of tears and there was a lot of soul searching for her, but she came back to me the next night and said, ‘Coach, don’t give up on me, I’m going to find a way to get it done.’” While her body was physically unable to perform, Mertens said she absorbed as much as she possibly could while watching from the bench. Former teammate and classmate Ciara Jones said Mertens’s growth through her injuries made her stronger than many of the other players on the team. “Her growth has been all mental,” Jones said. “She has a lot of mental toughness from her injuries and rehab, and I know that she’s going to give everything she can. This is her chance to finally be great, so I’m excited for her.” Last season was a breakthrough for Mertens, as she worked her way into the starting lineup as a rightside hitter. For the second season in a row she achieved All-Big East Academic honors and was voted the team’s most improved player, notching 144 kills and 38 blocks in 65 sets. “Last year you could see the payoff for her as she emerged into our starting lineup,” Shymansky said. “You got to see what I call the ‘face of destruction.’ She just keeps saying, ‘give me the ball, give me the ball,’ and it’s such a cool moment to witness as a coach.” Aside from making a huge impression on her coach, Mertens made some noise in the conference as an individual and was named to the All-Big East Preseason team heading into this season. She got off to a good start in the team’s first match against Bowling Green, as the Golden Eagles swept the Falcons in front of a raucous Al McGuire Center crowd. After reaching an all-time low, Mertens’ love for her sport has carried her back to the top, thanks to a mindset that Shymansky said he can’t teach. “Part of Holly’s gift is she’s incredibly positive and doesn’t let things get her down,” Shymansky said. “That’s a personality trait we as a coaching staff can’t begin to take credit for. Overall, it’s been a great maturation process for her.”

“so get a few laughs and do the best you can.”

augh

-will rogers

read the

marquette tribune

t

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Last season, Mertens started 65 sets and put on what coach Bond Shymansky calls “the face of destruction.”

leading roles to captains Carlson and junior Julie Jeziorowski, and in their first two matches both were solid and consistent performers. Carlson recorded 19 kills over the weekend, while Jeziorowski notched 20 digs in each match. Both think they can help ease the transition of the less experienced players. Carlson showed her leadership right away on Friday, as she smacked a kill cross-court for the first point of the 2012-13 season. “It’s important for the older players and obviously the captains to really show what Marquette volleyball is going to do, and the first point really dictates that,” Carlson said. Jeziorowski, Marquette’s rock across the back line, credited practice and the friendly confines of the Al for what should be a quick start to the season. “We do a lot of 6-on-6 play (in practice),” Jeziorowski said, “so I don’t think the transition is going to be to hard into game play. We have an opportunity where we play a lot of home games, so that will help get us rolling.”


Monday, August 27, 2012

Sports

Tribune 19

Continued from page 14:

Continued from page 14:

LoCicero: Play of the year already here

Soccer: Knee a non-factor

Calum Mallace to the MLS. But Marquette enters this season projected to finish fourth in its six-team division, with perennial powerhouses Connecticut, Notre Dame and Georgetown expected to finish higher. This is also a team that has, at times, had trouble putting goals on the board and beating teams it should beat during the non-conference season. Nobody is expecting this team to replicate its finish last year, and Milwaukee was a team that

Marquette should beat. If not for a hellacious gaffe by Panthers’ senior goalkeeper John Shakon that gave Golden Eagles’ redshirt junior forward Adam Lysak a goal with just seven minutes remaining, the stage would not have been set for Jansson’s heroic goal. Milwaukee’s Declan Rodriguez produced some magic of his own with a firecracker from 35 yards out that could have been a dagger. But this year’s Marquette team, at least for one night, showed tremendous resolve and wouldn’t be

denied a result against a team that has been a thorn in its side since coach Louis Bennett switched sides seven years ago. For the class of 2016 who missed last night’s match, you better hope Trent Lockett’s silkysmooth left hand buries a jumper with no time remaining against Wisconsin in December, because you’ve already missed the highlight of the year. michael.locicero@marquette. edu

WELCOME BACK TO MU!

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know what we like to do and we know what they like to do.” Central Michigan, Marquette’s first-round NCAA Tournament opponent in 2010, returns to Valley Fields on Sept. 3. Sloan scored the lone goal in that game to advance to the second round, where Marquette eventually beat Wisconsin-Madison in overtime before falling to Florida State in the Sweet 16. It was also Sloan’s last truly competitive game against a highquality opponent until the team played the Seminoles again this year in a game that was declared a “no contest” after three weather delays.

“I’m extremely happy to be back out here,” Sloan said, a bag of ice wrapped around her knee following the Milwaukee game. “I’m just trying to take it day by day with my knee and it should be an exciting year.” For a player who has seen action in 71 games over four-plus seasons, including 51 starts, it makes sense to look at the big picture like Sloan has. “I was pretty disappointed when the injury happened last year,” Sloan said. “But thankfully I got one more chance to come out and play with these girls one more time.”


20 Tribune

Sports

Monday, August 27, 2012


The Marquette Tribune