January 2022 Marquette Monthly

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Marquette Monthly

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January 2022 No. 343

Publishers

Jane Hutchens James Larsen II

contents

City Notes

Highlights of important happenings in the area

15 On Campus News from U.P. Universities/Colleges 16

Feature

Kristy Basolo-Malmsten Heikki Lunta’s comin’ to Irontown

20 Art

Jonny Bahk-Halberg

Mixing mediums

Managing Editor

25 At The Table

Twice-Baked Potatoes

Katherine Larson

Calendar Editor

27

Gift of Water

Kalil Zender

Jackie Stark

Carrie Usher

Graphic Design Jennifer Bell Knute Olson

Proofreader Laura Kagy

Circulation

Dick Armstrong

Chief Photographer Tom Buchkoe

Marquette Monthly, published by Model Town Publishing, LLC, located at PO Box 109 Gwinn, MI, 49841, is locally and independently owned. Entire contents copyright 2022 by Model Town Publishing. All rights reserved. Permission or use of editorial material in any manner must be obtained in writing from the publishers. Marquette Monthly is published 12 times a year. Subscriptions are $65 per year. Freelance material can be submitted for consideration to editor@marquettemonthly.com. Events can be submitted to calendar@marquettemonthly.com. Ad inquiries can be sent to jane@marquettemonthly. com or james@marquettemonthly.com.

(906) 360-2180 www.marquettemonthly.com

About the Cover Artist This month’s cover artist is Diana Magnuson, a 2-D magical realism and allegorical artist and illustrator currently focused on nature images and trees in particular. Visit dianamagnuson.com for more information on this month’s artist.

Loi Krathong

28 Locals

32 Arts

Sonny Longtine

Mountain warrior

Melissa Matuscak Alan

Weaving into history

34 Back Then

Larry Chabot

Bernie at the front

36 Arts

Brad Gischia

Getting into the swing of it

38

New York Times Crossword Puzzle

Come Again? (answers on page 53)

39 Poetry

Lynn Domina

The Road To Happiness

40 Superior Reads

Victor Volkman Debut novel highlights bonds of family, horrors of war

41 In The Outdoors

Staying ever green

Scot Stewart

46 Lookout Point

Jon Magnuson A promise during the Time of the Starving Moon

48 Sporting Life

Kristy Basolo-Malmsten

Ice road racers

52 Home Cinema

Leonard Heldreth Films highlight pain of loss

54 Locals

Kathleen Carlton Johnson

A man and his trucks

57 Out & About

Carrie Usher January events and music, art and museum guides

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city notes MAPS provides winter gear to kids

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hanks to a donation from the Kaufman Foundation for its “Coats for Kids” campaign, Marquette Area Public Schools was able to purchase 46 coats, 31 pairs of snow pants, 41 pairs of boots, 83 hats and 76 sets of mittens and gloves. A donation and discounts from Costco also helped in the purchase of those winter items. The campaign aims to outfit school-aged children with the basic necessities to withstand the winter season.

Grants awarded for outdoor facilities improvements

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ov. Gretchen Whitmer and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources recently announced nearly $2 million in Recreation Passport grants will be awarded to 16 communities for local projects. The Recreation Passport grant program started 11 years ago with the goal of boosting visitation and funding for Michigan state parks and creating more funding for local and community parks and trails enhancement throughout the state. In the Upper Peninsula, Skandia Township and the City of Ishpeming both received funding through the grant program. The Skandia Township Park Hall renovation received $142,500 and the Teal Lake Water Trail in Ishpeming received $114,000.

UP Blood Center in urgent need of donations

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he U.P. Regional Blood Center is experiencing a critical need for O Positive, A Negative, O Negative, and B Negative blood types. The UP Regional Blood Center has collection sites in Marquette, Hancock and Escanaba and is the primary supplier of blood to 13 U.P. hospitals. Visit their Facebook page at UPRBC906 or website at mgh.org/blood for blood drive locations and more information. For hours and scheduling call Marquette at 906-449-1450, Hancock at 906-483-1392 and Escanaba at 906786-8420.

Marquette Mountain brings on new general manager

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aet Johnson has been named as the new general manager of Marquette Mountain, effective in December. She will provide strategic vision, management and direction for all seasonal operations at Marquette Moun-

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tain. As the general manager, Johnson will plan and direct the ongoing services, operations, construction and maintenance of the mountain operations departments. According to a press release from Marquette Mountain, Johnson brings years of robust knowledge and experience in the industry and comes to MMR from Vail Resorts, Inc where she supervised and led a team of ski lift mechanics as the team lead for lift maintenance. Johnson graduated from Michigan Technological University and has an Electrical Engineering degree. She also has experience as a lift maintenance engineer, supervisor for lift operations and over 30 years of National Ski Patrol experience.

UPEC seeking applicants for conservation grants

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he Upper Peninsula Environmental Coalition is seeking forward-looking U.P. conservationists and teachers to apply to this year’s Community Conservation and Environmental Education grant programs. Applications are being accepted through Jan. 8. UPEC’s Community Conservation Grant Program is designed to challenge U.P. communities to promote conservation values within their watershed or local area. The grants, up to $10,000 each, are for planning or implementing local conservation projects that engage a variety of stakeholders within a community, from recreational and sportsperson’s groups to naturalists, township officials, churches, and schools. The program honors the late Tom Church of Watersmeet, a longtime UPEC member whose bequest made this fund possible. The program is also supported by the Saari Family Fund and many individual donors. UPEC is also looking for teachers who have great ideas for getting their students interested in the environment. Interested teachers can apply to the Environmental Education Grant program. All educators in Upper Peninsula schools, public or private, are eligible, as are teachers working with other groups and institutions wanting to create or enhance an environmental education program. Grants are for up to $500 each. Visit upenvironment. org for more information.

MDNR to host 21st annual BOW program

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egistration is now open for the annual Michigan Department of Natural Resources Becoming an Out-


MRHC presents new special exhibit Crossing the Dead River Bridge is LS&I Railroad engine 2403 and two more engines in a newer paint style, circa 1980s. The Marquette Regional History Center will feature a special exhibit, entitled “Railroads of Marquette County: Yesterday and Today” from Jan. 31 through Feb. 11. Railroads were a central part of Marquette since its earliest development. Trains were an everyday sight around the city and downtown, crossing Front Street with ore cars, pulling into the depot to pick up and drop off passengers, or hauling logs from Alger County. Many Marquette families relied on the railroads for their livelihoods. Multiple railroads were headquartered in the city of Marquette. As iron mines on the Marquette Range opened in the 1840s, railroads developed to haul the iron ore. As mining expanded, so did the number of tracks and ore docks. Soon passengers, iron ore, timber, and other freight were all shipped to or from Marquette County. The railroads connected Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to the rest of the country. Learn more about the development and changes in this vast network. Learn where the tracks ran, what they carried, and their destination. The exhibit will look at how working the railroad has changed over the decades and how it is part of this region today, and will feature select hands-on elements as well as maps, artifacts and photographs. An exhibit reception will take place at 5 p.m. on Feb. 9. (Photo courtesy of Marquette Regional History Center) doors Woman winter program, which is set for Feb. 25 to 27 in Big Bay, Michigan. This winter will mark the 21st annual winter BOW gathering for women, 18 and older, who are seeking an opportunity to improve their outdoor skills in a relaxed, noncompetitive atmosphere. The BOW

program is sponsored by the DNR and offers instruction in two dozen different types of indoor and outdoor activities, including cross-country skiing, archery, winter camping and shelter building, ice fishing, fly tying, winter biking, wilderness first aid, wood burning, snowshoeing,

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along with several new features, such as wild game preserving and canning. Instructors provide basic and advanced teaching that is tailored to each participant’s individual ability. The program also includes special evening programs during the weekend. BOW participants stay and take their classes at the Bay Cliff Health Camp, a universally accessible facility overlooking Lake Superior, which is situated about 30 miles north of Marquette near Big Bay. Participants will be housed in a dorm-style facility with amenities including a sauna and hiking trails with access to northern hardwood forests and Lake Superior. The $225 registration fee includes all food and lodging, as well as most equipment and supplies, except as noted in the registration materials. Scholarships are also available on a limited basis. Visit Michigan.gov/ BOW for class information, registration materials and scholarship applications. Payment and registration materials should be sent to the address on the registration paperwork in Newberry. For more information on the winter BOW program, contact Michelle Zellar at the DNR office in Newberry at 906-293-5131 ext. 4004, or by e-mail at DNRBOW@michigan.gov

MDOC inmates able to attend funerals via video

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risoners in Michigan whose immediate family members pass away will have a new option available to them, by now being able to attend the funeral service virtually through a video connection at the prison. “Any death is tragic and a cause of great sadness that only compounds when you are not able to pay your final respects with your family,” MDOC Director Heidi Washington said. “While these individuals have broken the law, they are still human beings and helping them to maintain connections to family and to the community that most will someday return to are important steps to long-term public safety.” While incarcerated individuals do not have a right to have an in-person or video funeral visit, wardens will ensure efforts are made to allow a prisoner to view the funeral of an immediate family member via video when possible. Once the prisoner has received approval, the video viewing will take place in an area that allows the prisoner to have privacy from other prisoners. A facility employee will also be present to monitor the viewing at all times. The prisoner’s security level will not preclude them from attending the video funeral viewing. Previously, in-person funer-

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al visits were only available to lower security level prisoners. This will come at no expense to the department or taxpayers and if the funeral home or vendor conducting the service charges for recording the service, the prisoner or the prisoner’s family will be responsible for the cost.

Millions in funding recreation announced

for

Scholarship program caregivers continued

for

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ov. Gretchen Whitmer and the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund Board recommended recently to the Michigan Legislature that 117 recreation development projects and land acquisitions totaling $45,592,200 be funded in 2022. The board this year considered a total of 136 applications seeking over $59.1 million in funding. In a competitive process, all eligible applications were evaluated based on scoring criteria approved by the Trust Fund board. The Trust Fund board recommends funding to both state and local agencies for development projects and land acquisitions that will further access to public outdoor recreation.

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aregiver Incentive Project (CIP), a nonprofit organization focused on improving the lives of the cared for by supporting caregivers, continues its scholarship program and is now accepting applications from U.P. college students. CIP will award various scholarships of $500 and up to students working as caregivers. For every hour the student works as a caregiver, they will receive $1 of their scholarship from CIP. The scholarship program allows CIP to further its mission of incentivizing students to become or continue working as paid in-home caregivers within the existing systems as they attend school. Scholarships are restricted to students enrolled in a U.P. college or university and are not dependent on field of study. Applications and supporting documents are due to CIP by 5 p.m. on Jan. 17. Recipients will be notified by Feb. 1, and the announcement will be made on National Caregiver Day on Feb. 18. Visit the-cip.com for more information or to apply. These scholarships are made possible by a grant from Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation of Michigan, a generous donation from David and Claudia Werner of Dexter, Mich., along with other donations.

MSU Extension offers class on managing chronic pain

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hronic Pain PATH is a six-week, self-management online work-


shop designed for people living with chronic pain. Family members, friends, and caregivers are also encouraged to attend the workshop. Participants will learn to work with health care providers; manage symptoms such as pain, fatigue, difficult emotions, sleep problems, depression; make lifestyle changes such as healthy eating and physical activity; set goals and accomplish them. These free courses will take place online via Zoom at 2 p.m. on every Monday from Jan. 24 to Feb. 28. Visit MSU’s website at msu.edu to register for classes. Registration closes at 11:59 p.m. on Jan. 19.

Marquette League of Women Voters to meet Jan. 12

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he League of Women Voters of Marquette Co. will hold its next membership meeting from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 12. It will be held in Studio 1, lower level of the Peter White Public Library. The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization that encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy. All are welcome to attend. Current meeting rules

require participants to wear masks, be vaccinated against Covid, and to use social distancing. For more information email to dthomsona@gmail.com

MDNR Happy Little registration now open

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5K

nspired by Bob Ross’ love of the outdoors, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources is bringing back the Run for the Trees / Happy Little (Virtual) 5K April 22 to 29, now in its third year. Registration is open for this 2022 state parks-supporting race. The event is capped at 18,500 participants. Runners, walkers and hikers can complete their 5K anywhere outdoors anytime between April 22 to 29. For $34 per person, each participant will receive a keepsake Happy Little T-shirt, a commemorative bib number and a finisher’s medal. There is an international shipping option available to accommodate participants outside the United States. Race proceeds support tree planting and forest protection efforts – such as invasive plant and forest pest management and early detection surveys – in Michigan state parks and recreation areas. Many of these locations have been affected by tree pests and diseases like emerald ash borer and oak wilt. The program has produced more than 100,000 na-

Did You Know... ... how New Year’s Day was celebrated in the U.P.?

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he French introduced the idea of people visiting with each other, going from house to house on New Year’s Day, sharing food and good cheer. This tradition continued into the 20th century, with people in Marquette making the rounds of homes throughout the day of January 1. Subsequently, this tradition has declined in popularity. Submitted by Russell M. Magnaghi, history professor emeritus of NMU and a U.P. author and historian.

tive plants, shrubs and trees since its start in 2004. With support from the Bob Ross partnership, more than 2,100 trees have been planted in 20 state parks across Michigan. Visit Michigan.gov/DNRHappyLittleTrees to learn more about the program and register for the race. For more information, contact Michelle O’Kelly at OKellyM1@Michigan. gov or 517-881-5884.

Input sought from UP residents on energy plan

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he Michigan Public Service Commission will hold a public hear-

January 2022

ing from 5 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, January 11 to hear public input on an Upper Peninsula energy provider’s long-range integrated resource plan for providing electricity service to residential and business customers. Commissioners and MPSC staff will conduct the public hearing at Fornetti Hall at Bay College in Iron Mountain. The goal of the hearing is to take public comment on UMERC’s long-range forecasts for ensuring reliable service over the next 20 years, with specific requirements for reporting 5-, 10-, and 15-year projections. A subsidiary of WEC Energy Group,

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UMERC services more than 42,000 customers in the central and western Upper Peninsula. “We look forward to hearing from Yoopers served by UMERC about the utility’s longterm energy plans,” said MPSC Chair Dan Scripps. “This is a chance for UMERC’s customers to speak directly to the Commission and have their thoughts and concerns heard.”

MDHHS seeks proposals for substance use services

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he Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) has issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) for federally recognized tribes to provide substance use services. The purpose of the Substance Use Services for Federally Recognized Tribes program is to support substance use prevention, treatment and disorder initiatives through federally recognized tribal entities in Michigan. The RFP seeks competitive plans for local projects that will expand services, prioritizing evidence-based interventions in the area of prevention, treatment and recovery services. Funded applicants will receive ongoing technical assistance from the MDHHS project coordinator, which include help with

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program start-up, reporting requirements and barriers to program implementation. The initial award period begins March 1 and ends Sept. 30. MDHHS expects to award approximately $1,050,000, with a maximum of $150,000 per applicant. Successful applicants may receive funding from Oct. 1, to March 14, 2023, subject to availability of funding and acceptable performance. Grant applications must be submitted electronically through the Electronic Grants Administration and Management System program by 3 p.m. on Jan. 7.

Dementia training offered by UPCAP

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pper Peninsula Commission for Area Progress (UPCAP) is offering a three-part online Dementia training series, “Developing Dementia Dexterity,” for caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia from 2 to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 18 and 25 and Feb.1 Each class is an hour long and includes The Dementia Overview for Family and Friends, Planning Activities for Persons with Dementia, and Understanding Behavior and Support Needs of Persons with Dementia. Whether you are a seasoned dementia caregiver,

Bradford Veley is a freelance cartoonist, illustrator and farmer in the U.P. Follow him on Facebook, Instagram and at www.bradveley.com


family, or friend, this online training series provides a better understanding of dementia and the impact it has on the person with the disease, how to connect with individuals with dementia through activities, and behaviors and the support needs of persons with dementia. There is no charge to attend any of the Dementia Series online classes, but participants must have a computer, tablet, or smartphone with internet connection and email address, to attend. Registration ends on January 16. To register, visit upcap. org and click on “Events,” or call 2-11 during normal business hours.

