September 2022 Marquette Monthly

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City Notes Highlights of important happenings in the area 15 On Campus

News from U.P. universities & colleges

September 2022 No. 401

Publishers

Jane Hutchens James Larsen II

16 Then & Now 17

New York Times Crossword Puzzle In the money (answers on page 74)

18 Arts

Taylor Johnson An Unforgettable journey

Managing Editor

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Feature

Calendar Editor

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Feature

Jackie Stark

Carrie Usher

Graphic Design Jennifer Bell Knute Olson

Superior View

Calumet fire hall

Joyce Wiswell Keweenaw Dark Sky Park Kathy Ihde Copper Harbor Trails Fest brings buzz to award-winning trail system

30 In The Outdoors

Scot Stewart

Monarchs

Proofreader

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Back Then

Larry Chabot

Circulation

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Coloring Page

The Gathered Earth

Laura Kagy

Dick Armstrong

Chief Photographer Tom Buchkoe

Marquette Monthly, published by Model Town Publishing, LLC, located at PO Box 109 Gwinn, MI, 49841, is locally and independently owned. Entire contents Copyright 2022 by Model Town Publishing. All rights reserved. Permission or use of editorial material in any manner must be obtained in writing from the publishers. Marquette Monthly is published 12 times a year. Subscriptions are $65 per year. Freelance material can be submitted for consideration to editor@marquettemonthly.com. Events can be submitted to calendar@marquettemonthly.com. Ad inquiries can be sent to jane@marquettemonthly. com or james@marquettemonthly.com

(906)360-2180 www.marquettemonthly.com

About the Cover Artist Elizabeth Gartner Howe lives and works in Marquette. Primarily an oil painter, she is passionate about capturing the colors and movement of the places she wants to go, whether it’s down the trail, along the shore or the edge of a cloud. She is particularly inspired by the nature we find in our everyday experience living in Marquette.

Jeopardy!’s secret

40 At The Table

Katherine Larson

‘A wonderful mess’

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Back Then

The Miners’ Man

50 Lookout Point

Sonny Longtine

Beer, beer everywhere

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Brad Gischia

Back Then

Larry Chabot When trains were king

56 At The Table

Katherine Larson The ultimate summer taste test

60 Lookout Point

A place to call home

Deborah Frontiera

64 Superior Reads

Victor Volkman Chilling thriller is perfect autumn read

66 Sporting Life

Kristy Basolo-Malmsten

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Larry Chabot

A game for the ages

Back Then

Shocking revelations

72 Poetry The Fall

Lisa Fosmo

73 Home Cinema

Leonard Heldreth Science fiction, coming of age films in September’s reviews

75 Out & About

Carrie Usher September events and music, art and museum guides

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city notes Ore Dock Brewing Co to host vinyl show

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rom noon on Thursday, September 1 through 11p.m. Monday, September 5, a five-day vinyl record show will be held in the second floor community room of Ore Dock Brewing Company, in downtown Marquette. Thousands of new & used vinyl records, CDs, posters, cassettes, books and t-shirts will be available. For more information call (906) 3736183. All are welcome at this free, all-ages event, presented by the NMU Vinyl Record Club.

Blues Fest returns over Labor Day weekend

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he 18th Marquette Area Blues Fest features three days of worldclass blues on the shores of Lake Superior in the Mattson Lower Harbor Park in downtown Marquette from September 2 to 4. This year’s festival continues the tradition of an amazing array of world-class blues musicians and offers a wide variety of food vendors, a beer and wine tent, free workshops, and assorted arts and crafts booths. The festival will kick off with a free concert on Friday night to thank the community for their continuing support. Visit marquetteareabluessociety.org for more information.

Marquette Marathon returns Sept. 3

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or 2022, the Marquette Marathon, Marathon Relay, Half Marathon and Wildcat 5K will be held on Saturday, September 3rd, with the race expo being held on September 2nd. Visit the even’ts website at marquettemarathon.com/registration to register for the race. The Marquette Marathon runs on a downhill/certified course that is an official Boston Marathon qualifier.

LSCP partners with West End Health Foundation

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he Lake Superior Community Partnership and the West End Health Foundation have announced the signing of a formal collaborative agreement between the two entities that will have the LSCP providing marketing, grant assistance and administrative support to the West End Health Foundation. The projects involved in the partnership consist of website management, social media assistance, annual reports, event marketing and support, coordinating and distributing grants and grant applications, financial and other ad-

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ministrative support. The West End Health Foundation will transfer its phone number to the LSCP and can be reached at (906) 226-6591 ext. 104. For more information about the West End Health Foundation, visit westendhf.org, or visit Marquette.org to learn more about the Lake Superior Community Partnership.

SAYT holding auditions for new musical

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he Superior Arts Youth Theater is holding auditions for its fall musical, Madagascar: A Musical Adventure Jr.! The production is open to youth in preschool through 8th grade. Every audition has two parts, a vocal audition and a dance call. To be eligible for the show, auditionees must complete both parts. Auditions take place September 6 and 7, with callbacks on September 8. Rehearsals begin September 12. Performances take place November 10 to 13. Visit saytheater.org/auditions for a detailed list of audition times and instructions.

Marquette County Habitat for Humanity Partners with Rainy Creek Construction for Roof Donation

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arquette County Habitat for Humanity’s newest home, built in Negaunee Township, received a free roof, thanks to local contractor Rainy Creek Construction and GAF, one of the country’s largest roof manufacturers. Rainy Creek, a GAF Master Elite Contractor, will be donating their labor while GAF donates all the materials. Each adult in a participating Partner Family has to put in 250 hours of sweat equity, or invested time, into the project, and upon completion of the home the family is set up with an affordable mortgage. Those interested in helping with affordable housing in the Marquette community can contact the main office at (906) 228-3578 for opportunities to volunteer or donate.

Author event scheduled for Sept. 8

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he Crystal Falls Community District Library, in partnership with the U.P. Publishers & Authors Association, has scheduled author events with winners of the UP Notable Book List. The 21st event is with Raymond Luczak whose Once Upon a Twin is a poignant retelling of growing up in Ironwood, Michigan in a family of nine as the only deaf person. The events are open to all U.P. residents free of charge. Contact Evelyn Gathu


Finnish folk group Kardemimmit returns to Marquette

The Beaumier Heritage Concert Series is happy to announce the return of the Finnish folk group, Kardemimmit, to the campus of Northern Michigan University. Kardemimmit will perform at the Reynolds Recital Hall on Saturday, September 17 at 7:30 p.m. Visit nmu.universitytickets.com for tickets. The cost is $10 for the general public; $5 for NMU students and ages under 18. Kardemimmit will spend two days in Marquette performing for students on and off-campus, at the Jacobetti Veterans Facility and with music students from NMU at their concert on Saturday night. Their residency and performance are funded in part by a grant from the Arts Midwest Gig Fund. Kardemimmit is a band of four awesome women playing the Finnish national instrument, kantele. The band members are Maija Pokela, Jutta Rahmel, Anna Wegelius and Leeni Wegelius. You might wonder what the band’s name means. It’s a play of words. Kardemumma is a spice that Finnish people use a lot in their sweet baking. Mimmit is a word for girls that have bold nature. That means Kardemimmit is actually the Finnish Ethno Spice Girls. (Photo courtesy of NMU Beaumier Heritage Center)

in advance by egathu@crystalfallslibrary.org, or by phone (906) 8753344 to receive a link to this Zoom event.

Art comes to Marquette Mountain

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arquette Mountain will host Art and Music on the Mountain from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, September 10. The event is an art and craft fair, with live music by Conga Se Menne from 3 to 6 p.m.

Housing opportunities to be discussed

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he Social Education and Action Committee of First Presbyterian Church in Marquette will present a panel discussion, “Housing Opportunities in Marquette and the Populations They Serve” at 7 p.m. on September 18, in the church parlors. Participants include Stephen Kryieger from Room at the Inn, Jeanne Anderson from The Women’s Center, and Deanna Johnson from Habitat for Humanity. This is the first of several programs that will provide in-depth exploration of the varied housing needs in Marquette. The public is welcome.

The Crib hosts Snowbound author event September 14

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innesota author Peter Geye will be at The Crib Coffee Shop & Bar at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, September 14 for an event hosted by Snowbound Books as part of his fall book tour for his newest novel, The Ski Jumpers. Geye will discuss and read from the book, as well as answer audience questions. A signing will follow the presentation. The event is free and open to the public. Visit snowboundbooks.com for more information.

MCS seeks new members

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he Marquette Choral Society is celebrating the holiday season with a performance of Conrad Susa’s Carols and Lullabies: Christmas in the Southwest and Benjamin Britten’s Ceremony of Carols at 7 p.m. on December 17 and 3 p.m. on December 18 at Kaufman Auditorium. Tickets will be available for advanced purchase at NMU Ticketing (https://nmu. universitytickets.com/) and at the door. The choir is also currently seeking all voice parts, and an audition is not required. Rehearsals take place in room 250 in the Thomas Fine Arts Building, located on the campus of

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Northern Michigan University. Registration is $60 which includes membership and the music. Registration will take place at 6 p.m. on September 12 and 19. The Marquette Choral Society is a mixed-voice, adult choir of approximately 100 singers from a four-county region in the Upper Peninsula. MCS strives to engage, enrich and inspire the region through the art of choral music. The ensemble was founded in 1971 by Dr. William Dehning and is currently led by musical director Dr. Erin Colwitz. Visit www. facebook.com/MarquetteChoralSociety, www.marquettechoralsociety.org, or email choralsociety906@gmail. com for more information The Marquette Choral Society follows Northern Michigan University’s masking policy which can be found at https:// nmu.edu/safe-on-campus/masks

Marquette’s North Country Trail chapter meeting set for Sept. 13

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he Marquette Area Chapter of the North Country Trail will hold a general membership meeting on September 13 in the George Shiras III Room (upstairs) at Peter White Public Library. The event will include a presentation by John Forslin on “Climate Change and the Trail.” Additionally,

there will be an update from trail crew leaders on the state of the trail in the Marquette region. Attendees will also have a chance to provide feedback or ideas related to future chapter group activities and learn about various volunteer opportunities.

Soo Film Festival announces 2022 lineup

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oo Film Festival announces its selection of narrative and documentary features and shorts, music videos, and animation for 2022. The festival places an emphasis on Great Lakes films and filmmakers, but entry was open worldwide. Soo Film Festival is September 14 to 18 in downtown Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan at the historic Soo Theatre and at Bayliss Public Library, a Superior District Library. Featured selections will be screened at the library September 14 and 15 for free. All programs at Soo Theatre are ticketed. Dates and venues are subject to change. Festival passes are available now, individual tickets go on sale August 22. Complete ticket information is online at soofilmfestival.org. Ticket prices are $7 general admission (per block), $5 seniors and students (per block); $20 daily pass (admission to all blocks on a single day); $50 festival pass (ad-

mission to all films and shorts programs, all days). Films screened at Bayliss Library are free of charge. The 2022 Soo Film Festival was awarded a grant totaling $2,500 from the Michigan Arts and Culture Council and administered by Eastern Upper Peninsula Planning Commission. The grant was awarded through the MACC peer review process and was one of 559 applications to compete for fiscal year 2022 funding.

and Volunteer of the Year. Businesses and organizations must be GINCC members. Volunteer of the Year can be anyone in the community who has made an impact on their community. Nominations are accepted until September 9. Visit gincc.org to nominate an eligible business.

MRHC to host walking tour in North Marquette

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he Marji Gesick race, one of the most grueling endurance events in the entire Upper Peninsula, returns for those ready to take on the challenge September 16 to 18. The event boast a variety of races for bikers and runners looking to push themselves to their physical limits. Visit marjigesick.com for more information.

pend a fall evening strolling through one of Marquette’s iconic areas, as local historian Jim Koski leads a walking tour through North Marquette at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 14. Learn about how it was once the city’s industrial heartland, and hear tales of the amazing (and often unique) people who have called it home. Meet at the NMU PEIF parking lot. $5 suggested donation. Visit marquettehistory.org for more information.

GINCC accepting nominations for awards

UP Regional Blood Center Marquette in critical need

Marji Gesick returns to Ishpeming

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he Greater Ishpeming-Negaunee Area Chamber of Commerce will be accepting nominations for this year’s GINCC Business & Community Awards. Categories are: Business Person of the Year, Business of the Year, Organization of the Year

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he UP Regional Blood Center is experiencing a critical need for A negative, B negative and O negative blood types. The UP Regional Blood Center has collection sites in Marquette, Hancock and Escanaba and is the primary supplier of blood to 13

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Did You Know...

what the three Upper Peninsula foods are?

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he three foods attached to the U.P. are pasties, introduced by the early Cornish miners and their families in the 1840s; the cudighi or Italian sausage brought to the area by Italians from the region of Bergamo in northern Italy in the early 20th century; and world-famous Mackinac fudge created on the island beginning in the 1880s. Submitted by Dr. Russell M. Magnaghi, history professor emeritus of NMU and author, including the newly released Classic Food and Restaurants of the Upper Peninsula..

U.P. hospitals. Visit the center’s Facebook page at UPRBC906 or website at https://www.uphealthsystem.com/ regional-blood-center for more information. For hours and scheduling call Marquette at (906) 449-1450, Hancock at (906) 483-1392, and Escanaba at (906) 786-8420.

A look back at ‘company scrip’

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any years of extensive research led to the publication of this complete and colorful tome, Michigan Mining Scrip. Three authors and collectors collaborated on research of copper and iron mining companies throughout the U.P. that created their own company scrip (currency). Author David Gelwicks will present on this decades-long project and share his passion for rare fiscal papers and their stories at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 21 at the Marquette Regional History Center. $5 suggested donation.

New network aims to curb healthcare worker shortage

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collaborative effort to increase Upper Peninsula residents’ access to health care by expanding relevant workforce training, education and employment in the region has received a $1.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The project is called U.P. WIN, short for the Upper Peninsula Workforce Innovation Network. The Michigan Center for Rural Health was the lead applicant on the grant, and Elise Bur of the Northern Michigan University Center for Rural Health will be the project director. Bur said shortages of community health workers and paramedics in the Upper Peninsula continues to be an ongoing challenge that has only been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. One of the central elements of U.P. WIN is to create stronger links between training programs and the health care entities that will ultimately employ or rely on these public health professionals. The network’s goals are to: develop and expand sus-

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tainable community paramedicine and community health worker models in the U.P.; leverage EMS professionals to address at-risk populations, manage patients with chronic diseases in-home, and decrease hospital re-admissions, while avoiding unnecessary emergency department visits; identify, educate and provide cross-training opportunities for community health workers through NMU’s Center for Rural Health; and develop approaches in training to existing staff to maximize their clinical and operational capacity. In addition to the Michigan and NMU Centers for Rural Health, other partners in the network are: Upper Peninsula Michigan Works; U.P. Area Health Education Center; U.P. Health Care Solutions; Everyday Life Consulting; UP Health System Marquette School of EMT; and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services—Bureau of EMS, Trauma and Preparedness. The $1.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services went into effect August 1 and will be dispersed over a threeyear period.

Front Street Book Fair set for Sept. 22 to 24

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he three-day Front Street Book Fair returns in 2022 with used books on sale from September 22 through 24 at the Presbyterian Church in Marquette as well as the Peter White Public Library. The sale begins September 22 with a $5 presale from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., followed by a nocost admission sale from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on September 23. The final day will offer a half price sale from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., and then a $5 bag sale from 1:45 p.m. to 4 p.m. Proceeds from the sale at PWPL will benefit the library’s programs, services and materials. Proceeds from the sale at Presbyterian Church will benefit the Marquette Chapter of the American Association of University Women, whose mission is to advance equity for women and girls. Call Peter White Public Library at (906) 2289510 for more information.


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New bridge over Tahquamenon River named after longtime DNR Parks and Recreation division chief A 142-foot-long bridge installed last fall over the Tahquamenon River just got an important addition: a name. Friends, family, Michigan Department of Natural Resources officials and other colleagues gathered this morning at the Lower Tahquamenon Falls to dedicate the Ronald A. Olson Island Bridge, honoring the man at the helm of the DNR Parks and Recreation Division as chief for 17 years. The fabricated, all-aluminum pedestrian bridge at Tahquamenon Falls State Park, located in Paradise in the eastern Upper Peninsula, officially opened for use over the Memorial Day holiday weekend. Left, pedestrians use the new bridge to reach the island. Far left Olson is pictured. (Photos courtesy of Michigan Department of Natural Resources)

UPPCO accepting grant proposals through Oct. 15

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pper Peninsula Power Company (UPPCO) is now accepting proposals through October 15 for the annual Bond Falls Mitigation and Enhancement Fund (MEF) grant. The goal of the MEF grant is to create tangible, measurable improvements to aquatic and terrestrial environments within the Ontonagon River watershed. This watershed includes UPPCO’s Bond Falls and Victoria Hydroelectric Projects. UPPCO contributes annually to the MEF, which is managed by the Bond Falls Implementation Team (BFIT). BFIT is comprised of representatives from the Michigan Department of Natural

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Resources (MDNR), United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), United States Forest Service (USFS), Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC), Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) and other stakeholders. Applicants must contact a BFIT representative to discuss their proposal during the early stages of project development to ensure the objectives of the MEF grant are met. Proposals should focus on projects that improve aquatic, terrestrial, and/ or riparian habitats. Research into the benefits of previous watershed improvements are also eligible for MEF grant funding. Proposals must align with the management goals of Special Report No. 46: Ontonagon River Assessment (October 2008) published

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by MDNR Fisheries Division. For more information on UPPCO’s Bond Falls MEF grant, visit uppco.com and click on environmental efforts.

Beaumier opens new exhibit Sept. 22

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he Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center will open a new exhibition on the history of the Upper Great Lakes fisheries on Thursday, September 22. Entitled, “Above/Under the Surface: The Fisheries of the Upper Great Lakes,” this exhibition will look at the changes that have taken place in the fish populations and the impact of human beings on native fish species. There will be an opening reception at 6 p.m. on Thursday, September 22 at the Beaumier Center. The exhibition

will run through December 2022 and is free and open to the public. The history of the Upper Great Lakes fish life is central to not only the region’s ecosystem but its impact on human residents as well. For many millennia, the Great Lakes have been the home to dozens of species of fish, which is why it became such a popular region for habitation by the Indigenous people of the Midwest. With the arrival of Europeans and then the exploitation of the region’s natural resources, fish became an important part of not only nutrition but part of the way of life for Upper Peninsula’s residents. This led to overfishing of many of the fish species of the region, and in some cases, their extinction. In addition, the introduction of industrial


operations and human-made pollution had further impacts on the health of the waters and fish populations. Lastly, the introduction of non-native species, both intentionally and by accident, has further compromised the health of Michigan’s fishery. This exhibition will explore these themes and also highlight the work that students at Northern Michigan University are doing to assist fishery activities to maintain healthy fish populations.

Marquette County CROP Walk aims to end hunger

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he Marquette County CROP Walk is a fundraiser to end hunger one step at a time. Funds raised support both local and international hunger-fighting organizations. A total of 25% of the funds raised stay within Marquette County. Walkers raise funds to support their walk, which will take place at 2 p.m. on October 2, beginning at the Marquette Hope Connection Center. Contact coordinator Crystal Swanson at (906) 2250595 for more information.

UPAWS to host Strut Your Mutt fundraiser

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he Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter will once again hold its annual Strutt Your Mutt fund-

raiser, but this year it will be at a new location in Jackson Mine Park in Negaunee. The walk will then take place along the Iron Ore Heritage Trail, returning through the Old Towne area of Negaunee. The event will feature a 1.5-mile walk with over 100 other dogs from the area, recognition and prizes awarded to the top fundraisers, bucket raffle prices, vendor booths, a rescue raffle, snacks and beverages for people and pets alike, and dog contests throughout the day. Registration for the October 1 event runs through September 28 and is $20 for adults, $5 for children 16 and under, and all dogs are free. Visit upaws. org for more information.

Marquette’s 25th Annual Arts Awards set for October 8

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he City of Marquette Office of Arts and Culture presents the 25th Annual Art Awards on Saturday, October 8. This red-carpet affair honors outstanding individuals who have made an impact in arts and culture in Marquette. The awards show will be held at the Masonic Building’s Red Room, located at 128 W. Washington St. in Marquette. This year’s awards show is made possible by Innovate Marquette Smart Zone. The event is free and open to the public with a

Bradford Veley is a freelance cartoonist, illustrator and farmer in the U.P. Follow him on Facebook, Instagram and at www.bradveley.com

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Select Realty holds ribbon cutting at new office Select Realty recently held a ribbon cutting at its new location in Marquette Township. Originally a single-family home, the 2-acre property underwent a 12-month renovation, completed by local contractors. The new commercial space has 15 offices, a full kitchen and conference room. Pictured from left to right: Brooke Quinn, LSCP business development representative; Jon Kangas, Marquette Township manager; Lyn Durant, Marquette Township supervisor; Andi Goriesky, Select Realty associate broker/owner; Sean Leahy, Select Realty associate broker/owner; Elle Jansen, LSCP economic & community development specialist; Christopher Germain, LSCP CEO; Scott Knaffla, Marquette County ambassador; and Paul Wolfson, Marquette County ambassador. (Photo courtesy of Lake Superior Community Partnership)

“Marquette Formal” suggested dress code to match the occasion. The 25th Annual Art Awards show will feature performances by past recipients, notable community members as award presenters, and honor this year’s recipients: Arts Advocate, Susan Divine; Arts Business, The Gallery; Arts Educator, Barbara Rhyneer; Arts Organization, Revolve CC; Arts Volunteer, Robert Mercure; Performing Artist, Troy Graham; Visual Artist, Sawftsea (Chelsea Monaghan); Writer, B.G. Bradley; Youth, Ethan Swanson; Special Recognition, Judy Sarosik. Visit mqtcompass.com for more details about the Annual Art Awards. For questions contact the City of Marquette Office of Arts and Culture at arts-culture@marquettemi.gov or by phone at (906) 228-0472.

Marquette announces new arts award

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he City of Marquette Office of Arts and Culture recently announced a partnership with Innovate Marquette SmartZone in the creation of a new award for the 2022 Annual Art Awards; the Arts Innovation Award. After 25 years of honoring the Marquette creative community, it is apparent that recognition is required for those who think outside the box and take risks in their process. The Arts Innovation Award recognizes individuals who have exceptional creative thinking in their work and

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evidence of expansion in their perspectives and practice. Nominees should have demonstrated new methods, use of new technology, unique collaboration, unexpected use of materials, and develop new processes and collaborations that foster inclusivity and diversity. The Arts Innovation Award is open to traditional and contemporary artists of all mediums and forms; or could recognize an individual or business that purposefully incorporated artists or creative techniques to their process or product design. The nomination period for the Arts Innovation Award is open and will end Tuesday, September 6. Visit mqtcompass.com/annual-art-awards to find the nomination form. The 25th Annual Art Awards ceremony will occur Saturday October 8 and is free and open to the public to attend. Contact the City of Marquette Office of Arts and Culture 906-228-0472 or arts-culture@marquettemi.gov for more information.

News and notes from the DNR

• Last year, nearly 7,000 deer hunters voluntarily reported their deer harvest online to help test the Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ new reporting system. Starting with the fall 2022 deer seasons, online harvest reporting is required for all hunters who successfully take a deer. Hunters will have up to 72 hours


after taking a deer to report their harvest. The DNR estimates it should take about three to five minutes to complete the report. Report online at Michigan.gov/DNRHarvestReport or use the DNR’s new mobile app. • Looking for resources to improve urban forest management and better connect people to trees and forests? The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is now accepting applications for Community Forestry grants. • Eligible organizations including local and tribal governments, educational institutions and nonprofits can apply for grants of $1,000-$25,000 with a one-to-one match for projects that increase urban forest cover or improve community forest care and management.Projects may include tree inventories and assessments, tree planting and maintenance, Arbor Day celebrations, training and outreach, urban forestry technology and others. Projects should align with state goals outlined in the Michigan Forest Action Plan and a pledge to plant 50 million trees by 2030 as part of the DNR’s MI Trees initiative. Submit applications by Sept. 23. Projects must be completed by Sept. 1, 2023. Questions? Contact Urban and Community Forestry program coordinator Kevin Sayers, 517-582-3209, or urban forester Lawrence Sobson, 313-3164137. Learn more about community forests at Michigan.gov/UCF • A total of $250 million in federal relief funding was made available to the DNR to help address its long list of critical needs in Michigan state parks. These American Rescue Plan Act funds are part of a $4.8 billion infrastructure package signed in March as part of Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s Building Michigan Together Plan. This round includes more than a hundred projects, bundled into 40 contracts, for a proposed investment of $108.8 million. The funds will cover design, engineering and some

MDNR paying for red pine cones to help replant Michigan forests

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n an effort to help replenish Michigan forestland, the Michigan Department of Natural resources is offering $100 for a bushel of red pine cones. From Sept. 1 to 30, registered vendors can pick red pine cones and drop them off by appointment at several DNR locations in the Upper Peninsula and northern Lower Peninsula where red pines are most abundant. What are foresters looking for in a quality seed pine cone from a red pine? Freshness, proper storage and most of all – the right species. Old cones or the wrong species of cone won’t be accepted. To be paid for collected cones, register as a vendor in the DNR’s online system. Finding enough of the right cones is not an easy task, so come prepared for the outdoors and expect to be in the woods for a while. A bushel is approximately two five-gallon buckets. Tips to get started ed pines have craggy, reddish bark and 4-to-6-inch needles that grow in bundles of two. Scotch and Austrian pine cones, which have some similarities, will not be accepted. Cones should be picked off the tree; cones on the ground are likely too old or wet. No twigs, needles or debris will be accepted in bushels of cones. Cone scales – the individual plates of a cone – should be closed (scales should not move when squeezed), with a little green or purple tint. If they’re all brown and open, and they’re too far gone and will be refused. The easiest way to collect cones

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Michigan’s DNR is paying for red pine cones, like the ones pictured here. (Photo courtesy of MDNR)

is to pick from living red pine trees where branches extend close to the ground. Fresh cones can be found in recently felled treetops from timber sales and on state forest lands. If picking from a recent timber sale, logger permission is required, and hardhats must be worn for safety. Store pine cones in a cool, dry place in mesh bags. Onion bags will be provided to pickers by the DNR at drop-off locations. Don’t use burlap or plastic bags, which can hold moisture and ruin the cones. Tag bags on the inside and outside with your name, county where you picked and if the cones are wild or from a plantation. Cones may be dropped off by appointment at select DNR Customer Service Centers and Wyman Nursery in Manistique. The only Upper Peninsula service center collecting pine cones is in Newberry. Contact Jason Tokar at (906) 291-0126 to make a drop-off appointment.

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What does the DNR do with pine cones? fter pine cones are dropped off, they’re put into machines that gently warm and shake them, allowing the seeds within to drop out and be stored until planting time. This process helps foresters replant the forest and replenishes the supply of red pine seed, which is in high demand. Red pine is a fast-growing tree species that is used to make many types of forest products including lumber, posts and pulpwood. Michigan’s forests provide clean air and water, renewable resources, homes for wildlife and places to explore nature. The DNR is committed to ensuring we will always have forests by maintaining responsible management certifications and regenerating or replanting cut trees. Visit Michigan.gov/Forestry to learn more. MM

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construction. All projects, where possible, are sustainably designed to be environmentally sensitive and cost-efficient.

