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contents October 2021 No. 340

Publishers

Jane Hutchens James Larsen II

Managing Editor Joseph Zyble

Calendar Editor Carrie Usher

Graphic Design Jennifer Bell Knute Olson

Proofreader Laura Kagy

Circulation

Dick Armstrong

Chief Photographer Tom Buchkoe

Marquette Monthly, published by Model Town Publishing, LLC, located at PO Box 109 Gwinn, MI, 49841, is locally and independently owned. Entire contents copyright 2021 by Model Town Publishing. All rights reserved. Permission or use of editorial material in any manner must be obtained in writing from the publishers. Marquette Monthly is published 12 times a year. Subscriptions are $65 per year. Freelance material can be submitted for consideration to editor@ marquettemonthly.com. Events can be submitted to calendar@marquettemonthly.com. Ad inquiries can be sent to jane@marquettemonthly.com or james@ marquettemonthly.com.

(906) 360-2180 www.marquettemonthly.com

About the cover artist

Artist John French is a Marquette County artist who creates primarily using oil paints. In 2019, John was awarded “Best in Show” at the Lake Superior Association Members’ Show for his painting titled “The View.” To learn more about John and his work visit http://artofjohnfrench. com.

4 City Notes Highlights of important happenings in the area 18 On Campus News from U.P. Universities/Colleges 21 Gift of Water Mohey Mowafy

Protecting the blue planet 22 Feature Joseph Zyble The Ice Man Carveth

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New York Times Crossword Puzzle

Think Twice (answers on page 50) 27 At The Table Katherine Larson Making Minestrone 30 Lookout Point John Highlen Wintry Warmth 33 In The Outdoors Scot Stewart Citizen Scientists 36 Fiction John Smolens The Superior Gatsby, part 2 38 Lookout Point Deborah K. Frontiera Sun-Made Electricity 43 At The Table Katherine Larson Immune Boosters 45 Lookout Point SWP Staff Coastline Reclamation 47 Arts Joseph Zyble Symphony Celebrates 49 Back Then Larry Chabot The Lighthouse keepers 51 Lookout Point Jackie Stark Building Beauty 53 Back Then Larry Chabot Sauk Head and Yellow Dog 55 Superior Reads Victor Volkman ‘Anatomy’ Revisted 56 Lookout Point Sonny Longtine Reaching for Heaven 58 Sporting Life James Larsen The “Big League” 62 Home Cinema Leonard Heldreth Hopkins, 83, earns best actor 63 Poetry Esther Margaret Ayers In The Fall 64 Lookout Point SWP Staff Shore Grant 65 Out & About Carrie Usher October events and music, art and museum guides 78 Coloring Page The Gathered Earth

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city notes U.P. fall colors ranked 2nd in nation

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he U.P. took second place in the category of “Best Destinations for Fall Foliage” in the USA Today newspaper’s 10-Best Readers’ Choice Awards for 2021. The first-place destination went to the White Mountains in New Hampshire. Regarding the U.P., the newspaper wrote, “Just about the entire Upper Peninsula puts on a display of fall color that peaks during the last two weeks of September and the first week of October. A favorite fall experience for leaf peepers is the drive along M-26 along the shores of Lake Roland and past the trees of Copper Country State Forest.” Door County, Wisconsin was the only other area close to the U.P. to make the top 10; it was ranked number seven.

Blood Center in critical need of most types

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he UP Regional Blood Center is experiencing CRITICAL NEED for A Positive, A Negative, O Negative and B Negative blood types. The U.P. Regional Blood Center has collection sites in Marquette, Hancock and Escanaba and is the primary supplier of blood to 13 U.P. hospitals. Visit the U.P. Regional Blood Center Facebook page at UPRBC906 or the website at www.mgh.org/ blood for center details and blood drive locations. For hours and scheduling, call the Marquette location at 906-449-1450, Hancock at 906-483-1392, and Escanaba at 906-786-8420.

Cannabis Company to expand to Iron River

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he Fire Station Cannabis Co. has received local approval for a new retail location in Iron River. The store will be located on North 4th Ave. and will offer recreational cannabis products. The Iron River location is expected to open in the spring of 2022. It will be the seventh storefront for the U.P.-owned cannabis retailer. “There is a deep sense of community and pride in Iron River that stems from its history in mining and logging,” said Logan Stauber, co-owner and co-CEO of TFS. “I am excited to share our company’s sense of community and the pride we have for being the Upper Peninsula’s first licensed recreational cannabis company with the people of Iron River.” In a release from the company, it noted that making a positive impact on the economies of the U.P. is a top priority. The Fire Station presently employs over 100 U.P. residents, and the new Iron River location will create over 20 additional jobs. The Fire Station release said that wages for all positions start at over 200 percent of the federal poverty level. Open positions can be found on the company’s website. “I care deeply about the U.P. and the communities we’re a part of,” said Stosh Wasik, co-owner and co-CEO of TFS. “Our connection and commitment to the Upper Peninsula are what set us apart.”

Naubinway recognized as top of Lake Michigan

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he waterfront in the Eastern Upper Peninsula community of Naubinway will soon be home to a marker recognizing the Northernmost Point of Lake Michigan. At 10 a.m. on Saturday, October 2, Top of the Lake Communities Association (TOLCA) will dedicate a sculptural marker to declare the distinction at the Garfield Township Marina in Naubinway. Although the actual point is about two miles west of town, the marina is the most accessible and scenic location for the marker. TOLCA, a non-profit organization of volunteers that strives to enhance the community through events and a variety of other programs in the area, sees this claim to geographical fame as a point of pride and a way to celebrate Naubinway’s long history as a fishing village. Located just off of US-2 about 45 minutes west of St. Ignace, the marker is an easy detour for motorists and bicyclists along the Top of the Lake Scenic Byway and Iron Belle Trail, snowmobilers and visitors to the Top of the Lake Snowmobile Museum, as well as a nice stop for paddlers and boaters at the marina. The Michigan map-shaped marker, which stretches about 10 feet from Coldwater to Copper Harbor, was fabricated locally and is supported by grants from Michigan Council for Arts & Cultural Affairs, the Graymont Community

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An artistic rendering of the large “Northernmost Point of Lake Michigan marker” that will be dedicated at 10 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 2 at the Garfield Township Marina in Naubinway. (TOLCA image)

and Economic Fund, and donations from Cloverland Electric Cooperative, businesses and individuals. However, additional funds are needed. For more information about the project or about how to support it, visit the organization’s website at topofthelake.org.

New features dedicated on heritage trail

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he Iron Ore Heritage Recreation Authority recently opened accessible fishing piers and weather shelters on the Carp River in Negaunee, and a second weather shelter with access steps to the Pine Hill Pond in Negaunee Township. The $234,000 project was paid in part by a $163,000 grant from the Michigan Natural Resource Trust Fund which provides funding for outdoor recreation projects. The project was designed by Sanders-Czapski Associates of Marquette and built by Wuebben Construction of Dollar Bay. Fishermen who have accessibility challenges can now use these fishing piers along an accessible trail to fish for brook trout while trail users can seek shelter from weather events through the covered shelters, as well as view wildlife from the Carp River Platform. “Our goal is to always provide better access to outdoor recreation opportunities for all abilities along the spine of the Iron Ore Heritage Trail ,” commented Don Britton, chair of the Iron Ore Heritage Recreation Authority. Carol Fulsher, administrator of the IOHRA, added, “Some spots along the trail are just natural stopping points because of their beauty. The Pine Hill Pond in Negaunee Township offers stunning views of a greenstone bluff along with the pond and our ledge way that skirts along the pond’s side. We wanted to provide more accessible access to the pond and provide a shelter from sun, rain, wind, lightning along a remote section of trail...”

Instagram scavenger hunt Oct. 9

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opper Country Community Arts Center will hold an “Art is” Instagram outdoor scavenger hunt on Saturday, Oct. 9, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is described as a family-friendly event and team members can be located anywhere in the world. A list of 30 art activity clues, geared to get teams outside and thinking creatively, will be distributed by email to the registered team captain on Friday, Oct. 8, at 5 p.m. In order to participate, one open Instagram account is required during the event. The event will be moderated through the Copper Country Community Instagram account @coppercountryarts. Teams of 1-6 people may begin posting photos of their art activity clue answers to Instagram at 10 a.m. on Oct. 9; submissions close at 5 p.m. Prizes will be awarded to the top three teams on the basis of completion and creativity. “Art is” is a CCCAC fundraiser. For complete information, visit www.coppercountryarts.com/artis. The Copper Country Community Arts Center is a non-profit organization located at 126 Quincy Street in Hancock, MI. The CCCAC is dedicated to “Fostering an Environment where the Arts and People Grow Together.”

Benefit party will support lake protectors

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he public is invited to a benefit party to support two organizations that exist to protect and restore the Great Lakes. The organizations include the

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Superior Watershed Partnership and FLOW (For Love of Water). The event will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 12, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at the Belsolda Farm, located at 488 Mangum Road in Skandia Township. The event, which is catered by The Delft Bistro, will feature live music by Not Quite Canada, poetry readings by Mad Angler Michael Delp and U.P. poet laureate M. Bartley Seigel, as well as cocktails, spirit tastings and snacks. All proceeds will benefit the two organizations. FLOW focuses on improving Great Lakes policy, empowering citizen engagement, and protecting freshwater as a public commons. The SWP focuses on habitat restoration, coastal resiliency and community climate adaptation. Tickets are $50 for one person or $75 for two people. For more information or to purchase tickets, scan the QR code on any promotional poster or visit eventbrite.com and type “Skandia” or “Belsolda” in the search bar for the event information to appear.

U.P. author event to be held online

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he Crystal Falls Community District Library, in partnership with the U.P. Publishers & Authors Association, has scheduled author events with winners of the UP Notable Book List. The 10th event is with 7th-generation Marquette resident Tyler R. Tichelaar who will present his award-winning original history book, “Kawbawgam: The Chief, The Legend, The Man.” Tichelaar’s meticulous research of original sources exposes decades of embellishment and questionable reporting. This Q and A style event is open to all U.P. residents free of charge. It will be held Thursday, Oct. 14, at 7 p.m. (6 p.m. Central) on the Zoom platform. To participate, contact Evelyn Gathu in advance by email: egathu@ Tyler Tichelaar uproc.lib.mi.us, or by phone (906) 875-3344.  It is recommended that participants borrow a copy of the book from their local library or purchase from local booksellers in advance to get the most out of the event.

Cash, credit only in raffle final weeks

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he Keweenaw Natural Areas fundraising raffle drawing will be held on Saturday, Oct. 16. Proceeds will help preserve Seven Mile Point and other KNA Natural Areas for wildlife and public access. A total of 1,000 tickets are being sold for $100 each. Only credit/debit card or cash is accepted for payment for tickets during the last two weeks of the raffle. The grand prize winner will receive $20,000. There will also be a second prize of $5,000, a third prize of $1,000, and four prizes of $500. Ticket holders do not need to attend the drawing to win. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact KNA at

Pictured is the sand beach side of Seven Mile Point, one of the places Keweenaw Natural Areas works to preserve. (Photo courtesy of KNA.)

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the perfect event to get in the spirit as Halloween draws near.

History center to host archeology fair

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aturday, Oct. 16, is International Archaeology Day and the Marquette Regional History Center will celebrate with an archaeology fair. The event will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and MRHC invites the public to have fun learning about local and global archaeology through activities, demonstrations, artifacts and displays at a wide variety of interactive booths throughout the museum. The Marquette Regional History Center is among 45 world-wide, Long-Term Collaborators listed by the Archaeological Institute of America. For 2021, the history center will feature an update on an excavation in Marquette County. The archaeology fair is included with the cost of general admission. Prices are adults, $7; seniors, $6; students, $3; youth 12 and under, $2. The Marquette Regional History Center is located at 145 W. Spring Street in Marquette MI 49855. Call (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org for information.

Free online Tai Chi training offered

M Children examine a bear skull at the Marquette Regional History Center. The history center will host an archaeology fair on Saturday, October 16. (MRHC photo)

KNAraffle@yahoo.com or by phone at (906) 370-9022.

Scouting popcorn sales kickoff

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arquette area Cub Scout packs, scouts, and BSA troops are selling popcorn to help support their scouting adventures for the coming year. Popcorn is the top fundraiser for most scouting packs and troops. Scouts began offering booth sales at select weekend dates and times starting Sept. 18 at Super One Foods and Econo Foods in Marquette, Snyder Drug in Harvey and Negaunee, Tractor Supply in Negaunee Township and more. Contact Hiawathaland District Director Patrick O’Brien for more information, including locations and dates where sales will be held, at patrick.obrien@scouting.org or 920-419-8401.

Fall Phantasm offers seasonal fun

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ravel Marquette announces that its first-ever Fall Phantasm event will be held on Saturday, Oct. 2, from 6 to 11 p.m. The event, presented by Marquette Fringe, is at Lakenenland Sculpture Park (2800 M-28 East, Marquette) and will offer music, dance and performers in an illusionary, fantasy-themed atmosphere. The event will feature all kinds of fantastical creatures throughout the grounds to engage with attendees (witches, dwellers, a goat man, etc.), a bazaar where guests can make their own masks and costumes to join in with the performances, fantasy games and activities, an elixir bar with feature drinks, and themed stories read by actors at different fire pits throughout the grounds. The Fall Phantasm promises a fantastical night to remember and is

ichigan State University Extension Program is offering “Online Standing/Seated Tai Chi for Arthritis and Fall Prevention” on Mondays and Wednesdays from Oct. 11 to Dec. 15. The online class will be conducted via Zoom beginning at 2:30 p.m. (ET). The program aims to help increase strength, improve balance and posture, prevent falls, improve mind, body and spirit, reduce stress and increase relaxation. Modifications will be provided for those who want to attend seated or standing. The program is targeted to help older adults and older adults with disabilities at risk for falls stay active. Those new to Zoom video conferencing should contact Anita Carter for help setting up and becoming familiar with the Zoom platform. There are 21 position openings available. Registration will close at 11:59 p.m. on Oct. 7. To register, visit https://events.anr.msu.edu/standingseatedtaichi2021/.

Mass for health care workers at cathedral Oct. 19

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ishop John Doerfler of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Marquette will host a Mass of Thanksgiving, Tuesday, Oct. 19, at 5:15 p.m. at St. Peter Cathedral in Marquette. The Mass is open to the public. Physicians, healthcare workers and their spouses are invited to attend a light meal and reception in the parish hall following the Mass. Father Robb Jurkovich, chaplain at OSF St. Francis Hospital, will offer a brief reflection. To register for the reception, visit www.dioceseofmarquette.org/calendar/10/2021. For more in-

mea culpa!

In the September issue of the Marquette Monthly, it was accidentally stated that in addition to the top three prizes for the Keweenaw Nature Areas fundraising raffle, there were four additional prizes of $5,000. The correct value of the four additional prizes is $500 apiece. We apologize for the error.

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formation, contact the Office of the Bishop at (906) 2279115 or by email at mbernier@dioceseofmarquette.org

Public invited to voting machine tests

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he public is invited to attend public accuracy tests of the computer programs that will be used to record and count the votes cast at the Tuesday, Nov. 2, general election. The tests will be held according to the following: Monday, Oct. 11, at 10 a.m. at Ishpeming City Hall; Wednesday, Oct. 13 at 10 a.m. at Ishpeming City Hall; Tuesday, Oct. 19, at 2.p.m at the Baraga Gymnasium, Marquette; Thursday, Oct. 21, at Negaunee City Hall. Anyone in the public may attend.

New provider joins health center

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assandra Dix, LMSW, has joined the team of Behavioral Health providers at Upper Great Lakes Marquette Family Health Center (UGL). Cassandra was born and raised in the Upper Peninsula and attended Northern Michigan University where she received her Bachelor of Science in psychology degree with minors in sociology and philosophy. She then went on to earn her Master of Social Work degree from Michigan State University in East Lansing. During her time at MSU,

Cassandra had the opportunity to study social policy abroad in Finland. Following graduation, Cassandra began working as a therapist in the Lower Peninsula and then moved to Ann Arbor where she and her husband, Kyle, were married. The best part of being an LMSW for Cassandra is having the privilege to hold a safe space for each person’s unique journey. “Every day I learn from the people that I work with and it is a humbling experience to be able to connect with so many different people,” says Cassandra, “Social work is often very Cassandra Dix, challenging, but can be equally as reLMSW warding. Every day is different, and I’m grateful for the opportunity to be able to give back to the community that I was raised in.” UGL’s Marquette Family Health Center is located at 1414 W. Fair Avenue, Suite 242, Marquette, MI. For more information about Cassandra’s services, please call 906-449-2900.

Student can enter LIVE Art/Word contest

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he LIVE Art & Word Contest has begun and will run through Monday, Nov. 15. The contest is a way

Middle school students enjoy ‘fruits’ of their labor

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ather Marquette Catholic Academy middle schoolers started the year off by seeing the fruits of their labor from the spring school year. Fifth through 8th-grade students spent their science classes Sept. 9 harvesting, preparing, and eating the potatoes they planted before leaving last spring for summer break. Last June, the 5th-grade science/STEM students planted $3 worth of seed potatoes in Father Marquette’s new garden beds, purchased from an Excellence in Education grant received last year. That grant money allowed FMCA to purchase the three raised beds that were planted with potatoes, tomatoes, parsley, 10

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Father Marquette Catholic Academy middle schoolers William Niemi, Easton Lefebvre, Liam Connors, Jack Pozega, Logan Curran and 8th-grade science teacher Laura Ricklard are shown washing the potatoes the students grew in the school garden.

carrots, swiss chard, kale, onions, cucumbers, zucchini, squash, dill, cilantro, and basil. As part of the science curriculum and the Laudato Si Club, which is Latin for “take care of our common home,” students learn horticulture and botany skills, such as crop rotation and organic insect and pest control. Over the summer, families volunteered their time and tended

to the raised beds that housed the potatoes, in addition to other veggies and flowers planted on FMCA’s grounds. Middle school students harvested three bushels of potatoes, washed, cut, and boiled them, made homemade butter from cream, and prepped the basil, parsley, onion, and tomatoes to go with. They enjoyed their hardearned meal!


Bradford Veley is a freelance cartoonist, illustrator and farmer in the U.P. Follow him on Facebook, Instagram and at www.bradveley.com.

to help break the stigma surrounding mental health concerns and suicide, as well as showcase the talents of high school students from across the U.P. It is open to all U.P. high school students, whether they are doing in-person school, taking part in virtual classroom or home schooling. Students may submit poetry, paintings, photography, song, graphic arts, quilting, or any other art form that addresses the theme of Mental Health Awareness. The grand prize winner will receive $500. First place and second place prizes will be awarded in each of three categories: Visual Arts, Word and Song. Each piece of artwork will be judged by West End Suicide Prevention, as well as an Expert Panel. There will also be a chance for community members to vote for their favorite piece via Facebook. West End Suicide Prevention is a dedicated group of individuals who are committed to reducing suicide. Their efforts are facilitated by Great Lakes Recovery Centers. They introduced the LIVE campaign, a positive mental health campaign, on the west end of Marquette County in the fall of 2019. LIVE, which rhymes with ‘give,’ stands for LOVE (yourself), INCLUDE (others), VALUE (life), ENGAGE (community). For more information on the LIVE Art & Word Contest and to find the official rules and entry forms, go to www.glrc.org/LIVE. If you have a background in art, music or english and would like to be a part of the expert panel, please contact Amy Poirier at apoirier@greatlakesrecovery.org. If you would like to sponsor this contest or other programs of West End Suicide Prevention contact Amy Poirier at apoirier@greatlakesrecovery.org.

Marquette County CROP Walk Oct. 10

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CROP Walk to raise funds to feed the hungry in Marquette County will be held on Sunday, Oct. 10, at the Marquette Hope Connection, 927 W. Fair Ave., in Marquette with registration beginning at 1:30 p.m.; the walk will begin at 2 p.m. To participate, walkers can pick up donation collection packets ahead of time at First Presbyterian Church, 120 N. Front St. in Marquette. The packets are available at the church office Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Please call at (906) 226-6587. The Marquette County CROP Hunger Walk has set a goal of 100 Walkers and hopes to raise $8,000 to help end hunger and poverty through long-term sustainable approaches to significantly reduce or eliminate hunger. Twenty-five percent of

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the funds raised will be split between St. Vincent DePaul and the NMU Food Bank. Last year, Marquette County Walkers raised more than $6,200.00 through this CROP Hunger Walk. This year Marquette County and some 1,000 other communities nationwide are joining together in interfaith CROP Hunger Walks around the theme, “Raising Animals; Growing Communities.” Many of the walkers will be wearing t-shirts proclaiming their solidarity with the millions of neighbors around the world who have to walk to live -- as well as with the millions served by local food pantries, food banks and meal sites here in the U.S. These local ministries share in the funds raised by CROP Hunger Walks. For more information, visit www.crophungerwalk.org/marquettemi

Public invited to meet U.P. authors

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he Fourth U.P. Author’s Day which will be held at the Campfire Coworks in Downtown Marquette on Saturday, Oct. 9. This collection of Upper Peninsula authors and poets will be displaying and selling their creative wares from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Twenty of the U.P.’s finest writers and poets will be on hand for this free admission event, which is open to the public. The event, presented by the Upper Peninsula Publishers and Authors Association and the Campfire Coworks, will bring authors of all types of genres and styles from across the U.P. They will have their books available for sale and signing. Many of these authors are award-winning and will talk about their books and their experiences “This will be a gathering of authors and poets that represent the finest in the Upper Peninsula. With 20 authors represented, many of them award winners, there is no doubt there will be something for everyone’s reading tastes,” said Mikel B. Classen, one of the authors slated to attend. Over the last few years, many U.P. authors have found their way to the mainstream. Visit www.uppaa.org for more information and a complete list of authors who will attend.

Community forum will help MARESA map future

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ducators, school staff members, employers, community leaders and any resident of Marquette or Alger counties are invited to a community forum with the theme, “Redefining the Marquette-Alger RESA: Prioritizing Regional Educational Services and Support.” The three-part event begins on Thursday, Oct. 21, from 5 to 9 p.m. at Munising High School; it continues Friday, Oct. 22, from 5 to 9 p.m. at Ramada Inn in Marquette, and concludes Saturday, Oct. 23, from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., also at the Ramada Inn in Marquette. The goal of the forum is to identify this region’s educational priorities for the future. The Marquette-Alger Regional Educational Service Agency (MARESA) strives to improve the outcomes for all children, educators, and local school districts within the two-county boundary. This event will be professionally facilitated, and the feedback gathered will be used by MARESA to create a new strategic plan that reflects the collective values of our schools and community members. Participants should plan to attend all three sessions and should register in advance by calling (906) 226-5100 or visit www.maresa.org. Check the website for transportation and lodging options.

Revolve CC conference promotes creative, diverse collaboration

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rganizers of Marquette’s Revolve Creative Collaboration Conference (RevolveCC) will hold a conference on diversity and collaboration on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 5 and Nov. 6. Tickets are on sale now at revolvecc.net/ registration. RevolveCC is a creative collaboration conference hosted yearly in Marquette with a mission to promote the creative class in the Midwest and support collaboration, cross-discipline works and creative business. Keith Ellis, executive director of RevolveCC said, “The Revolve

To help ensure Michigan students and educators are as safe as possible in the classroom and keep students in school for in-person learning, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) has issued updated quarantine guidance. (MDHHS infographic, provide on September 8, 2021)

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Bradford Veley is a freelance cartoonist, illustrator and farmer in the U.P. Follow him on Facebook, Instagram and at www.bradveley.com.

Creative Collaboration Conference is about bringing together Marquette and the U.P.’s creative communities and providing new perspectives on the creative industry. We focus on bringing diverse voices, as well as exposure, to fields that often thrive in a collaborative environment. We want to inspire new and innovative creative ventures throughout the UP and beyond!” Conference attendees will get the opportunity to hear from Vashi Nedomansky, ACE, editor of 11 Hollywood films and over 50 national commercials, Antonio Michael Downing a.k.a. John Orpheus, multicultural musical artist and published author, Zoe Boekbinder, musician, activist, and founding creator of Prison Music Project, and Cal Lane, metalworker and sculptor known for creating delicate, lacy sculptures out of industrial steel products. For more information, ticket information and to register visit https://revolvecc.net/registration/

Non-partisan voter information available

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he League of Women Voters (LWV ) of Marquette County invites voters to check out VOTE411.org before the upcoming Tuesday, Nov. 2 election.

The League of Women Voters of Marquette County invites the public to visit www.411.org for non-partisan ballot information in their local communities. To learn more about the LWV of Marquette County visit www.lwvmqt.org

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Seven glass beads were found this past summer durring the archaeological dig at site GLO3. Pictured here on the four directions drum of Jim Paquette. More images from the proect can be found on the Marquette Regional History Museum’s Facebook page. Also, Jim Paquette will be giving a presentation about the recent archeological dig at the history center’s Archeology Fair on October 16. (Photo by Jim Paquette)

VOTE411.org is the league’s one-stop-shop for non-partisan, election-related information. Register to vote, look up deadlines for registering and applying for/returning absentee ballots, read about the local candidates and their views on topics of interest to the public, and much more. Visitors to VOTE411.org can read about the candidates running for Marquette City Commission, Board of Light and Power, and the Negaunee City Council; see what will be on their ballot; check their voter registration information; and find local polling places. Simply enter your residential address for your customized ballot, including any ballot issues. To learn more about the LWV of Marquette County visit www.lwvmqt.org

Archaeological dig in township completed recently

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he Marquette Regional History Center (MRHC), in cooperation with the Cleveland-Cliffs Inc., has completed a three-week archaeological excavation project at the circa 1630s GLO#3 site located in Sands Township. This important Marquette County cultural site has been the focus of western Great Lakes regional study for the past two decades by numerous archaeologists and historians who research the early Native/Euro contact period here in northeast North America. It is known as the “protohistoric period,” a time when local resident aboriginal peoples were making their very first contacts with early French explorers, traders, and settlers from what is today Canada, or New France. The 2021 excavation was headed up by Negaunee resident, archaeologist and longtime MRHC member Jim Paquette. Paquette also participated in past onsite professional investigations at the GLO#3 site with NMU archaeologists Dr. Marla Buckmaster (retired) and the late Dr. John Anderton in 1999, 2000, 2012, and 2013. “This is surely a one-in-a-million western Great Lakes early cultural site,” said Paquette. “We have, for the very first time, uncovered direct evidence of how a family of regional people toughed out the U.P. winter back at a time when there were no grocery stores and when it was totally up to everyone in that family to focus on their survival …” More images from

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the dig can be found on the Marquette Regional History Center’s Facebook page. Also, Paquette will be Visit www. marquettehistory.org for more information.