Bonifas hosts mixed media competition

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ll Mixed UP is a new competition show for mixed media artists. What is mixed media? Artwork that was created using more than one medium. Assemblages, collages and sculpture are three common examples of art using different media. Awards will be given out to the top three artworks, chosen by fellow artist, Mara Manning. This is the first exhibit of its kind at the Bonifas Arts Center. The exhibit will be open from Jan. 6 to Feb. 17, with a reception to take place from 7 to 9 p.m. on Jan. 6.

Annual Noque ski slated for Jan. 21, 22

races

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he Noquemanon Ski Marathon returns in 2022 with several events aimed at kids and adults alike. Friday, Jan. 21 will see the Junior Noque, beginning at Al Quaal Recreation area in Ishpeming, at the same start as the 50k ski marathon. All junior events will be classic. The weekend will also include a 15-mile snowshoe, 12K, 24K and 50K events. The Noque is an event of the Noquemanon Trail Network – a non profit organization. The mission of the “NTN” is to develop and maintain an interconnected, yearround, non-motorized trail network in the central Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Visit noquemanon.com for more information on any of the 2022 races taking place. Visit noquetrails.org to learn more about the NTN, and to become a member and trail supporter.

SHF accepting spring cycle grant applications

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he Superior Health Foundation is now accepting grant applications for its spring 2022 funding cycle. SHF will award more than $175,000 in grants during the spring cycle. Visit superiorhealthfoundation.org for eligibility information and online application forms. Applications will be accepted through Jan. 17. The foundation’s grants committee will review

the applications and will make its recommendations to the SHF board of directors at its March board meeting. The foundation is interested in receiving grant applications for health-centered projects or equipment purchases in the Upper Peninsula. In the past, the average fall grant award has been between $10,000 and $15,000. “We know there are a considerable number of health needs across our region,” said Jim LaJoie, SHF executive director. “We remain steadfast and committed to do our part to address these needs for the health-centered, non-profit organization across our beautiful region.” SHF’s mission is to assist with unmet healthcare needs, with health education and with programs and research on preventing illness and promoting health throughout the Upper Peninsula. Its vision is to improve the health of U.P. residents. Since its inception in September 2012, the SHF has awarded nearly $4.4 million in grant funding. For more information, contact the SHF at shf@superiorhealthfoundation.org or 906-225-6914.

Shiras Planetarium reopens to public

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arquette Area Public Schools announced recently the re-opening of the Shiras Planetarium for public shows, as well as school group field trips during the school day. The Planetarium’s full schedule can be viewed at shirasplanetarium. org. For more information, email planetarium@mapsnet.org to reach the planetarium director, Becky LaBrecque.

MDHHS seeks advice of kinship caregivers through advisory council

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he Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) is forming a Kinship Advisory Council to advise the department about the needs of these caregivers and the children in their care. Kinship care is the full-time care, nurturing and protection of children by family members, close family friends or other important adults in the child’s life. This could include grandparents, aunts, uncles, older siblings or family friends. The council will advocate for reform that will lead to a system that is better-coordinated and more consumer friendly and family-centered. Kinship care can occur when a child is placed formally through the MDHHS foster care system or through an informal arrangement between the parent and the caregiver. MDHHS is seeking diverse membership that includes professionals in a variety

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New buoys pulled from Lake Superior for season Jeff Koch pulls a buoy from Lake Superior. The last of three new climate-monitoring and maritime-safety buoys has been retrieved for the season from the south shore of Lake Superior. Superior Watershed Partnership staff retrieved the Marquette buoy on Nov. 29 with boat support provided by the Department of Natural Resources. The SWP received $47,786.80 in grant funding through the Great Lakes Observing System to purchase and deploy three new monitoring buoys during the 2021 season. New buoys were deployed at Marquette, Munising and Grand Marais. The Marquette buoy was placed north-east of Black Rocks at a new location determined by the US Coast Guard in cooperation with SWP, DNR and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The Munising and Grand Marais buoys were deployed and retrieved by SWP staff with boat support proof areas, as well as people with experience as kinship caregivers. Visit research.net/r/KinshipCouncil to submit applications for membership by Jan. 10.

135th annual Ishpeming Ski Jumping Tournament set

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he Ishpeming Ski Club will host the 135th Annual Ski Jumping Tournament, held on famous Suicide Hill, the evening of Tuesday, January 18. This event is one stop on both the regional premier Five Hills Tournament, and the U.S. Cup. Ski jumpers from all over the country will test their abilities to fly as far as possible with the best style. The evening begins with a trial round of ski jumping starting at 6 p.m. The first competition round will follow the trial round. The tournament will be complete with tailgating, huge bonfires and great views of the action on Suicide

vided by Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. Each of the three monitoring buoys collect important navigation and climate planning data including wave height, wind speed, water temperature and more. The live data provided by these buoys is critical for commercial and recreational boaters as well as the National Weather Service, Environment Canada and NOAA. In addition, the SWP uses buoy data for long-term climate adaptation planning with coastal communities in the Upper Peninsula. SWP is a Great Lakes non-profit organization focusing on environmental conservation, habitat restoration and community climate adaptation throughout the Upper Peninsula. Visit superiorwatersheds.org for more information on SWP, and visit glos.org for more information on the GLOS monitoring buoy program. (Photo courtesy of SWP)

Hill. There will be a Nordic combined cross country ski race on the Ishpeming Ski Club Norman Juhola Trail System on the following morning of Wednesday, January 19. Vist ishskiclub.com for more information.

Fat bike races return to Ishpeming

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l Quaal Recreation area in Ishpeming will celebrate fat bikes with the annual Fat-ish bike races, set to take place Jan. 15 and 16. The weekend will include 10- and 20mile fat bike races, 5K and 15K ski races, and free use of the tube slide. Proceeds from the event will go to the nonprofit Go Get Outside. Visit fatish.com for more information.

Kirtland Warbler to grace 2022 habitat plates

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ince December 2017, Michigan’s wildlife habitat license plate has

featured an elk to mark the 2018 celebration of 100 years of elk in our state. Beginning in January, the next species to adorn the plate is the Kirtland’s warbler – to celebrate the recovery of this unique bird. In 2019, the Kirtland’s warbler was removed from the endangered species list. Ongoing efforts by the DNR and a multitude of partners have ensured nesting habitat is and will continue to be available for this songbird, which nests only in young jack pine stands in Michigan, Wisconsin and Ontario. All proceeds from the sale of the wildlife habitat license plate will continue to support the Nongame Fish and Wildlife Trust Fund and benefit nongame species like the warbler. Purchase the plate through the Secretary of State for $35, with $25 of that fee going to the Nongame Fish and Wildlife Trust Fund.

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Goblins, fairies needed for new ballet performance Auditions for “Faeries of the Night” an original story and ballet written and choreographed by Deborah Choszczyk will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. on Jan. 9 at Kaufman Auditorium. Men, women, boys and girls, (5 and older) families, dancers and non-dancers may audition. Young dancers will audition as a group first. The production of this ballet is made possible with support from the Arts and Culture Center, Marquette, Kaufman Auditorium, The Second Skin Shop and Queen City Ballet. Performance dates are during Arts Week, June 20 to 25. This ballet is open to all sorts of talent, including acting, stage combat, ballet, contemporary, jumping, rolling and acrobatics. Backstage talent is also needed, including set construction/design, costuming, makeup, hair and more. A production fee will be required to help offset costs of this unique production. For more information contact Deborah at updance2@ gmail.com, or through the Queen City Ballet Facebook page. (Photo courtesy of Deborah Choszcyk)

Piano recital slated for Jan. 30 in Marquette

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ive members of the Lake Superior Piano Workshop (Dan Arnold, Esther Barrington, Robert Buchkoe, Nancy Railey and Nancy Zimmerman) will perform a recital of French music composed during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Music performed is Impressionistic, composed by Ravel, Satie, Debussy, Faure and Poulenc. The recital will begin at 3 p.m. on Jan. 30 at the Women’s Federated Clubhouse (corner of Ridge and Front Sts.). A free-will offering will benefit the Clubhouse’ Piano Maintenance fund.

New road near KI Sawyer now open

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he new Sawyer International Airport road, Gerry Corkin Drive, is now fully open. Entrance to the airport is off of Kelly Johnson Avenue onto 10th St. New signage has been placed to direct passengers. Questions can be directed to airport offices

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at 906-346-3308. More information is also available at sawyerairport. com, as well as the airport’s Facebook page.

New foundation focuses on poetry

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ducators, librarians, authors and community leaders announce the formation of the Upper Peninsula Poet Laureate Foundation. The foundation promotes poetry in the U.P. and the projects of the U.P. Poet Laureate through public events and through online and print publications. M. Bartley Seigel, the current U.P. Poet Laureate and former laureates Martin Achatz and Andrea Scarpino, participated in Peter White Public Library’s Winter Wonderland Land. From Dec. 6 through Jan. 3, during the library’s festival of lights, visitors could hear poetry on a talking “Poet Tree,” an interactive display. Future projects of the U.P. Poet Laureate Foundation will include distributing posters of the laureate’s poetry


Audubon Society winter bird count set for end of January Temperatures are dropping and birdsong has all but disappeared, but not all Michigan birds fly south to warmer climates. In addition to the birds that stay year-round, Michigan welcomes many visitors from the north in the colder months, making winter an exciting time to watch birds. Winter bird counts help scientists better understand winter bird movements, assess bird population health and guide meaningful conservation action. With bird populations in decline, it is increasingly important that scientists and land managers understand all aspects of a bird’s life cycle. The Audubon’s next bird count is “Climate Watch,” will take place from Jan. 15 to Feb. 15. This annual count explores how North American birds, like the eastern bluebird, are responding to climate change. The results from the survey will allow scientists to identify areas of high climatic suitability for target species and will inform on-the-ground land management decisions to protect birds. Visit birdcount. org for more information on how to participate. (Photo courtesy of Michigan Department of Natural Resources) to high school libraries across the U.P., a chapbook of the U.P. Young Poets Program poems, and accepting applications for the 2023 laureate. Visit its website at uppoetlaureate. org to learn more about the foundation and current laureate M. Bartley Seigel. The foundation is looking for volunteers from all 15 counties of the U.P. who are interested in participating in promoting U.P. poetry. Donations to the foundation can be sent to U.P. Poet Laureate Foundation, c/o Janeen Pergrin Rastall, 2100 M-28 E, Marquette MI 49855. As a 501(c) (3) organization, all donations are tax deductible. Contact Janeen Rastall at janeenpergrin@gmail.com for more information.

DNR offers Aquatic Wild programming for teachers

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he DNR is offering free “Aquatic WILD” workshops to help educators learn new and creative ways to bring the outdoors into the classroom. Best of all, there’s no charge to qualified participants because the DNR’s Education Services Section sought and was awarded an Environmental Protection Agency grant to support Salmon in the Classroom and Great Lakes watershed training – topics that are integrated into the Aquatic WILD curriculum. Aquatic WILD is part of the Project WILD suite of internationally renowned conservation and

environmental education activities and investigations aimed at helping teachers better engage their students in field investigations and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) concepts, all while following Next Generation Science Standards. The next Aquatic Wild workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8. Visit Michigan.gov/ MichiganProjectWILD to explore upcoming workshops and other program details.

Next to Normal hits the stage at Forest Roberts Theatre

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n intimate exploration of family and loss, this rock musical tells the story of Diana Goodman, a suburban mother suffering from bipolar disorder. Haunted by a ghost from her past, she tries to come to terms with her grief as her husband and daughter desperately long for a return to normalcy. At times delightfully funny and at others intensely raw, in the words of The New York Times, this is a “feel-everything” show. Performances will be on Jan. 28-29 and Feb. 2-5. The show is rated PG-13, and themes may not be suitable for younger audience members. Parental guidance is strongly suggested. Visit nmu.edu/theatreanddance/tickets to purchase tickets. MM

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on campus

UP Health System - Marquette’s former facility on College Avenue is pictured here.

NMU Foundation looks to acquire old UP Health System - Marquette campus

UP Health System press release

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P Health System - Marquette and the Northern Michigan University Foundation recently announced they are both conducting due diligence with the intention of transferring UPHSM’s previous property on College Avenue. The purchase price would be $1, along with an additional $10 million for prepaid rent and financial support to help offset high costs associated with preparing the site for development. “This project has the potential to be transformative in many ways,” said Brad Canale, CEO of the NMU Foundation. “The overarching objective of the NMU Foundation Board of Trustees is to facilitate a beneficial outcome for NMU and the Marquette community.” The property’s location, which is adjacent to the NMU campus and centralized in the city of Marquette, offers a variety of redevelopment opportunities that would benefit both the university as well as the greater community. “We are thrilled to have reached a tentative agreement with the NMU Foundation,” said Gar Atchison, Market President of UP Health System. “All along, our commitment has been to identify the right long-term plan for this campus, keeping in mind the interests of the surrounding neighborhoods and communities we serve.” NMUF is currently working with local and state government entities as well as private sector experts in conducting due diligence before it de-

cides whether or not to move forward. These efforts include a partnership with the Marquette Brownfield Redevelopment Authority in supporting environmental due diligence on the site, which is currently underway. The due diligence and planning process is expected to be complete by spring 2022. “NMUF will only proceed toward closing on the agreement if due diligence efforts reveal that demolition of the existing complex and redevelopment of the site can occur in a way that is both financially viable and beneficial to the university and community,” Canale said. “A critical factor in this evaluation will be the availability of funding to offset the sizeable expense of demolishing the current complex.” Near the close of the transaction, NMUF will issue a request for qualifications from master developers, which would result in a private development partnership where NMUF has a limited role as an equity investor. Any future development would also significantly enhance the tax base of the property and support services to Marquette residents. “We look forward to seeing this property in the heart of Marquette revitalized,” Canale added. “Evaluation of the site is now underway. More work needs to be done, and we remain focused on the due diligence process and thoughtful approach to this significant project.” MM

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feature

Heikki Lunta’s comin’ to Irontown

Annual festival returns like never before By Kristy Basolo-Malmsten

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Top, fireworks explode over Teal Lake at a previous Heikki Lunta Festival. (Photo courtesy of Kristy Basolo-Malmsten). Below, the Tunnel of Lights in Negaunee. (Photos by Kristy Basolo-Malmsten)

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eikki Lunta Winter Festival is returning to Downtown Negaunee this year—and just about everything but the name has changed. The festival, which honors the Finnish snow god and literally translates to “Hank Snow,” will take place on Jan. 28 and 29. The Negaunee Downtown Development Association (DDA) has taken the reigns, and hopes to reinvigorate the celebration— and the downtown area—at the same time. “We will have some of the traditional events, and some new events to add to it,” said Mona Lang, consulting director for the Negaunee DDA. “Things need to be revitalized a little bit.” Heikki Lunta has been put on by various volunteer groups over the years, including the Negaunee Irontown Association and the Upper Peninsula Luge Club. This year both organizations will be a part of the festivities, but the Negaunee DDA is doing the coordinating and publicizing. The two-day event begins on Friday at 5 p.m., with the lighting of the bonfire at the corner of Tobin and Iron streets, near Barr’s Bar. There is something for everyone that evening, with the self-guided Tunnel of Lights open in the pocket park on Iron Street, public sliding and an open house at the U.P. Luge Club on Lucy Hill, guided lantern-lit snowshoe tours through Old Town and the pinnacle event—the first Irontown Rail Jam. Lang said she felt bringing a rail jam to downtown Negaunee was key to welcoming young people into the festivities. “It’s going to be a great event,” Lang said. “It’s very exciting to watch, and brings young people downtown so that they feel a part of things.” Double Trouble Entertainment is producing the event, with DJ music and an MC. But what is a rail jam? Something that Negaunee won’t forget, Lang said. “We’ll be turning part of downtown Negaunee into a course, with slopes, jumps and turns,” she said. “Participants will really get to show their skills on snowboards and skis. It’s a great spectator sport.” A rail jam, by definition, is a “jib contest.” Jibbing is technical riding on non-standard surfaces, usually performing tricks, sliding or riding on top of objects other than snow and can be done by skiers and snowboarders alike. The area behind Old Bank Building Antiques between Iron Street and Rail Street will be turned into a course specifically made for the competition. Brandon Croney, owner of The Compound Ski & Snowboard Shop has been running events like this since 2001, and is excited to put on Negaunee’s first rail jam. “We’ve got a plan to put scaffolding on top of Rail


THE BEST PART ABOUT THESE EVENTS IS THAT THEY’RE DIFFERENT THAN WHAT MOST PEOPLE HAVE SEEN.

