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Marquette Monthly

September 2021


contents September 2021 No. 389

Publishers

Jane Hutchens James Larsen II

Managing Editor Jackie Stark

Calendar Editor Carrie Usher

Graphic Design Jennifer Bell Knute Olson

Proofreader Laura Kagy

Circulation

Dick Armstrong

Chief Photographer Tom Buchkoe

Marquette Monthly, published by Model Town Publishing, LLC, located at PO Box 109 Gwinn, MI, 49841, is locally and independently owned. Entire contents copyright 2021 by Model Town Publishing. All rights reserved. Permission or use of editorial material in any manner must be obtained in writing from the publishers. Marquette Monthly is published 12 times a year. Subscriptions are $65 per year. Freelance material can be submitted for consideration to editor@ marquettemonthly.com. Events can be submitted to calendar@marquettemonthly.com. Ad inquiries can be sent to jane@marquettemonthly.com or james@ marquettemonthly.com.

(906) 360-2180 www.marquettemonthly.com

About the cover artist

Artist Julie Highlen created the cover image for this September 2021 edition of Marquette Monthly. She enjoys working with acrylics, painting nature scenes from her Northwoods Art Studio, located near the shore of Lake Superior. She can be reached by phone at (906) 343-6610, or by email at northwoodsartstudio@gmail.com. Her work can also be found on the Northwoods Art Studio Facebook page.

4 Introductions Meet the new co-owners of Marquette Monthly 5 City Notes Highlights of important happenings in the area 15 Feature Jackie Stark

The good fight

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8-18 Media

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New York Times Crossword Puzzle

20 Fiction

John Smolens The Superior Gatsby 23 Outdoors Deborah K. Frontiera Great Lakes tsunamis 25 Gift of Water Jon Magnuson Protecting the blue planet 26 Lookout Point Elizabeth Fust Shipwrecks near the surface 29 Outdoors Scot Stewart Tiger beetles 32 Back Then Larry Chabot The First Lady of Mackinac Island 34 Arts Jaymie Depew Welcome to Art Town 36 Sporting Life Kristy Basolo-Malmsten Where close counts 38 At The Table Katherine Larson Community reads 42 Superior Reads Victor Volkman When a mid-life crisis hits the road 47 Locals Katherine Larson Sarah Rimkus 50 Arts Joe Zyble High art 52 Lookout Point Jackie Stark Taking out the trash

Brad Veley 58 Arts Pam Christensen The blues are back 61 Locals Deb Pascoe Courage, Incorporated 65 Arts Kristy Basolo-Malmsten Building community, one record at a time 68 Lookout Point Adam Berger Celebrating an anniversary, remembering a troubled past 71 Poetry Janeen Pergrin Rastall Residency Test At The Ore Dock 72 Back Then John Cebalo NMU, class of ’68 75 Home Cinema Leonard Heldreth September films examine two eras in history

Think Twice (answers on page 9) 77 Out & About Carrie Usher September events and music, art and museum guides

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introductions Meet ’s new owners Marquette Monthly’s new co-publishers Jane Hutchens and James Larsen want you to know one thing: MM is back, and it’s here to stay.

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fter a 17-month hiatus, Marquette Monthly is back in print, bringing the stories of Upper Peninsula life to readers once again. And for the first time in its long and storied history, MM has two co-publishers -- Jane Hutchens and James Larsen. Both Hutchens and Larsen said they received an overwhelmingly positive response following their announcement that Marquette Monthly would return with a September, 2021 edition. “It’s been awesome to see the enthusiasm our community has for the Marquette Monthly,” Larsen said. After the decision was made to shutter its doors as a result of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the question remained in the community: would Marquette Monthly ever return? “I could not see it going away for good,” Hutchens said. “I just did not want to see that happen.” Working as the ad sales representative at MM for the last several years, the opportunity arose for Hutchens to become the magazine’s next publisher. Her next step was to call her good friend and former coworker James Larsen. “I’ve always had James in mind as somebody that would be a perfect fit for Marquette Monthly … He takes care of his customers and builds relationships with his customers,” Hutchens said. “I picked up the phone and I said, ‘James, I have an idea that I think we should do.” For Larsen, it seemed like the right opportunity at the right time. “I was very interested,” he said. “I had been a long time reader and admirer of the product. The more we dug into it, and I found out more about how amazing the staff was, the more interested I got even. It just felt like it was the right thing to do so we jumped in.” Both Hutchens and Larsen have a long history in the UP, working for local media outlets and involving themselves in their communities.

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Hutchens was born and raised in Menominee, attended school at NMU and graduated with a BS in Speech Communications. She moved away for eight years, but “finally got smart and came back,” she said with a laugh, and has been working in advertising sales for over two decades. Larsen is a long-time Marquette County resident who has worked in local print media for roughly 13 years. He’s part of the Superiorland Baseball League and is a former Negaunee High School baseball coach. His son is the fifth generation to live in Marquette County. MM’s first edition hit the streets nearly 34 years ago, when Mary Kinnunen decided Marquette was ready for an independent publication to help tell the stories of the people who called the area home. Since the inaugural, 20page edition, Kinnunen’s idea blossomed and grew, finding a long list of contributing freelance writers and artists who were given an outlet for their work to be published in a magazine that has grown to be four times its original size. That legacy continued through Pat Ryan O’Day (whose name became synonymous with Marquette Monthly during her long tenure as publisher), and eventually her daughter, Aileen, who took over after Pat passed away. Now, Hutchens and Larsen can add their names to that list. For the pair, knowing where you came from helps guide the way ahead. “It is important because without them, there would be no us,” Larsen said. And though the pandemic claimed a few months from Marquette Monthly, it stole only time, not the resolve of the people who help keep the publication going month after month. “It’s like getting the band back together, and we’re so blessed to have such talented people.” Larsen said “Not just the staff, but the contributors, freelancers, and artists.” The pair plan to continue MM’s legacy of in-depth storytelling, featuring articles on the people, places and

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events that are woven into the fabric of Upper Peninsula culture. “We wanted to provide that platform for all this talent that’s out there -- writers, artists, to showcase what they can do,” Larsen said. “Imagine you have this thing inside of you, this creative drive and you have no outlet. What a horrible thing to not have an outlet. That was missing, and I think this fulfills that for a lot of people.” The content will remain what MM readers have come to expect from the monthly magazine: long-form features that highlight the brighter aspects of living in the UP, many of which will continue to be written by long-standing contributors. The City Notes and Calendar sections will also remain, offering MM readers plenty of opportunities to attend events in their communities. And the co-publishers remain committed to MM’s creed of local, local, local. That means local advertisers keep the publication free and available to anyone who wants a copy. “Many people ask us how we can give it away for free. It is because of the support of the local advertisers. They truly are the reason it makes it to the racks.” Hutchens said. Though the pandemic took its toll on MM over the last few months, the new publishers see a bright future ahead, and plan to continue providing a community based publication to readers across the UP. “Marquette Monthly is gonna keep going,” Larsen said. You can pick up Marquette Monthly at over 200 locations throughout the central and western Upper Peninsula. Potential advertisers and artists wishing to submit their work for consideration should contact Jane Hutchens at jane@marquettemonthly.com or James Larsen at james@ marquettemonthly.com. Calendar items should be sent to calendar@marquettemonthly.com Interested writers should contact editor@marquettemonthly.com. MM


city notes Public Invited to U.P. Authors Day Book Fair in Marquette

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ore than a dozen Upper Michigan authors from the Upper Peninsula will gather on Saturday, Oct. 9, for the fourth Upper Peninsula Authors Day Book Fair at Campfire Co-Works in the Masonic Building at 132 W. Washington Street in downtown Marquette. Participating authors will gather to greet the public from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Admission is free. According to Victor R. Volkman, president of the U.P. Publishers and Authors Association, the event is intended to raise awareness of the rich tradition of writing about upper Michigan and to introduce readers to local authors. The original U.P. Authors Day was the brainchild of Lon Emerick, award-winning author of “The Superior Peninsula.” Volkman said he believes the event will be the largest single gathering of U.P. authors ever held. Gretchen Preston, author of the Valley Cats children’s book series and one of the organizers of the event, said, “I continue to be amazed by how many authors are writing about upper Michigan and upper Michigan subjects, as well as non-U.P. related subjects who live here. We will have

everything from U.P. history books to romance novels, mysteries, children’s books, poetry, and a host of nonfiction titles.” For complete details visit www.uppaa.org/4th-up-authors-day

Pediatrician joins UGL in Hancock

Jared Meyette, MD, has joined the team of pediatric providers at Upper Great Lakes Hancock Family Health Center (UGL). Dr. Meyette is a native of Hancock and attended Michigan Technological University where he earned his bachelor of science in biology and completed his pre-med studies. He earned his doctor of medicine degree from Michigan State University in Grand Rapids, and completed his pediatrics residency at Beaumont Children’s Hospital in downstate Royal Oak. Patient and family relationships are one of Dr. Meyette’s favorite aspects of practicing medicine in Pediatrics. “I enjoy watching children grow up and attain their milestones while assisting in any way so they can achieve their best,” says Meyette, “With young ones – life is fun, simple things are appreciated, and the energy is endless.” Dr. Meyette and his wife, Tawni-

ka, have five children – two girls and three boys. Dr. Meyette appreciates the ease of accessing the outdoors in the U.P. and enjoys activities such as fishing, hiking, and camping. UGL’s Hancock Family Health Center is located at 500 Campus Drive in Hancock.

Two physicians join U.P. Health System

U.P. Health System recently welcomed two new members to its health care network. Cemil Purut, M.D., joins U.P. Health System—Marquette as the newest member of its heart and vascular team. Dr. Purut came from Salem, VA, where he served as medical director of cardiovascular surgery for Lewis-Gale Medical Center. Dr. Purut, a cardiothoracic surgeon, sees patients seeking treatment for heart and lung conditions that may require surgical intervention, including heart bypass surgery, aortic valve replacement, mitral valve repair, carotid artery surgery, and adult congenital heart surgery. Catherine Boomus, MD, MPH, FACOEM, joins U.P. Health System’s occupational medicine team where she will serve as the new medical director overseeing Bell, Escana-

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ba, and Marquette occupational medicine services. Dr. Boomus joins UPHS from St. Joseph in lower Michigan where she served as the occupational medicine director for Spectrum Health Lakeland. Dr. Boomus received a bachelor’s of biomedical engineering from Michigan Technological University before earning her doctorate of medicine from Michigan State University. She completed her occupational and environmental medicine residency and earned a master’s of public health from the University of California Los Angeles. Dr. Boomus is a fellow of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

2021 GINCC Business and Community Award Nominations Open

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he Greater Ishpeming-Negaunee Area Chamber of Commerce is accepting nominations for this year’s GINCC Business and Community Awards. The awards categories include: Business Person of the Year; Volunteer of the Year; Business of the Year; and Organization of the Year. Businesses and organizations must be GINCC members. Volunteer of the Year

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can be anyone in the community who has made an impact. Nominations will be accepted until Friday, Sept. 10. Anyone can nominate a local person, business or organization they feel worthy of special recognition. For more information or to submit a nomination visit gincc.org.

21,000 full-time jobs and $914 million in labor income, with a total economic impact of over $2.5 billion. In terms of overall number of breweries, microbreweries and brewpubs, Michigan ranks No. 6 in the nation — supporting its title as “The Great Beer State.”

UP Beer Festival will play host to dozens of breweries

Organizations teaming up to assist seniors with firewood

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n Saturday, Sept. 11, 85 members of the Michigan Brewers Guild will gather in Mattson Lower Harbor Park in Marquette for the annual U.P. Fall Beer Festival. Tickets are on sale now at MiBeer.com. General admission is 1 to 6 p.m., with the gates opening at noon for a VIP hour for enthusiast members. Tickets are $50 per person in advance ($55 day of) with designated driver tickets for $10. “We are very happy to be returning to Marquette for our first beer festival in more than a year, and we are excited to share a beer with so many of our friends,” said Scott Graham, guild executive director. Formed in 1997, the Michigan Brewers Guild represents nearly 300 member breweries. The mission of the guild is to promote and protect the Michigan beer industry with an overarching goal to help locally brewed beer attain 20 percent of all beer sales in the state by 2025. Michigan’s brewing industry contributes more than

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hree organizations serving senior citizens in Marquette County are teaming up through the a Better Together Initiative funded in part by the West End Health Foundation. Members of the Ishpeming and Negaunee Senior Centers, and Little Brothers-Friends of the Elderly, are aware that access to firewood for home heating is a challenge for some seniors. The group is using surveys to gauge the extent of the need and resources available to determine a feasible solution. For more information, contact Ishpeming Senior Center at (906) 485-5527, Negaunee Senior Center (906) 475-6266, or Little Brothers-Friends of the Elderly at (906) 273-2575.

Front Street Book Fair coming to Marquette

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he American Association of University Women and the Friends of Peter White Public Library have joined together to present the first annual Front Street

Bradford Veley is a freelance cartoonist, illustrator and farmer in the Upper Peninsula. Follow him on Facebook, Instagram and at www.bradveley.com.


Book Fair. The event will be held for three days, Sept. 23, 24 and 25 at venues in the City of Marquette. Thousands of clean used books, CDs and DVDs will be available for purchase at low prices at the First Presbyterian Church, 120 N. Front Street, and at Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front Street. Proceeds from the sales will support AAUW’s mission of advancing gender equity for women and girls and will support PWPL’s programs, materials and equipment. Throughout the fair there will be several community events including: local singer-songwriter Michael Waite performing live Thursday evening at the library; an evening with Marquette author, Tyler Tichelaar on Friday at 7 p.m. at the Women’s Federated Clubhouse at 104 W. Ridge Street; a rare book appraisal session for the public on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the library; author signings throughout the day on Saturday at Snowbound Bookstore, 118 N. Third Street; and more. During the book fair there will be libation and food specials at the Landmark Inn, 230 N. Front Street. Facemasks may be required at certain venues. For more information call Peter White Public Library at (906) 228-9510 or visit www.pwpl.info

Trail Hikers host ‘Celebrate Walking in Marquette’

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he North Country Trail Hikers, the local chapter of the national North Country Trail Association, will be hosting “Celebrate Walking in Marquette” The event, which is open to the public, will be held Saturday, Sept. 25, from 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the Mattson Lower Harbor Park. Participants are invited to simply walk from the park along the North Country

KNA holding fundraising raffle The Keweenaw Natural Areas is holding a fundraising raffle to help preserve Seven Mile Point, shown in this photo by Dennis Hake, and other KNA natural areas. A total of 1,000 tickets are being sold for $100 each, with a drawing to be held October 16. The grand prize winner will receive $20,000. Second, and third and fourth prizes will be $5,000, $1,000 respectively, and a total of four $5000 prizes will also be awarded. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact the KNA at KNAraffle@yahoo.com or by phone at (906) 370-9022.

Scenic Trail, which is the multi-use pathway that follows the shoreline, as far north or south as they wish and turn around and return to the park. Participants can sign up for free t-shirts and learn about the North Country Trail, a 4,700-mile national trail that extends from Vermont to North Dakota. Organizers describe the event as a fun day where chapter members get to interact with the public to share

their passion for the trail. For more information visit Facebook.com/NCTHikers, email nct@northcountrytrail.org, or call (906) 226-6210.

Police remind motorists about school bus rules

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ith schools returning to session and an increase in school bus traffic, the Michigan State Police are reminding

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motorists to pay attention to school bus lights and observe the school bus stop law. This law requires motorists to treat school buses like traffic signals: prepare to stop when a slowing bus has its overhead yellow lights flashing; come to a complete stop at least 20 feet away from the bus when its overhead red lights are flashing. Do not proceed until the bus resumes motion or you are signaled to do so by the

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New storage business opens in Negaunee

West End residents now have a new storage option with the opening of W.I.N. Storage in Negaunee. W.I.N. Storage offers 24-hour access, digital video surveillance, online bill payments, drive-up access and onsite security. W.I.N. Storage is a locally owned business committed to offering great customer service. The Greater Ishpeming-Negaunee Area Chamber of Commerce celebrated the occasion with a Ribbon Cutting on Friday morning. There is currently a waitlist for units; however, owner Ryan Reichel encourages prospective renters to sign up, “as storage units are month-to-month and have frequent turnover.” To find out more and to get on the waitlist, visit winstorageunits.com. Front row (left to right): Ayla, Arya and Nora Reichel. Back row: Kristin Knapp, Tracy Magnuson, Angela Hentkowski, Nate Heffron, Bob Hendrickson, Diana Sundberg, Ryan Reichel, Andrea Jackson, and Tia Rodda. (Photo courtesy of the Greater Ishpeming-Negaunee Chamber of Commerce) bus driver. Proceed with caution when the hazard warning lights, located near the headlights, are flashing.

National Mine resident named UP Veteran of Year

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ormer NMU student C. William “Bill” Hager was announced as the 2021 U.P. Veteran of the Year during an Aug. 19 ceremony at the U.P. State Fair. The National Mine resident served more than 20 years in the military, including two tours in Vietnam. He attended Northern before and after serving with the U.S. Navy from 1963-67, and was president of the NMU Vets Club. Hager later served for an extended period (1977-1993) with the 107th Engineers, Active Guard Reserve, retiring as a highly decorated master sergeant. “Bill Hager makes a better place for veterans and the community by opening his home, property and finances to others,” stated the Marquette Veterans Alliance, which nominated him for the honor. “He has been a mentor, counselor and advocate for county veterans. He addresses such is-

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sues as PTSD and drug/alcohol addiction through a church group, providing work and therapy for veterans at his hobby farm for rescued miniature horses and donkeys. Bill routinely aids homeless families searching for benefits and housing, and helps veterans enroll in VA services.” After his two tours in Vietnam, Hager wrote a play highlighting the struggles of Vietnam veterans while in service and after their return home, providing hope and promise to veterans and family members. The play was staged for four weeks at the Vista Theatre in Negaunee.

Conference to focus on youth development, virtual communication

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he Great Lakes Center for Youth Development will host the U.P. Nonprofit Conference on Thursday, Oct. 21, at the Northern Center at Northern Michigan University from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The keynote speaker will be Brad Gingras, a professional trainer, facilitator, generational strategist and consultant. Gingras has giv-

en professional development workshops, presentations and strategic planning facilitation to thousands of youth and professionals. He has expertise in generational training and strategies, leadership development, team building, career preparation and counseling, and motivational speaking. In addition to the keynote address, he will give a workshop titled Communication in a Virtual World. It is designed to provide insight into the evolution of communication along with effective strategies for engaging co-workers and colleagues, and for strengthening personal relationships. The event will include a breakfast buffet and lunch. For more information and to register visit www.glcyd.org

Marquette County economic club resumes meetings

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he Economic Club of Marquette County is returning in September with a full schedule of monthly speakers. The season will also include a networking hour along with a full dinner provided


DeVos features new exhibit

On display through October 31, the DeVos Art Museum presents “Personal to Political: Celebrating the African American artists of the Paulson Fontaine Press.” Organized by Bedford Gallery at the Lesher Center for the Arts in Walnut Creek, California, this exhibit features a range of fine-art prints, quilts, and sculptures, including abstract and formal imagery by African American artists who helped shape contemporary art conversation in the California Bay Area and beyond. The exhibition features more than 50 artworks by artists including Gary Simmons, Kerry James Marshall, Martin Puryear, and Gee’s Bend Quilters Louisiana Bendolph, Mary Lee Bendolph, Loretta Bennett, and Loretta Pettway. Their artworks speak to personal experiences and political perspectives. (Photo courtesy of DeVos Art Museum) by the Ramada Inn of Marquette. Board President Joe Esbrook said, “This return to normal is exciting, and we are looking forward to providing the U.P. with a great line-up of speakers and a fantastic networking environment everyone remembers pre-covid.” Economic Club of Marquette County meets on the third Monday of each month at the Ramada Inn of Marquette. Social hour begins at 5:30 p.m. with a dinner served at 6:30 p.m. followed by the headline speaker. Visit the Marquette Economic Club Facebook or marquetteeconomicclub.org for more information or to register.

Presentation focuses on winter sports history

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he Marquette Regional History Center will present “Skiing Skating & Slapshots: A Winter Sports Slideshow, Instant Replay!” on Wednesday Sept. 8, at 7 p.m. Participants are asked to bring a lawn chair and join Jack Deo and Jim Koski as they share reminiscences from local winter sport enthusiasts. Hear stories and see photos about Mt. Mesnard, Kirlin Hill, and watch movies from Cliff ’s Ridge. See how ice skating was a pastime for everyone and, of course, there will be plenty about hockey. This was recorded as a fundraiser for the History Center, but

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this time it will be presented live. Tickets are $15 and can be obtained in advance at the door. Call (906) 226-3571 for details. This fundraiser is supported in part by the Rotary Club of Marquette.

Former UP residents win big at 2020 Tokyo Olympics

Bluff Street parking ramp closes for renovations

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he Bluff Street Parking Ramp, located between Front and Third Streets in Marquette, is closed to public hourly parking to accommodate a restoration project. Parking access will be maintained for rental parking permit holders, with parking shifts necessary to accommodate partial closures throughout the two-phased project. The east side of both the upper and lower levels of the structure closed August 30 to accommodate phase one repairs. Parking will be maintained on both levels of the west side for parking permit holders only during phase one construction. The electric vehicle charging station will not be available during phase one. Subsequent to completion of phase one, the west side of the structure will be closed during phase two, with rental permit parking only to resume on the east side at that time. Parking permit holders will be contacted directly with more detailed information. Signed, two-way ingress and egress will be provided, and motorists are advised to exercise caution when entering and leaving the parking structure. Public parking will be available on-street or in other public parking lots throughout downtown. Ram Construction Services of Kentwood, Michigan is the general contractor for the project, which is expected to be completed by October 15; however, weather and delays could affect its duration. For further information, contact the Marquette Downtown Development Authority at 906-228-9475 ext. 101.

Marquette Marathon returns Sept. 4

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unners from throughout the region will descend on Marquette County for the 2021 Marquette Marathon on Saturday, Sept. 4. The race counts as a qual-

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Adeline Gray

merican freestyle wrestler Adeline Gray, who trained at what is now Northern Michigan University’s National Training Site while attending Marquette Senior High School, won a silver medal in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics in the 76-kilogram final. It was the first Olympics for the five-time world champion. Germany’s Aline Rotter-Focken won the gold with a 7-3 victory.

Helen Maroulis

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elen Maroulis won Olympic bronze in the 2020 Tokyo Games after defeating Mongolia’s Khongorzul Boldsaikhan in the women’s freestyle 57kg wrestling event, 11-0. Maroulis trained at the Northern Michigan University National Training Site while attending Marquette Senior High School. In 2016, Maroulis brought home gold, becoming the first U.S. woman to win an Olympic wrestling gold medal.

Delaney Schnell

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ron Mountain native Delaney Schnell earned a silver medal in the women’s 10-meter synchronized platform diving at the 2020 Tokyo Games. Schnell, 22, now of Tucson, Ariz., teamed up with Jessica Parratto, 27, and their second-place finish marked the best U.S. performance in the event’s Olympic history. Though she spent her school years in Arizona, she told WJMN-TV earlier this year that she is “still a Yooper at heart.”

Photos courtesy of Team USA

ifier course for the Boston Marathon. It begins in Ishpeming and follows the Iron Ore Heritage Trail to Marquette finishing inside the Superior Dome. The course has a reputation for being fast, as its vertical elevation drops 814 feet from start to finish. A half marathon and a 5K course are also available to runners. On Friday, Sept. 3, a one-mile fun run will be offered for children as part of the race expo event.

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The Marquette Marathon is presented by Northern Michigan University. For more information or to register visit marquettemarathon.com

Michigan Tech and Bay College team up to support four-year degree programs

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wo Upper Peninsula educational institutions — Michigan Tech and Bay

College — are working together to encourage higher education and ease the transition from community college to a four-year institution. Through the recently signed agreement, Bay College students pursuing an associate’s degree will gradually prepare for their transition to a bachelor’s degree program at Michigan Tech. Advisors at both institutions will help the students successfully navigate and com-


plete their degrees. The initial agreement focuses on the Department of Applied Computing bachelor of science programs in Electrical Engineering Technology and Mechatronics

Fresh Coast Film Festival returning in October

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resh Coast Film Festival organizers recently announced that the festival will return to Marquette October 14-17. Festival passes are available now at freshcoastfilm.com. Fresh Coast Film Festival is the first of its kind: a documentary film festival celebrating the outdoor lifestyle, water-rich environment and resilient spirit of the Great Lakes and upper Midwest. Amidst historical buildings and small business venues located throughout the city of Marquette, attendees can draw inspiration from the showcase of worldclass environmental and cultural filmmaking hand-selected by the Fresh Coast committee. “We are ecstatic to bring Fresh Coast back to the community for our 5th annual festival,” states Bugsy Sailor, Fresh Coast co-founder. “We’ve long spoken about the resilient spirit of the Great Lakes region, and bringing the festival back is a perfect example of the resilience in our community … “ A key component of the Fresh Coast experience will be guided outdoor activities to introduce visitors to the outdoor playground of the Marquette area. Rock climbing, yoga, waterfall hikes and mountain bike rides will all be offered as part of the Fresh Coast weekend. This year, Fresh Coast Film Festival is presented by its title sponsor, Make It Marquette, a talent recruitment and retention campaign that was launched by Innovate Marquette SmartZone earlier this year. For more information visit freshcoastfilm. com. and follow the organization on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Public encouraged to purchase from local farmers

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n an effort to support local farmers and encourage consumers to purchase local food, the U.P. Food Exchange (UPFE) has revamped its Farm Fresh Food Guides. The handouts, which can be found online at upfoodexchange.com/farmdirectories, contain information on local farms that offer Community Supported Agriculture (CSA), online stores, and other remote purchasing options for every county in the U.P. According to UPFE there are a number of important benefits for buying local: “To start, locally grown fruits and vegetables taste better and are better for you. Food grown in your own community was likely picked just days ago and is fresh, crisp, loaded with flavor and packed with nutrients. Local food supports local farm families. Local farmers who sell direct to consumers or at retailers that support local food systems are compensated much more fairly for their product. When

you buy from a local farmer or business, you’re circulating money directly back into the local economy, creating stability within your community,” are some of the advantages cited by UPFE. For more information about UPFE, or to obtain copies of the local food handbills free of charge, visit upfoodexchange.com or contact via email at info@upfoodexchange.com.

MDHHS urges Michiganders to continue routine cancer screenings

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ife-saving cancer screenings have experienced a significant decline during the pandemic, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noting an 87 percent drop in breast cancer screenings and an 84 percent decrease in cervical cancer screenings nationally in April 2020 compared to the five previous years. Screening disparities among low-income minority women were already evident prior to COVID-19 and the pandemic has intensified those disparities. The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) is urging Michigan women to resume these routine screenings. People in need of screenings can call MDHHS at 844-446-8727 to speak with a program specialist.

Chronic Pain PATH program available for free

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free, online program will be offered to provide education on chronic pain and issues related to chronic pain. “Chronic Pain PATH” is a six-week, self-management online workshop designed for people living with chronic pain. Family members, friends, and caregivers are also encouraged to attend the workshop. The workshop, which is presented by Michigan State University Extension, will offer information on how to work with health care providers; manage symptoms of pain, fatigue, difficult emotions, sleep problems, depression; make lifestyle changes such as healthy eating and physical activity; and set goals and accomplish them. The workshop will be held online via Zoom. An internet or data connection is required as well as a device with a camera and audio. There is also an option to listen over the telephone for those who do not have the computer equipment needed for Zoom. The online address for the workshop is https://events.anr.msu.edu/ chronicpainsept23carter/ For more information contact Anita Carter at carte356@ msu.edu or call (906) 360-9732.

Beaumier Center to host architectural walking tours

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orthern Michigan University’s Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center will host a free “Welcome Back” reception in its Gries Hall gallery at 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 2. Attendees will have an opportunity to view the current exhibition, “A Beau-

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tiful Location: The Architecture of NMU.” Hors d’oeuvres and light refreshments will be available. Masks are required. The exhibition explores how NMU’s campus transitioned from one building in a remote part of Marquette to modern facilities to accommodate significant growth in the 1960s and to the present high-tech community. Photographs, maps and architectural plans of past and present facilities are showcased. The exhibition also includes a time-lapse map showing how the campus has grown and spread out over the past 122 years, and display cases featuring architectural fragments, signs and artifacts from buildings no longer in existence. Additional architectural walking tours are scheduled at 1 p.m. on two Thursdays: Sept. 9 and Sept. 23. Reserve a spot by calling 227-2549.