From the desk of Gov. Gretchen Whitmer

MTU’s mascot celebrates 50 years The original MTU mascots, Kathy and Bill Wassberg, pose with the mascot of today, representing 50 years of Husky spirit. The university recently celebrated their mascot, Blizzard T. Husky’s 50th birthday, during an event at the Johnny Mac in August. Blizzard is not yet 50, technically, but carries on the spirit of Tech’s first mascots, who debuted 50 years ago. So it was fitting that the VIPs who came to celebrate this milestone included the original mascots, 1971 graduates Bill and Kathy Wassberg, and mascot program supporters Dave (’68 and ’71) and Sharron Paris. Longtime Tech donors, they assisted with the naming contest (the other options were Harley, Heikki, Howie and Yoopie). (Photo courtesy of Michigan Tech University)

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• Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is encouraging Michiganders working in public service to review the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program to see if they qualify for federal student loan relief no later than October 31, 2022. Thousands have already utilized the program to pay off their debt, and over 148,000 more Michiganders may be eligible due to the recent PSLF waiver. To apply for the PSLF waiver, borrowers should: visit studentaid.gov/pslf/ employer-search/search-tool to verify their employer qualifies for PSLF and submit a certified copy of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Employment Certification form to the U.S. Department of Education before October 31. If borrowers have questions regarding their individual situation, they can visit studentaid.gov/pslf/ or call FedLoan Servicing at 1-855-2654038.   • Gov. Whitmer celebrated the bipartisan expansion of access to free or low-cost child care for 150,000 more

Michigan kids and their families over the past year. Families with two kids earning up to $55,500 may qualify for help paying for child care. The state also launched a new tool to help Michiganders easily identify their eligibility for child care benefits. • Gov. Whitmer sent a letter directing the Michigan Department of Insurance and Financial Services (DIFS) to require Michigan health insurance companies to reduce their previously filed health insurance rates for 2023. This is possible because of an extension of premium subsidies under the Inflation Reduction Act, which are already saving enrolled Michiganders nearly $800 a year on health insurance. • Gov. Whitmer recently announced new appointments to state boards and committees. Upper Peninsula residents include: Sheri Davie, of Marquette, who was appointed to the Lake Superior State University Board of Trustees and is the executive director for the Marquette Brownfield Authority; and Dale Johnson, of Sagola, the president of Johnson Brothers Incorporated. Mr. Johnson was appointed to represent growers-at-large on the Michigan Potato Industry Commission. MM


on campus MTU professor awarded for leading COVID-19 testing at MTU

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or her efforts leading the COVID-19 testing lab on campus, Caryn Heldt has been selected to receive Michigan Technological University’s 2022 Faculty Distinguished Service Award. “Solutions always start small.” That’s the advice Caryn Heldt offers anyone feeling daunted by all the big problems facing the world right now, and she is well-qualified to offer it. Heldt — a professor and the James and Lorna Mack Endowed Chair of Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering in Michigan Tech’s Department of Chemical Engineering, and also the director of Tech’s Health Research Institute — helped solve one of the largest problems the University has ever faced. In early 2020, Heldt led the collaborative effort to stand up a COVID-19 diagnostic testing lab at Michigan Tech — the first and only such lab in the Upper Peninsula at the time, and one of the few campus-based testing labs in the nation without prior certification to handle human samples. For Heldt’s tremendous accomplishments during this time, she has been awarded MTU’s 2022 Faculty Distinguished Service Award. Distinguished Faculty Service Award The Michigan Tech Faculty Distinguished Service Award recognizes faculty whose service to the university community has significantly improved the quality of some aspect of campus or community life. The award is intended to recognize exceptional rather than integrated service. The work could have resulted, in part, from compensated efforts, but it must have been of a level that distinguishes itself above and beyond the normal

execution of those tasks. Nominations are solicited from University members and reviewed by the award committee. Winners receive $2,500 and a plaque at an awards dinner sponsored by the Office of the President in the fall. In his letter of nomination, Vice President for Research Dave Reed notes the “seemingly millions of details” Heldt navigated in setting up the lab, most of which occurred during the chaotic early days of the pandemic. “We had daily and often twice-daily calls with the team because things were advancing so fast,” says Reed. “Caryn had to hire and train staff, coordinate with medical care providers, manage the internal dynamics of using rooms assigned to different academic units, and acquire and move equipment from several other labs on campus.” Heldt’s natural leadership abilities were immediately apparent to the interdisciplinary laboratory group. “Her organizational ability was outstanding and her people skills were truly amazing to watch,” Reed says. “From the first moment, others looked to her for that leadership.” Heldt and her team’s work soon proved invaluable to the community. The lab analyzed samples from both surveillance testing and from symptomatic individuals, making it possible for the University to bring students back on campus for in-person instruction in fall 2020. By the time the lab stopped accepting patient samples in December 2021, it had provided almost 40,000 diagnostic tests for the people of the western U.P. “While all this was going on, Caryn went through what most every other faculty member went through, from

Professor Caryn Heldt. (Photo courtesy of Michigan Tech University)

having children in school to switching to online instruction and meetings, maintaining research projects, advising graduate students and keeping up her departmental service,” says Reed. “She graduated one M.S. and three Ph.D. students while working with the testing lab, published eight papers that year — twice as many as normal — and was awarded two grants of over a million dollars each.” Where others might have been overwhelmed by so many responsibilities or by decision fatigue, Heldt thrived. “Part of being a good problem solver is learning how to break the problem down into small pieces,” she says. “That’s the best way to solve these big problems. Sometimes the solution isn’t to impact the world. But if you can make your community better, then that’s how you start.” — Rick White, Michigan Tech University

NMU announces alumni award recipients

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orthern Michigan University Alumni Relations has announced four recipients of the 2022 Alumni Awards: Steve Nystrom (‘82 BS, ‘86 MA) of Marquette, Distinguished Alumni; James Paquette (‘74 BS) of Negaunee, Alumni Achievement; Stephanie Lay (‘10 AS, ‘11 BS) of Oakland, Calif., Outstanding Young Alumni; and Chris Mosier (‘03 BFA) of Chicago, Ill., Alumni Service -

Community. Nominated and selected by fellow alumni, the recipients are honored for significant achievements in their fields, substantial contributions to society, and have demonstrated exceptional leadership and civic qualities. The honorees will be recognized and celebrated in-person during Homecoming 2022 (Sept. 23-24). More information on Homecoming

2022 events will be released in the coming weeks. Detailed feature stories with comments from each recipient will be issued at a later date. Visit nmu.edu/alumni/awards for more information on the award criteria and to nominate fellow alumni. NMU Alumni Relations can be contacted at alumni@nmu.edu — NMU Alumni Relations

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then & now

The Calumet Fire Hall then, circa 1910.

The Calumet Fire Hall now.

Photos provided by Superior View Studios, located in Art of Framing, 149 W. Washington Street Marquette www.viewsofthepast.com

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September 2022


IN THE MONEY

Reprinted from the New York Times

No. 0828

By Jeff Chen & Jim Horne/Edited By Will Shortz

ACROSS 1 Hotel chain operated by Hilton 4 Banned insecticide 7 Big voices with big egos 12 Some users of Cyrillic script 17 Antique furniture expert, perhaps 20 Like bills in arrears 22 Freak out 23 100 percent 24 Sight at a checkout counter 26 Golfer who won the 1998 Masters (Italy) 28 Attach, as a patch 29 ‘‘Baa, baa’’ ma 30 ‘‘Rosy-fingered’’ Greek goddess 31 Snitch out 34 Zip 35 World’s end? 36 Grp. led by Mahmoud Abbas beginning in 2004 39 Apples and pears, botanically 41 Seethe (Norway) 44 Queen Latifah’s given first name 46 Playwright ____-Manuel Miranda 47 Benefit 48 Pipsqueaks 49 Give up all at once (Ecuador) 53 Org. with a Summer League 54 Churn 55 Response from a therapist 56 Were, for one? 58 ‘‘If we don’t end ____, ___ will end us’’: H. G. Wells 61 Calculus expert? 63 ‘‘Inventing ____’’ (2022 Netflix hit) 66 Die-hard 70 Gate in digital logic

Answer Key

To check your answers, see Page 74.

71 Major player in U.S. economic policy (Egypt) 74 Retired jersey number for the 76ers’ Moses Malone 75 Post-it notes, e.g. 77 Cousin of a plum 78 It’s good for three points 80 Where you might get into hot water 81 ____ Hortons (Canadian chain) 83 Statistician Silver 85 Land with an accent over its first letter 86 Big inits. in TVs 89 Boarding group? (Switzerland) 94 Causes for pauses 97 God: Lat. 98 Stephen of ‘‘V for Vendetta’’ 99 Except for 100 Activity for Santa (Rwanda) 102 Scouts B.S.A. members since 2019 104 Marks, as a ballot 105 ‘‘OK, you get it,’’ for short 106 De ____ (freshly) 107 Used room service, e.g. 109 Hamm of women’s soccer fame 111 Nickname that’s three consecutive letters of the alphabet 112 Torus-shaped gasket 114 One who walks to work? (Qatar) 119 What this puzzle’s circled letters are with respect to the surrounding shaded squares? 123 Quite eccentric 124 Noted underground adventurer 125 Sad ass 126 Burger topping that jacks up the cholesterol 127 Rich sources 128 Kidney-related 129 Asphalt component

130 Daily ____ (news blog) DOWN 1 Disneyland ride 2 McEntire of country music 3 Old map inits. 4 Certain coding snippet 5 Special collection of musical hits? 6 ‘‘Je te plumerai la ____’’ (line from ‘‘Alouette’’) 7 Old gold coin 8 ____ spot 9 Seconds, in brief 10 Open-mouthed responses 11 Temptresses in the ‘‘Odyssey’’ 12 Create an elaborate series of deceptions 13 Part of L.V. 14 Got in the game, perhaps 15 Watch parties? 16 Focus for 15-Down 18 It’s a drag 19 Seats 21 Big name in power tools 25 Fail 27 Monitors at school, briefly 32 ____-Eaters 33 Kindle competitor 36 ‘‘ASAP!’’ 37 Sondheim and Bernstein’s collaborator on ‘‘West Side Story’’ 38 Pungent party bowlful 40 Ultra-aggressive 42 Freshly 43 Quite a fight 45 Fighting 47 ‘‘____ días!’’ 50 Instantly get along well 51 Rush 52 Home of the David Geffen School of Drama 57 Laundry product 59 Like some 401(k) contributions 60 It’s touchy to hit 61 ‘‘____ Rheingold’’

62 ‘‘The Chi’’ channel, familiarly 64 It has a devoted following on Sundays 65 Expiates, with ‘‘for’’ 67 ‘‘____ out!’’ 68 Formal farewell 69 Modifier in digital logic 72 ‘‘Oh, really?’’ 73 Catch a few waves? 76 Lloyd of women’s soccer fame 79 Talk smack about 82 Skirt style 84 Getting bored with 87 Suggests 88 Kind of cat or rabbit 90 Flat top? 91 Target of a joke 92 Region of Croatia associated with a canine breed 93 ‘‘Did you ring?’’ 94 Hybrid farm animal 95 Site acquired by Match.com in 2011 96 London’s ____ Row 100 Liquor from Mexico 101 Like em dashes visà-vis en dashes 102 Benitez of TV news 103 Fuse by heating below the melting point 108 Bomb produced in the 1950s 110 Ritalin target, for short 113 Marvin who sang ‘‘Sexual Healing’’ 115 Offended 116 Food that’s a national emblem of Wales 117 ‘‘Thus . . . ’’ 118 Standard operating procedures, for short 120 Clinch 121 Plasma particle 122 Ambrose Burnside was its first president, for short

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arts

Todd Poquette, Kelsy Kellermann, and Marc Salm at the end of their 17 day bike ride around the U.P. (Photo courtesy of Aaron Peterson)

An Unforgettable journey

New film follows intrepid bikers as they circumnavigate Lake Superior By Taylor Johnson

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n May 22, 2021, four cyclists, Todd Poquette, Marc Salm, Kelsy Kellermann, and Liz Belt, took off from the Keweenaw Rocket Range at the tip of the Keweenaw Peninsula, starting their 1,640 mile bicycling trip around the Upper Peninsula.

They named their journey Project Adventrus. The team had a goal to cycle 100 miles a day, intending to complete their trip on top of Brockway Mountain. They weren’t alone on their journey. Ishpeming resident Aaron Peterson’s company, Aaron Peterson Studios, was contracted by U.P. Travel to film Project Adventrus and edit it into a movie. The result would be a 40-minute glimpse into the challenges, successes and determination it took for the four cyclists to circumnavigate the U.P. over the course of 17 days. They 18

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would name the film Unforgettable. “We named it Unforgettable because it’s an unforgettable journey in an unforgettable place, but ironically it’s a place that’s often left off the map,” Peterson said. All four bikers’ lives had been connected through the work of 906 Adventure Team; a non-profit Poquette had started in 2014. The 906 Adventure Team is the group that created the Polar Roll, The Crusher and Marji Gesick. Although the four had been linked through 906, all four had never ridden together before. Poquette and Salm were familiar with each other; as they had biked together in October 2020, taking a ten-day, 1,000-mile trip from the Keweenaw Rocket Range to Marquette. “It turned out to be the snowiest October on record,” Poquette said. “It felt like we were rained and


snowed on every day. By far the most brutal experience of my life.” So, why in the world would they want to experience something like that again? “Humans have evolved and learned for thousands of years through story. Whether it’s a drawing on a rock, a cave wall, a book, or an iPad. There’s nothing more powerful than story and shared experiences. That’s why we went back and did it again. That’s why we wanted to have Aaron document the attempt,” Poquette said. “We’re normal everyday men and women like everyone else in the middle class. We have jobs, families, obligations, kids, bills, all of it. And we found time to do it… no…. we made time to do it. That’s what we need to share and show. You don’t have to give up hopes and dreams. You have to build a life that has room for them.” Poquette was the project lead for Project Adventrus. For years, the idea to ride around the U.P. had been burrowing in his brain. “The idea to ride around the U.P. came up around more than one campfire the past 10 years but you know how that goes. We tend to get busy. We tell ourselves ‘I’ll do it when I have time,’ but we never seem to have time. Yet, we’re doing a lot of other stuff. Right? If we’re honest, and we need to be, it’s not about how much time you have. It’s about how you use the time you have and what you choose to do with it,” Poquette said. The decision to finally go after that idea turned into a reality, and they started preparing to make their long journey. Consistent training, gear testing and working with world-class athlete and coach Rob Lee helped to ensure that the trip would be successful. When May 22 came around, the four, along with Peterson’s crew, hit the road. Peterson’s crew would mainly follow the bikers around in a van but would bike with them when it was possible. “We were primarily van based, and then we would bike along with them when it made sense. [We] camped with them most of the nights,” Peterson said. Kellermann and Belt camped out in tents, while Poquette and Salm hammocked. “We carried three days’ worth of food on us at all times and took resupply from family and friends along the way. The support provided by our families, friends and everyone we encountered during the

YOU DON’T HAVE TO GIVE UP HOPES AND DREAMS. YOU HAVE TO BUILD A LIFE THAT HAS ROOM FOR THEM.

trip was incredible,” Poquette said. The first day the group intended to ride 120 miles. Around the Houghton area, about 90 miles in, a storm halted their ride. “You can’t go into a ride like this and think you’re going to script 16 days. There’s no ... way,” Poquette said. Eventually, they found a place to camp in someone’s backyard for the night. “We could have gotten worked up about being behind, but we just rolled with it,” Poquette said. The four weren’t the only ones who faced problems. Peterson’s crew ran into several problems during the jaunt. Those issues included accidentally backing the van into a lamppost in Ironwood, destroying Peterson’s bike that was on the back of the van. The bike was taken in to a bike shop to get fixed. Once it was repaired, they rejoined the bikers. The van also suffered some broken parts due to trying to drive it through some sandy hills. The most harrowing day, according to Peterson, was the day the crew got turned around in the Ontonagon area and got the van stuck in mud for several hours. It was a cold, rainy day and the crew couldn’t push the vehicle out no matter how hard they tried. Luckily, Peterson was able to get one bar of cell service and called some friends in the area. Those friends were out of the area but forwarded September 2022

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the message to some local volunteer firefighters who showed up on their ORV’s and had winches to get them unstuck. Because the crew was traveling mostly by van, they had some downtime on their hands between meeting the bikers from one spot to the next, so they shot some drone footage while waiting. During filming they had three or four drone crashes, one of which was disastrous. The drone had clipped a tree in the Nahma area and fell out of the sky onto the road, never to work again. One thing that did work well though was the electric cargo bike the crew had built. It was a one-person bike that had a long rear end. The crew converted the rear end part to have a backward facing seat on it so the person on the back could film the bikers. They put mountain bike tires and a double battery on it to top it off. It allowed two people to go around 20 miles an hour, which is about the speed the bikers were doing on good roads. “We could be right in among them and filming their faces, and filming details of the bike in motion as opposed to them just riding

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The bike route around the U.P. (Image courtesy of Aaron Peterson)

past us over and over,” Peterson said. The crew would capture the biker’s determination and mental and physical strength throughout the trip. They also showed the grittiness the four endured – bruises, sunburns, cuts, and scrapes from not only riding trails, but also

September 2022

pushing their bikes through mud, up steep hills and through dense wooded areas. “I wanted to come out here with the intention of really getting to know myself again,” Kellermann said in the film. The film also portrays the beauty of nature. Scenic shots of turtles,

a moose, the woods, and water, among much more, were used as transitional scenes between showing the bikers and switching scenes to showing the crew in various filming stages. Shots of small town businesses, run down barns, and bullet-hole-riddled highway signs gives the viewer a desolate feeling


of being in a small town, but in an oddly comforting way. “This trip, for me, it was kind of a rekindling of a relationship with the U.P. and driving home how wild it really still is in a lot of locations,” Peterson said. When the four pulled into the Marquette Welcome Center on U.S. 41, Belt announced this would be the end of the journey for her due to her severe back pain. She hugged all her companions before telling them to be safe and taking her leave. The remaining three would push through until the end of the journey on June 7, 2021. “I’m going to say in a broad sense the biggest challenge during any endeavor of this magnitude is managing your headspace and remaining highly adaptable,” Poquette said. He remarked that he wouldn’t change anything about the trip, though. “When you strip away modern conveniences, amenities, and comforts and transition to living off the bike outside for days, weeks, at a time you are afforded a unique opportunity to see the world, life in general, free of the filters and narratives forced upon us by employers, marketing, social media, etcetera. The experience is profound in a way you can only truly understand by experiencing it,” Poquette said. Unforgettable can be viewed at: https://vimeo.com/710360318

Above, Todd Poquette, Marc Salm, Kelsy Kellermann, and Liz Belt biking through Ironwood. Right, Peterson’s van trying to get through a large mud puddle. (Photos courtesy of Aaron Peterson)

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About the Author: Taylor Johnson is a Marquette native who graduated from Northern Michigan University in 2017. She thoroughly enjoys writing and has worked as a journalist for a local newspaper. September 2022

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feature

Keweenaw Dark Sky Park

Two-year process ends with first of its kind designation in UP By Joyce Wiswell

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ew owners of a resort often like to tout all the pampering amenities they are adding. The historic Keweenaw Mountain Lodge is taking a different tack, literally turning the lights way down low to offer a true back-to-nature experience. In fact, the property just became a designated Dark Sky Park, a nearly two-year process of revising and resubmitting applications (four in all) to International Dark-Sky Places. The IDSP Program encourages the preservation and protection of dark sites through responsible lighting policies and public education. Keweenaw is one of nearly 200 Dark Sky Parks around the world and Michigan’s third; the other two are in Mackinaw City and Jones, near the Indiana bor-

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der. (Efforts to achieve such a designation at Marquette’s Presque Isle about a decade ago have apparently stalled.) To emphasize that it’s for everyone, not just paying guests, Lodge owner John Mueller has dubbed it Keweenaw Dark Sky Park, keeping the word “lodge” out of the title. All are welcome to visit the golf course (stay off the greens!) as well as adjacent Brockway Mountain Drive for stargazing and northern lights viewing. Lodge guests can even borrow a telescope. Getting that official Dark Sky designation falls squarely in line with Mueller’s mission to make the lodge “a resort closer to nature.” As Outdoor Activities Lead Chris Guibert puts it, “people are coming for an

September 2022

outdoor experience, to hike, bike and enjoy the Lake Superior shoreline, and we have to make the resort friendly to them.” So while glamping continues to be all the rage in many places, Mueller has decided to embrace a more pristine, environmental mentality since acquiring the property from Keweenaw County in 2018. “People don’t come here to see people – they come here to connect with nature,” Mueller said, who has enacted changes big and small among the 560-acre property to emphasize that point. Tee times at the 9-hole course, for example, are now 15 minutes apart so golfers don’t run into, or even see, each other while out on the links.

Deep History uilt under the Works Progress Administration in 1934, the handsome wooden lodge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The sprawling log cabin structure is a classic example of “parkitecture” with its soaring beamed ceilings, giant stone fireplaces and original fireplace screens built by the Keweenaw County Road Commission. A 2007 addition added a conference and banquet center that has hosted countless weddings and special events over the decades. Keeping with the egalitarian attitude of its new owner, the prime space in the lodge that once housed staff offices (closing off some of the best views behind dated paneled walls) have been opened up as common space. Members of the public are wel-

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Thanks to a recent designation as a Dark Sky Park, the night sky at the Keweenaw Mountain Lodge is looking a lot brighter. (Photo courtesy of Chris Guibert)

come to bring their laptops and hang out in the atmospheric lodge to take advantage of the Wi-Fi, which can be a hot commodity in the area. The lodge has also worked with the Copper Harbor Trails Club, which holds a popular mountain biking festival each Labor Day weekend, to donate easements, allowing two trails to reopen that had been closed due to liability concerns. They also helped reopen overgrown cross-country ski trails known as the Back 9 that, thanks to their relatively rolling terrain, are appropriate for beginning mountain bikers — a rarity in the steep Copper Harbor area. “It’s a good asset for the folks in the Keweenaw because most of our trails are difficult,” said Nathan Miller, the organization’s executive director.

But not everyone is thrilled with Mueller’s changes, particularly the 40 or so people who used to have memberships to the golf course, thus stowing their carts for free and reserving tee times as early and often as they wanted — which Mueller says sometimes shut out lodge guests. Nowadays, those staying in one of the 25 cabins can book a tee time far out, while the public can only reserve a week in advance. Kids under 10 play free, and Keweenaw County residents get a discount. “I watched the first year and didn’t make any changes,” Mueller said of taking over the property, which some feared would close when the county put it up for sale. “We could have gone the country club route or the resort route. I let the data tell me.”

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There are plenty of trails at the Keweenaw Mountain Lodge for a family bike ride. (Photo courtesy of Chris Guibert)

That data, he says, told him that the cabins contribute as much as 70 percent to the property’s bottom line and that the golf course could not sustain itself as a municipal course. Those 25 log cabins offer rustic ambiance with one to three bedrooms and gas or wood fireplaces. Half are winterized, and new roofs are being added after 30 years and what Mueller called “five layers of shingles.” Due to the shortage of staff that has plagued many a U.P. business, meal service has been severely curtailed to

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breakfast burritos, a lunchtime sandwich that changes daily, and private four-course dinners that cost $100 per person, all under the banner of “rustic worldly food.” (Cabin guests can also purchase meal and s’mores kits to prepare on their outdoor grills.) “Staffing,” said Mueller, “has been harder than any pandemic. We have 21 employees when we should be at 50 or 55.” The former Pro Shop, which had been dormant for years, has been transformed into the Outdoor Activ-


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A racer is cheered on by spectators. (Photo courtesy of Chris Schmidt)

Copper Harbor Trails Fest brings buzz to award-winning trail system By Kathy Ihde

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opper Harbor Trails Club Executive Director Nathan Miller is looking forward to the 29th Annual Keweenaw Mountain Lodge Copper Harbor Trails Fest (formerly, The Bell’s Brewery Copper Harbor Trails Fest) Labor Day Weekend, Sept. 2 to 4, in Copper Harbor. “The official name this year is ‘The Keweenaw Mountain Lodge Copper Harbor Trails Fest,’” Miller said. John Mueller, the owner of Keweenaw Mountain Lodge, stepped in after Bell’s Brewery was acquired by another beer company. The Keweenaw Mountain Lodge was built in 1934, when Keweenaw County had a 75.2% unemployment rate; 1,000 families found themselves without work or money. Land was donated for a “Keweenaw Park and Golf Course” with the condition that a nine-hole golf course be constructed, and the park would be open to everyone in Keweenaw County. The Keweenaw Mountain Lodge is on the State of Michigan and the National Histori-

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cal Registers; it was designated a State Historical Location in 1976 and a National Historical Location in 1980. The Lodge received the full endorsement of Keweenaw Dark Sky Park Certification in June of 2022. Miller takes on not only the running the event, but he holds the history of “Trails Fest” in his keeping. Though he wasn’t a race director, Aaron Rogers is a cog in the wheel of the event. He’s the founder of Rock Solid Contracting. Without his skills, vision and trail-building artistry, there may not have been a “Trails Fest.” “After I’d been building trails for two years, we started seeing more riders,” Rogers said. “That’s when we started the Copper Harbor Trails Club and pushed fundraising.” Rogers’ creativity led to the International Mountain Biking Association (IMBA) designating the Copper Harbor Trails a Silver Level Ride Center. Sam Raymond was the race director from 1998 to 2012. He stepped down in 2012, and

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Lori Hauswirth became Executive Director in 2013. Nathan Miller succeeded her in 2018. According to Miller, he’d never mountain-biked until he became Executive Director of the Copper Harbor Trails Club in 2018. He thrives on outdoor activities: “I hike, I camp, I paddle, I ski, I snowshoe… you have to, it’s the Keweenaw,!” Miller said. “Mountain biking was one of the last things I got into — outdoor recreation-wise — in the Keweenaw.” Before becoming the club’s executive director, Miller worked at the Keweenaw Land Trust as a project coordinator, helping with conservation and trail building in nature areas that the land trust managed. He has a master’s degree in regional planning.

“I manage everything: trails, events, maintenance, volunteers, fundraising, outreach …a little bit of everything. I’m the only full-time employee,” Miller said. “We hire our maintenance workers through Rock Solid and we work with Continued on page 28


Picturesque vistas greet a snowshoer (right) and cross country skiers (above) on the trail system at the Keweenaw Mountain Lodge. (Photos courtesy of Chris Guibert)

ity Center, where people can rent high-end, full-suspension mountain bikes, cross-country skis or snowshoes. A bike washing/tool station is free to the public. Education is another big part of Mueller’s mission; as the website declares, “be fearless and persistent in learning on a daily basis.” That means workshops on topics as diverse as star gazing, night-sky photography, mountain biking, snowshoeing and local history (free for guests and open to the public for a fee). Mueller said he is dedicated to transparency, so much so that a visit to the lodge’s website can lead one down a virtual rabbit hole of detailed information on the resort’s history, philosophy, upcoming projects, food choices and

the like. Wonder why the cabins have no TV? You can read all about their problems with a satellite provider and learn that ultimately, television is “not what we are about.” Interested in what’s coming next? You’ll find lots of material on future goals, which include adding a charging station for electric vehicles, live night cams and a quiet park designation. “Transparency,” said Guibert, “is a big part of our thing.” People are taking notice; despite rates of $200 to $375 a night and a two-night minimum, the cabins are frequently sold out, and in June the venerable Travel + Leisure magazine called the property one of the “13 Best U.S. Resorts for Reconnecting With Nature.”