A celebration of the Finnish snow god January 29

January 28 Street for the start, add three or four features, a couple of rails and maybe a jump,” Croney said. “This is going to be non-stop action for spectators— one after another after another.” Croney said the first 45 minutes allow the public to try out the course in a non-competitive fashion. “It’s a fun experience for young people who don’t have the ability to do it competitively yet, but want to show off for their families,” Croney said. “Many older family members don’t get to watch their kids do things like this because it isn’t as accessible (at a ski hill for non-skiers).” Starting at 6 p.m., competitive skiers will have a 45-minute period to show their skills, and judges will weed out the competitors until there

5 p.m. Lighting of the Bonfire Corner of Tobin and Iron streets 6 p.m. Irontown Rail Jam Skiers compete 7 p.m. Irontown Rail Jam Snowboarders compete 8 p.m. Irontown Rail Jam Final competitions

South Shore Fishing Association Fishing Derby (All day) UP Luge Club and Ishpeming Ski Club Open Houses 6-8 p.m. Guided Snowshoe Tours

Begin at Old Town Pavilian, Snow Street

6-8 p.m. Freeze Yer Fanny Fat Bike Race Heikki Lunta Fireworks Over Old Town

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Scott Tyler takes a run down Lucy Hill. (Photo by Kristy BasoloMalmsten) are only about a half dozen left. The finalists will move on to compete for cash prizes. At 7 p.m., the same thing will take place with competitive snowboarders. The final competition begins around 8 p.m. “The best part about these events is that they’re different from what most people have seen,” Croney said. “It’s a way for us to take our abilities from the ski hill and bring them to the general limelight.” Croney said he’s appreciative of the support from the City of Negaunee, and especially the Negaunee Department of Public Works, who will be plowing snow in the course area to give the builders a base to work with. “The DPW has been super supportive,” Croney said. “It’ll take the better part of a week to get this all built and put together.” Registration is now open for participants, with public jibbing starting at 5 p.m. The fee for general public to try the course is $10, and the fee

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to compete is $20. Cash prizes will be awarded for first, second and third place in the competitive men’s ski and snowboard jams and awarded for first and second in the women’s ski and snowboard jams. All riders must wear a helmet and sign a waiver; those younger than 18 must have a parent sign. Visit www. eventbrite.com/e/irontown-rail-jamtickets- 226289276317 for details or to register. The event is sponsored by Travel Marquette, WJMN and the Negaunee DDA. It is brought in part by Northern Michigan University, Eagle Mine, The Fire Station, The Compound Ski & Snowboard Shop and OK Rental. On Saturday, a full day of Heikki Lunta fun is planned, beginning with the Teal Lake Ice Fishing Tournament, sponsored by the South Shore Fishing Association. Visit southshorefishing.com for more details or to register for the derby. Breakfast will be available at the


Several people listen to instructions on luging at Lucy Hill. The UP Luge Club will host an open house during this year’s Heikki Lunta Festival. (Photo by Kristy BasoloMalmsten)

Negaunee Elk’s Lodge, sponsored by the Negaunee Irontown Association, from 9 to 11 a.m. The U.P. Luge Club and Ishpeming Ski Club will both have open house events and opportunities for the public to partake. The Tunnel of Lights and bonfire will also be available, as well as guided lantern-lit snowshoe tours of Old Town from 6 to 8 p.m. Those wishing to snowshoe should meet at the new pavilion in Old Town, off of Snow Street. Cliffs Shaft Mining Museum volunteer Mike Ilmonen will be narrating the tours, Lang said. No registration is required, and the tours are free. The “Freeze Yer Fanny” Fatbike Race will take place from 6 to 8 p.m., with pre-registration required, and the evening will end with a fireworks display over Old Town, sponsored by Jackson’s Pit.

The race will be hosted by UPCross as part of the UPCross Snowcross Series. UPCross is a non-profit that organizes cyclocross races in the U.P. The series features four races with a 30-minute short race and 60-minute long race option. The course is roughly a one-mile loop. “Freeze Yer Fanny will be a night race and will also be going through Downtown Negaunee, so that should be pretty fun,” said Evan Simula, event organizer. Online registration will be available, along with day of registration. “We’ve been very fortunate with our sponsors to

date, and are looking for additional sponsors,” Lang said. Downtown Negaunee businesses will be having their own specials and events during the festival as well. For details or to sponsor the event, email mslang@cityofnegaunee.com MM About the Author: Kristy Basolo-Malmsten was the Marquette Monthly editor for more than a decade, as well as the owner of God’s Country U.P. Outdoors Magazine. She has a master’s degree in writing from NMU, and lives in Ishpeming. Her day job is as the senior center director in Negaunee.

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arts

Above, an encaustic painting by Rapid River Artist Tracy Anderson (who is pictured below), entitled “Somewhere To Be Flying II” was Marquette Monthly’s winner in this year’s Northern Exposure exhibition at the Bonifas Arts Center in Escanaba. (Images courtesy of Tracy Anderson)

Mixing mediums Local artist keeps styles varied By Jonny Bahk-Halberg

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he way she explains it, Rapid River artist Tracy L. Anderson felt almost compelled to paint her most recent award-winning work of art to rescue people from the turmoil of our covid-obsessed era. “It was really the last two years with the pandemic,” she said. “I just feel we are living in a chaotic world. And there’s a lot of ugliness in it. And I’ve really been pulled to create, … a peaceful, calming, serene scene.” Anderson’s work, entitled “Somewhere to Be Flying II,” won the Marquette Monthly’s award at this year’s annual Northern Exposure exhibition at the Bonifas Arts Center in Escanaba. The piece shows an iridescent blue tree swallow flying high over a surreal multicolored backdrop. The combination of the finely de-

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tailed, realistic bird and the dreamlike backdrop is just what Anderson was looking for, she said as she talked about her creative process. “I had this idea in my head of this ethereal landscape … fading off into the distance” she said. “And I wanted a bird flying over it. As I got working on this, and the colors started to come out, I’m like … I really need that pop of blue. Then I came across these tree swallow photos that I had taken. And I’m like, ‘Yep, that’s the right color that I’m going for… the right pose and everything that I want for this piece.’ ” This work is an example of encaustic painting, a technique where the colors are mixed with hot liquid wax and resin. Anderson uses resins to change the paint’s consistency, layer-


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At left an Anderson encaustic painting entitled “Spirit.” The technique utilizes colors mixed with hot liquid wax and resin. Anderson uses the resins to change the paint’s consistency, layering in the colors and textures. She also will add elements of realism, which can be seen in the piece pictured above, entitled “Calm.” (Images courtesy of Tracy Anderson)

ing in the colors and textures. Encaustic techniques are typically used to create more abstract paintings, but Anderson said she likes to combine those fantasy images with realistic elements. “For several years now I’ve kind of been playing around with that, with incorporating more detail and realism in it, but also that abstract background, and I guess this piece is one of those that kind of merges that,” she said. “It kind of has the hint of being a landscape or an abstract landscape. And it kind of has an ethereal feel to it. “And then with the bird flying over, you know, this beautiful landscape of colors, where it kind of fades off in the distance, I think it really evokes a really calming peaceful sense. And it also kind of pulls the viewer in as far as just envisioning and questioning: what is it flying over? What does that

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landscape look like, and maybe, in a sense, it’s kind of a dreamscape, too.” Encaustic painting is an ancient method used by Egyptians and Greeks for thousands of years. Anderson uses beeswax and plant resins to create the clear organic medium, adding colors and heat to fashion colorful images of abstract shapes. She tries to add a touch of realism to the fantastic images too. The hyper-realistic blue swallow in the painting, a pastel drawing on rice paper, is embedded into the multi-colored imaginary background, in a collage of realism and fantasy melded together in perfect balance. A native of Rapid River, Anderson said she started creating art as a child, with encouragement from her grandmother and parents.

January 2022

“I started taking formal painting lessons when I was 11. So not to really age myself, but it’d be 32 years I’ve been doing art. “I always loved creating, and my family was very supportive of that,” Anderson said. Classes at the Bonifas center and lessons from a local artist helped her refine her gift, along with an art and design degree from Northern Michigan University. In addition to her encaustic technique, another artistic technique Anderson enjoys working in is scratchboard, which can be used to create intricately detailed realistic images of the animals and other natural elements in her reproductions. Scratchboard uses a white clay board that’s had black ink applied, and Anderson uses an Exacto knife to scratch the black away and reveal the white underneath. She


In stark contrast to Anderson’s often whimsical encaustic paintings are her scratchboard etchings. Top right, a scratchboard entitled “Haven.” Bottom right, a piece called “Kindred Spirits.” (Images courtesy of Tracy Anderson)

I ALWAYS LOVED CREATING, AND MY FAMILY WAS VERY SUPPORTIVE OF THAT.

said she can get much more detail with scratchboard than she can with her artist’s pencil. Anderson said her painstakingly precise scratchboard work was “180 degrees” different from encaustic painting in terms of the time and intensity required. After creating art with oil paints for nearly 30 years, Anderson discovered these newer methods in recent years and refreshes herself by switching between them in her work. “It gives me a nice break when I’m working that detailed and meticulous,” Anderson said, “just to take a break from the scratchboard and go fire up the torch and heat up the wax. It’s much more free-flowing and it has more of an abstract quality. So it kind of gives me a nice break and still allows me to create.” An Upper Peninsula native, Anderson said there were pros and cons to being an artist in the U.P., but things are much better than they were in years past. “I think social media and the internet have really opened up opportunities for more artists that work more remotely,” Anderson said. “I can see in the past when that wasn’t available, it would have been more of a challenge. But I think now with the internet, it’s really opened up more avenues for artists to get out there and get their work seen.” Anderson said her “day job” is as an account representative with a packaging manufacturer in Escanaba. “It’s completely non-art related,” she said. “But the goal and the dream is to be able to support myself full-time with my artwork,” Anderson added. “It’s my driving focus; that’s what I want to do.” For now, her weekends, holidays and vacations are all spent working at her art. Fortunately for An-

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Above, another encaustic piece from Anderson, entitled “Rose breasted Grosbeak.” (Image courtesy of Tracy Anderson) derson, her studio is in her home, so it’s simply a matter of going down to the studio any time she feels that pull to create. And while supporting herself on her artwork has been a lifelong dream, she said it seems to be getting close to being a possibility. “Yeah, yeah, I think so,” Anderson said. Her work has shown at national and international levels, winning awards in both as well. Dozens of awards going back more than a decade throughout the United States appear on her website, and Anderson has even participated in a juried exhibition of scratchboard artists in Australia. “That’s the furthest away that my art has gone,” Anderson said. “I wish I could have traveled with it. But someday I’ll hopefully get over there.” Still, while her work has won awards both near and far, she said it’s an honor to earn recognition right here in the U.P. “It’s always a big deal,” Anderson said. “I always feel honored and thrilled when other people view my work, whether it’s chosen for an

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award or somebody buys a piece of my work. I’m extremely humbled by that experience; it really means a lot that somebody has connected with my work and finds value in it.” Anderson has also won numerous awards for her artistic photography. In addition to her award-winning painting on display at the annual Northern Exposure exhibition at the Bonifas Arts Center in Escanaba, her work can be seen at the East Ludington Gallery in Escanaba, the Erickson Center for the Arts in Curtis, Marquette’s Zero Degrees Gallery, and the Woodwalk Gallery in Egg Harbor, Wis. More artwork and information is online at Anderson’s website at tlandersonart.com or on Facebook and Instagram at tlandersonart. MM About the Author: After more than two decades working with universities in Seoul, writer/editor/teacher Jonny Bahk-Halberg brought his family back to his favorite place in the Western Hemisphere – the shores of Lake Superior. He can be reached at jonny@jonnybh.com


Twice-baked potatoes

at the table Ingredients needed for this mouth-watering recipe are shown. (Photo by Katherine Larson)

A warm comfort food for a chilly winter evening By Katherine Larson

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anuary meal-planning poses something of a challenge. On the one hand, the icy blasts roaring down from the Arctic need to be met with food that provides warmth, coziness and comfort. On the other hand, all that warm, cozy, comforting food tends to be extremely rich. For those of us who emerged from December’s festivities with a tighter waistband than we enjoyed back in November, richness doesn’t belong on the menu. Enter the twice-baked potato. I don’t mean the conventional twice-baked potato, gooey and cheesy and bacony and laden with calories. Instead, try this vegetarian version. It’s laden indeed, but not with calories — instead, with flavor. We start, of course, with potatoes. Almost any potato bakes well, but in my opinion russets are optimal — their crispy skins hold up well to the double-baking process, and their insides mash up creamy rather than gummy — while their size makes them ideal for a potato-centric meal. I buy mine from Virgin Earth Farm of Witch Lake, not because farmer Gregg Wixtrom is my husband’s cousin but because his potatoes are the best. And we start before we actually want to eat them, because the thing about twice-baked potatoes is that you have to bake them twice. Not necessarily on the same day (though that’s ideal), but these spuds do need two go-rounds in the oven. Heading out to camp? When you arrive, light the oven and put the potatoes in for the first time; let them cook, take them out and fuss with them, then put

them back in for round two. That way, the oven serves a double purpose: preparing supper, and helping get the chill out of the camp’s bones. But if you’re at home and the furnace or fire has already done whatever it can do to ward off winter, you might not want to keep the oven on that long or not be able to spend that much time in the kitchen at once. In that case, go ahead and bake the potatoes the first time beforehand, when you’re already using the oven for something else. The optimal temperature is 400 degrees, but the potatoes will accommodate as high as 450 or as low as 350; you’ll just have to adjust the time accordingly. You’ll also have to adjust the time for size: a five-inch-long potato will be done well before an eight-inch monster, and then their freshness will affect matters too. Obviously there’s no reliable hard-and-fast rule, but I generally have good luck with cooking them at 400 for an hour, maybe as long as 90 minutes for the true monsters. For those who use instant-read thermometers, the ideal internal temperature is 208 to 211 degrees. If you don’t have a thermometer, poke the potatoes with a fork or the tip of a sharp knife into the thickest part of biggest potato; it should go in

without resistance. But I got ahead of myself. First, of course, I washed and dried the potatoes. And I pricked them all over with a fork — once, but only once, did I prick them insufficiently, and the penalty I paid in terms of cleaning out an oven’s worth of exploded spud taught me my lesson. And I rubbed them lightly with olive oil, and I sprinkled them with coarse kosher salt. And I put them on a rack to bake so that the hot air would circulate all around them. What I did not do was wrap them in foil. Yes, this may be controversial, and if your loving parent taught you that foil is essential then who am I to stand in the way of family harmony? For that matter, it was my own father who taught me not to wrap them. Sentiment aside, the scientific fact remains that a foil-wrapped potato is steamed rather than baked, because the foil holds in the steam which escapes from those little holes that we so diligently pricked. And the texture of steaming is quite different from that of baking…If foil is your thing, go for it. You’re the boss of your own kitchen. While the potatoes bake, prepare the stuffing. As promised, this will be big on flavor (and nutrition) but light on calories. We’ll start with mushrooms, lots of them—say, at least half a pound of mushrooms for two large potatoes. Wild mushrooms are great; tame ones are delicious too. Chop them fairly small and sauté them in a little olive oil over medium-high heat, using your biggest pan to give them plenty of room so they’ll brown up nicely, even crisply, rather than steaming. Add a finely diced onion to the pan and give it