Partnership brings freshbrewed coffee to airport

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awyer International Airport is partnering with the Velodrome Coffee Company to offer specialty coffee in the security checkpoint for passengers waiting to board their flights. Passengers will be able to purchase fresh-brewed cups of coffee with the convenience of simple self-service at the press of a button. The newly installed Franke Freshbrew coffee machines, the same machines found in every American Airlines Admirals Club, dispense a variety of coffee flavors and offer decaf. The machine accepts cards and other contactless forms of payment and are designed for ease of use. Velodrome Coffee Company is a locally owned and operated café. Visit www.sawyerairport. com and www.velodromecoffeecompany. com for more information.

UPCAP offering Walk With Ease program

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PCAP) is offering the Arthritis Foundation’s Walk With Ease program. This is a self-guided walking program with online class support to help participants stay motivated and build confidence, while learning to safely increase physical activity. The six-week online course is designed with older adults in mind, but participants of all ages can benefit from walking. If you can be on your feet for 10 minutes without increased pain, you can have success with Walk With Ease. Online classes will be held on Thursdays, 11 am. to noon, September 30 through November 4. Participants also have the option to attend a Webex virtual platform orientation at 11 a.m. on Thursday, September 23. The orientation is designed to prepare participants to attend the classes virtually. To register, visit upcap.org or call 211, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, for assistance. There is no charge for this online class. You must have a computer, tablet, or smartphone with internet connection, microphone, webcam and email

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address, to participate. Class size is limited. Registration is required by September 19.

Marquette County United Way launches 2021-2022

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he United Way of Marquette County recently announced that Melissa Holmquist and Amy Quinn will serve as campaign co-chairs for the 2021-2022 campaign. Melissa Holmquist is the chief executive officer of U.P. Health Plan where she has been employed for over 19 years. A native of Crystal Falls, Holmquist moved to the Marquette area to attend Northern Michigan University where she obtained both a bachelor’s and master’s degrees. She serves on numerous local, state, and national boards including Invest UP and the Marquette County Economics Club. “I am honored to serve as a United Way co-chair for the 2021-2022 season. I believe in the mission of the organization and am excited to lend my voice to help them further their goals and to continue to provide critical funding to a variety of worthy community-based organizations,” Holmquist said. Amy Quinn is the CEO of Grow and Lead, a community-based organization working to create bright futures for youth by strengthening the nonprofit sector. Quinn previously served as the executive director of Four Corners Child Advocacy Center and as a Commodity Trading Advisor with Cargill, Inc. She has eight years of experience in for-profit and 15 years in for-purpose corporations. She holds a bachelor’s degree in agriculture business from Colorado State University and a master’s of business administration from Northern Michigan University. “A vibrant nonprofit industry is essential for a thriving community,” Quinn said. “United Way is a credible source to help your neighbors because they believe in the Tanzanian proverb that little by little, a little becomes a lot.” This year’s fundraising campaign began August 30. As part of the campaign, United Way of Marquette County is also offering to schedule15-minute presentations at interested organizations and workplaces about how United Way makes a difference in Marquette County. For more information call (906) 226-8171 or visit www.uwmqt.org.

Nominations sought for pandemic heroes

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he Michigan Community Service Commission is launching the Michigan Heroes Campaign virtual recognition website to celebrate individuals and organizations that have made a difference helping others during the Covid-19 pandemic and beyond in Michigan. Nominations are now being accepted in preparation for a campaign launch at the end of September. Anyone can nominate a hero by visiting www.miheroesproject.org. Heroes will have given their time, talent, or


treasures to make Michigan stronger and more resilient. The current focus of the campaign is the response and recovery of the COVID-19 pandemic, but anyone can be nominated for helping others. Nominees will be put through a brief screening to make sure they meet certain criteria, then will be featured on the website. Questions can be directed to LEO-MIHeroesProject@michigan.gov

SAYT holding auditions for musical

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uperior Arts Youth Theatre is holding auditions September 8 and 9 for Disney’s Descendents: The Musical. Based on the popular Disney Channel original movies, Disney’s Descendants: The Musical is a brand-new musical comedy featuring the beloved characters and hit songs from the films. Open to youth in preschool through eighth grade. Vocal Auditions are as follows, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on September 8; and from 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. on September 9. Dance Auditions for individuals with up to four years of experience (to include those with no experience) will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. on September 9. Dance Auditions for individuals with five years or more of experience will take place from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. on September 9. Callbacks will take place September 10, as assigned from 4 to 8 p.m. Rehearsals begin on September 13, with mandatory rehearsals from October 24 to November 3. Performances will take place November 4 to 7.

UPCF provides more than $500,000 in grants

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or the first time, the Upper Peninsula Catholic Foundation, Inc. (UPCF) topped $500,000 in its annual grant distributions for various Catholic ministries across the Upper Peninsula. The UPCF connects faith with charitable giving through long-term support for the needs of Catholic ministries in the Diocese of Marquette. Six new endowment funds are providing grant distributions for the first time in 2021, and several others are providing a significant boost in grant amounts due to bequests received and asset growth over the last year. Holy Name High School — A Chesterton Academy in Escanaba — will benefit from two firsttime grants from the UPCF as it opens its doors in the fall of 2021. The school created several endowment funds in the UPCF and continues to actively fundraise to grow those endowments for long-term sustainability of the new school. Due to a significant bequest gift received last year, Catholic Social Services of the U.P. will receive a first-time grant, and the Seminarian Endowment Fund will receive a higher grant this year. The bequest, over $1 million received from the estate of Donald Stanley, created a legacy of care for seminarians and social services in the U.P. The

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largest grant at $347,692 is from the Legacy of Faith Endowment Fund, and will provide funding to 76 parishes, Catholic schools, and Catholic Social Services of the U.P. The Legacy of Faith Endowment fund has been providing grants to foster the Catholic faith in the U.P. since 2002.

UP Regional Blood Center in need of all blood types

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he UP Regional Blood Center is currently experiencing a critical need for all blood types. The UP Regional Blood Center has collection sites in Marquette, Hancock, Escanaba, and Iron Mountain and is the primary supplier of blood to 13 UP hospitals. Please visit our Facebook page at UPRBC906 or website at http:// www.mgh.org/blood for center details and blood drive locations. For hours and scheduling please call Marquette at 906449-1450, Hancock at 906-483-1392. Iron Mountain at 906-774-1012 and Escanaba at 906-786-8420. Donate Local. Keep your blood in the U.P. donate with the U.P. Regional Blood Center.

MDHHS now recommends masking in schools

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n mid-August, the Michigan Department of Health and human Service issued updated health recommendations designed to help prevent the spread of Covid-19 within school buildings, reduce

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disruptions to in-person learning and help protect vulnerable individuals and individuals who are not fully vaccinated. Because many students have yet to be vaccinated and students under age 12 are not yet eligible, layered prevention measures, including universal masking, must be put in place for consistent in-person learning to keep kids, staff and families safe. According to MDHHS, the guidance was updated to reflect the most current recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on masking and prevention strategies to help operate schools more safely. Mask use has been proven to substantially reduce transmission in school settings. “We are committed to ensuring Michigan students and educators are safe in the classroom, including those who may not yet be vaccinated,” said Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, chief medical executive and chief deputy for health at MDHHS. “MDHHS is issuing this guidance to help protect Michiganders of all ages. We continue to urge all eligible residents to get the safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine as soon as possible, as it is our best defense against the virus and the way we are going to end this pandemic.”

Grant supports sustainable food system effort

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he Northern Michigan University Center for Rural Health has received a

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$194,421 grant from the Michigan Health Endowment Fund to explore the feasibility of an aggregation, distribution and light food processing facility serving Marquette and Alger Counties. The project will bring together businesses, service agencies, school systems and farmers to plan for a sustainable food system in the region. Research shows the benefits of local food consumption for both human and economic health, the grant proposal stated. The U.P.’s widely dispersed population and lack of food infrastructure require that the majority of food consumed in the region be transported from downstate.

NMU’s SHINE program will offer sustainability support to UP businesses

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orthern Michigan University’s Sustainability Hub for Innovation and the Environment (SHINE) recently launched and announced its partnership with Grand Rapids-based nonprofit People First Economy. Together, the entities will deploy technical assistance and sustainability expertise to a cohort of Marquette-area businesses. Funded in part by the MEDC, the “Good for Michigan” program will help businesses implement positive and measurable place-based impacts related to diverse workforces, sustainable supply chains, carbon footprint reduction, environmental stewardship and commu-

nity impact. The team will recruit 15 to 20 businesses to work with each semester. Michigan Technological University and Bay College sign partnership agreement to encourage four-year degrees in computing, electrical engineering, and mechatronics.

Bart King monument on Sugar Loaf turns 100

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ack in the late fall of 1921, a group of community members and Boy Scouts finished a stone monument on the top of Sugar Loaf Mountain. This monument stands today, 100 years later, to recognize a WWI soldier from Marquette, Bart King. The Marquette Regional History Center will commemorate his life and sacrifice during WWI, along with the volunteers who built this monument, including stone mason Harmidas Dupras, and scout leaders such as Perry Hatch, who organized the large effort of hauling stones and supplies. The event will take place at 6 p.m. at top of Sugar Loaf, when a short presentation will be given on the history of this centennial monument. Participants are encouraged to begin their hike at the MRHC information table at the new south parking lot. The event is free and open to the public, with donations optional. MM


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COVID-19 COVID-19 COVID-19 COVID-19 Story by Jackie Stark

COVID-19 COVID-19 COVID-19 COVID-19 n early March of 2020, as a once-in-a-century global pandemic began to take hold, Andrew Rickauer, like so many other peoCOVIDCOVID-19 COVID-19 COVID-19 COVID-19 ple, found himself wondering what he could do to help.

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to improve community well-being.” 19 COVID-19 COVID-19 COVID-19 together “I COVID-19 knew something needed toCOVID-19 happen, and I knew the United COVIDWay should be part of it,” Rickauer said, adding that he also knew he would require help as well in dealing with the sheer volume of 19 COVID-19 COVID-19 COVID-19 COVID-19 COVID-19 COVID need that was sure to come.

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The United Way and theCOVID-19 COVID-19 Community Foundation, it’s a great COVID-19 …COVID-19 partnership for the community in many ways, so it just made sense to partner with them.” That phone call started both organizations down a road that would ultimately lead to the creation of the COVID-19 Community Response Fund. A dedicated committee of volunteers for the fund began meeting weekly to review and award grants, with the goal of quickly

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The year that changed everything; the year that everything changed By Jackie Stark

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n what turned out to be true COVID-19 fashion, my introduction to this global pandemic was with a Zoom call. It was mid-March, 2020. I was in my office at work, surrounded by most of my co-workers, listening to my boss on a Zoom call from a trade show in California as she told us she was shutting the office down that week. Just days later, the entire state would be sent into a lockdown by the governor. Looking back, my co-workers and I shouldn’t have all been there together in the same room, huddled around a computer with no masks on. But the whole thing was just beginning, and we knew nothing about this clinical-sounding virus that would soon ravage the world. So we discussed logistics — keeping track of computers and files and ensuring workflow wouldn’t be interrupted too much. And then we all packed up our offices and went home. We had no idea we wouldn’t be back for over a year. *** My son, Silas, was born five years prior to the spring 2020 lockdown that sent all of us inside our homes for months. We had celebrated his birthday just a couple of weeks before the shutdown, and as I watched the news stories about a highly contagious and fatal respiratory disease infecting people around the world, it took me right back to that day in March, 2015 when a nurse woke me up to tell me my newborn son was in the NICU. Silas was born with a collapsed lung. Medical staff also said he may have necrotizing enterocolitis, a condition that can be fatal. I’d had a c-section just hours before and could not stand up, so they wheeled my giant hospital bed into the NICU, leaving me lying there beside my son, my husband standing beside me. Silas was sleeping, doped up on morphine so he wouldn’t move and accidentally pull out the chest tube that was reinflating his lung. We weren’t allowed to hold him. What followed was a five-week nightmare, where one day melted into the next, the boredom of just sitting for hours punctuated by tests for other potentially fatal conditions, until, finally, everything came back negative and we were allowed to take him home. All that remains of that time is a tiny white scar on his

distributing aid to nonprofits on the front lines and responding to community needs. Zosia Eppensteiner, who took over as CEO of the foundation after Gail Anthony’s January retirement, said the fund was created with the hope of helping people as quickly as possible. “We knew there was going to be these tremendous needs in the community, and we needed an immediate response to what was happening,” Eppensteiner said. “Food insecurity, PPE, shelter, we wanted to be able to provide the resources to help with that.” In other words, they wanted to meet

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The author with her husband, masked up on the chairlift at Marquette Mountain. side from where the chest tube was inserted. He has no lingering health problems, and my husband and I do our best not to dwell on how his life started. And then five years later, as news of this deadly virus that attacks the lungs grew worse every day, I found it difficult to not go back to that time, when I spent all day in the dimly-lit NICU, holding my son once the chest tube was removed, watching him sleep, waiting for the results on yet another test to prove he didn’t have a congenital heart defect or a brain disorder or a different potentially fatal condition. The quiet of the room was rarely disturbed, and conversations were always hushed, with the white noise of medical machines ever present in the

immediate needs immediately. Families wondering where their next meal was going to come from found themselves with food on the table. People worried about housing kept a roof over their head. Front line workers were given the PPE they needed to do their jobs. Operating on an annual calendar, the United Way doesn’t necessarily get to see the immediate effects of its good works in the community. But Rickauer said immediate effect was the whole point with the COVID-19 Community Response Fund. “With this fund, to be able to do, really everything, within a week or two and

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background. The thought of my son ever laying in a hospital bed again — well, I couldn’t go there. So, our little family of three stuck together and stayed home, doing our best to fill the hours with something other than a screen. We went for walks and created neighborhood scavenger hunts: find a barking dog, a house with nine windows, a blue mailbox, someone on a bike. We discovered that squirrels, which spend all day running along our backyard fence, were much more elusive out in the wilds of South Marquette. We also went hiking. A lot. And we found new trails we’d never been down before. We started making “adventure maps,” taking Silas’ compass out with us and mapping out our trail that day. We’d make note of interesting trees, slippery spots, or other memorable parts of the hike, cataloguing our adventures in a notebook. On other days, I scoured the internet to find art projects to occupy Silas’ time. We spent two weeks painting a backdrop on large pieces of cardboard and created a play based on an Anansi the spider story, inviting the grandparents to partake in a little COVID-19 theatre via Zoom. We spent an entire evening on the kitchen floor, creating a Hearts of Hope Marquette display, cutting out construction paper hearts in a rainbow pattern to say “All You Need Is Love, Soap, & John Prine.” As we taped them to the the large window on the front of our home in April 2020, our plan was to remove them when the pandemic was over, and I naively thought they’d only stay there a couple of months. But they hung in the window so long the sun sapped them of all their color, and we took the washed out hearts down that winter. And in between all of those moments, we worked. I spent eight hours a day in my dining room, managing work flow and basically living on Zoom. My husband set up shop in our guest bedroom (we wouldn’t be using that for a while), stealing a chair from the dining room and using a fold-out card table for his desk. At first, working from home wasn’t so bad. It was kind of nice some days to wake up, grab a cup of coffee and just get right to work. But soon a daily cycle began. My son would pop into the room and ask me to play a game,

then just keep repeating it over and over and over and over, it was just tremendous to see,” Rickauer said.. “It felt rewarding to see all the hard work pay off.” Each week, the committee pored over applications, doing the administrative work that was required to get resources in the hands of people that needed them. “In a way, it was the longest day, but the best day, of the week,” Rickauer said. “It was something to look forward to every week, because … at the end of it, it washed away any of the stress from the previous week because it felt good to be able to be there, having that impact.”

What started with $25,000 from the MCF itself, grew to nearly $180,000 in the year-and-a-half since it was created. Money raised for the COVID-19 Community Response Fund has gone back out in the community, helping groups and individuals alike, with the first grants sent out in April, 2020. “In the thick of it, you don’t realize the magnitude, but then I ran a report at the end of the year, just to see the annual statement of the fund,” Eppensteiner said. “Multiple pages of gifts coming and multiple pages of grants, for me, was something … It was pretty amazing.”


or go outside, and I had to repeat the dreaded sentences, “I can’t play with you. I have to work” so often that I began to feel disgusted with myself. He would leave, slightly dejected, and the guilt would wash over me. Then would come the resentment that I felt guilty at all. We still had bills to pay. And around and around it went, until it was quitting time, and I walked the 17 steps into my living room, where we could play Uno or color together, or watch a movie. And one day melted into the next. *** I have rewritten this piece at least 10 times by now. How do you boil an entire year’s worth of living down to a few hundred words? How do you convey what it was to feel the fear and the boredom, the relief and the guilt all wrapped up together? I was lucky. Only a few family members contracted COVID-19, and all of them survived. My husband and I both kept our jobs. It just felt like someone hit a pause button on our lives, trapping us in the same day with the threat of a deadly disease ever-present in the background. So, I’ve rewritten this thing over and over, choosing short, little stories about memorable days from the shutdown to try to tell you what it was like. To maybe offer a sense of connection. But none of the stories said what I wanted them to. So instead, I’m offering you just this one. Like many people, I learned a new skill last year: skiing. We took lessons as a family. Not only did it give us something to do outside, but my son absolutely loved it. It was a beautiful, wintery Saturday morning that we decided to spend a few hours at the hill, putting into practice what we’d learned from several weeks of lessons. I was more comfortable on my skis at that point than my husband, so we naturally formed a line as we snaked our way down the hill — Silas, me, then Kyle. The ride up was a peaceful experience. Silas was always seated in between us on a three-person chair. The thick snow quieted everything, giving it a hushed feel. It was the third or fourth run down that Silas, clearly feeling the most at ease of the three of us, skied out ahead, this time, not skiing down the hill in the wide, S-shaped pattern we’d been on all morning, but more like an “I.” Straight as an arrow he took off like a shot, and before I knew it, he was way ahead of me. I yelled for him to slow down, but it was a useless thing to do. So I hit the gas, the wind slapping me in the face as images raced through my head of Silas flipping up into the air, completely out of control, arms and legs flailing as he crashed back down to the ground. I leaned forward, flying, sure I was going to break one or both of my legs by the time this trip down was over but willing myself to go faster anyways. My heart was pounding in my chest and my feet felt light in my boots as my skis bounced over the hard crust of the hill.

Grants of up to $2,000 were given to grassroots organizations like Feed the Front Line, Masks For Marquette and established nonprofits like the Janzen House, Start the Cycle, Room At The Inn and countless others. And while funds raised are typically only distributed to nonprofits, this time the COVID-19 Community Response Fund was able to give grants to local businesses that wanted to provide community support in their own way. Eppensteiner said one of her favorite examples of how the fund sought to help in a multitude of ways was by providing a

And then, as we made one final, long right turn, Silas way out in front with little to no chance of me catching up, time seemed to slow down. Watching him ski effortlessly, while I concentrated on where my toes were pointing and how my weight shifted, hoping I wouldn’t wipe out, a wave coursed through me. A rush of love, and a heavy feeling of nostalgia for the moment I was in. Right then. Right there. It was something to remember, my five-year-old son enjoying the feel of the whipping wind and the crisp, cool sound of his skis cutting their way through the snow — this other human being that was as much a part of me as my own limbs, an extension of myself and yet a person all his own, skiing like he’d been doing it his whole life instead of just a few weeks. We were there together, flying down the hill, feeling the freedom of our own movement. I felt proud and exhilerated and amazed at his fearlessness. And then, as quick as it began, it was over. We were at the bottom. He looked over his shoulder to see if I was there, a big smile on his face to match my own, eager to go back to the top and do it again. I finally caught up to him and hugged him as best I could with skis on, his chest rising and falling with each breath. And that’s it. That’s my pandemic moment. A few short seconds when the world consisted of nothing but me and my son, and the joy we felt in being alive in that moment. That’s what I want to tell you about. *** How to put into words the shift a global pandemic creates? Things that were once commonplace take on new meaning, and we start to think of our lives in “befores” and “afters.” What you’ve just read is the effect of a global pandemic on one person. Just a few small moments from a year-and-a-half of living, filtered through the lens of my own experiences, and put onto a page for you to interpret however you’d like. Because the truth of the matter is, each of us experienced this thing in our own way. We all lost something last year. Some lost family, friends, a loss that is heavier than my own. I lost what everyone did — time. But we also gained something. We understood in a much deeper way the importance of human connection. We learned the true value of what is priceless. Who knows what the future will hold, or how long the shadow of COVID-19 will hang over the world. What we can do now is what we’ve always been able to do — be kind to one another. And we can remember to seek out those moments of joy. To quiet our minds and just be right where we are. Right here. Right now. Skiing down the hill, just at the edge of control, watching our children grow. MM

grant to Doulas of Marquette. “Doulas of Marquette recognized that, in the shutdown, there weren’t any birthing classes available,” Eppensteiner said. “They developed a program that was all virtual and free for the families that wanted to participate.” For Melinda Britton, owner of Doulas of Marquette and a certified doula herself, providing those classes was a necessity the community couldn’t do without. “With pregnancy, there is a lot of unexpected, and a lot of unknown anyway, so our goal was to be able to provide a class for the community that would help lower

anxiety and bring accurate information, not just about birthing, but about the current situation with COVID,” Britton said. Britton applied for a grant through the online process, with help from a friend who had already done some grant writing. The grant from the foundation allowed Doulas of Marquette to offer nine education programs from May through September, 2020, offering daytime and evening classes via Zoom. Outside-of-the-box thinking helped provide additional resources immediately to many people in need, and now, Eppensteiner said she’s hoping to establish a

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long-term solution to prevent such a large need from happening again. That means taking a look at things that had always been a problem, but were exacerbated by the pandemic, and finding solutions. One of those items is internet access, especially for families with children. “Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we were prepared, if we ever needed to do this again, and we had the systems in place to make sure no kid is left behind,” Eppensteiner said. “That kids are not driving to a library parking lot to be able to do their schoolwork, or not doing their schoolwork, because they don’t have access to the internet.” Looking back, Rickauer said the work they did throughout the pandemic was challenging, rewarding and necessary, and both Rickauer and Eppensteiner expressed their gratitude to all the people involved in the efforts of both organizations. “Within two weeks of the shutdown, we were already distributing funds to critical needs in the community,” Rickauer said. “It definitely wouldn’t have happened without community support and without collaborative effort.” And while many, many things have changed as a result of this monumental event, Britton said not all of those changes have been bad. One positive was the deeming of doulas as essential, allowing

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them into hospitals in addition to “support” people, rather than being included as a support person -- forcing women to choose between having their partner, their mom, or other loved one there by there side, OR their doula. “That’s been really neat to see that happen within the local hospital system. We’re our own piece of the pie,” Britton said. “You can have one support person and a doula … It was very validating of our role.” And though there are still plenty of questions about when life will return to how it was pre-2020, or if it ever will at all, Britton said there are lessons to be learned from the people living their lives through COVID-19. “For me, the biggest thing that’s been incredible to see the last year-and-a-half is just the resiliency in women and families, the ability for them to find joy,” Britton said. “I’ve seen loss, I’ve seen joy, I’ve seen babies born, all of it, but it’s been so encouraging to my spirit over the last yearand-a-half to see babies born, because it’s like life is continuing. “It’s been very powerful to see there’s still good and hope out there.” About the author: Jackie Stark has lived in the UP since she was 11. An avid reader, she also loves gardening and has been talking about learning to play the guitar for 14 years. MM


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fiction The Superior Gatsby By John Smolens

Then he drifted back to Lake Superior, and he was still searching for something to do on the day that Dan Cody’s yacht dropped anchor in the shallows along shore. — F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

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Part I an Cody stood at the starboard rail of his yacht Tuolomee, watching the boy row across the flats off of Little Girls Point. Torn green jersey, a pair of canvas pants, and still in his teens, it was his smile that bored through Cody’s afternoon gin and tonics, alerting him to an unbridled ambition, a vulpine want that could not be denied. His youth and virility posed such a threat that Cody called down the deck stairs, “Billings, my carbine on deck!” Grinning, the tanned, blond lad in the dinghy said, “This is not a safe anchorage, sir.” Dan Cody discovered that he had a gimlet glass in his hand. The ice had melted. Still, he drained the contents, watered-down gin, compliments of the Bronfman family of Canada. The good stuff, not the bootleg poison that drove people to blindness, hallucinations, and death.

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“Why is this not a secure mooring?” “The wind on Lake Superior is unpredictable. It can shift at any moment, and if it does, your fine boat could be driven ashore. She’ll break up in no time. Superior is full of shipwrecks.” “That a fact?” Dan Cody’s bellowing laugh was designed to create fear in his interlopers. He elicited no such response in the lad seated on the thwart in this dinghy. Billings came up on deck, silent and obedient as ever, took the empty gimlet glass from the railing and handed the Winchester to Cody. Cody liked the heft of his rifle, the feel of the wood grain stock. “I have worked the Nevada silver mines, and the copper rushes from Montana to the Yukon, and you are telling me that my ‘boat’ is in danger. You think I don’t recognized danger when I see it?” That smile persisted, a gift still offered. “I am only referring to the winds here on Lake Superior, sir.” “The winds. What’s your name, son?” A moment’s hesitation, and then, “Gatsby. My name’s Jay Gatsby.” Dan Cody was a man of means who could satisfy his

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rampant impulses. (Where other men were suspicious of hunches, he had learned long ago to follow every whim and fancy.) Something about the boy, his strong shoulders and arms, his sun-bleached hair told Dan Cody he was lying. Why would he lie about his name? But that was the key: he would lie; he would fabricate a new personality, a skin that suited his needs. Cody raised the carbine, fitting it to his shoulder, and sighted down the barrel at the boy’s chest. “Sir,” Billings said in his quiet fashion. “That will be all, Billings.” “Of course, sir.” He descended the stairs to the saloon. “Tell me, Jay Gatsby,” Cody said, “what is it that you value most in life?” Unperturbed, the boy raised his head and considered the sky. “A most interesting question.” “Is it?” “Yes. There is no one, definitive answer.” “You’re prevaricating, young man. Not a wise thing to do as this gun is loaded.” “Oh, I have no doubt about that. No, I was just thinking about the notion of value, how it is often only considered


from a purely monetary perspective, how it is often confused with the idea of net worth.” “You are a thoughtful young man.” “That is because thoughts are free. If thoughts were dollars, I would be a rich man. As it is, I have no worth. You might say I am worthless. But value, what I value, that is something else.” “Indeed.” As Cody drew back the hammer the audible click seemed to define the afternoon heat. “That bird,” Gatsby said, still gazing at the sky, “it’s a kingfisher and it appears to have its supper in its talons. I value this moment as that bird values that little fish.” “Why this moment?” “Because it’s about to change my life.” “How so?” “That, sir, is for you to determine.” Cody raised the rifle, took a bead on the kingfisher, and fired. There was an explosion of feathers and the bird plummeted into the water. “It appears,” Gatsby’s voice was fairly amused, “the fish has regained its natural habitat.” As Cody leaned his rifle against the railing, he felt the slightest shift in the air, a breeze out of the west. It ruffled the boy’s hair as the dinghy glided sideways. “If my ‘boat’ is in danger, you best come aboard and help me get her into safer waters. Before the suspect wind runs me aground.” Cody considered the rowboat’s sun-blistered and paint-chipped gunnels, the water swirling about the boy’s bare feet. “Besides, your yacht appears to be less than seaworthy.” The smile widened, framed by a flawless jaw. “Gladly, Mister…sir.” “Cody. Dan Cody. And that’s the truth.” “But, Mr. Cody, along with Billings, don’t you have a crew to assist you?” “Son, let me tell you about crew. You can always find men to fill out your crew. But able-bodied? And capable? That sort of man is all too rare. Tell me, Jay Gatsby,” and he paused, watching the boy sit upright on the thwart, squaring his wide shoulders as though feeling the cut and fit of his new name like a flawlessly tailored new suitcoat. “Tell me, are you such a man?” Jay Gatsby studied the Tuolomee from prow to stern, possessively, as though he had already taken command of her. He was versed well beyond his years, and Dan Cody had no doubt that he already maintained a powerful influence on women. Pulling gently on his oars, the lad drew closer, his eyes blue gems glinting in the northern summer sunlight. “I am,” he said with genuine solemnity. “Jay Gatsby is such a man.” Dan Cody gazed toward the anchor rode which angled into the water off the bow. There were no tides on Lake Superior, but the currents, not to mention the unpredictable winds, were a perpetual threat to any mooring. He could feel the wind

JAY GATSBY STUDIED THE TUOLOMEE FROM PROW TO STERN, POSSESSIVELY, AS THOUGH HE ALREADY HAD TAKEN COMMAND OF HER. rising. Held fast on her anchor, his yacht dodged and weaved, beating against the current. “Then come aboard, Jay Gatsby. I am in need of your assistance.” “In what capacity, Mr. Cody?” “With the exception of my man Billings,” Cody said, “I am surrounded by incompetence. I need a skipper capable of setting my ‘boat’ on course until we reach our destination. Some believe it is all about the voyage, the journey, but they underestimate the value of the destination.” Jay Gatsby gazed out at the lake long enough that Dan Cody wondered if he was about to refuse his offer — something no one had done in a very long time, at least not without suffering dire consequences — until he raised his eyes to the yacht’s deck. “What is your destination?” “My destination?” Cody said. “Marquette. I have business to attend to there.” “Marquette.” Gatsby had the smile of a natural-born killer. “Permission to come aboard, sir.” About the author: John Smolens, NMU professor emeritus, has published 12 books, including Cold, Out, Fire Point, The School Master’s Daughter, Quarantine, and Wolf ’s Mouth, a Michigan Notable Book selection. In 2010 he received the Michigan Author Award from the Michigan Library Association. His most recent novel is Day of Days. MM

This is the first installment of a multipart series written by John Smolens. The second part will appear in the October, 2021 edition of MM.