U.P. Home Health & Hospice honored

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.P. Home Health & Hospice has been named a 2020 HHCAHPS Honors recipient by HEALTHCAREfirst. This prestigious annual review recognizes agencies that continuously provide a positive patient experience and high-quality care as measured from the patient’s point of view. It acknowledges the highest performing agencies by analyzing the performance of the Home Health Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HHCAHPS) survey satisfaction measures. “HHCAHPS Honors recipients are industry leaders in providing quality care and constantly seeking ways to improve,” said Ronda Howard, vice president revenue cycle management and CAHPS at HEALTHCAREfirst. “We are honored to be aligned with such high performing agencies like U.P. Home Health & Hospice, and we congratulate them on their success.” U.P. Home Health & Hospice Executive Director, Jennie Garrett-Bureau credits the agency’s longstanding leadership and clinical expertise for being named a 2020 Home Health Honors recipient. She said, “We have an amazing team here that always puts the patient first. We look to provide the best continuity of care for our patients. These people are our friends and neighbors, and we take care of them like they are.”

Online class offered for caregivers

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owerful Tools for Caregivers, a six-week online workshop, designed for the non-professional, informal family caregiver, will be held on Wednesdays, beginning Oct. 6, through Nov. 10 from 2-3:30 pm ET, with an optional Zoom orientation on Wednesday, Sept. 29 at 2 pm. Research studies find high rates of depression and anxiety among caregivers and increased vulnerability to health problems. The Powerful Tools for Caregivers online program will provide caregivers tools to help reduce stress and increase relaxation, make tough decisions, reduce guilt, anger and depression, communicate effectively, set goals and problem solve, and take better care of themselves while caring for a relative or friend. Caregivers will benefit from the class whether they are helping a parent, spouse, or friend living at home, in longterm care or across the country. The workshop focuses on self-care for the caregiver, not on specific diseases or hands-on caregiving. Powerful Tools for Caregivers is offered by U.P. Commission for Area Progress (UPCAP) in partnership with Tri-County Office on Aging. There is no charge for this online workshop, but registration is required. Participants must also have a computer, tablet, or smartphone with internet connection and email address to participate. To register, visit www.upcap.org or call 2-1-1 Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET, for assistance.

Individual immunization records now available online

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o help Michiganders ages 18 and older more easily access their immunization records, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) recently launched the Michigan Immunization Portal.

Michigan adults with immunization records posted in the Michigan Care Improvement Registry (MCIR), including COVID-19 vaccination, will be able to locate their own record online and download, save or print this information. The portal was funded through CDC grant dollars and was officially launched in mid-August. “We want to make sure Michiganders are able to access their vaccination records as easily as possible as this is important health information,” said Elizabeth Hertel, MDHHS director. “The Michigan Immunization Portal allows them to find their record from their computer or smartphone and save a copy for their records. This will also allow anyone who has misplaced their COVID-19 vaccination card to print a record of their vaccination.” To ensure privacy and that individuals are the only ones able to access their own immunization records, Michiganders must create a MILogin account at Michigan.gov/MiImmsportal and upload a valid government-issued photo ID such as a driver’s license, state ID or passport. There is no cost to access the portal.

Conversational French meetings resume at NMU

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fter an absence of several semesters, La Table Française, an informal French converation/discussion group at NMU, has recently re-emerged and meets on Wednesdays from 7 to 8 p.m. at the NMU library room 311. The weekly event involves informal conversation and discussion on topics such as film, gastronomy, literature, art, and travel. The topic is selected in advance and presented by advanced students of French. Community members are warmly invited to attend to participate or just to listen. For additional information contact Nell Kupper at nkupper@nmu.edu or (906)227-2648.

Conference to focus on youth development, virtual communication

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he Great Lakes Center for Youth Development will host the U.P. Nonprofit Conference on Thursday, Oct. 21, at the Northern Center at Northern Michigan University from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The keynote speaker will be Brad Gingras, a professional trainer, facilitator, generaNicole Fende tional strategist and consultant. Gingras has given professional development workshops, presentations and strategic planning facilitation to thousands of youth and professionals. He has expertise in generational training and strategies, leadership development, team building, career preparation and counseling, and motivational guidance. In addition to the keynote address, he will give a workshop titled Communication in a Virtual World. It is designed to provide insight into the evolution of communication along with effective strategies for engaging co-workers and colleagues, and for strengthening personal relationships. The event’s closing speaker will

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be Nicole Fende. Also known as “The Numbers Whisperer,” she helps coaches and creative entrepreneurs achieve prosperity. She is a credentialed actuary with experience as an investment banker who attained chief financial officer status before age 30. Nicole is the author of two books, designer of Body Be Gone card game, and the Ringmaster of Creatopia. Her secret weapon – a highly contagious laugh with no known antidote. When she’s not teaching The Prosperity Solution, Nicole can be found spending time with her daughter, playing board games, or exploring the wilds of Minnesota. The event will include a breakfast buffet and lunch. For more information and to register visit www.glcyd.org

COVID-19 Community response fund grant provides support for PPE needs in Marquette County schools

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hrough a collaborative effort with local school districts, the Community Foundation of Marquette County and United Way of Marquette County recently announced a grant to Marquette-Alger Regional Education Service Agency (MARESA) to support the purchase of personal protective equipment, including masks, for Marquette County schools. The $7,400 grant was made possible by the COVID-19 Community Response Fund, which is administered by the Community Foundation in partnership with United Way of Marquette County. “These types of collaborative efforts have a meaningful impact in our community,” says Andrew Rickauer, Executive Director of United Way of Marquette County. “I am really pleased to be part of helping our local youth so that they are safe and can return to in-person learning.” The grant will allow MARESA to coordinate a bulk order of PPE, including masks, after the schools expressed a need as they prepare for the school year. “After hearing there was a need for PPE in Marquette County schools, we were able to utilize funds from the COVID-19 Community Response Fund to assist,” says Community Foundation CEO Zosia Eppensteiner. “With much uncertainty going into this school year, our hope is that this grant allows the schools to be prepared if the PPE is needed. Collaborating among organizations to provide a quick response to a community need is exactly what the Community Response Fund was set up to do.” The COVID-19 Community Response fund was established in 2020 to support the needs of the community and nonprofits during the COVID-19 pandemic. Since March 2020, over $178,000 has been raised and over $160,000 in grants have been distributed. Grants have supported the community in a multitude of ways, from purchasing food for senior meal programs, to at-home craft kits for youth, to supplies for organizations assisting homeless populations.

Millions in support for Michigan fire departments announced; Stanton Township receives grant

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he Michigan Public Health Institute will receive $1,408,797 to provide smoke detectors and develop online fire prevention tools for Michigan schools. The Fire Department Safety Officers Association will also receive $1,500,000 in federal funding to support community fire prevention education and training. These federal funds come from the Department of Homeland

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Security’s Fire Prevention and Safety Grant (FP&S) Program. “Our firefighters and first responders put their lives on the line to protect our families, homes, and communities,” said Sen. Debbie Stabenow in announcing the funding. “Prevention is so important. These new resources will help save lives and the treasured possessions of families.” “Research shows that a working smoke alarm can cut the risk of dying in a fire almost in half. Far too many people in our country lack this basic level of protection. Along with educating children about fire safety, this new funding from FEMA will allow us to distribute an additional 20,500 alarms, bringing the project total to 78,500 alarms in homes in high-risk communities,” said Meghan Faulkner, MA, associate director of Operations, Center for National Prevention Initiatives at Michigan Public Health Institute. Eligible fire departments and Emergency Medical Services organizations in Michigan and across the country can apply for Fire Prevention and Safety Grants. More information about the grant can be found at www.fema.gov/firegrants. U.S. Sens. Stabenow and Gary Peters also announced that the Stanton Township Volunteer Fire Department will receive $24,642 in federal funding for fire prevention and safety. These federal funds come from the Department of Homeland Security’s Fire Prevention and Safety Grant Program. “Our firefighters put their lives on the line to protect our families, homes, and communities,” said Sen. Stabenow. “These new resources will help keep the public safe and give our first responders the equipment they need to do their jobs more safely and effectively.” “First responders are on the frontlines to respond when emergencies strike. Ensuring that they are protected in the line of duty is vital,” said Sen. Peters, chairman of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. “I’m pleased to announce these grants, which will help improve public safety and better ensure departments in Michigan have the resources to do their jobs safely and effectively.” Eligible fire departments and Emergency Medical Services organizations in Michigan and across the country can apply for Fire Prevention and Safety Grants. More information about the grant can be found at http://www.fema.gov/firegrants.

Michigamme Moonshine Art Gallery closing its doors

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he Michigamme Moonshine Art Gallery in Michigamme will soon be closing its doors after 20 years of providing a venue for artists and art lovers in the region. Friederike Roach, owner of Michigamme Moonshine, said the business’ last day will be Sunday, Oct. 31. Over the years, the gallery has had more than 10,000 art pieces pass through its doors. Roach said she is proud to have displayed the works of many great artists, local and beyond. “Over these 20 years we have had so many wonderful patrons and artists. It was really a great time,” Roach said. These final weeks will be the first time the gallery has ever offered discounted prices for art. Michigamme Moonshine opened on Aug. 1, 2001. Discounts will vary by artist but are as much as 50 percent off. The gallery will continue its normal operating hours, Wednesday to Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and by chance, until its final day. MM


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on campus

Despite the lingering pandemic, students returned to Michigan Technological University in Houghton in great numbers this semester. (MTU phtoto)

ENROLLMENT BOOM

MTU’s incoming class is the largest since 1982 By Cynthia Perkins, MTU

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heir first classes and from ethnically diverse communities, undergraduate research with 162 identifying as members of experiences have barely underrepresented racial and ethnic begun, but at more than 1,480 strong, groups. And, the University enrolled Michigan Tech’s Class of 2025 is one the highest number of students who for the record books. identify as women, with 2,054 women Michigan Technological University’s newest Huskies arrived on campus last week, accounting for a 23 percent increase in firstyear student enrollment from fall 2020 and the largest incoming class the University has seen since 1982. Incoming academic credentials remain the highest in University Wallace Southerland III, history. VP for Student Affairs/Dean of Students “We couldn’t be more excited to welcome such an incredible class of talented students to the Michigan Tech family,” accounting for 29 percent of the total said Michigan Tech President Rick student population. Koubek. “We are a distinct research “Tech’s record-breaking enrollment institution, offering opportunities this year is proof positive that and experiences unique to Michigan Michigan Tech is one of the top Tech. Students recognize that. That’s universities in the world, and we why they want to be here.” are indeed a destination institution MTU’s incoming class also has the for talented women, minority, highest number of first-year students international and other students,”

Tech’s record-breaking enrollment this year is proof positive that Michigan Tech is one of the top universities in the world ...”

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said Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Wallace Southerland III. Tech’s total enrollment currently stands at 6,977, an increase from 6,875 in 2020-21, a year in which the global pandemic overshadowed the myriad of factors that consistently affect college choice. Full-time student enrollment has increased three percent. Beyond enrollment, Michigan Tech is projecting record gains in research expenditures and institutional giving. During the 202021 academic year, as MTU faculty pivoted to continue providing the learn-by-doing experience MTU is known for, researchers did what they do best, resulting in what is expected to be an all-time record of nearly $81.7 million in total research expenditures, an increase of nearly five percent over fiscal year 2020. The 2020-21 academic year also saw the University’s second-largest fundraising total in 20 years, at nearly $44 million. Over the last three years, the institution’s endowment has grown by roughly 40 percent.


U.P. universities get high ranks

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LSSU ranked in U.S. News & World Report

ake Superior State University continues to rate as a leading institution in higher education, especially in the Midwest, according to U.S. News & World Report. Its 2022 “best colleges” rankings celebrated LSSU in four categories that Lake State had also made in 2021: best regional colleges in the Midwest; top public schools in regional colleges in the Midwest; top performers on social mobility in regional colleges in the Midwest; and best undergraduate engineering programs nationwide. For 2022, LSSU tied for 45th best regional college in the Midwest from 87 ranked, up one slot from 46th in 2021 from 76 ranked and level with 2020 at 45th from 70 ranked. For a third consecutive year, Lake State appraised as the third top public school in regional colleges in the Midwest from 12 ranked. LSSU rose 13 slots to 33rd from 46th from last year as top performer on social mobility in regional colleges in the Midwest from 76 ranked. Lake State tied for 185th best undergraduate engineering program nationwide at schools that don’t offer doctorates from 239 ranked, down from tied for 157th in 2021 from 220 ranked and tied for 161st in 2020 from 210 ranked.

Magazine ranks NMU as 20th best in Midwest Northern Michigan University is the 20th best public university in the Midwest region, according to the 2022 U.S News & World Report rankings released recently. The latest edition assesses 1,466 U.S. bachelor’s degree-granting institutions on 17 measures of academic quality. Those that factor most heavily include graduation and retention rates, undergraduate academic reputation via peer assessment surveys, faculty resources for the previous academic year, and financial resources per student. NMU received another rankings accolade earlier this year: 39th nationwide in a listing of the “Top 50 Outdoor Colleges” compiled by Best Value Schools. “Even though students at this university have to face cold winters, they are surrounded by nature,” the NMU description stated. “They are close to Lake Superior, Marquette Mountain and other beautiful locations. NMU students receive free rentals of snowshoes, fat tire bikes and cross-country skis to explore.” The Best Value Schools list factored in available outdoor programs, activities and clubs. It also took into consideration the number of yearly days of sunshine.

Finlandia University was the site of a free COVID-19 vaccine and testing clinic at the Finnish American Heritage Center in late September. The public was invited, vaccinated or unvaccinated, and antigen test results were available within 15 minutes. Members of the Michigan Army National Guard, Western Upper Peninsula Health Department and Finlandia Nursing program were to assist and administer tests and vaccines. The clinic will serve as the first in a series of surveillance testing that will drive Finlandia’s decision-making regarding COVID-19. (Photo by Finlandia University)

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gift of water Honoring our forebears By Mohey Mowafy

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ublished in 1986, Mark Reisner’s Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water brought to public attention a growing scientific concern regarding increasing water scarcity in the western U.S. For instance, we had been systemically emptying the precious waters of the Colorado River onto golf courses in the Arizona desert. Candidly, my concern at that time is now dwarfed by more recent, and more disastrous, water dilemmas now facing us. No longer need we worry merely about the quantity of our water; now, we must worry about the quality of our water as well. Admittedly, for those of us living in the basin of the Great Lakes, it is difficult to contemplate running out of water, but protecting the quantity and quality of Great Lakes water is not only a regional concern; it has become a national concern, a national responsibility, as well. And climate change, with its furiously angry floods and hurricanes, will only exacerbate our water problems. How will we negotiate the water dilemmas that shall surely face us? I suggest that one source of wisdom is none other than the world’s great religions, ancient though they may be. My focus in the remainder of this essay is on the special meanings of water in these religions and the symbolism regarding water that underpins our religious and spiritual practices. Few things are as important to spiritual traditions as water. I was born into a Muslim family, and in my early childhood I learned the “ways,” or the teachings, in Islam regarding water. The Koran contains a plethora of verses acknowledging not only the importance but the sanctity of water; for instance, the words “… and, from water, God created everything alive.” This very same notion was also shared by Greek philosophers, who believed that water is none other than the source of life itself.

Water is paramount in the Hindu faith. The Ganges River is itself regarded as a holy river, and the faithful for thousands of years have gone on reverent pilgrimage to its banks. The sheer number of pilgrims over the millennia suggests the deep spiritual connectedness that the Hindu faithful feel toward the element of water. Likewise, in Christianity and Judaism, water enjoys a protean status. Think of the centrality of baptism, of Christ walking on the Sea of Galilee, of Christ turning water into wine, or of water springing forth from a rock after Moses struck it with his staff. In Buddhist practice, especially its ceremonies, water is similarly essential. Water is necessary for life, and water is commonly presented as an offering on Buddhist altars in many kinds of Buddhist services. Water, for Buddhists, also purifies and consoles, as when water is used to wash a freshly laid headstone. In the Abrahamic faiths, before praying, the faithful often wash in ritualistic ablution. It is advised that as one washes, one should praise God for the gift of water

Water Saving Tips • Dedicate a short period in each day to contemplating our responsibility to protect our water. • Water is too essential, and too important, to commodify. Resist its commodification by avoiding the use or purchase of commercial bottled water, except in emergencies.

and contemplate its life-giving properties. During funerals, the dead are bathed with water as certain prayers are ritualistically recited. In Islam, after quenching a thirst, a specific prayer of gratitude is uttered. In the Jewish tradition washing is essential upon rising and before eating. The parable of Hagar and her infant, abandoned alone in a vast sea of sand, is a story told in all the Abrahamic traditions. Muslims, in fact, consider that drinking from the well that Hagar dug in search of water for her infant as a source of eternal blessing. And so it goes. . . . Suffice it to say that across the broad array of the world’s religions, water is a primal symbol suggestive of earthly and heavenly salvation. But why should we look upon water, and not some other molecule, with such reverence? True, holy books are not the appropriate reference for a science-based discussion. I can only speculate that the unique chemical properties of water (H2O) deserve our respectful wonderment. Water can and does exist in three different forms, solid, liquid, and gas. It expands when it freezes. It is the most abundant molecule in all animals and plants. It is a solvent to an entire world of substances. Though it comes close, water is not quite magical, but, as the world’s great religions remind us, water amply deserves our reverence and our care. We would do well in contemporary times to honor the ancient wisdom and practice of our forebears. Contributor’s note: Mohey Mowafy is a retired NMU professor. His education background is in human health. He is a member of the Marquette Interfaith Forum. “The Gift of Water” columns are offered by the Northern Great Lakes Water Stewards and the Cedar Tree Institute, joined in an interfaith effort to help preserve, protect, and sanctify the waters of the Upper Peninsula. MM

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feature

Stan Bolsenga is shown with two wooden shorebirds he carved and painted.

The Ice Man Carveth

Retired glacial researcher is wood-carving artist

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Story by Joseph Zyble - Photos courtesy of Stan Bolsenga

unising resident Stan Bolsenga has an eye for detail. It’s evident in the bird sculptures he carves and paints. It’s also apparent in the many scientific studies and reports he’s authored or co-authored while he was active as a research glaciologist for 30 years. A wood carving titled “short-billed dowitcher” that he entered in the 2019 Northern Exposure Exhibit, an annual regional art competition sponsored by the Bonifas Arts Center in Escanaba, was chosen as the Marquette Monthly’s best in show.

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For Bolsenga, art was not something that he thought about early in his life. Of course, becoming a glaciologist wasn’t in his plans either. Nor would he have ever imagined he would spend his retirement years in the U.P. “It’s kind of a funny story,” he said about his first job after college, which actually led him to the U.P. Bolsenga, who was raised near Evanston, Ill., graduated from the University of Colorado with a degree in geology. The Snow, Ice and Permafrost Research Establishment, a company that was based near his

hometown, offered him a job. “They were looking for a geologist that they could turn into a glaciologist,” Bolsenga said, noting that the field station where he would be assigned was in a town in Michigan he was not familiar with: Houghton. He considered the company’s offer, looked at the map and spied Houghton Lake. “I thought, well, that’s not too bad. I can drive home every weekend and party with my friends,” he said. He accepted the job, found out that Houghton was not Houghton Lake,


but still looked forward to working at the field station after a few weeks of training at the main office in Evanston. Now a college a graduate with a real job, he went out and bought the shiny, used corvette he’d always dreamed of owning. “I loaded it up with my belongings and started driving, driving north,” he said. “Then all the roads became this red gravel.” The year was 1960. He kept driving and realized that a corvette was not the ideal vehicle for living in the U.P. Fortunately, Bolsenga really enjoyed his new job. “They made me into a glaciologist. I didn’t know anything at all about ice and snow research. They eased me into it and I was very interested in it,” he said. He worked at many locations throughout his career, typically as a civilian scientist contracted and supported by the U.S. government. “My prime area of expertise was looking at the interaction of solar radiation with ice and snow surfaces. I did a lot work on the reflection of solar radiation on ice and snow surfaces and a lot of work on penetration of solar radiation through various types of ice,” he said. In simple terms, Bolsenga created a reference for what would happen when snow and ice were struck by various levels and types of radiation. He connected the light radiation data collected by satellites to the physical

changes happening on the ground. His career took him to Greenland where he lived for a time at Camp Century, a former military installation carved into the polar ice cap and powered by a nuclear reactor. “The base was under the ice. There were about 150 people living and working there,” he said. One of Bolsenga’s assignments at Camp Century was to help prevent snow and ice from ingesting into the reactor’s air intake system, which had been a perpetual problem. “We experimented with different snow fence designs and we had success,” he said. While working in Yellowknife, located in the Canadian Northwest Territories, he recalls trying out a new extreme weather suit a company had recently developed. “My biologist colleague and I tested them out one day when we were working on a study to determine the amount of solar radiation penetrating through very thick ice and how this impacted the biota under the ice. We used a custom-fabricated support system to collect data beneath the ice,” he said. “They worked. The suits kept us perfectly warm though it was 70 below zero.” (In another study on thinner ice, Bolsenga assembled the same support system, but with a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to study Lake Erie under-ice biota.) While working in Alaska, he

They made me into a glaciologist. I didn’t know anything at all about ice and snow research. They eased me into it and I was very interested in it.”

Stan Bolsenga is shown somewhere in the arctic setting up sensitive equipment that measures the melting rates of snow and ice under specific conditions. He and his partner traveled to the site on snowshoes and hauled the equipment on a pull-behind covered sled.

Glaciologist Stan Bolsenga’s career once took him to Greenland to work at Camp Century, a military installation that was built into the ice cap and powered by a nuclear reactor. One of his assignments was to try to keep the snow and ice from building up inside the air intake vents for the facility. He is shown standing near part of the special fencing he designed to help prevent the build up. “We experimented with different snow fence designs and we had success,” he said.

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snapped a photo of a bank temperature sign that read -53, but the temperature continued dropping to -70 and -80. “I have a clipping from the Fairbanks newspaper and it says ‘70 below and no relief in sight.’ Some of the mercury thermometers actually burst in those temperatures,” Bolsenga said. “70 below is really an amazing experience.” During his career, Bolsenga also earned masters and doctorate degrees from the University of Michigan that complemented his research. His work took him as far away as Mongolia to study some of its lakes. This was later in his career when he started to move into the hydrology field. “I’ve been to Venezuela. Their Lake Maracaibo was just a disaster. The bottom of the lake had all these lines for pumping petroleum from the different oil companies and many were leaking,” he said. Bolsenga was there to help develop a plan to restore the polluted lake. “At that time that country was so wealthy they said anything you can do for us that would be fine, we’ll pay for it 100 percent. That was great, but by the time we got everything in place to get it going, their economy began to tank and that was the end of that,” he said. In retirement, Bolsenga and his

wife Judy lived near Ann Arbor. He enjoyed robust, outdoor activities like snowboarding and mountain biking. However, 19 years ago a neardeath accident involving a tractor forced him to slow down. One day a little advertisement in a newspaper about a local wood carving class caught his eye. Though he had no art background, he signed up for it, but the class was cancelled due to lack of interest. B o l s e n g a contacted the course instructor to see if he would be willing to teach him one on one; the instructor agreed. “I warned him that because of the accident I could only sit or stand still for about an hour. He told me that he’d been in a serious construction accident and said, ‘If I can do it, you can too.’”

Bolsenga recalled. “It was a good be-ginning; he gave me a lot. I also learned from books and magazines,” he said. A course offered by the world-class wood carvers of Krausmans Wood Carving Studio in Gwinn brought Bolsenga back to the U.P., at least for the weeklong course. “It was a great class. Afterward, I told my wife, let’s stay another week and I’ll show you the U.P.,” he said. It didn’t take long for their sightseeing to turn into house hunting for a summer cabin. The summer cabin they bought near Munising turned into their full-time home a year later when Stan kept spending all of his time there. “My wife got so frustrated she said, ‘This is silly. Why don’t we just move up.’ I felt like a pig in slop. We moved in full time,” he said.

I’ve been to Venezuela. Their Lake Maracaibo was just a disaster. The bottom of the lake had all these lines for pumping petroleum ... many were leaking.”

In his photo/scrapbook documenting his career, Stan Bolsenga has this photo he shot while working near Fairbanks, Alaska, during the 1960s. It was -53 at that moment, but later in the evening the temperature would drop to more than 70 degrees below zero.

(Above) Riding a state-of-the-art Mercury 644 Hurricane Mark I, capable of reaching 40 mph, Stan Bolsenga is shown on the ice of Lake Superior most likely near Whitefish Point. (Left) Bolsenga is assisted while setting up a tripod equipped with under-ice sensors to measure radiation levels through the ice. This one was most likely taken on Grand Traverse Bay near Traverse City in lower Michigan.

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Each of Stan Bolsenga’s shorebirds takes about 40 hours to create.

That was 16 years ago. Today, Bolsenga continues to perfect his art, which is a combination of woodcarving and fine detailed painting. He’s won awards at professional-level competitions throughout the U.S. He now focuses solely on creating shorebirds, and has become friends with Del Herbert, a California artist considered among the best shorebird artists in the world. Most of Bolsenga’s shorebirds take approximately 40 hours to create, but more detailed ones can take a lot longer. Many reside in private collections, some he gives away as gifts and others are available for purchase at The Gallery on Fifth in Calumet. “Sometimes I get to hear the stories about the people who buy them and why, and that’s really nice,” he said. Most gratifying to Bolsenga though is that the research he did during his career continues to live on and may be used for generations. He recently discovered “Google Scholar,” which collects

scholarly literature, and he found many of his books and papers listed. “… but even more impressive are citations where other researchers from Africa to Finland reference (use) my work. This is so immensely gratifying to know that your work lives on,” he said. “It could literally mean that a hundred years from now some young researcher will dig into the archives and use my work collaborating with his or her own.” About the author: Joseph Zyble is a long-time journalist, husband, dad and owner of two cats, one of which he has trained to walk with him on a leash. MM

A wood carving titled “short-billed dowitcher” that he entered in the 2019 Northern Exposure Exhibit, an annual regional art competition sponsored by the Bonifas Arts Center in Escanaba, was chosen as the Marquette Monthly’s best in show.

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WHAT A CHARACTER!

No. 0926

Reprinted from the New York Times By Alex Rosen/Edited by Will Shortz

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Answer Key To check your answers, see Page 63. No cheating!