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WITH A SALAD ON THE SIDE, THIS IS A MEAL WITH ENOUGH SOLID COMFORT TO KEEP THAT ARCTIC CHILL WELL AT BAY.

another three minutes or so. Then herbs: a teaspoon of dried basil, half a teaspoon of dried thyme. Several cloves of garlic, minced. Tomato. Since it’s wintertime, we can’t use a fresh tomato; those supermarket objects have about as much flavor as pink plastic. If, last summer, we slow-roasted tomatoes out of our gardens or from the farmers’ market and froze them, this is the perfect opportunity to break off a chunk and toss it in the pan to thaw and cook. If not, a couple of whole canned tomatoes, chopped, offer an adequate substitute. Stir everything together in the pan, then clear a spot in the middle and squirt in about a tablespoon of tomato paste to cook for a minute or two before you stir it in with everything else. This caramelization allows its full flavor to develop, and with these potatoes we’re all about flavor. Now, if you already have a bottle of white wine open for yourself, excellent: you’ll only need about half a cup to cook with. Otherwise, no problem; even one of those little bottles found in the 10-for-$10 bin will do, so long as it’s something like a crisp pinot grigio. Not sweet, anyway. Pour a quarter cup of wine into the hot pan and let it reduce, scraping up all those lovely brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Pour in the second quarter-cup and repeat, continuing to scrape, until there’s nothing but a flavor-rich glaze left. Take the pan off the stove and let it await the potatoes. If you like, enjoy some of that wine. When the potatoes are done, remove them from the oven and let them sit no more than 10 minutes; you don’t want to give them a chance to get gummy from leftover steam. Cut them in half lengthwise and scoop out the insides into a large bowl, leaving potato shells about a quarter-inch thick. Okay, you foil-lovers, indulge me here: if you cooked your potatoes in foil, you did you and that’s wonderful. But now please put the empty shells back into that still-hot oven for about 10 more minutes to crisp them up a bit, or they will go all limp and floppy when you try to stuff them.

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In the meantime, here’s where you decide just how low-cal you want to be. Me, I’m going to mash about a quarter cup of low-fat buttermilk and a couple of tablespoons of butter into the potatoes, along with about three ounces freshly-grated Parmesan, but then I’m past caring too much about svelteness. Besides, Parmesan is particularly high in calcium and tastes great. Lower-fat but less flavorful cheeses include farmers cheese and cottage cheese. Contemplate your own New Year’s resolutions and act accordingly. Whether or not you include the dairy products (and vegans swear by nutritional yeast here), we’ll all stir the mushroom-onion-tomato-wine mixture thoroughly into the mashed potato, then add salt and pepper to taste. By now, those crisped-up skins will be ready to take out of the oven. Fill them. If you like, sprinkle a little extra grated Parmesan on top. Do you want to eat them right away? Pop them back into the oven for another 20 minutes. Do you want to eat them in a few hours? Let the filled potatoes sit until half an hour before you’re ready to eat, then pop them into the oven for that half hour. Do you want to eat them in a few days? Put cooled filled potatoes into an airtight container, refrigerate for up to five days, then reheat in a 375-400 degree oven for at least half an hour till piping hot. With a salad on the side, this is a meal with enough solid comfort to keep that Arctic chill well at bay. The British call potatoes like these “jacket potatoes,” with the “jacket” referring to what Americans call “skins.” I like the jacket imagery, because a meal like this warms eaters from the inside the way parkas warm us from the outside. Add a crackling fire, and we’ll be toasty indeed. MM About the author: Katherine Larson is a writer, teacher, and former lawyer, with a special passion for food justice.


gift of water Loi Krathong Honoring water with an annual ritual by Kalil Zender

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he river before me is wide, slow, and patient. Thick green foliage crowds the banks and shallows, making a watery jungle for carp and snake fish and perhaps even a few giant water lizards. Sticks, plastic bottles and leaves float on the surface in an almost imperceptible current, seeming to stand still on this glassy murk. No ripples here, no waves. This river has seen the rise and fall of kingdoms. It has been the watering grounds for wild tigers and elephants, and it is the life behind all the villages and settlements up and down its banks for over 800 miles. Today is the festival called Loi Krathong, and hundreds of people have gathered along the banks of the Ping River. They come here asking, praying to be cleansed by the water in one of the most important Buddhist holidays in Thailand. Loi Krathong is a kind of yearly baptism, an opportunity to start fresh. I stand on the bank. At my feet, the gnarled roots of a huge Bodhi tree lay exposed, as if painted onto the worn, packed dirt. In front of me, a throng of strangers scrambles down to the water’s edge. They are boisterous but respectful. Reaching the grassy shallows, they kneel together, each holding a krathong to his or her chest. Each krathong is made by intricately folding banana leaves around a circular bamboo base and then filling and decorating it with marigolds, plump purple orchids and small yellow candles. It is evening, and I watch as a group below me pass lighters back and forth between them, each lighting the cluster of candles nestled inside their krathongs. Carefully, each krathong is set in the water. Traditionally, people sprinkle fingernail clippings or locks of hair amidst the flowers and candles, but these days most just whisper a prayer, or perhaps a confession, into the little boat before letting the river take it away.

I scramble down the bank and light my own candles, thinking of the mistakes I’ve made this year, how I would like to be different, better. Gently I place my krathong on the surface and use a stick to nudge it into the current. It bobs away slowly, bumping against others as it joins the legion of tiny floating candles flickering against the darkness. We all wait together on the bank, watching our krathongs drift away for as long as we can. In this place, the rains come once a year. For several months, rain pounds down a few times per day, flooding the streets and gutters until sometime in August or September when, without warning, the last rain falls. There are no great freshwater lakes in Thailand, and little chance of rain after the monsoons move on. The rivers are the only dependable water source. Water is life. Here, life is a river. In Southern Thailand, people release their krathongs into the ocean. But I’m a river girl, and I’m happier here. The ocean is too selfish, too violent. There is a humanity in rivers, a silent kindness in flowing waters that seems so patient, understanding, motherlike. Rivers are imbued with the ability to carry away our mistakes and our trespasses.

Water Saving Tips • Save rainwater to water your garden or houseplants • To save household water, when showering, turn off the water while you soap up.

As a child in Michigan, I would swim with my mouth open in the Yellow Dog River, lapping up that cold, clean water like a happy dog. Now, I live most of the year by this river on the other side of the world. Being near it brings me comfort, like sitting in my mother’s kitchen. But in these past six years, I have not once swum in this river I love. The Ping is dirty. Children do not swim open-mouthed and carefree here anymore. Once a year at Loi Krathong, we make an offering and ask the Ping to carry away our sins and baggage. Yet every day we force her to carry our garbage and waste, which is domestic, industrial and agricultural. Her tired body is a vehicle for plastic bottles, decaying fishing nets, waterlogged flip-flops, candy wrappers, plastic shopping bags and whatever invisible horrors I don’t even know. She doesn’t complain. A river is a mother, and she knows only patience and forgiveness. Stand up for yourself! I want to shout. Fight back! Do something! I wish she would retaliate, flood her banks, drown us all. But she won’t. Mothers will let their children ruin them for love. No, the Ping will carry on, her load growing heavier, her waters thicker, until eventually there is none of her left. MM About the author: Kalil Zender is from Marquette, Michigan. She lives in Thailand. “The Gift of Water” columns are offered by the Northern Great Lakes Water Stewards and the Cedar Tree Institute, joined in an interfaith effort to help preserve, protect, and sanctify the waters of the Upper Peninsula.

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locals Mountain Warrior Ishpeming skier fought Nazis as member of famed 10th Mountain Division, set records in ski jumping Joe Perrault (right) in the early 1950s with fellow skier Ralph Bietila. (Photo courtesy of Joe Perrault)

By Sonny Longtine

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he American military carefully watched what happened in Finland in 1939 when Russia invaded its quiet neighbor. The Russians had a much larger and better-equipped force than Finland, but they didn’t have the Finnish snow savvy. The Finnish army, on skis and dressed in white, most with light weapons, drove out Stalin’s tank division. The Russians learned a valuable lesson and subdued the friendly Finnish nation in a second and more massive assault. The Finnish-Russo skirmish alerted the U.S. military of the need for troops that were both skilled mountain fighters and accomplished skiers. Initially, the allies thought that adept skiing and mountain troops would be needed to spearhead an invasion of Europe through Norway. This changed, however,

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when France was targeted as the offensive site. As a result, America’s 14,000-man 10th Mountain Division was not created until 1943; instead of being sent to Norway, they were shipped to Italy to fight the Nazis in the Apennine Mountains. In 1943 there was little snow in Italy. As a result, the 10th Mountain Division did most of their fighting in snow-less conditions. Joe Perrault (Jumping Joe) of Ishpeming joined the elite 10th Mountain Division in 1943 at age 18. With three letters of recommendation and a strong skiing background he was ideally suited for the 10th. Perrault trained at Fort Sheridan in Illinois, and was then sent to Hale, Colorado, where at 9,200 feet, the selected ski troops trained. Perrault said, “Some nights at Camp Hale we slept outdoors in 30-degree

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below temperatures, but it really wasn’t too bad.” They were not the average recruits. Many were college graduates, and 64 percent were qualified to be officers. Perrault was also an accomplished trumpet player, and he initially thought he would try out to be the company bugler, thinking it might be a cushy job. However, when he tried out to be the bugler, he quickly changed his mind. One of the other bugle recruits said to Perrault, “When the battle begins where do you think we will be–in the front!” Perrault said, “After hearing that I purposely played poorly and did not qualify to be the bugler, and I happily returned to the ski troops.” Perrault was sent to Italy in December of 1944. The job of the 10th Mountain Division was very


Perrault launching off Suicide Hill at 54 miles per hour in 1949. (Photo courtesy of Joe Perrault)

clear: rout out the bunkered Nazis in the Apennine Mountains and then push on to Northern Italy. Previous attempts by other American forces were unsuccessful in dislodging the tenacious German fighters in the Apennines. Although he was trained to be a snow warrior, Perrault ended up in the 10th’s Company D, an engineering unit. The responsibility of the engineers was to pave the way for the main force by clearing out mines for the advancing troops. On one occasion, Perrault and a small contingency were on reconnaissance ahead of the main body when they spotted German troops on a nearby hillside. Before Perrault knew it, a mortar shell had exploded next to him and seriously injured a sergeant who was close by. Perrault said, “The guy yelled, ‘They got me in the family jewels.’ ” The sergeant was hit with shrapnel and was bleeding from the groin area. “I was standing next to him, shoulder to shoulder–it was miracle that I wasn’t hit.” Without hesitation and under fire, Perrault picked up the wounded sergeant and brought him to relative

safety in a nearby house. A short time later Perrault again risked his life when he retrieved a Jeep and drove it through a minefield so he could transport the sergeant to an area that had a medical facility. The self-effacing Perrault talks modestly about this heroism, saying only, “Anyone would have done the same thing if they were there.” For these acts of bravery, Perrault received the Silver Star, which is awarded for gallantry in action. Perrault said the Germans had respect for the 10th Mountain Division. One German soldier said, “It’s the first time I saw anybody run up a mountain.” After the American success in the Apennines at Riva Ridge and Mount Belvedere, the 10th marched north through the Po Valley. Perrault drove a bulldozer through the Po, with the “dozer” proudly wearing a sign that said, “From the U.P.” Marquette resident and fellow 10th Mountain member Walt Cook was in the operational headquarters for the 10th, and was going through Po Valley about the same time as Perrault. Cook said, “You could smell the stink of the

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Joe Perrault (2nd from left) at Camp Hale, Colorado in 1943. (Photo courtesy of Joe Perrault)

dead as we advanced north through the Po.” The 10th Mountain division took heavy losses in the Italian campaign. Of the 14,000 troops, 1,000 were killed and more than 4,000 wounded. They paid a high price for American victories. Perrault stayed in Italy after the war ended in May, 1945 and assisted in rebuilding and repairing bridges and roads. Perrault’s childhood in Ishpeming centered around three things: skiing, skiing and more skiing. From age 6, Perrault honed his skills on homemade jumps in backyards around Ishpeming. He entered his first ski tournament when he was 12 years old. Unbeknownst to Perrault, he was entered in a 1937 tournament at Ishpeming’s Al Quaal Recreational area. When the starting judge called his name, a disgruntled Perrault reluctantly complied and slid down the hill’s steep scaffolding. To his disbelief, he tied for first place. The tournament managers, in their infinite wisdom, split the first place prize in two – each skier received one ski pole. That prize, along with a pair of mittens he won, made him a professional athlete by high school standards of the time. A prize of more than a dollar made him ineligible to play high school sports. Ironically, C.C. Watson, Ishpeming’s legendary basketball coach, was one of the judges at the ski tournament, and the one who later declared him ineligible. When Perrault returned to the States from Italy, he resumed his ski career. At 5’6” and 130 pounds, he was a prototype ski jumper. He trained on Suicide Hill in Ishpeming, but set the American record of 297 feet at Pine Mountain in 1949. He held that record for one year. He was a member of the 1948 and 1952 U.S. Olympic

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ski team. Another momentous event happened to Perrault in 1949–he married Barbara Dufek, an Ashland, Wisconsin native. He met Dufek at the Ishpeming hospital, where she was an x-ray technician. Initially he thought she wanted to go out with his friend, but when the friend bailed out of taking her to the movie, Perrault graciously stepped in and escorted her to the film. With tongue in cheek and a twinkle in his eye, Perrault said, “I’ve been paying for that movie ever since.” Perrault noted that half of the ski jumpers on his Olympic squads were from Ishpeming. Just prior to the 1952 Olympics, he was injured in a fall and had to withdraw from the team. That fall severely curtailed his jumping, and in 1954 he abandoned the sport altogether. Perrault acquired the moniker “Jumping Joe” because of the tremendous height he could jump vertically from a standing still position. One time, after a ski tournament in Iron Mountain, the skiers and the media gathered at the Dickinson Hotel. The word was out that Jumping Joe Perrault was there. Mort Neff, a famed Michigan writer, had heard rumors about Perrault’s legendary leaps. Neff wanted to see it for himself. He approached Perrault and asked him to jump up on a table that was 40 inches high–and do it from a standing position. The gauntlet was thrown and Perrault accepted the challenge. He took a deep breath and leaped to the tabletop with ease. Perrault talks unassumingly about this incident, saying only, “I never really had a great vertical leap, but I could compress my legs better than anyone.” At any rate, this ability served him well when it came time to launch off a


Joe Perrault (portrait). (Photo courtesy of Sonny Longtine)

ski scaffold at 54 miles per hour. The National Ski Hall of Fame in Ishpeming has an impressive display of the 10th Mountain Division, including an imposing panorama of a 10th Mountain team, all dressed in white, making a precarious mountain climb. Perrault was inducted into the national shrine in 1971. He said of his induction, “It was my hope to be in the Ski Hall of Fame–and I did it.” Perrault went to work (at Cleveland Cliffs) the day he was inducted. He said, “I went to work, then took a couple hours off and went to the induction ceremony, and then I went back to work. It wasn’t a big ceremony then like it is today.” Twenty-five years later, he still warmly reflected on that honor. The l0th Mountain Division was dismantled after the war, only to be reactivated in 1986. The value of the force was recognized by the military when they deployed troops from the newly-trained 10th in Desert Storm, Somalia, Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The impact that the 10th Mountain

Division had on American skiing after the war is phenomenal. Thirty-eight of the l0th veterans have been enshrined in the National Ski Hall of fame, and many of them were instrumental in starting Western ski resorts: Vail, Colorado; Sugarbush, Vermont; and Sun Valley, Idaho. These are a few of the now large ski resorts that were started by 10th veterans. An excerpt from a poem about Perrault by William Garceau is most fitting: There is a lad called Joe Perrault, they call him Jumping Joe. He rode in many tournaments, and made fame where ere he’d go. Joe Perrault died in 2010 at the age of 86. The Ishpeming native left a rich legacy that is ensconced the National Ski hall of Fame. MM About the Author: Sonny Longtine is a Marquette resident who has published eight books on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. For more than three decades he taught American history and government in Michigan schools.