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outdoors

Great Lakes Tsunamis

How and why these surprising events take place Story by Deborah K. Frontiera

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hen most people hear the word “Tsunami,” they think of those mighty earthquake-generated waves that kill hundreds or even thousands of people. “We don’t have earth quakes in this area,” one might state. But huge, destructive waves do happen on the Great Lakes more often than many people might like to admit. In How the Rock Connects Us, a book by Bill Rose and Erika Vye, the authors state: “Waves higher than 40 feet have been recorded on Lake Superior. Waves build to breakers when the water gets shallow enough that the wave feels the lake bottom’s resistance. This occurs when the depth is about half the distance between the wave crests. The distance travelled by wind or waves over open water, known as the ‘fetch,’ is important for lakes with large surface areas like Lake Superior: the longer the fetch, the greater the strength of winds and height of waves.” Two different types of “rogue waves” can, and do, happen on Lake Superior and the other Great Lakes. One is known as a “seiche.” This large wave, or waves,

occur as a result of quick changes in atmospheric pressure accompanied by heavy wind. It is the oscillation in the water level of a lake or large bay. Think about what happens when you blow down and across hot coffee, tea or chocolate in a big mug to cool it before drinking. Your breath is like the wind, and the downward push of that breath, like a drastic change in air pressure on the surface of the hot liquid. A little depression forms in the liquid and ripples or waves flow across the mug and wash up on the opposite “shore.” Blow hard enough, and you’ll slosh some out onto the table or saucer. If you wait a bit, the liquid will come back to your side. Now picture this in nature on the enormity of the Great Lakes. Water on one side diminishes enough to make it seem like “low tide” along that shore. On the opposite side, rising water can cause quite a bit of destruction. Another comparison is water sloshing back and forth in a bathtub. The second type, known as a “meteotsunami,” is also caused by severe weather events, often formed on the western sides of the various Great Lakes because our

weather patterns generally move west to east. High winds, usually in late spring and early summer, (the height of the thunderstorm season), when accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric pressure, depress the lake on that side, forming a wave which then rolls in one direction across the lake. The wave’s height depends on the speed, intensity, depth of water and the shape of the lake at that particular place. That might seem exactly the same as the seiche. The key difference is that meteotsunamis roll in one direction, rather than “sloshing” back and forth. The resulting wave gains energy as it moves across the lake, especially as it nears the opposite shore. Here are a few examples of Great Lakes Tusnamis from the history books: • July 4, 1929, a 20-foot wave crashed ashore at Grand Haven, Michigan and 10 people drowned. • June 26, 1954, a 10-foot wave swept 10 fishermen off a pier in Chicago and all 10 were lost. • July 4, 2003, a 10-foot wave drowned seven swimmers on the Lake Michigan shore near Sawyer.

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Though the damage pictured here wasn’t caused by a tsunami, the image does provide an example of the destructive power of water. This image, taken just after a 2017 storm brought massive waves crashing over the shoreline, shows huge chunks of dislodged concrete in the Shiras Park parking lot. (Photo by Jackie Stark) The phenomenon happens often enough that a group of experts gathered in Ann Arbor in the summer of 2016 to discuss what might be done to protect people along the shorelines of all the Great Lakes. At that gathering, it was reported that such waves happen over 100 times per year on all the Great Lakes combined. In reporting on that gathering of scientists, the Detroit News (June 19, 2017) had this statement from Chin Wu of the University of Wisconsin. “When they [the waves] recede, it’s like a vacuum . . . The energy of the recessing wave can last 10 to 20 minutes. So you can imagine a swimmer swept that far out into the lake and fighting it all that time.” Besides the danger to people, several nuclear power plants are located on the shores of the Great Lakes. Such suction outward could remove all water from the intake cooling pipes, leaving the core reactors without cooling for several minutes. While this has not yet happened, scientists do have concerns about that possibility, no matter how low the odds against it. Statistics show that meteotsunamis happen most frequently on Lake Michigan because of the prevailing westerly winds on that lake and its overall width. Lake Earie places second since it is situated west to east, letting prevailing winds blow across its entire length. Only one has been reported on Lake Superior — in the area of Sault Ste. Marie. Meteotsunamis have also been reported in other parts of the world: Vela Luka in Croatia (June 1978), Nagasaki Bay, Japan (Mar. 1979) and Longkou Harbor, China (Sep. 1980) to name a few. Photographic evidence of the results

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of such a wave that hit the Ludington, Michigan breakwater on April 18, 2018 can be seen accompanying an article by Tony Briscoe of the Chicago Tribune (April 25, 2019). That article also reported the possible danger of “wash back” from such waves as they regain energy when flowing out. Theoretically, a wave could hit the eastern shore of Lake Michigan and then reflect back to the Chicago area where the weather might be quite fine, with no one suspecting anything could happen. While the odds of experiencing a meteotsunami this spring or summer in Upper Michigan are very low, it is important to be aware of your surroundings or a quick change of weather. Here are a few recommended safety precautions: • If in a boat, keep in mind that even a 5-foot wave can overturn small boats. Head into deeper water where the effect will be less. • On shore, head inland toward high ground. • If caught in the outgoing rip current, float on your back, resting as much as possible, rather than fighting it and becoming tired; then swim parallel to the shore until you are out of the current before attempting to swim to shore. About the author: Deborah K. Frontiera lives in the Calumet area. Three of her books have been award winners. She has published fiction, nonfiction, poetry and children’s books. Frontiera is on the board of the Upper Peninsula Publishers and Authors Association. For details about her many books and accomplishments, visit her website: www.authorsden.com/deborahkfrontiera MM


gift of water

Protecting the blue planet By Jon Magnuson

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n mid-September, Mother Earth will, once again, tilt in orbit around the sun, spinning in exquisite balance. We call this the Equinox. This time around, most of us will also be seeking to find a deeper kind of balance. We’re stumbling out of a terrifying global experience shaped over these past 19 months by COVID-19. How will we choose to live with each other and our environments now? What will water have to do with it? Most of us take it for granted, but keeping hydrated is absolutely key to sustaining our human health. Water is also part of the much larger drama of our planet’s precarious existence. Without water, there is no life whatever. In August, only weeks ago, the United Nations released its assessment of the impacts of climate change. Included in that document are “red code” warnings about predicted drinking water shortages for over 50 percent of the world’s population by 2035. Scientists remind us that our water (in its various forms — ice, rain, groundwater, mist and steam) is the same water that has been here since the origin of the world as we know it. Where water first came from is, so far, an inscrutable mystery. We are living on a “blue” planet, with water in dynamic, regulated balance. Climate change, the melting of Arctic ice and the impact of human development are, however, altering and distorting this delicate equation. Weather has now become more extreme; aquifers, where water is stored underground, are increasingly depleted; and vast reaches of our tropical forests are being destroyed. As we enter this more precarious world, we would do well to honor the mystery of water, what my physician friend Scott Emerson calls “the essential nutrient.” We who inhabit the Great Lakes Basin are blessed with 20 percent of the freshwater in the world. It makes sense that we should be guardians and stewards of that resource. This is where it gets complicated, however. The quality of water surrounding us here in Upper Michigan, though superior to water in other parts of the country, is in fact

not what it at first appears. Seth Siegel in his book Troubled Water: What’s Wrong with What we Drink (2019) provides an overview of the history of municipal water systems in the United States. In this careful, meticulously researched book, Siegel warns that the recent water crisis in Flint, Michigan, is the tip of a much larger, nation-wide iceberg of neglect and ignorance. Proliferation of commercialized bottled water, we all know, is now a part of daily life for most Americans. Why have we so easily bought into the assumption that we need commercially purchased water? Could this be evidence that something’s gone wrong? Access to clean drinking water and pure air should be a human right, regardless of economic status, social class and ethnic background. Because water is essential for human life, it needs to be a public trust, not a privilege of the wealthy. Siegal points out there are currently over 50,000 separate municipal water systems in the U.S. Almost without exception, these systems are maintained to meet only minimal standards for human health. For instance, the EPA has identified over 100 toxic chemicals harmful to human health and that are found in lakes, streams and other bodies of water. Currently, however, our municipal water systems typically test for only a dozen or so of these 100-plus toxic chemicals. For private wells, there are no regulations at all. According to Siegal, the majority of pri-

Water Stewardship Tips • Offer a brief, mindful ritual of thanks before drinking your first glass of water each morning. • Avoid purchasing plastic bottled water; instead, use your own thermos/ container.

vate wells are contaminated to some degree by ground water from industrial waste runoff, agriculture and development projects. A sound initial response to this state of affairs is for all of us to begin acquainting ourselves with our own drinking water here in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. First, we must demand that our water be tested not just for a minimum number of contaminants, which is current practice. We can also remind one another, as Jon Saari, founder of the UP Environmental Coalition and his colleague David Arnold state, that there’s “a sixth great lake” that requires our protection. That sixth lake is the vast underground system of aquifers that feeds our lakes and streams and that connects all five Great Lakes together. Arnold and Saari propose that, if we don’t prevent toxic contamination of this sixth Great Lake, we risk poisoning our all-important ground water supply for generations to come. There’s no good reason, except for emergencies, for commercially bottled water. Rather than supporting private, commercial water, we could instead commit to funding truly healthy public water systems. In this endeavor, we can and should work as partners with regional American Indian tribes to ensure higher standards for the quality of our water. We should all become “guardians of the Great Lakes” — kind and generous, and also wise, but fiercely protective, too, of our most vital resource. As you, the reader, finish this column, know that a few leaders of our faith communities are joining together with regional American Indian tribes to do just that. Please stay tuned. Contributor’s note: Jon Magnuson is Director of the Cedar Tree Institute and a member of the Interfaith Northern Great Lakes Water Stewards. “The Gift of Water” columns are offered by the Northern Great Lakes Water Stewards and the Cedar Tree Institute, joined in an interfaith effort to help preserve, protect, and sanctify the waters of the Upper Peninsula. MM

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lookout point

Shipwrecks near the surface

A view of Lake Superior from a Marquette shoreline. The Great Lakes are the final resting place of many vessels, but not all lay in murky depths accessible only to divers. (Photo by Elizabeth Fust)

Accessing Michigan’s sunken treasure isn’t just for SCUBA divers Story by Elizabeth Fust

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any say that the watery depths of the earth are the final frontier for exploration, to discover the new and to rediscover the ruins of old. The Great Lakes hold a waterlogged history, from their shores to their depths, and you don’t need SCUBA gear or training to catch a glimpse of these shipwrecks. Many of the wrecks are close enough to shore to be seen by paddleboarders, kayakers and canoers. A new interactive map from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Michigan History Center makes finding these shipwrecks easy and accessible. The map is an ongoing development built in ArcGIS with the details of the shipwrecks coming from the Michigan Underwater Preserve Council. There are over 6,000 shipwrecks in the Great Lakes and nearly 550 — many still undiscovered — littered on the shores and historic

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piers of the Great Lakes and around Michigan’s many peninsula’s, inlets and islands. Here are the stories of just a few that you can find in your travels along the Lake Superior shore. Panama – Ontonagon Approximate Distance from Shore: 160 feet Depth in Lake: 10 feet Laying furthest east of these shipwrecks in Lake Superior, the Panama met its fate at the mouth of the Mineral River, 14 miles from the port at Ontonagon. The Panama was a bulk freighter built in 1888 as the John Craig. After sustaining damages in 1903, the ship was rebuilt and renamed the Panama. With a load of coal and towing the barge Mantaza, the Panama was headed to the Keweenaw in 1906 when the fabled November gales of Lake Superior

September 2021

ravaged the freighter. Captain Jones ran the ship aground and the crew escaped into the woods — no lives were lost. The barge the Panama was towing had been let loose before they ran aground, but the heavy load the Panama carried had already done its damage to the freighter. Though able to anchor safely, the Panama was dashed against the rocks ashore. As the storm raged, the Panama was battered apart at the seams and broke in two. Some remains were scavenged, but the skeleton of the ship remains, sometimes visible from shore near where it lies in the water. Cruiser — Chapel Rock Approximate Distance from Shore: 150 feet Depth in Lake: 10 feet Many of the Great Lakes’ shipwrecks were freighters carrying supplies to the Upper Peninsula or natural prod-


Pictured is the De Soto, a three-masted schooner that wrecked just off the shores of Marquette in December, 1869. (Image courtesy of the Michigan History Center) ucts from the Upper Peninsula. But not all wrecked ships in this greatest of the Great Lakes were commercial vessels. The Cruiser was a private yacht, built in 1877 in Ontario. It was a late summer’s day when a group of sightseers went out on Lake Superior near Alger County. Like the trip undertook by the passengers who set sail on the Minnow in Gilligan’s Island, this Lake Superior trip turned fateful. The Cruiser encountered rough waters near Chapel Rock and the small yacht was foundered. Luckily, all of the sightseers made it safely to shore. Chapel Rock is accessible by paddle board, and though the Cruiser may be scattered around the area, it is a great place to go sightseeing — but only in calm waters. DeSoto — Marquette Approximate Distance from Shore: 465 feet, at old dock Depth in Lake: 10 feet Lake Superior’s shipwrecks are found all over the coast, near cities and rocky isolates. As the largest city in the U.P., Marquette has its fair share of shipwrecks in her harbors. The DeSoto was a three-masted schooner first launched in the spring of 1856. After only 15 years of service, the schooner was stranded and broke apart while in Marquette during December of 1869 — the remains of the schooner are still found at an old docking area. The wreck is in about 10 feet of water at the old dock and presents a good opportunity for snorkeling, paddle sports and novice SCUBA diving. Traveller — Eagle Harbor Approximate Distance from Shore: 400 feet Depth in Lake: 20 feet At the rounded crest of the Keweenaw and at the mouth of Eagle Harbor lies the remains of the Traveller. The wooden sidewheeler was upbound for Wisconsin when it stopped at Eagle Harbor. While harbored there, it was discovered that the Traveller was on fire. The ship had already burned once before, in 1854 in Chicago, two years after being built. The Traveller was rebuilt and set into service again. This time the schooner would not be salvaged. The Traveller burned and rests in the sandy depths by the Eagle Harbor Life Saving Station. Cargo and much of the furniture was saved before the Traveller burned and sank. All that remains now are the hull and timbers, still showing evidence of the fire

AFTER ONLY 15 YEARS OF SERVICE, THE DE SOTO WAS STRANDED AND BROKE APART WHILE IN MARQUETTE DURING DECEMBER OF 1869.

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Above, an example of the new shipwreck web app. Below, the Rome is pictured. The ship has new life as the breakwater for the residents of Lime island. (Photo courtesy of the Michigan History Center)

that claimed it. Rome — Lime Island Approximate Distance from Shore: N/A Depth in Lake: 15 feet While many wrecks are salvaged for parts, and others completely lost, one U.P. shipwreck has found a second life in the harbor of Lime Island off the western coast of the Upper Peninsula. The Rome was a wooden-hulled steamer built in 1879. In 1907, the Rome was in the harbor of Lime Island with a cargo of limestone, cemen and hay when the ship caught on fire. Like ancient Rome, this Rome burned down too. No one was harmed in the fire, but the ship was not able to be saved. The remains of the Rome were repurposed as the Lime Island breakwater when residents of the island filled the burnt hull with limestone. Since the wreck is so close to the water’s surface, its a good spot for snorkeling. There are many more shipwrecks than are counted here, and the DNR map continues to be updated with more shipwrecks and information. Of the wrecks described here and shown on the map, all

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the crew and passengers survived. For any ships where lives were lost, the shipwrecks are considered underwater burial sites and, out of respect, remain exempt from the map. To view the map, search online for “Michigan DNR shipwreck app” and click on the link. In addition to these, there are many more shipwrecks that are accessible by paddle sport and for beginner divers. The shipwreck app makes it easy to discover shipwrecks local to you or wherever you are traveling around Michigan. Each shipwreck on the MDNR GIS web app details the year the ship was built and some of its history, its depth in the lake, the level of SCUBA required to reach it and if the wreck is accessible by paddle sport. Whether paddling on the lake or surfing the web, this is a great tool for discovering Michigan’s sunken treasure — shipwrecks. About the author: After Elizabeth Fust graduated NMU she refused to leave the U.P. Now she is the author of two children’s books, gets to write about space for her day job, and is a contributor to several of the U.P. Reader anthologies in addition to the Marquette Monthly. MM


outdoors

A six-spotted tiger beetle.

Tigers in the sandbox Story and photos by Scot Stewart

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hey hunt by day, right under your feet. With bulging eyes and big jaws, they’re ready to chase down and pounce on an unsuspecting ant or other small insect wandering along a sunny dune or open, sandy bank. They are Tiger beetles, one of the most interesting, colorful groups of beetles. Beetles are the largest group of living things on the planet and belong to the division or order of insects called Coleoptera. So far, more than a quarter million beetles have been named, which is about 1/5 of the 1.2 million living species known named and identified to science so far. And while the numbers change all the time, other numbers (like 8.7 million, using diversity pattern estimates) are widely recognized as a starting point toward the truer number. Still, the number of beetles is impressive, and the diversity of tiger beetles is, too. At least 100

different types are found in the United States, and worldwide. There are more than 2600 different kinds of tiger beetles. These are small dynamos, most between half and three-quarters of an inch long. Because of their size and their take-flight behavior when startled, they are rarely noticed. They can also run extremely fast. (More about that later.) Most live in the tropics, but more than a dozen species live in Michigan. The best places to look for them are in sand dunes, along sandy trails and in sparsely vegetated dry areas. Around the world, most live on the ground, but in tropical areas some live in trees. Tiger beetles are incredibly colorful. Some have entirely bright green exoskeletons, while most in the U.S. are brownish with calligraphic markings on their back and amazing hints of metallic green, violet and purple across

their bodies and legs. Some also have lots of hair-like structures across their mid-section, or thorax, and legs. Their markings help camouflage them on the sand and among the dried parts of plants so well that even after watching one land, to look away for a minute means probably losing it in the mix. Some of the tropical species look like they have been splashed with the best metallic paints ever used on race cars, but can still blend in, matching sunspots, flower petals and other bright, colorful dabs of light and life among the ground cover. Tiger beetles are insect eaters. They feed mostly on ants, insect larvae and spiders, but will hunt just about anything small enough to catch. Their eggs are laid in the ground, and the young larvae dig a tunnel up to 2 feet down where they live. These immature beetles hunt by coming to the surface and waiting for prey to wander by.

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An adult oblique-line tiger beetle emerges from its larval burrow. Tiger beetles spend up to four years in the larval stage. Using an ambush strategy, when a meal gets close enough to them, they jump at it and grab with large, sickle-shaped jaws. They have hooks on the lower part of their body to anchor themselves to the ground so their prey can’t drag them away while struggling. They have similar sets of hook-like features on their backs to help them move up and down the burrow after they catch their prey to eat it. Some tiger beetles have digestive fluids they can use to break down larger prey like spiders before they eat them. As large-jawed, grub-like larvae can live in these burrows, go long periods without food or water and even survive flooding of their cavities, tiger beetles can spend up to four years in this stage, depending on the species. They are preyed upon by other insects like ground beetles, attacked by ants and dug up by birds. Several species of wasps lay their eggs on the immature beetles and the beetles are parasitized by the larval wasps before dying. When the larvae finally mature, they close off the opening to their burrow, and pupate, going through their metamorphosis into adults. After about three weeks, they emerge from their pupal case, still in the earth, and remain there for up to three days as their exoskeleton hardens. When complete, they dig their way out and begin a short four-to-eight-week life as an adult. While tiger beetles are mostly solitary, they can live close together in good hunting areas. In the path leading to Lake Superior near the mouth of the Dead River, half a dozen oblique-lined tiger beetles can be found at a time in late summer. The path from the Little Beaver Campground at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore to Lake Superior passes a sandy rise just before reaching the lake where a similar group lives during the summer months. Even small spits of sand can attract tiger beetles. There is a small V-shaped point jutting out on the north side of Harlow Creek where bronzed tiger beetles lie in wait for flies and other small insects to

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TIGER BEETLES ARE SIMPLY A GREAT EXAMPLE OF NATURE DESIGNING AN AMAZING SET OF CREATURES ... WONDERS OF ADAPTION, DESIGN AND BEAUTY.

stop and sun themselves on cool mornings. A subspecies of the hairy-necked tiger beetle, the Rhode Island hairy-necked tiger beetle, Cicindela hirticollis ssp. Rhodensis, was found on the Lake Superior beach in Grand Marais earlier this summer. As its name suggests, this variety is more commonly found in New England, but by the 1960s it had made it across the Great Lakes to Duluth. It was found in Alger County, right in the middle of a beach heavily used by bathers. It is almost impossible to find a tiger


A bronzed tiger beetle is pictured. There are hundreds of types of tiger beetles found in the world. Several different species can be found in Michigan. Keep an eye out on the beach for a glimpse of these elusive, amazing creatures. beetle by just scanning the ground — even in an area where tiger beetles are known to be: they just blend in too well. If a tiger beetle does happen to dash across an opening on the sand, it might be noticed. Often, they become apparent to a trained eye when they fly up in front of a disturbance, like someone walking down a path or along the edge of some dunes. It takes a little patience to follow the flight and see where they land. Then it takes even more patience to slowly ease toward them. That is easier early in a cool morning when they are still sluggish and trying to warm and get their metabolism to speed. Easing toward them on hands and knees, maintaining a low profile works best, sometimes allowing close-up looks at their tremendous jaws, bulging eyes and gorgeous colors. Usually, the look does not last long, and they are off in search of prey. But that close-up look is impressive. They won’t bite, unless handled, and then it is just a gentle squeeze as the jaws are meant to hold, not crush. When they do rush off to hunt, their speed is blinding, literally out of sight. Tiger beetles, like most insects, have compound eyes. Each eye is a composite of many smaller parts called ommatidia, structures that each contain a lens and opsins, parts used for observing color. The number of ommatidia in each eye limits the amount of light each eye can take in and the total set assembles a collective picture of what the insect is viewing. Unfortunately for tiger beetles, the number of ommatidia is not enough to give them a good picture of prey they are chasing or anything in front of them when they are running or flying fast. For careful viewers, it is possible to actually see them fly into stalks of plants as they attempt to escape danger. They are going too fast for their compound eyes to keep up. For hunting it is even worse. They are

among the fastest runners of all animals. They only run short bursts, many up to 1.2 mph but one species can sprint at speeds up to 7 km or 5 mph. Maybe that does not seem very fast, as world class human sprinters can run 23-plus mph. So, it is necessary to look at it a different way. That human sprinter can cover five body lengths of distance in a second. Tiger beetles going 1.2 mph can cover nearly 54 of its own body lengths per second — in relative terms, 10 times as fast. That is where the problems begin. Like the flying tiger beetle, running down a meal turns into a blur for them — they can no longer see what they are chasing. They must stop, up to four times, during a chase to relocate their prey before catching it. Fortunately, they are so much faster than most other insects, they can still catch them. Their speed is due to their long legs. They provide greater strides and more speed and help them clear larger grains of sand, grass blades and other potential obstructions during the chase. Tiger beetles are simply a great example of Nature designing an amazing set of creatures, though not clearly known to many, still wonders of adaptation, design and beauty. To get a full appreciation of them truly requires getting down on hands and knees, being patient, and becoming a true student of their entire biological community. Several national park visitor centers and nature centers have celebrated their design and colors with large-scale paintings and tapestries to encourage visitors to take that extra moment to bend down and take a look at a true wonder. About the author: Scot Stewart has lived in Marquette long enough to be considered a true Yooper even though he was born in Illinois. He is a teacher and loves to be outdoors photographing and enjoying nature. MM

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back then The First Lady of Mackinac Island How one UP woman became the forerunner in fur trading Story by Larry Chabot

Sketches by Mike McKinney

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ackinac Island – a magic isle in the Straits of Mackinac just off St. Ignace, famed for its fudge and banning of nonessential motor vehicles. And so rich in history, it seems that something memorable happened every few feet.

The island was a major center of the North American fur trade, where Native American canoes full of pelts pulled up to tempt buyers looking for deals. Amidst the piles of pelts and trading goods were rough and raucous men… and a single, solitary female who was the equal of any man there. She was the widow Madeline La Frambois, who ran furs in Michigan Territory (Michigan was not yet a state). Although her work took her up and down eastern Lake Michigan, her “office” and

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home were on Mackinac Island. Known as “The First Lady of Mackinac,” she thrived in a traditionally male occupation, which required hard work and constant travel against fierce competitors. Because of her success in a man’s world, a Grand Rapids newspaper called her “Michigan’s most successful female pioneer.” Sadly, both her husband and father were murdered, leaving her a single mother coping with a fur trading business. And she pulled it off.