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124 Dino’s tail? 125 Muse of love poetry 126 Arises (from) DOWN 1 Eastern cicada killers, e.g. 2 Suggestions 3 ‘‘ . . . said ____ ever’’ 4 School 5 Resolves out of court 6 Org. that flew a helicopter on Mars in 2021 7 Fail to mention 8 Information, old-style 9 Rounded quarters 10 Without stopping 11 How Alaska ranks first among the states 12 It’s often left on the table 13 What ‘‘vey’’ of ‘‘Oy, vey!’’ translates to 14 ____ Games, company behind Fortnite 15 Rey, to Luke Skywalker 16 Sword handles 17 ‘‘Einstein,’’ sarcastically 18 Puts pressure (on) 21 What can make men swear from men’s wear? 26 ‘‘____ pass Go . . . ’’ 28 Leading medal winner at the Tokyo Olympics 29 Forman who directed ‘‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’’ 35 Farm refrain 36 Weight of a paper clip, roughly 38 Ancient: Prefix 39 Soul-seller of legend 40 Half-baked? 41 Duck and goose, at times 42 ‘‘See ya’’ 43 Group dance popularized in the U.S. by Desi Arnaz 45 77-Down is on the most collected one in U.S. history 47 Epiphany 48 Voice actor Blanc 49 Show with over 1,000 handwritten cue cards each week, for short

51 City hazard 52 ‘‘My word!’’ 53 Pol in the ‘‘I am once again asking . . . ’’ meme 56 City whose police cars are adorned with a witch logo 58 Card game with a PGrated name 60 Boring 62 Purse 65 High degree 68 Not at all popular 69 Messes up 70 x, y and z 71 Chaotic skirmish 72 Fragrant compound 74 Saturn has more than 80 of them 75 Golf-course machine 77 He performed 636 consecutive sold-out shows in Vegas from 1969 to ’76 78 Burn-prevention meas. 79 The future Henry V, to Falstaff 80 Fight tooth and nail 81 One who consumes a ritual meal to absolve the souls of the dead 83 Bits on book jackets 87 Roc-A-____ Records 91 Part of U.C.L.A. 92 Fashion designer Geoffrey 94 It may run from an emotional situation 95 [Mwah!] 96 Departed by plane 98 Green vehicle 99 Frank 100 Duke’s org. 101 Pasta topper 102 Like the dog days of summer 103 Acrobatic 105 Make restitution 107 Faint color 108 ‘‘Take me ____’’ 109 Approaches 111 Where the lacrimal glands can be found 112 Pasta topper 113 Pump some weights 114 Not exactly 116 Vaccine-approving agcy.


at the table

The difference between summer minestrone and winter minestrone is all in the vegetables you choose. For those who enjoy dairy products, a piece of Parmigiano-Reggiano rind adds magic. (Katherine Larson photo)

Making Minestrone

The Italian soup is the perfect dish anytime during October

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hat would you like to read about in the October issue of MM?” I asked. Lucas answered without hesitation. “Soup. There’s something about October that cries out for soup.” He’s right, of course, and the soup to cry out for is minestrone. It’s a wonderfully variable dish: its summer versions delectable in October’s earlier sunny days and its winter versions heartening in the icy blasts which mark the end of the month. Minestrone’s Italian origins are reflected in its name as well as in the dish itself. The Italian word minestra means, literally, “that which is served.” It shares roots with the English word minister, and how better to minister to our loved ones’ needs than to ply them with soup? Not just any soup. The Italian suffix “-one” tells us that the minestra is big and robust, in the same way that those tiny tortellini pastas grow to be solid, well-stuffed tortellone. Thus, Italians can ask for zuppa (a broth-based soup served over toast), minestra (a vegetable soup), or a hearty minestrone—our topic for today. So if it’s so hearty, how can we make a summer-style minestrone? The answer lies largely in the vegetables we choose. The summer-style soup uses the last of those glorious late-summer vegetables: zucchini, sweet peppers, tomatoes. The winter-style soup heaves a sigh and then embrac-

Story by Katherine Larson

es our later crops: kale, cabbages, carrots, potatoes. Onions and garlic belong to both. What do we do with these vegetables? We layer them— the process described by the legendary Marcella Hazan as insaporire. Sure, it’s possible to cut up a bunch of veggies and toss them in a pot with some broth and beans until everything melts into each other. But if you do that you’ll get a vegetable soup that won’t deserve the “-one” suffix. To get a true minestrone, you want the complexity of flavor that comes from treating the vegetables in a more complex way. So here’s a basic outline, to be riffed on depending on what vegetables fall to hand. Gather your basic vegetables: maybe a couple of onions, a carrot, a stalk of celery, a potato, some green beans, a couple of smallish zucchini, a bit of kale, a couple of tomatoes… Chop them up. The rule is simple: make the pieces of a size that you and your loved ones would like to encounter in a soup spoon. If you like big hunks, cut them that way. If you like smaller dice so that multiple vegetables fit into a single spoonful, cut them that way. Thinking ahead here will enhance your eaters’ experience to a surprising degree. Now set aside about a third of your chopped onions, plus maybe a bit of leftover cabbage similarly chopped, for later. Pour a thin film of olive oil into the bottom of your soup pot. Add the onions, minus what you set aside, to the pot;

stir to coat it with the warm oil; and let it sauté for two or three minutes. Now add the carrots and give them their time to blossom. Then the celery. Then the potato. Add the vegetables that exude liquid—green beans, zucchini, kale, tomato—last and in succession, driest to wettest, so that each vegetable gets its full opportunity to sauté before there’s too much liquid. Finally, add enough water to cover everything by about an inch, cover the pot, and let it all simmer very gently for about 45 minutes. In the meantime, get out a skillet—yes, this minestrone requires several pots, but it’s worth it—and film it with more olive oil. Over medium-high heat, sauté the cabbage and onions that you set aside, along with a few fresh sage leaves, until it’s all a deep golden brown. Toss in some minced parsley and basil along with three or four cloves of garlic, chopped, to cook for one more minute. Add this robust mixture to the vegetables that you simmered in water. Slosh a little more water into the skillet to collect any of those wonderfully tasty brown bits that may have been left behind and add that to the soup pot too; the goal is, once more, for everything to be covered by about an inch of water. Now comes magic: a rind of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. If you splurged on the real stuff from Italy a while ago, you’ll remember how you grated it and loved it and grated it and loved it until all that was left was the rind. And you’ll remember that you stuck that rind in the freezer

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in a little bag and forgot about it until now. Haul it out and praise your own foresight. Of course, nothing prevents you now from going to the cheese store and asking them to sell you a piece of Parmesan rind. Where I shop, they occasionally offer little containers labeled “soup bones” filled with scraps of rind. They aren’t bones at all in the anatomic sense, of course, but boy do they impart richness to minestrone. If your family isn’t watching its fat intake, just toss the rind into the pot. When the soup is cooked, it will provide an amazingly juicy cheesy mass that my children, at least, always fought over. If your family is being careful about fat, wrap the rind in a bit of cheesecloth and fish it out at the end of the process. It will have infused the minestrone with flavor anyway. This is also the point where you add beans: cannellini or borlotti or pinto. Here I’m going to put in a word for home-cooked beans. Their flavor and texture are incomparable, and if you plan ahead by putting them to soak the night before they don’t add materially to the overall cooking time. But there’s yet another pot to wash, and I am realistic about the degree to which planning ahead fits with the hurly-burly of modern life. Canned beans are fine too. Just be sure to drain and thoroughly rinse them before using. Of course, if you are blessed with leftover home-cooked beans from another meal, this is the place to use them. In fact, the presence in your fridge of leftover homecooked beans is a terrific reason to decide to make minestrone in the first place. How many beans? Maybe a cup and a half, cooked. Whole or pureed? I like them whole or lightly mashed; some people prefer to puree about half the beans in a food processor to thicken the broth even more. (More dishes to wash…) So you added your rind and your beans to the pot. Let everything simmer slowly, with the pot partially covered, for another 45 minutes. Are we done yet? Not quite. There’s still the pasta. Do you expect to eat all this minestrone in one sitting, or will it last several days? The longer it sits, the soggier the pasta will get. Accordingly, if you are making this soup with the expectation that it will provide you with lunches for a week, consider cooking the pasta separately, tossing it with a little olive oil when done to keep it from sticking, and then adding only the amount you want each time you heat up a bit of minestrone. If, however, this minestrone is destined for consumption within a day or two— maybe as the backbone of a family meal before or after Halloween’s trick-or-treating—go ahead and toss half a cup of small pasta into the pot now. I like the small fun

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shapes, like ditalini or little stars, especially when feeding children; again, consider how it will fit on their spoons. Fifteen minutes worth of more simmering should get the pasta cooked and the minestrone finished. It’s ready to eat right away, or later; it’ll taste even better tomorrow; it can be served piping hot (in wintry times) or warm or room temperature (in that last moment of early-fall warmth). At this point, you have prepared something that bears strong kinship to Italian peasant food as served for millennia: Fully two thousand years ago, in De Re Coquinaria, Marcus Apicius described a Roman soup comprising farro, chickpeas, fava beans, onions, garlic, lard, and greens. Sounds like a pretty good minestrone to me; ours includes some additions from the Western Hemisphere (tomatoes, potatoes) but pretty much follows the same idea. Nowadays, however, we can add a bit of pizzazz without departing from the heart of minestrone. Besides the almost-obligatory grind of fresh black pepper, in Liguria they add a stir of fresh pesto. A big sprinkling of fresh basil or sage or rosemary, maybe chopped with some fresh garlic, would add similar oomph. Some freshly-grated Parmigiano-Reggiano is always welcome. Or place a piece of toast rubbed with garlic in the bowl before ladling minestrone over it. Let your imagination run wild. A word for the carnivorous: my friend Lucas’ family is vegetarian, so here I’ve focused on a vegetarian minestrone. Indeed, given the perilous state of our planet, an occasional vegetarian meal is good for us all. But if the people you are cooking for don’t believe that they have been fed unless some meat appears somewhere, that’s easy to manage. We do not have to imitate Marcus Apicius and add cooked brains; in fact, count me out on that one. We can, however, add a rind of prosciutto or a more prosaic ham at the cheese-rind stage, in addition to the Parmigiano-Reggiano. Or we can add an ounce of minced salami or pancetta to the onion-cabbage saute. Either or both of these additions will provide a meatier taste to the minestrone without causing it to lose its essential character. That essential character harkens back to its name. We gather the vegetables at hand according to season, we cook them with imagination and care, and then we serve forth the result—we minister to the needs of those we love. Buon appetito! About the author: For Katherine Larson, good things come in threes: three daughters, three grandchildren, and three careers. Lawyering and teaching were fun, but food writing is the most fun of all. She loves food justice, food history, and all things delicious. MM


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lookout point

Wintry Warmth

Artist seeks to capture beauty, comfort of snow-covered forest

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Story and photos by John Highlen

few January snowflakes drifted down as we loaded our six-foot sled with a couple of weeks-worth of food and supplies. My wife, Julie Highlen, had the privilege of being Artist-inResidence for the Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park, more affectionately known as “The Porkies”. She was preparing for the roughly two-mile trek into Dan’s Cabin, which was built by the Friends of the Porkies in memory of Dan Urbanski, a local nature photographer. Being the support crew, I got to pull the sled. We both carried day-packs stuffed with gear as well. A bigger pack and three large duffels of gear would come in on the second trip. Our host, Sherrie McCabe, who leads the artist program for the Porkies Friends group and her friend Melissa Santini, led the way as we embarked on our two-week adventure.

The Artist-in-Residence cabin is nestled in a quiet stand of mature hemlocks near the Little Union River. Even though it is rustic, meaning no electricity or indoor plumbing, we found the accommodations extremely comfortable and relaxing. After getting our introduction to the cabin, we quickly unloaded and headed out for the rest of our supplies. The last of our gear was unloaded and stowed away as darkness began filling the cabin. The flickering glow of a soy candle provided the feel of warmth as we built a fire in the woodstove for the real thing. The antique, Charm No. 23, as it stated on the ornate cast-iron door, was aptly named as it did indeed work like a charm, readily warming the cabin. So, with a slight freezing drizzle falling outside, we settled into our first evening of candle-light and wood heat and began laying plans for our first full day in the park before turning in for the night.


As the official artist, Julie slept in the log-frame twin bed tucked into its own bedroom corner. I took the fold-out bed in the main living area, situated beneath two large picture windows, giving me a view of the night sky beyond the tops of neighboring hemlocks and maples. I enjoyed the feel of sleeping out under the stars without snow falling in my face. Why did Julie choose January to spend two weeks living out in the woods in the Porkies? Well, in her own words, “I hoped to hear what is thought to be silent, see the rainbow of color in what is thought to be white and feel warmth in what is thought to be cold. To capture the magic of mature woods in winter on canvas that causes the viewer to stop and feel the comfort the blanket of snow provides, despite the frost in the air.” So, from a cozy cabin near a cascading waterfall in the forest, we set out to do just that. Our typical day started with a fire to warm cabin and spirits, followed by breakfast of oatmeal with nuts, dried fruit and home-made maple syrup. By mid-morning, with the day’s plans in mind, we would leave cabin comforts behind and immerse ourselves in the winter woods, traversing new trails, snowshoeing along meandering streams and exploring the surrounding forest. Most of our wanderings were limited to the park’s east side due to snow conditions, our limited means of travel and because Julie stopped often to study scenes and capture reference pictures in order to accomplish her goals. The exception was the day we decided to hike out to our vehicle and make the drive over to the park’s west side to explore the Presque Isle River falls area. We debated if the drive was worth doing until we stepped out of our car in the midst of a shadowed hemlock forest heavily punctuated with deer tracks, with the music of rushing water nearby. Our entire afternoon was spent exploring down the west side of the river, out along Superior, then back up the river’s east side, building a collection of photographs, notes and memories. Other adventures and wanderings included Union Spring, Little Union River gorge, Nonesuch Falls and many of the eastern rivers. We also snowshoed to the east and west vistas near the ski hill, viewing Superior to the east and the escarpment disappearing into a snowy mist to the west. On Saturday, we decided to participate in some park activities because Julie, as Artist-in-Residence, wanted opportunities to interact with more people

Artist Julie Highlen is shown with her camera at Nonesuch Falls in the Porcupine Mountains. One technique Highlen uses is to capture scenes on film and paint them later in her studio.

than we had been seeing during our usual ventures. Early afternoon, we joined a guided snowshoe hike led by Park Interpreter, Katie Urban. That was when we visited the East Vista by riding the chairlift to the top of the ski hill, then snowshoeing over to the vista and down around the mountain. That evening, we enjoyed a lantern-lit trail hike near Superior, also hosted by Katie. Both adventures were interesting and enjoyable ways to experience the park and meet new people. Though explorations and picture taking went well, actually painting turned out to be a little less productive than Julie originally anticipated. She had successfully done some winter plein air painting in the past, but conditions didn’t cooperate so well during her residency. Most days were overcast with light snow, which are certainly not ideal conditions for painting. One sunny day, it felt comfortable outside, so Julie set up her easel near the cabin, intent on painting a tiny creek meandering through the hemlocks. The sunshine proved to be misleading, though, as the actual temperature was still only 24° F, so brush-cleaning water and paint still wanted to freeze fairly quickly. Evenings in the cabin, candle and lantern light were inadequate for mixing and properly matching colors. So, actual artwork accomplishments during the residency were limited to a few pencil sketches, several small watercolor studies and a few small acrylic paintings. However, Julie did successfully assemble a collection of nearly 1000 reference photographs.

... The softness of the snowcovered wilderness just whispered ‘watercolor’ to me.”

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Near the end of her residency, she noted, “I was happy that I packed my watercolors at the last minute. The softness of the snow-covered wilderness just whispered “watercolor” to me.  Even though I didn’t paint as much as I had

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anticipated, I’m ready and eager to get to the easel. My time immersed in the quietness of the Porkies has certainly fueled my inspiration.”  The trip came to a close in the middle of a twoday snowstorm, making for a memorable trek out with all of our gear. In a way, it felt strange to be leaving. Dan’s Cabin had become “home,” and we looked forward to returning there each evening. The two weeks that sounded so long at the beginning had passed surprisingly quickly. We were amazed at how rapidly our idea of “normal” had changed and how things that were thought to be necessities soon faded to minor conveniences. Our adventures had been numerous, watching a fisher through the cabin window, witnessing the transition of rushing water to its state of suspended animation, reading stories of otters written in snow along with tales of snowshoe hares, deer, pine squirrels, beavers and grouse. Through the seemingly silent winter woods we had listened to the songs of streams changing with the season, the north wind giving voice to the hemlocks, and whispers of snowflakes coming to rest. Endless white had revealed shadows of blue and lavender, gleaming silver highlights and warm amber hues ebbing across the snowscape as the sun tracked across the sky. Following her residency, Julie completed more than a dozen Porkies paintings in her studio, with more yet to come. Her Artist-in-Residence may be done, but the painting and our relationship with the Porkies have just begun. With 60,000 acres in the park, including 42,000 acres of wilderness, there is still much exploring left to enjoy. About the author: John is a local independent outdoor writer, who focuses on the wonders of Lake Superior and the great north woods. (For more information about the Porkies Artistin-Residence program, please visit https://porkies. org/projects-programs/artist-in-residence.) MM


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in the outdoors CITIZEN SCIENTISTS iNaturalist invites everyone to track, identify the multitudes of earth’s creatures

and organisms

Story and photos by Scot Stewart “If you lose the power of wonder, you grow old, no matter how old you are. If you HAVE the power of wonder, you are forever young--the whole world is pristine and new and exciting.” - Sigurd Olson in “The Wilderness World of Sigurd F. Olson”

I

have written a few things, but only once before was it in the first person. I just haven’t. It seemed better to me that way.  Citizen science, though, has caught me by the tail and it just seems different.  When I watched an old video, yeah, a video on a VHS tape, recently about Sigurd Olson, one of my heroes, it just struck a note inside and helped me understand something driving me particularly hard this summer as I have been out photographing and putting my photos to work. Several years ago, a wise and good friend told me about iNaturalist, a citizen science website, developed by three Master’s students, to track sightings and

If you should come across an unknown creature, such as this ring-necked snake, a nocturnal creature found throughout much of the United States and parts of Canada, you can look up more information about it on the iNaturalist app.

sounds of literally all the Earth’s living organisms. Like many of the internet’s technological creatures, it took a little work to learn how to use it, and my short attention span soon left it.  Last June, I took a second look and quickly decided I really liked it.  It helped me identify the animals, plants, fungi, and other living things I was finding, but it also did something else, having a great effect on me. iNaturalist is set up for outdoor lovers, photographers, biologists, and others to post photographs or sound recordings of species they encounter to a website www. iNaturalist.com, with information about the location, date, and time of the find, in the discoverer’s account.  Currently over 80,000,000 posts have been made by 1,800,000+ observers around the world.  Nearly 100,000 new observations are being made daily.  Summers in

the northern hemisphere probably produce a higher number of submissions than summers in the southern hemisphere just because there is more to report in the greater land mass with its summer activity of life, so it may slow in the winter months here. iNaturalist was created in 2008 at the University of California, Berkeley School of Information as a master’s degree Final Project. Currently it is managed by the California Academy of Sciences and the National Geographic Society. “...an online social network of people sharing biodiversity information to help each other learn about nature,” is how the site describes itself. It is an amazing place. I describe it this way because, to many of us, it seems more than just a website. The site is a place where anyone could post an image of an

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A species of lentaria fungus grows on rotting wood.

organism they had found and get help identifying and/or contributing to a new bank of science. Initially, and even more so today, it’s a site where contributors could get help confirming the identity or get suggestions for organisms they found. First, it is good to know that in my youth there were just two groups (or scientifically, Kingdoms) of living things – the animals and the plants. I had books to help me learn about both as I wandered through the fields and woods then. It was easy to flip through them, and usually I found something that came close to what I saw. Today there are five, six or seven kingdoms, depending on which source you consult, with possibly more on the way as other planets, like Mars, are explored -- who knows? Besides animals and plants, there are the Fungi (mushrooms, mildews and molds), Protists (mostly one-celled organisms like amoebas), for some, Chromista (one-celled and multi-celled organisms,

like diatoms and algae, making their own food through photosynthesis using cell parts called chromatids) and two groups of bacteria formerly lumped together as Monera, now divided by some as Archaea/Archaebacteria (primitive, extreme bacteria), and Bacteria/Eubacteria (more prominent, commonly recognizable bacteria). When I began looking for birds, insects, and flowers, I used a wide range of field guides, like the Golden Guides for kids and the Peterson Field Guides. Roger Tory Peterson started the series with his first popular bird book in 1934. These gave me enough information to have a pretty good idea of what I was seeing. Not only are there more divisions of life today, but it turns out those field guides (and most guides today), usually showed two or three different species of the kinds of trees, flowers, birds, or insects I was looking for, but what I did not know was that for many, like asters, water striders and wasps, there were actually 20, 30, or even 50

A fascinating ninebark gall was discovered near the Dead River in Marquette.

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different kinds around! Obviously, there is a lot of science here for amateur nature lovers, but for those just trying to find out what they have found, it is a fascinating process made much easier with iNaturalist. It also opens eyes as we realize just how diverse the natural world around us actually is! But iNaturalist offers so much more. Scientifically it has been a boon for scientists. It has become a way to map the distribution of species across the globe, as species have expanded their ranges due to global warming. This is especially important for invasive species. It has also helped provide information about the actual ranges of species as more sightings are logged into the site. Date and time stamps in digital photograph metadata are added to the observation when photographs are added. Valuable information about flowering, adult emergence, mating, and more key phenology information is also added to provide additional insights about the organism for research. Timing information is now also proving to be critical for managing stop-over sites for birds and insects like shorebirds and monarch butterflies during migration. Planting key food plants, reducing construction activity and other management decisions can be aided with this information. Key breeding habitats can also be more effectively identified and preserved. I was lucky enough to take my students outside one morning at Bothwell Middle School, and as we moved away from the doors, a student exclaimed, “Look at this!” It was a black witch moth; one I had not known before, let alone seen. Eventually, I posted our sighting on iNaturalist and saw less than 15 sightings had been reported there from locations north of Marquette. Its normal range runs from just south of us to southern Argentina. It was a great example of how more feet on the ground and more eyes (and cameras) can help define a species and its place in the world. The camera is key to making iNaturalist work properly. Many of my sightings have not been properly confirmed by experts and curators, individuals who look to have specific groups of organisms flagged for notification by them. As I have posted some groups, I have noticed some never seem to get the identifications confirmed or get an identification disagreement from anyone. I have begun asking what I need to show in my photographs to get more identification feedback. For some ants, it is a microscopic view

showing the hairs on the ants. For was invading. Eventually spiders, it is a microscopic look it was determined at the backs of the pedipalps, no gall species had the leg-like structures in been identified front of their mouths. These in the flowers of kinds of documentation ninebark. Next require capture and more spring, I will to get them under the look for it again microscope, something and see if we that is not always can determine possible or desirable. what might be Information in the flowers about where the c a u s i n g photograph is taken the gall by is always helpful collecting too. For fungi and a developing group of organisms galls to see called galls, the what is living host for them is inside. important. Many iNaturalist also mushrooms grow has an interesting on specific sites, feature to find like certain kinds out where of tree stumps or organisms can logs. Galls are even be found. For more specific. They someone hoping to are growths found find a certain bird, to on plants caused by look for a frog or to find specific agents, fungi, out when a flower might mites, wasps, flies, and be found blooming in a other organisms, usually certain area, this is a great causing a swelling of the tool. There are features in the plant tissue. Probably the reporting portion to hide the best known gall in the U.P. exact locations of threatened, is the goldenrod (https:// endangered or sensitive hort.extension.wisc.edu/ species so they continue to articles/goldenrod-gallreceive proper protection, but fly-eurosta-solidagnis/). the data is added to the site for For many insects and research purposes. mites, their eggs are laid iNaturalist has two other inside part of a plant, and options I find particularly it is believed the young delightful. One is their produce chemicals “Explore.” It shows recent that create stems, posts from around the leaves or other areas world, offering a chance to become enlarged to to see what else is accommodate the young. being seen each day Fly galls appear as golf and to check out the ball-sized lumps on the observations from stems of these yellow other naturalists by roadside flowers. clicking on their names. Last year, I found a The second option is spectacular gall in the “Follow.” This feature sends flowers of a native shrub, you the new observations ninebark, along the Dead from selected naturalists. River in north Marquette. They are notified that The shrub is a wetland species you are enjoying their usually found growing in photographs and notes swamps, along creeks, that they took the ponds, and rivers. day after they are Have you ever seen a Curators looking at the made. You can get western scouringrush? Peroriginal submission I a daily fix from made asked what species haps known more commonly the rain forests of of plant the gall was found as the rough horsetail, this the Amazon or in, then asked which plant is found in wet or damp Sumatra, or the areas and can grow from specific part of the plant it tundra of Siberia. three to five feet tall.