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arts Left, Johanna Pohjala on her loom in 1954. Pohjala weaved rugs on this loom, built by her father, for 50 years. (Photo courtesy of Christine Simonen). Below, a rag rug by Johanna Pohjala, which is now part of the Marquette Regional History Center’s permanent collection. Inset, a detailed look at the weave. (Photos courtesy of Marquette Regional History Center)

Weaving into history UP native showcased Finnish heritage through rug weaving on hand-built loom By Melissa Matuscak Alan

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well-used loom can weave a legacy for years to come. Such is the case for the loom used by Johanna Pohjala, a Negaunee native who weaved her way into history, and whose inspiring art led to the creation of the Johanna Pohjala Fund for weavers, a field of interest fund established at the Community Foundation of Marquette County in 2003. Johanna Pohjala (1919 – 2003) was born on Case Street in Negaunee. Her parents, Anna (Kotka) and Matt Riihinen were Finnish immigrants who settled on the Riihinen farm in Negaunee. Like so many immigrants to the area at the time, Matt worked in the iron mines to supplement their income from the farm. During the Russo-Finnish War in 1939, Matt received numerous donations of secondhand clothing from customers along his dairy route. The Riihinen’s sent as much as they could to Finland, but much of it was of poor quality. Anna requested a loom to make rag rugs with the clothing. Matt, who was also a blacksmith and woodworker, built the loom almost entirely from lumber harvested on their property over the winter of 1945-1946. Johanna was Matt and Anna’s only child, and

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she graduated from Negaunee High School in 1937. She married Sulo E.Pohjala in 1941, and 10 years later they moved to the Riihinen farm to help care for her parents. Pohjala began weaving on the loom in 1952, and this began a journey of over 50 years weaving rugs on this loom. As a toddler, Pohjala spent over a year traveling in Finland with her parents and stayed in contact with her Finnish cousins. Her Finnish background influenced her weaving, and the more she created, the more her craftsmanship was widely recognized. Orders for Pohjala’s rugs came from all over the U.P. and the country. As a member of the local weaving guild, Yarnwinders, Pohjala explored different techniques and patterns in her rugs. In September 2000, Pohjala was recognized with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the U.P. Weavers Exchange annual conference. In the 1990s, Michigan State University Professor Yvonne Lockwood traveled to the Upper Peninsula to interview rug weavers. Her research was published as a book titled, “Finnish American Rag Rugs: Art, Tradition & Ethnic Continuity.” MSU Press published the book in 2010. Pohjala was

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one of eight weavers featured in the chapter titled, “Weavers.”Pohjala’s rugs can be found in the Michigan State University Museum’s textile collection, and closer to home, the Marquette Regional History Center’s permanent collection. Pohjala was also a poet, educator, and traveler. A charter member of the Finnish Language Class in Negaunee, Pohjala served as a substitute for wellknown Finnish language educator Tanya Stanaway. Three more trips to Finland allowed Pohjala to stay close to her Finnish family and heritage. She was a translator of family histories and correspondence for several different Finnish families. She was also a published poet, writing in both English and Finnish. Christine Simonen, Pohjala’s daughter, established the Johanna Pohjala Fund for Weavers at the Community Foundation of Marquette County in


Top, Christine Simonen (right) with her husband Fred after delivering the loom to The Antique Gas & Steam Engine Museum in 2017. Also pictured are Karen Greenly (standing) and Robyn Sendelbach (sitting). Below, the plaque on Pohjala’s Loom. This, and 50 other looms from across the country, are on permanent display. (Photos courtesy of Christine Simonen)

2003 after her mother’s passing. The fund creates opportunities for fiber artists and fiber arts education in Marquette County. This fund has supported Yarnwinders and Lake Superior Art Association to create educational programs and exhibitions around the tradition of weaving. And what about the loom? Christine took up her mother’s interest in weaving but knew the loom needed a permanent home that would fully appreciate and care for this historically significant artifact. In 2017, the family donated the loom to The Antique Gas & Steam Engine Museum, in Vista, California. The Museum is a nonprofit that “collects, preserves and displays examples of mechanical ingenuity and crafts associated with

the early days of the American farm and rural community.” The loom is on permanent display with over 50 other looms from all over the country. The loom is still fully operational and is utilized for demonstrations by museum volunteer weavers. The Johanna Pohjala Fund for Weavers is one of over 170 funds at the Community Foundation of Marquette County that provides support for nonprofits in Marquette County. Visit cfofmc.org for more information. MM About the Author: Melissa Matuscak Alan was previously Donor and Community Outreach Associate at the Community Foundation of Marquette County. She resides in Marquette.

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33


back then

Bernie at the front

Illustration by Mike McKinney

How one UP woman’s legacy lives on By Larry Chabot

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small group of men meeting in a side room at the Marquette Legion post were planning the 2008 Fourth of July celebration. The day’s parade would salute World War II veterans, including a large contingent expected from the Jacobetti Veterans Home. “Who could we get for parade marshal?” someone asked. “How about the highest ranking local veteran,” said another. “That would probably be Bernie Reider,” said a third. “I don’t think I know him,” said a fourth. That’s because the him was really a her: Army Colonel Bernadette Reider (ret.), but “Bernie” to family and friends. It’s no wonder that not many knew this quiet, humble woman, but there she was, leading the big parade in a Jeep, waving at a crowd which had started a long, continuous, flag-waving roar as she entered the parade route. She was the honorary leader of hundreds of proud vets in front of thousands of parade-goers, few of whom were aware that Bernie had been a combat nurse in three wars. Bernie and her twin brother Eugene, the last of 12 children, were born in Little Lake in 1921. She graduated from Marquette High School and earned a nursing degree at St. Mary’s Hospital in Saginaw. Inspired by two of her brothers who were serving in World War II, Bernie joined the Army Nurse Corps. Although not involved in battlefront action then, fire

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and brimstone would come later. When war came again in Korea and Vietnam, she dealt with countless casualties on the front lines, a seemingly “endless stream of wounded,”she said. “It was very depressing. There were sandbags all around the hospital and we were bombed. When we heard artillery, we had to put the recovery room patients under their beds and cover them with mattresses.” In a Library of Congress Veterans History Project interview, she described her experience in a Korean War MASH unit. Arriving in Korea, she set up the first hospital there, a welcoming committee-of-one, operating in an old flea-infested school. She worked in the emergency room, often taking a train to pick up casualties from the front lines. Sometimes the whole outfit had to pack up and flee from the North Korean Army. In thinking back on her war-time life and the friends she met then, she wished she had kept a diary. In a Bud Sargent interview in The Mining Journal, he noted that she has been memorialized in the Women in Military Service for America shrine at Arlington National Cemetery, nominated by the Marquette American Legion post. She was within earshot of the heaviest fighting in Vietnam, treating “endless lines of youthful American soldiers waiting their turn for medical treatment. I have met many

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lifetime friends and enjoyed traveling to so many places.” An accompanying photo showed Bernie examining wounded soldiers inside a railroad boxcar. After Vietnam, Bernie served as chief operating room nurse at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas, before leaving to care for her aging mother and elderly sisters. After 28 years of military service over three wars, she retired in 1973 with many medals and decorations, including the Bronze Star for heroism. That military retiree never slowed down, volunteering all over the place, always without fanfare. At St. Christopher parish, Bernie was a senior altar server, pasty maker and communion minister. Before funeral lunches, she and serving partner Barbara Whatley set all the tables. Family members sitting in the operating room waiting lounge at Marquette General Hospital probably saw Bernie manning the volunteer desk. She worked the phones at many a call-in-fund raiser, picked up trash after events at Mattson Park, and took her turn at the Retired Senior Volunteer Program. Reider believed that everyone deserved a fair shake, and lived her life accordingly. Her care in nursing war casualties was due to that belief. Former Marquette Community Foundation CEO Gail Anthony said, “Bernadette loved to come into


TRIBUTES POURED IN FROM MANY SOURCES ABOUT THE GENEROSITY OF THIS REMARKABLE WOMAN. our office and help. At one point, she was on oxygen and she still came in to stuff envelopes for [our] mailings.” In her rare spare hours, she enjoyed playing cribbage and solving New York Times crossword puzzles. In a previous interview about altar serving, Bernie told me, “The first time was scary, and we made mistakes, but we learned by doing. I always wanted to be a server, even learned the Latin prayers. Now that I’m a server they don’t use Latin any more.” At a special Mass with a “retired bishop and lots of priests, we saw all those chairs on the altar and thought oh-oh. But it went fine.” Her serving partner was always Barb Whatley, mother of five, a Wakefield native, and widow of an Air Force veteran. Between Bernie and Barb, they had seen the world. Colonel Bernie Reider passed away in 2015, survived by four generations of nieces and nephews and numerous friends. Tributes poured in from many sources about the generosity of this remarkable woman. Her reputation was further enhanced when her will was opened. “I had some extra money and felt it was a nice thing to do.” “Extra money?” How about a million dollars! Gail Anthony marveled at the bequests, “She took care of servicemen; she helped people all of her life.” Still, in death, her legacy is helping people. Her choice of benefactors represent those she was dedicated to helping. UPAWS received $390,000 and St. Christopher Church received $190,000, and a final endowment of $560,000 provides scholarships to graduating high school seniors pursuing a degree in nursing. TV channel 10 in Marquette editori-

alized that Bernie’s contributions “will continue to service others for years to come. Her caring ways will be continued in perpetuity with three endowment funds she established through her life insurance policy.” Anthony noted that Bernie “cared tremendously about people, and so she endured those horrific (war) battles and cleaned up afterwards. And when she got home and was retired, she continued to care for her mother, and then she took care of any stray animal she could find. She was just a giving, loving person, and her legacy not only lives on through her financial gifts, but through the nursing students who will carry on her legacy.” The Mining Journal’s editorial after her passing cited her “well-deserved reputation of generosity and compassion….She represented the best the Greatest Generation could offer. Bernie, thank you.” Those who knew her remember her quiet, unassuming, humble and modest manner. Even after death, her dedication to serving others will endure for generations to come. Her motto lives on, too: “Just do it.” MM Author’s Note: Larry knew Reider from their volunteering at St. Christopher parish, but didn’t learn of her military service until reading the Bud Sargent interview. As the saying goes, “she hid her light under a bushel.” About the Author: Larry Chabot, an Ontonagon native, worked his way through Georgetown University and was then employed at White Pine Copper Company for 32 years, before moving to Marquette with his wife, Betty. He is a freelance writer who has written for several publications, including over 150 articles for Marquette Monthly.

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arts

The Westerly Winds Big Band performs at the Ore Dock Brewing Co. in Marquette. (Photo by Brad Gischia)

Getting into the swing of it

Westerly Winds Big Band celebrates classic big band sound By Brad Gischia

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hush falls across the dance floor. Couples are poised, arms stretched out, hands lightly touching. Softly, a sound can be heard…”a one… a two…a one, two, three, four…” Horns blare. A piano builds into a crescendo as the drums rattle a fast beat. The dancers are in motion, spinning, pulling at each other, sliding across the floor, their feet a blur. The band plays on. For nearly 40 years the Westerly Winds Big Band has been playing venues in and around the Marquette area. They are a 17-piece big band and play swing music, a style that was popular during the 1930s and ’40s and well into post-war America. Swing music finds its roots in early jazz music from the turn of the 20th century in cities like Chicago, New Orleans and Kansas City, Missouri. The 1920s brought new technology, including the ability to record music and reproduce it, and bands became

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known. The Fletcher Henderson Orchestra was an early popular band and hired musicians like Louis Armstrong and Coleman Hawkins to help fill out their rosters. During the Great Depression in the 1930s, the light and happy music was a balm to an injured country, and as the United States became involved in World War II in the ’40s, swing music reached its highest popularity. Though the popularity waned with the advent of Rock and Roll music in the ’50s and ’60s, swing never really went away, and bands continued to keep that music and swing feeling alive. Dan Richards, who currently is the guitarist for Westerly Winds, is the only original member of the band still playing. “This started as a jazz band of Westwood High School students and adult community members in the NICE school district. Mark Arslainian, band


director, came forward to me with the idea. We played nursing homes and school functions.” Like all groups, some people stayed, and some moved on. “When Mark left in 1986, the new director, Mark Stephens, continued with the jazz band and membership grew, both in students and adults.,” Richards said. “Both directors played trumpet and enjoyed that type of music. We had members in age from 16 to 83 years of age. I taught science at the high school but play several instruments too: guitar, tuba, trombone, trumpet, piano and bass guitar.” The membership never stayed exactly the same, but the popularity of the group grew, and they began booking gigs around the Upper Peninsula. They’ve played from Curtis to Manistique, and everywhere from Elks’ Clubs to Catholic school gymnasiums. In all of their travels they have gained a loyal following, people who come to listen to the music, as well as several who are there strictly for the dancing. Eva Bergner and Greg Kerwin are one such couple. “We are faithful followers of the Westerly Winds, from the first time we “crashed” their concert at the Elks Lodge.” The couple can be seen cutting the rug at every gig, spinning each other across the floor or moving in syncopated rhythm to a tango or waltz. Gordon Erikson of Harvey began sitting in with the band when he was a student at Northern Michigan University in 2000. “I love the uniqueness of different types of swing music as well as the energy of the bands who played and continue to play it,” Erikson said. “It’s also terrific to be able to listen to great musicians improvise on this music and to have the ability to improvise myself.” Although this music reached the height of its popularity during the war years, Erickson, who is now the band director at Westwood High School, thinks it could come back. “I do think swing music can and does connect to a younger generation. This music was originally aimed at youth so much of it is high energy and fun. It seems to me that interest in swing music keeps coming back.” Erikson said. “I was in high school when it came back with ‘Neo swing’ era and I definitely think that movement could become popular again.” Bergner had similar thoughts on the popularity of the music and her ability to dance to it. “It’s not about being perfect, but about musicality, movement and having a lot of fun,”Bergner said.

THIS MUSIC WAS ORIGINALLY AIMED AT YOUTH, SO MUCH OF IT IS HIGH ENERGY AND FUN. IT SEEMS TO ME THAT INTEREST IN SWING MUSIC KEEPS COMING BACK.

Ireland Dewitt, 8, of Marquette was dancing in front of the band for nearly two hours at an Ore Dock Brewing gig in November. “I really like this kind of music,” she said. “It’s old but like jazz.” No matter your age you can find something to enjoy at a Westerly Winds gig. Either the music or the dancing, it’s an atmosphere that breeds fun, and as long as people continue to come to the gigs the Westerly Winds Big Band will show up to bring the music. For information on future performances by the Westerly Winds Big Band, refer to their Facebook page. For information regarding booking the Westerly Winds Big Band for gigs, contact Andra Sullivan at 906-2495172. MM About the Author: Brad Gischia is a writer and artist native to Upper Michigan. He mixes his time between drawing funny books and writing.