She had been born Marguerite-Magdelaine Marcot (but answered to Madeline) on Mackinac Island in 1780 to fur company agent Jean Baptiste Marcot and his wife Marie, daughter of a Native American chief. (Some claim she was born in Niles). While the family was living on the island and Madeline was only three, her father was killed in Wisconsin in 1783. At the tender age of 14, she married 29-year-old fur-trader Joseph La Framboise in a Native American


ceremony (they later repeated Catholic vows) and became his business partner. But like his father-in-law, Joseph was also murdered, as he knelt in prayer in a cabin near Grand Haven. He was only 41. When the murderer was brought to the widow, she forgave him because of her deep religious beliefs. The Beaver Wars The fur business was a powerful economic force in Madeline’s time. When European fur-bearing animals became scarce from over-hunting, clothiers turned to the wilderness of North America and its abundant wildlife to clothe the elite. The fur business was marked by such intense competition that violence was ever present. The long, bitter conflict is forever known as the Beaver Wars. (Author note: My ancestor, Jean Poisson, was killed in the Beaver Wars in 1652.) Beaver, sable and marten furs were especially prized. Because fur is waterproof, beaver skins made into felt hats kept Europeans warm and dry. Their craving for beaver and other furs lasted more than 200 years. Native American men trapped the animals, and women prepared the pelts for market. Every fall, traders provided knives, tools, kettles, flints for starting fires, guns and ammunition, alcohol, blankets, beads and other goods to the Native Americans to get them through the trapping season. The trappers returned in the spring to settle accounts and trade their furs. The buyers then sailed big canoes loaded with pelts to Montreal for shipment to Europe. Madeline La Framboise and her husband, Joseph, were in perfect position to satisfy these customers, and developed a fur trade through a string of more than 20 trading posts in Michigan Territory and assembled goods to trade with the trappers at Mackinac Island. Madeline Takes Over After Joseph’s murder, Madeline earned a trader’s license and took control of the business, managing an increasing number of trading posts and expanded territory. Historian Erica Emelander called Madeline “one of the most successful fur traders in the Northwest Territory of the United States… Michigan’s first prominent businesswoman,” with most of her business and her home centered on Mackinac Island. Success brought great wealth, allowing her to send her children, Joseph and Josette, to fancy schools in Montreal. John Jacob Astor’s American Fur Company dominated the fur trade during this period, but Madeline was able to compete with him pelt-for-pelt until 1818, before European clothiers were switching to other materials. When the fur business stalled in the 1830s, she had already sold part of her business to Astor and her trading posts to other buyers. She was 48, and her children were now adults. Young

Madeline La Framboise built a formidable fur-trading company, keeping step with the leading traders and amassing great wealth, all on her own. Joseph followed in his father’s footsteps, becoming one of North America’s top traders. Daughter Josette married Benjamin Pierce, commander of the military fort on Mackinac Island. Benjamin’s brother Franklin was later elected the 14th president of the United States in 1853, but Josette had already died in childbirth by then, and so never had the chance to refer to her brother-in-law as the president. Meanwhile, Madeline built a fabulous home and settled in on her favorite island. Although fluent in several languages and Native American dialects, she was illiterate until teaching herself to read and write after her retirement. She donated land for a new St. Anne Catholic church, which had been established in 1670. Her generosity helped to keep the parish going when it had no regular priest. She was a willing godmother at many baptisms at St. Ann’s, a frequent witness at many marriages, benefactor

of a Native American school, and taught religious classes for children. Her many acts of charity earned her the honorary title of “First Lady of Mackinac” and a spot in the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame. Madeline died at home on April 4, 1846 and was buried under the church altar beside her daughter and grandson. The remains were later relocated to a crypt in the churchyard. Her home is now the site of the Harbour View Inn, where the original floor plan is intact with its parlor, eight fireplaces and original four bedrooms. She rests forever on her magic Mackinac Island. About the author: Larry Chabot, an Ontonagon native, worked his way through Georgetown University and was then employed at White Pine Copper Company for 32 years, before moving to Marquette with his wife, Betty. He is a freelance writer who has written for several publications, including over 150 articles for Marquette Monthly. MM

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arts Welcome to

art town

How Alger County is using art to tell its story Top, the seasonal Art in the Alley contains over 70 reproduced works of art from Alger County residents, annual and perennial plants and flowers, café lighting, and custom designed metal gateways. The alley is located 1/2 block south of Munising Avenue running from Maple to Birch streets. Bottom, the History of Munising mural is located on Madigan’s Ace Hardware in downtown Munising.

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Story and photos by Jaymie Depew

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umerous art installations have blossomed around Alger County in the past decade with most of the projects showcasing the area’s rich culture and history. Kathy Reynolds, executive director of the Munising Downtown Development Authority and CEO of the Alger County Chamber of Commerce/ Greater Munising Bay Partnership, said one of her office’s ambitions has been to increase walkability within the county, especially the cities of Munising and Grand Marais, which border the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. “The main goal of the Munising DDA, and really any other downtown organization, is to increase business activity, and one of the ways you can do that is by getting people walking around,” she said. “So, about nine or 10 years ago, we decided to start adding art installations around the county.” With the help of various grants and sponsorships, the Chamber and DDA have successfully implemented art installations throughout the region, with one of the first being a banner contest held in Munising. “We first displayed the art banners along Elm Avenue by the Munising city dock because we knew groups of people would be coming off tour boats and looking for something to do. So, there was that possibility of getting them downtown to visit other businesses,” Reynolds said. The project — which was eventually expanded to other streets around town — has been a hit locally as hundreds of contenders have submitted


One of the newest Munising murals, located on the bathroom building at Binsfeld Bayshore Park, pays homage to the area’s Fourth of July celebration that takes place at the park. designs over the years. Since then, the Chamber and DDA — which has three full-time and a handful of seasonal employee — has implemented Munising welcome signs that are changed in the summer and winter months, a historic photography walk, several large murals depicting Munising’s history and culture, and two art alleys. One alley features 75 different pieces from local artists and the other features 12 large panels depicting the area’s maritime history. The office also helped obtain funding for an art park in Grand Marais after Reynolds worked collaboratively with a group there to make it happen. The most recent project consists of six murals that were installed on the bathroom building at Binsfeld Bayshore Park in Munising this summer. All of the murals pay homage to the city dock and park, focusing on popular happenings that have taken place there over the years. Murals located on the west side of the building showcase the history of boating in the area. The installations on the east feature popular events that take place at the park, such as Pictured Rocks Days, the Concert in the Park series and Fourth of July festivities. “The main thing I like about them is that they highlight different things the community is proud of. They all represent something about us and tell a story,” Reynolds said. “We will continue to add more installations that tell stories about the greater Munising area and the things we’re proud of in the upcoming years.” While many organizations found themselves coming to a screeching halt during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Chamber and DDA have taken advantage of discovering ways to become more productive than ever before. “Being able to meet virtually during the pandemic with our graphic design-

er has made us more creative,” Reynolds said. “I don’t think people know how long it takes to brainstorm new ideas, but being able to hop on a virtual platform to hash them out has been extremely effective.” The office’s designer, Mike Stockwell of Cranking Graphics, located in the Keweenaw Peninsula, is responsible for creating a lot of the panels found around Munising, with Signs Now of Negaunee being the company to install them. “They’re great to work with, and we have a wonderful working relationship,” Reynolds said. While Alger County is home to just shy of 10,000 residents, the Pictured Rocks park reported a visitation of 1.2 million people last year. The Michigan Department of Transportation is in the process of wrapping up a two-year road construction project along Munising Avenue/M-28, which has entailed creating multiuse paths and more sidewalks, which, according to Reynolds, has also helped to increase walkability within the city. “I think we’re a good example of what small towns are capable of, by working together and being creative,” she said. “You have to think outside the box. Whether it’s expanding the gardening around town, creating more installations, or silly things like matching colored trash cans and bike racks. Every year we incorporate something new, and you can’t do it over night. It’s taken a lot of time and planning to get where we are today.” For more information about art and culture projects in Alger County, visit algercountychamber.com/arts-culture. About the author: Jaymie Depew is the communications and special project assistant of the Munising Downtown Development Authority, Alger County Chamber of Commerce/Greater Munising Bay Partnership, and Munising Visitors Bureau. MM

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sporting life

Far left, Shirley Reno and Faye Stratton play in a recent game. Larissa Hanson and Stratton take a break from throwing to take a photo. The mother-daughter duo are continuing the family tradition of horseshoe throwing started by Stratton’s mother.

Where

close counts

Women’s horseshoe league turns 50 Story and photos by Kristy Basolo-Malmsten

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n Western Marquette County, Tuesday nights are a time for ladies to get together and have some fun outdoors. Friends, cousins and even immediate family gather to pitch, chat and enjoy the fresh air. The Ishpeming-Negaunee Women’s Horseshoe league celebrated its 50th anniversary this season. The league’s players range 50 years in age as well, from those in their 20s to those in their 70s. In the case of Faye Stratton of Negaunee Township, her experience in the league is special as she has played with both her mom and her daughter. “Horseshoe nights make me think of my mom,” she said. “Good memories.” Her mom, Sylvia Lammie, was one of the original players in the league. Lammie, who passed in 2011, threw competitively until she was 83 years old. She was an inspiration to the women in her family — even placing second in the senior division for the Great Lakes Games. “My mom traveled to play in community horseshoe tournaments,” Stratton said. “She even did well in the senior division in the state games.” Now, Stratton is the only original player still partici-

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pating in the league, which was started by Pat Paquette in 1972. Paquette, who passed away in 2019 at almost 90, was honored by the league many times for her dedication to sustaining the league over the years. Stratton can’t be sure she played in the league from the very beginning, but remembers subbing at an early age. “I remember playing around the time my children were born, and loved it,” she said. Stratton and her daughter, Larissa Hanson, both say they learned to pitch at camp when they were young. Other family members were doing it, so it only made sense to learn so they could join the fun. “I remember my grandpa saying, ‘It doesn’t matter where you stand, the peg doesn’t move,’” Hanson said. “He taught us about getting the shoe to flip and how to lock it in.” Stratton’s current team, the Negaunee Township Quickshooters, won the league this year by one game. She threw every week of the season, and her teammates say she was a unifying force for her team. “I’m very young-minded, and I plan to stay that way,” she said.

September 2021

Stratton said the league win was special for her on the 50th anniversary. Her team has been in the top of the league standings for a few years, but just couldn’t pull past league leaders, Vick’s Little Store (formerly Tino’s), who won the league for several years in a row. “My mom is smiling down on this,” Stratton said. The connection with Grandma Sylvia is something that the mother-daughter duo draws on for focus even


Members of the Ishpeming-Negaunee Women’s Horeshoe League are pictured. today. “A lot of times, it’s just to bring the basics of what she taught us,” Hanson said. “Look at the bottom of the peg, reach for it.” While not as many families play horseshoes at camp anymore, the league still had eight teams participate in the 2021 season. “We want people to join,” league president Shirley Reno said. “The more, the merrier!” Participation in the league has dwindled some in the last decade, which started with three divisions of at least six women’s teams a piece, and now has only an eightteam league. The women play with teams of at least six; each game is played until one team reaches 25 points. The league has teams whose home courts range from Palmer to Republic, with several in National Mine. “It’s fun to get to know ladies from other areas,” Stratton said. “I’ve met some great people through the league.” To help accommodate the original players such as Stratton, the league amended a rule in 2007 to allow throwers age 70 or older to move up an extra three feet from the foul line. “The 70 and older line wasn’t a thing early on, but came later in the league to accommodate seniors throwing,” Stratton said. “We wanted these ladies to still be able to participate if they wanted to. They have a lot to share with younger players.” Throwers range from high-arcing pitches with several flips to low shoes and three-quarter turns. Many of the players say the skill is similar to bowling or pitching in softball. The art of horseshoe throwing can be traced back further than either sport, however. According to the National Horseshoe Pitchers Association (NHPA), horseshoe pitching was done in Greek and Roman athletic competitions, as well as some ancient religious observances and festivals. Use of the horseshoe evolved when dis-

cus throwers could not afford the metal or stone, and improvised with what was available. Despite its ancient history, the first horseshoe pitching tournament open to world competition was held in the summer of 1910 in Kansas. Things have changed throughout the years, and now even the horseshoe weight and shape are regulated, with the most commonly used shoe being Gordons. The Ishpeming-Negaunee Horseshoe League gives away two sets of these prized shoes each year during its year-end picnic. Like other leagues in the area, players pay a one-time fee for the season, and each team pays a $40 sponsor fee. This sustains the help needed to keep the league going, with the league secretary/treasurer maintaining records, depositing funds and ordering trophies. “We encourage former players who don’t want the weekly commitment to be on our sub list to fill in when needed,” Reno said. “There are always teams looking for subs.” Reno, who found the league through an interest night after moving into the area from Manistique, said renewing interest in the sport is important to the league’s survival. She is passionate about recruiting new players. “The ladies who have thrown for a while are very willing to help new players,” she said. “If young people want to learn, we can help.” Reno encourages new and former players who are interested in pitching fulltime or filling in as a substitute next season to reach out through the league’s Facebook page, by searching “Ishpeming-Negaunee Women’s Horseshoe League.” About the author: Kristy Basolo-Malmsten was the Marquette Monthly editor for more than a decade, as well as the owner of God’s Country U.P. Outdoors Magazine. She has a master’s degree in writing from NMU, and lives in Ishpeming. Her day job is as the senior center director in Negaunee. MM

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at the table

Community read Books for 2021 event evoke thoughts on food and family Story and photo by Katherine Larson

W

hen I saw the title of one of the books chosen for this year’s Two Books, Two Communities program, I had to buy it. Fried Walleye and Cherry Pie: surely that was right in the wheelhouse of Marquette Monthly’s renascent At the Table column. Two Books, Two Communities stems from a partnership between Marquette County, Alger County and Northern Michigan University, intended to bring these communities together through shared reading and shared conversations. There are some great events planned; see the list outlined later in this article. One of the book choices for 2021 is Teacher/Pizza Guy (Wayne State University Press 2019), a collection of autobiographical poems by Jeff Kass — an English teacher and director for an Ann Arbor literary arts program who supplemented his income by delivering pizza. The other book is Fried Walleye and Cherry Pie. Walleye! We have walleye here, and we fry it. Fresh from Alger County’s St. Mary’s River or Marquette County’s Lake Conway, it’s delectable. And cherry pie! While locally grown cherries are few and far between, we can get some good ones from lower Michigan, and it’s hard to beat a good cherry pie. I settled down to read,

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mouth watering. Fried Walleye and Cherry Pie bears the subtitle “Midwestern Writers on Food,” and that’s what the book is — 31 short pieces, many written for this book and some drawn from other sources, all collected and edited by Chicago food writer Peggy Wolff and published in 2013 by the University of Nebraska Press. I’m glad I read the book. I’m glad because I love the idea of a community read, of sharing a book with so many members of the community I’m so proud to be part of. I’m glad, too, because this book contains joyful moments of what it means to share food in community. But my gladness was, at first, tempered by a tinge of disappointment. To begin with: where the heck is the fried walleye? I read the book three times to confirm its absence. The closest that any of the articles or stories comes is Wolff ’s own engaging description of a Door County fish boil — boiled whitefish, which is neither fried nor walleye. For that matter, calling the book “Beef ” or “Pork” rather than anything fishy might have been more appropriate. When not writing about desserts, the authors skew heavily toward red meat; Stuart Dybek even contributes a difficult-to-read


Two Books, Two Communities Events

These events will take place throughout the fall in Marquette and Alger counties. Centered around both books chosen for this year’s annual read, events will be related to Teacher/Pizza Guy by Jeff Kass, and the anthology Fried Walleye and Cherry Pie.

Cooking Video Open Mouth, Open Mic

Sept. 7 7 pm, Sept. 29 Online at Ore Dock Brewing Co., Marquette

nmu.edu/onebook/twobooks Cooking video by Inspiring Roots’ Pam Roots, showing her making Anne Dimock’s Rhubarb Kuchen with Almond Meringue from Fried Walleye and Cherry Pie. View at nmu.edu/onebook/twobooks from September 7 onward.

Open Mouth, Open Mic: share your writings, songs, and thoughts about food at 7 pm on Wednesday, September 29, at the Ore Dock Brewing Company in Marquette.

Battle of the Recipe Box Readings of Fried Walleye Submissions accepted and Cherry Pie from Sept. 2 to Sept. 15

Taste off on Oct. 16 at Munising School Public Library

Battle of the Recipe Box: submit your favorite recipe, along with a paragraph or to about why it’s special, between September 2 and September 15 at nmu.edu/onebook/twobooks. The top five recipes will be voted on and winners announced at a COVID-safe taste-off on October 16 at the Munising School Public Library.

7 pm, Oct. 6

Online at nmu.edu/onebook/twobooks Author readings and panel discussion with Fried Walleye editor and featured authors Bonnie Jo Campbell, Anne Dimock, and Peggy Wolff on Wednesday, October 6, at 7 p.m. The virtual event link will be at nmu.edu/onebook/ twobooks.

Poetry Reading Recipe Box Taste Off

6 pm, Sept. 19 East Channel Brewery, Munising 7 pm, Sept. 20 Peter White Public Library, Marquette

Poetry readings by Jeff Kass, author of Teacher/Pizza Guy, on Sunday, September 19 at 6 p.m. at East Channel Brewery in Munising with The Cooking Carberry’s wood-fired pizza; and again on Monday, September 20, at 7 p.m. at the Peter White Public Library Shiras Room in Marquette.

description of his grade school field trip to a Chicago slaughterhouse, which is challengingly placed as the second entry in the book. This volume is not vegetarian-friendly. More fundamentally than the absence of fried walleye, I needed to rethink my expectations of the book, which actually has very little to do with Yooper-style food. The point of the Community Read, I remembered, was not to read about the community but to read in community, in

11 am, Oct. 16 Munising Public School Library Battle of the Recipe Box: taste-off and awards on Saturday, October 16, at 11 a.m. at the Munising School Public Library.

fellowship with neighbors. So I put aside my indignant list (eight articles about Chicago and a total of 10 about Indiana and Iowa and Kansas and Missouri and Nebraska, but only three measly pieces about Michigan — two near Kalamazoo and one in Ann Arbor!) and thought: okay, taking this book on its own terms, what does it offer? A lot. A strong thread of family tradition runs through these stories, with a number of writers meditating on their

grandparents’ lives and the food that fueled them. Bonnie Jo Campbell — one of the participants in the October 6 panel discussion involving Fried Walleye authors — tastes a disappointing bite of commercial fudge and spends the next dozen years perfecting a home-made version that rivals her grandmother’s; if your stirring arm is strong enough, her lovingly detailed description invites you to join in too.

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Anne Dimock — another panelist — buys a Minnesota home that comes with 30 rhubarb plants, and she learns to love them, channeling her own German heritage with rhubarb kuchen and her husband’s Swedish background with rhubarb kram. A video of Inspiring Roots’ Pam Roose cooking that kuchen will be available on the Two Books, Two Communities website starting on September 1. There’s humor as well, including Michael Stern (of Roadfood fame) on the subject of Chicago’s Italian beef sandwiches and Peter Sagal (of NPR’s “Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me”) on Chicago’s now-abandoned effort to ban foie gras. History plays an important role in this book, including an evocative essay about the Creole memories that author Donna Pierce’s mother brought with her to Missouri as part of the Black migration in quest of integration. Tony Bascom contributes one of my favorite pieces, a moving essay set in Kansas on the United States’ bicentennial of July 4, 1976, as the then-15-year-old boy contemplates realities of American history, a mission to Ethiopia his family is poised to embark on, and peach cobbler. Religion appears, as Jeremy Jackson writes about the dichotomy between being “a boy sitting in the pews, listening to sermons that made it quite clear that I was a pretty darn bad person” and then hustling down to the church basement for the joyfully lavish potluck featuring his grandmother’s lemon meringue pie: “implicit messages about food and family and community that were at the literal foundation of the church.” County fair culture recurs repeatedly, redolent with grease, in stomach-churning variety. So do endless fields of corn and cream by the gallon. Among the dozen or so recipes scattered through Fried Walleye and Cherry Pie, we are offered kuchen, chocolate pistachio cake, fudge cake, buttermilk doughnuts, corn bread… But just when it seems like every imaginable cliché about Midwestern food has been covered (looking at you, deep-fried Twinkies!), the book offers a bit of corrective. How about goat cheese panna cotta with caramelized figs? Clearly those figs had to be flown in from somewhere far away, but a good local goat cheese — that one from Indiana — is hard to beat. Or a more complicated dish: tamales made with beef brisket, sour cherry compote and jalapeño cheese? Both these recipes reflect Chicago’s cosmopolitanism; the Midwest includes sophisticated cities as well as endless fields. Here in the UP, we fry our local fish, we stew our local rhubarb, we roast our local potatoes, we gobble our local berries, but we share humanity with all the Midwesterners in Fried Walleye and Cherry Pie. Some of us, like the writers who

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IF WE READ THOUGHTFULLY, WE CAN PLUMB OUR OWN HUMAN DEPTHS AND THEN REACH OUT TO OUR COMMUNITY IN SHARED HUMANITY.

owned an Ann Arbor hot dog stand and a Greek diner in Chicago, sell cooked food; some of us, like the many farmers featured in the book either as themselves or as memories, grow food to cook; each and every one of us eats food. And all of us eat food that is wrapped up in emotion — the complex memories of complex people, good and bad; the idealized memories of some golden moment in time; the painful memories of loss or revulsion or fear — emotion that is so deeply entwined in how we experience food that we may not even be aware, for example, of why one of us loathes bananas and another thrills to the sweet-tart pucker of rhubarb torte. Fried Walleye and Cherry Pie gets the reader thinking about food and emotions. The food may not be what you enjoy; the emotions may not be the same as yours; but the intertwining of the two is quintessentially human. If we read thoughtfully, we can plumb our own human depths and then reach out to our community in shared humanity. Maybe over a piece of pie. Editor’s Note: For Katherine Larson, good things come in threes: three daughters, three grandchildren, and three careers. Lawyering and teaching were fun, but food writing is the most fun of all. She loves food justice, food history, and all things delicious. MM


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superior reads When a mid-life crisis hits the road Review by Victor Volkman

A

Tales from the JanVan: Lessons on Life and Camping By Jan Kellis March 2021

t age 45, Jan found herself at a crossroads when her orderly life drifted off course. A devastating divorce without warning and the sudden death of her mother made her realize it was time to make her dreams of road-tripping around the USA come true. Tales from the JanVan is equal parts memoir, travel guide, inspirational story, and yes, a history of the motorhome in America! In the true Midwestern spirit, Jan decided to reclaim happiness on her own terms, one mile at a time. Perhaps the catalyzing moment for such a seemingly impulsive move to buy her own motorhome and embark on a series of solo excursions was as mundane as a visit to her friend Sandy’s newly-renovated kitchen. An old-fashioned kitschy sign on the wall caught her eye with the inscription: “Enjoy yourself, it’s later than you think!” Jan still had fond childhood memories of family trips in the Rolls K’Nardly, as her father christened it. This beast was a vastly underpowered military surplus truck that would remind you of a UPS delivery truck at first sight. But it was a labor of love for her dad as he had tricked it out with insulation, carpeting, a dinette, kitchenette, and bunk beds and other motorhome-ish amenities. The coup de grâce was a bench seat covered in fake arctic fox fur near the front of the van behind the engine. From this eclectic and improvised adventuring, the seeds were planted early. You can find the full story of Rolls K’Nardly in U.P. Reader Volume #2. Jan writes: Travel is my drug of choice. It’s more potent than caffeine and as addictive as heroin. It’s mood-altering, unfiltered, legal, and doesn’t require a prescription. It’s socially acceptable, non-fattening, nonallergenic, and non-hallucinogenic (except during road trips after 36 hours of driving). Fortunately, it’s also habit-forming. If there is a travel gene, I have it. I was born traveling — Mom was three months along when Dad, a geophysicist, accepted a job prospecting for nickel in Australia. Much of the time, Dad had to live “out bush” in a primitive camp comprised of corrugated tin buildings and an outhouse or two. Mom sometimes joined him as the camp cook Jan’s Midwestern trips also form part of a recap of the history of motorhomes, as hinted earlier. She recounts a 1915 road trip featuring Thomas Edison and Henry Ford, no less! With Edison’s penchant for inventing and Ford’s straightforward engineering, they evolved the concept quickly in just four years to include a two-truck caravan complete with refrigerator, and full built-in kitchen, furniture, tents, storage batteries and room to carry a bevy of servants. But all is not wine and roses for a single woman traveling solo in today’s high-tech motorhomes. Jan had to master complete knowledge of the electrical and plumbing systems, including

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the black tank and the gray tank. She describes the wastewater management in meticulous detail: To empty the tanks, remove the cover from the drain pipe near the rear of the rig and attach the sewer hose. Make sure the other end of it is securely inserted into the dump station tube. Open the valve for the black tank and let it drain completely. Flush the toilet a couple of times, or run water into the “black water rinse” hookup if your RV has one, to rinse out the black tank. Open the gray tank valve and let it drain, then shut the black, then the gray valves before detaching the sewer hose from the RV. Rinse out the sewer hose — most dump stations offer a non-potable water hose for this purpose — and pack up. She also had to manage getting service done for various inand-out-of-warranty repairs on her beloved Class B motorhome, a 2004 model (the Forest River Cruiser) which cost her about $30,000 out of pocket. As Jan explains, the difference between Class A and B motorhomes is significant: Class Bs are marketed to those who tend toward adventure; those more interested in experiences than in material wealth, who long to advertise their minimalist tendencies by taking extended vacations and/or living in their tiny rigs. If Class As are the RV equivalent of luxury condominiums, Class Bs are the tiny houses. On the road, Jan has a ton of fun setting her own timeline, deciding what to leave in and what to leave out, without having to negotiate with a partner. However, being a single woman, she has to be on the lookout for creeps at all times. She always has a “bug out” plan formulated, which could even involve driving off with hookups still attached! There are a few close calls with men who stare incessantly or come around and can’t take a hint that they aren’t wanted. And in one case she bluffs having a firearm at her disposal. Jan writes: My security strategies are few: I remain aware of my surroundings and I carry pepper spray when I go hiking or biking. If I pull into a place that doesn’t feel safe, I leave. And I’m prepared to drive away, even if I’m set up and connected to utilities, if I feel threatened. I’ll happily sacrifice my electric cord, water hose, and sewer hose if necessary. There’s much, much more, than I can write about here, including a surrealistic FROG conference — Forest River Owners Group (FROG), her trip to Prince Edward Island to see Anne of Green Gables lore, and her rambles throughout New England. Whether you’re an itinerant roadtripper or just an armchair traveler, Tales from the JanVan will transport you enjoyably through time and space and maybe give you an idea that you could go mobile too! About the author Victor R. Volkman is a graduate of Michigan Technological University (class of ’86) and current president of the U.P. Publishers and Authors Association (UPPAA). He is Senior Editor at Modern History Press, publisher of the U.P. Reader. Send your book review suggestions to victor@LHPress.com MM


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locals

Sarah Rimkus, pictured on Presque Isle with her husband, Tom LaVoy, is a composer and instructor of composition and theory at Michigan Tech University. (Photo courtesy of Sarah Rimkus)

Sarah Rimkus

A look at a UP composer’s inspirations

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r. Sarah Rimkus is the latest addition to the luminous roster of Marquette-connected professional composers. We sat down recently in one of Marquette’s coffee shops to discuss how a freelance composer makes her way. For Rimkus, the spark of music came early with childhood piano lessons, but her first effort at composition was the product of an assignment for Ms. Sullivan’s tenth grade English class in Bainbridge Island, Washington. Asked to produce some sort of creative response to William Golding’s Lord of the Flies, Rimkus imagined, wrote and performed her soundtrack to a dramatic chapter. The following summer found her writing a string quartet at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music; Rimkus had been well and truly bitten by the composing bug. Some of her work was composed both in and for the U.P., including a recent premiere, Heliograph, for Patrick

Story by Katherine Larson Booth (saxophone) and Carrie Biolo (vibraphone) and a work for solo violin for Danielle Simandl, both performed in 2020 at Michigan Technical University’s festival of new music. But much of it has achieved national and international renown. It began when she enrolled at the University of Southern California as a composition major, studying with such luminaries as Morten Lauridsen and Stephen Hartke. Hartke proved an especially powerful influence. “I try to emulate the balance of intellect and intuition that pervades his music,” she said. In addition, Hartke taught her courage. “You just have to get up, do it, be confident in your work and in yourself,” Rimkus said. Rimkus said many composition students who go to USC “think they want to score movies.”

“I quickly realized that wasn’t for me, and I gravitated to choral and vocal music,” she said. “I love working with texts. Music is so abstract; texts allow you to connect the abstraction with concrete ideas, and I’m fascinated by the way that texts and music act together.” She is also “grateful that there is a strong community of choral and vocal musicians with an interest in living composers.” For a person who, like Rimkus, wants to teach, a graduate degree was essential, so after earning her Bachelor’s of Music magna cum laude she went to the University of Aberdeen in Scotland to study first with Paul Mealor and then with Phillip Cooke. There she also met fellow composer Thomas LaVoy, now her husband and the reason Rimkus came to Marquette. In Aberdeen, Rimkus truly found her voice, focusing on choral music. “I wanted to do it in my own way ...