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A muddy rider continues down the trail. (Photo courtesy of Chris Schmidt)

Continued from page 26 lots of volunteers for our events. I also meet with our board of directors and committees.” Originally from Pennsylvania, Miller attended Michigan Technological University. “I never left the area; I’ve been living here for 16 years,” he said. “This is my fifth Trails Fest (except for the COVID year). That year, we were in the park with a little gift stand, a ‘merch booth,’ and an information table. People were still riding, but we didn’t organize any races that year. “Now that we’re not sponsored by Bell’s Brewery, we have a bigger selection of beers to choose from. We partner with Pisani Distributing; they have a variety of beers from across the state and Midwest. We’ll have the usual large selection of beers, seltzers, and ciders.” Miller is looking forward to the musicians taking the Donny Kilpela Band Shell stage that weekend. “There will be music in the park Saturday and Sunday nights, from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.,” Miller said. Terrapin Flyer, a national touring Grateful Dead band, takes the Bandshell stage Saturday night. “On Sunday, we have 4onthefloor,” Miller said. “They played for us last year and they were awesome! They’re a regular American rock band that knows how to party.” Non-bikers are invited to enjoy the music. “We sell wristbands for one or both nights,” Miller said. Tickets for the music are $20 for the weekend or $10 per night. Volunteers and racers get in for free.

“Be sure to keep your wristband,” he noted. “No wristband/no music.” Miller is expecting a large turnout of racers. “In the past, we’ve had over 600, almost 700 racers. It’s going to be another big event,” Miller promised. The weekend opens in the Donny Kilpela Memorial Park with registration and check-in from 7 to 9 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 2. Racing kicks off at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 2 with the XC Race in Downtown Copper Harbor; the Downhill Race on Overflow Trail at 3 p.m., and the Junior MTB Races at the Back 9 Trails near the Keweenaw Mountain Lodge at 4 p.m. The XC and Downhill awards ceremony begins at 6 p.m. Saturday evening, and the ArtBike at the Harbor opens at 6:45 p.m. Registration and check-in for Sunday’s races are open in the park from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. The Trail Run kicks off racing for the day at 9 a.m., followed by the Enduro Race, which starts from 10 to 10:30 a.m. MM About the Author: In June of 2018, Kathy Ihde and her husband, Jeff, retired to Copper Harbor, MI, from Fort Atkinson, WI, where she was a feature writer and theatre reviewer for the DAILY JEFFERSON COUNTY UNION for over 27 years.

The Copper Harbor Trails Club’s Miller said he’s grateful for the new regime’s appreciation of the area’s rugged beauty. “It has been really exciting to see their focus on the outdoors and embracing the trails. That wasn’t so much the case when it was owned by the county,” he said. “Nothing has really changed for the visiting public if you are out in the woods, but every year we work to develop new trails and protect more land for the pubic to use, so we are happy to work with them.”

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Keweenaw Mountain Lodge Copper Harbor Trails Fest Events The Enduro is a stage-race format where the goal is to accumulate the lowest combined time from a series of individually timed sections. The Short and Long cross country races feature challenging singletrack and elevation changes that are the trademark of the Copper Harbor Trails. The Downhill event will be held on the mightiest trail, Overflow. Back after a year off, the trail received a complete overhaul from the crew at Rock Solid. The rugged 10K Trail Run tackles some of the system’s gnarliest terrain. There are 1.5-mile and 3-mile mountain bike races for children under 13 years of age on the Back 9 Trails near the Keweenaw Mountain Lodge.

Increased tourism, he said, is “almost too much of a good thing” as the Keweenaw Peninsula explodes in popularity. “For better or worse,” Miller said, “COVID helped people rediscover the outside.” MM About the Author: Joyce Wiswell is a freelance writer and editor in Hancock.


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in the outdoors An adult monarch butterfly on common milkweed. (Photo by Scot Stewart)

Monarchs A journey over generations, with a stop in the UP By Scot Stewart “We must remain as close to the flowers, the grass, and the butterflies as the child is who is not yet so much taller than they are.” — Friedrich Nietzsche

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he monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is probably the most recognized insect in the country. It is best known for its bright orange, black and white wings, and its epic story of its migration to Mexico each fall. Its relationship to milkweed plant and its life cycle are well-known

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to many, including school children, who are familiar with caterpillars and chrysalises of the butterflies. The Upper Peninsula is a special place for monarchs, and more and more people are beginning to realize just how special they are. Most monarchs spend the winter in around a dozen mountain regions of oyamel fir forests in the states of Mexico and Michoacan in central Mexico. They are small pockets of forest in just a small area, about 70 miles square, in the Sierra Madre Mountains. During

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four to five winter months, the butterflies huddle in trees in large clumps that can contain 15,000 butterflies. Weather occasionally drops to below freezing temperatures and experiences occasional snow. The cool temperatures reduce the butterflies’ need for food during this time — imagine the flowers that would be needed to feed thousands of butterflies for several months! In February, the population begins to become more active and starts moving back north. These monarchs

have lived the longest of any of their species. Typically, adults live only a few weeks before mating, laying eggs and passing on. These migrants have delayed breeding, a process called reproductive diapause, until they have made their way northward to Texas and a few other southern states. Once their offspring have turned into adults, they continue on and start the next wave of monarchs even further north. Third and fourth generations are the ones that make it to the Upper Peninsula and even beyond in Canada.


Right, a monarch butterfly with a tag for tracking it on its long journey. Below, a Viceroy Butterfly one of a few Monarch mimics. (Photo by Scot Stewart)

“We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty.” — Maya Angelou nce adults reach their destination, they seek out milkweed plants. Although there are about 100 species of milkweed in the United States, only a quarter of them serve as hosts for monarchs. In the Upper Peninsula, common milkweed, (the one with pinkish-purple balls of flowers, usually seen alone the roadsides); swamp milkweed, (usually seen along the edges of wetlands); and butterfly milkweed, (a garden favorite naturally found farther south), are the most common hosts. Female monarchs lay a single, beautifully designed, whitish-yellow eggsac on a milkweed leaf and can lay 100 – 300 eggs during their lives. The eggs are cone-shaped, with lateral, perforated lines running down the sides. After four days, they hatch and become leaf-eating machines. The choice of milkweed plants for the food of the larvae is crucial to their survival. Monarch caterpillars are immune to the effects of toxic chemicals the plants contain called cardiac glycosides. For most animals, even humans, the chemicals can be quite toxic, affecting digestive and cardiovascular systems and even the skin with direct contact of the milky sap. Monarch caterpillars concentrate the toxic chemicals in their bodies and retain them throughout their lives. They advertise this with their protective coloration – yellow, black, and white stripes as larvae, and orange, white, and black coloration as adults. Its close relative, the queen butterfly, Danaus gilippus, also has orange, black and white coloration, and feeds on milkweed as a larvae to produce the same chemical protection. Should an unknowing young predator, like a blue jay, eat a butterfly, it becomes sick and regurgitates it a short time later. Similar colors and patterns in some

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bees, wasps and snakes offer warnings to potential predators in much the same way, only using stings and bites instead of poisonous tissue. Through the wonder of selective breeding, another butterfly, the viceroy, Limenitis archippus, has attained a close resemblance to the monarch for protection, without eating milkweed or developing the poisonous results from eating them. These mimics are smaller than monarchs, giving them their name as a lower ranking member in the order. Their larvae look like bird droppings on willows as they eat the leaves. They do acquire a different chemical from the willows, salicylic acid, the active ingredient in aspirin, giving the caterpillars and butterflies a bitter taste and to upset predators’ stomachs. The viceroys are smaller than monarchs and differ from the larger butterflies by having a black band on their hind wings that connects all the vertical veins in each. In southern states the viceroys may actually more closely resemble the queen butterflies found in there. Monarch larvae feed on the leaves for about two weeks. Because they are exothermic, warmer conditions speed their metabolism, feeding growth, while cooler days slow it down. Despite their protective coloration, they are not without challenges. Eggs can be eaten by several types of insects, like lacewings. Ants, wasps, true bug, praying mantises and spiders eat the caterpillars. Tachinid flies and tiny wasps lay their eggs on the backs of

caterpillars. The parasitic larvae burrow into monarch larvae and begin feeding on the caterpillar muscles, avoiding vital organs. The parasites quickly reach their pupal stage. Large fly maggots emerge from caterpillars to pupate on the ground. Wasps pupate in tiny cocoons usually just prior to the death of the monarchs. Two-hundred tiny wasps have been observed exiting the remains of one caterpillar. There is even one parasite that develops after the caterpillar pupates, developing in the monarch chrysalises. Monarch larvae are also subjected to problems from bacterial and parasitic infections and infestations. Much of the current data on predations and parasites can be found on the Monarch Joint Venture web-

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site, monarchjointventure.org It is estimated only 5% of monarch caterpillars make it through their first instar or stage as a caterpillar. Some nature centers and individuals have worked to give them a better chance of survival by raising them in captivity. The best results come from collecting eggs before they are eaten or parasitized. In a screened enclosure, fed fresh milkweed plants, they avoid the challenges of predators and parasites. Other challenges also are playing a huge part in the survival of monarchs, who were just recently placed on the endangered species list. Habitat destruction has been a major issue. The forests in their winter grounds in Mexico have been subjected to logging operations for years, causing

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Right, a single monarch larvae. Below, a monarch pupae - chrysalis with a tiny wasp crawling on the outside. (Photos by Scot Stewart)

the oyamel forests to shrink. Climate change has also changed the timing of arrival of monarchs to different areas in spring and the blooming of flowering plants providing food for migrating butterflies and developing larvae. If the two are not in the same place at the same time, the butterflies may be doomed in their travels and early development. The latest, and perhaps most significant threat to monarchs may come from genetically modified herbicides used in farming. The herbicide Glyphosate is currently sprayed on fields where 89% of the country’s corn and 94% of the soybeans are grown. These crops are genetically modified to be resistant to the chemical. The herbicide kills the milkweed growing at the edges of the fields and elsewhere where the wind carried the glyphosate. The chemical is also believed to be a possible human carcinogen, causing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a blood cancer. When the caterpillars are about 2 inches long and have gone through five instars or stages with a skin molt in each, they find a quiet place, normally not on a milkweed plant, and attach the tip of their abdomen to a small branch or other horizontal surface with several threads of silk. Then, they literally shake out of their skin

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and the newly exposed surface dries into a beautiful, apple-green chrysalis covering, replete with shimmering golden spots fitting for royalty. “There is nothing in a caterpillar that tells you it’s going to be a butterfly.” — R. Buckminster Fuller n just a week to 10 days, the metamorphosis takes place as the long, gangly caterpillar in its white, yellow and black stripes, darkens and the orange wings begin to develop. When complete, the outer shell splits open and the butterfly emerges, its wings wrapped and folded. Slowly, while the wings are still moist, the butterfly pumps fluids into the veins in the wings and they unfold. Further pumping helps fully stretch the wings and then aids them in drying. Here in the U.P. those fresh, newly emergent butterflies have begun feeding and heading south. Brilliant orange, the scales on their wings are perfect. Males can be told from females by the prominent black dots on their hind wings. They fly southward until they have crossed the peninsula and hit Lake Michigan. They are frequently seen along U.S. 2 through late July and all of August, nectaring on goldenrod and other late blooming plants.

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An adult on a Monarda (bergamot). (Photo by Scot Stewart)

“May the wings of the butterfly kiss the sun, And find your shoulder to light on, To bring you luck, happiness and richer, Today, tomorrow and beyond.” — Irish Blessing eninsula Point has gained a huge place in the natural history of the Upper Peninsula. Birders have long recognized it as a premier place to see some of the most amazing displays of spring bird migration in the Upper Peninsula. The Stonington Point stretches out into Lake Michigan, reaching out toward Door County, Wisconsin. Peninsula Point at its tip is 19 miles south of U.S. 2 in Rapid River and around 20 miles from Washington Island at the tip of the Door. During the latter part of summer, monarch butterflies begin their slow flight to the mountains of northern Mexico. As they fly southward through the U.P., many eventually reach the shore of Lake Michigan. Like migrating birds flying north in the spring, they prefer avoiding flight over water and often follow the lake edge westward until they are funneled to Peninsula Point. There they seem to recognize land is close enough to head south when the weather conditions, including sunshine, warm temperatures and favorable north winds, push them off the point. The Point, though, has become a destination location as late summer travelers drive down to get a last look

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at these intrepid travelers. The monarchs are just half a gram in weight, 1/56th of an ounce, on a 2,300-mile trip to Mexico. Some of the monarchs at Peninsula Point have come from other locations in the U.P. Later in the fall, monarchs from the north shore of Lake Superior will arrive to make their way to Mexico as well, having added another 100 miles or so on to the trip. Hiawatha National Forest and the United States Forest Service have recognized the importance of Peninsula Point as a stopping point in spring for an incredible spotting and resting point for migrant birds. On good days in mid-May, 120 species may be seen around the historic lighthouse at the tip of the point. They can include 26 different species of warblers, three species of tanagers, two species of orioles and other neotropical species. Red-headed woodpeckers and many rarer U.P. species and a number of vagrants only on brief stops before heading back south can be seen. Fall sees some flocks passing the point headed south, like blue jays, but the USFS has now recognized the extreme importance of the point to monarch migration too. They are looking to create an area with vegetation able to provide more native species with flowers and nectar for monarchs on their way south in the fall. Others are working to make that happen too. Joe

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Clockwise from top, a group of onlookers watching monarchs betting to take off and head south at Peninsula Point. A monarch butterfly takes a break for a little lunch. The Peninsula Point overlook, where monarchs find a safe haven on their long journey. (Photos by Scot Stewart)

What: Blessing of the Monarchs Who: UP Wild Church Where: Stonington Peninsula When: 5 p.m., Sept. 14 Kaplan and the Common Coast Research and Conservation non-profit organization in Escanaba continue to work toward a plan with funding for an area near the lighthouse where late blooming plants will provide food for migrating butterflies. Monarchs are not the only butterflies migrating south. During the late summer and fall months, painted lady butterflies are also funneling southward on their way to winter sites in Texas and northern Mexico. They are considerably smaller than monarchs and have a much bigger range. Their summer range includes both North America and Europe. Scientists wondered what happened to the painted ladies in the fall, much as they wondered about the monarchs. Eventually it was discovered they also migrated. Scandinavian painted butterflies flew high enough to reach jet stream courses able to help them reach Africa for the winter. Painted ladies also look for nectar bearing plants at Peninsula Point while they wait to cross Lake Michigan to Washington Island. Additional native plantings will help them with their crossing too. “There is a difference between our wisdom and nature’s simplicity. That reflects the burden of a complex intelligence. A complex

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intelligence like ours is impotent compared to the intelligence of a monarch butterfly migrating from Canada to Mexico, or the intelligence of hummingbirds that have co-evolved with the flowers all along their migration route. That seems so simple; it just happens, it just unfolds.” — Alison Hawthorne Deming t may be impossible to ever entirely understand how the metamorphosis of monarch butterflies happens. Monarch butterflies are remarkable insects, and research is just beginning to understand all their mysteries. A 2016 study combining the work of researchers from the Universities of Washington, Michigan and Massachusetts examined the navigational process involved in monarchs finding their way to the Sierra Madre Mountains. Their simple brains are programed to use their large eyes to measure sun direction and angle with the information from their internal clock, located in their antennae to set their fall course to the southwest and Mexico and their spring course to the northeast. Their genetic programming does have the ability to reset after off-course flying involving storms and strong winds. The process of finding the oyamel forests are still being studied. They have

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never been to Mexico before, and most have never experienced freezing conditions. Metamorphosis is an entirely different matter. Once a monarch caterpillar is set in its chrysalis, it literally begins to digest itself with special enzymes it contains. Using structures called imaginal discs, they reorganize the chemicals in their bodies broken down by the enzymes to develop new eyes, feeding mouth parts, legs, wings, and even a digestive system for sipping nectar instead of eating leaves. How they do that is still being studied. Choosing to eat milkweed, migrating north in waves to create

enough young to make it to the next region north in summer, then go all the way to Mexico are other matters. “Just living is not enough,” said the butterfly, “one must have sunshine, freedom and a little flower.” — Hans Christian Andersen atching monarch butterflies coasting over late afternoon breezes, finding nectar in common milkweed flowers, and performing simple pirouettes with each other is far different from trying to understand their amazing physical transformations or their navigational skills. It involves an opportunity to be

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Above, adult monarchs on common milkweed. Right, a painted lady butterfly spreads its wings. The painted lady migrates through the Stonington Peninsula south to western Texas and northern Mexico. (Photos by Scot Stewart)

outdoors and involve all one’s senses. It’s a chance to see the brilliant colors of the flowers they visit, smell the aromas of the lake air, blooming flowers, and cedar essences, hear migrant birds calling as they too head south, the whipping of waves, and feel the warm breezes through trees, sense the beauty of the surroundings and bring a sense of the peace of a millennium. It is a way to connect with the natural world. Citizen scientists continue to collect data about the use of Peninsula Point by monarchs throughout summer and fall. Weekly checks of the vegetation include looking at nectar plant use by butterflies and are conducted by volunteers working with the Hiawatha National Forest and University of Minnesota Larval Monitoring Project. Migration censuses are kept in August and September and tagging is done in cooperation with the Monarch Watch Project at Kansas University to find out more about migration routes and successes. Volunteers are sought

regularly and can help by contacting the Hiawatha National Forest office in Rapid River at (906) 474-6442. There are many ways to experience and enjoy monarch migration at Peninsula Point. There is yet one more way to observe the monarch migration at Peninsula Point in September. The UP Wild Church will hold a “Blessing of the Monarchs” at 5 p.m. on September 14. They describe the event this way: “It’s a chance for locals to become more familiar with the creatures within our ecosystem - learn more about their presence and understand this delicate balance. It’s an opportunity to witness and pray with the creation not just sing about it in church.” Their ceremony will offer blessing and prayer for the monarchs’

safe passage to their winter home. Understanding the lives of monarchs, painted ladies and migrant birds at Peninsula Point offers all who stop there a chance to better understand the vast connections between people, animals, plants, the land, water, atmosphere and climate of not only the Upper Peninsula but the entire planet. Spending a day with a group of butterflies can only bring a sense of peace and wonder to anyone fortunate to witness that wonder. MM About the Author: Scot Stewart has lived in Marquette long enough to be considered a true Yooper even though he was born in Illinois. He is a teacher and loves to be outdoors photographing and enjoying nature.

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back then

Jeopardy!’s secret How a Yooper created the greatest game show

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By Larry Chabot t the end of every televised Jeopardy! game show, the last credit reads “Created by Merv Griffin.” He did create the popular Wheel Of Fortune program, had his own TV talk show for 21 years, and was an entertainment legend, but he DID NOT create Jeopardy! A Yooper did, and Griffin admitted it. The creator is Julann Wright of Ironwood, who was married to Merv Griffin for 17 years. Griffin revealed the true story in an interview, Julann repeated it in another interview, and she repeated the

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straight scoop when we traced her to the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, where she lives now on an old plantation. “Don’t let the ‘plantation’ word fool you,” she cautioned. “It sounds more elegant than it is!” Our far-ranging talk was full of wonderful memories and swapping Ironwood stories with a lively and very funny show-business veteran from the U.P. Julann recalled that in 1963 she and Merv were flying from Duluth to New York after visiting her parents in Ironwood. He was shuffling notes and

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clippings, looking for a show idea. “What, another game show?”she asked, and he said, “Yeah.” She said she was tired of game shows “with people jumping around and doing pantomimes and acting like fools. What happened to knowledge-based games?” At that time, TV executives were leery of game shows because of recent scandals in which contestants were given the answers in advance and told to feign anguish and indecision before spouting the winning answer. Mindful of this, Julann countered


I FEEL LIKE IT’S MY BABY THAT WENT TO SCHOOL AND GRADUATED AND THEN WENT OVERSEAS ... JEOPARDY! BELONGS TO ALL OF US NOW. with, “Why don’t you give them the answers and make people come up with the questions?” When Merv asked for an example, Julann replied with “the answer is 5,280” and Merv responded with the question: “how many feet in a mile?” “

A Legend Is Born e kept going and I kept throwing him answers and he kept coming up with questions,” Julann recalled. “And by the time we landed the plane, we had an idea for a show. Well, after that he went right down to his office, got the guys working on it, building some sets, which I helped him build, and then they had meetings at our house, playing practice games. “When we first went to NBC with the idea, they said it was too difficult, so we had to dumb it down a little so the big men at NBC could play it!” Merv’s version of events had them taking the idea to NBC which “bought it without even looking at a pilot show.” It first aired in early 1964 with Julann’s sisters Sally and Maureen on the original writing staff. Julann said that President Richard Nixon was a faithful viewer, always scheduling his lunch hour so he could watch the show. Singer Frank Sinatra was another big fan. A syndicated version began in 1984 with the beloved Alex Trebek hosting

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until his recent death. Jeopardy! has been voted one of the best TV shows in American history, born out of the creative mind of a Memorable U.P. Woman. Julann recalled that the first big winner was a cab driver from Chicago with a long winning streak “because he knew a lot of trivia. He beat a lot of professors and everybody else.” She’s still a fan and watches whenever she can. “But I feel like it’s my baby that went to school and graduated and then went overseas,” she told an interviewer. “It’s not even connected to me anymore. Jeopardy! belongs to all of us now. I think the reason it quickly grew was that it was real and not fake. It’s about the information and not gimmicks. I’m shocked that it’s still on today. Those first days were a miraculous time.” Merv Griffin sold the rights to the show for $250 million, and made millions more from his Wheel of Fortune program — especially the show’s theme song, which brought in more millions. When he died in 2007, his wealth was estimated at $1.6 billion, according to digital sources. There was a lot more to Julann Wright than that show’s creation. She was a force in her own right. After graduating from high school and college in Ironwood, she headed for New York and a career in show business. She played the comic foil on the Robert Q. Lewis TV show for years, drawing laughs through her feigned stupidity. It was on the Lewis show that she met Merv Griffin; they eventually married and moved to California with. Another career as a movie actress gave her parts in films like Haunted Honeymoon and The Woman in Red.

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Illustration by Mike McKinney

Big Mistake fter her 17-year marriage ended, Julann faced a glass ceiling in being denied a credit card in her own name. Sorry, the bank said, not for women. Well, they had just poked a bee’s nest! Out of the same creative brain which invented Jeopardy! came another breakthrough: the First Women’s Bank of California, created by persuading eight other women to help her form the bank whose mission was to help women save money and establish credit. The first customer through the door was none other than Florence Henderson, star of the wildly popular Brady Bunch TV show. Then came actresses Jane Fonda, Phyllis Diller, Anne Bancroft, Farah Fawcett, Loretta Swit of MASH, and a parade of the famous and unfamous who bought into Julann’s creation by buying stock and opening accounts. In 1978, Julann was honored with an invitation from Gogebic Community College in Ironwood, her alma mater, to address the graduates at commencement, in a speech entitled “You Are What You Think.” Her status as a banking executive, radio star and TV creator and producer also earned her an honorary degree. “I graduated from there,” she told us, “but was not a good student. My interests were elsewhere so it was really something when they asked me to give the commencement speech!” She loved Ironwood and its great people, a wonderful place to grow up. The family home was at 223 West Aurora, and her father Robert was a local judge. “My favorite store in Ironwood was my uncles’ Gil and Joe Trier’s drug store on Suffolk Street. I was a soda jerk there. When my friends

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came in, my uncles would warn me not to tell them how big my pay was, but I told them not to worry, I was ashamed about how little I was paid!” Even though she lived in ski country, she was never a skier “but I would go down Mount Zion sitting in a box.” She lives on an old plantation in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, not far from Thomas Jefferson’s home and the University of Virginia. “I raise a lot of my own vegetables. It’s a lot like the U.P. here without the snow.” “I miss the U.P. and think about it a lot,” she said. “We were able to make many trips home because Merv was very good about visiting his relatives and my family. I wish I could do that now.” MM Author’s Note: The information in this article came chiefly from interviews of Merv and Julann by other writers, and from a wonderful phone conversation I had with her. She has total recall, a great sense of humor, and no bitterness at the lack of royalties from Jeopardy! Julann Wright Griffin truly earns the title of Memorable U.P. Woman. How cool it would have been if the give-and-take leading to the creation of Jeopardy! had occurred as their flight passed over the U.P.! About the Author: Larry Chabot, an Ontonagon native, worked his way through Georgetown University and was then employed at White Pine Copper Company for 32 years, before moving to Marquette with his wife, Betty. He is a freelance writer who has written for several publications, including more than 170 articles for Marquette Monthly.