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The international aspects of iNaturalist are one of the best parts. Not only can you see life from around the world, you can interact with the biologists and naturalists living there. When you create a post, iNaturalist makes suggestions regarding the identity of the organism. You can choose a suggestion or make your own and post the photograph along with the location and the date of the photograph. Then other naturalists can view your observation and confirm your identification, suggest a different identification, or back up the ID to a less specific classification due to insufficient information in the photograph(s). Because some curators and other individuals who regularly check regional or organism groups for specific entries look in on submissions from around the world, an observation can be reviewed by a world authority from just about anywhere. I have had an Equisetum species, or scouring rush, from Alger County identified by Radek Walkowiak, the Program Manager and Botanist at The International Equisitological Association. He lives in Poland. Slime molds are interesting protists found in the rotting wood and plants in the woods of the U.P. Some have interesting names like white carnival candy slime mold, wolf ’s milk, salmon eggs slime mold, and dog vomit slime mold. The respective colors of these are white, pink then chocolate brown, orange and yellow. They are great to find when the weather turns wet in the fall. One of the best authorities is Sarah Lloyd from Tasmania. She has helped me with several questions I have had. Like most of the premiere biologists on iNaturalist, she is extremely accessible and helpful with identifications and information. Some curators have reviewed more than 500,000 submissions, so they are true experts! iNaturalist offers means to add to or access the site from computer and phone so the process can be quick, but the site, like many on the Internet can be addictive. It is definitely educational, relaxing, and just plain fun to see what else lives in our world and who is watching it! And when you do find something new, like a ring-necked snake, a Lentaria fungus or a whitefaced meadowhawk dragonfly you can usually find out more about it at iNaturalist. About the author: Scot Stewart has lived in Marquette long enough to be considered a true Yooper even though he was born in Illinois. He is a teacher and loves to be outdoors photographing and enjoying nature. MM

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fiction

The Superior Gatsby By John Smolens

He was employed in a vague personal capacity—while he remained with Cody he was in turn steward, mate, skipper, secretary and even jailor, for Dan Cody sober knew what lavish doings Dan Cody drunk might soon be about and he provided for such contingencies by reposing more and more trust in Gatsby. —F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

D

an Cody envisioned himself a gentleman bootlegger. Much like the gentleman farmer who hires others to toil in the fields, he wished not to dirty his hands while reaping the harvest. Jay Gatsby ran the operation, purchasing confiscated liquor from customs officials who worked the border on the St. Mary’s River, and then running it to ports on the Great Lakes. The benefit for Cody was that he had access to an unlimited supply of booze, the result being that Gatsby would lock him in his cabin during lengthy binges. The lesson for the young man was that alcohol is a deterrent to one’s deepest hopes and dreams. Cody provided another lesson while prostrate in his teak berth. “You’re going to make your first fortune working this yacht.” “My first?” “There will be others. They come and go, like women. You win, you lose.” “Lose?” Gatsby said. “I lose?” They had dropped anchor in Marquette’s Lower Harbor, cluttered with ore boats, fishing shacks, and schooners. Masts and rigging stitched the air, and the Tuolomee’s contraband could be offloaded in broad daylight without fear of local constabulary that had been sufficiently compensated. Gatsby drove Cody’s rented Duesenberg filled with crates of contraband whiskey to hotels near the train station, making deliveries at the Merchants Hotel, the Hotel Janzen, the Hotel Brunswick. His last stop was the Adams Hotel, where Lila Banks sang torch songs in the lounge and her network distributed booze to various outlets as far inland as Michigamme and Republic. Cody was much taken with her, which was the reason why the Tuolomee frequented Marquette. But this time he did not come ashore, citing self-preservation. The reason for this rare act of discretion waited in the alley behind the hotel: Lila’s long-time paramour Tuukka Hautamaki. “Where’s your boss?” he asked as his man Emmet Jones unloaded the crates from the wagon. “Mr. Cody is predisposed to attend to other business.” Hautamaki had a hard empty face and looked like a man whose favorite pastime was hunting bear. “You tell Mr. Cody he wants to get paid, he comes himself.” Emmet unloaded the last crate and Hautamaki shut the hotel door, leaving Gatsby in the dark alley. He began the drive down to the Lower Harbor but stopped when he saw Lila Banks step out from the shadows on the corner of Front and Main. She climbed up on the Duesy’s running board, and from a pocket in her fur coat produced a tiny sequined purse. “Consider this a down payment.” She handed Gatsby a folded Ben Franklin. “A C-note’s not enough, Lila. You know how Cody gets.” “It’s not for the hooch.” Lila’s voice was husky from crooning over speakeasy echolalia. “It’s for my passage.” She leaned so close he could smell cigarettes, Chanel No. 22, and gin. “You must take me away from here.”

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“But Tuukka—” “He reeks of bear bait. Get me on Cody’s yacht.” She climbed down off the Duesy, clutching the fur coat about her alabaster neck. “Tomorrow night, by the cinder pond. I will nurse Cody, but you, dear boy, I will croon sweet lullabies in your pretty ears.” • “How did you know Tuukka was back in town?” Gatsby asked after Billings served his steak and eggs in the yacht’s saloon. Cody’s traditional hangover remedy was a Mai Tai, and he wore steampunk sunglasses against the morning glare off the Lower Harbor. “I have this sixth sense, and well-paid informants. So, old sport, what should we do?” “About Lila?” “And the money.” “We cut off Hautamaki’s supply. And get Lila on board before we weigh anchor.” Cody shook his head with great care. “Next time we return to Marquette, the problem will still be here. And worse, such lassitude will encourage others to not pay what’s due. We have to deal with Hautamaki.” “But he’ll—” “Kill her? Perhaps. Lila lives close to the edge. She likes it there.” “Don’t you want to save her? You’re taken with her. You said she was elegantly corrupt.” Cody massaged his temples, a sign that he was thinking, and it was doing dreadful things to his already damaged face. “You ever—?” He removed his sunglasses, revealing bloodshot eyes. “Ever kill a man? You look like you have.” Gatsby shrugged. “It’s a quality I have.” “A quality worth cultivating?” “Are you speaking from experience?” “I am, old sport, and it’s time you learned. Remove Hautamaki from the equation and problem solved. But

first, get the money.”

• After dark, Gatsby parked so the Duesy was concealed behind an enormous pile of coal near the cinder pond. Lila unbuttoned her fur coat as she slid across the front seat and put her arms about his neck, her breath warm on his ear. “Know what I want, darling?” she whispered. “Everybody wants something,” Gatsby said. “You want to sail away. Cody wants to get paid.” “I can get the money.” She leaned back from him, the veil of her auburn hair sweeping down over her dimpled cheek. “Emmet Jones, he knows where Tuukka keeps his stash.” “And?” “Emmet hates Tuukka. He’s been waiting for this opportunity. He’ll clean him out, give me Cody’s share for my passage on the Tuolomee.” “You’re on,” Gatsby said. “We weigh anchor tomorrow night.” Lila took gentle hold of his face; she had the profound fingers of a jazz pianist. “There’s more,” he said. Her kiss was tender, tasting of top-shelf gin.

This is the second installment of a multi-part series written by John Smolens. The third part will appear in the November 2021 edition of MM.

“Do we need Cody, darling? After we set sail, could he manage to disappear in the lake?” Gatsby looked out across the harbor, where he could see the bow lights of Cody’s yacht, swinging on its anchor, the green starboard light alternating with the red port light. “Then what?” “We could winter in the Caribbean.” “What about Billings?” Gatsby asked. “He’s loyal to Cody.” “Emmet tells me Tuukka’s stockpile is more than substantial. He and Billings are alike, secretly obstinate men who are willing to be serfs until they can overthrow their masters. Everyone has a price.” She laid her head on his chest while her fingers played subtle minor chords in his hair. “Now, darling, tell me what you want.” This question had long tormented Gatsby. A grand house, a fine automobile, custom-tailored suits and imported silk shirts, and most of all the love of a woman who could never love another man. And respect. The kind of respect that caused others to pause when he walked into a room, their awe and silence acknowledging that they were suddenly in the presences of a god. “What do I want?” Gatsby said as his arms tightened about her fur coat. “I want it all.” He gazed out toward Cody’s yacht, the red and then the green light signaling their enigmatic code. About the author: John Smolens, NMU professor emeritus, has published 12 books, including Cold, Out, Fire Point, The School Master’s Daughter, Quarantine, and Wolf’s Mouth, a Michigan Notable Book selection. In 2010 he received the Michigan Author Award from the Michigan Library Association. His most recent novel is Day of Days.

The question had long tormented Gatsby. A grand house, a fine automobile, custom-tailored suits and imported silk shirts, and most of all the love of a woman who could never love another man. And respect. The kind of respect that caused others to pause when he walked into a room ...”

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lookout point

Rows of solar panels are positioned in an array near the Delta County Airport in Escanaba. (Glendon Brown photo)

SUN-MADE ELECTRICITY

Escanaba’s solar panel array is lowering consumers’ electric bills By Deborah K. Frontiera

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ome might think the U.P. would not be a good place to build a solar power generating facility. Too much snow in the winter, not enough sunlight, not practical . . . but think again! For every short, snowy winter day, there is a long, sunny summer day. Studies over the last few years have shown that in addition to those long summer days the U.P. enjoys, Delta County has less cloud cover and lower over-all humidity than other areas in the state of Michigan. On an annual basis, more solar energy can be produced in Delta County, panel for panel, than any other place in the state, based on data collected by several agencies over recent years. For those reasons, the City of Escanaba (and UPPCO independently) began considering the value of a solar farm as another part of over-all electricity production. Those plans have come a long way since their inception. While it is hard to estimate how much savings, in terms of dollars and cents, customers might see from the inclusion of solar energy in a company’s energy portfolio, the amount could be significant. UPPCO has sought to buy solar power from third party developers, rather than building and owning a solar project itself; the advantage being that certain tax credits are available for solar projects that cannot be used by UPPCO. If UPPCO built a solar project, it would cost more and those costs would be passed on to customers. By partnering with a developer that can use those tax credits, UPPCO’s customers might ben-

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efit from reduced energy costs for many years to come. However, those partnership plans are currently stuck in limbo. UPPCO’s ultimate goal is to have over 50 percent of its power generated through renewables by 2025. Including solar energy in the company’s energy portfolio would help achieve that goal. Today, about 20 percent of the power UPPCO delivers to its customers is generated by hydroelectric generating facilities, which is above the state’s requirement. These UPPCO facilities have been in place for many years and are known under the names Hoist, McClure, Prickett, Victoria, Boney Falls, and Escanaba River. They were built between 1907 and 1931 and have a capacity to deliver a total of 34 megawatts of energy. UPPCO has long had a policy to have power generated within its service area whenever possible, keeping it “in the UP.” All of this is part of UPPCO’s Integrated Resource Plan, a state requirement in which the company must develop its plans for meeting the future energy needs of its customers. In a Feb. 6, 2020, press release, UPPCO announced that “the Michigan Public Service Commission approved the settlement that was reached in its Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) case. The approved settlement sets the stage for more clean, reliable and affordable energy to be delivered to all UPPCO customers.” On the “UP” side, the Glendon and Marilyn Brown Solar Facility for the City of Escanaba is currently operational. Gerald Pirkola, electric utility director for the City of Escanaba, noted that

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the city’s solar array, which was installed near the airport in 2018, is named for an area retired couple who were instrumental in getting the project underway. Any City of Escanaba electric customer, including residential, business, or large power users, may purchase one or more of the solar panels and receive a discount off their power bill in proportion to the amount of power generated by each panel. The original installation consisted of 3510 panels, and 1440 more were added in 2020 bringing the total to 4950. Each panel is capable of generating 330 watts of power. So far, the city has sold 618 panels to individuals and businesses. While these individuals and businesses “own” the panels, they remain at the airport where meters measure the amount of power generated and credit each owner accordingly. The average electric rate in Escanaba at present is 10 cents per kilowatt hour, but solar panel owners receive a refund of 6.4 cents when panels are producing. This may change from time to time, of course, but predictions are for it to remain in the 6.5 to 7 cent range. The city owns the remaining panels for the benefit of all rate payers. Pirkola said, “There were a few bugs in the beginning, of course, but the system has been working well since installation was completed. We have not had any complaints concerning looks on the ground, sound from them, or any other issues.” The city is exploring the possibility of adding an additional solar array at a different site in the next few years. “The

existing solar array has had such a positive impact on the community that we’re hoping to add an additional facility in the next few years to more than double the existing installation,” Perkola said. “Technology is improving every day, with newer panels generating higher outputs with smaller footprints.” Solar power is considered “green energy,” in that it is helpful for the preserving the natural environment. Use of solar power results in much lower emissions of carbon monoxide in energy production, and is cabable of producing a tremendous amount of electricity. For those in the area who are interested, the cost of a panel is $328.38. Customers may not purchase more panels than the amount of power they use in an average year. (A high-use customer could own more panels than a low-use customer.) Solar panels produce electric energy any time the sun is out. The peak of production is, of course, from May through September; and the lowest is in November and December. For more information, including statistics about energy saving, visit the city’s website: www.escanaba.org. About the author: Deborah K. Frontiera lives in the Calumet area. Three of her books have been award winners. She has published fiction, nonfiction, poetry and children’s books. Frontiera is on the board of the U.P. Publishers and Authors Association. For details about her many books and accomplishments, visit her website: www.authorsden.com/deborahkfrontiera MM


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at the table

IMMUNE BOOSTERS

Good nutrition can improve the body’s resistance Story and photo by Katherine Larson

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n times of stress, it’s good to feed your body. Not with just anything, though. The right food can help boost your immune system and so enable you better to resist whatever the stressful world might throw at you. What helps? Go for deep rich color. Aromatic spices and herbs. Garlic, onions, citrus. Broccoli, spinach, chard. Chicken. Oily fish (think sardines, lake trout, salmon). Tomatoes (including canned), red bell peppers. Sweet potatoes. Almonds. Probiotics (think plain unsweetened yogurt, miso, kombucha). Avoid sugar—for anyone over 12 months old, local raw honey is the way to go. About that honey: why does it have to be both local and raw? Raw honey hasn’t been heated or pasteurized, so it’s packed with natural vitamins, enzymes, powerful antioxidants, and other important nutrients. Local honey is made from local pollen, which strengthens immune systems and reduces symptoms of seasonal allergies. Local raw honey is even a natural antiseptic! And, of course, buying local supports our community. Here are ten easy recipes to get started. BREAKFAST 1. Yogurt and berries. Put a big scoop of plain yogurt into a bowl with some thawed blueberries, a sprinkle of ground cinnamon, and a swirl of local raw honey. Enjoy with wholegrain toast on the side if you like. 2. Herb omelet. Break a couple of eggs into a bowl and whip them with a fork. Melt butter in skillet over medium-low heat. Frizzle some fresh herbs—sage tastes great here—in

the butter, then add the beaten egg. (If you don’t have fresh herbs, dried ones are good too. Just don’t use as much; say, a teaspoon of dried sage instead of ten or twelve leaves of fresh.) Cook for two minutes; flip and cook for one minute; eat. Wholegrain toast with local raw honey on the side.

3. French toast. The night before, beat up a couple of eggs. Stir in 1-1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon plus about 1/4 teaspoon each of cardamom and/ or ground ginger and/ or allspice. Add 1/4 cup plain yogurt and 3/4 cup milk and stir vigorously to combine. Put slices of stale bread in a baking dish and pour the mixture over it. Let everything sit in the fridge until morning. In the morning, melt butter in skillet over medium heat. Put slices of soaked bread in skillet and cook for two or three minutes; flip and cook for one or two minutes. Serve with local raw honey.

make your own, of course) and put in a pot. Mince up a clove of garlic, half an onion, and a bit of fresh ginger; add to pot. If you have fresh rosemary, mince up a little and add that; if your herbs are all dried, use thyme and/or basil and/or oregano instead. Heat to boiling; serve when the onions are cooked enough for your taste. 6. Sardines on toast. Slather mustard on a slice of whole-grain bread. Put a very thin slice of red onion or some minced green onions on the mustard. Take some canned sardines, pat them dry with a paper towel, and put them on the onion. Top with cheese. Put the whole concoction on a cookie sheet or pie pan and stick it under the broiler until the cheese is melted. If you have some leftover broccoli lying around, toss it with a little vinaigrette for a nice accompanying salad.

... Raw honey hasn’t been heated or pasteurized, so it’s packed with natural vitamins, enzymes, powerful antioxidants, and other important nutrients... ”

LUNCH 4. AB&H. Slather almond butter and local raw honey on whole-grain bread to make an extra-healthy sandwich; serve with a sliced orange. 5. Chicken noodle soup. Open one or more cans of chicken noodle soup (or

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DINNER 7. Spaghetti with sauce. Chop up an onion, a lot of garlic, and the stems of a big bunch of rainbow chard. Put them in a pot with a little olive oil and cook for five minutes while you chop up the chard leaves. Add a lot of herbs to the pot, fresh or dry: thyme, basil, oregano, rosemary; some cinnamon; dried crushed red pepper flakes; salt and pepper. Then add a can or two of tomatoes, the

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chard leaves, and perhaps a couple of minced anchovies. Let it all simmer together for about half an hour. Meanwhile, put a big pot of heavily salted water on to boil. The package of pasta will tell you how long to cook it; follow those directions, then drain the pasta and pop it into the simmering sauce. Toss and serve. 8. Chicken, broccoli, and sweet potatoes. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Put a piece of parchment paper on a sheet pan for easiest clean-up; if you don’t have parchment paper, use oil instead. Sprinkle salt and pepper on pieces of skin-on, bone-in chicken— thighs or drumsticks are particularly good here. Scrub sweet potatoes (no need to peel) and cut them into halfinch slices. Cut stalks of broccoli in quarters lengthwise. Spread chicken, sweet potatoes, and broccoli out on the sheet pan, drizzle olive oil over it all, and sprinkle with thyme and some dried crushed red pepper flakes. Put the pan in the oven and bake. After 30 minutes, flip the potato slices and check the broccoli; if it’s getting too brown, take it out and let the potatoes and chicken finish cooking for another 20 to 30 minutes. (Serve any leftover broccoli for lunch, tossed in vinaigrette to make a salad.) 9. Fish and peppers. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Put a piece of parchment paper on a sheet pan for easiest clean-up, or use oil instead. Thinly slice a red bell pepper, an onion, and some garlic and put them in a bowl with a good slosh of olive oil plus 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger, 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom, and 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves or allspice. Stir. Scat-

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Fresh greens, leftover roasted beets, bites of canned red salmon, and a few edible flowers combine for a tasty immune-boosting lunch.

ter the vegetables on the pan and put in oven for 15 minutes. While peppers and onions are roasting, spread one or two teaspoons of South River sweet white miso on the non-skin side of a fillet of lake trout or salmon. (Other brands of miso are much saltier; if you choose one of them, use less.) After those 15 minutes are past, take pan out of the oven, stir vegetables around, and add the fish, skin-side down, to the parchment paper. Bake for ten more minutes and serve. Rice on the side.

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10. Salmon salad. On a warmer day when you want a room-temperature meal, open a can of chickpeas or white beans, pour them out into a strainer, rinse and shake dry. Open a can of red salmon and drain (but don’t rinse) it. Put the salmon in a bowl and mash it with a fork. Leave the skin and bones in there! Add the rinsed beans or chickpeas. Chop up a stalk of celery and mince up a clove of garlic, then add them. Mix a little plain yogurt with olive oil and add that. Stir it all together; let the flavors

come together in the fridge until dinnertime, or serve right now. A green salad with lots of fresh herbs is nice on the side. About the author: For Katherine Larson, good things come in threes: three daughters, three grandchildren, and three careers. Lawyering and teaching were fun, but food writing is the most fun of all. She loves food justice, food history, and all things delicious. MM


lookout point

COASTLINE RECLAMATION Partnership project will repair eroded shoreline; restore habitat, public access Story, photos/illustrations by SWP staff

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t’s called armoring. Or rip-rap. Or a rock revetment. Massive grey boulders, some five feet across and weighing half a ton, piled high in a futile attempt to keep Lake Superior at bay. It started almost a century ago, and they kept adding more and more boulders, decade after decade, until over a mile of natural shoreline and coastal habitat was completely buried under huge boulders. These boulders also barred anyone from reaching Lake Superior. And that’s how it’s been for as long as anyone can remember. Then the waters of Lake Superior started to rise at the same time the region was experiencing more frequent and more severe storm events. During one fall storm in October of 2017, a monitoring buoy deployed by the Superior Watershed Partnership (SWP) documented record-setting, 28-foot waves just north of Marquette. The lake started eroding portions of the shoreline and even began devouring Lakeshore Boulevard. The road had to be closed. Eventually over a mile of the road had to be moved 300 feet inland. This new drive along Lakeshore Boulevard is now a showpiece attraction for Marquette. But the project is not complete. The road has been moved but the shoreline is still in the same degraded condition: mostly buried under giant boulders. The lake is still inaccessible due to

Above, scenes such as this sprawling stretch of debris that was thrown up on the shore and across Lakeshore Boulevard in Marquette by a storm in October 2017, have become commonplace using coastal erosion-prevention techniques of the past. The Lake Superior Partnership is introducing new methods for restoring the shoreline that will make it usable for the public and will restore wildlife habitat.

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the rip-rap boulders. Left in its current condition, this section of shoreline is still actively eroding with each storm event. Phase two of the project is designed to restore a more natural shoreline, restore coastal habitats and restore public access to Lake Superior. Working closely with the Marquette Community Development Department and the Marquette Engineering Department, the Superior Watershed Partnership received a $2.5 million Coastal Resiliency grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in cooperation with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF). Baird Engineering, an international coastal design firm, was selected to work with the city and SWP on developing a living shoreline approach that restores natural features, allows people to reach the water again, and still provides protection from storm events and coastal erosion. Throughout the Great Lakes, there has been a dramatic shift away from

the old armoring approach and a move towards incorporating more resilient, more natural coastal restoration solutions. A recent article in Bridge magazine was titled “Michigan’s Coast is Being Armored, Making Erosion Worse.” Another article in Stateline magazine titled “Rising Waters Threaten Great Lakes Communities” recommended that communities “retreat and allow a living shoreline”; Marquette is doing both. They have already moved the road (retreat), and the next step is to restore a more natural, living shoreline instead of the historic boulder armoring. The Marquette living shoreline design is bio-engineered to replicate a natural cobble beach often found on Lake Superior. The cobble beach will be comprised of small quarried rock four-to-eight inches in diameter that people can easily walk over or carry a kayak across. In addition, the project design includes a small sand beach cove, sand dunes and several restored coastal wetlands. The Keweenaw Bay Indian

A present view of the shoreline facing south near the Presque Isle power plant in Marquette shows rocks and boulders piled haphazardly along the shore. Below, an artistic rendition of how the restored, usable shoreline will look.

The Superior Watershed Partnership’s coastal resiliency project will replace the massive rip rap boulders with smaller rocks to make the shoreline useable.

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Community (KBIC) provided recommendations for many traditional native species of plants, shrubs and trees that will be incorporated throughout the site. The project improves both aquatic and terrestrial habitat conditions, including improved habitat for several species of fish, amphibians, migrating birds, monarch butterflies, bees and other pollinators. The site also includes a series of ADA-accessible hiking trails, boardwalks and lookout platforms. Lastly, the mile-long project will provide numerous community benefits, including but not limited to: increased recreation opportunities, increased nature tourism, increased economic development and other quality-of-life benefits. At a time when many Great Lakes coastal communities are looking for more natural solutions to traditional erosion control methods, the Marquette living shoreline project is being viewed as a model for possible replication. Thanks to a nomination submitted by Assistant City Manager Sean Hobbins, the project design

recently won the Wege Sustainability Best Practices Award. In addition, the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Cities Initiative (GLSLCI) shared information on the award with over 120 member cities in both the United States and Canada. Marquette also received a grant through the Michigan Coastal Management Program in support of the project. It’s also worth noting that the NOAA/NFWF Coastal Resiliency Program is a new national grant program that has already funded over 30 ground-breaking projects throughout the country, but only two were selected in the Great Lakes; Marquette is one of those. Lastly, there has been widespread, bi-partisan political support for the project at the local, state and federal level. The final phase of the project is scheduled to begin in the spring of 2022. (Artistic renditions of the cobble beach/ living shoreline are approximations and were created by Baird Engineering. Visit the Superior Watershed Partnership and Land Conservancy at superiorwatersheds. org)


back then

During the Marquette Symphony Orchestra’s free outdoor concert in August, Sing With The Symphony Contest winner Olivia Simerman sang popular hit songs backed by symphonic musical arrangements. Her singing along with the musicians’ backing were appreciated by the hundreds of audience members present.

SYMPHONY CELEBRATES

MSO launches 25th season, enjoys good support but seeks more fans

Story and photos by Joseph Zyble

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he Marquette Symphony Orchestra began its 25th anniversary season by performing a free outdoor concert with the theme “Celebrate With Your Symphony.” The concert was held on a gorgeous, mid-August summer evening at the Presque Isle band shell in Marquette. Hundreds of people, many bringing their own lawn chairs, attended. The symphony performed a variety of arrangements, including pieces from

French composer Hector Berlioz, Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Rodgers and Hammerstein, and contemporary music accompanied by vocals. Microphones were strategically placed among the performers to carry the music through loud speakers to reach audience members seated as far as 80 yards away from the band shell. Andrew LaCombe, who in addition to playing in the cello section and serving as vice president of the symphony

board, is also the spokesperson for the organization. He noted that the Marquette Symphony Orchestra held two other concerts outdoors in the past year to comply with the covid safety precautions in place at the time. However, now that most of the covid restrictions have been lifted, having enough space to accommodate a vast audience was the driving factor for holding this concert outdoors. “This was the first time we ever had

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a free, unlimited-attendance concert,” LaCombe said. “It was a way of thanking the public, inviting everyone to celebrate our 25th season, and introducing the symphony to people who may never have experienced it before.” Local talent Olivia Simerman provided vocals for several popular songs during the concert. She sang “Shallow,” by Lady Gaga (among others), “Skyfall,” by Adele, “At Last” by Etta James, and “Feelin’ Good,” made famous by Nina

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Simone. Simerman was the winner of the “Sing With The Symphony” contest, which was held in February 2020 before corona-virus precautions began shutting down gatherings. “Olivia was one of several incredible people in the competition. She won it based on the audience vote,” LaCombe said. “What’s cool about that is it was an idea our conductor, Octavio Mas-Arocas, brought to the symphony, and it’s an example of new innovative ways we’re trying to get more people into seats and to become consistent supports of the symphony.” The symphony will host the season’s first formal concert on Saturday, Oct. 9, at 7:30 p.m. at Kaufman Auditorium in Marquette. The concert will feature a classical work by Beethoven and a modern arrangement titled, “Sinfonia (for Orbiting Spheres) by Missy Mazzoli. “It’s two completely different kinds of music that are combined together in the same concert,” LaCombe said. The popular “Sounds of the Holiday” concert will be held Dec. 18 with local music directors Steve Grugin and Janis Peterson sharing conductor duties. “Sounds of the Holidays always draws a huge crowd every year … it’s always a great way to enjoy whatever aspect of the season you celebrate, but we combine it all. It promotes a lot of positivity about where we live around the holidays and the incredible musicians we have. “ The March 12 concert will feature youth concerto winner Xiaoya Liu who will perform Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 3. The final concert of the season will be on May 7 and will feature youth concerto winner Christine Harada Li performing Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1. About 60 musicians perform at a typical Marquette Symphony Orchestra concert. The musicians are paid a stipend for rehearsing and performing in concerts. Ticket sales, donations and

grants all support the many costs involved in making the symphony possible. While the symphony enjoys a good following, it is seeking to attract more people to the symphony orchestra experience. “One goal is to appeal to people who may have never gone to the symphony before,” LaCombe. “People may have misconceptions about what we are and we want to appeal to all kinds of people, people who just love live music.” Janis Peterson, one of the symphony founders, remains very active in the symphony serving as a violinist, con-

certmaster, youth concerto coordinator and more. She said the dedication of so many talented musicians and support of the community has enabled the symphony to reach this anniversary year. “Most of our musicians have day jobs. We have people from doctors and dentists to every kind of occupation. Many work all day then go home and practice at night. They care,” she said. There are also formal practices, which Peterson describes as “pretty intense. It’s not just a picnic,” she laughs, “although it feels like it. I can say everyone in there is just so happy to make music. It’s just a great bunch of people.”