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Rimkus enjoys composing choral music, mixing her love of music with her love of language. (Photo courtesy of Sarah Rimkus) a bit dissonant, with layered and sometimes conflicting harmony and textures,” she said. “A lot of what I think about is communication and its failures. Especially in an era where we are bombarded with so much information in so many seemingly instantaneous forms, true communication gets relegated to a back burner.” Rimkus said her work strikes a balance between the intellectually interesting and the beautiful. “It’s grounded in tonal harmony, but I do it in my own way,” she said. Finding various different texts to work with also adds variety to Rimkus’ work. “I write a lot of sacred music,” she said. “Regardless of one’s religious persuasion, there are universal themes in those texts.” In addition, she seeks out texts from other sources. One example is the poetry of Dana Gioia. “I knew him from USC; he was chairman of the National Endowment of the Arts for eight years, and former poet laureate of California. He writes using both

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traditional rhyme schemes and contemporary terminology.” An upcoming CD recorded by the Grammy-nominated Westminster Williamson Voices under Dr. James Jordan will include Rimkus’ The Burning Ladder as well as a work by LaVoy, both set to Gioia’s poetry. For another commission, this one awarded by The Esoterics for their Polyphonos competition, Rimkus interviewed two survivors of the United States’ internment of Japanese-Americans in World War II, Lilly Kitamoto Kodama (interned at age 7) and Kay Sakai Nakao (interned at age 20). Rimkus then “took their words and wove them into a secular requiem,” Uprooted. Yet another commission, this one by the Harmonium Choral Society of New Jersey, tasked her to write a Christmas work based on the biblical text of John 1:1. Rimkus used that text but wove together the words as rendered in the five most commonly spoken languages in the


world — Mandarin, Spanish, English, Arabic and Hindi, combining Rimkus’ love of music with her love of language. “A mass setting I wrote was performed in Aberdeen; it mingled two languages, with Latin sung by the choir and Scottish Gaelic sung by a quartet, with the different textures interweaving,” she said. And before the pandemic, the Portara Ensemble in Nashville commissioned a piece for a planned concert on the theme of space exploration; Rimkus took her inspiration from the Golden Record contained in the Voyager probe, which was created by NASA to include multiple languages and music, including the first movement of Bach’s second Brandenburg concerto. Rimkus is writing a choral reflection on that music, with texts taken from the Golden Record’s various readings and languages. Other work focuses on folk traditions in many languages. “I’d love to delve into Finnish,” Rimkus said. How do choirs handle Rimkus’ music? Some of them are professionals; others are not. “There are ways to write complex music for any level of singing group,” Rimkus said. “You just have to be smart about it, be clear in your explanations, and give the choir confidence that they can do it.” For example, for a work premiered online in 2020 by an all-volunteer choir in San Diego, Rimkus used the organ and brass for more challenging harmonies and “made sure the singers’ lines all supported each other.” “You want to give the singers something to sink their teeth into, but at the appropriate level of challenge,” she said. How can a young person hope to make a living as a freelance composer? Rimkus said, “A few years ago I would never have thought it possible.” But “things have a snowball effect. You write music and it’s performed and, hopefully, recorded. People listen and some of them want to perform it themselves or commission new pieces.” For example, she wrote a piece for cello and vibraphone for the Red Note Ensemble that was performed at a festival of new music in Aberdeen. “Students from the Royal Conservatoire attended, and one came up to me afterwards and asked if I was Lithuanian. I explained that I’m American but my family name comes from Lithuania,” Rimkus said. “It turned out that she was pulling together a concert by alumni of her singing school in Lithuania, and they commissioned a work. This was back in 2015, but that work has been performed many times, most recently in Rochester, New York. Lee Ryder [founder of several New York choral groups] came across it, liked it, and since then has commissioned me to write four more works. And so

things go.” Besides composing music herself, Rimkus teaches at Michigan Tech as an instructor in composition and theory. She also teaches private students. “I love teaching as much as composing, and I like the structure of academic life as well as being part of an academic community and influencing younger musicians,” she said. While here, she has drawn inspiration

YOU WANT TO GIVE THE SINGERS SOMETHING TO SINK THEIR TEETH INTO, BUT AT THE APPROPRIATE LEVEL OF CHALLENGE.

from the Upper Peninsula’s extraordinary natural beauty and the vibrant community she found in Marquette. Critics have called her work “challenging yet attractive,” “always powerful and well-judged,” and with language that includes not only “denser textures that suggest a holy clamor” but also “uncluttered lyrical poignancy.” For those wanting the opportunity to hear it for themselves, CDs which include her music include several recent releases by the Cambridge Chorale, SACRA/ PROFANA, and the Gesualdo Six, along with excerpts featured on Rimkus’ own website, sarahrimkus.com. Editor’s Note: For Katherine Larson, good things come in threes: three daughters, three grandchildren, and three careers. Lawyering and teaching were fun, but food writing is the most fun of all. She loves food justice, food history, and all things delicious. MM

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arts

An aerial view of Marquette’s Mattson Lower Harbor Park during a recent Art on the Rocks festival. The annual event is canceled this year, but art lovers can participate in a scaled down version at Marquette Mountain, called Art on the Mountain.

High

art

Artists to display works at Marquette Mountain Story by Joe Zyble Photos courtesy of Curtis Aho Photography

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he first ever Art on the Mountain arts show will be held the weekend of Sept. 11 and 12 at Marquette Mountain Resort in Marquette. The event will feature a fine arts show, face painting and other artistic activities for kids, plein air (outdoor) painting opportunities, an art auction, live music, dancing and more. The weekend will conclude with the city’s annual art awards ceremony. Art on the Mountain is being offered in lieu of the traditional Art on the Rocks Fine Arts Show, which was canceled earlier this year (and last year) due to public health concerns related to COVID-19. The unknowns regarding how the virus might spread during the summer months, and possible restrictions on public gatherings that might ensue, were key factors in the Art on the Rocks organization’s decision to cancel the event earlier this year. “We had concerns about things like whether we’d be able to use the park or not, and all the investment that goes into holding a large-scale event like that,” said Tristan Louma, director of Art on the Rocks. “When we

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made the decision to cancel again last spring, it was really tough.” As the summer season progressed and the COVID virus remained relatively under control, Eric Jorgenson, owner of Marquette Mountain Resort and a supporter of the arts, contacted Art on the Rocks to offer his resort for a possible substitute event. “We came up with Art on the Mountain. It was a good opportunity to change up the scenery and scale things back a little as we continue to crawl back to normalcy (from the pandemic),” Louma said. He added that Art on the Mountain helps to continue Marquette’s annual tradition of celebrating local, regional and out-of-state artists by giving them an opportunity to formally display their works. It provides the public an opportunity to enjoy and purchase art, drawing people from both near and far to Marquette. While Art on the Rocks has been held at Mattson Lower Harbor Park in recent years, the Marquette Mountain venue is allowing organizers to do things differently. “Art on the Rocks is more of the formal structure of

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a fine arts fair; it focuses on the artists’ booths. With Art on the Mountain, we saw an opportunity to try out a few new things,” Louma said, “With that comes live music in the evening, more activities for kids, things for all ages, an art auction and just the venue itself.” Organizers are taking advantage of the location to provide art fair goers the opportunity to enjoy a magnificent view of the natural beauty of the area (when it’s not covered in snow). “The chairlift will be operating, which can bring folks up to the top of the mountain if they want to hike or bike down. It will be a really cool, holistic outdoor Marquette experience in what’s going to be approaching the peak color season,” Louma said. Like Art on the Rocks, this is a juried art show in which artists needed to apply for entry by the Aug. 22 deadline. Artists’ booths will be located indoors and outdoors at the resort. Art on the Mountain begins on Saturday, Sept. 11, and runs from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Artists will have the option to keep their booths open during the live music


Right, people walk among the tents at a previous Art on the Rocks. The festival did not take place this year, but a new event has sprung up in its place. Art on the Mountain will take place at Marquette Mountain Sept. 11 and 12.

IT WAS A GOOD OPPORTUNITY TO CHANGE UP THE SCENERY AND SCALE THINGS BACK A LITTLE AS WE CONTINUE TO CRAWL BACK TO NORMALCY.

performances afterward. The show continues Sunday, Sept. 12, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Several artists have donated pieces for an art auction that will be held during the show to benefit the Lake Superior Art Association. Food and beverages will be available for purchase throughout the show. The weekend’s art show will conclude with the annual Marquette Art Awards ceremony at Marquette Mountain from 5 to 9 p.m. This free, black-tie awards show celebrates local, creative individuals who have made an impact in arts and culture in the community. Attendees are invited to dress in “Marquette Formal”; organizers are encouraging black and yellow attire. The public is invited, and no reservations are necessary. The awards begin with a cocktail hour at 5 p.m., followed by the awards ceremony and special performances from 6 to 7:30 p.m., and then dancing to live music. While the absence of Art on the Rocks for two years has been disappointing, Louma said people realize the difficulties the pandemic has wrought. “People have been really understanding on the whole. It’s difficult, especially with some of the larger mainstay events

that people have come to expect. A lot of folks plan their trips around these kinds of events,” he said. “In general people here have been very understanding; it’s been a tough road these past two years for everybody.” This year’s art award winners include Marty Aschatz for arts advocate; U.P. Supply Co. for arts business; Lynne Blitho for arts educator; Marquette Poets Circle for arts organization; Andrew LaCombe for arts volunteer; Daniel Truckey for performing artist; J. Marc Himes for visual artist; Janeen Pergrin Rastall for writer; Matthew Reilly for youth; Vic Holliday for special recognition; and Steve Grugin for lifetime achievement. Art on the Mountain is being presented by Art on the Rocks, the Lake Superior Art Association, Marquette Mountain resort, and the City of Marquette Office of Arts and Culture. Travel Marquette is sponsoring the event. For more information and updates, including the list of performers, visit www.marquetteartontherocks.com Next year’s Art on the Rocks Fine Art Show is scheduled for the weekend of July 30-31. Editor’s Note: Joe Zyble has been with Marquette Monthly for several years, as the proofreader and editor. Joe lives in Negaunee with his family. MM

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lookout point Members of the Marquette City Police Department dive team are seen through the middle of a massive tire they helped pull from the bottom of Marquette’s lower harbor.

Taking out the trash

Cleaning up Lake Superior, one day at a time Story and photos by Jackie Stark

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ith so many miles of public shoreline in Marquette, it’s easy to find a spot to take in the beauty of the big lake. A sunrise at McCarty’s Cove, or a sunset on Presque Isle. Serene waves lazily lapping at the sand along Little Presque, or an angry Mother Superior on stormy days sending waves crashing over the black rocks. Many who live in the area — and indeed those here for a visit — feel called out to the lake, to breathe in the crisp, cool air and gaze out at the rippling water teeming with life. But what’s lurking below the surface? Just a few feet down is an ecosystem all its own, and in Marquette’s lower harbor much of it is manmade — tires, refrigerators, car batteries, old chains and bicycles. After diving recreationally in Marquette’s lower harbor and seeing all of the debris that had been tossed into

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the lake, unseen and forgotten, Don Fassbender decided it was time to do something about it. “I got sick of seeing all the crap … as I’m out in the harbor seeing these things and bringing bags in, I noticed there was a lot more trash than one guy can handle,” Fassbender said. “I started putting videos on Youtube and linking them to my Facebook page, and some folks took notice and offered to help.” So began the first ever lower harbor cleanup organized by Fassbender. Most people know him as Diver Don, and indeed, pretty much everyone in attendance on Saturday July 31, was there because they knew him. Now in its third year, the event has pulled tons of trash — literally — from the bottom of Marquette’s lower harbor. Looking out over the water, Barbie Dupras said all she initially sees is “geese and boats.”

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“You don’t understand what’s underneath the water,” Dupras said. “Don was posting video of his dives and talking about how much garbage there is underneath the water. It’s unseen. So generally, none of us know. We look at the lake and appreciate it, and it’s beautiful and that’s the end of it — but it’s not.” Dupras is the treasurer for the Great Lakes SCUBA Divers and Lake Preservation Club, a group newly formed and on its way to attaining nonprofit status. Their first goal is to raise money for an air compressor so Marquette area divers can fill their oxygen tanks locally. As it stands now, the nearest place to refill empty tanks is Iron Mountain. “If we can get a compressor for the club, then right here in Marquette, all divers year-round can have access to air,” Dupras said.


Above, Hope Rosten and Charlie Soqui gear up for the day’s dive in Marquette’s lower harbor. Below, Diver Don Fassbender takes video as a tire is pulled up out of the water by a City of Marquette Public Works Department employee.

But the matter at hand this warm Saturday morning in July lay below the surface of the lake. A thunderstorm early in the morning had threatened to postpone the day’s clean up, but by the time Fassbender organized the divers around him for a safety report, the sun was shining through the clouds. Kevin and Amy Ailes, hailing from downstate South Haven, Michigan, listened to Fassbender give information about general areas of focus for the clean up, water depths and other things for the divers to look out for. The event relies heavily on volunteers, and the couple was happy to lend a hand. Indeed, volunteerism plays a significant role in their lives. Kevin is the president of the Southwest Michigan Underwater

Preserve and volunteers his time in many other ways. “They say the first person benefited by volunteering is the volunteer. Not just with ecology. I’m also a member of the national ski patrol, the fish and water preserve council,” Kevin Ailes said. “It’s important that we all find something a little bigger within ourselves to volunteer for, to help out. It’s always good to find a good cause and put your energy into that.” A Tec 40 CCR diver, Kevin Ailes has experience diving down 200 feet in the water, but divers on this day wouldn’t face such challenging depths. Their maximum dive would be 25 feet. However, removing debris long buried at the bottom of the lake could stir up silt and make conditions difficult to see.

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Amy and Kevin Ailes listen as Diver Don Fassbender discusses the day’s dive. The Ailes drove up to Marquette with their boat to help in the cleanup efforts.

THEY SAY THE FIRST PERSON BENEFITED FROM VOLUNTEERING IS THE VOLUNTEER.

Purpose-driven diving was the name of the game that day. The plan? Fill two massive dumpsters with whatever the divers could pull out of the water. And for the junk too heavy to pull up by hand, heavy machinery was available to handle the job. Having dived in the area countless times, Fassbender knew where the largest debris was and had mapped it out for the day’s divers. A tire over 5 feet in diameter (they’ve pulled several of those out of the water over the years), refrigerators, even a picnic table. A crane donated by Lakenen Crane and Rigging Service for the day’s event was attached to the largest underwater objects by divers from the Marquette City Police Department. Also on hand were Marquette City Public Works employees, there operating heavy machinery to help move the large debris to the waiting

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dumpsters. Det. Lt. Chris Aldrich has spent 13 years with the MPD, and is a member of the police dive team. Aldrich said it’s important for the police department to participate in community events. Not only that, but the day’s dive worked double duty as a good training exercise. “Just watching those huge objects coming out of the water and getting disposed of properly, that’s a good feeling” Aldrich said. Morgan Ciecko, a senior fish and wildlife management major from NMU and member of the Superior Watershed Partnership, was there with several of her co-workers to help load trash into the dumpsters. The SWP organizes and participates in many clean-up and maintenance efforts related to the big lake.


Inset, Diver Don Fassbender directs a boat of volunteers during the July 31 Lower Harbor Clean Up as they return to shore. Below, Fassbender takes a picture of an invasive zebra mussel, found on a tire pulled out of the harbor, as a member of the MPD dive team looks on. Bottom, volunteers, including workers from the Superior Watershed Partnership, form a line to put a boatload of tires retrieved from the harbor into dumpsters. The day’s effort resulted in more than three tons of trash being removed from the harbor.

“It’s really important to preserve Lake Superior and make sure the citizens, they can jump in any time,” Ciecko said. “It’s such a well-loved lake, and it’s our biggest one. We’ve got to keep it clean. It means so much to, not only to us, but a lot of our tribal communities. It’s very important to keep it clean, keep it preserved, and make sure we can look forward instead of going back and making it dirty.” The group of volunteers pulled more than three tons of trash from the lake this year. Fassbender said there’s enough debris left to do at least one more largescale cleanup. And now, with a few years of experience under his belt, Fassbender is ready to bring similar clean ups to other communities across the Upper Peninsula. That’s another reason for creating the Great Lakes SCUBA Divers and Lake Preservation Club. “We hope to take this show on the road and go down to Baraga, down to the Soo, Munising — wherever there was an industrial harbor at one time, which would be every harbor,” Fassbender said. “These harbors need cleaning.” Fassbender has also been communicating with other organizations around the state, sharing his own story of starting an annual, large-scale cleanup so others can replicate it in their hometowns. What started as one man’s effort to clean up his own backyard is now becoming a model for large-scale underwater cleanup events. “This thing is growing,” Fassbender said. “It’s pretty cool.” For more information on the Great Lakes SCUBA Divers and Lake Preservation Club, visit their Facebook page. Editor’s Note: Jackie Stark has lived in the UP since she was 11. An avid reader, she also loves gardening and has been talking about learning to play the guitar for 14 years. MM

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8-18 media Brad Veley

Using cartoons to make sense of the world Story by 8-18 Media

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ave you ever been bored in class, and doodled your way through it? Did you draw a cartoon of your teacher with a thought bubble that said, “Blah, Blah Blah?” And then did you show it to your friends to make them laugh? Illustrating cartoons that make people laugh can happen in class, at home, or maybe you get so good at illustrating cartoons it becomes your career, and your cartoons are featured in magazines and publications around the world. Marquette resident and professional illustrator and cartoonist Brad Veley’s love for cartoons started very early on in his youth and grew from there. “I just loved drawing, and I think I was about 7 years old when my mom brought home a book of New Yorker cartoons. It was one of the first collections of cartoons, from the New Yorker magazine. It’s a magazine that is still around and still has a lot of cartoons in it. I didn’t know how to read yet, it took me a while, I think I was 7 or 8 before I learned how to read really well, but I loved looking at those cartoons and it made me laugh, even though I couldn’t read the captions or make sense of them,” Veley said. “Some of the humor was adult, I knew that, but I just loved the way the cartoons looked, and that got me really. My mother was an artist and teacher. She was a painter and specialized in landscapes and portraits, and she taught art at the public school, and I was an only kid so I had a lot of time on my hands and I really like drawing as a way of entertaining myself, and I got a lot of encouragement from my mother and my father too.” Veley takes advantage of modern-day technology to sell his cartoons and bring smiles to people. “A lot of my cartoons these days are being sold online, so sometimes they pop up in publications in South Africa, New Zealand. I never know where they are going to show up until I get paid for them. There is a company that sells my cartoons for me. One of the things I found out that I’m not very good at is business, being a good business person. I am very happy to let a company take care of all of that: marketing, selling my cartoons, finding customers, and handling the business transactions. I’m really happy to let someone else take care of that. I started

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out drawing cartoons before there was the internet before there were really computers, where you had to send photocopies of your cartoons to editors. Things have changed dramatically since I started cartooning,” Veley said. People might wonder, where does Veley get ideas for his cartoons? In a surprise twist, Veley said he is more of a

word person than an artist. “When I think of something funny, it is usually by banging words together or coming up with a twist on a familiar phrase or saying. If it makes me laugh it is a possible good idea for a drawing a cartoon, and then an image comes after that,” Veley said. “I do a lot of reading and I stay up on current events so I know what’s going on in the

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world. I’m interested in a lot of different things. I consider myself a writer who doodles. I don’t walk through my day picking cartoon ideas off of trees like they are ripe fruit. I have friends who do that, and I’m real jealous of them. I have to work real hard at my ideas. For me, it involves carving out some time each day. Sitting at my desk, having a quiet space and reading usually — sometimes a magazine, sometimes a novel, sometimes non-fiction, or just daydream and start jotting down what I’m thinking about: it’s a word, it’s a phrase, it’s a quotation, maybe a cliché, something you have heard a thousand times and you don’t even think twice about it and you move some words around a little bit and it becomes funny.” Veley said the best part of cartooning is that the process isn’t very expensive. His supplies are very basic and affordable, and his studio is a little desk in a spare bedroom office that he shares with his wife. “I have a very old computer, which I do use, but some of my supplies are very old. This is probably a 20-yearold pen. It’s called a ball-dipped pen. I actually dip it into a bottle of black India ink. I have a bunch of these and you can pull off the metal tip when it wears out or gets dull and you can replace it with another one that costs about 50 cents each, it’s great I love that. Another really inexpensive tool I use is this eraser. I’m always erasing and changing my mind. “I also do a lot of drawing with brushes and ink. These are sable brushes that you dip into ink, and they produce a different, thicker kind of line. I come up with a cartoon idea, and I decide it’s good enough to do a cartoon about, I’ll do it on a piece of Bristol board. I draw the cartoon in pencil and then when I get it how I want it, I ink it in with the pen or the brush. And then I scan it into the computer and use photoshop to add shading and then I have a digital copy of it, and that is how it becomes a cartoon I send out to clients.” How long does it take him to create and illustrate a cartoon? “Sometimes not long. Other ones take an agonizing amount of time,” Veley said. “If I have to redraw them and have to go back and scrap the drawing and start it


Brad Veley is pictured here with a friend. Veley has been a cartoonist for decades, documenting over…I’m never sure. The ones that I think are going to be easy are the ones that take three hours. I don’t know. It takes what it takes.” Cartoons are supposed to make people laugh, but sometimes cartoons touch on serious subjects such as politics. Veley said some of his more serious cartoons have to do with environmental topics. “It’s stuff I think about a lot. We have a lot of environmental problems we need to take care of. How do you talk about that and make it funny at the same time? That’s a challenge. Something that is kind of scary, but to make it funny so you get people talking and thinking about making positive changes. Those are the ones that are hard. “Also, a lot of my characters are just kind of perplexed and baffled by life like I am a lot of time and maybe a little anxious or depressed or scared, so all of those topics are serious to me because I have experienced all of those myself. You may think, being an adult, you have all the

answers, but I find I have more questions and the less sure I am about answers I have found. “One of the ways I work things out for myself is through humor and drawing about it. Making something funny out of something serious. I guess a lot of my cartoons start out with serious topics, but when I’m done with the cartoon, people can chuckle with the laugh of recognition. I hope that my cartoons are never mean or make someone feel bad. If I make fun of something in a cartoon it is usually because it is something I have felt or done myself,” Veley said. Veley offered advice to kids who might want to pursue illustrating and cartooning. “Keep at it. Do it as often as you can. When I first started cartooning I spent most of my time copying cartoons that I loved. I loved Peanuts. That was hugely popular. I loved copying characters like Yogi Bear. I was really lucky because my mom would buy me cartoon books so I would

copy characters I loved. Drawing Yosemite Sam just made me laugh. It made me happy. “Take art classes. These days it’s pretty easy to get in touch with a cartoonist. Almost every cartoonist is on Facebook. If you fall in love with their work, you can send them a message. Most of the cartoonists I have met like hearing from young people and like sharing what they know with young people and encouraging young artists and cartoonists,” Veley explained. Veley enjoys his job, but the best part is how his audience perceives his work and hearing from people who see his cartoons, and knowing he makes people smile. Written by the FMCA 8-18 Media Bureau reporters: Ana Alexander, Eli Alexander, Amelia Capuana, Madalyn Croney, Solomon Gorsalitz, Lydia Gorsalitz, Isaac Hagle, Ethan Hagle, Margaret Holm, Morris Holm, Travis Link, Grace Matt, Lily Smigiel, and Victoria Turask MM

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arts The blues are back Annual Blues Fest returns to Marquette’s lower harbor Story by Pam Christensen

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he Marquette Area Blues Society is looking forward to hosting its 17th Marquette Blues Festival 2021, to be held at Marquette’s Ellwood Mattson Lower Harbor Park Labor Day Weekend, September 3-5. The first Blues Fest was held in 2004 at Marquette Mountain. In the subsequent years, the festival has grown to become one of the premier music events in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. The festival features an amazing array of world-class Blues musicians, a variety of food vendors, beer and wine tent, free workshops, a large dance floor and vendors selling arts and crafts and Blues-related merchandise. A Welcome Back to the Blues concert will be held on Friday night. This event is free to the public as a thank you to the community and a way to introduce the audience to the Blues. Saturday and Sunday events are ticketed. Tickets can be ordered via the

Top and above, Ivy Ford and James Arms will perform at this year’s Blues Fest. Right, John Primer performs at a previous Blues Fest. The annual event is returning to Marquette’s lower harbor this September. (John Primer photo courtesy of Tom Daniel)

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Marquette Area Blues Society website, or purchased in person at the Berry Events Center, Marquette Wallpaper and Paint or Yooptone Music. Advanced weekend tickets cost $60 for adults. Tickets can also be purchased at the gate. Adult tickets for Saturday or Sunday are $35 per day. Students ages 15-23 can purchase tickets at the gate only for $10 per day. Children 14 and under can attend without charge when accompanied by an adult who has purchased a ticket. Advanced tickets are available at nmu.universitytickets.com. “As a Marquette Blues Society Board member, Blues musician and local resident, I am happy that we can once again hold the festival over Labor Day weekend. Last year’s festival was canceled due to the pandemic, and it was disappointing and sad that we could not bring the Blues to the U.P. in 2020,” said Walt Lindala one of the early organizers of the Marquette Blues Society and band member of the Flat Broke Blues Band. “Most of our performers for 2021 are musicians who signed on for 2020 and have honored their agreement to take part in our festival this year. The 2021 festival will be a poignant one for us, because of the loss of last year and the January 2020 death from cancer of well-known Blues specialist Tom Hyslop. We are dedicating Sunday’s performances to Tom’s memory.” Hyslop, a resident of Negaunee, who is legendary in Blues circles, wrote and served as an editor for Blues Revue and Blues Music Magazine for over 20 years. He received the Keeping the Blues Alive award in 2019 from the Blues Foundation. He was a nominator for the Blues Music Awards and a member of the Historical category panel. He also served as a nominator for the American Association of Independent Music’s Libera Awards. His passion was Blues music and anything Blues-related, including guitars and vintage amplifiers. Lindala said those who have not had much experience with Blues music should attend the free Friday night sessions. Thanks to the Ore Dock Brewing Com-

pany and Honor Credit Union, music will fill the air from 6 to 10 p.m., kicking off with Mike Letts and the Marquettes, with special guests the Tomcats. James Reeser and the Backseat Drivers will perform beginning at 8 p.m. The Saturday lineup includes Under the Radar at 1 p.m. followed by Eddie and the Bluesers at 2:30 p.m. Then, at 4 p.m. the Ivy Ford Band takes the stage. The final two acts on Saturday include Amanda Fish at 6 p.m. and Albert Castiglia at 8 p.m. Music begins on Sunday at 1 p.m. with Uncle Pete’s All-Star BBQ Blues Band, followed by local favorite Flat Broke Blues Band. Laura Rain and the Caesars perform at 4 p.m. John Primer and the Real Deal Blues Band take the stage at 6 p.m. The final band of the festival is The Nick Moss Band at 8 p.m. Following that act, the music moves to the Marquette Elks for the afterparty, featuring Laura Rain and the Caesars To festival attendees, it appears that the festival, featuring world-class Blues musicians, food and beverage, comes together effortlessly, but that is not the case. The festival runs on the hard work of volunteers from the Marquette Area Blues Society and the community at large. Volunteers who work for one shift receive a festival tee shirt. Those working additional shifts will receive a refund on their ticket price. Volunteers can help with venue setup on Thursday and venue take-down on Monday, or fill slots such as ticket sellers, gate security, grounds security, bartending, merchandise sales or providing general information. Volunteer sign-up is easily accessed via the festival website marquetteareabluessociety.org. The festival budget is $75,000 to $80,000 per year. It is recognized by musicians and the audience as a premier event as much for the setting along Lake Superior as the warm reception and hospitality offered to the musicians. Sponsorship support and grants help to support the festival beyond the ticket sales.

In memoriam

S

Tom Hyslop

unday’s Marquette Area Blues Fest performances will be dedicated to Tom Hyslop, who died in January 2020 after battling cancer. Hyslop, a resident of Negaunee, who is legendary in Blues circles, wrote and served as an editor for Blues Revue and Blues Music Magazine for over 20 years. He received the Keeping the Blues Alive award in 2019 from the Blues Foundation. He was a nominator for the Blues Music Awards and a member of the Historical category panel. He also served as a nominator for the American Association of Independent Music’s Libera Awards. Hyslop’s passion was Blues music and anything Blues related, including guitars and vintage amplifiers.