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at the table

Rijstaffel with the granddaughters (Photo by Katherine Larson)

‘A wonderful mess’

Rijstaffel offers variety of tastes for diverse palates By Katherine Larson

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hat do you cook when you know that the people you’re feeding have wildly disparate tastes — when you don’t want to be bossy about it, but instead want to make each individual person feel that they’ve been served something both nourishing and delightful? My answer is rijstaffel. Pronounced “rice tahffle,” it can be dressed up or dressed down, made simple or fancy, Midwestern bland or Asian spicy — all those things at once, and still be true to its origins. I stumbled across it when I was a single mother of three, and it changed the lives of all four of us. I loved those three daughters dearly, as I still do, and I believed then and believe now that I would do anything, anything, anything at all in the world for them. Except that doing anything in the world for them, it seemed after a few years of singleness, was confining me to a round of meals that, to put it politely, bored me silly. And that same round of meals was dooming them to cramped palates, while at the same time depriving them of

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good food that they loved but that I just could not bear to put in my mouth or even have in the room. (Bananas. Yes, I know they are extraordinarily healthy. Yes, I know many people find them delicious. For some reason lost in the mists of time I cannot bear them. If you ever find yourself feeding my husband when I’m not around, offer him a banana; he has given up a lot for my sake, poor soul.) So how does rijstaffel solve these problems? Through choice. At its simplest, rijstaffel comprises a big heap of rice surrounded by a lot of little bowls of this and that. This short-hand description does not sound particularly mouth-watering. But get into the longer version and, oh boy, delicious possibilities abound. Two essentials make or break the meal. First, rice; second, the “little bowls of this and that.” Rijstaffel has its roots in the Dutch colonization of many of the islands which make up what is now called Indo-


nesia; thus its name (rijs is Dutch for rice, and taffel for table) and thus its dependence on quality rice. Indeed, many recipes with roots in Asia are so dependent on quality rice that they don’t even bother to explain how to make it, any more than a recipe with roots in the United States would explain, say, how to make toast. Just as toast starts with quality bread, so does cooked rice start with quality raw rice. I buy mine from the local bulk food store, where I know turnover is high and so the rice will be fresh. I choose my rice depending on the dish to be served — white? brown? long-grain? short- or medium-grain? basmati? jasmine? arborio for paella? sushi for, obviously, sushi? And so on. For rijstaffel I typically choose jasmine rice, a favorite in Indonesia’s neighbor Thailand and also a favorite in our banana-free household for its delicate scent and toothsome texture. If you have a rice-maker, the next steps are easy: measure out a quantity of rice that reflects its centrality in the meal to come; rinse the rice per the machine’s instructions; add the requisite amount of water; turn the machine on. Kind of like putting bread in a toaster, but with wholly reliable results. (My toaster seems to produce toast that is either underdone or burnt on a fairly random basis. This, I learn from the New York Times, is because modern toasters can be expected to last only about five years, even less in humid climates or if used for frozen items. Appalled by the waste inherent in this fact, I’m philosophically committed to making do with my morning gamble.) Lacking a rice-maker, you’ll want a good pot with a sturdy bottom and a well-fitting lid, plus knowledge of which of the burners on your stovetop offers the lowest setting. (It’s usually the one on the back side of a four-burner stove.) Measure water into the pan — two cups for long-grain white rice, 1-3/4 cups for medium-grain white rice — and bring it to a boil. Add one cup of white rice, cover, and cook over very low heat until all the water is absorbed, about 18 minutes. Do not stir, and do not lift the lid to check; rely on your timer instead. When the rice is done, it can happily sit on the stove, covered, for another five to 10 minutes before serving. Okay, the rice is under way. How about the little bowls of this and that? Let’s take a brief step back into history here. What were the Dutch doing in Indonesia anyway? It all started way back in the 1400s or so, when spices from various is-

lands in the Malay archipelago — most notably, cloves, cinnamon, mace and black pepper — made their way along the Spice Road to the Republic of Venice and thence into Europe. Spices may seem like just a bunch of little bottles in the grocery store now, but back then spices were among the biggest of big businesses and eye-poppingly large fortunes could be made in their trade. That, of course, caught the attention of people who wanted eye-poppingly large fortunes and, with advances in European boat-building and navigational technology, the race was on. Despite valiant efforts on the part of the Portuguese, the Spanish, the French and the English — not to mention valiant efforts on the part of the residents of all these islands, none of whom particularly wanted to be colonized — by the 1600s, the Dutch ended up winners. So powerfully did the legacy of the Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie) affect foreign policy that even in the 20th century, when former colonizers all over the globe were retreating from their colonies, Holland fought to maintain control over the region. It was not until 1949 that, under heavy pressure from the United Nations, Holland turned sovereignty of many of these islands over to a new national government which has tried ever since to hold together thousands of different islands containing thousands of different cultures and languages in one nation: Indonesia. Also thousands of different flavors. Black pepper, coriander and garlic are pervasive; coconut and its milk equally so; and many regional enhancements include basil, bay leaves, cardamom, chili, ginger, galangal, lemongrass, peanuts, saffron, scallions, shallots, soy sauce, star anise, tamarind, turmeric and on and on. In the meantime, the 1869 opening of the Suez Canal had speeded up travel between Holland and the East Indies, meaning that wives and tourists had joined the mostly-male colonists and also that some of the glories of Indonesian cuisine made their way towards the Netherlands. The long process of decolonization left many Dutch folk with fond memories of their time in the sun and their connections to an equatorial area redolent of fragrant spices. Enter rijstaffel. And now we’re back to those many little bowls of delicious things. Trade and conquest involving Chinese, Arabs, Europeans and endless folk in between had left Indonesian cuisine in a state of glorious eclecticism which the rijstaffel puts on full display.

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Above, 7-year-old Ava’s review of Larson’s rijstaffel. (Photo by Katherine Larson) Want a lamb curry from the Minangkabau region of West Sumatra? A Balinese specialty like betutu bebek (smoked duck slowly baked in banana leaves)? Loempia (egg rolls); sateh (skewers of meat with peanut sauce, spicy or sweet depending on which part of Indonesia it comes from); perkedel (meatballs); daging smoor (beef with soy sauce); babi ketjap (meat in soy sauce); kroepoek (shrimp toast), serundeng (fried coconut); roedjak manis (fruit in sweet sauce); pisang goreng (fried banana)? Want any or all of these things? Just make a little bowlful of each of them, and add them to your rijstaffel. And so, finally, we see the beauty of the rijstaffel as the solution for a group of mixed eaters. Choose an array of dishes and condiments, ideally balanced among sweet, sour, bitter and salty tastes; among hot, cold and room temperatures; and among textures ranging from smooth and soft to crispy crunchy. Set them all out and pass them around as you leisurely dine. Thus, me with my three young children years ago: a bowl of sautéed chunks of chicken, unseasoned. A bowl of rich curry sauce, highly seasoned. Bowls of raisins, dried coconut, mango strips. A bowl of chopped raw onions and a bowl of onions caramelized to fragrant sweetness. Bowls of crunchy peanuts, shrimp chips, chopped red bell peppers. A bowl of

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the tastiest, most intense chili sauce available — sambal oelek, happily available right here in Marquette at local stores. And, way far down at the kids’ end of the table, a bowl of sliced bananas. Despite the numerous bowls (I count 12 in that last paragraph), it can be a very straightforward meal to put together, with a fair amount of simple package-opening and not a lot of fancy cooking. But what a lot of happy diners! My daughters, all now well into their 30s, still remember not just their favorite bowls but also, and even better, the glory of free choice. We would pass things round and round the table, with no pressure at all to choose or eschew any given dish. As the years have gone by, the people around my table now more typically include folk with a higher tolerance for the exotic. I still serve rijstaffel, but now indulge in a few more frills and flourishes. Here, for example, is a recipe for sateh lilit, a skewered dish of minced seafood which is delectable, made with Lake Superior whitefish: Sauté in a little olive oil over medium-low heat five chopped shallots, five cloves garlic, five small red chilies, 2 inches’ worth of fresh chopped ginger, 2 inches’ worth of fresh chopped turmeric and a tablespoon of whole coriander seeds. After about five minutes, empty the pan into a food processor


Right, her sister, 9-year-old Alyssa, also provides a review. (Photo by Katherine Larson) along with a tablespoon of lemongrass paste and purée the whole thing. Add a pound of raw whitefish fillets, four ounces of unsweetened coconut and half a cup of coconut milk; purée some more, until you have a coarse paste. With your hands, mold a portion of this paste around a skewer — ideally, if you can get it somewhere, a 6-inch piece of whole lemongrass, but an ordinary skewer works fine too. This amount of paste should make about 20 skewers’ worth. Grill them over a medium-hot grill, turning as needed, until light brown and opaque in the center. Gado-gado is an absolute mainstay of Indonesian cuisine and perfect for rijstaffel. Some recipes call for combining such things as thinly-sliced carrot, shredded cabbage, snow peas, cucumber, bean sprouts, perhaps with some watercress or slices of hardboiled egg, in a single bowl and then covering it with a peanut sauce. In the spirit of choice, however, I prefer to serve each component separately and then pass the sauce. Of course, you can buy a bottle of pre-made something called peanut sauce. The following moderately Americanized version is, however, much better. Lightly fry a cup of raw peanuts for a few minutes, then grind them up finely and set them aside. In a skillet, stir-fry two cloves of garlic and one cup of green onions, finely chopped, both for a minute. Add half a teaspoon each of chili powder, ground ginger and brown sugar; a quarter teaspoon of ground fennel seed; a tablespoon of soy sauce; a teaspoon of fish sauce (Red Boat brand is best); and one and a half cups of water. Bring it all to a boil, stir in the ground peanuts, and let everything simmer together over low

heat for about 10 minutes. Stir in two tablespoons of fresh lemon juice and serve or allow the sauce to cool and then serve. Yum! In the unlikely event that there’s any left over, it lasts well in the refrigerator. This past summer, I found myself recreating a version of the rijstaffels of my children’s youth, this time with grandchildren — different people, same reason. More or less the same assortment of choices, though I added some parsley and some fresh raw pea pods (because I had them) and a few sautéed lightly spiced shrimp (because I knew the grandchildren love them, and I had neither time nor inclination to make sateh lilit). I try not to brag in these columns, but when it comes to grandchildren I hope you allow me some indulgence. Here is the reaction of Ava, age 7, to the meal: “A wonderful mess. Some parts I dident like, some parts I loved, and some parts I was not shure about. My favorite parts were the shrimp, chicken, and [tikka] masala sauce.” As for Alyssa, age 9: “At dinner tonight, my favorite thing on the table was sugar snap peas because I really love eating them and hearing the snap of my crunches. I loved the combination of parsley, rice and coconut, especially when I couldn’t identify the coconut. The whole layout of the dinner and the way we passed things around was superb! All in all, this was a wonderful dinner.” May you, too, enjoy wonderful dinners with those you love. MM

MY DAUGHTERS, ALL NOW WELL INTO THEIR 30S, STILL REMEMBER NOT JUST FAVORITE BOWLS BUT ALSO, AND EVEN BETTER, THE GLORY OF FREE CHOICE.

About the Author: Katherine Larson is a writer, teacher and former lawyer with a special passion for food justice.

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back then

William G. Mather was the head of Cleveland Cliffs for 50 years, retiring in 1940 at the age 83. He was a descendant of the famous New England Mathers that included the fiery Cotton Mather who published Bewitched Child. (Photo courtesy of Cleveland- Cliffs)

The miners’ man

Dignified William G. Mather, corporate titan of CCI, often pushed for better conditions for his workers By Sonny Longtine

W

illiam G. Mather was born into a New England dynasty, an ancestral legacy that consisted of the great colonial Mather genius. The Mathers were prominent New England pioneers who first settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1635; they quickly established the Mather name in New England. Increase Mather became the president of Harvard University, while his son, the prolific and fiery writer Cotton Mather, authored Bewitched Child, a Salem witch-hunt story that he wrote with joyful resolve. Both Increase and Cotton were eminent Puritans of New England during the 18th century. In all, the Mather heritage is compelling, one that produced 14 authors, an incredible total of 633 books and 29 ministers.

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William G. Mather, a descendant of the illustrious family and the driving force behind Ishpeming’s Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Company, was given stellar Puritan genes that provided him with an important sense of duty, yet didn’t make him intolerant. While the fires of Puritanism did not burn as hotly in William G. Mather as in his predecessors, they did, however, influence his attitude toward corporate responsibility. For 100 years, Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co. was the economic engine that provided prosperity for the central Upper Peninsula. Mather’s 42-year reign as president of the corporation (1891-l933) brought the Marquette range into the 20th century. William G. Mather, son of Samuel Mather and Elizabeth Lucy Gwinn


William G. Mather, fourth in the top row from the left and Peter White, first in the top row from the left at Cliffs cottage. The cottage not only served as a residence for Mather when he was in Ishpeming but also for corporate dignitaries. (Photo courtesy of Cleveland-Cliffs)

Mather and founder of the Cleveland Iron Company, was born in 1857 in Cleveland. His early education was at Cheshire Academy in Connecticut and then at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. He received his B.A. in 1877 and his M.A. in 1885; he would receive honorary degrees later in life. After receiving his Master’s degree in 1878, Mather took a trip to Europe. Upon his return, he began an entrepreneurial career by taking an entry-level position as a company clerk in his father’s business, the Cleveland Iron Mining Company. Mather’s acceleration in the company was fast; he advanced to vice-president in 1885 and after his father’s death in 1890, he succeeded to the office of president. After one year as president, Mather merged his company, the Cleveland Iron Mining Company, with the Cliffs Iron Company to form the Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Company. Today it is Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. (CCI). The growth of the company under Mather was phenomenal. He added acreage of undeveloped land that had iron ore deposits; he set up new blast furnace operations; and he added chemical plants and timberland. In addition, he built power plants, paper mills, railroads and steamships. CCI was no longer just an ore extraction company; it was a veritable conglomerate. Among the many acres that Mather purchased for the company was the pristine 13,000-acre, Grand Island, a jewel located in Lake Superior just north of Munising. Mather sought to make the island another Yellowstone National Park by creating an animal preserve and resort. Along with the introduction of indigenous animals,

he brought in species not native to the area. Mule deer, antelope and exotic birds were some of those rare species. In 1906, Mather authorized a wolf hunt on the island, in an attempt to reduce the wolf population that was decimating his transplanted animals. It didn’t work. When Mather’s control of CCI ended in the early 1930s, the game preserve experiment was in decline. Today, there are no exotic species left on the island. One significant contribution that Mather made was the creation of a horse and carriage route that traced the perimeter of the island. Today, this trail serves bikers, snowmobiles and hikers. In 1998, CCI sold the island to a public trust; it eventually became federal property and is now managed by the U.S. Forest Service. Mather was a corporate practitioner of “noblesse oblige;” to him, this meant that the more fortunate are obligated to help the less fortunate. During his tenure as president of CCI, Mather made the business world more humane. He was concerned with the welfare of men who labored in the dank iron ore mines in the Marquette range. For Mather, this was a human rights issue, but, most corporate moguls of the time were not sensitive to human rights. Mather, instead, addressed his welfare concerns in the language of corporate efficiency. A miner who had decent housing, a livable wage and good medical services was much more likely to be an efficient company employee than one who subsisted on a meager wage. Mather said, “To operate steadily and economically, it is important to understand what conditions will give a sufficiency of efficient, competent men, to keep them and to make them more

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Cliffs Cottage, built in 1891-1892, was home for William G. Mather while he was in Ishpeming to monitor CCI operations. The stately cottage had six bedrooms, five baths, and a billiard room that was added in 1903. Mather paid particular attention to the well-appointed grounds. (Photo courtesy of Sonny Longtine)

capable.” With passionate social conscience, Mather’s reign as head of Cleveland Cliff’s Iron Company was profuse with social engineering. He contributed to the building of Ishpeming’s Bell Memorial Hospital. In conjunction with the hospital, he hired visiting nurses to care for the miners’ health. He instituted a health care program that assessed miners 25 cents a month, and provided disability benefits of $1 per day and a $299 death benefit. He launched a pension program in 1909 and maintained it until the Depression. Rest cottages were available for the overworked and for convalescent women. He pioneered the hiring of safety engineers and instituted safety practices. Attractive brick clubhouses were built in Gwinn and North Lake to serve the recreational needs of the miners. He built the town of Gwinn in the early 1900s, a model community named after his mother’s maiden name. The town, 17 miles south of Marquette, was designed for miners who worked in the seven mines in the Gwinn area. The main street of Gwinn was expansive, with two traffic lanes separated by a green median. Company duplex houses neatly lined the main boulevard and were available to the miners at a reasonable rate. Prizes were offered for artistic yards and gardens. To some, this represented paternalistic slavery, but to many it was a generous company offering that made their lives more comfortable. Although congenial, Mather was reserved and far from being an extrovert. His patrician looks made it easy for subordinates and colleagues to refer to him as “Mr. Mather; no one dared call him W.G.,” or greet

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WITH PASSIONATE SOCIAL CONSCIENCE, MATHER’S REIGN AS HEAD OF CLEVELAND CLIFF’S IRON COMPANY WAS PROFUSE WITH SOCIAL ENGINEERING.

him with any other casual salutation. Although his primary home was in Cleveland, he spent considerable time at the “Cliffs Cottage,” located in the Cleveland location in Ishpeming. Here he entertained executives with quality meals and perhaps a game of bridge. Mather was not a bridge “shark,” but just an average player, according to


Negaunee High School, located just off US 41 and near Teal Lake, is on the site that was the Mather B Mine. With a depth of 3,500 feet, it once was the most productive underground mine in the world. It ceased operation in 1979 after 29 years of service. Negaunee High School was built in 1986. (Photo courtesy of Cleveland-Cliffs)

one old-timer. He was fond of lamb and squab and enjoyed a good meal, but with his typical self-will he never overindulged and always ate moderately. In 1926, the worst mine disaster in the state of Michigan occurred at the Barnes-Hecker mine site in Ishpeming. Fifty-one men died in a tragic mine collapse. In an act of compassion for the victim’s survivors, Mather waived future payments for housing, electricity, water, and had jobs waiting for the sons of the dead miners when they reached 18 years of age. Curiously, Mather was single until 1929, when he married 38-yearold Elizabeth Ring. Mather was 71 at the time, and 33 years older than his bride. Prior to the marriage, Mather was considered one of the most eligible bachelors in Cleveland. The couple honeymooned to Fort William, Ontario, on his iron ore carrier, the William G. Mather. From all reports, the marriage was a good one. Being wealthy, as the Mathers found out, can also be a detriment. This was the case in 1950, when masked, armed gunmen, in a commando-like raid, burst into the opulent Mather mansion in an affluent Cleveland suburb and made off with $350,000 worth of jewelry. Mather, at age 93, didn’t hear a sound and contently slept through the burglary. But his 60-year-old wife was not so fortunate; the brazen bandits broke into her bedroom and struck her when she began to scream. They got the combination to the family safe from a reluctant Mrs. Mather, only to find after opening it that it contained little of value. The desperate desperadoes then fleeced Mrs. Mather’s jewelry cache. Later, Mrs. Mather said of the

incident, “The jewelry doesn’t mean much.” The six naive gunmen were oblivious to other wealth in the house; while exiting, they walked passed valuable paintings. In his later years, although his slight body was a tad stooped and his hair was thinning, he still had a patrician look and his associates still referred to him as “Mr. Mather.” He stepped down from the company in 1940. He died in 1951 at 94 years of age; he was gone, but he left a rich legacy. William G. Mather died a wealthy man. He bequeathed his $3,700,000 fortune to his wife, and upon her death the wealth was distributed to a number of charitable, religious and educational institutions. The largest benefactors were Mather’s alma mater, Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and the Hartford Trinity Episcopal Church. The Episcopal Diocese of Northern Michigan received $10,000, while smaller legacies in Marquette County went to local churches. Grace Episcopal Church in Ishpeming received $5,000, while St. John’s Episcopal in Negaunee, St. Paul’s Episcopal in Marquette, St. John’s Episcopal in Munising, and Holy Innocents’ Church in Little Lake all received $2,500. William G. Mather left an enviable record by creating an enormously successful industry that helped build steel-clustered cities as well as providing prosperity in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. MM About the Author: Sonny Longtine is a Marquette resident who has published eight books about the Upper Peninsula. For more than three decades he taught American history and government in Michigan schools.

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lookout point

Glasses are raised at the 2021 Upper Peninsula Beer Festival, a toast of welcome at the start of the festivities. (Photo courtesy of Michigan Brewer’s Guild)

Beer, beer, everywhere

How to drink beer on Sept. 10 in Lower Harbor

UP Fall Beer Festival returns to Marquette’s Lower Harbor

Tickets can be purchased online at mibeer.com

but don’t worry, there’s plenty to drink, because...

By Brad Gischia

T

he calendar doesn’t lie; summer is ending. Shortly the leaves will begin to change, the days will shorten and the thermometer will begin its rapid descent towards colder months. Don’t despair, there are still things to do in the Marquette area that don’t require a rake or a pair of snow boots. On Saturday, September 10, the Upper Peninsula Beer Festival will bring around 100 small brewers together in Mattson’s Lower Harbor Park. The U.P. festival is the fourth of five shows put on by the Michigan Brewers’s Guild each year. “We’re a non-profit trade association,” said Scott Graham, Executive Director of the MBG. “Our main mission is to promote and protect the beer industry here in Michigan.

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“The festivals are, first and foremost, a showcase for our member breweries and our member’s beer, but they’re also a fundraiser for the trade association.” The MBG puts on an annual conference as well, has a website, mibeer. com, and an annual magazine. The extra funds from the festivals go toward producing those things as well as employing a small staff to keep them up. “We also have a person who keeps an eye out in Lansing, so that we can be on top of policy changes that might affect people in our industry,” Graham said. The industry is booming despite the recent pandemic. According to the Brewer’s Association, at the end of 2018 there were 357 breweries in Michigan, and they have become important parts of the communities they

September 2022

are in. “They are typically gathering places,” Graham said. “There are many creative people in our industry, and they’re excited to control their own fate and exercise their creativity. You see that in their beer and in the buildings they choose. We see in many cases, they have revitalized an old building and really reinvigorated a downtown area.” Andy Langlois, co-owner of Blackrocks Brewery in Marquette, sees that community-minded nature as well. “I think what we’ve seen is that small breweries provide a very community-focused taproom experience,” Langlois said. “A place to get together and enjoy a craft beer.” Jesse Herman, senior brewer at Upper Hand Brewery in Escanaba, sees the same thing.

Advance tickets - $50 At the door - $60 Designated Driver - $10 Attendees must be 21 to enter. Each ticket comes with 15 tokens for samples. Trade a token for some beer, then drink it. “I think what Upper Hand really likes to convey is that we’re a U.P. brand,” Herman said. There are challenges that come with choosing beer as a profession. It’s hard work. “Some people think it’s kind of glamorous, and part of it is,” he said. “You get to go to festivals and meet up with the other brewers, and we all know each other. But in the summer-


time, it’s brutal. We’re brewing and canning at the same time, and when the kettle is boiling it’s physically exhausting. In the winter our CO2 lines can freeze.” Langlois echoed some of those challenges. “Unlike the Coors and Miller Lites and Budweisers of the world, acquiring materials to make your products can be a challenge,” said Langlois. “It’s something we have to navigate every day to put beer in a can or a keg and get it to our customers.” Herman said that, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, supply issues have been a problem. “There was an aluminum shortage, which we’re getting caught up on but still dealing with, and there were some issues with getting hops and malt when we needed it,” Herman said. But he also said one of the big challenges is the tastes of the drinkers themselves. “A lot of the people in the U.P. are light beer drinkers. It’s challenging to be experimental with beer, and often people don’t want to break their habits. Upper Hand Light is one of our best sellers.” The brand calendar is determined by the sales team both locally and with the Bell’s team downstate. They watch trends and figure out what’s next. But for Upper Hand, it’s all about the Upper Peninsula. “We take a lot of pride in being from the U.P. and everything traces back to that. From our ingredients

Top, City of Marquette Mayor Jenna Smith and Michigan Brewers Guild volunteer staff member Chas Thompson tap the firkin (a type of keg) which is procured for a welcome toast during the 2021 Upper Peninsula Fall Beer Festival. Above, attendees get a sample from the inaugural keg. (Photos courtesy of Michigan Brewer’s Guild)

to our packaging, it’s a brand and a brewery that loves to be a part of this area,” Herman said. “It’s dedicated and focused on serving customers in the U.P. From what the beer tastes like to how it looks on the shelf, we want it to feel very U.P.” Also of note, the Michigan Brewers Guild is celebrating its 25th year as a trade association. To celebrate, they’ve put together a documentary called “Great Beer State” which they have released to their member breweries. It consists of 60 interviews with

brewers gathered over the last four years, and documents how the Michigan beer landscape has changed and grown. “We’re encouraging our member brewers to have viewing parties,” Graham said. Check your local brewery for viewing times from August to October, or check the mibeer.com website for viewing times. There is also a companion podcast found in iTunes, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts, under “Great Beer State Podcast” for the full interviews.

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Above, a Beerfest attendee makes use of some of the other entertainment at Beerfest, like creating huge bubbles. Live entertainment will be part of this year’s Beerfest as well, in addition to other activities. Below, an aerial shot of Marquette’s Lower Harbor Park during the 2021 Upper Peninsula Beer Festival. (Photos courtesy of Michigan’s Brewer’s Guild)

The Upper Peninsula Beer Festival takes place on September 10 in Lower Harbor Park in Marquette. General admission is from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. with a VIP hour beginning at noon. Tickets are $50 in advance and $60 at the event. Attendees must be 21 to enter. There are also Designated Driver tickets, also for 21 and older, for $10. Each ticket comes with 15 tokens for samples. Additional tokens are available for purchase inside, and there will be food vendors and music there as well, but the main entertainment will be the beer and the many brewers. “It’s a chance to welcome other people in the beer community over to Marquette, especially from below the bridge, to share an afternoon and showcase Michigan craft beer in a beautiful setting,” Langlois said. “It’s close by so the logistics of bringing a large variety of beer is not a problem.” If you don’t make it to Beerfest, Blackrocks is holding Oktoberfest at

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their brewery on October 1st. Check their website for details. “I’ve never missed one.” Herman said. “I think it’s my favorite. It’s a great setting and always fun.” Upper Hand will have several beers for people to try, including their new Pricker Bush sour, made from local U.P. berries, and Peninsula Point, an IPA that uses all Michigan hops. Even if you can’t get to the Upper Peninsula Beer Festival, if you enjoy beer, go to a local brewery. Graham says “They’re very much a part of the community. They’re places to engage and socialize. A place to let the lubricating forces of beer generate camaraderie and goodwill.” MM About the Author: Brad Gischia is a writer and artist native to Upper Michigan. He has published two children’s books and done illustrations for both comic books and novels.


back then When trains were king Life in a railroad town

Illustration by Mike McKinney

By Larry Chabot

B

efore scheduled train service began in the United States in 1830, it was said that man could only travel as fast as a horse could run. Trains, then, came to be called ‘iron horses.’ As the years went by, rail service almost totally dominated the business of hauling people and freight to every corner of the country. In the peak war year of 1944, three-quarters of all business travel and 97 percent of military travel was by train. One massive troop movement saw more than 250,000 peo-

ple riding in 726 sleeper cars and 512 coaches. This dominance continued until the growing popularity of scheduled air service and the construction of the interstate highway system reduced train service to mostly freight. The U.P. experience mirrored the rest of the country. The Milwaukee Road (the nickname of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific line) and Chicago & Northwestern ran lines from the Chicago to Ontonagon, Calumet, and Ishpeming, with

side jaunts east to Escanaba and the Soo and west to Gogebic County. These north-south lines fanned out like tines on a bamboo rake. Slicing through this fan-like spread was the fabled Soo Line, whose east-west route across the Upper Peninsula, with its countless spurs, appeared on a map like a badly frayed rope. The jumble of lines resembled the worst case of varicose veins or a massive tangle of necklace chains. The four-county area of Houghton, Keweenaw, Baraga and Onto-

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THESE WEREN’T COMMON BUMS, OF COURSE, BECAUSE HOBOS WERE A HIGHER CLASS OF VAGABOND WHO THOUGHT OF THEMSELVES AS ‘BETWEEN ASSIGNMENTS.’