Peterson, who is now retired following 37 years as a music teacher, said one of her goals when working to form the symphony was to make it appeal to her students. “I wanted something my students would aspire to belong to, and that has worked very well,” she said. While the symphony performances are exciting and moving, she described the August concert as “one of the most incredible nights of all 25 years” of the Marquette Symphony Orchestra’s history. “The way the community came out to support it, and the way everyone embraced the modern piece we did (Our New Day Begun, a piece about the historical struggles of African Americans) … it was very emotional for me. You could’ve heard a pin drop during that,” Peterson said. “Just the whole feeling of the night and the many smiles I could see in the crowd, and it was a crowd!” Following results from surveys a few years ago, the symphony has adopted changes to draw more fans. It has added more contemporary music to its concerts, developed a smaller, less formal group called The Summer Strings that performs in Marquette three nights each summer, produced on-line performances during the pandemic, and is beginning an education outreach soon. According to LaCombe, “Getting to the 25-year milestone is huge. A lot of organizations don’t make it that far.” “ We’re growing and we’re finding new ways to do what we love, and that’s share music with more and more people,” he said. About the author: Joseph Zyble is an amateur music appreciationist. He enjoys all of the classical composers: Bach and Beethoven, Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Styx and the Stones. MM

(Bottom) Hundreds of spectators filled the band shell area, and also set up lawn chairs and blankets far back among the trees, to hear the Marquette Symphony Orchestra’s free outdoor anniversary concert in August. Above are a few scenes of members of the symphony during the performance.

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back then Lady in the Lighthouse Several women kept the lights burning despite prejudices against women serving as lighthouse keepers Story by Larry Chabot

Sketches by Mike McKinney

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ary Terry – she of the musical name – was dead. She was found among the smoking ruins of the Sand Point Lighthouse at the end of Ludington Street in Escanaba. Mary had come from Canada in 1863 with her husband John, a railroad man who had been hired to tend the new Sand Point lighthouse. Sadly, before he could report for work, John died of tuberculosis. His surprise successor was his wife Mary who – despite the prejudice against women keepers – not only lit the first light on May 13, 1868, but stayed on the job 18 years until tragedy struck her down. Escanaba had become an important port on Lake Michigan after a new railroad linked the city with U.P. iron ore mines. It was obvious that a lighthouse was needed to guide incoming ships safely into the harbor, especially avoiding the big sand reef offshore. And so Sand Point was built. Her appointment was criticized by some, who felt that women couldn’t handle the work, the long hours, or the isolation. “There was a lot of opposition to her appointment from local political leaders,” said Karen Lindquist of the Delta County Historical Society in an interview,” but people in the town, the general population of the city, loved her and thought she was a very capable woman.” A local paper praised her as “a living illustration of the capacity of women to do honest, hard work” as good as any any man. As a childless widow, Mary was usually all alone

Mary Terry took care of the Sand Point lighthouse for 18 before dying in a fire. She got the job when her husband, who had been hired for the job, died of tuberculosis before he could even get started.

in the building. Work was indeed hard and often dangerous. The hours were 24-7 during shipping season, and keepers were burdened with an 87-page rule book. The light alone called for over 130 separate tasks. She cleaned, made repairs, and kept a detailed log book (the local historical society has a copy). One entry read “whitewashed the north wall of the lighthouse today.” Other chores called for daily cleaning and polishing the lens, cleaning windows in the lantern room, shining all the brass, painting and repairing the buildings, keeping weather reports, giving tours for visitors, stacking wood in the woodshed, planting a vegetable garden, and so on and so on and so on. As one lady of the light learned to her sorrow (see below), Mary was unable to leave the property without permission (see below). UP IN SMOKE Then, on a stormy night in March of 1886, fire broke out in the lighthouse, engulfing it in flames. Poor Mary Terry perished in the blaze, probably because fire fighters couldn’t reach her or the lighthouse due to the deep snow. Among the active rumors about the fire was that it was deliberately set

to get rid of Mary and rob her of her valuables (her few possessions were untouched). Her reputation for careful and safe management convinced most people that the fire wasn’t her fault. A coroner’s jury decided that the cause of her death couldn’t be determined. The historical society’s Karen Lindquist said that a worker had noticed that a woodpile near the furnace was “very warm,” whatever that meant. It took a couple of months to put the lighthouse back in business so that a new keeper – Lewis Rose – could succeed the late Mary Terry. In the period 18681939, nine different keepers minded the light. One of them was Peter Peterson, whose wife took over the job after Peterson died until his replacement arrived. At least 50 women served as keepers on Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior, according to a University of Michigan study. One remarkable female was Catherine Shook, who raised eight children while keeping the light at Saginaw. Eliza Truckey, an assistant keeper at Marquette, ran things while her husband Nelson fought in the Civil War, and Elizabeth Whitney spent 41 years as a keeper at Harbor Springs and Beaver Island.

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Women Who Kept The Light by Candace and Mary Clifford reported on many notable females, like Mary Ryan of Chicago who noted that her job was “so dull this place is killing me.” And there was Ida Lewis who served an incredible 54 years in the state of Rhode Island. More than 40 lighthouses dot the 1,700 miles of U.P. coastline; many of them are still active. In addition to Mary Terry, Eliza Truckey, and Mrs. Peter Peterson (whose husband died in the kitchen while his wife was tending the light), other U.P. female keepers included: • Annie Sullivan at Granite Island (1903-1905). • Julia Griswold at Eagle River (1861-1865). • Mrs. Donald Harrison at St. Mary’s River (1902-1904). • Mary Wheatley at Eagle Harbor (1899-1905). • Catherine McGuire, an assistant at Marquette (1882-1891), whose keeper husband Patrick fired her for taking an unauthorized trip to Chicago to visit relatives.

So what happened to Sand Point? After a new light was built offshore in 1938, Sand Point served as Coast Guard quarters until that unit moved out in 1985. The Delta County Historical Society leased the premises and began restoring the lighthouse to its original condition. Sand Point is fully restored, furnished, and open for summer visitors to climb the tower. The society is publicizing Mary Terry’s story and raising funds for a headstone (she is thought to be buried by her husband in the Lakeview Cemetery. An Escanaba web site cited rumors that Mary Terry’s ghost occasionally drops in to haunt the lighthouse and check on things. (For further reading, check out Women and the Lakes by Fred Stonehouse.)

Larry Chabot, an Ontonagon native, worked his way through Georgetown University and was then employed at White Pine Copper Company for 32 years, before moving to Marquette with his wife, Betty. He is a freelance writer who has written for several publications, including over 150 articles for Marquette Monthly. MM

Answers to the New York Times crossword puzzle located on page 26.

S H P A F L I M O U T

V E R B S

I N P U T

W A S P S

A G I L E

N E O D O U N C E A T C E O N S G A A L L E I M N E A N G E L E S

S N O T I E A M I G T S I D L T U A T I O L S N O E A E G G S S I R S S E A I M I M O S B O O H A A G H Y G M M E C O O L S L O W L I B A N E N E W S R E E E C A N E R O T E Y F A C E E D G A R S A U R

N O E N M D I L S O T S A M P H A T F E E D L L A A T O N E

W I E N E R E R R S S P A C E B A R

M A S C A R A

L I F T

F R A A U R S E T A E X L E V S I S A C O C R S O

I F W E N O O P A R E I R K C E A P A B L E E R O N I E B I O S

A I R K I S S

F L E W O U T

H N O T H H U M D O N O T

P R O T E G E

T I N G E A H A M O M E N T H I L T S

A S I A M M E L E E

N E A R S E S T E R

M S E N L L I D I O T

L E A N S

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lookout point

A massive mural featuring Mother Nature graces the side of the BeWell facility located on the corner of Third and Ohio streets in Marquette.

BUILDING BEAUTY

Marquette’s new mural features Mother Nature Story and photos by Jackie Stark

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hen Kate Lewandowski and Christopher Ray first purchased the massive building on the corner of Third and Ohio Streets in Marquette, they had big plans. And those plans included equally big art. “When we bought the building, we just saw this big, open, flat empty pallet and just thought how great it would be to have something beautiful on the wall,” Lewandowski said. So, she contacted the City of Marquette Arts and Culture Center to inquire about potential artists for a mural, and director Tiina Harris put Kate in touch with Power of

Words Project founder and artist Mia Tavonatti. Tavonatti had already created several Power of Words murals in communities across the Upper Peninsula. Originally from Iron Mountain, she was happy to return to the U.P. on occasion to share her artwork with the general public. But Tavonatti said she never had plans to create a mural in the city of Marquette. “I figured they got their stuff going on already and they didn’t really need me … but they wanted something here and we got it done,” Tavonatti said during the official introduction of her newest Power of Words project, the largest mural on display in the city of Marquette.

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The project was a couple of years in the making, with production on the mural beginning in 2019. However, after an accident at the site of the mural, followed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the project was delayed significantly. But, it came to fruition this summer and was officially unveiled to the community in August of this year. Tavonatti had help with creating the mural from a team of local artists, including Michele Tuccini, Sabrina Langdon, Taryn Okesson, Emmalene Oysti and Patty Gagnon. Tuccini, who was also part of the mural project along the bike path in Marquette, said she learned a lot being part of this type of project.

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“It’s totally amazing” she said of the mural as she worked the merch table at the unveiling, handing out scavenger hunt lists to kids which prompted them to find some of the many images included in the mural, and selling Power of Words Project t-shirts. “I’ve known Kate and Christopher for a long time, and when (Kate) was talking to me about this project, I had never heard of the Power of Words.” At that time, Tavonatti was working on a mural in Gladstone, so Tuccini went there to meet the artist and check out her work. “That mural is wonderful,” she said. To date, there is one Power of Words Project mural in Gladstone, three in Manistique, and five in Iron Mountain. Marquette’s mural, like all the Power of Words murals that came before it, began with a community-wide voting process. First, words were nominated for contention. Then, a list was presented that the community voted on. “Natural” received an overwhelming majority of votes, and so was chosen to be the word for this 10th Power of Words Project. Once Tavonatti had her design, the mural took 20 days to complete. Using a grid to help the team work together, several local painters helped bring Tavonatti’s design to life. And for this project, so did Tavonatti’s sister, Tara. Though their lives have taken them far from the Upper Peninsula, (Mia is a professor at Laguna College of Art and Design in Laguna Beach, California) the sisters have roots in the UP. Tara is a full-time artist, just like their father was, who attended NMU. Their mother was born in Marquette. The sisters grew up in Iron Mountain. During the mural’s official introduction, City of Marquette arts

One of three Power of Words Project murals in Manistique features the word “Discover” and illustrates scenes found in the community.

and senior services coordinator Tristan Luoma said the mural was a welcome part of the local public art scene in Marquette. “This is the largest mural to date in the Marquette area, a stunning addition to our downtown landscape that speaks to Marquette’s unrelenting creative spirit, our unique sense of community and our admiration for our natural environment,” he said. He went on to say the word the community chose was fitting for the area. “Though everyone who voted for it will have different reasons for doing so, different passions, different priorities when it comes to appreciation and preservation, and different ideas for how we can help sustain what we treasure so dearly, we all undoubtedly share a very personal and emotional tie to nature,” he said. That personal connection became evident when, after the official word “natural” was chosen, Tavonatti went back to the well, asking the community

what, exactly, “natural” meant to them. “I got a lot of feedback. Very diverse,” she said. “Some of it was controversial about construction and building. Some of it was more esoteric, ‘I love nature and I want it to stay that way.’” That feedback helped in her design of the mural, which features the face of a woman (Mother Nature, herself) gazing out over a landscape that spans the seasons, a birds nest perched on her head and sunlight shining through the trees in the background onto water. “I thought (the feedback) was really well-rounded. For me, I just wanted to create something that was really like nature. Because everything is connected,” Tavonatti said. “So in this mural, everything is really connected. There’s a lot of patterns weaving together. I think that’s what people enjoy about nature, how you become part of it. It’s like a web that pulls you in.” The mural was funded in part by a $35,000 matching façade grant from the Michigan Economic Development

Corporation, which the Marquette Downtown Development Authority applied to receive. “Our downtown has been the beneficiary of numerous public art projects in the recent past and we look forward to more in the future,” said DDA events coordinator Tara LaaseMcKinney. “Downtown Marquette benefits because public art like this is accessible to all and inspires engagement and a sense of belonging.” The mural certainly makes an impact, just off of Third Street at the corner of Ohio Street, appearing from seemingly nowhere as you crest the hill heading north. In order to ensure the mural contained natural elements appropriate to the area, Tavonatti contacted several local photographers, “trying to find resource materials of the flora and fauna.” “There’s a lot of local photographers represented in here,” she said on the day of the official introduction, gesturing to the sweeping mural behind her. With this 10th mural in the Upper Peninsula done as part of the Power of Words Project, Tavonatti is still receiving calls from multiple U.P. municipalities, asking her to create one in their town. For Tavonatti, large works of public art uplift the community in multiple ways. “You do one here and then the neighbor on each side says, ‘Well, now we need to paint our door and change our sign,’ and it spreads,” she said. For more information on the Power of Words project, visit powerofwordsproject.org. About the author: Jackie Stark has lived in the UP since she was 11. An avid reader, she also loves gardening and has been talking about learning to play the guitar for 14 years. MM

The new mural in Marquette’s downtown district on Third Street was officially unveiled at a ceremony on Aug. 25 that included organizers, artists and others who made the massive artwork possible.

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back then

SAUK HEAD & YELLOW DOG Dark history of two Marquette County place names recalled Story by Adam Berger

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omer Kidder (1874-1950) took a health break from studying at Harvard from 1893-1895. He came home to Marquette, summering at the Huron Mountain Club. His father, Alfred Kidder (1840-1923), a mining engineer who served as a wilderness guide for famous anthropologist Lewis Henry Morgan (1818-1881) in Marquette County, was deeply interested in Native history, and passed this passion to his sons. While home from Harvard, Homer Kidder collected oral histories from local Ojibwe elders. The stories he wrote down were eventually published in 1994 as Ojibwa Narratives, a book worth exploring for glimpses into local Native history. Three informants helped Homer Kidder. Charlotte Kawbawgam (circa 1836-1904) was the daughter of Ojibwe leader Mah-je-ge-zhik (died circa 1857), the man who guided mineral explorers to iron deposits near Teal Lake in Negaunee in 1845. Charlie Kawbawgam (circa 1815-1902) hosted early Marquette settlers such as Peter White (1830-1908) in their first years living on Iron Bay. Francis Nolan (circa 1820-1911), known by his jocular nickname Jacques LePique, French for Jack of Spades, was Mah-je-gezhik’s other son-in-law. He guided with Alfred Kidder when Lewis Henry Morgan came to the Upper Peninsula in the 1850s, and for George Shiras III (1859-1942), who became a famous wildlife photographer. One story Jacques LePique told Kidder described events that took

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Sketch by Mike McKinney place about a century earlier, around the 1780s. An Ojibwe man named Yellow Dog, his wife, their infant, and teen-aged son were paddling north across Iron Bay. Unbeknownst to them, a group of Sauk raiders who had come up from Lake Michigan via a trail near the Chocolay River were scanning the lake from the tall crag just south of Marquette commonly called the Rock Cut. There was thick fog on Lake Superior, so the Sauk could not see the Ojibwe family, but they heard the baby cry. The Ojibwe family paddled on and camped along a river near what is now Big Bay. The teen-aged son had an uneasy feeling that enemies were close, and thought he saw a canoe on the horizon, but his father told him it was probably just seagulls on a log. The young man, about 16 years old, went to look around, taking his father’s gun. As he walked along the lake shore, a Sauk canoe pulled up and raiders rushed him. He fired the gun, killing two Sauk attackers, then hid in the woods. While hiding, he heard Sauk warriors murder his family and saw flames as his family’s camp burned. The river became known as the river where Yellow Dog was killed, or the Yellow Dog River. From concealment, the Ojibwe teenager watched Sauk raiders load their fallen compatriots into canoes, blacken their faces to grieve, and slowly paddle back the way they had come, singing mourning chants. The Ojibwe young man was almost able to keep up by running along Lake Superior for about ten miles. He watched the Sauk

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land on a small island close to shore and bury their two dead companions. Once the Sauk passed Garlic Point, he swam to the island, dug up the bodies, cut off their heads, and hung them on trees. This place was thereafter named Sauks Head Island, since washed away by waves. The memory of the raid endures in the place names of nearby Saux Head Point and Saux Head Lake. As in the story told to Homer Kidder by Jacques LePique, the Sauk are too often remembered as generic enemies. Diplomatic relations between the Ojibwe and Sauk were in fact more complicated, and the Sauk were not simply aggressors, but displaced people probing for opportunities along Lake Superior. Sauk, or Sac, are not Anishinaabe, the culture mainly consisting of Ojibwe, Odawa, and Potawatomi people. However, they speak a related Algonquian language and migrated to the Great Lakes from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, like the Anishinaabe. They also participated in Midewiwin ceremonies, as did many other Algonquian-language speakers in the Great Lakes. The Sauk were closely related to the Meskwaki, often called Fox. The two groups may have been a single culture in an earlier era. Meskwaki and Sauk intermarried but were distinct when contacted by Europeans in the 1600s. In the beginning of that century, the Sauk probably lived around Saginaw Bay; the place name comes from the word Sauk. The Meskwaki held territory in the eastern Upper Peninsula. The Sauk and Meskwaki faced pressure from Native rivals throughout the 1600s. Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) aggression disrupted the balance of power in the Great Lakes region. Anishinaabe groups pushed into Sauk territories around Saginaw Bay and challenged the Meskwaki in the eastern Upper Peninsula. Sauk and Meskwaki populations moved to Green Bay. Jesuit Jean Claude Allouez (16201689) encountered Sauk and Meskwaki in Wisconsin in 1670. He noted that the Meskwaki recently suffered a brutal Haudenosaunee raid near the site of Chicago by Seneca warriors and were also at war with the Dakota in northwestern Wisconsin and Minnesota. The Meskwaki, never populous, maintained a reputation for ferocity in the 1700s. They put up strong fights against their Native enemies, attacking Ojibwe territories along southeastern Lake Superior in 1703

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Sauk raiders were perched atop what Marquette-area residents know today as the rock cut looking to make trouble. Due to the fog that concealed view of the lake, they could not see the Ojibwe family paddling their canoe off shore, but they could hear the baby’s cry, which would lead to tragedy later that day.

and 1708. Ojibwe counter raids were supported by Odawa warriors. The Meskwaki opposed cooperation with the French fur trade. The French launched the so-called Fox Wars that lasted into the late 1730s. Anishinaabe participation in the Fox Wars was strategic, intended to weaken a dangerous adversary. The Fox Wars ended when Anishinaabe people petitioned the government of New France, sending delegations to Montreal in 1736 and 1737. The decimated Meskwaki people sought refuge with Sauk relatives who were living among Potawatomi people. Ojibwe and Odawa warriors did not want to fight the Potawatomi, fellow members of the Anishinaabe culture. In the wake of the Fox Wars, the Sauk and Meskwaki were pushed into western Wisconsin. Meskwaki survivors maintained a separate

identity for a time, then mixed with the larger Sauk culture. They alternatively warred and allied with the powerful Dakota to their northwest, who also contested Ojibwe control of western Lake Superior. Sauk and Ojibwe relations reached an interesting place in 1763. They

Diplomatic relations between the Ojibwe and Sauk were in fact more complicated, and the Sauk were not simply aggressors, but displaced people probing for opportunities along Lake Superior.

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came together to seize Fort Michilimackinac from the newly arrived British. The surprise attack was part of the pan-tribal uprising largely inspired by Odawa leader Pontiac (circa 1720-1769). Native forces assaulted British forts throughout the Great Lakes from May through October. On June 2, Ojibwe and Sauk warriors played baggataway, or lacrosse, a

sport favored by Great Lakes Native peoples. During the game, players flung the ball inside the fort, grabbed concealed weapons, and rushed inside, slaughtering British soldiers. The Ojibwe cooperation with the Sauk in 1763 possibly reflected Ojibwe concerns that Sauk and Meskwaki people might ally with the Dakota. Indeed, this is what happened. Meskwaki warriors joined the Dakota in an unsuccessful effort to defeat Ojibwe forces at the St. Croix Falls in northwestern Wisconsin circa 1780. When Sauk warriors attacked Yellow Dog’s family around the 1780s, they may have been acting in support of an alliance with the Dakota intended to push the Ojibwe out of western Lake Superior. When this strategy failed, the Sauk moved southwest into southern Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, and Oklahoma, leaving behind the Great Lakes region for the prairies and plains.

About the author: Adam Berger holds a PhD in social anthropology, an MA in educational psychology, and has professional experience in the nonprofit field. Keenly interested in Upper Peninsula local history and ecology, Adam believes that teaching younger generations about the land and its past is the way to protect our unique region. MM


superior reads

‘ANATOMY’ REVISITED Review by Victor Volkman

DISSECTING ANATOMY OF A MURDER By Eugene R. Milihizer

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Publisher: Ave Marie School of Law Press

ore than 60 years on, the book (and later the film) Anatomy of a Murder continues to fascinate people. Why is that? Well, first and foremost, it introduced the genre of “realistic courtroom drama” to American readers, and its impact cannot be underestimated. You can draw a clear line from the 1957 novel to potboilers like John Grisham’s A Time to Kill (1989) and Scott Turow’s Presumed Innocent (1987). The courtroom drama differs from typical Hitchcock-era fare in that the plot does turn on a “McGuffin,” like a coded message, to motivate the characters or silly tricks like surprise witnesses at the 11th hour. Indeed, Eugene Milihizer quotes author John D. Voelker (aka Robert Traver): I wanted to tackle a single courtroom trial because I had a small ax of my own to grind. For a long time, I had seen too many movies and read too many books and plays about trials that were almost comically phony and overdone, mostly in their extravagant efforts to overdramatize an already inherently dramatic human situation. The impact of Anatomy of a Murder also involved several firsts with respect to the Upper Peninsula. Specifically, Eugene Milihizer’s book Dissecting Anatomy of a Murder claims it was the first Hollywood film shot entirely on location. Normally, exteriors would be shot by a “second unit” and performances shot on a soundstage. The magic of editing would fool the viewer into thinking the action was taking place in Rome or New York City or wherever. The prime location happened to be the Marquette courthouse and numerous other locations around the county, including Ishpeming, Big Bay, and Michigamme. You can still see the famous “autograph wall” of the cast and crew in the basement of what is now Globe Printing in Marquette. The film adaptation led to Jimmy Stewart’s fifth and final Oscar nomination in 1960, so you could say it was the capstone of his career. Standout performances by rising stars Lee Remick and George C. Scott, and popular actress Eve Arden, made it a tour de force. A running time of 160 minutes made it the longest Hollywood blockbuster up until that time, except for Ben Hur. Dissecting Anatomy of a Murder (2019) is the first and only book so far from the Ave Maria School of Law Press in Naples, Florida. Residents of northside Ann Arbor are quite familiar with the Ave Maria School of Law which had a big campus there from 2000 to 2009, when they moved to their present location in Naples, Florida. I bring this up to make the

connection between the very Michigan-centric book and film franchise of Anatomy of a Murder and the law school. There’s certainly no shortage of books about Anatomy of a Murder; specifically, I’m thinking of Anatomy of “Anatomy”: The Making of a Movie by Joan G. Hansen (1999) and the Anatomy of a Murder Scrapbook recently released in a new 60th anniversary edition in 1999. The all-encompassing structure of Milihizer’s Dissecting Anatomy of a Murder makes it unique and a must-read for the Anatomy completist. Specifically, the book divides into three sections: the early life and career of lawyer John D. Voelker (pen name Robert Traver), a detailed comparison of the real-life case; the real-life story of how Lt. Coleman A. Peterson shot and killed tavern owner Maurice Chenoweth point-blank in Big Bay vs. the screenplay depictions of case materials, and lastly an intense legal analysis of the pivotal issues, including the insanity defense, jury nullification, and the underutilization of voir dire (eliminating unqualified jurors). Sprinkled throughout copiously footnoted book are wonderful reminisces from John Voelker about his career both as a struggling lawyer and then his 16 years as prosecuting attorney for Marquette County. Voelker’s love for the rugged beauty and wilderness of the U.P. comes through his disdain for how the newly constructed Big Mac bridge would open up the U.P. to just about anybody and how carefully he hid his favorite trout fishing hole. Some of these reflections come to us through excerpts of his three prior unsuccessful novels and his extensive personal diaries which give us a rare look at the man behind the mirror. In one of life’s cruel ironies, Voelker was finally selected as a Michigan Supreme Court justice just weeks after Anatomy of a Murder became a New York Times Bestseller. This nomination would have solved his financial woes but came at the cost of forsaking his beloved U.P. As a lifelong film buff, I enjoyed the behind-the-scenes look at film production a bit more than learning about the subtle and not-so-subtle differences between the brazen murder of Peterson vs. the on-screen depiction of Manion as the perpetrator. Otto Preminger, the film’s director and producer, comes through as a larger-than-life character who stops at nothing to ensure a smooth movie making process. In one example, he pays off a lawsuit brought by the family of the real-life perpetrators for the too-close-to-real-life depiction, seeking compensation for both royalties and violation of privacy. If Anatomy of a Murder is on your Netflix playlist, then Milihizer’s Dissecting Anatomy of a Murder should be on your bedside table! About the author Victor R. Volkman is a graduate of Michigan Technological University (class of ’86) and current president of the U.P. Publishers and Authors Association (UPPAA). He is Senior Editor at Modern History Press, publisher of the U.P. Reader. MM

Send book review suggestions to victor@LHPress.com. Books submitted for review can be sent to: MM Book Reviews, 5145 Pontiac Trail, Ann Arbor, MI 48105.

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lookout point

St. Peter Cathedral in Marquette is adorned with beautiful stained-glass windows depicting saints and scenes from the Catholic tradition.