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Marquette Area Blues Fest 2021 Lineup Friday, Sept. 3 • 6 pm - Mike Letts and the Marquettes, with special guest Tomcats • 8 pm - James Reeser and the Backseat Drivers Saturday, Sept. 4 • 1 pm - Under the Radar • 2:30 pm - Eddie and the Bluesers • 4 pm - Ivy Ford Band • 6 pm - Amanda Fish • 8 pm - Albert Castiglia

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Sunday, Sept. 5 • 1 pm - Uncle Pete’s All-Star BBQ Blues Band, Flat Broke Blues Band • 4 pm - Laura Rain and the Caesars • 6 pm - John Primer and the Real Deal Blues band • 8 pm - The Nick Moss Band

Top left Lil Ed and the Blues Imperials, and above, Sue Foley, have performed at previous Blues Fest events. (Photos courtesy of Tom Daniels). Bottom left, musician Nick Moss is the final performer in the 2021 lineup for the annual event. The organization is grateful to the many sponsors who stepped up this year to make the festival a reality. “When Terry Klavitter, my wife, April and I dreamed of a Blues Festival in Marquette back in 2002, we never dreamed that this event would come as far as it has today,” Lindala said “The musicians and bands we have coming to Marquette are regionally, nationally and internationally recognized as being some of the best Blues musicians of our time. In addition, the Marquette Area Blues Society has really developed a following for Blues music.” The organization is run and supported by memberships, which run at $20 per person, or $30 per couple for a year. Members have the option of serving on the board, volunteering for special events as well as the annual festival. While the Marquette Area Blues Society might best be known for the Blues Festival, it has set deep roots in the community and developed an appreciation for Blues music through its partnerships with other local organizations. In the past, the society has

September 2021

offered informational monthly programs about the Blues at the Peter White Public Library, in addition to other special events held throughout the year. Asked why the Blues, traditionally thought of as a music originating in the deep south of the U.S.A. translates to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, Lindala said, “The Blues are emotional and improvisational, they transcend borders and capture the blood, sweat and tears that we all share at one time or another. People who enjoy live music can get a taste of the Blues and will come to embrace all that it offers at the Marquette Blues Festival.” About the author: Pam Christensen moved to Marquette 30 years ago when she accepted the position of Library Director at the Peter White Public Library. She served in that post for over 24 years. Most recently, she was Foundation Manager for the West End Health Foundation, finally hanging up her formal work shoes in May 2021. She and her husband Ralph are in the process of making an off-grid cabin in Nisula their second home. MM


outdoors

Courage, Incorporated

Empowering people, one adventure a time

C

Story by Deb Pascoe Photos courtesy of Courage, Incorporated

ourage Incorporated helps veterans and others with physical disabilities participate in outdoor activities they might not otherwise be able to access, including camping, fishing, kayaking/canoing, and hiking. All activities are offered free of charge. Courage Incorporated was co-founded by Erik Conradson, whose childhood friend and Courage co-founder, Nate Denofre, was disabled, but didn’t let that stop him from keeping up with the other kids in sports and outdoor adventures. Denofre kept up with his pals, preferring a skateboard for mobility rather than his prosthetic legs. “You sort of forgot he didn’t have legs. He was just one of the guys,” says Conradson. The pair went their separate ways after high school, reconnecting as adults, when Denofre was hospitalized in the city Conradson had moved to. Spurred by a vision of persons with disabilities having the ability to access the healing power of the natural world, they transformed Courage Incorporated from a shared vision into a successful non-profit organization. Its mission statement: We provide free outdoor excursions to individuals and veter-

ans with physical disabilities to help them harness their natural courage and enjoy the woods and water. The only cost is the courage to try something that they thought might not be possible. Conradson brought his business expertise to the process of establishing a non-profit. A graduate of Northern Michigan University, he worked in the retail industry in operational and security management for almost 20 years. His love of the outdoors and his passion to provide access to the wilderness for all who dream of it keeps him motivated. The men talked through each step of the fundraising process, aware of the importance of presenting Courage Incorporated as a trustworthy, legitimate enterprise. Once Courage Incorporated was officially established, fundraising began. “Trust and credibility is a big deal. Asking people for their money is a big deal,” notes Conradson. They set up a website and showed potential donors photos they’d taken on their wilderness outings. Courage Incorporated is now headed by Conradson and by Rhonda Numikoski. Numikoski, a United States Army veteran, shares Conradson’s love of the outdoors and sharing that love with others. Numikoski is in charge of campsite organization and meal planning - meals that include her homemade desserts. Participants are encouraged to challenge their ideas

about what they can and cannot do. There’s no itinerary, no schedule. Some clients are fearful, others eager to show what they can do. Many find it hard to ask for help. If someone falls, no one rushes to rescue them. Instead, they are asked if they want help. Conradson says that clients often decline assistance, preferring to help themselves. “What’s great is when people initiate, taking a hike or getting into a boat, and they see they can do it. Their confidence level shoots through the roof.” Conradson chokes up when recalling one vet’s experience. “On one of our earlier trips we were taking out two disabled military vets. One was old enough to be my dad. He had neck fusion down to the base of his spine, and he was a die-hard outdoorsman. We were hiking on the Yellow Dog River. He says he’d love to check out the waterfall, but it’s a mile and a half hike, and he can’t carry his gear that far. I said, we’ll help you. As we move closer we can hear the waterfall and we can gauge the excitement building in him. I told him to take the lead. As he walked around the corner we stopped and watched him and we heard this shriek of excitement. I went up to him after a minute and said, ‘What do you think?’ He was crying, and he said, ‘Thank you. I never thought I’d see this sight in my life.’ The following year we went to the same place. This time he was a volunteer, and he led people to the spot. Same thing: I walked around the corner and he was cry-

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Top, disabled single mother Tina Taylor, of Marquette, hikes to the Yellow Dog Falls, accompanied by Courage Incorporated volunteer Michelle Colon-Bowers. Below, client Lori Butlier fishes from a canoe at dusk during a rustic camping adventure. Right, client Wes Matteson, battling stage four colon cancer, hoists a 40inch, 20-pound northern pike he caught through the ice on the Dead River Basin.

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NATURE HAS THE ABILITY TO HEAL THE MIND AND SPIRIT, AND THE BODY TOO. IT CAN COMPLETELY CHANGE YOUR MINDSET AND OUTLOOK...


ing. I asked him why he was crying, and he said it was because last year he had to be led and now he’s the one leading people here.” A woman who had lost a leg in a car accident challenged herself and conquered fear on a Courage Incorporated outing, fishing near Silver Lake. There were mines nearby; an old silver mine was a 100-foot rock climb away. When the woman expressed doubt about her ability to make the climb, she was told she could go back to the boat and fish, or, with some assistance, she could attempt the climb. She opted for making the effort, and made it to the top, besting her fears. Courage Incorporated’s most recent outing was in August: rustic camping at Squaw Lake, located south of Republic. The organization supplied everything needed for the camp out, including tents, sleeping bags, fishing equipment, air mattresses, and food. Participants provided their own clothing, medical devices/ equipment, medications, and any special foods or snacks. Caretakers and support

persons were welcome, as well. Camp was set up when the campers arrived, with volunteers available to assist with fishing and canoe paddling, and to lead hikes. “Nature has the ability to heal the mind and spirit, and the body, too,” says Conradson. “It can completely change your mindset and outlook, and that’s just as important as any medicine that’s out there today.” Planned winter activities will include an ice fishing outing, as Courage Incorporated continues its mission of offering adventure, hope, and healing, one mountain, one forest, one waterfall at a time. For more information about Courage Incorporated, visit their website at courageincorporated.org. About the author: Deb Pascoe is a lifelong Yooper. She lives in Marquette, and is employed as a peer recovery support coach for Great Lakes Recovery Centers. Deb enjoys reading, writing, spending time with family, friends and pets, Trenary Toast, and time spent along the shore of Lake Superior. Her award-winning column, “Life With a View,” ran for several years in The Mining Journal.

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This coloring page from Colors of Marquette, Michigan Volume 3 is courtesy of The Gathered Earth, located in downtown Marquette.

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arts

From left, Geoff Walker and Jon Teichman stand among their records during an August sale at the Ore Dock Brewing Co. in Marquette. The pair have been holding record sales for several years. (Photo courtesy of Andrea Carr/Ore Dock Brewing Co.)

Building community, one record at a time

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bout eight years ago, two friends brought their love for music into a vinyl partnership. For Marquette natives and longtime family friends Jon Teichman and Geoff Walker, records brought them together for a specific mission — sharing the fruits of their collecting hobby with others. “Other formats of music cannot unite generations,” said Vinyl Reception owner & DJ Greg Sandell. “Vinyl does that.” The next vinyl sale is September 9-12 at Ore Dock Brewing Company in Marquette. Thousands of records will be available for purchase from noon until Ore Dock closes for the evening. “This sale will be during Beer Fest,” Teichman said. “It should be a lot of fun.” The Michigan Brewers Guild 12th Annual U.P. Fall Beer Festival takes place on September 11 this year. “Thankfully, we’ve only had two incidents with beer and the records,” Walker said. “I had one guy spill 50 cents of beer and destroy $500 worth of records. We had words.” The first record show started around

By Kristy Basolo-Malmsten

Walker’s brother Mike’s taco-making skills. Mike was selling tacos at Ore Dock Brewing Company, prior to having the Dia de los Tacos food truck, when he connected Geoff with the brewery manager. He pitched the vinyl sale idea — one he wasn’t sure would work, but the public quickly proved him wrong at that very first sale. “At 5 p.m., we unlocked the back door and they piled in, two or three deep in front of the tables,” Walker said. “We sold 1,500 records, and my brother sold out of tacos.” He continued hauling thousands of records to the U.P. he had bought downstate and while en route to Marquette. Walker also stored records with friends and family in the Marquette area so not everything had to be hauled back and forth. The demand continued, and soon, Walker realized the sales had become busy enough that he might need an assistant. Finally, when he was asked to play in a local festival during one of the sale weekends, he called on Teichman for help. “I can’t imagine doing this with anyone

else,” Teichman said. “Our wives are super supportive, and the community has been amazing.” Both Teichman and Walker agree they have complementary skill sets, which makes their partnership work. “We’ve been friends so long that we finish each other’s sentences,” Teichman said. “And we laugh a lot.” The labor of love is obvious at the sales, with each box and table organized meticulously. Customers often compliment the selection; “You’ve got eight Replacements albums? You’re not going to find that anywhere in the United States.” The men just smile graciously. “They’re very enthusiastic,” said vinyl connoisseur Olivia Pirhonen of Negaunee. “The atmosphere is always fun. [Geoff and Jon] are always chatting with customers, and everyone is so happy to be there. It’s always a good time.” The ebb and flow of foot traffic is like music — sometimes a slow moving ballad and sometimes a lively polka. But the customers just keep showing up. “People come from all over the U.P.,”

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Teichman said. “It was more than we expected.” For both men, the events are about more than music, though. They are about building community. “There are people who I just see at these events,” Teichman said. “And there are people who just come out to help us, unasked.” Teichman said friends will show up to help haul the thousands of records in for the sale; others will drop off food to keep them going for the day. Even locally famous “Uncle Pizza” makes sure to bring them a pie. “We never expect people to help, but it wouldn’t work without them,” Walker said. “This builds community in a lot of ways during a time with way too many things dividing us.” Teichman said this sense of community is how the sales keep going. For him, he had a similar experience visiting Bowling Green while he was checking out places to go to college. He found a record store in the town, and the staff was so welcoming and friendly that he knew he’d spend some years in that area. “If this is our contribution to building community, I feel good about that,” Teichman said. Both men have day jobs, with Teichman working as an assistant director of admissions at NMU, and Walker a counselor with his own practice in the Detroit area.

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“As a counselor, I’m focused on helping people find internal balance in a pure therapeutic sense,” Walker said. “I have helped people find that more through [music] than I ever did in the office.” Despite that, Walker said the best thing about the shows is the friends they’ve made. He revels in the challenge of finding certain records for collectors. “Music knowledge has no boundaries,” Walker said. “You can have a conversation with anyone about any genre and always learn something from each other.” Walker enjoys watching people with spontaneous purchases, as well as those who are seeking out something in particular. The men pride themselves on having something for everyone at the sales. “There are some days I think, ‘Why did I buy that? Nobody’s gonna want that.’ And then two hours later, it sells,” Walker said. “I can’t force it though. It has to happen organically.” Teichman said there’s nothing like customers finding a treasure in the stacks. “I love when I hear, ‘I’ve been looking for this!’” he said. “People get excited about their finds, and it energizes me.” In a time when other forms of non-tangible media may seem to dominate, vinyl has not gone out of style. Whether it’s the trend of retro being cool, or the artwork and lyrics that come with some albums, records have not lost their luster for many. “I’m a fan of physical media,” Teichman said. “There’s a connection between


At left, records on display at The Emporium, featuring Vintage Vinyl, in downtown Marquette. Above, a vintage record player, is also on display. (Photos by Kristy Basolo-Malmsten) holding that album in your hand and how it makes it effortless to share memories of times that music was important to you.” Teichman said he uses a form of publicity that some might say is as archaic as vinyl — but it still works as well. The duo design flyers for each show, and mail and handout postcards with event details. “The flyer game is strong in Marquette County,” he said. “Putting a poster up in a store window gets attention here.” He also said his patrons often take postcards for the next show, keeping it on their refrigerator or in another safe place as a reminder. While the shows are also advertised on social media, that isn’t the main focus. “Even in the era of social media, there’s something about that postcard,” Teichman said. “It’s been successful enough to do four times a year, so we must be doing something right.” The shows start at the end of March and run through November — or before the snow gets too deep to be hauling dozens of boxes of records. In between his day job and the sales, Teichman and his wife Laura have another passion — pop culture collecting in general. Teichman’s even got a degree in it. The Teichmans’ store, The Emporium featuring Vintage Vinyl, is located at 317 West Washington Street. “The décor and items are all Laura,” Teichman says. “I just stick to the records.” The store is filled with old record players, vintage toys, jewelry and more. It all comes together to offer customers a step back in time — but not too far back. “I enjoy talking to people and reliving their memories when they pick some of these things up,” Teichman said. Both in his store and at the sales, there is no one demographic who shows up for the music.

“We have a variety of people who like to come in here and explore and learn about new music,” Teichman said. Walker said he likes that things are changing with the type of customer he sees at sales. “The gender balance of vinyl shoppers has shifted in the last few years,” Walker said. “It used to be a male-dominated thing and now we are seeing women of all ages as well.” Teichman said his customers have a variety of experiences while flipping through records. “One of my customers said, ‘I’m time traveling right now,’ as he was looking through albums in the store,” Teichman said. “And then I get young people coming in who get introduced to old music they’ve never heard. It’s special.” The Emporium is open from 5:30 to 9 p.m., Monday through Friday, and from noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. The store is closed the last Saturday and Sunday of the month, when the couple travels to buy new treasures for their store. “We also love to look at other people’s collections and we buy records,” Teichman said. “The best way is to give us a call to set up a time to get together.” Vintage Vinyl also ships records purchased by people all over the country. “We’ve shipped more than 1,000 records,” he said. For details, call Teichman at (906)3736183. About the author: Kristy Basolo-Malmsten was the Marquette Monthly editor for more than a decade, as well as the owner of God’s Country U.P. Outdoors Magazine. She has a master’s degree in writing from NMU, and lives in Ishpeming. Her day job is as the senior center director in Negaunee. MM

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lookout point

C h o c o l ay

b ay o u n at u r e p r e s e r v e

Celebrating an anniversary, and remembering a troubled past Story by Adam Berger Photos courtesy of Andrea Denham, UPLC

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s the fall colors emerge, celebrate the fifth anniversary of the establishment of the Chocolay Bayou Nature Preserve. With help from more than 150 local individuals, organizations, and businesses, the Upper Peninsula Land Conservancy (UPLC) acquired this 13-acre wetland property in 2016. Located near the Michigan Welcome Center on U.S. 41, just southeast of Marquette, along the North Country National Scenic Trail and Iron Ore Heritage Trail, the Chocolay Bayou has become a favorite place for watching migrating birds and other wildlife, looking for wildflowers and enjoying an easy stroll in a peaceful, wooded setting. The Chocolay Bayou is also accessible by kayak and canoe, as the chocolate-hued Chocolay River connects to Lake Superior. As a nonprofit land conservancy, UPLC protects wilderness throughout the Upper Peninsula. UPLC also promotes knowledge of the history of that land. Visitors to the Chocolay Bayou Nature Preserve can enjoy the site’s natural beauty while contemplating the 1836 Treaty of Washington as one example of how Native lands were

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taken as the United States expanded west. In 1836, the Chocolay River became the border between the United States and Ojibwe land in the Upper Peninsula. According to the Treaty of Washington, signed March 28 and ratified by Congress May 27, Ojibwe and Odawa leaders ceded approximately 13.8 million acres in the western lower peninsula and eastern Upper Peninsula, approximately 40 percent of the land area that is now Michigan. Under the terms of this treaty, east of the Chocolay River became U.S. property, and west of the river remained unceded Ojibwe territory. The American Fur Company, founded by John Jacob Astor (1763-1848), extended credit to Native hunters in the northern Great Lakes each fall, requiring payment in furs in the spring. By the 1830s, over harvesting diminished furbearing species in the region. Astor himself pulled out of the Great Lakes fur trade. Ramsay Crooks (1787-1859) took control of the northern part of the company. Particularly poor fur harvests in 1833 and 1834 left many Native families owing large debts to the Amer-

September 2021

ican Fur Company. Elbert Herring (1777-1876), Commissioner of Indian Affairs under Secretary of War Lewis Cass (1782-1866), knew the debts held by Anishinaabe people could be used as leverage to acquire Native land. He wrote to Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (1793-1864), then working as Indian Agent at Mackinac Island, telling him to travel to the lower peninsula to pursue the matter. Schoolcraft wrote back that the events of the past several years had prepared Native people to sell their land. Anishinaabe people were very much aware of the threat of violent removal from their territories without compensation because of recent actions against their traditional enemies, the Sauk. In 1832, a Sauk leader named Black Hawk refused to leave territory in southern Wisconsin. United States troops and Dakota warriors launched an assault against Black Hawk that killed 1,300 of his people. The United States government invited a select group of Ojibwe men from the Upper Peninsula and Odawa


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A view of the fall colors along the Chocolay River. men from lower Michigan to negotiate the treaty in the spring of 1836. This was an irregular move, as important treaty councils were usually held near the concerned lands and interested communities so many people could give their opinions. Anishinaabe treaty decisions were traditionally made by respected men and women, and the exclusion of women contradicted custom. Meeting in Washington, D.C. cut off the usual forms of community input. Holding treaty negotiations in Washington, D.C. was also a way to intimidate the Ojibwe and Odawa diplomats. President Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) made no secret of his antipathy towards Native Americans. The populist political campaign that won him the presidency made much of his reputation as an Indian fighter, earned in brutal battles against Native people in the Southeast. After an 1814 battle, Jackson’s troops cut off noses to count their victims and made horse bridle reins from skins of dead Native people. His Native contemporaries gave Jackson the name Sharp Knife. Jackson’s pro-removal policies were part of his political success. The removal program known as the Trail of Tears displaced as many as 100,000 Native Americans in the southeastern United States between 1831 and 1850, mostly Cherokee, Chickasaw and Muscogee (Creek) people. Surely the message to the Great Lakes Anishinaabe diplomats that came to Washington in 1836 was that they were now under the control of an American president who would use force to take their lands if they refused sell. Schoolcraft, who led negotiations for the U.S. government, was uniquely positioned to broker a treaty concerning the area that would soon become the state of Michigan. His wife, Jane Johnston Schoolcraft (1800-1842), also known as Bamewawagezhikaquay ‘Woman of the Sound the Stars Make Rushing Through the Sky,’ was the daughter of Irish fur trader John Johnston (1762-1828) and Ozhaguscodaywayquay ‘Woman of the Green Glen’ or Susan Johnston (circa 1775-1840), herself the daughter of the famous Ojibwe warrior and orator Waubojeeg ‘White Fisher’ (circa 1747-1793). Jane Johnston, like her grandfather, was a gifted storyteller. She was also a prolific writer. Schoolcraft lived with his wife’s relatives in Sault Ste. Marie before being reposted at Mackinac Island and knew many of the Upper Peninsula Ojibwe men assembled in Washington. He leveraged these relationships, threatening downstate Odawa that he could make a separate deal

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with the Ojibwe if they did not go along with the joint treaty. The U.S. government bought the land for about 12.5 cents per acre. According to the treaty signed by Schoolcraft and the Anishinaabe delegates, the United States agreed to pay cash and goods upon ratification, provide a cash annuity for 20 years, fund medical care, education, blacksmiths, and agricultural improvement, and to distribute supplies such as tobacco, salt, and fish for 20 years. The government also agreed to pay debts to the American Fur Company and provide agents to help examine claims against Native families. The treaty set aside reservations within the boundaries of the ceded territory. The government said it would establish a voluntary program for removal if Native people should choose to leave the region. Native people retained hunting rights until the land was required for settlement. In an extraordinary move, the Senate changed the terms of the treaty after it was already signed. The version ratified by Congress made the reservations north of the Straits of Mackinac temporary rather than permanent, gave the government discretion to take back reservations to the south and eliminated the provision of agents to examine debt claims by the American Fur Company. Removal remained a threat. Without neutral arbiters helping settle debts, the American Fur Company had final authority to determine what people owed. These amendments were due to political infighting within the U.S. government. Senator Hugh White (1773-1840), in charge of the Senate Indian Committee, wanted to block Jackson from gaining loyal followers in patronage positions that could come from permanent reservations. Ojibwe and Odawa leaders, assembled at Mackinac July 12 to 14, accepted the adjusted terms of the treaty. They chose to do so after the American Fur Company threatened to cut off lines of credit, which would have thrown the local economy into chaos and left Native families with mere months to figure out how to survive the upcoming winter.

About the author: Adam Berger holds a PhD in social anthropology, an MA in educational psychology, and has professional experience in the nonprofit field. Keenly interested in Upper Peninsula local history and ecology, Adam believes that teaching younger generations about the land and its past is the way to protect our unique region. MM


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M A O R I

A L T A R

L A S H

E N I G M A

V A L I U M

E S S A Y

D A R E D N O T

D R I N K I N

A T W O O D

L E I T S E T A F A C S S A T I F W O L O N O R S O S D T I A T L A W B I O A R R I K N E S E S O T

L A P P E D R K P I E E T R S O U R R C E H R I D O N A U T O E O N S

O L Z P I A I N G E A U T O P S W T E R T I P A T B L E S O B F E E F M D S M E A C H K I P T O P H D

R E N E W S C A F E M O T O W N

A D S F R O L O U P R R I O T A B D O R D O A B L M R O S R S J E T U C U S O T T W F O P A W I T C E

T E S U N C D M O U O M L N I B L T E D A S A N S Y O K I I S S P E T E A S I N N N D E R T O M E A P H E U A H L S E D A R E N A

B E E R

T U T E E I G N I T E R E A L I Z E

T H A T A N T E D

S P L E E N

Answers to the New york Times Crossword puzzle on page 76

- Janeen Pergrin Rastall, first published in The Michigan Poet I no longer stop when the chutes shudder and lower. i don’t turn when i hear the pellets bang and race to the cargo hold. i am not mesmerized as the ship unzips the seam between Superior and the sky but at night when the freighter lights flow between two wells of darkness i cannot look away.

Residency Test At The Ore Dock poetry


back then NMU,

class of

’68

Concerts, festivals, the Vietnam War: a look at a year at odds with itself By John Cebalo

“The idea of a co-ed dorm was a lurid novelty even as far back as 1968.” Tom Wolfe, In Our Time.

T

here’s so much that can be said about NMU in the late ‘60s, but perhaps this excerpt from a May 24, 1968 Northern News Letter to the Editor sums it up best: “I cannot begin to describe to you the horror, chagrin, and genuine disgust I felt as I witnessed Northern’s young adult students frolicking madly about in the mud created in front of Spalding Hall Tuesday night. Not only were individual rights infringed upon, but also their bodies, clothes and personal belongings. Roving bands of students preyed upon innocent bystanders and passerbys. They were subject to the discomfort of a mud

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bath.” There were several threads which led up to this event that can be traced back to earlier in the year. What is there left to say about 1968? The year was energized. It wasn’t all negative energy either, and the positive energy ran across the entire spectrum from the ethereal to the goofy. Northern began the Spring Semester with an enrollment of 6,500. In January “ Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges” listed several Marquette County Northern students: Constance Hill (Ishpeming); Cheryl Anderson, Raymond Gudegast, Linda Heathman, Mary Jo Mulligan, Mary Pace, and Suzanne Somers (Marquette); Peggy Dompierre, Norman Munson, and Jan Sivula (Negaunee); Jean Coleman

September 2021

(Skandia). Mary Pace would later be named Northern’s Outstanding Senior Woman. All Events Week came the next month. Competition took place in sports, for Campus Sweetheart and in snow statue building. The guys vied in a half-dozen outdoor events, of which broomball, played on the field between Hedgcock Fieldhouse and Forest Roberts, was the most popular. Co-eds competed in Polar Bear Volleyball and “tobogganing.” Tobogganing was where several laughing, woefully under-dressed girls, clinging together on a cafeteria tray, slid down a snowy hillside toward the inevitable pileup at the bottom. However, for the automotive-inclined, there was the Volkswagen Race behind Spooner. Following a Le Mans Start, 11 girls pushed a


VW (probably adorned with a flower on the hood) to a point where all dove in, the driver started the motor, turned the car, and raced — or perhaps jerked — back to the start line. There were 19 Sweetheart candidates. The winner, Marquette’s Mary Hammerschmidt, whose beaming countenance adorned the entire front page of the Northern News, was crowned at halftime of the Northern-Tech basketball game. Mary had previously been featured in one of the News’ Friday’s Fairest sections. The Sandpipers, a folk rock group, best known for their hit “Guantanamera,” performed before a full crowd in Hedgcock. Several organizations worked all night in freezing temperatures to be finished in time for Saturday morning’s snow statue judging. A total of 19 of them were constructed. The Snow Queen Ball was held in the University Center that evening. It was announced that, for the third year in a row, the same fraternity, helped by their spectacular 80-foot long sleeping dragon snow statue, had won the overall competition again. The Mining Journal headline summed it all up; “Thousands On NMU Campus To Take In Carnival Events.” As winter grudgingly loosened its grip, and by the last Monday night in March, Spring was definitely in the air. Around 11 p.m., neighborhoods near the college first heard, and then observed, a disturbance on campus. Was this some kind of weird orgiastic collegiate rite perhaps? It was. While the triggering circumstances will forever be shrouded in myth, it seems to have originated in the Golden N cafeteria between two girls’ dorms, Magers and Meyland Halls, and two boys’ dorms, Hunt and Van Antwerp Halls. Before anyone knew it, the guys were rampaging through Magers and Meyland in search of panties. After looting these two dorms of souvenir female underwear, and with growing confidence and increasing numbers, they next turned their attentions to the ladies in Spalding. Sweeping through the hall, hooting and yelling, they then streamed across campus toward one remaining female bastion. It was 1 o’clock in the morning by the time they had finished with West Hall, and retreated, sniggering, into the darkness. All this, and on a Monday night too! Apparently the normal weekend activities just weren’t enough. These included favorite party places like the lodge at Cliffs Ridge ski area; road trips to Wisconsin, with its 18-year-old drinking age; and keggers atop Sugar Loaf — where, of course, getting chased, laughing and stumbling through the woods, by the law was just a bonus. During April, the distractions includ-

WHAT IS THERE LEFT TO SAY ABOUT 1968? THE YEAR WAS ENERGIZED.