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nagon once hosted 79 railroads, including short lines and logging roads. Subsequent mergers, acquisitions and abandonments left a mess to baffle rail historians. The Milwaukee Road, meanwhile, operated its popular Chippewa (also known as the Hiawatha), starting on May 28, 1937, from Chicago to Iron Mountain, a six-hour ride over 291 miles of track. The northern terminus was extended to Channing in 1937 and to Ontonagon on Lake Superior in 1938. Travelers along the line never had it so good, with dining cars, observation decks and modern Beaver Tail parlor cars which the Milwaukee Road made in its own shops. The southbound Chippewa left Ontonagon in mid-morning and arrived in Chicago at 9:40 p.m., adding cars and passengers as it rolled south. It seems that every hamlet along the way had a depot or at least a flag-stop to pick up freight or people, even if the train just blew its whistle and rolled on through. In their mind’s eyes, former passengers can still recall the conductor announcing the stations as the train chugged through Wisconsin: “Pemmmbine … Cuh-rivitz …WauSAWKee.” As the train rolled along, folks living along the tracks saw the heads in the windows, wondering who they were, where they were heading, and why, and then “Could that be me someday?” The return from Chicago left past noon and puffed into the Ontonagon depot at 10:45 p.m. When the train had reached Green Bay, it left the dining car behind, encouraging resourceful people in Channing to cruise the aisles with baskets of food and drink for sale to the riders, at least to those who didn’t sprint from the train to a nearby restaurant during the 25-minute stopover. Shades of North Platte, Nebraska, whose citizens gave food and other goodies to six million soldiers and sailors who came through their town on the way to western forts and ports. As the train neared its Ontonagon terminus, a few wise guys would detrain at Mass or Rockland, knowing it would take another 30 or 40 minutes to reach Ontonagon because of the many long, slow bends in the line. A buddy would pick them up, drive them to the nearest tavern, hoist a snort or two, and drive the 12 miles or so to Ontonagon to stand there as the passengers got off, hoping to get a rise from surprised fellow riders who stuck it out to the end. The train was so slow approaching Ontonagon that hobos riding the rails could simply step off the train and


Illustration by Mike McKinney

slip into the hobo camp in the nearby woods, where local kids like me — ignoring parental warnings — would sneak up to the camps and even be invited in for a libation and a chat. These weren’t common bums, of course, because hobos were a higher class of vagabond who thought of themselves as “between assignments.” Train-waiting was a popular pastime in small towns, where local citizens (especially bored teens) would appear at the station to see who was getting off or going on, like businessmen, honeymooners, college kids, vacationers, soldiers on leave, folks seeking work in the cities, or who had just ridden in from Mass or Rockland so they could enjoy an actual train ride. In the early 1900s, a future homeowner was awaiting delivery of an entire house from the Sears Roebuck catalog, which came bundled on a train: wood, windows, nails and all. A small family group, maybe accompanied by a military escort, was not an uncommon sight, waiting beside an undertaker’s hearse for a loved one’s remains coming home for burial. Every town along the way had similar events, especially for war casualties who had earlier left for the service to go off to war from the same station. Since the station manager was often the Western Union telegrapher, he was the recipient and deliverer of bad news for war families as he delivered telegrams to grieving families. In Ontonagon, the agent lived but a block from the town’s Pearl Harbor casual-

ty and had to make the sad journey to the neighbor’s home with the terrible news. The depot was a social center for the community, where people visited back and forth while waiting for the train. When my brother came home on leave from the Marines, we always arrived at the station an hour before train time “in case the train came in early.” It never did. After 1950, with increasing competition from airlines and improved highways, the railroads began downgrading service as ridership dropped, eventually ending runs to Ontonagon in early 1954 and in other stops along the way. Despite public protests over losing the railroad, the die was cast, and depot lights blinked off across the U.P. There is a story, maybe true, that a delegation from one Milwaukee Road town appeared at a hearing to protest the dropping of rail service. “How did you get here?” asked the hearing officer. “We drove down” they said. Wrong answer, end of hearing. Along the way, railroad stations have been converted into museums, gift shops, restaurants, offices and grocery stores, or torn down, or simply abandoned and allowed to deteriorate — forlorn echoes of one-time prominence. Folks who preferred the train, or had no other choice, had to catch rides at still-active depots until they too were shut down. On one embarrassing occasion, my father was driving me to Ironwood to board a train

to Chicago but misjudged the time. Off we went to the next station: too late. And the next: barely missed it. At the next station, the train was just chugging away from the station so my dad drove onto the tracks and parked there so I could grab my bag and board the train. The looks I got were embarrassing, although some few might have admired my dad’s resourcefulness. I didn’t look back to see if he was arrested. Ontonagon’s original depot dates back to 1893. Three years later, a massive fire roared through town, consuming everything in its path, including the railroad depot, its outbuildings, and its rails. Today, the rails are gone again, torn up to avoid maintenance costs. MM Author’s Note: Trains have always fascinated the author, as have great stations like Grand Central in New York and Union in Washington. The most evocative stations from the good old days are local ones like Sidnaw, Seney, Michigamme, and the greatest of all: Channing. About the Author: Larry Chabot, an Ontonagon native, worked his way through Georgetown University and was then employed at White Pine Copper Company for 32 years, before moving to Marquette with his wife, Betty. He is a freelance writer who has written for several publications, including more than 170 articles for Marquette Monthly.

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at the table The ultimate summer taste test A friendly competition pits three methods of corn grilling against each other.

By Katherine Larson

T

here was the corn, a dozen ears fresh from the farmers’ market. There was the family, all of us eager to engage with that corn. But there was the heat: summertime at its most sweltering. I was raised in the firm conviction that the only way to cook corn was in a big pot of boiling water. Anything else would be apostasy, impossible even to contemplate and bound to be a waste of good corn. Still, it was so darn hot. We decided that this was the time to try corn on the grill. And since this would be new for all of us and since we had plenty of corn, we decided to turn it into a side-by-side experiment. Team Husk, captained by Laura, demanded a lot of preparation. For each ear, first the husks had to be pulled back to the stem; then the silk had to be meticulously plucked off;

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Bruce, captain of Team Naked, handles the grilling, with all three teams represented on the grill together. (Photo by Katherine Larson)

then the husks had to be pulled back over the cob; and finally they had to be tied shut at the cob’s tip, using an extra-long strand of husk from one of the other team’s ears. It was a good thing that Laura had only four ears in her charge. It was also a good thing that Laura is dexterous — a less sure-fingered person (for example, me) would have struggled to match her neat packages. Team Foil, captained by Rashaad, also demanded a fair bit of preparation. For each ear, after husking and meticulously de-silking it, he spread the kernels with a thin layer of butter (perhaps half a teaspoon per ear), then rolled the buttered ear up in a square of foil which he sealed with a twist at each end. Rashaad, too, had four ears in his charge, and his packages were a similar miracle of neatness. Team Naked, captained by Bruce,

had the easiest prep job by far. Husking, de-silking, and that was it. Nor was meticulousness called for: any stray wisps of silk left on the cob would be burned off during the grilling process. It was time to prepare the field of play. Coals were lit, then spread, glowing in a layer all across the bottom of the kettle-style grill. A grate was positioned about 5 inches over them. The whistle blew and the teams were off. After some jostling for position — even eight ears of corn is a lot for one grate, if four of them are bound up in those fluffy husk packages — Team Husk and Team Foil began their first five minutes of grilling. Team Naked sat peacefully on a plate, waiting. After five minutes, the wrapped ears were all turned. After five more minutes, the wrapped ears were all


Above, all three methods after they’re done grilling. They may not look very different, but looks can be deceiving. Below, Team Husk Captain Laura and Team Foil Captain Rashaad shuck their corn in preparation for the day’s competition. (Photos by Katherine Larson)

turned again, and now Team Naked joined in. Happily, the husks had burned down enough so that room could be made in the middle of the grill for the newcomers. Less happily, enough time had passed that the field of coals was neither as thick nor as hot as it had started out, so the Team Naked ears didn’t get the ideal fiery blast they deserved. To summarize, Team Husk and Team Foil were turned about every five minutes for a total of maybe 15 minutes’ grilling. Team Naked were turned every minute or two for a total of maybe five minutes. The whistle blew again and cook-

ing was done. Time to prepare the contestants for eating. For Team Husk, Laura had to pull the charred husks off each ear. The process was quite messy but not challenging as long as one didn’t care where bits of burnt husk might fly. For Team Foil, Rashaad struggled a bit to release each steaming ear from its hot, tight package. And for Team Naked, Bruce simply put his ears on a plate. Judging, also known as dinner, began. We munched. We tasted. We conferred. And the results were clear: Team Husk ears were delicious, subtly flavored with the smoky musk

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Freshly shucked corn, bears it all in the name of truly great flavor. (Photo by Katherine Larson)

Rashaad, captain of team foil, carefully butters each corn before wrapping them in his team’s namesake and putting his ears on the grill. (Photo by Katherine Larson)

Once the ears are buttered, the all-important work of wrapping the corn in foil can commence. (Photo by Katherine Larson)

JUDGING, ALSO KNOWN AS DINNER, BEGAN. WE MUNCHED. WE TASTED WE CONFERRED. AND THE RESULTS WERE CLEAR.

Team Husk required a deft hand with tying off the husks. Beautiful to behold, but would they taste equally delicious? (Photo by Katherine Larson)

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Corn from all three teams, hot off the grill, waiting for the taste test to begin. (Photo by Katherine Larson)

of their charred covering; juicy and corny. Team Foil ears were delicious, juicy and a bit more intensely corny without the competition of husks’ scent. Team Naked ears were pretty good, not quite as juicy and not quite as corny. We speculated that they would have been better if they’d encountered a hotter fire. Of the three teams, Team Foil was the unanimous choice of all judges, not just for their corniness but also because, as the Husk captain mentioned pointedly, her preparation work was something of a pain. I then asked the panel — experienced and enthusiastic corn-eaters all — how each of us felt grilled corn stacked up against boiled corn. Again we were unanimous: boiled won, hands down and no contest. In the future, no matter how hot and sticky the weather, we’ll let steak or chicken occupy the grill but, for corn, stick with boiling. (Or, for me at least and if the corn is truly rightfrom-the-field fresh, raw). So how does one boil corn? Like my father did, when I was small so many decades ago. When we had corn for dinner, that’s what we had: corn. Sometimes butter or salt or pepper, but really just corn. My father’s bellows would find us in our scattered hideouts: “Corn for dinner tonight! How many do you want? I’m having 12 ears!” Then he’d put the biggest pot, filled with water and generously salted, on to boil. It took forever — we could go back to those hideouts, back to our books — but we knew to come running when the puffs of steam emerged. That would be when he’d stride out to his corn patch with the big knife and

start harvesting, tossing us the ears. It was our job to shuck as fast as we could, corn silk flying in the wind. We’d run into the house with the shucked ears and hand them to my father, who would slide as many as could fit into the boiling pot. Then he stood guard with the big tongs. The moment the water came back to the boil, he would fish out each ear, give it a good shake, and heap it on the platter to be seized and munched piping hot. And oh, the smell! The fragrance of deep summer! And oh, the taste! Crisp, milky, corny, the definition of fresh! We kids started out using those little plastic corn-shaped holders, but my father grabbed his scalding cobs with bare hands and, as the fever grew upon us, so would we, wincing and ouching but determined. We girls preferred the corn straight, right out of the pot, but my father swathed his in butter along with a quick grind of pepper, a quick shake of salt. We girls ate our corn in rows, munching down the length of each ear back and forth like a typewriter carriage — this was back in the old days, before computers; we knew typewriters. But my father wolfed his corn in big slashing slurpy mouthfuls, dripping butter and corn juice and snuffling loudly with the sheer joy of it. And when the platter was empty, he’d swab himself down with a wadded napkin: “How many do you want? I’m going to cut some more!” MM About the Author: Katherine Larson has enjoyed corn on the cob in California, on the East Coast, in the Midwest and in Marquette, undeterred by geography but insisting on freshness.

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lookout point The Manistique Habitat for Humanity building. (Photo by Ann McGregor)

A place to call

HOME

Habitat for Humanity has strong legacy across UP

A

By Deborah Frontiera ll the Habitat for Humanity organizations in the Upper Peninsula (Marquette County, Manistique, Kingsford and the Copper Country) are part of a global non-profit housing organization which seeks to “put God’s love into action

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by building homes, communities and hope.” They are dedicated to eliminating substandard housing locally and worldwide by building houses, repairing others, building handicap accessibility ramps, replacing water heaters and anything else that might affect safe living conditions for those

September 2022

who struggle to afford decent housing. They also advocate for fair and just housing policies. The organization was founded “on the conviction that every man, woman and child should have a simple, durable place to live in dignity and safety, and that decent shelter in decent communities

should be a matter of conscience and action for all.” While many of us may be aware of what Habitat for Humanity does, some may be under the misconception that HFH “gives away” houses. In reality, families who “receive” their houses are required to do at least 250


Left, Nancy Pellegrini holds one of their group’s awards. (Photo by Kathy Kulas) Above, the foundation of a new home project for the Menominee River HFH. (Photo by Kathy Kulas)

hours of “sweat equity” per adult in the home during the building process. They are also set up with affordable mortgages once they take possession of their home. The fact that the labor for these homes, rehabilitations, etc. is all volunteer is a huge part of keeping the program going and the homes affordable. The various Re-Stores across the U.P. depend on grants and donations as well. They also form partnerships with churches and YMCAs where volunteers stay, shower and do their laundry when coming from elsewhere for a construction project. Area churches are also active in providing lunches for volunteers when they are active on a construction project. While each Habitat group may have differences in their individual programs, the number of such projects varies. Each area has a Re-Store, and all the net proceeds from the sales at the Re-stores benefit that local region’s program. At the Manistique Habitat for Humanity, their Re-Store, affiliate for construction and office area are all in

one building. Ann McGregor, the area director, said their Re-Store is open five days a week (six in the summer). They cover all of Alger, Luce and Schoolcraft Counties and the western half of Mackinac County. Local volunteers cover the Re-Store, helping McGregor run the show. During the summer months, they will have groups of 20 to 25 out-of-area volunteers arrive to help with their major projects. Care-A-Vanners of retired and semi-retired people arrive for the construction projects. These groups focus on the southern parts of the country in winter and areas like the U.P. in the summer. Other volunteers come from “Collegiate Challenge.” McGregor posts the weeks they need help and what the projects will be on habitat.org/volunteer under the “travel and build” tab. These sites direct volunteers to where and when people are needed. People can also call the Manistique office directly at 906-341-7437. Manistique has the advantage of occupying an old elementary school.

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The Copper Country Habitat for Humanity Re-Store on Pine St. in Calumet is located in a former church — yet another re-use of a great building. (Photo by Deborah K. Frontiera)

Some of the rooms have been combined for the Re-Store, while others have become dormitories, a kitchen, dining area, restrooms with showers, a recreation room and conference room. Some volunteers refer to them as the “Tajmah Hall” of volunteer places. McGregor is pleased to hear that kind of praise. (In other areas, it is typical for out-of-town volunteers to be housed at a local church, but shower and wash clothes at a local YMCA.) Last year, after 2020 when COVID-19 stopped all projects, they were able to build one new home. This year, so far, they’ve done repairs for seven families. Nancy Pellegrini of the Menominee River HFH was happy to talk about earning the current Affiliate of the Year for Michigan and Non-profit of the Year for Dickenson County. They were pleased to be interviewed in July by TV-6. While they don’t have many big groups of volunteers come, they have one church-affiliated group from Hastings, Michigan that has been coming for a week or so every summer for 14 years. Their volunteers stay at a local church and shower at the Y. Local businesses and contractors also help them out. Their Re-Store is opened from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday.

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Their office and Re-store are in the same building. They cover Dickenson and Iron Counties and the surrounding Wisconsin counties “on the other side of the river.” Pellegrini works full time for their program and has a part-time construction manager, Danny, who plans projects two weeks out and then contacts a list of local people for his core crew. They also use social media to broadcast their needs. This summer, two students (children of Pellegrini’s parttime helper, Kathy) joined the team in the Re-Store. Kathy told Pellegrini it’s “always take your kid to work day.” Workers at the Copper Country HFH Re-Store shared some of their reasons for volunteering. T. J. (Thomas Jack) Griffin began volunteering in his teens and now is a paid employee — assistant manager — said he loves to help people in any way he can and enjoyed the years he was a volunteer. Now, as an employee, he tries to go above and beyond to help customers and to do his best to keep the Re-Store organized so people can find an item they are looking for. Other senior citizens throughout the U.P. state that volunteering is very fulfilling, and that Habitat for Humanity and its people are a wonderful organization to work for. The Copper Country unit

has its office in the lower level of Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in Hancock. Copper Country Habitat for Humanity Director Steve Cadeau reported that his unit “was recently honored by Habitat Michigan by winning the ReStore of the Year Award for our two ReStores — Calumet and Atlantic Mine — combining to break $300,000 in gross sales for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022 (started July 1, 2021). We also started the new fiscal year by breaking our previous monthly gross sales high. Construction wise, we completed our last build with a home dedication of 20 Sixth St. in South Range on June 7, 2022, and we had our ground-breaking ceremony for our next build on 46854 Green Acres Road in Houghton on the same day. We are expecting a church group to arrive on August 18th who will be helping us raise the walls and hopefully the rafters that week.” The Marquette County Habitat for Humanity is the largest, since that area has the biggest portion of the U.P.’s population. Executive Director Deanna Johnson manages a staff of 16 full and part-time employees, works with a board of directors of 10 and with the help of her staff keeps track of countless volunteers. Their offices and ReStore are not in the same building but are close to each other in Harvey.


Volunteers work on a Marquette County HFH)

new

Habitat

It’s a special year for the Marquette group — their 30th anniversary. That group was established in 1992 and built their first house in 1993. They were the Affiliate of the Year in 2002 and established the Re-Store in 2003. Besides local volunteers, they work with Norway Grove Memorial Lutheran Church in Deforest, Wisconsin;, Markesan United Methodist in Markesan, Wisconsin; 1st Presbyterian Church in Hastings, Michigan; an ACTION Group from Iowa; RV CareA-Vanners and AmeriCorps. They have completed 107 houses as of the summer of 2022 and broke ground on the 108th last fall. They have also completed 91 critical repairs on other homes. The ACTION Group arrived

for

Humanity

home

in

Marquette

in July 2022 to install the floors of house number 109 in Negaunee. On August 28, 2022, they celebrated their 30th birthday with an event at Lakenenland Metal Sculpture Park. Attendees included volunteers — past and present — staff, past staff, homeowners and the public. People participated in door prizes and a silent auction. A Business After Hours party is planned for October 19, 2022, at the Re-Store from 5 to 7 p.m. All are welcome. Those interested in volunteering can go to their website, mqthabitat.org, call 906-228-3578 or go to the Yoopers United website. All the U.P. Habitat for Humanity groups can use volunteer help in construction, Re-Stores, office help, com-

County.

(Photo

courtesy

of

the

mittees, boards of directors and lunch providers for construction projects. If none of those appeal, shopping at the Re-Store is another way to help provide needed funding. The Marquette Re-Store had a batch of Coke Memorabilia arrive in July and it didn’t last long. All the Re-Stores carry furniture, home goods, mattresses and bedding, paint, and construction materials, and who knows what else. MM About the Author: Deborah K Frontiera has written many articles for MM over the years. She is also an award-winning author of books in several genres. Visit her website at authorsden.com/deborahkfrontiera

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superior reads Chilling thriller is perfect autumn read

Review by Victor Volkman

W

hat is it about wintertime that lends itself so supplely to the horror genre? Beginning with Jack London’s To Build a Fire in 1908, the dangerous beauty of winter was driven home. Now throw in a dash of the supernatural, as in John W. Campbell’s Who Goes There?, which inspired John Carpenter’s low-budget classic The Thing (1982) and you have a real recipe for edge-ofyour-seat chills. Matthew Hellman builds on the winter-horror tradition with his latest novel The Biting Cold. In 1842, the Ontonagon Boulder, an immense tonnage of float copper, was removed from the eponymous county. That very same year, the Chippewa ceded all claims to 30,000 square miles of the Upper Peninsula to the United States government. Hellman uses the purported disappearance of people in Copper Harbor in 1842 as the central mystery of The Biting Cold. What did those Native Americans know that made them happy to be rid of Copper Harbor? Hellman’s novel is that sub-genre of horror which you could call “man vs. creature”, and that’s all I’m going to say about the central conflict in order to avoid spoiling it for readers who take notice of this review. The novel has a large cast of characters from Copper Harbor and one research scientist, Dr. Stephanie Crowe, an archaeology professor from Michigan Tech in Houghton. The action takes place entirely in the environs of Copper Harbor in 2019. The story opens as veteran charter boat pilot Bill Hitze has been reunited with 15 year-old son Brandon for the first time in a decade. Following a bitter custody battle with his ex-wife who left for Minneapolis and denied all visitation rights, Bill never expected to see his son again. However, the death of Brandon’s mother, Renee, a few months earlier and the apathy of his stepfather, Nick, bring him back into Bill Hitze’s orbit once again. Since the two have an extremely awkward relationship, one of Bill’s first moves is to introduce Brandon to the joys of fishing on Lake Superior. Almost immediately, Brandon snags a stray body part with his fishing hook and the mystery begins. The novel opens in late summer and Hellman has a keen eye for detail in describing the real life dangers of an everyday boating expedition on Lake Superior. He describes the danger both in terms of how fast things can go wrong and how severe the consequences of exposure in the big lake can be. Goaded by the aforementioned Dr. Crowe, Bill Hitze stays out just a few minutes too long to miss a Lake Superior thunderstorm, and the harrowing level of detail had me mesmerized as he describes the near disaster between Hunter’s Point and Porter’s Island on the

IF YOU ENJOY A TAUT THRILLER ... THEN YOU SHOULD CURL UP WITH THE BITING COLD AND A WARM BLANKET.

inbound trip. The result of more exploration determines that the infamous “lake that never gives up her dead” has preserved the body of one of those 1842 Copper Harbor casualties largely intact due to the depth and frigidity of the water. Local crank and barfly Ernest Kearse has been selling the theory of a supernatural explanation for the 1842 disappearances at Jotnar’s Tavern and Brewery, the fictional heart of the Copper Harbor community in contemporary times. He hints of a larger cycle at play, perhaps with an interval of 175 years, meaning Copper Harbor is overdue for a calamity in the coming winter. Ernie doesn’t know what’s coming but he’s got a bad feeling about it and, as events turn out, he will be right; however, he will gain no satisfaction from that fact. As the investigation proceeds throughout the rest of the summer and into the fall, we learn more about this big cast of characters that will have to fight the impending disaster. Brandon falls under the sway of newly-minted millionaire resident and philanthropist Jeff Jansen. As a game developer, Jansen is strictly a one-hit wonder whose mobile app “Rabid Turtles” was a huge overnight success. He is desperate for a

follow-up success but has neither the ideas nor the talent to pull it off. Jansen has no qualms about using Brandon as cheap labor to develop and test a game that Jansen will take 100% of the credit and money from. Meanwhile, Brandon may actually be more interested in local girl Trillium (“Tril”), a competent outdoors-woman and the daughter of crunchy granola hippie parents. Their bond will be tested in the epic battle that the coming winter provides. A few other locales are mentioned such as Calumet and Eagle Harbor. A key discovery takes place on top of Brockway Mountain which will serve as a secondary anchor in the action of the coming battle. The mountain, it seems, is concealing a series of important aspects of the evil to come, including petroglyphs and a huge sinkhole that threatens to swallow our two teenage protagonists. Throughout the area during the ensuing winter, Hellman portrays snowmobile and snowshoe pursuit scenes with great detail and accuracy. He has a penchant for introducing winter survival techniques and traps in just the right proportion and at just the right juncture in the storytelling. Even though I grew up watching snowmobile races outside Mackinaw City, I learned a thing or two about the dangers of handling a big machine in untracked snows, such as how it can dig itself into a hole in an unpacked snowbank. If you enjoy a taut thriller in a single location where a group are trapped and must use every last portion of their wits to survive and outwit evil, then you should curl up with The Biting Cold and a warm blanket. MM About the Author: Victor R. Volkman is a graduate of Michigan Technological University (Class of ’86) and is the current president of the U.P. Publishers and Authors Association (UPPAA). He is senior editor at Modern History Press and publisher of the U.P. Reader.

Send Upper Peninsula-related book review suggestions to victor@LHPress.com Books submitted for review can be sent to: MM Book Reviews, 5145 Pontiac Trail, Ann Arbor, MI 48105

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sporting life A game for the ages

United Way kicks off new campaign with hockey fundraiser By Kristy Basolo-Malmsten

M

arquette County will be offered an amazing night of hockey, with former stars from the professional level to local heroes — and all in the name of charity. United Way of Marquette County is offering a unique opportunity for hockey fans to see Red Wings alumni on the ice on September 17 at NMU’s Berry Events Center. They will face off against Yoopers United, a who’s-who of local hockey talent, including former NMU hockey players. “We’ve been wanting to do a larger community event to help kick off the campaign, and I always like to consider unique ideas,” said Andrew Rickauer, executive director of United Way of Marquette County. “This idea was brought up at one of our committee meetings, and we took it and ran with it. It fits well with Marquette County and the U.P.” Anyone could apply to be on the Yoopers United team. “Our goal was to get everyone who had a strong affiliation with Marquette County,” Rickauer said. “We wanted some diversity, and there is a broad range of talent and connections. About half are ex-NMU players. There are a couple that play for the Marquette Mutineers.” This event will serve as United Way’s campaign kick-off this year, and the organization hopes to raise awareness for United Way’s mission and the agencies it funds. The idea was suggested by United Way Marketing & Campaign committee member Mike Smith, who had seen it done in communities downstate. The conversation initially started about awareness. “We were trying to find something a little fresher,” said Jennifer Wieczorek, chairperson of the Marketing & Campaign committee. “We had a new committee member (Smith) who moved up from downstate, and he heard about United Ways down there having similar events. Not only will this be fun, but it’ll bring the community together.”

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VS.