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COME AGAIN?

No. 1114

Reprinted from the New York Times

By CHASE DITTRICH AND JEFF CHEN /Edited by Will Shortz 1

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ACROSS 1 “Bull” airer 4 Out 10 Win for a 10-Down 15 Yukon automaker 18 Set down 20 With 116-Down, artificial intelligence system that mimics the human brain 21 Who is “too small to make a difference,” per a Greta Thunberg book title 22 Propel, as a shell 23 “… and to ____ good night!” 24 … FLOOR FLOOR FLOOR … 27 It’s got some miles on it 29 Home to the Burj Khalifa, for short 30 Singular 31 Stark who was crowned Queen of the North on “Game of Thrones” 32 … GRIZZLY GRIZZLY GRIZZLY … 39 First responder, for short 40 Percussion instrument of African origin 43 What some kings and queens dress in 44 Maker of the classic video game Frogger 45 … PROPOSAL PROPOSAL PROPOSAL … 49 Kind of milk 50 Rapper with more than 20 Grammys 51 Reps 52 Click ____ (artificial increasers of website hits) 53 Goddess of the dawn 55 Pet lovers’ org. 60 James who sang “I Sing the Blues” 61 Grandma, affectionately 65 Roy Lichtenstein’s genre 70 Brit’s “How shocking!” 71 What many lifeguards have 72 … COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL …

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74 Steve with eight N.B.A. championship rings 75 Chemical suffixes 76 Like the color of honey 77 “Give me a break, would you?!” 78 Philosopher who wrote “A Treatise of Human Nature” 79 Lead-in to ask or suggest 81 Get hitched 83 They’re explained by Newton’s law of universal gravitation 84 N.F.L. Hall-of-Famer Shannon 89 Inconveniences 94 Company with a Page Program 97 … AMBITION AMBITION AMBITION … 99 Word-of-mouth 101 Actor Spall of “Prometheus” 102 Literally, “I bow to you” 103 Op. ____ (footnote abbr.) 106 … STAIRS STAIRS STAIRS … 109 ____ di Pietro, artist better known as Fra Angelico 111 Ta-ta 112 Opposite of down: Abbr. 113 “Let’s Stay Together” singer, 1971 115 … CAUTION CAUTION CAUTION … 122 Slight problem 123 Pablo Neruda work 124 “Please, I can handle this” 125 Many an informant employed by Sherlock Holmes 126 Org. involved in the Scopes Monkey Trial 127 R.S.V.P. option 128 Way up or way down 129 Pocketful in ringaround-the-rosy 130 Syracuse-to-Albany dir. DOWN 1 Part of a contract 2 Christmas fir

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3 Investor behind the scenes 4 Palindromic feminine name 5 One gifted with the “inner eye” 6 Word on a candy heart 7 Before, poetically 8 Piercing spot 9 ____ cavity (where the lungs are located) 10 Likely loser 11 Hawaiian taro dish 12 Family member inaptly found in “ladies only” 13 High school subj. 14 Vehicle company with a market value over $1 trillion 15 Adventurous kids in a 1985 film 16 Napoleon’s famed war horse 17 Shout 19 Some diaper changers 25 Rapper dissed by Jay-Z in “Takeover” 26 Young ’uns 28 Popular Toyotas 32 How a zombie might spread the infection 33 Ostrich relatives 34 Peter out 35 “Symphony in Black” artist 36 Something necessary for gain, they say 37 The “grand slam” of showbiz awards, in brief 38 Like some apparel, in song 41 Mimic 42 Opposite of FF 46 Together 47 Kind of jar 48 Org. that hires cryptanalysts 50 Samurai’s sword 52 Awful-smelling 54 Give one’s take 56 Religion that emphasizes seva, or “selfless service” 57 Astrology or palmistry

Answer Key To check your answers, see Page 6. No cheating!

58 Sandiego not usually found in San Diego 59 Lew ____, portrayer of Dr. Kildare 61 Badger 62 Brouhaha 63 When doubled, boring result in the Premier League 64 Word commonly following the Oxford comma 66 Messy sort 67 What seven did to nine, in a joke 68 Lament 69 Celebrity gossip site 73 Like New Jerseyans vis-à-vis New Yorkers 80 Destination for Birthright trips: Abbr. 82 Someone’s in the kitchen with her, in song 83 Savory Chinese snack 85 Grinder 86 Put ____ on (limit) 87 Dennis the Menace’s appropriately named dog 88 Bishops, e.g. 90 Execs: Abbr. 91 Smartphone predecessors, for short 92 Choice words 93 Card-matching game 94 Prefix with binary 95 Male etiquette, as described by Barney Stinson on “How I Met Your Mother” 96 Eyeteeth 98 Clique 100 Exam with a 35-minute timed essay, in brief 104 What 10s represent 105 Notable chameleon feature 107 Grinds away 108 Not friendly 110 ____ Minor 113 Singer India.____ 114 Part of the eye 115 Demure 116 See 20-Across 117 Pac-12 athlete 118 Rapscallion 119 ____-yo 120 They’re found below the “To” field 121 Tuna, on a sushi menu


poetry An excerpt from Maiden Voyage

The Road To Happiness a streak of light visible upon a breezewrinkled surface of water is called “The Road to Happiness” Monte Reel Cresting the hill west of Seymour, past shiny signs proposing chicken sandwiches, breakfast all day, larger coffee, biscuits, new flavors, and past two Chinese buffets rumored to be closing forever, and past the auto parts store, insurance agency, and cheap hair salon where young women wax my eyebrows, and always past a snowplow spitting sand and the car wash that opens only after temperatures rise above twenty, and past the school bus carrying cheerleaders to the township and the pick-up stacked with storm windows, I look up to see, again, the lake stretching, I know, to another country, and I take its blue measure, and I take in its wind-brushed surface, its narrow breakwater crusted with ice, clouds dropping to a near horizon, and I know I don’t want to live forever, but I want to live here forever. About the Author: Lynn Domina is the author of two collections of poetry, Corporal Works and Framed in Silence, and the editor of a collection of essays, Poets on the Psalms. She currently serves as Head of the English Department at NMU and lives with her family in Marquette. Editor’s Note: Maiden Voyage is available for $15 at Snowbound Books and the Marquette Regional History Center. If can also be purchased by mail for $19 by sending a check made out to Richard Rastall and mailed to 2100 M-28 East, Marquette, MI 49855.

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superior reads Debut novel highlights bonds of family, horrors of war Review by Victor Volkman

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North Dixie Highway by Joseph D. Haske Pub. By Texas Review Press

t first glance, Joseph D. Haske’s North Dixie Highway is a rage-fueled trip through three generations of an Eastern U.P. family locked in a cycle of grinding poverty, trauma and alcoholism. But beneath the surface there’s much more lurking as we follow this broken family of men who have served their country with patriotism and distinction and yet are consigned to an ever more difficult path just to get bread on the table. This is the book that Philip Caputo hoped to write with Hunter’s Moon, but Haske’s elegiac tribute to the hard life of working class U.P. men is by turns both searing and hopeful where Caputo is merely bitter and cynical. The background is the story of a blood feud between two old families of the Sault Ste. Marie area, the Cronins and the Metzgers. This is slowly revealed as a long simmering dispute between the two patriarchs, grandfathers Lester and Colonel Henry, which is terminated by a fateful moose hunting trip to Canada. Only one of them returns, without the body of the second and without a story that seems to hold much credence. Thereafter, Buck Metzger, grandson and youngest member of the family swears vengeance while enlisted in the US Army. The stories play out between two points in time: 1984 as Buck is a young 13-year-old making the transition to manhood in that distinctive way of the U.P., and 1994 as he is mustering out of the war in Bosnia. Buck’s father is a grizzled veteran of the Vietnam conflict with sufficient cojones to take on a wounded bear with his bowie knife. Colonel Henry, the Metger patriarch, is a career military man, having signed up slightly underage for World War I, which makes him 84 years old in the older timeline. All of them are severely bruised by their service, but Buck’s tour with the U.N. blue hats in Bosnia was marred by an incident where he was forced to kill an enemy sniper by dint of his being the only one with firearms experience in an observation post. His skills learned as a deer hunter have made him into a hunter of men. The story begins as Buck is being picked up in Detroit, after Buck’s tour of duty, by his brother Johnny, who has a promising basketball scholarship, and Colonel Henry as they head back to the U.P. Buck is trying to find his way into

college by way of earning money for it with odd jobs, but he is woefully unsuited for civilian life now. Now living in his car with a dwindling supply of cash as he plots revenge in an alcoholic haze, he is headed on a downward spiral. Almost the entire novel takes place in the U.P. and you’ll find plenty of familiar landmarks and rites of passage. Buck’s Spring smelting trip ends in a near-death experience. His first deer kill is carefully choreographed. Much of the action takes place in and around Sault Ste. Marie, where the older version of Buck stalks the streets and encounters the youngest of the Cronin clan bragging about what his grandfather did to Colonel Henry. Thus the stage is set for revenge and dark deeds. Buck immediately begins to drown his guilt over killing an enemy combatant in Bosnia and seals his fate in the Metzger family tradition of drinking from sunup to sundown. There’s a lot more to North Dixie Highway, which plays out as a streamof-consciousness experience from Buck Metzger’s point-of-view as it bounces between the last two decades of the 20th century. Many of these stories were first published individually in more than a half dozen literary journals, so there is a recursive nature to episodes which are revisited in different ways to reveal new aspects of character, motivation and plot. However dysfunctional and broken the generations of Metzgers are, there is a sense of loyalty, courage and unity, which is admirable if only forged by the bonds of poverty and mutual hardships experienced. Haske’s debut novel is a paean to the working class man of the North, that taciturn tribe who will do whatever it takes for family, for countrymen and their country regardless of the consequences. Like the eponymous road system that meanders and wends its way from the Florida backwaters up through to the Sault Ste. Marie, Haske’s North Dixie Highway is a compelling coming-of-age story that examines what goes into the making of a man. I recommend this book for anyone looking for a story about family, sacrifice and the struggle to make a living in the contemporary U.P. If you enjoy an occasional glass of Kessler’s whiskey, Haske’s book will be a great companion. About the Author: Victor R. Volkman is a graduate of Michigan Technological University (class of ’86) and is the current president of the U.P. Publishers and Authors Association (UPPAA). He is senior editor at Modern History Press, publisher of the U.P. Reader.

Send Upper Peninsula-related book review suggestions to victor@LHPress.com Books submitted for review can be sent to: MM Book Reviews, 5145 Pontiac Trail, Ann Arbor, MI 48105

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in the outdoors

Staying

ever green (well, mostly) By Scot Stewart

“Every creature is better alive than dead, men and moose and pine trees, and he who understands it aright will rather preserve its life than destroy it.” – Henry David Thoreau

U White spruces on Harlow Creek. (Photo by Scot Stewart)

pper Peninsula winters often seem to be a matte of black and white. The land stands as skeletons of trees, snow, and something in between – that winter sky, so set on being neutral gray filled with amorphous, unrecognizable shapes. On some overcast days it just seems to be a challenge to find a scrap of color. Then comes a blizzard, and everything – yes, everything – turns to white. A bit of pale, golden sun may follow, and those glorious shades of green on the hills nearby, pines, hemlocks, cedars, spruces and firs bring the

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Top right, a bald eagle rests in a white pine near Presque Isle. Bottom right, a barred owl and a red squirrel together in a red pine. (Photos by Scot Stewart)

color back into view. Glorious winter greens! The contributions of these trees and shrubs come because they are conifers, plants with evergreen leaves, usually in the shapes of needles or scales, clinging to branches. Needles do fall, but for most conifers it is over longer periods of time after new needles are already present, maintaining their colors. Conifers also have cones, protective packages on their branches containing their seeds. “I remember a hundred lovely lakes, and recall the fragrant breath of pine and fir and cedar and poplar trees. The trail has strung upon it, as upon a thread of silk, opalescent dawns and saffron sunsets.” – Hamlin Garland n many places, conifers are of paramount importance in defining the landscape. They also help define the life living with them. Towering white pines, bent and pruned by great fall and winter winds and storms, standing tall over Lake Superior and smaller lakes are perfect promontories for bald eagles. They perch there, eyeing the water surfaces for potential meals – fish and water birds. While the eagles’ diet consists mainly of fish, from their high perches they can also watch for injured birds and other food opportunities along the shore. There is a large white pine on Lakeshore Boulevard in Marquette, just south of the Dead River, where eagles perch right over the road from time to time and the pines along Lake Superior. One was spotted at the mouth of the Dead River several years ago as it left its perch to pluck an immature ring-billed gull off the beach. After a spectacular figure-eight maneuver to access an attack approach, the eagle grabbed it and carried it to a small off-shore rock to eat. East of Big Bay, east of Marquette, and lakes around Gwinn are great spots to watch for roosting eagles too. Interior white pines are good nesting sites for great horned owls. Crows and ravens often build their nests deep in the center of large red and white

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pines. Great horned owls restart their territorial announcements and courtship behaviors and begin looking for suitable nesting sites in early winter. They often settle in where crows nested the previous summer and adopt the nest as their own. In the U.P., two eggs usually appear, as early as March. Large white pines along the Dead River near the BLP trails in Marquette

January 2022

Township, in the Park Cemetery in the middle of town and the Chocolay Bayou are places to listen for them in winter. Red and white pines also provide good perches in winter for barred owls near residences with bird feeders. When temperatures rise above freezing, rain or melting snow can refreeze at night, creating a hard crust on the

top of drifts, making it impossible for owls to dive into them to capture mice and voles tunneling beneath. As the owls become more desperate to find food, they come to wait near feeders for the rodents that emerge from the snow’s depths and forage for fallen seeds below the feeders. The mammals find themselves in a vulnerable spot, and if an owl is present, their


Above, a stand of red pines at Presque Isle Park. Right, a close-up of a red pine shows the intriciate detail in its bark. (Photos by Scot Stewart)

appearance may be short before being eaten. Squirrels and even weasels hunting the same mice can also provide a meal for an owl perched above in a large pine. Conifers have an interesting relationship with fire. Red pines and white pines, like sequoias, have thick, fire-resistant bark, providing them some protection from small to moderate wildfires. These fires are extremely important as they can clear undergrowth and take out smaller trees, leaving the larger trees with only some scars from the ground fires. Historically, fires in the Upper Peninsula occurred with some regularity. The fires encouraged the growth of the larger pines, producing the old growth forests that once thrived. New evidence in some areas suggested fires were initiated by Native peoples to reduce white birch, red maple and balsam fir, which encouraged blueberries, provided better hunting and possibly made travel easier. When fires do not occur, an understory of fir and spruce can develop. A fire in this understory can be far hotter and more serious, enabling flames to reach the boughs of larger trees like red and white pines, resulting in serious injury or death to them. Large pines also retain larger amounts of snow in their boughs during winter, lessening snow depths below them and helping to hold in daytime heat, producing favorable conditions for wildlife like whitetailed deer. Deer save energy with the warmer nights and lower snow

depths to move in during daytimes. With the limited understory though, deer still need to move to more open areas to feed. The reverse is true in summer months when the extra shade produced by large trees can produce cooler areas for wildlife on hot days. Jack pines, on the other hand, have a very different relationship with fire. They typically live shorter lives than white and red pines and are generally shorter trees. They are very dependent on fire to regenerate new stands. Fire often kills entire trees but has a crucial impact on producing new trees. Jack pine cones rely on fires to open them, releasing the seeds to start new trees. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has used this important detail to provide for crucial nesting habitat for the Kirtland’s warbler, an endangered species in the United States. This warbler once reached a low point in population and only nested in Michigan. Nesting requirements are extreme, with the birds nesting on the ground only under jack pines between 8 and 15 feet tall. As the trees mature, the warblers move to new nesting areas. The MDNR manages state areas by cuttings and controlled fires to ensure there are always adequate areas of preferred habitat for the warblers. Fire is an important management tool because the jack pine cones need heat to open and release their seeds. Mature jack pines can be cut for pulp and if fires push through a stand or are used to burn slash, cones can be opened in the heat to initiate a replanting. Fires