REACHING FOR HEAVEN

Marquette’s St. Peter Cathedral is a Romanesque masterpiece Story and photos by Sonny Longtine

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ew York has St. Patrick’s, London has St. Paul’s, both grand cathedrals of the first order, but the Upper Peninsula has its own impressive house of worship: St. Peter Cathedral. It may not be as large as the others and perhaps not as grand, but to Upper Peninsula Catholics, it is a cherished place of prayer that has basilica stature. St. Peter is in the classic Romanesque Revival style with its solid, rough cut, sandstone walls and a steeply pitched roof. St. Peter is more muscular than lyrical. Deeply recessed windows, framed by rounded arches, reinforce its massiveness. Truncated buttresses dominate the exterior walls and give the cathedral a classy toughness. The facade is typical Romanesque with symmetrical, arched-topped stained glass windows, a cavernous entryway, and square towers. Romanesque churches are solid; they look like they have always been there. The cathedral is located on the corner of Fourth Street and Baraga Avenue in Marquette; it is the fourth

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church to exist on that site. Bishop Frederic Baraga visited Marquette on October 1853, confirmed 30 people and selected the present site as the location for the village’s first Catholic Church. The beginning of St. Peter was inauspicious. The first church in 1856 was a two-story frame building located just behind the present cathedral. In 1864, a larger and more substantial church replaced the old wooden structure. The new Gothic church had a stone foundation and was an imposing church for its time. Built for only $12,000, it was a bargain even then. But it was glacially cold, and worshiping in the church during the winter would have been a nightmare if the furnace was not fired up for three days prior to a church service. Calamity, however, disturbed the peaceful church in 1879 when Bishop Vertin removed Father Kenny as church pastor. This firing angered many of the parishioners, and it was presumed they sought retribution by burning the church down. Vertin then reinstated Kenny as pastor of the church that was now

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a pile of blackened ruins. Vertin and Kenny, apparently with some spiritual guidance, patched up their discord and a new church era began. The cornerstone for a new sandstone church was laid in 1881 but was not completed until 1890. During construction, the basement of the church served the parishioners. When it was completed, the church nourished the Catholic community for the next 53 years. Then catastrophe struck again in November 1935 when another fire demolished the cathedral. No foul play was evident this time. The sandstone walls were all that was left after the devastating ’35 fire. Father Francis Scheringer and custodian, Rock Beauchamp, masked against the smoke and linked with a rope, fought the flames and smoke to the main altar to bring out the sacred vessels. Seconds after they exited the burning building, the roof caved in and the floor collapsed. Marquette resident Mary Belmore (now deceased) was 17 years old at the time of the fire that started in


the early morning hours on Saturday night. When she went to attend mass on Sunday morning the church ruins were still smoldering from the fire. The auditorium in Bishop Baraga High School, across the street from the church, served as a temporary sanctuary for the Sunday service. Smoke drifting from the cathedral permeated the school auditorium. She lucidly recalled that day and said, “It was a very sad day, Monsignor Bucholtz was visibly upset when saying Mass. I remember the smell of the smoke, and the noise from the fire trucks.” Parish donations and fire insurance funded over a halfmillion dollars to construct a new church from the remnants of the old. Belmore also noted that the day after the fire, “My father gave $1,000 to the parish for the building of a new church.” Mass continued to be celebrated in the auditorium of Bishop Baraga School until the new cathedral was completed in September 1938. The new St. Peter Cathedral was imposing, and parishioners took extreme pleasure in their new house of worship. In the winter, teasing snowflakes were spiritually greeted by new and higher spires with blue and red domes capped with gold-leafed crosses. The nave is longer and boasts a vaulted ceiling that is supported by sequoia-like Corinthian pillars that “stretch to heaven.” A marble altar and a marble bishop’s throne (cathedra) were added. Brilliantly colored stained-glass windows were installed that depict the mysteries of the Lord’s life. Stained glass windows were more than a thing of beauty in the middle ages; they illustrated significant events in church history at a time when many parishioners were unable to read. Also, lining the walls of the St. Peter nave are intricate mosaics outlined in marble and framing the Stations of the Cross—a series of scenes that depict the crucifixion of Christ— that Catholics use for devotions. Belmore said, “The soaring spires on the new church belfry attracted bats, and the girls at the school shrieked and covered their heads when the bats swooped down from the belfry, terrorizing the frightened lasses on their way to church. It gives credibility to the phrase, “ bats in the belfry.” In 1947, the cathedral was completely refurbished at a cost of $25,000, and in the 1960s changes were made to accommodate the dictums of the

Vatican II Council. The cathedral was again given a major face-lift and updated in the 1980s at a cost of $300,000. The beauty of St. Peter Cathedral has justly been recognized: In 1996, the Chicago Tribune praised it as “the most beautiful sandstone structure in the world.” Bishop Frederic Baraga, the church’s first bishop, is entombed, along with other bishops in a crypt below the church’s chapel, but he now has a new resting place in a newly built chapel on the west side of the cathedral. Baraga received venerated status by the Vatican in 2012.

“It was a very sad day, Monsignor Bucholtz was visibly upset when saying Mass. I remember the smell of the smoke, and the noise from the fire trucks.” Bestowed with this extraordinary status, Rome asserted that Baraga must have a special place of entombment. As a result, a new chapel was built in 2014; it houses Baraga’s Italian marble sarcophagus. The chapel has two entrances, one from inside the church near the sacristy and the other in a courtyard. The courtyard entrance enables visitors to visit the chapel without disturbing mass. Two impressive stained-glass windows honor Baraga’s Slovenian roots and his incredible ministry to Native Americans. The larger of the two windows is more than 13 feet high and close to five feet wide. The two windows were not cheap:

the total cost was $86,000. The windows gently illuminate the sarcophagus in the center of the chapel. The Bishop Baraga Association is hopeful that beatification, another major step toward sainthood, will follow the Venerable status, though it may take years. One of the most vexing problems with building the chapel was where to get the sandstone for the exterior wall. In order to preserve the building’s historic integrity, it was essential that sandstone be used. Monsignor Michael Steber said, “The sandstone was very difficult to come by. We attempted to get some from the old orphanage and then from Northern Michigan University, but were turned down by both.” He continued, “Eventually the contractor (Gundlach Champion Inc.) found enough sandstone in Sault Ste. Marie to complete the exterior.” The new chapel/crypt cost $600,000. Dr. John and Mary Jane Beaumier of Duluth contributed $100,000 to the project. Parishioners are hopeful that Baraga will make the final step to sainthood, In August 2012 St. Peter was listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the National Park Service. As a result, it may qualify for federal or state assistance for historic preservation. Bishop Frederic Baraga would be pleased to know that from the church’s nascency in 1853, when he confirmed 30 Catholics, that a celebrated cathedral would spring forth in the Upper Peninsula’s wilderness. About the Author: Sonny Longtine is a Marquette resident who has published eight books on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. For more than three decades he taught American history and government in Michigan schools. MM

In 2012, Frederic Baraga, the first bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Marquette, was declared “venerable,” a significant step toward sainthood in the church. In 2014 a new chapel was added to the cathedral that houses the bishop’s sarcophagus.

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sporting life

Tyler LaDuron of the Channing Railroaders baseball team hits the ball in a game against the Marquette team.

THE ‘BIG LEAGUE’ Baseball a major tradition in small town; tournament hits 50 years Story and photos by James Larsen

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s Cody Darling dug his cleats into the batter’s box dirt for the first time at Felch Memorial Field, it felt oddly familiar. Following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, Cody became the third generation of his family to participate in the hallowed tradition. “Baseball is all about generations,” explained Cody’s father Joe Timmer.

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“To look at the field we all played on, it’s just so special.” During the 50th annual Felch Labor Day Championship tournament, hundreds of fans lined the outfield walls and stands. They cooked out. They camped. Many arrived before the first pitch and stayed long after the final out each day. They renewed old friendships and created new memories. Jim Janofski has been coming to


Marquette hitter Dan Sabin awaits the pitch during the championship game of the Felch Labor Day Tournament against Bonduel, Wis.

the old ballpark located off M-69 in Felch since the 1970’s. “We love the atmosphere. It’s like turning the clock back to a time when baseball was the attraction in small towns – like taking a page from the past. It’s refreshing to see.” While there wasn’t a goat auctioned off between innings like Jim recalls from the seventies, there was plenty of excitement. The 50/50 raffles and autographed baseballs donated by former Detroit Tiger great John Hiller added another layer of intrigue to complement the action on the field. Following his remarkable career, Hiller found himself eight hours north of Tiger Stadium on a mound in Felch in 1981. Forty years later, the long-time area resident climbed up that same mound. This time, to throw out the first pitch before the Labor Day championship game. After being honored with a plaque and addressing the crowd during a moving pre-game ceremony, Hiller signed autographs, spoke with fans and caught up with old friends. “It was a good day. A really good day” exclaimed Hiller. Among the many people taking in the action was Mike Ferguson. As a sophomore in high school, Mike

played for the Channing Railroaders during the inaugural Felch tournament in 1971. “There were so many good ballplayers. The talent was unbelievable.” Former player and current volunteer Todd Lindeman explained, “when high school kids got to play in the Felch Tournament it was like being called up to the big leagues.”

Another youngster making his debut in Felch in 1971, was 16-year-old Gus Murray. “When I got that call, I thought it was like the Major Leagues.” The talent did in fact extend to many former professionals, including future and former major leaguers. Kevin Tapani, Bob Wickman, John Hiller and Mark “The Bird” Fidrych were some of the big leaguers cited.

Remembering Tom Donckers

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eloved local umpire Tom Donckers passed away unexpectedly in September. The long time Marquette area resident’s lifelong passion was baseball in all its forms. Widely respected, he was NCAA certified, and umpired many games and tournaments. Many leagues around the Upper Peninsula depended on him. Recent highlights from this year (Mark Pantti photo) included umpiring the American Legion State Championships in Marquette and the Superiorland Baseball League Championship game in Gwinn. October 2021

Other professionals, including several minor leaguers, also graced the field built upon an old swamp in the woods. With Hiller’s arrival in 1981, the crowds swelled, reaching their pinnacle in 1983. According to multiple first-hand reports and corroborated by an article in the Iron Mountain Daily News, more than 10,000 people took in the action during the tournament that year. Joining Hiller was former Detroit phenom Mark “The Bird” Fidrych. People came out in droves to see the former 1976 Rookie of the Year. An estimated 5,500 showed up the day he pitched. The beloved and often eccentric Fidrych took the nation by storm during his 19-win rookie campaign. That season Fidrych nearly won the Cy Young award as the American League’s best pitcher as a 21 year old. Injuries led to a premature end to his Major League career, but his popularity never flickered. Former Felch Ranger Dave Bray called seeing Hiller and Fidrych take the mound in Felch “the coolest thing I’ve ever seen in my life.” Warren “Windy” Wickman has been the public address announcer each year since 1971. He recalled vehicles on each side of the road all through Felch. He spoke of Fidrych

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down at Solberg’s tending bar and even his mannerisms. “He even manicured the mound when he was here, like he did when he was in Detroit,” recounted Windy, referencing Fidrych’s habit of smoothing the mound’s dirt by hand before he pitched. People stood several deep, enjoying the history taking place on the field. The celebration after the games was just as intense. John Hiller described it as “shoulder to shoulder,” with Fidrych just handing out cans of beer at Solberg’s Bar in Felch, and it being so crowded “we were not able to move.” Just as in the early years of the tournament, the 50th installment had its share of excitement. The four-day, double elimination marathon saw several games decided in dramatic fashion. Multiple elimination games included walk off victories with plays at the plate. After winning one such game on Monday, the Marquette team found itself in another close game later in the day. Down by two in the final inning with two runners on base, their last hope rested on the bat of Ethan Bemowski. The crowd erupted when the ball jumped off his bat and easily cleared the outfield fence, sending his team to a winner-take-all championship game against Bonduel, Wisconsin. That

game would be another thriller, as Bonduel won the title on a walk-off hit. Marquette player-manager Hunter Larson spent part of this summer playing professionally in Boise, Idaho. While a great thrill for him, he explained that Labor Day in Felch is hard to beat. “It’s always fun. I look forward to it each year” he said with a smile.

I never want to miss this tournament. It brings back a sense of the American past. People are coming out of the woods and genuinely appreciate baseball.”

A sign on the outside of the left-field fence sums up the sentiment the Felch community feels toward their annual summer baseball tournament.

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—Bobby Beauchamp

Team 906 shortstop Bobby Beauchamp echoed that sentiment. “I never want to miss this tournament. It brings back a sense of the American past. People are coming out of the woods and genuinely appreciate baseball. People are really watching the whole time. There’s definitely something special about this tournament.” To put something of this caliber together, it takes a dedicated team. At the forefront of those efforts is tournament director John Benzie who is simply proud to have the event in Felch. He was quick with gratitude and offered “thanks to all the people who support the tournament.” Supporters include the board, grounds crew, concession stand volunteers, raffle ticket sellers, business sponsors, fans, community members and more. The list is long and keeps growing as it takes a lot to put on an event of this magnitude in the middle of the woods. As for the devotion to the game at this location, former Channing Railroader Mike Ferguson felt it was “like a religion.” In addressing the crowd before the championship game, former Detroit Tiger and Felch Ranger John Hiller referred to Felch Memorial Field as “the field of dreams.” A sign in the corner of left field greets fans as they enter the ballpark. It asks the question, “Is this Heaven?” The answer, “No, it’s Felch.”

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Felch Labor Day Tournament Director John Benzie (right) presents former Detroit Tiger pitcher John Hiller with a plaque for his dedication to Felch at the community’s annual Labor Day tournament.

REACHING HOME Retired World Series champ traded Tiger Stadium for Felch Story and photos by James Larsen

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hen you hear the name John Hiller, what do you think of? Many recall his pitching contributions for the 1968 World Champion Detroit Tigers. Others marvel at his trailblazing return to professional baseball following a heart attack in 1971. Others may point to his pioneering role in helping change the perception of a relief pitcher and closer. Those in the Upper Peninsula may have a different description for the Dickinson County resident: friend. John Hiller explained it this way, “I go to the grocery store to pick

up five things and come back two hours later. People see me in the store and they just want to talk baseball. I’m one of them. Part of the community.” So how did the Canadian born Hiller, who played his entire 15year Major League career with the Detroit Tigers, come to buy an old farm in Felch 40 years ago? Following Hiller’s retirement from the Tigers in 1980, Dickinson County resident Andy Anderson reached out to Hiller who was living in Duluth, Minnesota, at the time. Anderson asked if he’d like to pitch for the Felch team. To their amazement, the former All-Star ac-


cepted. Nearing Sagola, Hiller recalled saying with a grin, “I don’t think they have any hotels around here.” Hiller stayed at a camp in the woods and loved it. He enjoyed the Felch Labor Day baseball tournament experience and asked his family if they would consider moving to the Upper Peninsula. To his surprise, none of his kids opposed the move. Forty years later, Hiller accepted a plaque from Felch Labor Day Tournament director John Benzie this Labor Day. It stated the following: ‘With sincere thanks and appreciation for your generosity and for sharing your lifetime dedication to baseball. Our community is honored to call you friend.’ Hiller then spoke spontaneously to the crowd. “It’s a fact that the love and generosity and the ‘down-to-earthness’ of the people of this area made me come back the following year, buy a farm that had no water, very little electricity, and our family made it our home. And I’ve been here ever since. God bless all of you.” One of the reasons Hiller acclimated so quickly was an instant connection to his teammates, including Felch catcher Bruce “Hubba” Murray. “He was an outstanding receiver” exclaimed Hiller. “I shook him off once and Todd Lindeman hit a home run off me” Hiller lamented with a wry smile. When told that Hiller, the former MLB single season saves record holder would be suiting up for the Felch Rangers, Bruce “Hubba” Murray responded “yeah right.” In speaking of Hillers astonishing arrival, “he just came and fit in. He was easy to get along with. You know they called him gentleman John. You won’t meet a nicer man.” How was it to catch a Major Leaguer? Hubba explained, “The better the pitcher, the easier it is to catch. We trusted each other and it just clicked.” A couple years later, Hubba would have the opportunity to catch not one but two former Detroit Tigers on the same day. In 1983, former 19-game winner Mark “The Bird” Fidrych teamed up with Hiller and the Felch squad. In describing the experience, Hubba roared, “unbelievable.” Speaking of Fidrych, Hubba explained that, “His slider was good, he still hit his spots, control was good and he was fun.” After giving up a

home run to Stanton hitter Larry Asiala, Hubba went to the mound to talk to Fidrych who was famous for allegedly talking to the ball. “I don’t know what you said to that ball, but don’t say it again” Hubba counseled the 1976 rookie of the year. The Bird laughed and kept the Stanton hitters at bay for a few more innings. Then in a flashback to their days at Tiger Stadium, Hiller came in to close out the game and preserve the victory. While playing with major leaguers was a thrill of a lifetime, the Felch catcher they call Hubba went on to conclude, “the biggest thing about playing ball is all the friends you make. A lot of life-time, close to the heart buddies.” Hiller spoke in similar tones when reflecting back on the last 40 years of life in the Upper Peninsula. “You put all these pieces together. It’s amazing how it all came to be.” Yes, John Hiller was a champion in 1968 with the Detroit Tigers. Then, he did what nobody had done before and came back from a heart attack to become the best relief pitcher in the American League for much of the 1970’s. He set records and helped to change perceptions. He won awards and was invited to an All-Star game.

Referring to the heart attack, Hiller used what was a low point in his life to try and help others and raise awareness of what is possible. Most wrote off his career after he missed the entire 1971 season. Not Hiller, who “got out of that hospital and started working out.” He emphasized “I hated to run. It was 35 laps to a mile. I ran two laps and fell flat on my face.” A burning desire, coupled with an unshakable determination to return to the mound, saw him changing his diet, repeatedly throwing a baseball at a square at the YMCA wall and adding a new change-up to his pitching arsenal. After getting cleared by a cardiologist, the Tigers finally gave him the green light. Hiller quickly found himself back on the mound. The first batter he faced was star Dick Allen who promptly deposited a Hiller offering over the outfield wall. Hiller settled down, finding his groove en route to contributing to the Tigers American League East title in 1972. The next year, he set a record for saves, posted a 1.44 ERA and had what famed Sabermetric guru Bill James reportedly once called, “the greatest season for a

closer in the history of baseball.” Hiller cited Detroit Tiger manager Billy Martin’s vote of confidence as a major factor in the success of his return to baseball. Doing his best Billy Martin impression, Hiller recalled the manager exclaiming after his first outing, “this guy came back from the dead and didn’t walk anybody.” Hiller continued pitching for the Tigers until his retirement during the middle of the 1980 season. His second act in baseball would consist of traveling around as a roving pitching coach for the Detroit Tigers minor league affiliates. This allowed him to get back home monthly to see the family and pitch a game for the Felch Rangers in the Wishigan (Michigan-Wisconsin) hardball league. While he deeply loves the game, what means the most to John Hiller are relationships. Seeing old friends at the ballpark, interacting with fans, and passing on a few words of wisdom to a young ball player were all counted as Felch Labor Day highlights When asked if he’d be back next year for the tournament, Hiller said what he often does when asked to help, “Yes.” MM

John Hiller, wearing his Old English D Tiger uniform, tosses out the ceremonial first pitch before the championship game at the annual Championship Tournament in Felch over Labor Day weekend.

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home cinema Hopkins, 83, earned best actor for role in ‘The Father’ Reviews by Leonard Heldreth Our films this month include an account about the onset of dementia, a Chinese film about the loss of a grandmother, a Coen brothers collection of riffs on the Hollywood western, and a WWI version of a mission behind enemy lines.

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THE FATHER istinguishing between reality and illusion can often be difficult. Someone glimpsed at the edge of your field of vision can be the person you expected or simply someone dressed like that person. A person who approaches during, say, a concert intermission may be someone you know or simply some one who thinks he knows you and wonders why you don’t recognize him (it has happened to me). Even worse is the person you half-recognize but can’t really identify as you desperately look for hints. The Father takes these problems and misinterpretations to new levels of anxiety as it tracks the increasing effects of dementia on an eighty-four-yearold man (Anthony Hopkins) whose world is slowly crumbling around him, leaving him at the end crying out for his long-dead mother. In the opening scenes Anthony (Anthony Hopkins) seems like a reasonably adjusted senior citizen living in a very comfortable flat in London with his daughter Anne (Olivia Colman). But cracks in his situation appear–he doesn’t recognize the man in the living room who says he is Anne’s husband (Mark Gatiss); he doesn’t remember that one of his daughters, who he says hasn’t been to see him in some time, is actually dead; he tells one caregiver that he was a professional dancer, but Anne says he was an engineer; and he keeps imagining someone has stolen his watch. To give the audience some insight into Anthony’s confusion, Anne is played in some scenes by Olivia Coleman and in others by Olivia Williams; the husband is sometimes played by Rufus Sewell, and Imogen Poots sometimes plays Laura, a caregiver being interviewed, and sometimes, in flashbacks, plays

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Olivia Colman and Anthony Hopkins in a scene from ‘The Father.’

Lucy, Anthony’s dead daughter. Further, the apartment keeps changing in its layout and its decorations; even small details vary–a bag holding a chicken to be roasted for dinner is blue in one scene and white in another. These switches let the audience share Anthony’s growing confusion as his reality keeps changing. It’s a disconcerting look at a fate that is becoming more common, as longer life spans force our brains to exceed their optimum function. Anthony Hopkins gives what many critics see as the best performance of his distinguished career, winning his second Academy Award for best actor at age 83. The Father is directed by writer/ director Florian Zeller, who adapted his prize-winning, 2012 French play of the same name, and with Christopher Hampton won the Oscar for best adapted Screenplay.

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THE FAREWELL he Farewell was written and directed by Lulu Wang, a Chinese woman who based the film on an incident from her own life–the impending death of her grandmother. Wang is portrayed in the film by Awkwafina (Crazy Rich Asians), who balances the humor and sadness of her character, and won a Golden Globe for Best Actress. Billi (Awkwafina), an aspiring writer

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who has just been turned down for a Guggenheim Fellowship, finds out from her mother that her grandmother Nai Nai (Zhao Shuzhen) has been diagnosed with lung cancer and has only a few months to live. The family doesn’t want Nai Nai to know she has terminal cancer, and with the doctor’s collaboration, they falsify the records and swear Billi to secrecy. Then the family convinces a cousin who was planning a wedding to move his nuptial plans forward, and they all agree to meet in Changchun to say farewell to Nai Nai without her being aware of the real reason for the family meeting. Billi objects to keeping her grandmother in the dark about her condition, and Billi’s parents, Haiyan and Jian, want her to stay in New York for fear that she will accidentally reveal the truth. They try to explain to her the cultural differences between how Easterners and Westerners deal with impending death, telling her that Nai Nai concealed her husband’s impending death from him until nearly the end. Billi acquiesces, but as soon as her parents are on their way to China, she books her own fight to Changchun. All goes as well as possible, and the sadness of the impending death is balanced by humor from minor characters and the often funny confusions that arise in any wedding.

The family successfully conceals that the wedding is also a farewell, and Billi has several talks with Nai Nai and other family members about matters that concern her–the clash between her desire for Western success and her reluctance to give up some of the old ways; the changes she sees happening about her as China modernizes; the family’s collective grief that contrasts with the individual Western grief; and ways she can cope with her transition from traditional Chinese customs and the city she grew up in, to newer ways and the metropolis that now sprawls around her. These discussions are not isolated sermons or lectures but simply subjects that wind through the conversations and actions. At the end Billi and her parents fly back to New York, and a card states that the woman on whom Nai Nai was modeled is still alive, six years after her diagnosis. The film, combining humor with the inevitable grief over expected loss, conveys a good picture of the dilemmas facing the Chinese people as they find themselves, ready or not, thrust into the 21st century. THE BALLAD OF BUSTER SCRUGGS ans of Joel and Ethan Coen will want to watch all six sections of The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, even though the title refers only to the first section. The film was originally conceived as a multi-part series for Netflix, with different directors handling different sections, as Italian filmmakers did for collections such as the 1968 Spirits of the Dead. Like most anthologies, however, these collections were frequently uneven, with an audience forced to watch Roger Vadim’s mediocre Metzengerstein to get to Fellini’s Toby Dammit. The Coens decided to toss the multidirector concept, and that smoothed out the quality; then they jammed the six episodes into one 135-minute film, inserted a book at the beginning to imply each minifilm was a chapter, and turned it over to Netflix to release.

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The result is frequently stunning, full of the Coen macabre humor (think Blood Simple or No Country for Old Men), and much better than such a hodge podge has any right to be. My favorite is the opening segment in which Tim Blake Nelson, as Buster, comes riding up in a white hat and his best Roy Rogers regalia, strumming his black guitar and singing “Cool Water.” Buster is the fastest gun in this part of the West (which he demonstrates), until he isn’t. Also noteworthy is “All Gold Canyon” in which a grizzled prospector (Tom Waits) strikes gold and has to protect it. In fact, all the episodes are noteworthy, if you’re a Coen brothers fan, although individual viewers may find some more noteworthy than others. But that’s true of most anthologies, and may be the reason TV controllers have a fast forward.

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1917 917 is in many ways a typical war movie. It sends two innocent young soldiers on a challenging mission behind enemy lines; it works at showing “war is hell” without getting too grisly or too cynical; and the excellent

photography is by Academy-Awardwinner Roger Deakins. Directed by Sam Mendes, it offers some excellent sequences–my favorite occurs when a biplane comes crashing into a barn. The film is photographed to look as if it were shot in one continuous take, an interesting attempt to submerge the viewer into the action, although though the resulting scenes are sometimes awkward. It even has big stars in walk-on parts, e. g., Benedict Cumberbatch. Why wasn’t I more impressed? Primarily because, even though it’s well done, it is very similar to many other war films; even using the 1917 setting doesn’t help much. It would be interesting to watch this back-to-back with They Shall Never Grow Old, Peter Jackson’s recutting and updating of actual footage from World War I. (About the author: Leonard Heldreth became interested in films in high school and worked as a movie projectionist in undergraduate and graduate school. His short “Cinema Comment” aired for some years on WNMU-FM. In 1987 he started writing reviews for the Marquette Monthly. He taught English and film studies at NMU for over 30 years.) MM

poetry An excerpt from Maiden Voyage

IN THE FALL By Esther Margaret Ayers for Linda

Try to remember who we are: not single flames of maple that lie extinguished on the ground. No, we are the leaves of an oak, curling inward against the cold, the brown hands folding in prayer who cling the longest to the tree. Nor are we broken husks of milkweed that relinquished their burden of summer clouds. No, we are the roses, closing like fists upon our seed: burnished hard and crimson, each with our own jagged crown.