The Detroit Red Wings Alumni association started in 1959, and they play dozens of games every year around Michigan and into Ontario. The association doesn’t announce which former Red Wings players will be in attendance in advance, as they are volunteers and cannot guarantee they will be there. “They do all fundraising games,” Rickauer said. “Most of them are in the Detroit area, but they are excited to come up here. They haven’t been up here in a long time — if ever. They’re excited to come up, and we’re excited to have them.” Wieczorek said an event of this type supports United Way’s vision. “United Way feels that every individual in this community should have the opportunity for success,” she said. “We bring together resources and funds and distribute them — to improve education and offer financial stability and resources to those in need.” Wieczorek said the funds raised by United Way of Marquette County stay local. “My goal is to raise more funds and raise more awareness for the agencies that we support,” Rickauer said. “I felt that bringing United Way’s name out in the community was important. “Putting on a larger event helps us to raise awareness and, hopefully, to raise some funds.” Rickauer said the donations were impacted, with two years of pandemic-impacted work, as most of United Way’s fundraising is through workplace campaigns. “When workplaces aren’t there, or have changed so much, it’s a challenge,” he said. “We can’t reach the

remote workers in the same way. Payroll deductions have been suffering, which is what we really had been depending on. There is a big shift in how to adapt to a new way of doing things and finding other revenue streams.” Ultimately, the people the United Way-funded agencies serve are being impacted, Rickauer said. “Those needs are going up, and we want to still be able to support them at the same level or more,” he said. “There is a lot of work to do. There is so much need out there.” United Way has 28 partner agencies this year; not all of them want the funding as that is just one aspect of what United Way can do to support the agencies. To support them, Rickauer said they are exploring new ways of giving, focusing on individual giving, small fundraisers and text-to-give. To give to United Way of Marquette County, visit www.uwmqt.org and click on the “Donate” tab for all the options. “We are always looking to do workplace campaigns,” Rickauer said. “We have workplaces that have one donor, and some that have more than 100. No business is too large or too small. It’s a collective effort of bringing the community together to support agencies however they can — that’s where the strength is. Maybe $1 a pay period doesn’t impact a person greatly, but collectively that has a huge impact on Marquette County.” Workplaces who are interested in participating in a workplace campaign can call the United Way office at (906)226-8171 for more information. “Payroll deduction is easy, but now


Former Boston Bruin Justin Florek, pictured here, will play on the Yoopers United team. (Photo courtesy of United Way Marquette)

we offer the same thing for people who do not have a workplace campaign,” Rickauer said. “There are sustained giving options for everyone.” Volunteering is another way to give. Rickauer spearheaded the Yoopers United website to bring volunteering opportunities together in one place and make it easier for the community to see where the volunteer need is. “Most of what the United Way does is bringing the community together to help support everyone,” he said. “Yoopers United does that through volunteer opportunities, either skillsbased or hands-on. Bringing community needs onto one central platform hopefully will make it easier for volunteers to connect with agencies who need them.” Visit www.YoopersUnited.com to volunteer. “Times aren’t what they used to be,” Wieczorek said. “I don’t think it’s all COVID-related. We’re seeing a trend, and trying to figure out how to meet multiple needs in the community. This younger generation who may

not be able to donate yet isn’t afraid to get their hands dirty, so they can give in that way. Yoopers United came out of that.” Wieczorek has been involved with United Way for more than five years; she supported the United Way since her employer, Upper Peninsula Health Group (UPHP) started offering the ability to contribute, which was nearly 20 years ago. “I have the ability to give, and it’s important to me to support the community,” she said. “The people who can donate make services possible. I’ve always thought, ‘I can do it, so I should do it.’” Wieczorek got the chance to sit on one of United Way’s community investment panels several years ago to hear presentations from the agencies seeking money for their programs. “Seeing those drove home to me how important it was to do more to support United Way and the agencies,” she said. “The hardest part is when you can’t give what everyone is asking for — you want to do more.”

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Yoopers United packs a punch By Kristy Basolo-Malmsten

T

he Yoopers United team will take on the Red Wings alumni with a fair amount of talented alumni of their own. Former NMU Wildcat hockey players on the team include David Bonk, Justin Florek, Chris Gobert, Jim Jackson, Nicholas Kosinski, Ryan Riipi and Alex Sawruk. Left-handed center Bonk played for NMU from 2000-04, playing in 74 games and totaling 25 points. He played in a variety of leagues, including the AHL. Florek, a forward, played for NMU from 2008-12 in 157 games, scoring 60 points. He played in four games for the Boston Bruins in the 2013-14 season, as well as spending many years in the AHL and skating overseas. Marquette native Gobert, a center, played for the Wildcats from 1999-2003, seeing action in 142 games and scoring 148 points. He played in the AHL, ECHL and UHL after his stint at NMU. Jackson, a defenseman, was a Wildcat from 1999-2003, seeing time in 153 games and scoring 86 points. He played in the ECHL, AHL and overseas for many season after his time at NMU. Kosinski played for NMU from 2007-11, and is a native of Marquette.

The desire to be able to support the community agencies with greater capacity is what brought about Marquette County Hockey Night. This event will offer more than just the game. Youth hockey will be showcased, and many opportunities will be available for people to give. “We’re planning on doing 50/50, chuck-a-puck, bucket raffles and are hoping to offer auction items, some autographed, from the Red Wings and Yoopers United teams,” Rickauer said. Other hockey groups are planning events to showcase the event as well, including thoughts of a hockey parade and a tailgating party. Other local businesses are supporting this event leading up to it. Queen City Running Company has a Happy Hour Run on September 8 at Ore Dock Brewing Company; cost is $10 and all paces and distances are welcome.

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Riipi, a Marquette native and left-handed center, played for NMU from 1997-2001, seeing time in 127 games and scoring 49 points. Sawruk, a forward, played for the Wildcats from 2000-04, seeing time in 120 games and scoring 45 points. He played several seasons in the ECHL after his time at NMU. Other former collegiate talent includes Blake Miller, who played for Finlandia University and saw time in the ECHL. Local law enforcement and firefighters are also taking to the ice, many who play to help raise funds for the Pigs-N-Heat Fire Relief fund. Brett Love, an employee of the Marquette County Sheriff’s office, grew up playing hockey in Marquette and played for the Electricians and Marquette’s high school team. Marquette City firefighter Brett Beaudry, a goalie, grew up playing hockey and has coached at every level of Marquette Junior Hockey for the past 30 years. Jon Wheeler is a 20-year veteran of the Marquette Township Fire Department, and helps with PigsN-Heat. Local Aaron Ranta was a product of the Marquette Junior Hockey Program, and eventually earned

Several of the Yoopers United players are raising funds for the kickoff by planning their own events, such as golf outings, merchandise auctions and more. “Leading up to the event, all the Yoopers United players have been challenged to do some extra fundraising to help raise awareness of United Way and the game,” Rickauer said. “There are several events that will be happening between now and game day.” The fundraising benefits the community, but also is a competition for two lucky winners who get spots on the Red Wings roster for the night, including jerseys; in addition, a captain and assistant captain will be named on the local team based on fundraising numbers. “There are some players who also just want to help support the community,” Rickauer said. Visit the United Way of Marquette

a state championship in 1991 with Jilbert Dairy Squirt AA and with the Marquette Senior High School hockey team in 1995. He coaches his daughter’s hockey team in the Marquette Junior Hockey Program for the past four years. Other familiar coaching names on the roster include Jon Nebel, who has coached hockey for 40 years, and David Paananen. Kevin Thomsen, owner of Queen City Running Company and local hockey player, will also suit up. Christian Howard grew up playing hockey in the area, as did Nickolas Boyle and Jeffrey Clark. Neeco Belanger, a Marquette native, competed for the National Champtionship with the Marquette Electricians, and is the assistant captain for the Marquette Mutineers of the Great Lakes Hockey League. His brother Wolff has played hockey in Marquette his entire life, and is currently playing with the Mutineers. Justin Cain, who played for the Marquette Redman, also is a Mutineer. Rounding out the roster is 68-year-old Barbara Salmela, who has been involved with the hockey community for about 20 years. She has played in the Marquette Old Timers tournament. MM

County Facebook page for details of these pre-event fundraisers. “We’re a hockey town,” Wieczorek said. “This will be fun, and a great way to get everyone together to raise funds and raise awareness for the non-profit agency programs we fund.” Marquette County Hockey Night begins at 6 p.m. on Saturday, September 17 at NMU’s Berry Events Center in Marquette. Tickets are available online at nmu.universitytickets.com/w/default. aspx or through the NMU ticket office. Businesses interested in sponsoring the event may call (906) 226-8171. MM About the author: Kristy Basolo-Malmsten has a master’s degree in writing from NMU, has worked for MM for almost two decades and has her own editing and publishing company. Her day job is as senior center director in Negaunee.


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back then

THESE CLAIMS MAY STRETCH THE BOUNDS OF CREDULITY, YET ARE AS TRUE AS A RULER’S EDGE.

Shocking revelations

The truth about our ‘northern’ neighbors, some surprising lake locations and a little interesting math By Larry Chabot

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old onto your atlas: the world population will compress, north becomes south and lakes will appear magically. These claims may stretch the bounds of credulity, yet are as true as a ruler’s edge. Here is a shocking fact, truly hard to believe: if every person on earth (and there are 7.9 billion of us) were allotted four square feet of earth to occupy, all of us could fit into….Marquette County! And with acres and acres of space left over. This is mind-boggling without some hard numbers to chew on. Here’s another: every single Chinese person — and there are 1.4 billion of them — if bunched together, would fit into Isle Royale National Park, with enough empty space for all of the moose. Here’s the math: a square mile contains 27,878,400 square feet, or almost 7 million spaces measuring 2 feet by 2 feet for us to stand or sit on. When you divide the world’s population of 7.9 billion people by 7 million spaces per mile, you get 1,133 square miles. Counting both land and water in its boundaries, Marquette County is three times that size. The leftover space could accommodate the entire state of Rhode Island, all of Alger County, O’Hare Field in Chicago (we would need a big airport to fly everyone in), the entire Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park and Disneyworld, leaving 22 square miles for interpreters, green spaces, fast-food joints, dumpsters and portable toilets. Of course, with a limited amount of flat surface in the county, some occupiers would be under water, hanging from cliffs, clinging to trees or crouched inside culverts. Actually, six different counties in Michigan could accommodate the entire world population in that fashion, all of them in the Upper Peninsula. But

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then, this is a purely hypothetical exercise, so there is no need for crowd control or welcome bags. A Geographic Flip-Flop ay you live in Copper Harbor, the northernmost town in Michigan, at the very top of the Keweenaw Peninsula, which pokes into Lake Superior. From the top of nearby Brockway Mountain, one can see Michigan’s Isle Royale National Park on a clear day, but not the Thunder Bay region of Canada located behind the island. So the Copper Harborite can’t see our neighbor to the north, just 70 miles away. Yet, despite its well-known title as our northern neighbor, more than half the population of Canada lives south of Copper Harbor. This makes Canada both our northern and southern neighbor. The southernmost Canadians live way down south, on Pelee Island in Lake Erie, well below the entire state of Michigan and a dozen other states. Another 14 states are partly north of Pelee Island like California, for Pete’s sake. Over half the states in the United States have folks living north of those southern Canadians. Pelee, the largest island in Lake Erie, lies directly across from Toledo, Ohio, and is linked by ferries with Ohio and mainland Canada. The island is home to about 235 Canadians; it’s known for agriculture and tourism, including worldclass pheasant hunters and long-distance runners. Canada’s total population is about 38 million. The number living south of the Keweenaw is at least 19.5 million in the major population centers like Toronto and Montreal and smaller cities scattered throughout Ontario province. Numbers in the smaller cities and villages in southern Ontario aren’t included in the math, so the southern percentage is even higher.

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September 2022

Go north, young man: my Canadian grandfather, whose hometown was St. Constant across the St. Lawrence River from Montreal, emigrated to Lake Linden in Houghton County, which is 125 miles north of his Canadian birthplace. Lake Surprises ichigan has the fifth highest number of lakes in the United States (Alaska is first with over three million, named and unnamed). Michigan has 11,000 or so. Since early lake-namers didn’t have the internet or other sources available when it came to naming bodies of water, some duplications crept in. There are 22 Long Lakes in Michigan; two counties have two Longs each, and Barry County in southwestern Michigan has four. Indian Lake was the name given to 10 bodies of water, and there are eight Silvers, six Crookeds and six Muds. Three of the state’s biggest are in the U.P., with Gogebic the peninsula’s largest. Nestled in eastern Ontonagon County, near the Houghton County line, are two bodies of water with the most unusual and ominous names. Just off Forest Highway 16 is a 35-acres lake with an inviting variety of fish for area anglers. Unwary motorists approaching this body of water must be ever alert. I remember bouncing on this rough road many years ago and have it suddenly appear beneath our wheels, seemingly out of nowhere. Another few feet and we would have been submerged. Thus the perfect name: Sudden Lake. Whoa! It gets weirder. Sudden Lake has a suspicious neighbor tucked behind it, lying in wait for unsuspecting victims. On that same long-ago trip, a very rough trail ended with our wheels in the drink, a super-quick turn having led us into appropriate-

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Illustration by Mike McKinney

ly named Very Sudden Pond. There should be a Wet Wheels Club for those who have dipped tires into both lakes. End-to-End Water rom Ironwood on the west to Sault Ste. Marie on the east are an uncounted number of rivers and streams, so many that one watershed abuts another, all across the peninsula. The undisputed champion U.P. river is the Ontonagon, an historic stream with a 2,700 square-mile watershed in five counties and part of Wisconsin. The main trunk and its five big branches total 255 miles, second only to the Grand River in the lower peninsula. There are 400 notable streams and 200 lakes of at least 10 acres, the largest of which is Lake Gogebic. Anyone driving through the western U.P. is almost certain to cross one of the Ontonagon’s branches. Many U.P. rivers discharge into Lake Superior, the largest Great Lake, whose bottom is littered with as many as 550 shipwrecks, most of them un-

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discovered. It’s unnerving to peer over the side of a boat to see the ghostly remains of a sunken vessel, and even wilder to snag one with a fishline. MM Author’s Note: The author has a healthy respect for water, having nearly drowned in a Mackinac Island pool at age four. As a pre-teen, he quickly learned to swim when “big kids” threw him off a raft in Lake Superior. For this and other reasons, he was glad that his children were in a school system which taught students to swim in second grade. About the Author: Larry Chabot, an Ontonagon native, worked his way through Georgetown University and was then employed at White Pine Copper Company for 32 years, before moving to Marquette with his wife, Betty. He is a freelance writer who has written for several publications, including more than 170 articles for Marquette Monthly.

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poetry The Fall I can’t believe how far the year has fallen. How late the sunrise comes. It was summer only yesterday. Grateful for this small parcel of time. This short passage that is mine. The old abandoned root cellar dug out near the edge of the woods. An old log washed to the shore notched for the cabin that once stood here. This place that someone once built How wondrous it must have been. Now our own place overlooks it all. The Blue Jays call out, cry like babies, it’s almost time for them to leave. I will miss how they greet me each time. Fly in low along the dirt road. Their backs so impossibly blue in the last of the evening light. We have gathered the seasons fallen nests, enchanted by the mastery, the crochet of grasses, twigs, and bark leather. The gifts they have held that sing us home. When we have long gone Who will stand in wonder of Our timber bones.

About the Author: Lisa Fosmo is a poet and writer who resides in Escanaba and is a native of the Upper Peninsula. She enjoys spending time at her cabin in Marquette County. Lisa combines her great love of nature with her love of writing, and photography. She is a member of the Marquette Poet Circle, and also a member of The Poetry Society of Michigan. She has been published in Walloon Writers review, as well as anthologies and other publications in the United States and abroad. In her spare time, native bee conservation and habitat continue to be a passion near to her heart.

The Marquette Poets Circle is very thankful for the support of Marquette Monthly with respect to its five-year anthology Maiden Voyage. The 10-year anthology, Superior Voyage, is intended to be published this year with a tentative book release date of October 18, 2022 at the Peter White Public Library, with all profits from any books sold at the event to be donated to the library.

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home cinema

Science fiction, coming of age films in September’s reviews Reviews by Leonard Heldreth ur films this month include a traditional horror film, a science fiction film about young love, and a memoir about growing up in Italy in the 1980s. SPOILER ALERT: These reviews discuss key plot points.

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The Cursed et mostly on an estate in France in the 19th century, The Cursed is a werewolf film that combines elements of the traditional Lon Chaney, Jr., films from Universal with elements of contemporary literary criticism that see horror as a metaphor for colonial and class suppression or contagious disease (George Romero’s Night of the Living Dead is an obvious example). From The Wolfman, the film draws its references to gypsies and minority groups, the use of silver as an antidote to lycanthropy, and infection by bite (COVID-19 hangs over the film like a plague waiting to happen). The colonial suppression is stated explicitly by one character who asserts that the sins of the fathers will be visited on the children, and several children die in the film as a direct result of their father’s actions. The Cursed, originally entitled Eight for Silver, begins in the trenches of World War I when a wounded officer is operated on for three bullet wounds, but the surgeon finds four bullets, including one made of silver. The film then flashes back to a French estate in the 1880s, where local landlords, led by Seamus Laurent (Alistair Petrie), are trying to expel a group of gypsies who have laid claim to the same land. The conflict explodes into violence, and a gypsy man is killed and his body mutilated before being exhibited as a scarecrow. A gypsy woman is buried alive after creating a set of silver fangs that are put in the ground with her, and she calls down a curse on the perpetrators. After the violence, the landowners retreat to their houses to celebrate their victory. Soon the landowners’ children begin having nightmares, and Laurent’s son disappears after being attacked by “a wild animal.” Other children and adults are attacked. Pathologist John McBride (Boyd Holbrook) arrives in the town and tells how his wife and children were killed by a cursed creature until the curse was purged by a blood-letting. McBride tries to convince the landowners of their danger but fails, and several more attacks occur. When Laurent’s house is attacked by the creature and accidentally catches fire, everyone flees to the church, which apparently the monster cannot enter without being invited in, but a woman is convinced to let her son in, and the beast attacks. McBride has made silver bullets and is able to stop the werewolf, but much blood is shed before it is destroyed. Apparently the wounds created in these encounters become non-infectious when the werewolf is killed.

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Sean Ellis, the director, creates a frightening world of monsters, fog and carnage. Although he brings some new twists to the werewolf mythology, and revives some old ones, his creation of the major characters leaves something to be desired. The landowners and their henchmen are stock characters; the victims are interchangeable; and the villagers could have wandered in from any genre horror film. Nonetheless, his moody photography and atmospheric scenes make The Cursed worth seeing for anyone who enjoys the genre. The Map of Tiny Perfect Things ost people who go to films are familiar with Bill Murray’s Groundhog Day, in which a man is trapped inside a “temporal anomaly” that just keeps repeating the same events over and over. The film was popular enough to create almost a subgenre of films about people trapped in such time warps, e. g., Palm Springs, Edge of Tomorrow, Happy Death Day, and Before I Fall. While The Map of Tiny Perfect Things lacks the ambition of some of these other films, it has a charm and a positive quality that makes it very agreeable as a young romance film. If you don’t expect profundity and a scientific explanation for the existence of Black Holes, you may find yourself smiling as the film comes to its generally predictable conclusion. The film opens with Mark (Kyle Allen) waking up to begin the umpteenth iteration of his repeating day. He has breakfast, banters with his little sister, argues with his father (Josh Hamilton), bikes to school, and stops little disasters along the way. Then he just wanders around. He knows everything that is going to happen, from the spilled soft drink that he catches just before it hits the ground, to the just-missed accident that he avoids. He plays video games with best friend Henry (Jermaine Harris), goes to the neighborhood swimming pool, and steals construction equipment to drive down the street. Eventually he ends up back at home, where he repeats the same argument with his father about his desire to attend art school instead of traditional college. At midnight, his body automatically falls asleep, and the day resets. When he wakes up, it’s the next morning and the same day starting again. One of the things he repeats each day is to keep a girl from getting hit in the head by a beach ball at the pool, but then one day another girl interferes, and he realizes the new girl is caught in the same time loop as he is. Since it’s better to be in a time loop with someone than to be in one alone, he makes friends with the new girl (yes, there’s a practical problem here – he can’t become friends with the new girl while repeating his interactions with the previous girl, but maybe there’s a little slippage between the repeated days). Margaret (Kathryn Newton) and Mark share information about the temporal anomaly that they share and exchange their plans for the

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future if they can ever escape the current day. They try to break the spell by traveling and crossing the international date line, but that fails. Then they try to capture and map all the tiny perfect things they encounter – an older couple playing cards and her winning; a bird scooping a fish out of the lake; etc. They fill these experiences in on a map they create, hoping to fill it up, but the day keeps recurring. Mark sees that every evening Margaret leaves after receiving a text message from someone named Jared, and he concludes that Jared is her boyfriend. Eventually the reason for the recurring day is revealed, and Margaret and Mark become the couple that they obviously had to become. While the revelations are not astounding, the director shifts the emphasis at the end from Mark to Margaret, and the loose ends are wrapped up as the rain begins to fall at midnight, ushering in a new, non-repeating day. The Hand of God n every film director’s life there seems to come a time when the desire to sum up his achievements becomes overwhelming. The results include Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma, Kenneth Branagh’s Belfast, Pedro Almodovar’s Pain and Glory and, of course, Federic Fellini’s 8 ½ and Amacord. One of Fellini’s admirers, Paolo Sorrentino (an Oscar winner in his own right for The Great Beauty, 2014) has now completed his film memoir, The Hand of God, in which he tries to recapture what he experienced being an adolescent in Naples in the 1980s. It’s a film about growing up, dealing with a family that is sometimes as grotesque as Fellini’s most outrageous characters, and surviving tragedy to achieve his goal of making films. It even includes an audio clip from Fellini himself in which he asks, “What good are movies?” They are a “distraction from reality,” something we need because “reality is lousy.” The film opens with a long tracking shot along the Bay of Naples, coming to rest on a nighttime traffic jam. A voluptuous woman waits for a bus along the clogged highway, and an antique car pulls out of the confusion and offers her a ride home. The elderly passenger addresses her by name, “Patrizia” (Luisa Ranieri), and says he is San Gennaro, the city’s patron saint (Enzo Decaro). Accompanying him is “the little monk,” a fertility figure dressed in black, whose touch can give Patrizia the fertility she has long wanted. She agrees and enters the car, but when she arrives home, her husband calls her a whore and strikes her, and the viewer must decide who to believe since Patrizia is known to have periods of confusion alternating with ones of lucidity. Thus we are introduced to the unpredictable family of 17-year-old Fabio Schisa (Filippo Scotti) – Patrizia is his aunt and the subject of his adolescent lust. Fabio, who will grow up to be the director Paolo Sorrentino, lives with his parents, a

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brother, and a sister in a comfortable apartment in Naples. His mother, Maria (Teresa Saponangelo), is adept at juggling oranges and playing pranks. Her husband, Saverio (Toni Servillo), works at the Bank of Naples, though he proudly calls himself a communist. Fabietto’s brother, Marchino (Marlon Joubert), is an aspiring actor, but when Fellini declares his face “too conventional,” Marachino acknowledges that he lacks the perseverance to be successful as an actor. A sister who spends most of her time in the bathroom is seldom seen. Fabio’s family is put on exhibit at a luncheon, and it’s clear that Sorrentino shares Fellini’s taste for odd, sometimes grotesque human faces and physiques. Most of The Hand of God concerns Fabio’s tentative relationship with his parents, Saverio and Maria, and the events that the boy encounters, with one exception, are somewhat predictable. In the second part of the film he encounters Armando (Biagio Manna), a cigarette smuggler who teaches him what not to do; he loses his virginity; and he has a long talk with the film director Antonio Capuano. Listening to this young man bemoan Naples as a place where nothing happens, Capuano snaps back: “Do you know how many stories there are in this city!?” The title refers not to divine intervention – or at least not just to that – but to soccer. In the first part

of the film, Naples is consumed with whether the great Argentine midfielder, Diego Maradona, will come play for the city’s team. In the second half he accepts the offer and makes the notorious hand-assisted goal in the 1986 World Cup, that Maradona attributed to divine intervention. Later in the film Fabio explains how he thinks Maradona inadvertently saved his life. At the end of the film, Fabio is on a train headed to Rome, and at the nextto-last stop he looks out the window and sees the little dark monk from the opening sequence standing on the platform. They wave, and then Fabio snuggles down into his seat as the train carries him into the future. The Hand of God is a sensitive, sometimes sad film about a teenager encountering life in all its complexity, and it should appeal especially to anyone interested in Italian life or film. MM About the Author: Leonard Heldreth became interested in films in high school and worked as a movie projectionist in undergraduate and graduate school. His short “Cinema Comment” aired for some years on WNMU-FM. In 1987, he started writing reviews for Marquette Monthly. He taught English and film studies at NMU for more than 30 years. Editor’s Note: All films reviewed are available on DVD or streaming video.

Answers for the New York Times crossword puzzle, located on Page 17.

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Out & About Out & About is a free listing of Upper Peninsula events. Events included must cost $25 or less (except fundraisers). All events are free and in Eastern time unless noted. We print information sent to us by a wide variety of people and organizations. It pays to double check the date, time, place and cost before heading out. Due to changing event requirements, please call ahead to ask about safety precautions, or bring a mask to events, as many events require masks regardless of vaccination status.

Index

E-mail your October events by Saturday, September 10 to:

on the town ………… 77

calendar@marquettemonthly.com Marquette Monthly P.O. Box 109 Gwinn, MI 49841 phone: (906) 360-2180

art galleries ……… 78-79 museums …………..81, 83 support groups ……… 86

Marquette Area Blues Fest - Biscuit Miller | September 2 | Marquette

end of august events

Farmers Market, 1501 Ludington St. (906) 789-8696.

31 WEDNESDAY

• Farmers Market. 3 to 5:50 p.m. Waterfront Park, N. Front St.

sunrise 7:08 a.m.; sunset 8:32 p.m.

Calumet

• A Course of Love. Donna Trudell will lead the class based on the book by Mari Perron. Participants will learn about peace, joy and clarity through this self-awareness class. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Escanaba

• Farmers Market. 3 to 6 p.m. Escanaba

L’Anse

Marquette

• Wednesday Evening Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com

Negaunee • Negaunee to 7 p.m. of Maas

City Miner’s Street

Market. 4 Park, corner and US-41.

Skandia

• Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Skandia Farmers Market, 9271 US-41 S.

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Copper Harbor

september events 01 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:09 a.m.; sunset 8:30 p.m.

Copper Harbor

• Performances in the Park Open Mic Night. Bring your own blankets, chairs and picnic baskets, and listen to performances by local musicians. 7 to 9 p.m. Donny Kilpela Memorial Park.

Escanaba

Ishpeming

L’Anse

• Feeding America Food Truck Distribution. Pre-packed boxes will be loaded into your vehicle during this drive up distribution. Those walking can pickup boxes at the VFW parking lot. 9 to 10:30 a.m. parking lot, North Iron Church, US41.

L’Anse

• Lakefront Concert Series. Enjoy a night of jazz, rock and country music by Black Pearl. Bring a chair and blanket. Rain location is Meadowbrook Arena. 7 p.m. Lakefront Park, Broad St.

Marquette

• Vinyl Record Show. New and used vinyl records, CDs, posters, cassettes, books and t-shirts will be available for purchase. Noon to 11 p.m. Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. (906) 373-6183. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • First Thursdays Art Walk. Visit local art galleries, studios and creative spaces throughout the city. Maps of participating business available at the Marquette Arts and Culture Center and online. 4 to 8 p.m. Locations vary.

Negaunee

• Irontunes. Sign up for bean-bag games and listen to live music. 6 to 10 p.m. Iron St.

02 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:10 a.m.; sunset 8:29 p.m.

Marquette

• Vinyl Record Show. New and used vinyl records, CDs, posters, cassettes, books and t-shirts will be available for purchase. Noon to 11 p.m. Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. (906) 373-6183. • Marquette Area Blues Fest Free Night. Enjoy music from The Jimmys and Biscuit Miller. 6 to 10 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, 200 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or nmu.universitytickets. com

03 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:12 a.m.; sunset 8:27 p.m.

Calumet

• Community Market. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

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• Copper Harbor Trails Fest. Bikers will compete in cross-country and downhill races. Prices and event times vary. copperharbortrails.org • Trails Fest Concert. The national touring Grateful Dead band, Terrapin Flyer, will perform. $10. 7 to 111 p.m. Donny Kilpela Memorial Park. copperharbortrails.org • Labor Day Celebration. Bring your chairs and listen to music by Reflections. 6 p.m. Ludington St. Ludington Park, Lake Shore Dr. • Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to noon. Waterfront Park, N. Front St.