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Above, a jack pine cone and branch. Right, a white pine male strobili, the tree’s equivalent to a flower. (Photos by Scot Stewart) can also stimulate blueberry growth at these sites. Fires in pine forests can also benefit other bird species too. As hotter fires kill larger pines, the smell of smoke actually draws insects to the trees to attack the now defenseless bark. Beetles and wasps lay eggs in these trees and the emerging larvae begin to eat the inner cambium bark. Birds, especially black-backed woodpeckers, are drawn to these trees and with their unique bark chipping behavior, are able to zero in on these pine bark insects. “Sweet is the rose, but grows upon a brere; Sweet is the juniper, but sharp his bough; Sweet is the eglantine, but sticketh nere;.” – Edmund Spenser he understory of Upper Peninsula forests, the rocky balds in the forest at higher elevations and the areas in sandy dunes and pine forests near Great Lakes shorelines are home to several conifer shrubs – yews and junipers. Canada yew can be found in denser forests, like those in the Pictured Rocks near Miners Falls. It is similar to Japanese yews, popular shrubs used in landscaping, and can be readily recognized by its bright red, fleshy cones, called arils. Ruffed grouse, cedar waxwings and robins eat these cones. Growing to a height of 2 to 3 feet in height, the branches have needles eaten by deer and moose. Farther north around Lake Superior, it is an important food of wood land caribou. Out west, juniper trees are a critical and important part of desert and mountain landscapes. In the Upper Peninsula, junipers are found in two shrubs, common or ground juniper and creeping juniper. Both can be found near the shores of the Great Lakes, especially lakes Michigan and Huron. Though the former rare-

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ly grows more than 4 or 5 feet high, a variety found in Alger County may be a variety with European connections that can grow up to 30 feet tall. An easy place to find the common juniper in Marquette is under the jack, white and red pines at Picnic Rocks. Creeping juniper is a smaller version of juniper also found on sandy dunes. There are a few western junipers planted in Marquette too. They are taller columnar trees. Some can be found at the edge of Lake Superior near the breakwater at Presque Isle and at McCarty Cove. The arils of juniper take three years to mature, turning from an ivory-green color, to bluish, then to black. They attract some waxwings and robins but also vagrant Townsend’s solitaires from the western states in winter. “The scaly spindles of a conifer’s cone, the helicoidal flow of a river’s curve biting away the bank, the flash of orange upon a butterfly’s wings warning predators of a bitter taste. This is order from chaos; this is beautiful, and it’s all the more beautiful for having designed itself.” – Alexandra Oliva ne of the tiniest of cones is found on some of the largest and oldest conifers, eastern hemlock. They are some of the biggest trees in the old growth stand on Presque Isle. It is an enchanting stand of hemlock and white pine, and walking through it is a step back in time to the distant past, before America was a colony. Sounds and light are dimmed just like they are when entering a temple or chapel. They grow to be some of the oldest trees in the eastern United States too. The oldest known is in Pennsylvania, and is at least 554 years old, but they

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are believed to grow to the age of at least 800 years. Their needles are tiny and delicate for such huge trees and remind those who see them of the delicate nature of all life. Although their bark is thick, it can be a surprise to find yellow-bellied sapsucker wells in some hemlocks. Closer to wet, low spots, ephemeral ponds and rocky outcroppings near lakes are white cedars, also known as arbor vitae. While most conifers have needles, cedars have scale-like leaves. They are fragrant, sweet and share their wonderful aromas with their rot-resistant wood. The needles of arbor vitae are a food favorite of deer, and dense stands are often heavily browsed along the low edges of stands, creating a distinct browse line in areas where deer are common in late fall and winter. Peninsula Point in Delta County, and much of the eastern U.P., especially along M-28, bear the browsing effects of deer. “Dark spruce forest frowned on either side of the frozen waterway. The trees had been stripped by a recent wind of their white covering of frost, and they seemed to lean towards each other, black and ominous, in the fading light.” – Jack London ense, thick spruces can provide warm, sheltered resting and roosting spots for birds. They are the best wind blocks in the forest and

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Black Spruces at Keweenaw Bay in Baraga County. Spruces and firs are the primary conifers found across boreal pockets in the U.P. and in second growth areas. (Photo by Scot Stewart) provide a warmer shelter for animals not sheltering in cavities. At night, this dense cover can provide roosting places for birds, as wind chill values create temperatures much lower than on open branches, and better cover from owls and other predators. Many birds visiting feeders will duck into cedar hedges to get out of the wind and avoid predators on freezing days. Warblers, kinglets, chickadees and nuthatches delight in dangling from fall branches as they hunt for insect larvae and pupae. Spruces and firs may be the best choices by many for Christmas trees. They are the primary conifers found across the boreal pockets of the U.P. and many areas where second growth has followed areas where logging or fires have occurred. There are two native spruces in Michigan, black and white. Black spruces are thin, columnar trees, usually found in swamps, bogs and areas that resemble the boreal forests in Canada and Alaska. They are sometimes home to birds found in that biome, boreal chickadees, gray jays, spruce grouse and black-backed woodpeckers. White spruces are more triangular in shape and much more massive in mature individuals. They are found in drier soils of upland areas and occasionally along creeks and small rivers. Their sap and roots were often used to tie and bind parts of early cedar strip and birch bark canoes by Native Americans. Both species of spruces can have significant crops of cones that attract finches, redpolls, goldfinches and crossbills to feed on these cones. Sometimes called winter finches, these species travel around the boreal regions of the Northern Hemisphere

looking for substantial crops to eat. Once they find these areas they may choose to nest there, no matter the season, feeding nesting partners and young seeds of these cones. Balsam firs are the other iconic Christmas trees. Of all the conifers, they are the most recognizable in pictures and paintings. Their strong, fresh, wild fragrance provides most of their allure at Christmas. Usually short-lived understory trees, they have a great smelling sap too. The most unique of the conifers may be the tamarack tree. It is a deciduous conifer, one that loses it needles in the fall. Each spring the trees, often growing in bogs or very wet lowlands, sprout soft, luxurious new needles. Usually slight and spindly, these wetland individuals are outdone by large upland tamaracks often used for building because their wood is tough and resistant to insects and rot. In the fall, tamarack needles turn a bright yellow-gold, bringing a brilliance to bogs over the bright red fruits of cranberries. Then the needles turn brown and drop off, leaving the trees bare all winter, except for occasional coats of frost or snow. Luckily for the outdoor observer, most of the conifers keep their needles through the winter and provide the color, the cover and the intrinsic beauty craved by so many during a season often thought to create so many monotone images in the Upper Peninsula. MM About the author: Scot Stewart has lived in Marquette long enough to be considered a true Yooper even though he was born in Illinois. He is a teacher and loves to be outdoors photographing and enjoying nature.

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lookout point

A promise during the Time of the Starving Moon By Jon Magnuson

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few days ago, shortly after sunrise, I carefully placed a pair of ice cleats in a small backpack along with two cups and a thermos of hot tea. A friend of mine, a former wildland firefighter, was soon to join me for a morning’s trip. We were driving to a remote cabin to cover and tie down two kayaks set on a storage rack not far from a rocky cliff on Superior’s shoreline. We took the opportunity later that morning to also stack extra firewood and run a rebuilt generator to charge the cabin’s six marine storage batteries. As meteorologists remind us, these are days when daylight is shortest, skies cloudiest. This month averages only about 25 percent of possible sunshine. No question about it. Deep winter has arrived. Up here in the Northern Great Lakes Basin, the planet is not friendly during this particular season of year. Earth is hard as iron. Snow covers the ground. Under trees in cedar swamps, herds of shivering deer huddle together for warmth and protection. Traditional Anishinaabe people of our region call these days, “Time of the Starving Moon.” Seventeenth century Jesuits, known as “Black Robes” once lived and traveled among the Native peoples of our area, a land they called “New France.” Gathered around campfires during long, cold winter evenings, one of their cherished hymns opened with the haunting lyrics, “T’was in the midst of wintertime, when all the birds had fled.” As if living in a frozen mirror, all of Mother Earth spins these weeks in dark, cold, dangerous shadows. A devastating pandemic has overwhelmed the global health system. It already has taken lives of hundreds of thousands of individuals in the United States. There appears no clear path forward. As if to make matters worse, there are mixed messages. We have predictions, certainly. But they’re precarious at best. We live in an unprecedented time with ravaged natural environments and depleted resources. Our global population now exceeds five times its size at the beginning of the 20th century. (1.6 billion in 1900 vs 7.9 billion in 2020). No one is clear what is coming. *** This afternoon, I stopped by to visit a friend who, for 17 years, worked as a volunteer bookkeeper for the faith community with which I am affiliated. She is in hospice care. The time will soon be here when she will leave the world as we know it. Her husband invited me in to sit at her bedside. A mother of

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Above, an icy, wintry landscape. At right, new life returns during spring. (Photos courtesy of the Cedar Tree Institute) two sons, she lay asleep, breathing slowly. The room was dark, shades closed to reduce light and noise. In the shadows I saw she was covered by a blanket designed with an oversized logo from Disney World, a favorite vacation destination that she and her family had visited so many times over the years. Sitting quietly by her side, I recalled a recent interview with Nobel Prize winning scientist Edward O. Wilson. As an evidence-based entomologist, now 94 years old, he’s predicting that on the other side of COVID-19 lies a world of beauty and integrated ecological integrity that we cannot yet fully imagine. His puzzling conviction, however, comes from a lifetime of studying the natural world. Wilson maintains, like Darwin, that the human species is driven by “survival instinct.” It will find its way. Hopefully sooner than later, our human species will come to live in a way, he says, that balances consumption, resource protection, health and community. It will be, Wilson predicts, a marvelous and beautiful planet. There will always be problems, of course, but the basic trajectory of human evolution ensures such a basic shift. How much suffering it will take, how much time will be required, are other questions. Serious ones. But Wilson says we’re on our way. He tells us the clock is ticking. We now must work together, urgently, collectively, as never before in history, to get there. If we muster up courage and energy, we can look around and choose to see signs of such a New Creation. If we look carefully enough, one can identify such signs here in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. I personally worked alongside a spirited botanist with the US Forest Service who, in collaboration with American Indian tribes in the Upper Peninsula for 10 years, led an award-winning


ican Indian tribes in the Upper Peninsula for 10 years, led an award-winning initiative to restore native plants and protect the integrity of botanical seed life in threatened state and national forests. She captivated tribal leaders, at-risk youth and faith-based leaders with her knowledge and optimism. Henry Ford once regarded the Upper Peninsula as his private playground, a reservoir of unlimited timber resources for his auto industry. Months ago, Ford Motor Company committed itself to transfer 50 percent of its global vehicle production to electric cars by 2030. Recently, the president of the Upper Peninsula Regional Labor Federation penned a remarkable editorial in our region’s major newspaper calling for a balance of new construction skilled labor projects alongside protection and celebration of our threatened natural resources. *** The visit with my former bookkeeper has finished. Time has come for my departure and I rise to leave her bedside. I whisper the Lord’s Prayer. It matters not, I think, that she hears the words, “Thy Kingdom Come.” The phrase, itself, stands on its own. It lifts an extraordinary promise. One inviting us, personally and collectively, into a future larger than any of us can dream. No shortcuts out of human suffering. But into a deeper way of living. And dying. Her husband bids me farewell at their home’s entry. As a caregiver, he is weary, but overwhelmed with thanks for hospice nurses and volunteers who are walking alongside of him. He is filled with gratitude for his wife and their years together. In early dusk of a winter’s afternoon, I return to my vehicle. The street is filled with a coating of ice. Darkness is falling. There’s news a winter’s storm is on its way. I think of the vision of a Nobel Prize winning scientist and echoes of another prophetic voice, this one from the 13th century, Julian of Norwich, an English mystic and anchorite nun. Long ago, she wrote a prayer with ink and feather pen. It was during another time of plague and cultural disintegration. A promise, not unlike E. O. Wilson’s. “All shall be well. In All things. All shall be well.” MM About the Author: The author is director of The Cedar Tree Institute, a nonprofit organization in Northern Michigan that initiates projects and provides services in the areas of mental health, religion and the environment.

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sporting life

Top, Escanaba native Tyler Livingston leads the open bike race. Below, Gladstone native and racer Avery Dix carries the flag to start the racing during the National Anthem. (Photos courtesy of Stephen Tripp Photography)

Ice road racers Gwinn winters attract competitors looking for an icy victory

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By Kristy Basolo-Malmsten

great thing is happening in Gwinn, and no one wants to take credit for it. Selflessness is often the start of a great story—but especially that of the Upper Michigan Ice Racing Association (UMIRA). Ice racing is something unique to the Northern United States and Canada. It includes four-wheelers or “quads”—some with studded tires and some non-studded tires—and “dirt bikes,” which all race with studded tires. It’s the perfect sport for people who like to work on motorized vehicles and enjoy the outdoors. Snowmobiles are raced in other places, but ice racing is a thing of its own. Local ice racing has traditionally taken place on a river track in Gladstone, but mild winters continue to make the Escanaba River ice conditions unpredictable. Racers travel to Wisconsin as well, but ice conditions weren’t always ideal there either. “It was trending later and later in the year to get racing on the river safely,” said Ross Underwood, UMIRA vice president. “Some years there is a lot of snow, and others a lot of cold. There was always a concern about not being able to be out there as early as we wanted to

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race.” Two UMIRA volunteers—Underwood and Doña Kevern—said they got involved to support their sons’ racing habits. The Underwoods’ (Ross and Lorrie) son Josh races, as does Doña and Steve Kevern’s son Zack. Both sons are involved in UMIRA, and their parents see the benefits racing has for keeping young people busy and doing something productive. “We have a lot of kids that need a purpose here (in Gwinn),” Doña Kevern said. “We have never been about hand-outs to our kids—you want it, you earn it and upkeep it yourself— so trying to spread that where it isn’t always available was important.” This group of Marquette County racers and supporters wanted something closer to home, and a potential site was identified in Gwinn, just far enough north to have a little better ice-making conditions. “Some of the guys liked [the current track] location,” Underwood said. “There was just standing timber, no opening even there. We staked out the track. And Neil Armatti used his equipment to start clearing.” There is a reason the UMIRA board decid-


Top, Josh Underwood chases Tyler Johnson in a non-studded quad class. Josh is UMIRA vice president Ross Underwood’s son. Bottom, Underwood helps a young racer during an event. (Photos courtesy of Stephen Tripp Photography)

MANY U.P. TOWNS ARE KNOWN FOR SOMETHING, BUT WE WANTED TO MAKE A NAME FOR GWINN.

ed to call the track the “Neil Armatti Sr. Memorial Raceway.” His support and hard work in making the track what it is today is undeniable. Armatti, who served the Forsyth Township Board for more than 30 years, was a driving force in the creation and support of the track. He passed away in November 2020. “He was literally [my son’s] best friend,” Kevern said. “He was the greatest. Our hearts hurt over him, for sure.” Zack is the reason Doña and her husband Steve got involved—they wanted to support their son in his racing, as well as to promote the community they love. As with all good ideas in the U.P., the conversation started in a garage in Gwinn. Underwood said Steve Kevern and Terry Corkin began exploring what it would take to build a local track. “There was a test track locally, but we really needed to decide how to pursue racing here,” Underwood said. “We had to approach the township, get support and get the community behind us.” Armatti provided a lot of equipment to build the track, and much of the encouragement the UMIRA group needed to put Gwinn on the map. “Papa Neil owned an excavating company and was on the township board,” Underwood said. “Most of the time, he wouldn’t even take our mon-

ey for fuel for his machines. We drew up a proposal, went to township meetings, got the township board to give the go-ahead to start planning. But he did so much work on this.” Armatti took his dozer and punched the track out. It was so rough, the men had to drive the property in a side-by-side. “Terry Corkin owns logging equipment; he came in and cut the timber,” Underwood said. “We didn’t have any money for all of this. People just helped us clear down there, burning brush and making the berm for the track.” They got an opening cleared, and kept working it out. “Lots of people brought equipment out and let us use it,” Underwood said. “It was amazing.” The steps were endless. The property had to be

leased to the then-non-existent 501(c)3, and had to be rezoned on the township and county levels. And, it had to be cleared of all that timber. Forsyth Township Supervisor Joe Boogren was supportive of the project. And then, the community rallied. “The community as a whole stepped up behind liking the idea,” Underwood said. “The location being right in town, we needed to be able to sell advertising to pay for it. We wanted it to bring people into town—to spend money in the community.” And to this day, UMIRA still doesn’t have a concession trailer at the track; they made a conscious decision to not sell food as they want people to spend money in the Gwinn community. “During the first couple of weeks of racing, we sold (Gwinn’s) Subway out of supplies,” Underwood said. “That was more than we ever imagined.”