ed Twirp Week, with its Most Eligible Bachelor Contest, and the Associated Women Students’ House of Brides fashion show. At this time, because of the Vietnam war and the draft, 60 percent of Northern’s student body was male; while 35 percent of the senior men and 29 percent of the senior women were married. Meanwhile, a sports reporter for the News decided to imitate author George Plimpton’s “Paper Lion.” Plimpton had participated in the Detroit Lions’ pre-season training camp for Sports Illustrated. The Wildcats had gone undefeated and made the playoffs the year before; and the reporter decided to do the same thing at Northern’s spring football practice. The stipulation was that he be treated just like everyone else. He was; and the “Paper Wildcat” column dried up after only one report. Greeks constituted only about 7 perent of Northern’s student body. In 1968 there were 15 “social” fraternities and six “social” sororities. They informally occupied their own areas in the Wildcat Den in the University Center; and on Mondays their banners hung on display in the foyer in Kaye Hall. While they were continually sniped at in the Reader’s Column in the News, there was also another long-standing issue: student apathy. A February ’67 editorial weighed in: “Greeks, fraternities foremost among them, are the foundation for practical-

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ly all activities taking place on Northern’s campus. They take a large part in producing fall Homecoming festivities, All-Events snow carnival, and other All-student activities on campus. Since independent students and student groups have never given any indication that they would be willing to take up any slack created by diminishing Greek participation, it appears necessary that the fraternities and sororities on this campus not only grow with the University but grow beyond it.” That was not the only area Greeks were active: there was politics too. From 1961 through 1969, all the Student Council presidents were fraternity members. Inter-Greek competition was fierce. In the fall of ’67, inter-fraternity flag football had come within a shade of being canceled. In one three-day period, a half-dozen frat boys had been knocked into the Health Center: broken collar bone, sprained hand, two shoulder injuries, head injury (requiring stitches) and broken nose (requiring stitches). Greek Week was in early May. It was heralded in the News with a full page ad, as well as 3-by-5 photos of all God and Goddess candidates. A large wooden scoreboard was erected in the entrance of the University Center, so that progress in the multitude of events could be followed. Of special interest was the grueling bantam tug-ofwar, held across the road from Hedgcock, in the field north of Married Housing (nicknamed “Fertile Valley”). Saturday was the track meet, and the chariot race, which, actually, was a timed event, where a homemade sulky-like vehicle, carrying the fraternity’s lightest member, was pulled by four sprinters around Memorial Field’s 440-yard cinder track. The week was capped by an all-night carnival held in the fieldhouse, featuring The McCoys (“Hang on Sloopy”). It was Northern’s first all-night dance. This was at a time of student dress codes and visitation and curfew hours for women, when the administration, prompted by the Student Government Association, was reassessing its in loco parentis philosophy. All women, if they stayed in the fieldhouse, had a 5 a.m. curfew. Those who left after 1 a.m. were required to sign into their dorms within half an hour. A frequent sight on weekend evenings in those days was a fan-shaped mass of embracing couples, saying goodnight in the courtyard before the entrance of West Hall. As curfew approached, the women would break off and scurry inside to sign back into the dorm. In late May, was The Mud Festival. This was a week-long event sponsored by the Residence Hall Association. All 11 halls were represented by a queen candidate, and they initiated the activities with a pie-eating contest, which saw each

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INTER-GREEK COMPETITION WAS FIERCE ... IN ONE THREE-DAY PERIOD, A HALF-DOZEN FRAT BOYS HAD BEEN KNOCKED INTO THE HEALTH CENTER

candidate kneeling in the mud, hands secured, faces pressed into pie shells, devouring the contents. Other cultural events in the mud included a greased pig chase, a grapefruit nose roll, egg throwing contest and an obstacle course over hurdles, saw horses, and barrels. Each contestant had a raw egg in their mouth — and to break the egg was to be disqualified. After each event, the contestants were literally hosed down in order to keep the mud out of the dorms. The final event was on Saturday at Memorial Field when the queen candidates got into a whipped cream fight; the dripping winner being crowned Miss Mud Week. Appropriate trophies were handed out that night during halftime of the Green and White intrasquad football game. Considering everything else that happened that year, for the 155 Marquette County graduates in the Class of ’68, this really wasn’t a bad way to end their semester. About the author: John Cebalo (NMU ’69) graduated from Graveraet in ’64; but was academically hopeless. Northern had open admissions and he only got into college because of President Hardin’s “Right To Try” policy. There, he thoroughly enjoyed being a Greek. He eventually scraped together enough credits for a General Studies B S. And then? Hello Vietnam! MM


home cinema September’s films examine two different eras in history Reviews by Leonard Heldreth The films this month include one adapted play and a look at the creation of one of the classic films of all time. Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom Ma Rainey was born Gertrude Pridgett in 1882 (or perhaps 1886) in Columbus, Georgia, or maybe Russell County, Alabama — the data is a little contradictory. The young girl began performing in minstrel shows when she was 12-14, and in 1904 she married William “Pa” Rainey, taking her stage name from him. Given the historical time and the racial circumstances, she had a flamboyant and remarkably successful career. At the time of her death from a heart attack in 1939, she was the proprietor of three Georgia theaters — one in Columbus and two in Rome. Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom takes its name from one of her most successful songs, which she wrote and which served as her traveling stage show’s dance number. The 1984 stage play by two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning African American playwright August Wilson, is part of his Pittsburgh or Century Cycle of 10 plays portraying 100 years of the Black experience. Each work tells a story from a different decade. Denzel Washington, to whom Wilson’s plays have been entrusted, filmed Fences in 2016, and Viola Davis won an Oscar for an entirely different kind of role in that film. The setting is July 2, 1927, and Ma and her band have traveled north to a sweltering Chicago to record songs for her new record company, Paramount. With her are her band: trombonist Cutler (Colman Domingo), bassist Slow Drag (Michael Potts), pianist Toledo (Glynn Turman), and trumpeter Levee (Chadwick Boseman). The four musicians joke, gossip and verbally spar for the first 20 minutes of the film, letting the three older characters set themselves off from the rebellious Levee, who wants to update Ma’s old fashioned versions of the songs. Ma finally arrives in her new car with her nephew Sylvester (Dusan Brown) and her girlfriend of the moment, Dussie Mae (Taylour Paige). The historical record as well as the lyrics to some of Ma’s songs indicate that she found spending the night with women as attractive as spending it with men, and the film doesn’t shy away from this connection. The other two main characters are her manager, Irvin (Jeremy Shamos), and the recording producer, Mel Sturdyvant (Jonny Coyne); both are white men who keep suggesting to Ma that things would go more smoothly if she signed the rights to her songs over to them. Ma’s late arrival has delayed the session already, but she postpones it further by demanding the ice-cold Coke that is specified in her contract; a further requirement is that the introduction to the Black Bottom song should be done by her nephew, who stutters, making getting a clean recording difficult but guaranteeing the nephew some pay. When her requirements are met, Ma agrees to sing, knowing that with her voice, she holds all the power, and she doesn’t hesitate to exercise it. After the session ends, Ma, Dessie Mae and Sylvester leave in her new car

to return to the South, and the band members squabble about various matters as they pack up until violence breaks out and brings the film to a close. The film is dominated by Viola Davis as Ma and Chadwick Boseman as Levee. Gaining 20 pounds, covering her face with layers of make-up (which Ma apparently did), dressing in expensive dresses and waving huge fans, Davis brings Rainey to life as a dominating diva who is ready to face down anyone who stands in her way. She values her title as “Mother of the Blues” and doesn’t want anyone to forget who she is and how hard she had to fight to get there. In this Jim Crow world, she is looked down upon even by the other patrons in a Black restaurant because she sings for a living. Davis brings Rainey to life in all her flamboyant, force-of-nature glory. The second force in the film is Chadwick Boseman as the trumpet player Levee. Boseman got rave reviews with Black Panther and Da Five Bloods, and his performance in Ma Rainey more than matches those of these earlier films. Knowing that he was dying of colon cancer, Boseman pulls out all the stops as he channels the rage and frustration of Levee, who finds himself trapped in Ma’s old-fashioned blues when he wants to take his music into the next level of jazz. In one of the most powerful speeches in the film, Levee relates how he was abused as a child and the fury he still feels against society and God for letting such things happen. Boseman was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor but lost out to Anthony Hopkins. He died at the age of 43 shortly after filming was completed. The rest of the cast is also exemplary (some repeated their roles from the stage play), and the only consistent complaint among reviewers is that the play remains very theatrical, moving only a few times out of the hot, confined recording studio to the surrounding streets. Curiously, the original play was set in the winter, but the Chicago heat seems more appropriate to the simmering tension that threatens to spill over among the band members, and the racial conflict between Ma and the white men who try to exploit her. Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom remains as relevant today as it was in 1927. Mank Orson Welles’ masterpiece Citizen Kane has been the subject of controversy and disagreement since its inception. Inevitably cited as one of the top films of all time, at the time of its release in 1941, it won only one Academy Award — “Best Original Screenplay” — and that award was split between Welles and Herman J. Mankiewicz, a New York screenwriter who had come to Hollywood 10 years before to seek his fortune. The question of who actually wrote what parts of the Citizen Kane screenplay has been extensively argued over the years in articles such as Pauline Kael’s “Raising Kane.” David Fincher’s Mank (Mankiewicz’s nickname in Hollywood) tells one side of that story, and briefly examines various surrounding characters, such as

publisher William Randolph Hearst, Marion Davies (Hearst’s mistress), Welles, John Houseman of the Mercury Theater, Louis B. Mayer, David O. Selznick and Josef von Sternberg. As the film opens, Mank, with a broken leg, is being deposited at an isolated ranch in the desert where he is to be confined and kept sober for 90 days or until he finishes the screenplay. As Mank works on the script, the story flashes back 10 years to his arrival as a writer for Paramount, and traces his decline and fall as he battles alcoholism, his disdain for Hollywood and the idiots he must deal with. Much of the fun of Mank is what it adds about the characters that Kane is modeled on. Charles Dance (Game of Thrones) makes a slender but imperial Hearst, vaguely amused by Mank before he decides to destroy him. The scenes at Hearst’s estate, San Simeon, are among the most impressive, with Mank and Marion Davies strolling though the grounds at night while elephants and giraffes can be seen and heard in the background. At a lavish dinner party, Mank gets drunk and insults Hearst, who simply smiles, knowing he is far beyond anything Mank can do. Marion Davies (Amanda Seyfried), a young blonde starlet who was Hearst’s mistress for years, has been portrayed as everything from a manipulative gold-digger to someone who just wasn’t too bright but did what she was told to do — she apparently knew how to be believable as the stereotypical dumb blonde. Mank presents her as intelligent, rather happy-go-lucky, and genuinely fond of the much older Hearst. Mankiewicz sees her as one of the few people he doesn’t sneer at. Cheerful and apparently a good comic actress, she demonstrated her affection for Hearst late in their relationship when Hearst lost much of his fortune. She sold the jewelry he had given her over the years to bail him out financially. Mrs. Hearst never forgave Davies and her husband for their open affair, and she barred her from attending Hearst’s funeral. Hearst’s attempt to turn Davies into a serious Hollywood actress when she wasn’t interested, parallels Kane’s attempt to turn his second wife into an opera star when she simply didn’t have the voice for it. If there is a problem with Mank, it’s that the Hollywood cynicism that Mankiewicz exhibited seems to have spilled over into the film. With the possible exception of Davies, it’s hard to generate much sympathy for any of the characters. But maybe that’s just an accurate picture of the people of Hollywood. Anyone who hasn’t seen Citizen Kane recently may want to review it before watching Mank. About the author: Leonard Heldreth became interested in films in high school and worked as a movie projectionist in undergraduate and graduate school. His short “Cinema Comment” aired for some years on WNMU-FM. In 1987 he started writing reviews for the Marquette Monthly. He taught English and film studies at NMU for over 30 years. MM

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THINK TWICE

No. 0829

Reprinted from the New York Times

By Aimee Lucido and Ella Dershowitz/Edited by Will Shortz 1

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ACROSS 1 Confound 6 Sarcastic internet laughter 10 Most Times Square signage 13 Performance check 17 Dark hair and a warm smile, for two 19 Samoan capital 20 To’s opposite 21 Full-length 23 Something that bugs criminals? 25 Blabberer 27 Duplicitous 28 Musicianship 30 ____ dress 31 Pasture 32 Signed off on 33 Ukr. or Lith., formerly 34 Places for development 36 Corn kernel, e.g. 38 Actress Merrill 40 Genre for BTS or Blackpink 43 Added to the staff? 45 Alerts 48 ____ of lies 49 Aquafina : PepsiCo :: ____ : Coca-Cola 52 #$%& and @%¢! 55 Practice whose name means, literally, ‘‘union’’ 57 Words before ‘‘before’’ 58 ‘‘Deck the Halls’’ contraction 59 Symbol on the Connecticut state quarter 60 Stop along the highway 61 Quite 64 Finished brushing one’s teeth, say 66 Racial-justice movement since 2013, in brief 67 ‘‘Really, though?’’ 68 Word in many font names 69 Betray . . . or a hint to four answers in this puzzle 73 ____ the Cat (fictional feline of children’s books)

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74 Thin incision 75 Some $200 Monopoly properties, in brief 76 Set of 50 on the Argo, in myth 77 Coaxed (out of) 79 Insurance giant bailed out in 2008 80 Word before cap or pop 81 Awesomest bud 82 Spirit in Arabian myth 83 Arizona county or its seat 85 Pushing up daisies 90 Neighbor of Mozambique 92 Nonwriting credentials for Conan Doyle and Chekhov, informally 93 Seller’s need 95 Artificial habitat 97 Abolitionist Lucretia 98 The avant-garde ‘‘artists’’ Congo and Pierre Brassau 100 Hedy of the 2017 documentary ‘‘Bombshell’’ 103 Kind of chip 105 Question of perplexion 108 ‘‘The Raven’’ writer’s inits. 109 Like 110 Big believer in the freedom of assembly? 112 Press ____ 113 What the beleaguered are behind 115 Classic folk story that teaches a lesson of sharing 118 Be up for some biking? 120 Fast runners 121 Advanced math degree? 122 Ninny 123 Sternutation 124 Real cutup 125 Landscaper’s supply 126 In the past 127 ‘‘As You Like It’’ forest

To check your answers, see Page 71. No cheating!

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DOWN 1 Novelist Margaret 2 Absorb the beauty of, as a scene 3 Lacked the gumption to 4 Gladly, old-style 5 Jazzy James and Jones 6 First law-enforcement org. in the U.S. to hire a female officer (1910) 7 Nail-polish brand 8 List of performers 9 Star man? 10 Half of a ’55 union merger 11 ‘‘That’s enough arguing out of you!’’ 12 Lip-puckering 13 Things that may be rubbed after din-din 14 Playwright Will who was a 2005 Pulitzer finalist 15 Crew implement 16 One getting special instruction 18 Ink holders in pens and squid 22 ‘‘Just like ____!’’ 24 Like morning people vis-à-vis night owls, around dawn 26 Response to ‘‘How bad was it?’’ 29 Extends, in a way 35 Lead-in to call 37 Cause for an onslaught of yearly txts 39 ‘‘If the pessimists are right . . .’’ 41 Stroke 42 East: Ger. 44 Wednesday, but not Friday 46 Accelerator particles 47 Overwhelm 48 Some tax breaks 50 Boos and cheers 51 Light 53 Latin list ender 54 Some Hershey candies 56 Bought in 61 Time-consuming assignment to grade 62 Xanax alternative

63 Monthly publication of the National Puzzlers’ League, with ‘‘The’’ 64 More convinced 65 ‘‘The Magic School Bus’’ was its first fully animated series 66 Sound at the end of December, appropriately? 67 Beach with a girl who ‘‘swings so cool’’ 70 Part of many a corsage 71 Bite site 72 Job to do 78 High-quality cannabis, in slang 80 ‘‘Success!’’ 81 Decorate 82 ‘‘I. Can’t. Even.’’ 84 Spain’s Duchess of ____ 86 Classic novel with the line ‘‘You must be the best judge of your own happiness’’ 87 Environmental opening 88 When repeated, a reproof 89 Overturned 91 Most chiffonlike 94 Figure out 96 Not thinking 97 The Supremes’ record label 99 Bad temper 100 Makeup target 101 Where a ‘‘Married at First Sight’’ contestant meets his or her mate 102 Language in which ‘‘kia ora’’ is a greeting 104 Up on 106 Confused responses 107 Fight site 111 Long runs? 113 ‘‘A man’s character is his ____’’: Heraclitus 114 ‘‘Suds’’ 116 Prefix with classical 117 Prof’s degree 119 Post on Insta


Out & About Out & About is a free listing of Upper Peninsula events. Events included must cost $25 or less (except fundraisers). All events are free and in Eastern time unless noted. We print information sent to us by a wide variety of people and organizations. It pays to double check the date, time, place and cost before heading out.

Send your October events by Friday, September 10 to: calendar@marquettemonthly.com Marquette Monthly P.O. Box 109 Gwinn, MI 49841 phone: (906) 360-2180

Index on the town ……………78 art galleries …………80-81 musuems ……………82-83 support groups …………86

Copper Harbor Trails Fest | September 4 to 5 | Copper Harbor

september events 01 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:09 a.m.; sunset 8:30 p.m.

Houghton

• Library Book Group Discussion. The group will discuss Feather Thief by Kirk Wallace Johnson. 5 p.m. Portage Lake District Library, 58 Huron St. 482-4570.

Marquette

• Outword. LGBTQIA youth and allied students in grades 7 to 12 are invited. Masks required for all participants. 4 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front

St. 226-4321. • Wednesday Farmers Market. Shop for local produce, flowers, crafts and more. 5 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Registration Deadline: NLCC’s 1868 Scientific Expedition to Lake Superior– In 3D. See Wednesday the 8th.

Marquette

• First Thursday Art Walk. Visit art galleries, studios and creative spaces during this monthly art stroll. 4 to 8 p.m. Locations vary and maps available through the Marquette Arts and Culture Center. travelmarquette.com • First Thursday Art Demo Artist Marlene Wood will give a demonstration on palette knife painting. Small boards, oils and palette knifes will be available for a small groups. 4 to 8 p.m. Zero Degrees Art Gallery, 525 N. Third St. 228-3058.

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on the town

Uncle Pete’s All Star BBQ Blues Band | September 11| Orpheum Theater, Hancock

Gwinn

• Hideaway Bar. - Mondays: The Hideaway All-Stars. 7 p.m. 741 M-35. 346-3178. • Up North Lodge. - Sunday, September 5: Jim & Ray. - Sunday, the 12th: Barefoot Davis & Up North Caribbean Band. - Sunday, the 19th: Grand Design Band. - Sunday, the 26th: Cold Spring Band. Sunday music, 4 to 8 p.m. 215 South CR-557. 346-9815.

Hancock

• Orpheum Theater. - Thursday, September 2: David Rogers - Saturday, the 11th: Uncle Pete’s All Star BBQ Blues Band. - Saturday, the 18th: Them Coulee Boyes. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted. 426 Quincy St. 482-5100.

02 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:11 a.m.; sunset 8:28 p.m.

Escanaba

• U.P. Steam and Gas Engine Show. View antique automobiles from 1900 to 1935, Allis-Chalmers and Case machinery, and visit the Antique Village and Agricultural Museum. Youth 14 and younger, free; $6 per day or $10 weekend pass. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, 2401 12th Avenue North. upsteamandgasengine.org

Marquette

• Marquette Area Blues Fest – Free Night. Enjoy music by Mike Letts & the Marquettes with special guest The Tomcats, followed by James Reeser and the Backseat Drivers. 6 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, Lakeshore Blvd. marquetteareabluessociety.org

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Marquette

• Drifa Brewing Company. - Sunday, September 5: Chris Valenti. 4 to 7.p.m. 501 S. Lake St. 273-1300. • Flanigan’s. - Tuesday through Thursday: Karaoke. 9:30 p.m. Cover charge on weekends only. 429 W. Washington St. 228-8865. • Ore Dock Brewing Company. - Friday, September 3: Ivy Ford. - Thursday, the 9th: Steve Leaf. - Friday, the 10th: Conga Se Menne. 8 p.m. - Saturday, the 11th: The Day Dreamers. 7 p.m. - Friday, the 17th: The Whistle Stop Revue’s Grateful Dead Tribute. 8 p.m. - Tuesday, the 21st: Comedy night with Brad Wenzel. $10. 8 p.m. - Friday, the 24th: 80s night with Sister

03 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:12 a.m.; sunset 8:26 p.m.

Escanaba

• U.P. Steam and Gas Engine Show. View antique automobiles from 1900 to 1935, Allis-Chalmers and Case machinery, and visit the Antique Village and Agricultural Museum. Youth 14 and younger, free; $6 per day or $10 weekend pass. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, 2401 12th Avenue North. upsteamandgasengine.org • Rock the Dock. Listen to music performed by Ryan Harvey and Friends, Phil Lynch, Tohubohu, and Doozy. 2:30 to 10 p.m. Municipal Dock, Ludington Park. deltami.org

Hancock

• Community Night Out. Enjoy music performed by Rewind. 6 to 9 p.m. Porvoo Park, Navy St. keweenaw.org • Firework Show. 9 p.m. Portage Canal.

Hammer. - Saturday, the 25th: Lavendar Lions. 8 p.m. All shows are free and begin at 9 p.m. unless noted. 114 W. Spring St. 228-8888. • Rippling River Resort. - Saturday, September 4: Chris Valenti. 4321 M-553. 273-2259. • Superior Culture. - Saturday, September 4: Ramble Tamble. - Thursdy, the 9th: Sister Hammer. - Friday, the 10th: Troy Graham. - Friday, the 17th: Derrell Syria Project. - Saturday, the 18th: Beechgrove and Blacksmith. - Friday, the 24th: Waxy Motion. Music 8 to 10 p.m. 713 Third Street. 273-0927 or superiorculturemqt.com MM

Houghton

• Art on the Town. Vendors will showcase music, art, homemade crafts and more. 4 to 7 p.m. Houghton Municipal Parking Deck, Downtown. keweenaw.org • Boat Parade. Boats are to line up at the Super 8 dock no later than 8:30 p.m. The parade will move west in the canal. 8:45 p.m. Portage Canal. • Firework Shows. 9 p.m. Portage Canal.

04 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:13 a.m.; sunset 8:24 p.m.

Copper Harbor

• Copper Harbor Trails Fest. Bikers will compete in cross-country and downhill races. Prices and times vary. copperhabortrails.org • Uncle Pete’s All-Star BBQ Blues Band. 7 p.m. Grant Township Park, 220 Gratiot St. copperhabortrails.org

Escanaba

• U.P. Steam and Gas Engine Show. View


antique automobiles from 1900 to 1935, Allis-Chalmers and Case machinery, and visit the Antique Village and Agricultural Museum. Youth 14 and younger, free; $6 per day or $10 weekend pass. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, 2401 12th Avenue North. upsteamandgasengine.org • Rock the Dock. Listen to music performed by Jam Band and Driver. 3 to 10 p.m. Municipal Dock, Ludington Park. deltami.org

Ishpeming

• Tween Book Club. Youth age 8 and older are invited to discuss Turtle Boy by M. Evan Wolkenstein. 1 p.m. Email njohnson@uproc.lib.mi.us to RSVP and for Zoom link

Marquette

• Marquette Marathon. Cheer on runners as they compete in a marathon, half-marathon, and 5K races. Prices, times and locations vary. marquettemaraton.com • Farmers Market. Shop for local produce, flowers, crafts and more. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Marquette Area Blues Fest. Enjoy music by Under the Sun, Edie & The Bluesers, The Ivy Ford Band, Amanda Fish and Albert Castiglia. Weekend pass, $60. 1 to 10 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, Lakeshore Blvd. marquetteareabluessociety.org

Rock

• Boogie Fest Too. Listen to music performed by TC Knuckleheads, Outlaw’d, Howard “Guitar” Luedtke & Blue Max, Carp River Barn Band, and the Todd Michael Band. $25. Noon. 14069 County Line G Road. 356-6191 or boogiefesttoo.rocks

05 SUNDAY

sunrise 7:14 a.m.; sunset 8:22 p.m.

Copper Harbor

• Copper Harbor Trails Fest. Runners will compete in a 10K, and bikers will compete in the Enduro races. Prices and times vary. copperhabortrails.org • Outdoor Concert. Listen to music performed by 4onthefloor. 7 p.m. Grant Township Park, 220 Gratiot St. copperhabortrails.org

Marquette

• Marquette Area Blues Fest. Enjoy music by Uncle Pete’s All-Star BBQ Blues Band, Flat Broke Blues Band, Laura Rain & The Caesars, John Primer & The Real Deal Blues Band, and The Nick Moss Band. Weekend pass, $60. 1 to 10 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, Lakeshore Blvd. marquetteareabluessociety.org

Michigamme

• Bluegrass on the Ridge. Enjoy music by Chashin’ Steel and Strung Togehter. 3 to 7 p.m. Maple Ridge Resort, 134 CR- I C.

06 MONDAY

sunrise 7:16 a.m.; sunset 8:20 p.m. Labor Day

Escanaba

• U.P. Steam and Gas Engine Show. View antique automobiles from 1900 to 1935, Allis-Chalmers and Case machinery, and

visit the Antique Village and Agricultural Museum. Youth 14 and younger, free; $6 per day or $10 weekend pass. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, 2401 12th Avenue North. upsteamandgasengine.org • Labor Day Parade. The parade will begin at the Marketplace on Ludington Street and end at the Municipal Dock. Noon. Ludington Street. deltami.org • Rock the Dock. Listen to music performed by Sit Down Francis and We Ain’t Saints. 1:30 to 8 p.m. Municipal Dock, Ludington Park. deltami.org

Ishpeming

• Labor Day Festival. Celebrate the day with a paradem music, kids’ activities, food and more. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lake Bancroft, West Euclid St.

Marquette

• Registration Deadline: NLCC’s The Drug Epidemic in Marquette County. See Wednesday the 13th.

07 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:17 a.m.; sunset 8:18 p.m.

Ishpeming

• Storytime at the Park. Bring your own blanket for seating. 11 a.m. Al Quaal Recreation Area, 501 Poplar St. 486-4381.

Marquette

• PWPL Kindness Club. Create outdoor chalk art displays with a positive vibe. Chalk kits will be available for pick-up from the youth service desk. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18-to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Muggles for Potter. Youth in grades 2 and 3 are invited. Help chose a wizard and make a butterbeer potion. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • What’s Up? Astronomy Series. Scott Stobbelaar of the Marquette Astronomical Society will discuss what can be seen in the U.P. skies in September. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link

08 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:18 a.m.; sunset 8:16 p.m.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club. During this 5-week course, the group will read Because of Winn Dixie by

September 2021

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art galleries Calumet

• Calumet Art Center. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., 57055 Fifth St. 934-2228. • Copper Country Associated Artist. Works by members and workshop participants in watercolor and oil, drawings, photography, sculpture, quilting, wood, textile, clay, glass and other media. Thursday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 205 Fifth St. 337-1252 or ccaartists.org • Gallery on 5th. Works by local and regional artists. Days and hours vary. 109 Fifth St. 369-0094. Copper Harbor • EarthWorks Gallery. Featuring Lake Superior-inspired photography by Steve Brimm. Daily, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. 216 First St. (910)319-1650.

Escanaba

• East Ludington Art Gallery. Works by local artists. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1007 Ludington St. 786-0300 or eastludingtongallery.com • William Bonifas Fine Arts Gallery. - Journey Through Mental Health, featuring works by artists who live with mental health symptoms, will be on display September 9 through October 28, with a public reception at 7 p.m. September 9. Tuesday, through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 pm. 700 First Ave South. 786-3833.