Marquette

• Marquette Marathon. Cheer on runners competing in the half and full marathons. Runners will finish at the Superior Dome. Times vary. NMU. marquettemarathon.com • Saturday Morning Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Vinyl Record Show. New and used vinyl records, CDs, posters, cassettes, books and t-shirts will be available for purchase. Noon to 11 p.m. Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. (906) 373-6183. • Marquette Area Blues Fest. This annual festival will feature music from Graham Brothers & Howlin’ Rhythm, Whiskey Ryan, Crossroads Resurrection, Tail Dragger with Jonny Burgin and Carolyn Wonderland. Prices vary. 1 to 10 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, 200 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or nmu. universitytickets.com

Rock

• 77th Annual Labor Day Celebration. This annual celebration includes a parade, food, music, bounce houses, games and more. Parade, 11 a.m. Activities to follow. Rock Lions Club, 14454 M-35.

04 SUNDAY

sunrise 7:13 a.m.; sunset 8:25 p.m.

Copper Harbor

• Copper Harbor Trails Fest. Runners will compete in a 10K trail run and bikers will compete in the enduro. Prices and event times vary. copperharbortrails.org • Trails Fest Concert. The American rock band, 4onthefloor, will perform. $10. 7 to 111 p.m. Donny Kilpela Memorial Park. copperharbortrails.org

Escanaba

• Labor Day Celebration. Bring your chairs and listen to music by Angels and Outlaws and Smooth. 1 to 8 p.m. Ludington St. Ludington Park, Lake Shore Dr.

Marquette

• Vinyl Record Show. New and used vinyl records, CDs, posters, cassettes, books and t-shirts will be available for purchase. Noon to 11 p.m. Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. (906) 373-6183. • Marquette Area Blues. This annual festival will feature music from Jake & the Fireside Blues Band, The Wallens,


on the town

Maria Davey

John Davey | September 9 | Ore Dock Brewing Company, Marquette

Gwinn

• Hideaway Bar. - Mondays: The Hideaway AllStars. 7 p.m. 741 M-35. (906) 346-3178. • Up North Lodge. - Sunday, September 4: Jim and Ray. - Sunday, the 11th: Barefoot Davis and Up North Caribbean Band. - Sunday, the 18th: The Reveal. - Sunday, the 25th: Derrell Syria Project. Music, 4 to 8 p.m. 215 S. CR-557. (906) 346-9815.

Hancock

• Orpheum Theater. - Friday, September 30: The Driftless Revelers and Sugar on the Roof. 8 p.m. 426 Quincy St. (906) 482-5100.

Marquette

• Blackrocks Brewery. - Mondays: Trivia. 7 to 9 p.m. - Wednesdays: Open mic. 6 to 9 p.m. Music begins at 6 p.m. 424 N. Third St. (906) 273-1333 or blackrocksbrewery.com • Drifa Brewing Company. - Mondays: Musicians’ Open Mic. 6 to 8 p.m. - Saturday, September 3: Bradley and Jason. - Thursday, the 8th: Alex Teller. - Friday, the 9th: Whiskey Ryan. - Saturday, the 10th: Kaleb Shannon. - Thursday, the 15th: Derrell Syria Project. - Friday, the 16th: Gena and Hozz. - Friday, the 23rd: The Wallens.

- Friday, the 30th: Big Lake Band. Music begins at 6 p.m. 501 S. Lake St. 273-1300. • Flanigan’s. - Tuesday through Thursday: Karaoke. 9:30 p.m. - Friday, September 23: SunnySide Up. 7 p.m. Cover charge on weekends only. 429 W. Washington St. (906) 2288865. • Ore Dock Brewing Company. - Friday, September 2: On the Spot Blues Band. - Saturday, the 3rd: Crossroads Resurrection. - Friday, the 9th: John Davey. - Saturday, the 10th: StoneFolk. 7 p.m. - Saturday, the 17th: Trophy Boy. 8 p.m. - Friday, the 23rd: Nick Gonnerging. 8 p.m. - Friday, the 30th: Blanco Suave and Fake Baseball. All shows are free and begin at 9 p.m. unless noted. 114 W. Spring St. 228-8888. • Rippling River Resort. - Thursdays through Sundays: Fireside music by various musicians. 6 to 9 p.m. 4321 M-553. (906) 273-2259 or ripplingriverresort.com • Superior Culture. - Friday, September 2: Chris Valenti. 9 p.m. - Friday, the 9th: Alex Teller. 7 p.m. - Thursday, the 29th: Heather Evans. 9 p.m. 717 Third St. (96) 273-0927 or superiorculturemqt.com • The Fold. - Sundays: Acoustic Jam. 3 to 5 p.m. 1015 N. Third Street, #9. (906) 226-

8575.

Munising

• Falling Rock Café and Bookstore. - Saturday, September 3: Beechgrove and Blacksmith. 6 to 8 p.m. - Sunday, the 4th: A Place to Land. 6 to 8 p.m. - Saturday, the 10th: Cedar Street Rhythm Section. 6 to 8 p.m. 104 E. Munising Ave. (906) 3873008.

Negaunee

• Smarty’s Saloon. - Thursdays: Live acoustic music. 7 to 10 p.m. 212 Iron St. (906) 401-0438.

Republic

• Pine Grove Bar. - Friday, September 2: The Wallens. - Saturday, the 3rd: Reverend. - Friday, the 9th: DayDreamers. - Friday, the 16th: Spun. - Saturday, the 17th: Adam Carpenter and the Upper Hand. - Friday, the 23rd and Saturday, the 24th: Diversion. - Friday, the 30th: Toni Saari. 286 Front St. (906) 376-2234.

Rock

• Herbs Bar. - Friday, September 2: Big Al and the Tomata’s. - Saturday, the 3rd: Pink Violin. 3 p.m. - Saturday, the 3rd: Luke Warm & Not So Hots. 5 p.m. - Sunday, the 4th: Luke Warm & Not So Hots. 4 p.m. 14360 M-35. (906) 356-6126. MM

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art galleries Calumet

• Calumet Art Center. Works by local and regional artists. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228. • Copper Country Associated Artist. Works by members and workshop participants in watercolor and oil, drawings, photography, sculpture, quilting, wood, textile, clay, glass and other media. Thursday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 205 Fifth St. (906) 3371252 or ccaartists.org • Gallery on 5th. Works by local and regional artists. Days and hours vary. 109 Fifth St. (906) 369-0094.

Copper Harbor

• EarthWorks Gallery. Featuring Lake Superior-inspired photography by Steve Brimm. Daily, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. 216 First St. (910) 319-1650.

Escanaba

• East Ludington Art Gallery. Works by local artists. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1007 Ludington St. (906) 786-0300 or eastludingtongallery.com • William Bonifas Fine Arts Gallery. - Abstraction: Unveiling the Surface, featuring works by Ginnie Cappaert and Dan Cross, will be on display September 1 through October 20, with a public reception at 6 p.m. on September 1. - BAC Membership Show Winner, featuring works by the winner of the featured artist award, will be on display September 10 through Ocobter 20. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3p.m. 700 First Avenue South. (906) 7863833 or bonifasarts.org

Hancock

• Finlandia University Gallery. - Folk School at Midsummer, an exhibition of work by Folk School instructors and students, will be on display through September 2. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m. 435 Quincy St. (906) 487-7500. • Kerredge Gallery. - Remembering Jan Manniko, will be on display through September 10. - Arts Center Staff Show, will be on display September 13 through 30. Tuesday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts Center, 126 Quincy St. (906) 482-2333 or coppercountryarts. com • Youth Gallery. - The Hexagon Project, featuring works by Houghton Elementary School students, will be on display through August 31. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts Center, 126 Quincy St. (906) 482-2333 or coppercountryarts.com

Houghton

• The Rozsa Galleries. - Arabesque, an exhibition featuring

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works by Clement Yeh and Tomas Co, will be on display September 23 through November 4, with a public reception at 5 p.m. October 28. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays, 1 to 8 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. mtu.edu/rozsa

Marquette

• Art—U.P. Style. Art by Carol Papaleo, works by local artists, gifts, classes and more. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. 130 W. Washington St. (906) 225-1993. • DeVos Art Museum. - U.P. Focus, an exhibition featuring works by Lindsey Heiden and Linda King-Ferguson, will be on display through November 4. - The Last Place on Earth, featuring works by Jan Manniko, will be on display through November 15, 2022. Monday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Corner of Seventh and Tracy streets. NMU. (906) 227-1481 or nmu.edu/devos • Graci Gallery. Works by regional

and national artists. Featuring fine craft, contemporary art, and jewelry. Thursday and Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday, by appointment or chance. 555 E Michigan Street. gracigallery.com • Huron Mountain Club Gallery. - Banned Books, this exhibit will showcase the history of banned and challenged books in the U.S., will be on display, September 19 through 24. Monday through Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. • Lake Superior Photo and Gallery. The studio features landscape photographic art by Shawn Malone, including naturescapes of the Lake Superior region. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 211 S. Front St. (906) 228-3686 or lakesuperiorphoto. com • Marquette Arts and Culture Center Deo Gallery. - Sunrises and Wild Places, featuring works by Cameron Wilcox, will be on display September 1 through 30. (continued on page 79)


art galleries Monday through Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • Peter White Public Library Reception Gallery. - Flora, featuring digital illustrations by Sarah Reynolds, will be on display through September 30. Monday through Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • Presque Isle Station. This working pottery studio features pottery by Michael Horton and Terry Gilfoy, along with works by local artists. Days and times vary. 2901 Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 225-1695. • The Gallery: A Marquette Artist Collective Project. Works by local and regional artists. Monday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 1 to 4 p.m. Suite U7, 130 W. Washington St. mqtartistcollective.com • The Studio Gallery at Presque Isle. Works by local and internationally acclaimed artists. Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 2905 Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 360-4453. • Wintergreen Hill Gallery and Gifts. - Works by Maddie Pederson will be on display through September 2. - Works by Steve Pelto will be on display September 3 to 16, with a public reception at 6 p.m. on the 3rd. - Works by Laura Songer will be on display September 17 through 30, with a public reception at 6 p.m. on the 24th. (continued from page 78) Jennifer Westwood & the Handsome Devils, Reverend Raven & the Chain Smokin’ Alter Boys with Westside Andy, and Vanessa Collier. Prices vary. 1 to 10 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, 200 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or nmu. universitytickets.com • Registration Deadline: Battle of the Boards. See Saturday the 10th.

05 MONDAY

sunrise 7:14 a.m.; sunset 8:23 p.m.

LABOR DAY

Escanaba

• Labor Day Celebration. This celebration will include a parade, music, a petting zoo, bounce house, food, beverages and music. Parade, noon. Ludington St. Park activities, following the parade until 8 p.m. Ludington Park, Lake Shore Dr.

Marquette

• Vinyl Record Show. New and used vinyl records, CDs, posters, cassettes, books and t-shirts will be available for purchase. Noon to 11 p.m. Ore Dock

Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 810 N. Third St. (906) 273-1374. • Zero Degrees Artist Gallery. - Paintings by Dan Cook will be on display September 1 through 30, with a public reception at 1 p.m. on the 10th. Works in oils, watercolors, mixed media, jewelry, photography, metals, woods, recycled and fiber arts and much more. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 525 N, Third St. (906) 228-3058 or zerodegreesgallery.org

Munising

• Open Wings Pottery Studio & Gallery. Featuring works by more than 50 local artisans in a variety of media. Open by chance or appointment. E9795 County Road H-58. (906) 387-5070. • UP-Scale Art. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. or by appointment. 109 W. Superior Ave. (906) 387-3300 or upscaleart.org

Rapid River

• The adhocWORKshop. Owner Ritch Branstrom creates sculptures with found objects inspired by the land in which the objects were found. By appointment or chance. 10495 South Main Street. (906) 399-1572 or adhocworkshop.com

Sand River

• Aurelia Studio Pottery. Featuring high fire stoneware, along with functional and sculptural pieces inspired by nature, created by potter and owner Paula Neville. Open by appointment or chance. 3050 E. M-28. (906) 343-6592.

MM Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. (906) 373-6183.

06 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:15 a.m.; sunset 8:21 p.m.

Escanaba

• Phil Lynch Album Launch Concert. Singer and songwriter Phil Lynch will perform piano-based pop music. 7 p.m. Leigh’s Garden Winery, 904 Ludington St. phillynchmusic.com

Marquette

• Oil Painting, Pastels and Drawing Classes with Marlene Wood. Bring your own supplies. $20. 1 to 3 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 225-8655. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • What’s Up? Astronomy Series. Scott Stobbelaar of the Marquette Astronomical Society will discuss what can be seen in the U.P. skies. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit

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pwpl.info for Zoom link.

07 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:17 a.m.; sunset 8:19 p.m.

Calumet

• A Course of Love. Donna Trudell will lead the class based on the book by Mari Perron. Participants will learn about peace, joy and clarity through this self-awareness class. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

L’Anse

• Farmers Market. 3 to 5:50 p.m. Waterfront Park, N. Front St.

Marquette

• Congregate Meals for Seniors–Dine in or Curbside Pickup. Meals available to those age 60 and older. Call to reserve a meal. $3.50 suggested donation. Noon to 1 p.m. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. (906) 228-0456. • Visual Art Class: Wool Felt Applique. This class is for those age 55 and older. Register in advance. Marquette city and surrounding township residents, free; nonresidents, $5 donation. 1 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 225-8655. • George Shiras III: Camera Hunter, Presentation and Hike. This two-part program will include a presentation about George Shiras III, his contributions to the conservation movement and nighttime photography. Registration required. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 2 p.m. Room 101B, Superior Dome, NMU. (906) 228-9367. • Craft Magic Series: Felt Magic with Jody Trost. Join felt artist Jody Trost for a beginner needle felted workshop. Bring your own scissors. Space is limited. 6:30 p.m. Heritage Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322. • Teens Game On. Youth in grades 6 to 12 are invited to play video games, board games and other games. 6:30 p.m. Teen Zone, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • Wednesday Evening Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • League of Women Voters Membership Meeting. Visitors are welcome. 6 p.m. Lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217. N. Front St. (906) 225-9103 or kwinokur@scbglobal.net

• Virtual Q&A with U.P. Author Raymond Luczak. Raymond Luczak will discuss his book Once Upon a Twin. 7 p.m. ET. Call or email to register. (906) 875-3344 or egathu@uproc.lib.mi.us

L’Anse

• Lakefront Concert Series. Uncle Floyd will perform music from the 1970s to today. Bring a chair and blanket. Rain location is Meadowbrook Arena. 7 p.m. Lakefront Park, Broad St.

Marquette

• Marquette Beautification and Restoration Committee Meeting. Lunch provided but donations appreciated. Noon. Beacon House, 200 Seventh St. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • Wings of Fire. Youth in grades 4 to 6 are invited to discuss the series while creating dragon key chains. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Second Thursday Creativity Series: All Aboard. Meet child-friendly agencies from the community and see what groups your child might like to join, from Headstart to Scouting, with handson activities, snacks and music. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. U.P. Children’s Museum, 123 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 226-3911 or upchildrensmuseum.org • Artificial Intelligence. Michael Uschold will discuss the historical roots of artificial intelligence, subfields, machine learning and concerns about artificial intelligence. Registration required. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 6:30 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 361-5370. • NMU Theatre and Dance: Spotlight Variety Show. Students will perform a collection of scenes, songs, monologues and dance pieces. NMU students, $5; other students, $10; seniors, $12; general public, $17. 7:30 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. nmu.universitytickets.com

Negaunee

• Music, Movement and More. This parent-led story time is for all ages. 10:30 a.m. Negaunee Public Library, 319 W. Case St. (906) 475-7700, ext. 18. • Irontunes. Sign up for bean-bag games and listen to live music. 6 to 10 p.m. Iron St.

Negaunee

• Wings of Fire Interest Group. Youth age eight and older are invited to discuss the series, write fanfiction, make crafts and other activities. 3 p.m. Negaunee Public Library, 319 W. Case St. (906) 475-7700, ext. 18. • Negaunee City Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Miner’s Park, corner of Maas Street and US-41.

08 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:18 a.m.; sunset 8:17 p.m.

Copper Harbor

• Performances in the Park Open Mic Night. Listen to music by Powers of Air’s. 7 to 9 p.m. Donny Kilpela Memorial Park.

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Crystal Falls

09 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:19 a.m.; sunset 8:15 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. This story time is geared towards preschool-age children with stories, crafts and a light snack. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 180 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Ishpeming

• Coffee and Donuts. Learn about the fall lineup of adult programming. 10 a.m. Ishpeming Carnegie Public Library, 317 N. Main St. (906) 486-4381.

Marquette

• Docu Cinema Matinee. The documentary film The Barkley Marathons: The Race That Eats Its Young


museums Big Bay

Phoenix Church | Phoenix

• Big Bay Lighthouse. The grounds of the 1896 lighthouse are open yearround. 3 Lighthouse Rd. (906) 3459957.

Calumet

• Coppertown Mining Museum. View exhibits relative to the copper mining industry and community life. Prices vary. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 25815 Red Jacket Road. (906) 337-4354. • International Frisbee Hall of Fame and Museum. Learn about the history of Guts Frisbee. Days and hours vary. Open when events are held. Second floor ballroom, Calumet Coliseum, Red Jacket Rd. (906) 281-7625. • Keweenaw Heritage Center. Exhibits focused on different aspects of life in the Keweenaw are on display, with exhibits varying each year. $3. Monday through Saturday, 1 to 4:30 p.m. corner of Scott and Fifth streets. keweenawheritagecenter.org or (906) 337-2410. • Iron County Historical Museum. This complex is the U.P.’s largest outdoor museum. Twenty-six buildings represent the industries of lumber, mining and transportation and include a homestead, cultural center and art complex. Youth 5 and younger, free; 6 to 18, $10; adults, $15. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Off M-189 or two miles off US-2 at Iron River. ironcountymuseum.org or (906) 265-2617.

Copper Harbor

• Fort Wilkins State Park. Built in 1844, this fort is a well-preserved, nineteenth century military post and lighthouse complex. Through museum exhibits, audio-visual programs and costumed interpretation, visitors can explore the daily routine of military service, experience the hardships of frontier isolation and discover another era. Park store, bookstore, concession stand and campsites are on site. 8:30 a.m. to dusk. $17 per car, per day for Michigan residents, $9 for nonresidents. US-41 (one mile east of Copper Harbor). (906) 289-4215.

Delaware

• Delaware Copper Mine. This authentic copper mine operated from 1847 to 1887. The tour takes visitors to the first level at 110 feet, where they can see veins of copper exposed in the walls of the mine. A deer pen and museum are also on site. Youth 5 and younger, free; 6 to 12, $7; 13 and older, $12. Daily, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. US-41, 12 miles south of Copper Harbor. (906) 2894688 or keweenawheritagesites.org

Eagle Harbor

• Eagle Harbor General Store Museum. View collection of memorabilia including old toys, tools, housewares, mementos and photographs. Saturday, Sunday and by

Kristy Basolo-Malmsten

Caspian

appointment. 181 W. North. (906) 2317442 or eagleharborstoremuseum.org • Eagle Harbor Life Saving Museum. View displays of early wooden rescue boats, surfboats, life-cars and more. Donations appreciated. Daily, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Marina Rd. keweenawhistory. org • Eagle Harbor Lighthouse and Museum. Tour the museum and lighthouse complex. Youth, free; adults, $8. Monday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. M-26. keweenawhistory. org

Eagle River

• Eagle River Museum. The museum focuses on four themes, including the Cliff Mine, the town of Eagle River the town and mine of Phoenix and the Crestview amusement area. Donations appreciated. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. M-26. Keweenawhistory.org

Escanaba

• Delta County Historical Society Museum and Sand Point Lighthouse. Exhibits portray the local history of logging, shipping, railroads, military, Native American culture, surveyings, fishing, sports and more. Youth, free; adults, $2; families, $5. Daily, 1 to 4 p.m. 16 Water Plant Road. (906) 789-

6790. deltahistorical.org • Upper Peninsula Honor Flight Legacy Museum. The museum chronicles the history of the U.P. Honor Flights with the history of the trips. Donations appreciated. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and by request. Inside the Delta County Chamber of Commerce, 1001 N. Lincoln Rd. • Upper Peninsula Military Museum. The museum honors Upper Peninsula Veterans, and features exhibits and dioramas portraying the Upper Peninsula’s contribution to U.S. War efforts from the Civil War through the Afghanistan wars. Donations appreciated. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and by request. Inside the Delta County Chamber of Commerce, 1001 N. Lincoln Rd.

Garden

• Fayette Historic Townsite. This site was once one of the Upper Peninsula’s most productive ironsmelting operations. A town of nearly 500 residents grew up around two blast furnaces, a large dock and several charcoal kilns. It now includes a visitor center, museum exhibits, a twentysix station walking tour and a scale model of the original townsite. $17 per car, per day for Michigan residents, (continued on page 83)

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will be shown. Noon. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • NMU Theatre and Dance: Spotlight Variety Show. Students will perform a collection of scenes, songs, monologues and dance pieces. NMU students, $5; other students, $10; seniors, $12; general public, $17. 7:30 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. nmu.universitytickets.com

• Reading with Madison. Children are invited to read to therapy dog Madison. Participants will receive free ice cream. 1 to 3 p.m. Falling Rock Café and Bookstore, 104 E. Munising Ave. (906) 387-3008.

10 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:22 a.m.; sunset 8:11 p.m.

Negaunee

• Irontown Classics Car Show. Classic cars will line the street during this inaugural event. Additional activities include food and music by the Swampberry Moonshine Band. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Iron St. (906) 4755551.

11 SUNDAY

sunrise 7:21 a.m.; sunset 8:13 p.m.

Calumet

• Community Market. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Escanaba

• Yooper Fest. This festival will include vendors, games, food and music. Proceeds benefit the End the Silence Walk. Festival 10 to 5 p.m. with a Battle of the Bands, 3 to 8 p.m. Downtown. (906) 553-7766. • LEGO Club. Bring your own LEGOs. 1 p.m. Escanaba Public Library, 400 Ludington St. (906) 789-7323.

L’Anse

• Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to noon. Waterfront Park, N. Front St.

Marquette

• Lake Superior Shore Run. Runners can compete in a half marathon, 5K run, 5-mile hike or a 1 mile kids race. Proceeds benefit the youth cross-country skiing program with Superiorland Ski Club. Prices vary. Half marathon, 9 a.m. 5-mile hike, 9:05 a.m.; 5K run, 9:30 a.m.; Kids run, 6:30 p.m. Little Presque Isle Recreation Area, CR-550. lakesuperiorshorerun.com • Saturday Morning Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. Lessons, 10 a.m. Games, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Citizens Forum, Lakeview Arena, 401 E. Pine St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • Battle of the Boards. Teams will compete in a cornhole tournament. Proceeds will benefit the UP Vets Served Program and Sled Hockey U.P. Register by the 4th. $50. Team check in, 10 a.m. Start, 10:30 p.m. SAIL, 1200 Wright St. (906) 936-0926 or eventbrite.com • Art on the Mountain. View works from local artists and listen to music from local musicians. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Marquette Mountain, 4501 M-553.

12 MONDAY

sunrise 7:23 a.m.; sunset 8:09 p.m.

Marquette

• Book Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Toddler Storytime. Toddlers age 18-months to age 3, with an adult, are invited for stories, songs and sensoryfriendly activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Argonics Tour. The group will carpool to Argonics for a tour of their facility which formulates a variety of proprietary performance-based polyurethane materials and services. Wear long pants and closed-toe footwear. Registration required. NCLL members,

$5; nonmembers, $10. 2 p.m. Northeast parking lot of Tadych’s Foods,1401 O’Dovero Dr. (906) 228-9367. • Senior Theatre Experience: Monthly Workshop and Discussion. This workshop is for those age 55 and older. Register in advance. Marquette city and surrounding township residents, free; nonresidents, $5 donation. 4 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 225-8655. • Wiggle Worms STEM Storytime. Stories are intermixed with activities followed by STEM-related activities to stimulate senses. 6 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Singin’ the Good Old Stories Again. Singer and songwriters Jackie Davidson and Gary Brandt will perform a combination of classic and original folk music. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322.

13 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:24 a.m.; sunset 8:07 p.m.

Gwinn

• Mackinac Island’s Grand Hotel. Mike Fornes will discuss the history of the Grand Hotel. 6 p.m. Gwinn High School Library, 50 W. M-35. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

• Book Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Preschool age

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sunrise 7:26 a.m.; sunset 8:05 p.m.

Calumet

• A Course of Love. Donna Trudell will lead the class based on the book by Mari Perron. Participants will learn about peace, joy and clarity through this self-awareness class. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

L’Anse

• Farmers Market. 3 to 5:50 p.m. Waterfront Park, N. Front St.

Marquette

Aubrey Antles on Unsplash

Munising

• Mountain Goat Mash. Bikers will compete in a 15- or 45-mile course. Proceeds benefit the Munising Bay Trail Network. $60. Start times vary beginning at 9 a.m. Valley Spur Trailhead, M-94. mbtn.org • Onagomingkway Chapter of NSDAR Monthly Meeting Potluck. Bring a dish to share. Beverages and dessert will be provided. Noon. Welsley Hall, First United Methodist Church, 312 Lynn St. (906) 226-7836.

children are invited for stories, songs, finger-plays, crafts and other schoolreadiness activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Tasty Reads Book Group. The group will discuss Homemade by Beatrice Ojakangas. Noon. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4303. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • George Shiras III: Camera Hunter, Presentation and Hike. This group will carpool from the Berry Events Center to Whitefish Lake for a guided hike in the Laughing Whitefish Lake Reserve. Rain date is September 14. Registration required. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 1:30 p.m. East parking lot, Berry Evenst Center Superior Dome, NMU. (906) 228-9367. • Oil Painting, Pastels and Drawing Classes with Marlene Wood. Bring your own supplies. $20. 1 to 3 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 225-8655. • Dumbledore’s Army. Students in grades 4 to 6 are invited for Harry Potter crafts. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Docu Cinema Matinee. The documentary film The Barkley Marathons: The Race That Eats Its Young will be shown. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322.

Mackinac Island’s Grand Hotel Discussion | September 13 | Gwinn

September 2022

• Wiggle Worms STEM Storytime. Stories are intermixed with activities followed by STEM-related activities to stimulate senses. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Congregate Meals for Seniors–Dine in or Curbside Pickup. Meals available to those age 60 and older. Call to reserve a meal. $3.50 suggested donation. Noon to 1 p.m. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. (906) 228-0456. • Wednesday Evening Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Junior Teen Advisory Board. Students in grades 5 to 8 are invited to meet new people, plan events and gain volunteer experience. 4:15 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • Marquette and Alger Counties College Fair. Representatives from colleges and universities across the


museums $9 for nonresidents. Daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 14785 II Road. (906) 644-2603.