Esther Margaret Ayers lives and works in Marquette as a writer, piano teacher and accompanist. She studied at the Yeats International Summer School in Sligo, Ireland, and holds a BME in music and an MA in English, both from Northern Michigan University. In recent years she has written the librettos for two large choral/orchestral works commissioned and premiered by the Marquette Symphony Orchestra: A Child’s Requiem by composer Thomas LaVoy (2013) and Bagidaabii-Neyaashi by composer Griffin Candey (2016). Her poem “White Stones” is the text of a choral piece by LaVoy which has been performed at Carnegie Hall and recorded by the Philadelphia-based professional choir The Same Stream.

George MacKay and Dean-Charles Chapman play two soldiers assigned to race against time and deliver a message that will stop 1,600 men from walking straight into a deadly trap in the movie 1917.

Editor’s Note: Maiden Voyage is available for $15 at Snowbound Books and the Marquette Regional History Center. It can also be purchased by mail for $19 by sending a check made out to Richard Rastall and mailed to 2100 M-28 E, Marquette, MI 49855.

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gift of water SHORE GRANT

$122,000 in federal monies will help to clean 100s of miles of U.P. shoreline Story and photos by SWP Staff

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he Superior Watershed Partnership (SWP) has been awarded a $122,000 grant through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program to assist coastal communities and Tribes in cleaning up the shorelines, harbors and nearshore waters of Lake Superior. The project area includes over 600 miles of Lake Superior coastline throughout the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Marine debris, also known as marine litter, is human-created waste that has been accidentally or deliberately released into the Great Lakes or ocean waters. Marine debris impacts aquatic habitat, injures or kills fish and other wildlife, interferes with navigation safety, and can pose a threat to human health. Marine debris includes a wide range of items both small and large including plastic bags, bottles, cans, commercial fishing gear, tires, appliances, cars and abandoned boats. The most common materials are plastics, glass, metal, paper, cloth, rubber, and wood products. Sources of marine debris include stormwater runoff, littering, industrial activities, unregulated construction sites and illegal dumping. Sadly, there is no place on earth that is immune to this problem. While the

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Breanna Argeropoulos and Logan Turner, members of the Great Lakes Climate Corps, are shown at a Lake Superior shoreline clean-up project near Ontonagon.

Upper Peninsula has approximately 312,000 year-round residents, it has experienced a dramatic increase in nature tourism in recent years with millions of additional visitors annually. Unfortunately, many Great Lakes coastal areas have seen a corresponding increase in beach litter, shoreline erosion, habitat degradation and water quality impacts. According to SWP Executive Director Carl Lindquist, “Most monitoring confirms that Lake Superior is still the cleanest of the Great Lakes, but it will take increased effort at the community level to keep it that way, especially with increased coastal development and increased nature tourism. The key to nature tourism is keeping it truly sustainable. Thanks to NOAA, the Great Lakes Climate

Corps and proactive communities, the Upper Peninsula can be a model for sustainability and coastal resiliency.” To address the problem in the Upper Peninsula, the SWP will mobilize its Great Lakes Climate Corps (GLCC) to implement a series of cleanup events with coastal communities, tribes and other project partners. The Great Lakes Climate Corps is comprised of women and men who possess both the passion and work ethic to implement a wide range of env ironment a l projects that benefit the Great Lakes and mitigate the impacts of climate change. Several prioritized sites such as harbors and marinas will be eligible for underwater debris removal requiring a dive team and support boats. While the SWP has conducted

Most monitoring confirms that Lake Superior is still the cleanest of the Great Lakes, but it will take increased effort at the community level to keep it that way ...”

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annual beach clean-up events for over two decades, NOAA funding allows the program to expand and serve more communities and partners. The public is also invited to participate in upcoming community clean-up events through the Lake Superior Volunteer Corps (LSVC). All ages are encouraged to participate in beach clean-up events including families, children and visitors. On a positive note, the SWP has also seen a recent increase in the number of out-of-state tourists participating in summer volunteer events. The SWP will also conduct an intensive public education and engagement program that includes K-12 schools, community organizations and Great Lakes media outlets. Communities, tribes and other coastal property owners are encouraged to contact the SWP with information on large debris locations, potential beach cleanup sites or related debris removal sites. This is a two-year, NOAA-funded project with clean-up events taking place spring, summer and fall of 2022 and 2023. (For more information visit the Superior Watershed Partnership and Land

Conservancy at superiorwatersheds. org) MM


Out & About Out & About is a free listing of Upper Peninsula events. Events included must cost $25 or less (except fundraisers). All events are free and in Eastern time unless noted. We print information sent to us by a wide variety of people and organizations. It pays to double check the date, time, place and cost before heading out.

Send your November events by Sunday, October 10 to: calendar@marquettemonthly.com Marquette Monthly P.O. Box 109 Gwinn, MI 49841 phone: (906) 360-2180

Index on the town ………… 66 art galleries ……… 68-69 museums………… 72-73 support groups ……… 77

Hayes Corn Maze | Saturdays and Sundays | Rock

end of september events 29 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:45 a.m.; sunset 7:35 p.m.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) (906) 2264323. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club.

During this 5-week course, the group will read Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo. Activities will include cooking, science and art. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) (906) 226-4323. • More then Beginning Photography. Learn about the digital camera, photographic techniques and composition. Meets Wednesdays through October 28. Register by the 22nd. NCLL

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on the town Gwinn

• Hideaway Bar. - Mondays: The Hideaway All-Stars. 7 p.m. 741 M-35. 346-3178. • Up North Lodge. - Sunday, October 3: Shag Lake Drive. Sunday music, 4 to 8 p.m. 215 South CR-557. 346-9815.

Hancock

• Orpheum Theater. - Friday, October 1: Chad Borgen and the Collective. - Saturday, the 2nd: the World’s Most Dangerous Polka Band. - Saturday, the 9th: Marquis Morel - Friday, the 15th: Brothers Burn Mountain. - Friday, the 22nd: Drew Peterson. - Friday, the 29th: Uncle Pete’s All Star BBQ Blues Band. All shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted. 426 Quincy St. (906) 482-5100.

Marquette

• Drifa Brewing Company. - Sunday, October 3: Cory Coffman. 5 p.m. 501 S. Lake St. 273-1300. • Flanigan’s. - Tuesday through Thursday: Karaoke. 9:30 p.m. Cover charge on weekends only. 429 W. Washington St. 228-8865. • Ore Dock Brewing Company. - Friday, the 8th: Distant Stars. - Saturday, the 9th: Seven Foot Drft. - Friday, the 15th: Adam Carpenter & the Upper Hand. - Thursday, the 22nd: Kal Marks, Liquid Mike and Curfews. $5. - Saturday, the 23rd: John Davey. - Sundy, the 24th: Comedy night with Darren McCarty. Advanced tickets, $15; at the door, $20. 7 p.m.

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members, $3; nonmembers, $6. 11 a.m. Room 404-A, Cohodas Hall, NMU. (906) 225-1004. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) (906) 226-4323. • 18 Tiny Deaths Reading/Presentation. Biographer Bruce Goldfarb will discuss the life and work of Frances Glessner Lee, the mother of modern forensics. 7 p.m. Room to be determined. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. Room 311, NMU Library. (906) 227-2648 or nkupper@nmu.edu • Two Books, Two Communities: Open

October 2021

Adam Carpenter & the Upper Hand | October 15| Ore Dock Brewing Company, Marquette

- Friday, the 29th: Raveyard. 9 p.m. - Saturday, the 30th: Brothers Quinn. 7 p.m. - Saturday, the 30th: Blanco Suave. 10 p.m. - Sunday, the 31st: Brothers Quinn Halloween Special. 7 p.m. All shows are free and begin at 8 p.m. unless noted. 114 W. Spring St. 228-8888. • Rippling River Resort. - Saturday, October 9: Music around the bonfire. 7 p.m. - Saturday, the 16th: Music around the bonfire. 7 p.m. 4321 M-553. 273-2259. • Superior Culture. - Friday, October 1: Troy Graham. - Saturday, the 2nd: DJ Wintermute. - Thursday, the 7th: Heather Evans. - Friday, the 8th: Olliofski. - Saturday, the 9th: Streaking in Tongues

Mouth Open Mic. Share your writing, songs and thoughts about food. 7 p.m. Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. nmu.edu/onebook/twobooks • Registration Deadline: Marquette Area Public Schools Education Foundation. See Wednesday the 6th.

30 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:47 a.m.; sunset 7:33 p.m.

- Thursday, the 14th: Ramble Tamble. - Friday, the 15th: Sister Hammer. - Saturday, the 16th: The Kitchen Sink. - Thursday, the 21st: Electric Words and Music. - Friday, the 22nd: High Wasted Genes. - Saturday, the 23rd: Zachary Watson. - Thursday, the 28th: Martin Manderfield. - Friday, the 29th: The Kitchen Single. - Saturday, the 30th: Waxy Motion and Rat King Cult. $3. 7 to midnight. Music 8 to 10 p.m. 717 Third Street. superiorculturemqt.com

Munising

• Falling Rock Café and Bookstore - Sunday, October 3: Chris Valenti. 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. 104 E. Munising Ave. (906) 387-3008. MM younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) (906) 226-4323. • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323.

Hancock

• Author Presentation. Author Angeline Boulley will discuss her book Firekeeper’s Daughter. 3 p.m. North Wind Books, Finlandia Univeristy. finlandia.edu

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those

october events 01 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:48 a.m.; sunset 7:31 p.m.

Baraga

• Baraga County Chamber of Commerce Membership Mixer.


Members, prospective members and interested parties are invited to bid on silent auction items., a 50-50 raffle and a brown page auction. Proceeds benefit the L’Anse Masonic Lodge scholarship fund. 5:30 p.m. Conference Room, Ojibwa Resort, 16449 Michigan Ave. (906) 353-8808. • Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 180 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

individuals age 18 and older. The outdoor area includes a fire pit and seating. Bring your own beverages. Social, 6 p.m. Dancing, 7 to 10 p.m. Marquette Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 1510 M-28 East. jill906@icloud.com • Co/Lab Collective. View a dance showcase choreographed and performed by NMU dance students and faculty. NMU students, $5; nonstudents, $10; seniors and military, $12; adults, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. (906) 227-1032 or nmu.universitytickets.com

Houghton

Munising

Gwinn

• Erik Koskinen Concert. Eric Koskinen will perform a blend of American folk, country, rock-n-roll and blues. Youth, $10; adults, $20. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. rozsa.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Asahi. Participants will learn about the Finnish mind-body health practice. Donations appreciated. 10 a.m. BeWell Marquette, 601 N. Third St. (906) 2731330. • Co/Lab Collective – Sensory Friendly Performance. View a dance showcase choreographed and performed by NMU dance students and faculty. NMU students, $5; nonstudents, $10; seniors and military, $12; adults, $17. 10 a.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. (906) 227-1032 or nmu. univeristytickets.com • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

02 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:49 a.m.; sunset 7:29 p.m.

Marquette

• Marquette Fall Enduro. Riders are invited to participate in the open, sport and beginner classes. Proceeds benefit the Noquemanon Trail Network. Registration required. Prices vary. 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. NTN South Trails, 2375 CR-553. noquetrails.org • Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Chess Club. Youth age 7 to 12 are invited for chess. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • NMU Homecoming Parade. 2:30 p.m. Third Street. • The Fall Phantasm. This themed event will feature music, campfire stories, creatures, illusions, costumes and a bazaar. Proceeds benefit Fringe Festival 2022. 6 to 11 p.m. Lakenenland Sculpture Park, 2800 M-28 East. • Campus Cinema. The film Forever Purge will be shown. NMU students, free; nonstudents, $1. 7 p.m. Room 1100, Jamrich Hall, NMU. nmu.edu • Dance and Outdoor Gathering for LGBTQ+. This free dance is for LGBTQ+

• Multi-author Book Signing. Local authors will sign copies of their books. 12:30 p.m. Falling Rock Café and Bookstore, 104 E. Munising Ave. (906) 387-3008.

Rock

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more. Youth two and younger, free; others, $10.50. 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

Skandia

• Fall Craft Bazaar. Shop for soups, sandwiches and pies. Pantry donations will be collected. Proceeds benefit scholarships, youth development and the Victory Food Pantry. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. West Branch Township Hall, 1016 CR-545.

03 SUNDAY

sunrise 7:51 a.m.; sunset 7:27 p.m.

Rock

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more.Youth two and younger, free; others, $10.50. 12:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

04 MONDAY

sunrise 7:52 a.m.; sunset 7:25 p.m.

Ishpeming

• NEA Big Read: Amber Edmondson Poetry Reading. Indigenous poet and artist Amber Edmondson will give a poetry reading and discuss her work and art. 7 p.m. Joy Center, 1492 Southwood Dr. (906) 226-4322.

Marquette

• Zoom Storytime. Enjoy stories for newborns to age 6 during this online event. 9:30 a.m. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • Halloween Take and Make: Spooky Candy Bark. Materials provided, while supplies last. 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Youth services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

05 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:53 a.m.; sunset 7:23 p.m.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs,

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art galleries Calumet

• Calumet Art Center. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228. • Copper Country Associated Artist. Works by members and workshop participants in watercolor and oil, drawings, photography, sculpture, quilting, wood, textile, clay, glass and other media. Thursday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 205 Fifth St. (906) 337-1252 or ccaartists.org • Gallery on 5th. Works by local and regional artists. Days and hours vary. 109 Fifth St. (906) 369-0094.

Copper Harbor

• EarthWorks Gallery. Featuring Lake Superior-inspired photography by Steve Brimm. Daily, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. 216 First St. (910) 319-1650.

Escanaba

• East Ludington Art Gallery. Works by local artists. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1007 Ludington St. (906) 786-0300 or eastludingtongallery.com • William Bonifas Fine Arts Gallery. - Journey Through Mental Health, featuring works by artists who live with mental health symptoms, will be on display through October 28. Tuesday, through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 pm. 700 First Ave South. (906) 786-3833. - Biore, A Retrospective: Then and Now, featuring works by Marilyn D.F. Biore, will be on display, through October 28. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3p.m. 700 First Avenue South. (906) 786-3833 or bonifasarts.org

Hancock

• Finlandia University Gallery. - Copper Planted Seeds, featuring works by Ashante Kindle and Khari Turner, will be on display through October 5, with a closing reception at 7 p.m. September 30. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m. 435 Quincy St. (906) 487-7500. • Kerredge Gallery. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts Center, 126 Quincy St. (906)4822333 or coppercountryarts.com • Youth Gallery. Featuring works by local students. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts Center, 126 Quincy St. (906) 482-2333 or coppercountryarts.com

Houghton

• A-Space Gallery. - HYPERCONNECTION, featuring

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Steve Bowles | Awareness of Self| Bonifas Art Center, Escanaba

works by Tiffany Lange, will be on display through November 7. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays, 1 to 8 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. mtu.edu/rozsa

Marquette

• Art—U.P. Style. Art by Carol Papaleo, works by local artists, gifts, classes and more. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. 130 W. Washington St. (906) 225-1993. • DeVos Art Museum. - Regional Perspectives by Women Artists, featuring works in various media from the dawn of the 20th century to present, will be on display. - Personal to Political, featuring works by African American artists who helped shape contemporary art conversation, will be on display through October 31. - Still, an installation of drawings and objects by Cynthia Cote, will open on October 4. Monday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Corner of Seventh and Tracy streets. NMU. (906) 227-1481 or nmu.edu/devos

• Graci Gallery. Works by regional and national artists. Featuring fine craft, contemporary art, and jewelry. Thursday and Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday, by appointment or chance. 555 E Michigan Street. gracigallery.com • Huron Mountain Club Gallery. - Sunrise Art Exhibition, featuring works by local artists inspired by Joy Harjo’s An American Sunrise, will be on display October 1 through 31, with a public reception at 6 p.m. on the 12th. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • Lake Superior Photo and Gallery. The studio features landscape photographic art by Shawn Malone, including naturescapes of the Lake Superior region. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 211 S. Front St. (906) 2283686 or lakesuperiorphoto.com • Lake Superior Art Association Deo Gallery. Works by local and regional artists. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • Peter White Public Library Reception Area Gallery. Works by local and (continued on page 69)


art galleries regional artists. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • The Gallery: A Marquette Artist Collective Project. Works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, Noon to 2 p.m. Suite U7,130 W. Washington St. mqtartistcollective@. org • The Studio Gallery at Presque Isle. Works by local and internationally acclaimed artists. Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 2905 Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 360-4453. • Wintergreen Hill Gallery and Gifts. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 810 N. Third St. (906) 273-1374. • Zero Degrees Artist Gallery. Welcoming new artists with works in oils, watercolors, mixed media, jewelry, photography, metals, woods, recycled and fiber arts and much more. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 525 N, Third St. (906) 228-3058 or zerodegreesgallery.org

Michigamme • Michigamme Moonshine Art Gallery. Works by local and regional artists. Wednesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday by chance. 136 E. Main St. (906) 323-6546.

Munising

• Open Wings. This working pottery studio and gallery features works by regional artists. Closes for the season on October 17. Daily, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 318 W. Munising Ave. (906) 387-5070. • U.P.-Scale Art. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 109 W. Superior Ave. (906) 387-3300 or upscaleart.org

Rapid River

• The adhocWORKshop. Owner Ritch Branstrom creates sculptures with found objects inspired by the land in which the objects were found. By appointment or chance. 10495 South Main Street. (906) 339-1572 or adhocworkshop.com MM

(continued from page 68) rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Muggles for Potter. Youth in grades 2 and 3 are invited. The book will be read aloud and Every Flavor Beans and butterbeer will be provided. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m.. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Beginning Genealogy Workshop. Learn how to use pedigree charts, family groups, census records and organizational techniques. 6:30 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4312. • What’s Up? Astronomy Series. Scott Stobbelaar of the Marquette Astronomical Society will discuss what can be seen in the U.P. skies. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl. info for Zoom link • NMU Choral Ensemble Concert. 7:30 p.m. Reynolds Recital Hall, NMU. Live streaming available at nmu.edu/music • Registration Deadline: Blossoms in the Dark of Winter. See Tuesday, the 12th.

06 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:55a.m.; sunset 7:21 p.m.

Ishpeming

• NEA Big Read: Amber Edmondson

Book-Making Workshop. Indigenous poet and artist Amber Edmondson lead a book-making workshop. Participants will create a handmade journal. Registration required. 7 p.m. Joy Center, 1492 Southwood Dr. (906) 226-4322.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club. The group will finish Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo. Activities will include cooking, science and art. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Marquette Area Public Schools Education Foundation. Linda Winslow will discuss the foundation and share

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updates. Register by September 29. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $6. 2 p.m. Heritage Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 225-1004. • Outword. LGBTQIA youth and allied students in grades 7 to 12 are invited. Masks required for all participants. 4 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • Fried Walleye and Cherry Pie Author Readings and Panel Discussion. As part of the Two Books, Two Communities series, writers Bonnie Jo Campbell, Anne Dimock and Peggy Wolff will read and answer questions.7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link. • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. Room 311, NMU Library. (906) 227-2648 or nkupper@nmu.edu • Registration Deadline: Burials - Differences and Legalities. See Wednesday the 13th.

07 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:456 a.m.; sunset 7:19 p.m.

Hancock

• New Music in the Mine. Contemporary composers will perform. Hard hats required. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. Hoist Building, Quincy Mine, 49750 US41. rozsa.mtu.edu

Ishpeming

• NEA Big Read: Two-Time U.P. Laureate Marty Achatz Poetry Worshop. Marty Achatz will lead a poetry writing workshop with prompts based on poems from Joy Harjo’s An American Sunrise. 7 p.m. Joy Center, 1492 Southwood Dr. Also on zoom, vial pwpl.info or (906) 226-4322.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Registration Deadline: Superior Arts Youth Theatre Tech and Design Workshop Series – Stage Management. See Saturday the 9th.

08 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:57 a.m.; sunset 7:17 p.m.

Calumet

• Calumet-Keweenaw Sportsmen’s Club Gun & Knife Show. Vendors will offer a variety of guns, knives and related supplies. Proceeds benefit the Supplemental Deer Feeding Program. Youth 12 and younger free with an adult; adults, $5. 4 to 9 p.m. Siskiwit, 26070 Pine St. (906) 337-2470.

Gwinn

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October 2021

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Hancock

• New Music in the Mine. Contemporary composers will perform. Hard hats required. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. Hoist Building, Quincy Mine, 49750 US41. rozsa.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Asahi. Participants will learn about the Finnish mind-body health practice. Donations appreciated. 10 a.m. BeWell Marquette, 601 N. Third St. (906) 2731330. • Superior Arts Youth Theatre Tech and Design Workshop Series: Stage Management. Youth in grades 6 to 12 are invited to learn skills used in theatre. Register by the 7th. $15. 3 to 5 p.m. Marquette Hope Connection Center, 927 W. Fair Ave. saytheater.org • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • NEA Big Read: Three-Day International Chapbook Competition. Register for this three-day writing challenge. Write a 15 to 45page poetry chapbook. The theme is Yesterday/Today/ Tomorrow. Prizes awarded for first, second and third places. (906) 226-4322 or pwpl.info

09 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:59 a.m.; sunset 7:15 p.m.

Au Train

• Onagomingkway Chapter of NSDAR Meeting. Meeting maybe on Zoom, if necessary. Noon to 3 p.m. Brownstone Inn, E4635 M-28. (906) 226-7836.

Calumet

• Calumet-Keweenaw Sportsmen’s Club Gun & Knife Show. Vendors will offer a variety of guns, knives and related supplies. Proceeds benefit the Supplemental Deer Feeding Program. Youth 12 and younger free with an adult; adults, $5. 4 to 9 p.m. Siskiwit, 26070 Pine St. (906) 337-2470.

Houghton

• With Wings Attached Concert. The concert will feature music by contemporary composers inspired by bird song. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. rozsa. mtu.edu

Marquette

• Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • U.P. Authors Day. Meet twenty U.P. authors and poets as they sell, sign and discuss their works. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Campfire Coworks, 132 W. Washington St. uppaa.org • Marquette Symphony Orchestra Concert. This concert will feature Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7. Prices vary.


7:30 p.m. Kaufman Auditorium, 611 N. Front St. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu. edu

Munising

• Multi-author Book Signing. Local authors will sign copies of their books. 12:30 p.m. Falling Rock Café and Bookstore, 104 E. Munising Ave. (906) 387-3008.

Rock

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more. Youth two and younger, free; others, $10.50. 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

10 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:00 a.m.; sunset 7:13 p.m.

Calumet

• 100 Years of Hats 1865-1965. Vintage hats and clothing will be modeled by Friends of Fashion members. Donations appreciated. 2 p.m. Keweenaw Storytelling Center, 215 Fifth St. (231) 838-6480 or realpeoplemedia.org

Houghton

• Sonatas and Interludes: Stephen Rush Performs John Cage. Youth, $5; adults, $15.4 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. rozsa.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Marquette County CROP Hunger Walk. Walk to bring awareness of the hunger needs in our community. Donations appreciated. Registration, 1:30 p.m. Walk, 2 p.m. Marquette Hope Connection Center, 927 W. Fair Ave. (906) 225-0595.

Munising

• Blind Date with a Book. 12:30 p.m. Falling Rock Café and Bookstore, 104 E. Munising Ave. (906) 387-3008.

Rock

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more. Youth two and younger, free; others, $10.50. 12:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

11 MONDAY

sunrise 8:01 a.m.; sunset 7:11 p.m.

Marquette

• Zoom Storytime. Enjoy stories for newborns to age 6 during this online event. 9:30 a.m. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Registration Deadline: What’s New at Sawyer International Airport? See Monday the 18th.

12 TUESDAY

sunrise 8:03 a.m.; sunset 7:10 p.m.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Tasty Reads Book Group. The group will discuss Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking by Anya Von Bremzen. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Noon. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Blossoms in the Dark of Winter. Christine Saari will share personal stories and historical information in poetry. Register by the 5th. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $6. 3 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-8347. • Dumbledore’s Army. Students in grades 4 to 6 will listen to the story read aloud while enjoying butterbeer and Every Flavor Jelly Beans. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superior Watershed Partnership and Flow Benefit Party. Enjoy food catered by the Delft Bistro, spirit tastings, music by Not Quite Canada and poetry by Mad Angler Michael Delp and U.P. poet laureate Matt Seigel. Proceeds benefit Superior Watershed Partnership and For Love of Water. Must be 21 or older to attend. Individuals, $50; Couples, $75. 5:30 to 8 p.m. Belsolda Farm, 488 Mangum Rd. superiorwatersheds.org or forloveofwater.org • Online Genealogy Resources Workshop. Participants will learn about the online genealogy database Newspapers.com. 6:30 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4312. • Authors Reading Virtually. Author B.G. Bradley will read from his book Tales from the Sugar Shack. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link

13 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 8:04 a.m.; sunset 7:08 p.m.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club Session Two. The group will read Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front

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museums Big Bay • Big Bay Lighthouse. The grounds of the 1896 lighthouse are open yearround. 3 Lighthouse Rd. (906) 3459957.

Calumet

• International Frisbee Hall of Fame and Museum. Learn about the history of Guts Frisbee. Days and hours vary. Open when events are held. Second floor ballroom, Calumet Colosseum, Red Jacket Rd. (906) 2817625.

Caspian

• Iron County Historical Museum. This complex is the U.P.’s largest outdoor museum. Twenty-six buildings represent the industries of lumber, mining and transportation and include a homestead, cultural center and art complex. Youth 5 and younger, free; 5 to 18, $10; adults, $15; families, $30. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Off M-189 or two miles off US-2 at Iron River. (906) 265-2617 or ironcountymuseum.org

Central

• Central Mine and Village. This community was once home to 1,200 people and was one of the most prosperous mines in the Keweenaw. The Keweenaw Historical Society maintains a visitor center and several exhibits about the area’s families, homes, schools and churches. Closes in mid-October. Daily, 10 a.m. 5 p.m. U.S.-41, five miles east of Phoenix. (906) 248-4990 or keweenaw.info

Copper Harbor

• Fort Wilkins State Park. Built in 1844, this fort is a well-preserved, nineteenth century military post and lighthouse complex. Through museum exhibits, audiovisual programs and costumed interpretation, visitors can explore the daily routine of military service, experience the hardships of frontier isolation and discover another era. Park store, bookstore, concession stand and campsites are on site. Closes October 17. 8:30 a.m. to dusk. $17 per car, per day for Michigan residents, $9 for nonresidents. US-41. (906) 289-4215.