Hancock

• Finlandia University Gallery. - Copper Planted Seeds, featuring works by Ashante Kindle and Khari Turner, will be on display through October 5, with a closing reception at 7 p.m. September 30. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m. 435 Quincy St. 487-7500. • Kerredge Gallery. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts Center, 126 Quincy St. 482-2333 or coppercountryarts.com • Youth Gallery. Featuring works by local students. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts Center, 126 Quincy St. 482-2333 or coppercountryarts.com

Houghton

• A-Space Gallery. - HYPERCONNECTION, featuring works by Tiffany Lange, will be on display September 17 through November 7, with an opening reception at 5 p.m. on September 17. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays, 1 to 8 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. mtu.edu/ rozsa

Marquette

• Art—U.P. Style. Art by Carol

80

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September 2021

John French | Presque Isle Looking South| Wintergreen Hill Gallery, Marquette

Papaleo, works by local artists, gifts, classes and more. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. 130 W. Washington St. 225-1993. • DeVos Art Museum. - Regional Perspectives by Women Artists, featuring works in various media from the dawn of the 20th century to present, will be on display. - Personal to Political, featuring works by African American artists who helped shape contemporary art conversation, will be on display through October 31. Monday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Corner of Seventh and Tracy streets. NMU. 227-1481 or nmu.edu/devos • Graci Gallery. Works by regional and national artists. Featuring fine craft, contemporary art, and jewelry. Thursday and Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday, by appointment or chance. 555 E Michigan Street. gracigallery.com • Huron Mountain Club Gallery. Works by Paula Kiesling will be on display through September 30. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 228-0472. • Lake Superior Photo and Gallery. The

studio features landscape photographic art by Shawn Malone, including naturescapes of the Lake Superior region. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 211 S. Front St. 228-3686 or lakesuperiorphoto.com • Lake Superior Art Association Deo Gallery. Works by local and regional artists. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 228-0472. • Peter White Public Library Reception Area Gallery. - Pursuing a Perfect View, featuring landscape art by John French, will be on display through September 18. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 228-0472. • The Gallery: A Marquette Artist Collective Project. Works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, Noon to 2 p.m. Suite U7,130 W. Washington St. mqtartistcollective@. org • The Studio Gallery at Presque Isle. Works by local and internationally acclaimed artists. Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 2905 (continued on page 81)


art galleries Lakeshore Blvd. 360-4453. • Wintergreen Hill Gallery and Gifts. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 810 N. Third St. 2731374. • Zero Degrees Artist Gallery. Welcoming new artists with works in oils, watercolors, mixed media, jewelry, photography, metals, woods, recycled and fiber arts and much more. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 525 N, Third St. 228-3058 or zerodegreesgallery.org

Michigamme

• Michigamme Moonshine Art Gallery. Works by local and regional artists. Wednesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday by chance. 136 E. Main St. 323-6546. (continued from page 80) Kate DiCamillo. Activities will include cooking, science and art. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • NLCC’s 1868 Scientific Expedition to Lake Superior–In 3D. Don Balmer will discuss the 1868 expedition. Register by the 1st. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $6. 2 p.m. Room 101B, Superior Dome, NMU. 228-9367. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Junior Teen Advisory Board. Students in grades 5 to 8 are welcome to play games, plan events and gain volunteer experience. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:15 p.m. Teen Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Wednesday Farmers Market. Shop for local produce, flowers, crafts and more. 5 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Authors Reading Virtually. Author Peter Markus will read from his collection of poetry, When Our Fathers Return to Us as Birds. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • Skiing, Skating and Slapshots: A Winter Sports Slideshow, Instant Replay. Jack Deo and Jim Koski will share stories and photographs about Mt. Mesnard, Kirlin Hill and show a movie from Cliff’s Ridge. $15. 7 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Spring St. 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Registration Deadline: NLCC’s Annual Meeting and Presentation. See

11 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:22 a.m.; sunset 8:10 p.m.

Escanaba

Munising • Open Wings. This working pottery studio and gallery features works by regional artists. Daily, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 318 W. Munising Ave. 387-5070. • U.P.-Scale Art. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 109 W. Superior Ave. upscaleart.org or 3873300.

• End the Silence Walk. This noncompetitive walk and run raises money for the Delta County Suicide Task Force. 16 and younger, $10; adults, $25. 9 a.m. Ludington Park. Endthesilencewalk.com • Onagomingkway Chapter of NSDAR Meeting. Attendees should bring a sack lunch. Meeting may be on Zoom, if necessary. Noon to 3 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, address. 226-7836.

Rapid River

Marquette

• The adhocWORKshop. Owner Ritch Branstrom creates sculptures with found objects inspired by the land in which the objects were found. By appointment or chance. 10495 South Main Street. 339-1572 or adhocworkshop.com MM Wednesday the 15th.

09 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:20 a.m.; sunset 8:14 p.m.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18-to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Women of Science. Professor Sheena Ketchum will discuss the relationship people have with food and their entanglement between culture, food ways and more. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link

10 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:21 a.m.; sunset 8:12 p.m.

Escanaba

• Friday Night Live. Enjoy a night of music performed by Ben Schmidt-Swartz. Bonifas members, $15; nonmembers, $20. 7 p.m. Bonifas Arts Center, 700 First Avenue South. 786-3833 or bonifastarts.org

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:00 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323.

will discuss the drug epidemic in Marquette County. Register by the 6th. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 228-8051. • Concert on the Steps. Bring a chair and listen to music performed by Ramble Tamble. 7 p.m. Front steps, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St.

14 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:26 a.m.; sunset 8:05 p.m.

Ishpeming

• Storytime at the Park. Bring your own blanket for seating. 11 a.m. Al Quaal Recreation Area, 501 Poplar St. 486-4381.

• Farmers Market. Shop for local produce, flowers, crafts and more. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Art on the Mountain. This event includes a fine art fair, art activities and face painting for kids, plein air painting, an art auction, and more. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Marquette Mountain, 4501 CR-553. • Upper Peninsula Publishers and Authors Association Fall Membership Picnic. UPPAA members are invited for the annual picinic. Noon. Presque Isle Pavilion, Presque Isle. UPPAA.org • Meet and Greet with Guest Artist Gene Bertram. 1 to 4 p.m. Zero Degrees Gallery, 525 N. Third Street. 228-3058 or zerodegreesgallery.org • Registration Deadline: NLCC’s Wetmore Pond Hike. See Saturday the 18th.

Marquette

Munising

Houghton

• Mountain Goat Mash. Mountain bikers can compete in either a 15-mile or 45-mile routes. Proceeds benefit the Munising Bay Trail Network. $50. 45mile route, 9 a.m.; 15-mile route, 10:30 a.m. Valley Spur Trailhead, M-94. mbtn. squarespace.com/mountain-goat-mash

12 SUNDAY

sunrise 7:23 a.m.; sunset 8:08 p.m.

Calumet

• Bob Milne Ragtime Piano Concert. $20. 2 p.m. Keweenaw Storytelling Center, 215 Fifth St. redjacketjamboree.org

Marquette

• Art on the Mountain. This event includes a fine art fair, art activities and face painting for kids, Plein air painting, an art auction, and more. 11 a.m. to 4p.m. Marquette Mountain, 4501 M-553. • City of Marquette Annual Art Awards. These awards honor outstanding individuals who have made an important impact in arts and culture in Marquette. 5 p.m. Marquette Mountain, 4501 CR-553.

13 MONDAY

sunrise 7:25 a.m.; sunset 8:06 p.m.

Marquette

• Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • NLCC’s The Drug Epidemic in Marquette County. Sheriff Greg Zyburt

September 2021

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18-to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323.

15 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:27 a.m.; sunset 8:03 p.m. • Storytime for Preschoolers. Preschoolers with an adult are invited for stories and crafts. 10:15 a.m. Portage Lake District Library, 58 Huron St. 482-4570.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club. During this 5-week course, the group will read Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo. Activities will include cooking, science and art. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • NLCC’s Annual Meeting and Presentation. Join the NCLL Board of Directions and membership for the annual meeting to elect new board members. Bring your own lunch, drinks and chair. Lorana Jinkerson will discuss the North Country Trail System. Register by the 8th. 11:30 a.m. Lakenenland, M-28. 225-1004. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required for all participants ages

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museums Big Bay

• Big Bay Lighthouse. The grounds of the 1896 lighthouse are open yearround. 3 Lighthouse Rd. 345-9957.

Calumet

• Coppertown USA Mining Museum. The Keweenaw Peninsula is the site of the first mineral rush in the United States and the museum traces the evolution of miners with a series of exhibits designed for the family. Closes September 11. Youth 5 and younger, free; 6 to 15, $2; adults, $4. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 25815 Red Jacket Rd. keweenawheritagesites.org or 3374354. • International Frisbee Hall of Fame and Museum. Learn about the history of Guts Frisbee. Days and hours vary. Open when events are held. Second floor ballroom, Calumet Colosseum, Red Jacket Rd. 281-7625.

Caspian

• Iron County Historical Museum. This complex is the U.P.’s largest outdoor museum. Twenty-six buildings represent the industries of lumber, mining and transportation and include a homestead, cultural center and art complex. Youth 5 and younger, free; 5 to 18, $10; adults, $15; families, $30. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Off M-189 or two miles off US-2 at Iron River. 265-2617 or ironcountymuseum.org

Central

• Central Mine and Village. This community was once home to 1,200 people and was one of the most prosperous mines in the Keweenaw. The Keweenaw Historical Society maintains a visitor center and several exhibits about the area’s families, homes, schools and churches. Daily, 10 a.m. 5 p.m. U.S.-41, five miles east of Phoenix. keweenaw.info or 2484990.

Copper Harbor

Marquette Monthly

289-4688 or keweenawheritagesites.org

vary. 482-3101 or quincymine.com

Garden

Houghton

• Fayette Historic Townsite. This site was once one of the Upper Peninsula’s most productive iron-smelting operations. It now includes a visitor center, museum exhibits, a twenty-six station walking tour and a scale model of the original townsite. $17 per car, per day for Michigan residents, $9 for nonresidents. Daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 13700 13.25 Lane. 644-2603.

• Fort Wilkins State Park. Built in 1844, this fort is a well-preserved, nineteenth century military post and lighthouse complex. Through museum exhibits, audiovisual programs and costumed interpretation, visitors can explore the daily routine of military service, experience the hardships of frontier isolation and discover another era. Park store, bookstore, concession stand and campsites are on site. 8:30 a.m. to dusk. $17 per car, per day for Michigan residents, $9 for nonresidents. US-41. 289-4215.

Greenland

Delaware

• Quincy Mine Hoist and Underground Mine. There are two options for touring the site. On both the surface tour and the full tour, visitors will see the museum, inside the No. 2 Shaft House and the Nordberg Steam Hoist and ride the cog rail tram car to the mine entrance. On the full tour, visitors will take a tractorpulled wagon into the mine, seven levels underground. Prices, days and hours

• Delaware Copper Mine. This authentic copper mine operated from 1847 to 1887. The tour takes visitors to the first level at 110 feet, where they can see veins of copper exposed in the walls of the mine. Youth 5 and younger, free; 6 to 12, $7; 13 and older, $12. Daily, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. US41, 12 miles south of Copper Harbor.

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Adventure Mine, Greenland

September 2021

• Adventure Mining Company. The Adventure Copper Mine opened in 1850 and remains one of the best preserved sites of its time. Although the mine closed in 1920, many of the shafts are still open for touring. Tours range from surface walking tours to underground rappelling down a mine shaft. Youth 6 and younger, free; 7 to 12, $7.50 to $14.50; 13 and older, $14 to $25. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 200 Adventure Ave. 883-3371 or adventuremine.com

Hancock

• A.E. Seaman Mineral Museum. View the largest collection of minerals from the Great Lakes region and the world’s finest collection of Michigan minerals. Exhibits educate visitors on how minerals are formed, fluorescent minerals and minerals from around the world. Prices vary. Monday through Satuday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1404 E. Sharon Ave. 487-2572 or www.museum.mtu.edu • Carnegie Museum. Features rotating displays of local history, natural science and culture. The Science Center is dedicated to interactive exhibits about science for kids. Thursdays,, noon to 5 p.m. 105 Huron St. 482-7140 or carnegiekeweenaw.org • MTU Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections. Features a variety of historical memorabilia, highlighting life in the Copper Country. Open by appointment. Lower level of the J.R. Van Pelt Library, MTU. 487-3209.

Ishpeming

• Cliffs Shaft Mine Museum. Tour historical grounds and see mining artifacts, photographs and equipment. View historical and unique obelisk head frames and the only Koeppe Hoist System in the United States. Other items of interest include a 170-ton ore truck, a blacksmith shop, mineral displays from the Ishpeming Rock and Mineral Club and displays and information from the Ishpeming Historical Society and the Marquette County Genealogical Society. (continued on page 83)


museums Closes September 25. Prices vary. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 501 W. Euclid St. 485-1882. • Ishpeming Area Historical Society Museum. New exhibits include a military exhibit and artifacts from the Elson Estate. Donations appreciated. Days and hours vary. Gossard Building, Suite 303, 308 Cleveland Ave. ishpeminghistory.org • U.S. National Ski Hall & Snowboard Hall of Fame & Museum. The museum features more than 300 Hall of Fame inductees, presented in photographs and biographies, and displays and exhibits of skiing history and equipment, an extensive library, video show, gift shop, special events and more. By appointment only. US-41 and Third St. 485-6323 skihall.com

K.I. Sawyer

• K.I. Sawyer Heritage Air Museum. The museum promotes and preserves the aviation history the air base brought to the area. Air Force-related materials are on display, including photographs, flags, medals and more. Donations appreciated. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. 402 Third St. 3623531 or kishamuseum.org

Marquette

• Beaumier Upper Peninsula Heritage Center. - A Beautiful Location, featuring the architecture of NMU, will be on display through October 2. Three separate collections focus on cultural artifacts relating to ethnic, religious and social diversity in the U.P. Monday thruogh Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. NMU, corner of Seventh Street and Tracy Avenue. nmu.edu/beaumier or 227-3212. • Marquette Maritime Museum. The museum collects, preserves and presents maritime history. Many exhibits and guided tours of the lighthouse grounds are offered. Prices vary. Tuesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 300 Lakeshore Blvd. mqtmaritimemuseum.com or 2262006. • Marquette Regional History Center. - The Story Behind Their Clothes, (continued from page 82) 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Teen Advisory Board. Students in grade 9 to 12 are welcome to plan events and gain volunteer experience. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4 p.m. Teen Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Wednesday Farmers Market. Shop for local produce, flowers, crafts and more. 5 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Submission Deadline: Two Books, Two Communities Battle of the Recipe Box. Submit your favorite recipe with a description on why it is special to you. The top five will be voted on and the winners announced at a Taste-Off event on October 16.

featuring wedding gowens, dresses, hats, baby bonnets and other articles of clothing, will be on display through January 8, 2022. The museum includes interactive displays as well as regional history exhibits. Students, $3; seniors, $6; adults, $7. Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 145 W. Spring St. 2263571 or marquettehistory.org • Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum. A variety of interactive exhibits offer learning through investigation and creativity. By appointment. 123 W. Baraga Ave. 2263911 or upchildrenmuseum.org

Munising

• Alger County Historical Society Heritage Center. Exhibits include the Grand Island Recreation Area, Munising Woodenware Company, barn building, homemaking, sauna and more. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 1496 Washington St. 387-4308.

Negaunee

• Michigan Iron Industry Museum. In the forested ravines of the Marquette Iron Range, the museum overlooks the Carp River and the site of the first iron forge in the Lake Superior region. Museum exhibits, audio-visual programs and outdoor interpretive paths depict the large-scale capital and human investment that made Michigan an industrial leader. The museum is one of 10 museums and historic sites administered by the Michigan Historical Center. Daily, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 73 Forge Rd. 475-7857.

Phoenix

• Phoenix Church. The church was originally built as St. Mary’s Church in 1858 in Cliff. In 1899, the church was dismantled and reassembled in Phoenix, where it was renamed Church of the Assumption. It closed in 1957. The church now has been repaired and restored and appears as it did a century ago. Daily 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. US-41 at the junction of M-26 to Eagle River. keweenawhistory.org MM nmu.edu/onebook/twobooks

16 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:29 a.m.; sunset 8:01 p.m.

Houghton

• Quilt Art Group. Those interested in art quilts and the artistry of creating quilts are invited. 6 p.m. Portage Lake District Library, 58 Huron St. 482-4570.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18-to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • After School Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games,

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activities and crafts. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Dumbledore’s Army. Students in grades 4 to 6 are invited to create a butterbeer potion and discuss Harry Potter. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Music on Third Street. A variety of musicians will perform in front of businesses along Third Street. 6 to 8 p.m. Third Street. downtownmarquette.org

17 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:30 a.m.; sunset 7:59 p.m.

Gwinn

• Storytime. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 p.m. Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. 346-3433.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:00 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public

Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Wisconsin Brass Quintet Concert. The group will perform A Night at the Movies with special guest Matthew Endres. 7:30 p.m. Shoreline Theatre, NMU, near the soccer fields and the Superior Dome. nmu. edu

Munising

• Munising Bay Cruisers Night Cruise. Cars will cruise along H-58 Grand Marais for a block party with food, awards, prizes and more. 3 p.m. City Park Drive. munisingbaycruisers.org

18 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:31 a.m.; sunset 7:57 p.m.

Hancock

• Parade of Nations. International residents and visitors from more than 50 countries will display flags, floats and fanfare during this parade. The parade begins near the Finnish-American Heritage Center and end at Dee Stadium 11 a.m. Quincy Street. mtu.edu

Marquette

• Farmers Market. Shop for local produce, flowers, crafts and more. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Strut Your Mutt. Dogs and their humans are welcome during this fundraising walk. $25. Registration, 10 a.m. Walk, 11 a.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, Lakeshore Blvd. upaws.org • Community Play Date. Families with children are invited for sensory play, digging, bubble making and more.

Strut Your Mutt | September 18 | Marquette

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Rain location is Peter White Public Library. If indoors, masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:30 a.m. Tourist Park Playground, Sugar Loaf Avenue. 226-4323. • NLCC’s Wetmore Pond Hike. Puck Bates will lead the hike. Register by the 11th. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $6. 11 a.m. Wetmore Pond Trailhead, CR550. 345-9295. • Chess Club. Youth age 7 to 12 are invited for chess. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323.

Munising

• Munising Bay Cruisers Classic Car Show. More than 100 classic cars will be on display. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Downtown. 387-5121

19 SUNDAY

sunrise 7:32 a.m.; sunset 7:55 p.m.

Gladstone

• Delta County Century Ride. Riders can choose between ride lengths of 13K, 40K, 78K and 100k courses. Prices vary. 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. John & Melissa Besse Sport Park, 1280 N. Bluff Dr. 786-2192 or deltami.org

Marquette

• Volleyball Tournament. Proceeds from this tournament will benefit the Superior Child Advocacy Center. Limited to 14 teams. $150 per team. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Marquette Mountain, 4501 M-553. (920) 858-8982.

Munising

• Two Books, Two Communities: Poetry Reading. Poems from author Jeff Kass’s book Teacher/Pizza Guy will be read. 6 p.m. East Channel Brewery, 209 Maple Street. nmu.edu/onebook/twobooks

20 MONDAY

sunrise 7:34 a.m.; sunset 7:53 p.m.

Marquette

• Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Global Geeks Book Club. The group will discuss Eartheater by Dolores Reyes. 6 p.m. Dandelion Cottage Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4312. • Two Books, Two Communities: Poetry Reading. Poems from author Jeff Kass’s book Teacher/Pizza Guy will be read. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. nmu.edu/onebook/twobooks • Application Deadline: Holiday Art Sale. Artists wishing to participate in he 2021 Holiday Art Sale must submit an application by this date. Applications available online. marquettehistory.org • Registration Deadline: NLCC’s Fall Colorful Hike. See Monday the 27th.

Newberry

• Fashion Show by Crock and Rocker. Tickets available at the Newberry Country

Munising Bay Cruisers Classic Car Show | September 18 | Munising

Club. Dinner includes chicken alfredo, salad, bread and dessert. $25. Browising and social, 5 p.m. Style show and dinner, 6 p.m. Newberry Country Club, 5073 M-123 South. 293-8422.

21 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:35 a.m.; sunset 7:51 p.m.

Ishpeming

• Book Club at Lake Bancroft. The group will discuss The Flight Attendant by Chris Bohjalian. 2 p.m. Lake Bancroft, Euclid St. 486-4381.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18-to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Artists and Their Art: Winslow Homer. Art historian Ellen Longworth will discuss the life and work of landscape artist Winslow Homer. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • Lake Superior Art Association: Meet and Greet. Bring a piece of art to talk. A limited number of easels will be available to display. Refreshments will be served. Dues can be paid as well. 7 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 2507364.

22 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:36 a.m.; sunset 7:49 p.m.

Gwinn

• After School LEGO Club. Youth are invited for LEGO building. 4 p.m. Forsyth

Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. 346-3433.

Houghton

• Storytime for Preschoolers. Preschoolers with an adult are invited for stories and crafts. 10:15 a.m. Portage Lake District Library, 58 Huron St. 482-4570. • Vieux Farka Touré. Vieux Faraka Touré, the son of legendary Malian guitar player Ali Farka Touré, will perform. Youth, $10; adults, $20. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, MTU. events.mtu.edu

Ishpeming

• Book Club at Lake Bancroft. The group will discuss The Flight Attendant by Chris Bohjalian. 2 p.m. Lake Bancroft, Euclid St. 486-4381.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club. During this 5-week course, the group will read Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo. Activities will include cooking, science and art. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Community Foundation of Marquette

September 2021

County Annual Celebration. This event includes stories of the positive impacts which result from the foundation. Food, beverages and music will be provided. Proceeds benefit the Community Foundation of Marquette County. Ticket prices vary. 5 to 8 p.m. Grand Ballrooms, Northern Center, NMU. 226-7666 or cfofmc.org • Sugar Loaf Bart King Monument Centennial. Celebrate the 100-year anniversary of the Bart King monument. Learn of the World War I soldier and the volunteers who built the monument. Donations appreciated. 6 p.m. Sugarloaf parking lot, CR-550. 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Registration Deadline: NLCC’s More then Beginning Photography. See Wednesday the 29th.

23 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:38 a.m.; sunset 7:47 p.m.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18-to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Front Street Book Fair Presale. Shop for used books. Michael Waite also will perform at the library. $5. 6 to 9 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 120 N. Front Street and Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 228-9510.

24 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:39 a.m.; sunset 7:45 p.m.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age

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17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Front Street Book Fair. Shop for used books. $5. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 120 N. Front Street and Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 228-9510. • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:00 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • An Evening with Tyler Tichelaar. Local author Tyler Tichelaar will speak. 7 p.m. Women’s Federated Clubhouse, 104 W. Ridge St. 228-9510.

25 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:40 a.m.; sunset 7:43 p.m.

Iron Mountain

• An Afternoon to Remember. Join members of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs of Iron MountainKingsford for high tea and a fashion show presented by Lydia’s by Crock & Rocker. $25. 1 p.m. CST. Chippewa Club, 106 Carpenter Ave. 282-6017.

Marquette

• Farmers Market. Shop for local produce, flowers, crafts and more. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Fall Preque Isle Art Fair. Local artists will showcase their works. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Niik Creative Co., 2905 Island Beach Road. • Front Street Book Fair. Shop for used books. All items half price until 1:30 p.m. The $5 bag sale begins at 2 p.m. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 120 N. Front Street and Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 228-9510. • Marquette Full Meter-thon 2021. Events include a fun “race” of 3.28 meters, entertainment, family-friendly activities and more. Proceeds benefit Kids Cove 2. $25. Noon. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, Lakeshore Blvd. nmu. universitytickets.com • Rare Book Appraisal. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 120 N. Front Street and Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 228-9510.

26 SUNDAY

sunrise 7:41 a.m.; sunset 7:41 p.m.

Calumet

• Red Jacket Jamboree. This live radio show celebrates the Keweenaw through stories and music. Singer and songwriter John Davey will perform. The Copper Cats and the Red Jacket actors will perform as well. $22.50. 7 p.m. Keweenaw Storytelling Center, 215 Fifth St. redjacketjamboree.org

27 MONDAY

sunrise 7:43 a.m.; sunset 7:39 p.m.

Marquette

• Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children

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with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • NLCC’s Fall Colorful Hike. Kathy Peters will lead this hike. Register by the 21st. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $6. 1 p.m. Vielmetti-Peters Nature Preserve, Brickyard Road. 228-9367. • NEA Big Read Kickoff with Margaret Noodin. Anishinaabe poet and educator Margaret Noodin and the Teal Lake Singers drum circle will perform poetry and music. 7 p.m. Huron Mountain Gallery, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St.

28 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:44 a.m.; sunset 7:37 p.m.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18-to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Bluesday Tuesday. Listen to a blues concert sponsored by the Marquette Blues Society. 7 p.m. Front steps, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St.

29 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:45 a.m.; sunset 7:35 p.m.

Houghton

• Storytime for Preschoolers. Preschoolers with an adult are invited for stories and crafts. 10:15 a.m. Portage Lake District Library, 58 Huron St. 482-4570.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club. During this 5-week course, the group will read Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo. Activities will include cooking, science and art. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • NCLL’s More then Beginning Photography. Learn about the digital camera, photographic techniques and composition. Meets Wednesdays through

September 2021

October 28. Register by the 22nd. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $6. 11 a.m. Room 404-A, Cohodas Hall, NMU. 2251004. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • 18 Tiny Deaths Reading/Presentation. Biographer Bruce Goldfarb will discuss the life and work of Frances Glessner Lee, the mother of modern forensics. 7 p.m. Room to be determined. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. • Two Books, Two Communities: Open Mouth Open Mic. Share your writing, songs and thoughts about food. 7 p.m. Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. nmu.edu/onebook/twobooks

30 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:47 a.m.; sunset 7:33 p.m.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18-to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. 226-4323. MM

support groups • Alano Club. Twelve-step recovery meetings daily. Monday through Saturday, noon and 8 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. 1202 S. Front St., Southgate Plaza, Marquette. • Al-Anon Family Groups. A fellowship offering strength and hope for friends and families of problem drinkers. (888)425-2666 or www.alalon.org • Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings throughout Marquette County, open daily, at many locations and times. Twenty-four-hour answering service, 2494430 or www.aa-marquettecounty.org ALZConnected. This is a free, online community for everyone affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other memory loss diseases. alzconnected.org • American Legacy Foundation. Smoking quit line for expectant mothers and cessation information for women. (800)668-8278. • Amputee Social Group. This peer support group is for amputees, friends and families to share resources, life experiences and create relationships. Septembe 14. 6 p.m. SAIL, 1200 Wright St. 273-2444. • Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Checks. Cholesterol checks are $5. Call for Marquette County schedule. 225-4545. • Divorce Care—Ishpeming. This non-denominational group is for people who are separated or divorced. New members are welcome. Tuesdays, 6 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. Northiron Church, address. 475-6032 or northiron.church • Grief Share—Ishpeming. This nondenominational group is for people dealing with grief and loss. Mondays, 2:30 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. 475-6032 or northiron.church • Grief Support Group—Gwinn. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. Second Wednesday of the month. 2 p.m. Forsyth Senior Center, 165 Maple St. 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Grief Support Group—Marquette. People dealing with grief and loss are

encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. Third Wednesday of the month. 5:30 p.m. Lake Superior Hospice, 914 W. Baraga Ave. 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • iCanQuit. Smokers are invited to learn more about quitting with the help of a quitting coach. (800)480-7848. • Michigan Tobacco Quit Line. This free quit smoking coaching hotline provides callers with a personal health coach. (800)784-8669. • National Alliance on Mental Illness—Support Group. Individuals living with mental illness and friends or families living with an individual with mental illness are welcome for Zoom meetings. September 6 and 16. 7 p.m. Call (906) 360-7107 or email ckbertucci58@ charter.net for Zoom invitation. • Nicotine Anonymous. (415)7500328 or www.nicotine-anonymous.org • Sexual Health and Addiction Therapy Group. Call Great Lakes Recovery Centers for more details. Dates, times and locations vary. 2289696. • SMART Recovery—Calumet. A selfhelp group for alcohol and substance abuse and other addictive behaviors. Mondays, 7 p.m. Copper Country Mental Health, 56938 Calumet Avenue. smartrecovery.org • SMART Recovery — Hancock. Thursdays, 7 p.m. Basement Conference Room, Old Main Building, Finlandia University, 601 Quincy St. smartrecovery. org • SMART Recovery — Marquette. Mondays, Noon. Zoom meeting. Visit smartrecovery.com for Zoom link. • Take Off Pounds Sensibly. This is a non-commercial weight-control support group. Various places and times throughout the U.P. (800) 932-8677 or TOPS.org • Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Supplemental Food Program. Clinics include nutritional counseling and coupon pick-up. Appointments required. Call for Marquette County schedule. www.mqthealth.org or 4757846. MM


September 2021

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September 2021 Marquette Monthly  

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