Greenland

• Adventure Mining Company. The mine opened in 1850 and remains one of the best-preserved sites of its time. Although the mine closed in 1920, many of the shafts are still open for touring. Tours range from surface walking tours to underground rappelling down a mineshaft. Tour prices vary depending upon chosen tour. Youth 6 and younger, free; 7 to 12, $7.50 to $14.50; 13 and older, $14 to $25. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 200 Adventure Ave. (906) 883-3371 or adventuremine.com

Hancock

• Quincy Mine Hoist and Underground Mine. There are two options for touring the site. On both the surface tour and the full tour, visitors will see the museum, inside the No. 2 Shaft House and the Nordberg Steam Hoist and ride the cog rail tram car to the mine entrance. On the full tour, visitors will take a tractor-pulled wagon into the mine, seven levels underground. Prices, days and hours vary. (906) 482-3101 or quincymine.com

Houghton

• A.E. Seaman Mineral Museum. View the largest collection of minerals from the Great Lakes region and the world’s finest collection of Michigan minerals. Exhibits educate visitors on how minerals are formed, fluorescent minerals and minerals from around the world. Prices vary. Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1404 E. Sharon Ave. museum.mtu.edu or (906) 487-2572. • Carnegie Museum. Features rotating displays of local history, natural science and culture. The Science Center is dedicated to interactive exhibits about science for kids. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 105 Huron St. (906) 482-7140 or carnegiekeweenaw.org • MTU Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections. Features a variety of historical memorabilia, highlighting life in the (continued from page 81) Midwest, along with the Armed Forces and ROTC programs will be on hand for high school students and parents to meet. 6 to 7:30 p.m. C.B. Hedgcock Building, NMU. nmu.edu/admissions • Meet the Author. Author Peter Geye will discuss his new novel The Ski Jumpers. 7 p.m. The Crib, 401 N. Third St. (906) 228-4448. • Proforestation: Secrets to a Carbon Capture Forest. Steve Waller will discuss how trees can help reduce the impacts of climate change and how to follow a carbon capture forest strategy. 6:30 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 361-9255. • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. NMU

Copper Country. Open by appointment. Lower level of the J.R. Van Pelt Library, MTU. (906) 487-3209.

Iron Mountain

• World War II Glider and Military Museum. During World War II, the Ford Motor Company’s Kingsford plant built the CG-4A Gliders for the U.S. Army. View one of seven fully restored CG-4A G World War II gliders, military uniforms from the Civil War through the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, memorabilia, restored military vehicles and more. Prices vary. Days and times vary. 302 Kent St. (906) 774-1086.

Ishpeming

• Cliffs Mine Shaft Museum. View local historical artifacts of miners and mines, past and present, safety equipment, blasting and diamond drilling equipment and more. Guided tours of the tunnels are available. Prices vary. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 501 W. Euclid St. (906) 485-1882 or cliffsshaftminemuseum. com • Ishpeming Area Historical Society Museum. New exhibits include a military exhibit and artifacts from the Elson Estate. Donations appreciated. Days and hours vary. Gossard Building, Suite 303, 308 Cleveland Ave. ishpeminghistory.org • U.S. National Ski Hall & Snowboard Hall of Fame & Museum. The museum features more than 300 Hall of Fame inductees, presented in photographs and biographies, and displays and exhibits of skiing history and equipment, an extensive library, video show, gift shop, special events and more. By appointment only. US-41 and Third St. (906) 485-6323 or skihall.com

K.I. Sawyer

• K.I. Sawyer Heritage Air Museum. The museum promotes and preserves the aviation history the air base brought to the area. Air Force-related materials are on display, including photographs, flags, medals and more. Donations appreciated. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. 402 Third St. (906) 236-3502 or kishamuseum.org

Lake Linden Library. (906) 227-2648 or nkupper@ nmu.edu • Sierra Club: Backpacking the Agawa River and Canyon. Michael Neiger will provide a photographic tour of the remote Canadian wilderness. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322.

Negaunee

• Wings of Fire Interest Group. Youth age eight and older are invited to discuss the series, write fanfiction, make crafts and other activities. 3 p.m. Negaunee Public Library, 319 W. Case St. (906) 475-7700, ext. 18. • Negaunee City Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Miner’s Park, corner of Maas Street and US-41.

• Houghton County Historical Museum. Exhibits include local Copper Country mining, logging and cultural history. Outdoor exhibits include a working Calumet & Hecla Mining Company Train. Prices, days and hours vary. 53102 M-26. (906) 296-4121 or houghtonhistory.org

Marquette

• Baraga Educational Center and Museum. View artifacts and tools used by Venerable Bishop Baraga. Donations appreciated. Monday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. and by appointment. 615 S. Fourth St. (906) 227-9117. • Beaumier Upper Peninsula Heritage Center. - Above/Below the Surface: The Fisheries of the Upper Great Lakes, an exhibition examining the changes to fish populations and the impact of humans on native fish species, will be on display September 22 through December 2022. Three separate collections focus on cultural artifacts relating to ethnic, religious and social diversity in the U.P. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. NMU, corner of Seventh Street and Tracy Avenue. (906) 227-3212 or nmu.edu/ beaumier • Marquette Maritime Museum. The museum collects, preserves and presents maritime history. Many exhibits and guided tours of the lighthouse grounds are offered. Prices vary. Tuesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 300 Lakeshore Blvd. mqtmaritimemuseum. com or (906) 226-2006. • Marquette Regional History Center. - Railroads of Marquette County: Yesterday and Today, featuring select hands-on elements, as well as maps, artifacts and photographs, will be on display through February 2023. The museum includes interactive displays as well as regional history exhibits. Youth 12 and younger, $2; students, $3; seniors, $6; adults, $7. Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum. A variety of interactive exhibits offer learning through investigation and creativity. Monday

15 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:27 a.m.; sunset 8:03 p.m.

Escanaba

• Bay Film Series: The film Everything Everywhere All At Once will be shown. $5. 7 p.m. Besse Center Theatre, Bay College, 2001 Lincoln Rd. (906) 2174045 or baycollege.tix.com

Gwinn

• The Harvest. Learn how to prepare, eat, can and dehydrate harvested foods 6 p.m. Forsyth Township Clubhouse, 165 N. Maple St. gwinnseedlibrary@gmail.com

L’Anse

• Lakefront Concert Series. Enjoy a

September 2022

through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Prices vary. 123 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 226-3911 or upchildrensmuseum.org

Munising

• Alger County Historical Society Heritage Center. Exhibits include the Grand Island Recreation Area, Munising Woodenware Company, barn building, homemaking, sauna and more. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 1496 Washington St. (906) 387-4308.

Negaunee

• Michigan Iron Industry Museum. In the forested ravines of the Marquette Iron Range, the museum overlooks the Carp River and the site of the first iron forge in the Lake Superior region. Museum exhibits, audio-visual programs and outdoor interpretive paths depict the large-scale capital and human investment that made Michigan an industrial leader. The museum is one of 10 museums and historic sites administered by the Michigan Historical Center. Daily, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 73 Forge Rd. (906) 475-7857.

Pelkie

• Hanka Homestead Museum. The homestead recreates farming life from the 1920s. $3. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. 13249 Hanka Rd. (906) 334-2601 or hankahomesteadmuseum.org

Phoenix

• Phoenix Church. Originally built in 1858 and located in the town of Cliff, the museum was dismantled and reassembled in its church location in 1899. The last mass was held in 1957. Donations appreciated. Daily, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Junction of US-41 and M-26. keweenawhistory.org

South Range

• Copper Range Historical Museum. Exhibits recreate life from the early 1900s to the mid-1950s of the immigrants who built the towns and villages of the area. Collections include photographs, books and artifacts. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 3 p.m. 44 Trimountain Ave. (906) 482-6125.

MM

night of music by Uncle Pete’s All-Star BBQ Blues Band. Bring a chair and blanket. Rain location is Meadowbrook Arena. 7 p.m. Lakefront Park, Broad St.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Toddlers age 18-months to age 3, with an adult, are invited for stories, songs and sensoryfriendly activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • Graphic Novel Geeks. Youth in grades 4 to 6 are invited to discuss books, create graphic novel crafts and other activities.

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4:15 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Music on Third. Musicians will perform outside businesses from Fair Avenue to Ridge Street. 6 to 8 p.m. Third St. downtownmarquette.org • Genealogy: Let’s Get Started. Research your family tree with a packet of tools for beginners. Genealogy starter kits will be available for pickup at the Reference Desk. 6:30 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4311. • Time to Focus on Preventing Diabetes. Diabetes educators from UPHS will discuss the prevention and treatment of diabetes, and how subtle changes can help your body. Registration required. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 2 p.m. Room 101B, Superior Dome, NMU. (906) 228-9367.

Negaunee

• Music, Movement and More. This parent-led story time is for all ages. 10:30 a.m. Negaunee Public Library, 319 W. Case St. (906) 475-7700, ext. 18. • Irontunes. Sign up for bean-bag games and listen to live music. 60 p.m. Iron St.

16 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:28 a.m.; sunset 8:01 p.m.

Escanaba

• Karlee Metzger and Friends: Nashville Writer’s Round. U.P. native Karlee Metzger and Friends will perform with a Q&A to follow. $20. 7 p.m. Besse Center, Bay College, 2001 Lincoln Rd. (906) 217-4045 or baycollege.tix.com Gwinn • Story Time. This story time is geared towards preschool-age children with stories, crafts and a light snack. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 180 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

• Preschool Storytime. Preschool age children are invited for stories, songs, finger-plays, crafts and other schoolreadiness activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Global Cinema. The international classic Rashomon directed by Akira Kurosawa will be shown. Noon. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Youth age 7 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Paranormal Lighthouse Tour. This tour is for those age 18 and older. Proceeds benefit the Marquette Maritime Museum. Registration required. $25. 7 p.m. Marquette Maritime Museum, 300 Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 226-2006.

17 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:29 a.m.; sunset 7:59 p.m.

84

Marquette Monthly

Calumet

• Community Market. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

L’Anse

• Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to noon. Waterfront Park, N. Front St.

Hancock

• Parade of Nations. International residents and visitors from more than 50 countries will display flags, floats and fanfare during this parade. The parade begins near the Finnish-American Heritage Center and ends at Dee Stadium 11 a.m. Quincy Green, Finlandia Univerisity, 401 Quincy St. (906) 487-2160 or mtu.edu

Marquette

• Saturday Morning Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. Lessons, 10 a.m. Games, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Citizens Forum, Lakeview Arena, 401 E. Pine St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • Saturday Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for babies and toddlers with an adult. Masks required. 10:30 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Kardemimmit Concert. The Finnish folk group will perform. Students 18 and younger and NMU students, $5; others, $10. 7:30 p.m. Reynolds Recital Hall, NMU. nmu.universitytickets.com

18 SUNDAY

sunrise 7:31 a.m.; sunset 7:57 p.m.

Ishpeming

• Bingo. Food, snacks and beverages will be available for purchase. 1 p.m. Ishpeming VFW, 310 Bank St.

K.I. Sawyer

• Dance. Dance to music performed by the Hart Beats. $8. 1 to 4 p.m. K.I. Sawyer Heritage Air Museum, 402 Third St.

Marquette

• Housing Opportunities in Marquette and the Populations They Serve. Representatives from Room at the Inn, the Women’s Center and Habitat for Humanity will discuss the varied housing needs in Marquette. 7 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 120 N. Front St..

19 MONDAY

sunrise 7:32 a.m.; sunset 7:55 p.m.

Marquette

• Book Babies. Newborns age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Toddler Storytime. Toddlers age 18-months to age 3, with an adult, are invited for stories, songs and sensoryfriendly activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • School’s Out, Library’s In. Students are invited to make candy slime and paper-shape crafts Noon. Youth Services

September 2022

Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Winter Sky Wool Company Farm Tour. The group will carpool to Winter Sky Wool Company to learn about the company and view handspun, hand-dyed, USA produced wool yarns, knitwear and dryer balls. Registration required. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 1:30 p.m. Northwest parking lot, Lowe’s, 3500 US-41. (906) 228-9367. • Global Geeks Book Club. The group will discuss Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera. 6 p.m. Dandelion Cottage Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4312. • Wiggle Worms STEM Storytime. Stories are intermixed with activities followed by STEM-related activities to stimulate senses. 6 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Declutter with Dar Shepherd. Learn strategies on how to simplify your life and living spaces. 7 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322.

20 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:33 a.m.; sunset 7:53 p.m.

Gwinn

• Literature at the Lodge. The group will discuss The Ride of Her Life: The True Story of a Woman, Her Horse, and Their Last-Chance Journey Across America by Elizabeth Letts. 7 p.m. Up North Lodge, 215 S. CR-557. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

• Book Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Preschool age children are invited for stories, songs, finger-plays, crafts and other schoolreadiness activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • Oil Painting, Pastels and Drawing Classes with Marlene Wood. Bring your own supplies. $20. 1 to 3 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 225-8655. • Muggles for Potter. Youth in grades 2 and 3 are invited for Harry Potter-related activities. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Marquette Children’s March. Join others for music, snacks and information from speakers about efforts to get the American Rescue Plan Act funds spent on child-care and child wellbeing efforts. Speakers will address the county commission during public comment. 5 p.m. Marquette County Courthouse, 324 W. Baraga Ave. wethepeoplemi.org • Hospice: Dignity Surrounding Death and Dying. Sharon Walker and Jamie Barbiere will discuss when a patient might be eligible for hospice, services provided by hospice and additional areas of interest. Registration required. NCLL

members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 6:30 p.m. Room 101B, Superior Dome, NMU. (906) 361-5370. • Lake Superior Art Association Membership Meet and Greet. Members can bring a piece of their artwork to introduce themselves to other members. Elections and a brief meeting will also take place. Open to the public. 6:30 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 250-7364. • Artists and Their Art: Hudson River School Part 2. Art historian Ellen Logsworth will discuss the Hudson River School art movement. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Zoom link available at pwpl.info

21 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:35 a.m.; sunset 7:51 p.m.

L’Anse

• Farmers Market. 3 to 5:50 p.m. Waterfront Park, N. Front St.

Marquette

• Wiggle Worms STEM Storytime. Stories are intermixed with activities followed by STEM-related activities to stimulate senses. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Congregate Meals for Seniors–Dine in or Curbside Pickup. Meals available to those age 60 and older. Call to reserve a meal. $3.50 suggested donation. Noon to 1 p.m. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. (906) 228-0456. • PWPL Nonfiction Book Club. The group will discuss Dead Wake by Eric Larson. Noon. Conference Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4311. • Visual Art Class: Wool Felt Applique. This class is for those age 55 and older. Register in advance. Marquette city and surrounding township residents, free; nonresidents, $5 donation. 1 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 225-8655. • Wednesday Evening Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Teen Advisory Board. Students in grades 9 to 12 are invited to meet new people, plan activities and gain volunteer experience. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • Books Unite Us Reading. As part of Banned Books Week, listen to passages from challenged books that help shape and reflect the world in which we live. 6:30 p.m. Huron Mountain Club Gallery, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • Michigan Mining Scrip. Author David Gelwicks will discuss the decades -ong project of researching the copper and iron mining companies throughout the U.P. that created their own currency. $5 suggested donation. 6:30 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory. org • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. NMU Library. (906) 227-2648 or nkupper@ nmu.edu

Negaunee


• Wings of Fire Interest Group. Youth age eight and older are invited to discuss the series, write fanfiction, make crafts and other activities. 3 p.m. Negaunee Public Library, 319 W. Case St. (906) 475-7700, ext. 18. • Negaunee City Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Miner’s Park, corner of Maas Street and US-41.

Register in advance. Marquette city and surrounding township residents, free; nonresidents, $5 donation. 4 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 225-8655. • Wiggle Worms STEM Storytime. Stories are intermixed with activities followed by STEM-related activities to stimulate senses. 6 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Shay and Linda’s Big Lake Band Concert. Rock favorites will be performed. The rain location is inside the library. 7 p.m. Front Steps, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322.

22 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:36 a.m.; sunset 7:49 p.m.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Toddlers to age 18-months to age 3, with an adult, are invited for stories, songs and sensoryfriendly activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • Selma – Voting Rights. Beverly Braden will discuss the beginning of the modern Civil Rights Movement and the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 1:30 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-8347. • PWPL Kindness Club. This club is for school-aged children to get involved and give back to the community. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Front Street Used Book Fair Presale. $5. 5 to 8 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 120 N. Front St. and Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-9510.

Negaunee

• Music, Movement and More. This parent-led story time is for all ages. 10:30 a.m. Negaunee Public Library, 319 W. Case St. (906) 475-7700, ext. 18. • Irontunes. Sign up for bean-bag games and listen to live music. 6 p.m. Iron St.

23 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:37 a.m.; sunset 7:47 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. This story time is geared towards preschool-age children with stories, crafts and a light snack. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 180 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

• Front Street Used Book Fair. 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 120 N. Front St. and Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-9510. • Preschool Storytime. Preschool age children are invited for stories, songs, finger-plays, crafts and other schoolreadiness activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects

27 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:42 a.m.; sunset 7:39 p.m.

Ishpeming

Karlee Metzger and Friends | September 16 | Escanaba

using the library’s LEGO blocks. Youth age 7 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • NMU Homecoming Parade. 5:30 p.m. Third St. nmu.edu

24 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:38 a.m.; sunset 7:45 p.m.

Calumet

• Community Market. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Central

• Adventures in History Series: Cider Making at Central. Make your own cider from heritage apples you can pick. Bring containers for the cider and a picnic lunch. Keweenaw County Historical Society members, $5; nonmembers, $6. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Doctor’s House, past the intersection of Main Street and Stagecoach Road. keweenawhistory.org

L’Anse

• Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to noon. Waterfront Park, N. Front St.

Houghton

• Comedy Night with Jay Jurden. Comedian Jay Jurden will perform. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. events.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Saturday Morning Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Front Street Used Book Fair. Books will be half price until 1:30 p.m. The $5 bag sale begins at 1:45 p.m. 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 120 N. Front St. and Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-9510. • Saturday Storytime. Stories, songs,

rhymes, finger-plays and activities for babies and toddlers with an adult. Masks required. 10:30 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. Lessons, 10 a.m. Games, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 236-3173.

25 SUNDAY

sunrise 7:40 a.m.; sunset 7:43 p.m.

Calumet

• Red Jacket Jamboree. Singer and songwriter Jetty Rae and author T. Marie Bertineau will perform. $25. 7 p.m.. Keweenaw Storytelling Center, 215 Fifth St. redjacketjamboree.

26 MONDAY

sunrise 7:41 a.m.; sunset 7:41 p.m.

Marquette

• Book Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Toddler Storytime. Toddlers age 18-months to age 3, with an adult, are invited for stories, songs and sensoryfriendly activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Rock River Falls Hike. The group will carpool to Rock River Falls for a guided hike with Don Balmer. Wear waterproof footwear. Rain date is September 28. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 12:30 p.m. parking lot, Lofaro’s Market, 101 Carmen Dr. (906) 249-1273. • Senior Theatre Experience: Monthly Workshop and Discussion. This workshop is for those age 55 and older.

September 2022

• Fall Color Hike at Teal Lake. The group will hike 3.25 miles from Al Quaal to Negaunee to view the fall colors. Registration required. Rain date is September 30. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 1 p.m. Al Quaal Pavilion, 501 Poplar St. (906) 361-5370.

Marquette

• Book Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Preschool age children are invited for stories, songs, finger-plays, crafts and other schoolreadiness activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com • Oil Painting, Pastels and Drawing Classes with Marlene Wood. Bring your own supplies. $20. 1 to 3 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 225-8655. • Outword. LGBTQIA youth and allied students in grades 7 to 12 are invited. 4 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • Bluesday Tuesday. U.P. Gumbo will perform. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322. • Evening Lighthouse Tour. Registration required. $20. 7 p.m. Marquette Maritime Museum, 300 Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 2262006.

28 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:44 a.m.; sunset 7:37 p.m.

Calumet

• A Course of Love. Donna Trudell will lead the class based on the book by Mari Perron. Participants will learn about peace, joy and clarity through this self-awareness class. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Copper Harbor

• Adventures in History Series: Neil

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support groups • Alano Club. Twelve-step recovery meetings daily—Marquette. Monday through Saturday, noon and 8 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. Suite 10, Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41. • Al-Anon Family Groups. A fellowship offering strength and hope for friends and families of problem drinkers. al-alon.org or (888) 425-2666. • Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings throughout Marquette County, open daily, at many locations and times. Twenty-four-hour answering service, aamarquettecounty.org or (800) 605-5043. • ALZConnected. This is a free, online community for everyone affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other memory loss diseases. alzconnected.org • American Legacy Foundation. Smoking quit line for expectant mothers and cessation information for women. (800) 668-8278. • Amputee Social Group. This peer support group is for amputees, friends and families to share resources, life experiences and create relationships. September 13. 6 p.m. SAIL Office, 1200 Wright St. (906) 273-2444. • Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Checks. Cholesterol checks are $5. Call for Marquette County schedule. (906) 225-4545. • Divorce Care—Ishpeming. This nondenominational group is for people who are separated or divorced. New members are welcome. Tuesdays, 6 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. (906) 475-6032 and Friends in Concert. Join Michigan’s Troubadour, Neil Woodward, in concert with invited musician guests. Donations appreciated. 7 to 9 p.m. Community Building, downtown. keweenawhistory. org

Escanaba

• Bay Health and Wellness Fair: Surviving and Thriving. Local and national professionals will provide health and wellness information for day-to-day wellness. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Conference Rooms JHUC 952, Bay College, 2001 Lincoln Rd. (906) 217-4045. • Author Talk. Author Dianna Stampfler will discuss her book Death & Lighthouses on the Great Lakes: A History of Misfortune and Murder. 4:30 p.m. Escanaba Public Library, 400 Ludington St. (906) 789-7323.

Houghton

• Samantha Ege Piano Workshop. Dr. Samanatha Ege will lead a workshop with piano students about repertoire and performance practice, and discuss what is means to be a performer-scholar of 20th Century music. 6 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. events.mtu.edu

Ishpeming

• Dinner and a Movie. The film Monty Python and the Holy Grail will be shown. Congress pizza and popcorn provided. 5 p.m. Ishpeming Carnegie Public Library, 317 N. Main St. (906) 486-4381.

L’Anse

• Farmers Market. 3 to 5:50 p.m. Waterfront Park, N. Front St.

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or northiron.church • Grief Share—Ishpeming. This nondenominational group is for people dealing with grief and loss. Mondays, 2:30 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. northiron.church or (906) 475-6032. • iCanQuit. Smokers are invited to learn more about quitting with the help of a quitting coach. (800) 480-7848. • Lake Superior Life Care and Hospice Grief Support Group— Gwinn. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. September 14. 2 p.m. Forsyth Senior Center, 165 Maple St. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Lake Superior Life Care and Hospice Grief Support Group— Marquette. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. September 21. 5:30 p.m. Lake Superior Hospice, 914 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 2257760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Lake Superior Life Care and Hospice Grief Support Group— Negaunee. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. September 15. 3 p.m. Negaunee Senior Center, 410 Jackson St. lakesuperiorhospice.org or (906) 475-6266. • Michigan Tobacco Quit Line. This free quit smoking coaching hotline provides callers with a personal health Marquette • Wiggle Worms STEM Storytime. Stories are intermixed with activities followed by STEM-related activities to stimulate senses. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Congregate Meals for Seniors–Dine in or Curbside Pickup. Meals available to those age 60 and older. Call to reserve a meal. $3.50 suggested donation. Noon to 1 p.m. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. (906) 228-0456. • Wednesday Evening Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Americans and the Holocaust Film. The Charlie Chaplin film The Great Dictator will be shown. 6:30 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322. • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. NMU Library. (906) 227-2648.

Negaunee

• Wings of Fire Interest Group. Youth age eight and older are invited to discuss the series, write fanfiction, make crafts and other activities. 3 p.m. Negaunee Public Library, 319 W. Case St. (906) 475-7700, ext. 18. • Negaunee City Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Miner’s Park, corner of Maas Street and US-41. •

29 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:45 a.m.; sunset 7:35 p.m.

September 2022

coach. (800) 784-8669. • Motherhood Support Group. This free group meets the second Thursday of each month. September 8. 6 p.m. Suunta Integrative Health, 1209 N. Third St. (906) 273-0964. • National Alliance on Mental Illness—Support Group. Individuals living with mental illness and friends or families living with an individual with mental illness are welcome. September 12 and September 15. 7 p.m. Superior Alliance for Independent Living, 1200 Wright St. Ste. A. For the Zoom invitation, email ckbertucci58@charter. net or call (906) 360-7107 by 6:45 p.m. the day prior to the meeting. namimqt. com • Nar-Anon Meetings. Family and friends who have addicted loved ones are invited. Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. Mission Covenant Church, 1001 N. Second St. (906) 361-9524. • Nicotine Anonymous. (415) 7500328 or www.nicotine-anonymous.org • Parkinson’s Support Group— Marquette. September 21. 2 p.m. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. (906) 228-0456. • Senior Support Group—Marquette. Vicki Ballas will discuss nutrition, strength, flexibility and balance training. September 15. 2 p.m. Mill Creek Clubhouse, 1728 Windstone Dr. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Sexual Health and Addiction Therapy Group. Call Great Lakes

Houghton

• Samantha Ege Piano Concert. Pianist Dr. Samanatha Ege will perform. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. events.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Toddlers age 18-months to age 3, with an adult, are invited for stories, songs and sensoryfriendly activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 360-3056. • Learn About the Rocket Launch Site. Members of Citizens for a Safe and Clean Lake Superior will discuss what an industrial rocket launch site is, the background on the plans to build the site, updates and impacts on the local economy, environment and U.P. lifestyle. Registration required. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 3459295. • Project Publish. Youth in grades 3 to 12 are invited to participate in writing, illustrating and publishing their own book. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

Negaunee

• Music, Movement and More. This parent-led story time is for all ages. 10:30 a.m. Negaunee Public Library, 319 W.

Recovery Centers for more details. Dates, times and locations vary. (906) 228-9696. • SMART Recovery—Calumet. A self-help group for alcohol and substance abuse and other addictive behaviors. Mondays, 7 p.m. Copper Country Mental Health, 56938 Calumet Avenue. smartrecovery.org • SMART Recovery — Hancock. Thursdays, 7 p.m. Basement Conference Room, Old Main Building, Finlandia University, 601 Quincy St. • SMART Recovery — Marquette. Mondays, Noon. Zoom meeting. Visit smartrecovery.com for Zoom link. • Take Off Pounds Sensibly. This is a non-commercial weight-control support group. Various places and times throughout the U.P. (800) 932-8677 or TOPS.org • Virtual Caregiver Support Group. U.P. family caregivers are welcome to join. A device with an internet connection, webcam, microphone and an email address are required. Advanced registration required. 2 p.m. Second Tuesday of the month. (906) 217-3019 or caregivers@upcap.org • Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Supplemental Food Program. Clinics include nutritional counseling and coupon pick-up. Appointments required. Call for Marquette County schedule. mqthealth.org or (906) 4757846.

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Case St. (906) 475-7700, ext. 18.

30 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:46 a.m.; sunset 7:33 p.m.

Crystal Falls

• Cold Tone Harvest Concert. The Southeast Michigan quartet will perform folk and bluegrass repertoires. Students, $5; adults, $25. 7 p.m. Crystal Theatre, 304 Superior Ave. (906) 875-3208 or thecrystaltheatre.org

Houghton

• Samantha Ege Piano Concert. Pianist Dr. Samanatha Ege will perform. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. events.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Preschool Storytime. Preschool age children are invited for stories, songs, finger-plays, crafts and other schoolreadiness activities. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 12:30 p.m. $5 for games. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Youth age 7 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

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