Delaware

• Delaware Copper Mine. This authentic copper mine operated from 1847 to 1887. The tour takes visitors to the first level at 110 feet, where they can see veins of copper exposed in the walls of the mine. Closes in mid-October. Youth 5 and younger, free; 6 to 12, $7; 13 and older, $12. Daily, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. US-41, 12 miles south of Copper Harbor. (906) 289-4688 or keweenawheritagesites.org

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Quincy Mine, Hancock

Garden • Fayette Historic Townsite. This site was once one of the Upper Peninsula’s most productive iron-smelting operations. It now includes a visitor center, museum exhibits, a twenty-six station walking tour and a scale model of the original townsite. Closes October 17. $17 per car, per day for Michigan residents, $9 for nonresidents. Daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 13700 13.25 Lane. (906) 644-2603.

Greenland

• Adventure Mining Company. The Adventure Copper Mine opened in 1850 and remains one of the best-preserved sites of its time. Although the mine closed in 1920, many of the shafts are still open for touring. Tours range from surface walking tours to underground rappelling down a mine shaft. Closes in mid-October. Youth 6 and younger, free; 7 to 12, $7.50 to $14.50; 13 and older, $14 to $25. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 200 Adventure Ave. (906) 883-3371 or adventuremine.com

Hancock

• Quincy Mine Hoist and Underground Mine. There are two options for touring the site. On both the surface tour and the full tour, visitors will see the museum, inside the No. 2 Shaft House and the Nordberg Steam Hoist and ride the cog rail tram car to the mine entrance. On the full tour, visitors will take a tractorpulled wagon into the mine, seven levels underground. Prices, days and hours vary. (906) 482-3101 or quincymine.com

Houghton

• A.E. Seaman Mineral Museum. View the largest collection of minerals from the Great Lakes region and the world’s finest collection of Michigan minerals. Exhibits educate visitors on how minerals are formed, fluorescent minerals and minerals from around the world. Prices

vary. Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1404 E. Sharon Ave. (906) 4872572 or museum.mtu.edu • Carnegie Museum. Features rotating displays of local history, natural science and culture. The Science Center is dedicated to interactive exhibits about science for kids. Thursdays, noon to 5 p.m. 105 Huron St. (906) 482-7140 or carnegiekeweenaw.org • MTU Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections. Features a variety of historical memorabilia, highlighting life in the Copper Country. Open by appointment. Lower level of the J.R. Van Pelt Library, MTU. (906) 487-3209. Ishpeming • Ishpeming Area Historical Society Museum. New exhibits include a military exhibit and artifacts from the Elson Estate. Donations appreciated. Days and hours vary. Gossard Building, Suite 303, 308 Cleveland Ave. ishpeminghistory.org • U.S. National Ski Hall & Snowboard Hall of Fame & Museum. The museum features more than 300 Hall of Fame inductees, presented in photographs and biographies, and displays and exhibits of skiing history and equipment, an extensive library, video show, gift shop, special events and more. By appointment only. US-41 and Third St. (906) 485-6323 skihall.com

K.I. Sawyer

• K.I. Sawyer Heritage Air Museum. The museum promotes and preserves the aviation history the air base brought to the area. Air Force-related materials are on display, including photographs, flags, medals and more. Donations appreciated. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. 402 Third St. (906) 362-3531 or kishamuseum.org

Marquette

• Beaumier Upper Peninsula Heritage Center. - The Seventh Fire: A Decolonizing Experience, featuring the architecture of (continued on page 73)


museums NMU, will open on October 9, and be on display through April 9, 2022. - Three separate collections focus on cultural artifacts relating to ethnic, religious and social diversity in the U.P. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. NMU, corner of Seventh Street and Tracy Avenue. (906) 227-3212 or nmu.edu/ beaumier

Munising

• Marquette Maritime Museum. The museum collects, preserves and presents maritime history. Many exhibits and guided tours of the lighthouse grounds are offered. Closes in mid-October. Prices vary. Tuesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 300 Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 226-2006 or mqtmaritimemuseum.com • Marquette Regional History Center. - The Story Behind Their Clothes, featuring wedding gowns, dresses, hats, baby bonnets and other articles of clothing, will be on display through January 8, 2022. The museum includes interactive displays as well as regional history exhibits. Students, $3; seniors, $6; adults, $7. Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org

• Michigan Iron Industry Museum. In the forested ravines of the Marquette Iron Range, the museum overlooks the Carp River and the site of the first iron forge in the Lake Superior region. Museum exhibits, audio-visual programs and outdoor interpretive paths depict the large-scale capital and human investment that made Michigan an industrial leader. The museum is one of 10 museums and historic sites administered by the Michigan Historical Center. Daily, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 73 Forge Rd. (906) 475-7857.

• Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum. A variety of interactive exhibits offer learning through investigation and creativity. By appointment. 123 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 226-3911 or upchildrenmuseum.org (continued from page 72) St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Burials - Differences and Legalities. Mark Canale will discuss funeral arrangements and burial options. Register by the 6th. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $6. 1:30 p.m. Canale Tonella Funeral Home and Cremation, 526 N. Third St. (906) 228-8051. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Junior Teen Advisory Board. Students in grades 5 to 8 are invited to meet new people, plan events and gain volunteer experience. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal

• Alger County Historical Society Heritage Center. Exhibits include the Grand Island Recreation Area, Munising Woodenware Company, barn building, homemaking, sauna and more. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 1496 Washington St. (906) 387-4308.

Negaunee

Phoenix

• Phoenix Church. The church was originally built as St. Mary’s Church in 1858 in Cliff. In 1899, the church was dismantled and reassembled in Phoenix, where it was renamed Church of the Assumption. It closed in 1957. The church now has been repaired and restored and appears as it did a century ago. Closes in mid-October.Daily 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. US-41 at the junction of M-26 to Eagle River. keweenawhistory.org MM conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. Room 311, NMU Library. (906) 227-2648 or nkupper@nmu.edu • NEA Big Read: Dr. Lynn Domina Keynote Address. Dr. Lynn Domina will present a memoir and ethnography among Crow Indians during the 20th century. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 7 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-4323.

14 THURSDAY

sunrise 8:05 a.m.; sunset 7:06 p.m.

Houghton

• Shockingly Good Music. The Superior Wind Symphony will perform. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. rozsa.mtu.edu

Ishpeming • NEA Big Read: M. Bartley Seigel Poetry Reading. U.P. poet laureate M. Bartley Seigel will give a poetry reading. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 7 p.m. Ishpeming Carnegie Public Library, 317 N. Main St. (906) 2264322. • Registration Deadline: Tour of Ishpeming Senior Center and Medicare Open Enrollment. See

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Thursday the 21st.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • NEA Big Read: Building Bridge – The Good Luck Cat. Enjoy an afternoon of reading and activities about pets and animals base on Joy Harjo’s book The Good Luck Cat. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 2:30 p.m. U.P. Children’s Museum, 123 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 226-4323. • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Ghosts of Lighthouse Point Haunted Tour. Take a spooky tour our Lighthouse Point. Proceeds benefit the Marquette Maritime Museum, and the NMU Food Pantry. Prices vary. Family friendly tour, 7 p.m. Teen and adult tours, 8 to 10 p.m. Coast Guard Station parking lot, address. (906) 226-2006. • NMU Orchestra Concert. 7:30 p.m. Reynolds Recital Hall, NMU. Live streaming available at nmu.edu/music • Second Thursday Creativity Series. Themed activities and crafts for children will be available. Time and location to be determined. (906) 226-3911 or upchildrensmuseum.org • Fresh Coast Film Festival. This documentary film festival celebrates the Great Lakes and Upper Midwest. Prices, times and locations vary. freshcoastfilm.com

Sands

• Haunted Hayride. Ghouls, ghosts and other scary creatures will be lurking in the darkness during this haunted hayride . Prices vary. 7:30 to 11 p.m. Marquette County Fairgrounds, 737 M-553. marquetteshauntedhayride.com

15 FRIDAY

sunrise 8:07 a.m.; sunset 7:04 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

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• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Levata Sleep Open House. Enjoy a popcorn bar, apple cider and prizes. 3 to 6 p.m. Levata Sleep, 304 M-553. (906) 2422443. • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and

older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Ghosts of Lighthouse Point Haunted Tour. Take a spooky tour our Lighthouse Point. Proceeds benefit the Marquette Maritime Museum, and the NMU Food Pantry. Prices vary. Family friendly tour, 7 p.m. Teen and adult tours, 8 to 10 p.m. Coast Guard Station parking lot, address. (906) 226-2006. • Forest Robert Theatre: Above the Timberline. Watch as a son searches for his explorer father. NMU students, $5; nonstudents, $10; seniors and military, $12; adults, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. (906) 227-1032 or nmu. universitytickets.com • Fresh Coast Film Festival. This documentary film festival celebrates the Great Lakes and Upper Midwest. Prices, times and locations vary. freshcoastfilm.com • Registration Deadline: Dino Dig. See Saturday the 15th.

Sands

• Haunted Hayride. Ghouls, ghosts and other scary creatures will be lurking in the darkness during this haunted hayride . Prices vary. 7:30 to 11 p.m. Marquette County Fairgrounds, 737 M-553. marquetteshauntedhayride.com

16 SATURDAY

sunrise 8:08 a.m.; sunset 7:02 p.m.

Curtis

• Kirsten Gustafson Concert. Prices vary, 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. (906) 586-9974 or ericksoncenter.org

Escanaba

• Night of Magic and Wizardy. Enjoy food, games, magic activities and more while you visit a wand shop, candy store and pottion classes. Costumes welcome. 6 p.m. Prices vary. Bonifas Arts Center, 700 First Avenue South. (906) 786-3833 or bonifasarts.org

Houghton • Beethoven’s 250th Anniversary Concert. The Keweenaw Symphony Orchestra will perform Beethoven’s 8th Symphony. Youth, $6; adults, $19. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. rozsa.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Archeology Fair. Learn about local and global archeology through activities, demonstrations, artifacts and displays. Youth 12 and younger, $2; students, $3; seniors, $6; adults, $7. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Washington St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Dino Dig. Youth ages 8 and older with an adult are invited to learn about paleontology, dig up dinosaur bones and reassemble a dinosaur model. $5 per child or $10 per family. Noon. MooseWood Nature Center, Peter White Drive, Presque Isle Park. (906) 228-6250. • Chess Club. Youth age 7 to 12 are invited for chess. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks


encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Forest Robert Theatre Sensory Friendly Performance: Above the Timberline. Watch as a son searches for his explorer father. NMU students, $5; nonstudents, $10; seniors and military, $12; adults, $17. 2 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. (906) 227-1032 or nmu. universitytickets.com • Ghosts of Lighthouse Point Haunted Tour. Take a spooky tour our Lighthouse Point. Proceeds benefit the Marquette Maritime Museum, and the NMU Food Pantry. Prices vary. Family friendly tour, 7 p.m. Teen and adult tours, 8 to 10 p.m. Coast Guard Station parking lot, address. (906) 226-2006. • International Observe the Moon Night. View the moon, planets, a Globular Cluster, a Planetary Nebula, and a neighboring galaxy. Telescopes will be setup near the playground. Eyepieces will be sanitized after each observer. 8 to 10:30 p.m. Mattson Harbor Lower Park, Lakeshore Blvd. • Forest Robert Theatre: Above the Timberline. Watch as a son searches for his explorer father. NMU students, $5; nonstudents, $10; seniors and military, $12; adults, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. (906) 227-1032 or nmu. universitytickets.com • Fresh Coast Film Festival. This documentary film festival celebrates the Great Lakes and Upper Midwest. Prices, times and locations vary. freshcoastfilm.com

Munising

• Battle of the Recipe Box Taste Off and Awards. As part of the Two Book, Two Community series, the top five recipes will be voted on and winners will be announced. 11 a.m. Munising Public Library, Suite A, 810 M-28.

Rock

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more. Youth two and younger, free; others, $10.50. 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

Sands

• Haunted Hayride. Ghouls, ghosts and other scary creatures will be lurking in the darkness during this haunted hayride . Prices vary. 7:30 to 11 p.m. Marquette County Fairgrounds, 737 M-553. marquetteshauntedhayride.com

17 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:10 a.m.; sunset 7:00 p.m.

K.I. Sawyer

• Country Dance. Dance to music performed by the Hart Beats. 1 to 4 p.m. K.I. Sawyer Hertiage Museum, 402 Third St.

Marquette

• Fresh Coast Film Festival. This documentary film festival celebrates the Great Lakes and Upper Midwest. Prices, times and locations vary. freshcoastfilm.com

Rock

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more. Youth two and younger, free;

others, $10.50. 12:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

Haunted Hayride | October 14 to 16 | Sands

18 MONDAY

sunrise 8:11 a.m.; sunset 6:59 p.m.

Marquette

• Zoom Storytime. Enjoy stories for newborns to age 6 during this online event. 9:30 a.m. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Evergreen Award of Marquette County Luncheon. This award honors individuals who are dedicated to supporting and mentoring women and girls, and helping them to reach their leadership potential. $15. Noon. Holiday Inn, 1951 US-41 West. Tossava1979@gmail.com • What’s New at Sawyer International Airport? Learn about the new developments happening at the airport. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $6. 1 p.m. Meet at the northeast corner of the Econo Foods parking lot to carpoo to the airport. 1401 O’Dovero Dr. (906) 2289367. • Global Geeks Book Club. The group will discuss My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite. 6 p.m. Dandelion Cottage Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4312. • NEA Big Read: Andrea Pierce. Environmental activist Andrea Pierce will discuss her work with Great Lakes water preservation and protection. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • NMU Choral Invitational Concert. 7:30 p.m. Reynolds Recital Hall, NMU. Live streaming available at nmu.edu/music

19 TUESDAY

sunrise 8:12 a.m.; sunset 6:57 p.m.

Gwinn

• Literature at the Lodge Adult Book Club. 7 p.m. Up North Lodge, 215 S. CR557. (906) 346-3433.

Ishpeming

• Registration Deadline: Tibetan Signing Bowls and Hands-on Workshop. See Tuesday the 26th.

Marquette • Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and schoolreadiness activities for preschoolaged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

20 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 8:14 a.m.; sunset 6:55 p.m.

Gwinn

• After School LEGO Club. Youth are LEGO activities. 4 p.m. Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club Session Two. The group will read Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required for all participants ages

October 2021

5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Teen Advisory Board. Students in grade 9 to 12 are invited to meet new people, plan activities and gain volunteer experience. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. Room 311, NMU Library. (906) 227-2648 or nkupper@nmu.edu • MSHS and BMS Bands Spooktacular Concert. The Marquette Senior High School and Bothwell Middle School bands will perform. Prices vary. 7 p.m. Kaufman Auditorium, 611 N. Front St. (906) 2271032 or tickets.nmu.edu • Forest Robert Theatre: Above the Timberline. Watch as a son searches for his explorer father. NMU students, $5; nonstudents, $10; seniors and military, $12; adults, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. (906) 227-1032 or nmu. universitytickets.com • Registration Deadline: More than Beginning Photography. See Wednesday the 27th.

21 THURSDAY

sunrise 8:15 a.m.; sunset 6:53 p.m.

Escanaba

• Halloween Cookie Decorating. Learn how to work with royal icing, pipe and flood a cookie, wet on decorating

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technique and how to build dimension to your cookies. Bonifas members, $20; nonmembers, $25. 7 p.m. Bonifas Arts Center, 700 First Avenue South. (906) 7863833.

Ishpeming

• Tour of Ishpeming Senior Center and Medicare Open Enrollment. Tour the new center and learn about Medicare Open Enrollment. An optional lunch is available for purchase for $6. Register by the 14th. If carpooling and eating lunch meet at 11:15 a.m. at the old Pizza Hut parking lot, 2131 US-41 West. If carpooling at not eating lunch, meet at 12:15 p.m. at the old Pizza Hut parking lot, 2131 US-41 West. If not carpooling, lunch is at noon and the progam at 1 p.m., Ispheming Senior Center, 121 Greenwood St. (906) 226-8347.

Marquette • Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • PWPL Kindness Club. Participate in activities that encourage health habits,

both mentally and physically. Online registration required. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • STEM Preschool Storytime. Preschoolage children and an adult will learn about the states of water and explore with handon activities. Online registration required. 6:15 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Women in Science. Dr. Jennifer Dehlin will speak. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl. info for Zoom link • Forest Robert Theatre: Above the Timberline. Watch as a son searches for his explorer father. NMU students, $5; nonstudents, $10; seniors and military, $12; adults, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. (906) 227-1032 or nmu. universitytickets.com • Registration Deadline: Superior Arts Youth Theatre Tech and Design Workshop Series – Stage and Shop Safety. See Friday the 22nd.

Munising

• Community Forum. Discuss education and share ideas about ways to improve opportunities and outcomes for students. Registration recommended. 5 to 9 p.m. Munising High School, 810 M-28. (906) 226-5100 or maresa.org

22 FRIDAY

sunrise 8:17 a.m.; sunset 6:52 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m.

Bellamy Brothers Concert | October 23 | Ishpeming

Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Houghton

• Backstage Jazz: Jazz Meets Hip Hop. This concert will combine big band covers of jams sampled by hip hop artists, a hip hop artist performing the songs as they were sampled and an onstage installation by Osman Koc. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. rozsa.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Community Forum. Discuss education and share ideas about ways to improve opportunities and outcomes for students. Registration recommended. 5 to 9 p.m. Ramada Inn, 412 W. Washington St. (906) 226-5100 or maresa.org • Superior Arts Youth Theatre Tech and Design Workshop Series: Stage and Shop Safety. Youth in grades 6 to 12 are invited to learn skills used in theatre. Register by the 21st. $15. 5 to 7 p.m. Room 107, McClintock Building, NMU. saytheater.org • Genealogy Lock-In Workshop. Those interested in researching family history are welcome. Space is limited. 6:30 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4312. • Forest Robert Theatre: Above the Timberline. Watch as a son searches for his explorer father. NMU students, $5; nonstudents, $10; seniors and military, $12; adults, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. (906) 227-1032 or nmu. universitytickets.com • Registration Deadline: Superior Arts Youth Theatre Tech and Design Workshop Series – Lighting. See Saturday the 23rd.

23 SATURDAY

sunrise 8:18 a.m.; sunset 6:50 p.m.

Houghton

• Backstage Jazz: Jazz Meets Hip Hop. This concert will combine big band covers of jams sampled by hip hop artists, a hip hop artist performing the songs as they were sampled and an onstage installation by Osman Koc. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. rozsa.mtu.edu

Ishpeming

• The Bellamy Brothers Concert. Enjoy a night of music performed by The Bellamy Brothers, with an opening performance by Lighting Ridge. Proceeds will go towards improvements to the auditorium. $35. 7 p.m. W.C. Peterson Auditorium, 319 E. Division St. (906) 227-1032 or nmu. universitytickets.com

Marquette

76

Marquette Monthly

October 2021

• Community Forum. Discuss education and share ideas about ways to improve opportunities and outcomes for students. Registration recommended. 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Ramada Inn, 412 W. Washington St.. (906) 226-5100 or maresa.org • Cans for Critters Fundraiser. Drop off your rinsed cans and plastic bottles. Donated cans and bottles will assist with operational costs, along with care and feeding of the animals at MooseWood Nature Center. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. MooseWood Nature Center, Peter White Drive, Presque Isle Park. (906) 228-6250. • Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com

• Superior Arts Youth Theatre Tech and Design Workshop Series: Lighting Youth in grades 5 to 12 are invited to learn skills used in theatre. Register by the 22nd. $15. 10 a.m. to noon. Black Box Theatre, NMU. saytheater.org • Forest Robert Theatre: Above the Timberline. Watch as a son searches for his explorer father. NMU students, $5; nonstudents, $10; seniors and military, $12; adults, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. (906) 227-1032 or nmu. universitytickets.com

Rock

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more. Youth two and younger, free; others, $10.50. 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

24 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:19 a.m.; sunset 6:48 p.m.

Little Lake

• Drew Peterson Concert. Minnesota singer/songwriter Drew Peterson will perform. Donations appreciated. 2 p.m. The Section House, 1824 Ski Hill Road.

Rock

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more. Youth two and younger, free; others, $10.50. 12:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

25 MONDAY

sunrise 8:21 a.m.; sunset 6:46 p.m.

Marquette

• Zoom Storytime. Enjoy stories for newborns to age 6 during this online event. 9:30 a.m. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • NEA Big Read: April Lindala. Professor April Lindala will discuss the work of Joy Harjo and the theme of reclaiming indigenous voice and vision. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322.

26 TUESDAY

sunrise 8:22 a.m.; sunset 6:45 p.m.

Ishpeming

• Tibetan Singing Bowls and HandOn Workshop. Enjoy a sound bath of traditional instruments and Tibetan Singing Bowls. Register by the 19th. 10:30 a.m. Massage with Kim, 506 Mather Ave. (906) 228-8051.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those


support groups • Alano Club. Twelve-step recovery meetings daily. Monday through Saturday, noon and 8 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. 1202 S. Front St., Southgate Plaza, Marquette. • Al-Anon Family Groups. A fellowship offering strength and hope for friends and families of problem drinkers. alalon.org or (888) 425-2666. • Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings throughout Marquette County, open daily, at many locations and times. Twenty-four-hour answering service, 2494430 or aa-marquettecounty.org • ALZConnected. This is a free, online community for everyone affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other memory loss diseases. alzconnected.org • American Legacy Foundation. Smoking quit line for expectant mothers and cessation information for women. (800) 668-8278. • Amputee Social Group. This peer support group is for amputees, friends and families to share resources, life experiences and create relationships. October 12. 6 p.m. SAIL, 1200 Wright St. (906) 273-2444. younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Bluesday Tuesday. Listen to a blues concert sponsored by the Marquette Blues Society. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322.

27 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 8:24 a.m.; sunset 6:43 p.m.

Gwinn

• Halloween Evening Story Time. Families are invited for a Halloweenthemed story. 6 p.m. Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club Session Two. The group will read Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the

• Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Checks. Cholesterol checks are $5. Call for Marquette County schedule. (906) 225-4545. • Caregiver Support Group— Marquette. All caregivers are welcome. October 21. 2 p.m. Mill Creek Community Center, 1600 Mill Creek Court. (906) 2257760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Divorce Care—Ishpeming. This nondenominational group is for people who are separated or divorced. New members are welcome. Tuesdays, 6 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. Northiron Church, address. (906) 475-6032 or northiron.church • Grief Share—Ishpeming. This nondenominational group is for people dealing with grief and loss. Mondays, 2:30 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. (906) 475-6032 or northiron. church • Grief Support Group—Gwinn. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. Second Wednesday of the month. 2 p.m. Forsyth Senior Center, 165 Maple St. (906) 225-

7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Grief Support Group—Marquette. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. Third Wednesday of the month. 5:30 p.m. Lake Superior Hospice, 914 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 2257760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • iCanQuit. Smokers are invited to learn more about quitting with the help of a quitting coach. (800) 480-7848. • Michigan Tobacco Quit Line. This free quit smoking coaching hotline provides callers with a personal health coach. (800) 784-8669. • National Alliance on Mental Illness— Support Group. Individuals living with mental illness and friends or families living with an individual with mental illness are welcome for Zoom meetings. October 11 and 21. 7 p.m. Call (906) 3607107 or email ckbertucci58@charter.net for Zoom invitation. • Nicotine Anonymous. (415 750-0328 or www.nicotine-anonymous.org • Sexual Health and Addiction Therapy Group. Call Great Lakes Recovery Centers for more details. Dates, times

and locations vary. (906) 228-9696. • SMART Recovery—Calumet. A selfhelp group for alcohol and substance abuse and other addictive behaviors. Mondays, 7 p.m. Copper Country Mental Health, 56938 Calumet Avenue. smartrecovery.org • SMART Recovery — Hancock. Thursdays, 7 p.m. Basement Conference Room, Old Main Building, Finlandia University, 601 Quincy St. smartrecovery. org • SMART Recovery — Marquette. Mondays, Noon. Zoom meeting. Visit smartrecovery.com for Zoom link. • Take Off Pounds Sensibly. This is a non-commercial weight-control support group. Various places and times throughout the U.P. (800) 932-8677 or TOPS.org • Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Supplemental Food Program. Clinics include nutritional counseling and coupon pick-up. Appointments required. Call for Marquette County schedule. mqthealth.org or (906) 475-7846. MM

book. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • More Than Beginning Photography. Learn digital camera, photographic techniques and composition. Register by the 20th. NCLL members, $6; nonmembers, $10. Room 404A, Cohodas Hall, NMU. (906) 225-1004. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. Room 311, NMU Library. (906) 227-2648 or nkupper@nmu.edu

activities and crafts. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

Frankenstein will be shown. Prices vary, 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. (906) 586-9974 or ericksoncenter.org

29 FRIDAY

28 THURSDAY

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

• Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Chess Club. Youth age 7 to 12 are invited for chess. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 2 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Sober Dance Party. This familyfriendly dance will feature music by Double Trouble and an outdoor fire pit. 7 to 10 p.m. Marquette Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 1510 M-28 East. • Campus Cinema. The film The Conjuring 3: The Devil Made Me Do It will be shown. 7 p.m. Room 1100, Jamrich Hall, NMU. NMU students, free; nonstudents, $1. 7 p.m. Room 1100 Jamrich Hall, NMU. nmu.edu

sunrise 8:25 a.m.; sunset 6:42 p.m.

Ishpeming

• NEA Big Read: Beverly Matherne. Poet Beverly Matherne will give a poetry reading and presentation on the removal history of Acadian people. 7 p.m. Joy Center, 1492 Southwood Dr. (906) 2264323.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games,

sunrise 8:27 a.m.; sunset 6:40 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Houghton

• Black (& Gold) Tuesday…no, Friday. The Huskies Pep Band will perform. Youth, $5; adults, $13. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. rozsa.mtu.edu • The Rocky Horror Picture Show. The 1975 film will be shown. Youth, $5; adults, $15. Pre-show, 10 p.m. Film, 11 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. rozsa.mtu.edu

Marquette

30 SATURDAY

sunrise 8:28 a.m.; sunset 6:38 p.m.

Curtis

• Movie

Night.

The

film

Young

October 2021

Marquette

Rock

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more. Youth two and younger, free; others, $10.50. 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

31 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:30 a.m.; sunset 6:37 p.m.

Rock

Halloween

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more.Youth two and younger, free; others, $10.50. 12:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

Marquette Monthly

MM

77


This coloring page from Colors of Marquette, Michigan Volume 3 is courtesy of The Gathered Earth, located in downtown Marquette.

October 2021

Marquette Monthly

78


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October 2021 Marquette Monthly  

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