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Kids quad class racers get lined up for a race. (Photo courtesy of Stephen Tripp Photography) The UMIRA group was focused on putting Gwinn on the map, but didn’t expect it to happen so quickly. “Many U.P. towns are known for something, but we wanted to make a name for Gwinn,” Underwood said. “It became way bigger than we’ve ever dreamed it could become—bigger than any one person. For all of us, it’s a labor of love.” Businesses and individuals who have contributed to UMIRA’s success far exceeds a list of names. No one wanted to be the one to talk about UMIRA’s achievements, but there are many. The organization that started with a loan and borrowed equipment has now been able to give back to the community with scholarship donations and other charitable giving. They have grown far beyond the fledgling track they started, and many hours of blood, sweat and tears are a testament to it—all by volunteers. UMIRA has no paid employees. “Zack (Kevern) works more hours there than anyone realizes,” Underwood said. “He sacrificed a lot. When we had our first race, Zack borrowed the money to make it happen. We owed so much in diesel fuel when we had our first race.” Volunteers water the track as necessary to make ice, sometimes until 4 a.m the night before a race. Some water before work; others come between the holidays and help keep the ice-making going. “We bought an old water truck from the county on auction,” Underwood said. “It hadn’t been started for years; there was a dead raccoon inside. The volunteers got it going.” Despite the group’s racing experience, Underwood admits there was a steep learning curve about the rest. “We knew nothing about making

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an ice track,” Underwood said. “We were packing snow, doing a lot of trial and error. We knew the guys who built tracks for Delphi (an ice test track at K.I. Sawyer), and picked their brains. I’ve been around racing since 1988 or ’89 and I always ask people lots of questions. I’ve been to a lot of racing and had a lot of ideas. But there was a curve.” Two years of hard work built up to their first race, in January 2020. “I didn’t sleep the night before the first race,” Underwood said. “I was afraid we had made all of these promises, borrowed money, got in debt and no racers would come.” UMIRA had more than 80 paid entries that first week. “I was praying for people to come on the first night,” Underwood said. “By the end of the season, I was praying for them to stop coming on the last night race.” The first night race was more than any of the board members could have imagined. For the 2022 season, UMIRA has tripled the size of the pits for racers to park in, and have doubled the spectator parking. Their success comes largely from their approach. “We try to accommodate everyone,” Underwood said. “We don’t always agree on everything, but in the end, we just try to be fair. We do our best to listen to what people want because we’re all racers. And we always try to look at it from the racer’s perspective, but try to keep the fans in mind.” UMIRA’s board asked everyone’s opinion when they started the track, and continue to take feedback and implement improvements. “We’re not bike guys, so we told them, ‘You figure out what you want,


and we’ll support you,’” Underwood said. “We also took feedback from parents. We had to work on the kids racing schedule. It’s cold at night, and hard to see. That’s harder for the kids. We wanted the kids to be able to race and then go home and sleep as it gets later. So we changed things.” Underwood said more people are standing on the banks for the kids’ races than during any other class, of which there are many. “The nice thing about UMIRA is that anyone can try racing,” said Cycle City parts manager Tyler Johnson. “The cost of entry can be extremely low—you can literally just throw a number plate on a hunting ATV and give it a shot. ” During a pandemic, UMIRA is proud of how they rallied. “We totally brought people together last year,” Doña Kevern said. “Outside at the track, and then the restaurants could take people on after the race. That was pretty cool—even both gas stations felt the difference on the weekend.” Bringing together community is a recurring theme for UMIRA. While the parents help guide the club, they wanted to empower the 20- and 30-year-olds who were racing to lead the organization—currently president Zack Kevern, treasurer Nick Bjork, secretary John Kay and board member Wyatt Leutz. “We decided we wanted it to be the young guys,” Underwood said. “They were young when we started racing, and have turned into great men. When they’re working on those machines, they’re not out getting in trouble. It was always my thought, if we could save any of these young kids from going down the wrong path, it’s worth it to me.” Underwood said the racing is fun, but the life lessons are most important “We’re teaching these young guys that it’s OK to not agree on everything, but it doesn’t have to be personal,” he said. “We need to be doing this for the right reasons.” The right reasons have brought as many as 2,000 people to the track on a regular race day, and up to 3,000 for a night race. The racers come from all over the Midwest, and beyond. “We have a national motor builder who comes from some place in Oregon, guys come from Appleton, the Grawns from lower Michigan drive 305 miles one way almost every week,” Underwood said. “They also come from all over the U.P.—Delta, Dickinson, Alger. We will have Canadians now that the borders are open.” Underwood said the last night race of the 2021 season was particularly

Above, Levi Leutz holds on to his non-studded quad during a snowy race. Below, Tyler Johnson crosses the finish line in a non-studded quad class, as volunteer flag man Danny Pelkola waves him on. (Photos courtesy of Stephen Tripp Photography) overwhelming—with about 480 entries. “It was an incredibly stressful day,” he said. “Still to this day, I don’t know how we managed to pull that off. A cold front came in, and we somehow had ice to race. During the day, I had a little boy come up to me—Henry Mallory.” Underwood was always aware of the young racers, and couldn’t believe such a little boy could ride a bike as big as he did. “Henry comes to me and says, ‘I made something for you,’” Underwood said. “We were so busy, but I thanked him, stuck it in my shirt pocket, and never thought anything more about it.” When Underwood sent the last racers onto the track, it was 1 a.m. The amount of racers who showed up that day had pushed UMIRA to their limit. He had blisters on his feet and was ready to go home. “I go home, take my boots off. I’m trying to eat, and feel something in my shirt pocket,” Underwood said. “I pull that note out. Henry had drawn a motorcycle on it.” On the drawing, Henry had written, “I love ice racing,” and included his racing numbers. “It was a day you couldn’t imagine having unfolded,” Underwood said. “We have all these people traveling up to Gwinn, and thought we might be

the laughing stock if the track didn’t cooperate. But Henry took the time to draw me that picture. That was more important to me than anything to do with racing. Sometimes we lose track of what it’s supposed to be about.” UMIRA continues to focus on supporting youth of the community in their racing pursuits, and although many of their supporters and members choose not to be named, their hard work and support is felt every Saturday when the fans get to see their family members on the track—from the youngest last season at 4 years old to the oldest in his 70s. “Jesi Melchiori and the Christian Motorcycle Club Marquette chapter, ‘Superior Lights for Christ,’ help us with the gate,” Doña Kevern said.

January 2022

“Volunteer groups earn a donation towards their charity (for their help).” Cost for spectators is $5 per carload, and they are encouraged to head to Gwinn and follow the signs to the track on race days. There is a radio channel that broadcasts the races for spectators who wish to watch from the warmth of their vehicle. Visit uppermichiganiceracing.com for details and the schedule. MM About the Author: Kristy Baso-

lo-Malmsten was the Marquette Monthly editor for more than a decade, as well as the owner of God’s Country U.P. Outdoors Magazine. She has a master’s degree in writing from NMU, and lives in Ishpeming. Her day job is as the Senior Center director in Negaunee.

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home cinema Films highlight pain of loss Reviews by Leonard Heldreth

P

The Sound of Metal eople normally accept the input of their senses in an automatic way–the color of the sky, the beauty of flowers, the sound of birds. But loss of one or more of the sense responses forces a drastic change in the person’s life, placing limitations on activities. Anyone doubting this should put on a blindfold for a day, go through their normal activities, and see what happens. The sense lost in The Sound of Metal is hearing, perhaps a less critical sense than sight, but still debilitating in our multisensory world. Ruben (Riz Ahmed), the drummer in a punk-metal band called Blackgammon, performs with his girlfriend, Lou. A recovered addict, he keeps the music volume high to help counter his temptation to take drugs, and the process works for the two as they travel about the country in an elaborately outfitted RV playing gigs. Then one night Ruben finds he can no longer hear clearly, and he consults a pharmacist who refers him to a doctor. When the doctor confirms that Reuben has lost most of his hearing and will likely lose the rest unless he reduces the volume of his drums, Ruben refuses and continues to perform. Hoping that cochlear implants will help, Ruben finds that they cost thousands of dollars and are not covered by insurance, nor are they guaranteed to work for him. Ruben’s sponsor, Hector, finds a rural shelter for deaf recovering addicts run by Joe, who lost his hearing in the Vietnam war. Lou cannot stay in the shelter, but she persuades Ruben to try living there for a while and see if he can accommodate to the new situation, and he agrees. Joe’s attitude toward being deaf is to learn to accept it, but Ruben wants to be cured and sells everything to get the money for the transplants. Much of the body of the film focuses on Ruben’s time at the shelter, showing how other people who have lost their hearing cope with the disability and how he resists accepting it. Joe keeps urging Ruben, through writing a log and other therapies, to accept his limitation

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and move on with his life, but Ruben is determined to find the money for the surgery necessary to resume his previous life. After the operation he goes to find Lou, who is living with her wealthy father. They reconcile, and Lou’s father thanks Ruben for helping Lou kick the drug habit. Lou and Ruben spend the night together, and the viewer will have to see how it all turns out. Part of the reason for seeing the film is the sound-scape: the audience hears what Ruben hears, and as it declines, the sound effects copy what he hears. The film also has excellent acting: Riz Ahmed is excellent as Ruben, showing the emotional trauma of a young man trying to cope with a no-win situation and learning to accept when he can’t change. Paul Raci almost steals the show as Joe, who runs the shelter for recovering addicts, giving Ruben the “tough love” that he needs but refusing to bend the rules even an iota to accommodate his needs. At the 93rd Academy Awards, The Sound of Metal was nominated for Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, Best Actor (Ahmed) and Best Supporting Actor (Raci); it won for Best Sound and Best Film Editing.

S

Da Five Bloods pike Lee’s films are always complex, exploring one or more themes or plots, usually against a background of the Black experience, and frequently highlighting that experience in a way that is new for a White audience. Da Five Bloods is no exception. While its main focus is on the traumatic experience, usually in flashback, of Black soldiers during the Vietnam war, it also weaves a complex plot that draws from previous Hollywood films and adds additional layers of interpretation to Black life today. The title refers to four veterans who are officially returning to Vietnam to recover the body of a comrade who was killed and buried there during the war. Their clandestine reason for the trip is to recover a chest of gold ingots worth several million dollars, which they buried near their comrade, and to smuggle the loot out of the

country. The first half of this long film covers their search for the grave and the gold; the second half covers the squabbling over the ownership of the gold and the complications of getting it out of the country. The film opens with a montage of Muhammed Ali giving his reasons for opposing the draft and ends with Martin Luther King, Jr., a year before his death, expressing his feelings about the war. Throughout the film, photographs and film clips show what is happening in the United States, linking the war and the Bloods’ search in Vietnam with the broader social experience. The film action starts with the four men meeting in Ho Chi Minh City and organizing their expedition. Paul (Delroy Lindo) is suffering from post traumatic stress syndrome, waking up screaming from nightmares that he is back in the war. He also sports a red MAGA cap and admits, “Yeah, I voted for him.” (Lee loathes Trump, but often puts strong dialogue opposing his own beliefs into the mouths of major characters.) Otis (Clarke Peters), Eddie (Norm Lewis), and Melvin (Isiah Whitlock Jr.) arrive to make up the rest of the quartet with Paul’s son, David (Jonathan Majors) and Vinh, their guide (Johnny Tri Nguyen), joining the group before they set out up the river. All the characters have seen Coppola’s Apocalypse Now, and references are everywhere, from a poster in a bar for the film, to the “Flight of the Valkyries” on the soundtrack as helicopters soar over the rice fields, to a character shouting “Madness! Madness!” to parallel Kurtz’s “The horror. The horror.” One character is a big fan of Rambo, which is ridiculed, but the greatest number of references are to one of Lee’s favorite films, John Huston’s masterful 1948 classic parable of greed, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. While the search for gold parallels the basic plot of Madre, Lee also references Walter Huston’s joyous gold discovery dance, and Vietnamese bandits paraphrase the line about not needing any “stinkin’ badges.”


If Lee has fun embedding movie references, he piles on the illustrations to a comment by the guide, Vinh, that “Wars never end,” and the film is full of left-overs from the war. First, there’s the personal trauma left in each American soldier by his war experiences, and the parallel trauma suffered by the Vietnamese. The jungle floor is littered with unexploded land mines, and the bones of Stormin’ Norman Earl Holloway (Chadwick Boseman in the last role released in his lifetime) wait to be excavated. The lost gold must be retrieved and its ownership determined. Last, the children, crippled or physically intact, some sired by American GIs, are left to suffer their own form of discrimination. While the action is sometimes fairly straightforward, Lee usually keeps the audience’s attention during this nearly three-hour movie. Taking a script originally written for White veterans, Lee and his collaborators revised it to reflect the Black veteran’s point of view: “We flipped that concept. Put our flavor on it, some barbecue sauce, some funk, some Marvin Gaye. And there you have it,” Lee says. The acting is excellent throughout with Paul (Delroy Lindo) dominating. When he loses his mental balance, he often talks to himself as well as the audience, in a Shakespearean

monologue that calls up King Lear in the storm scene. Chadwick Boseman is excellent also in his exit role, one as good in its own way as his role in Ma Rainey. Shot on location, the photography is beautiful, and the temple set is impressive. Da Five Bloods offers a different view of the Vietnam War, integrating Black veterans’ experiences with their social structure and background as they play out against the broader picture of American life. The film received numerous accolades, including nominations for the Academy Award for Best Original Score and Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture, and was named by the National Board of Review as the Best Film of 2020. It’s one of Spike Lee’s best films, and that is no small compliment. MM About the Author: Leonard Heldreth became interested in films in high school and worked as a movie projectionist in undergraduate and graduate school. His short “Cinema Comment” aired for some years on WNMU-FM. In 1987, he started writing reviews for Marquette Monthly. He taught English and film studies at NMU for over 30 years. Editor’s Note: All films reviewed are available as DVDs or on streaming video.

Answers for New York Times crossword puzzle on page 38

N B C O R A L N O N S C I A C O N T O D E Y E S January 2022

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K A T A N A

F E T I D

B A L S A M

C L A U S E

S I L E N T P A R T N E R

E N M A S S E D A D S

T O I L S

A S L E N E U R N E V E C A R A B E M A R I M R P E T U Y E W E S S N A N A A D I N G O L D I S H A R P R E C U R R A F E O P F L A N U I T E T M E T E P S

I C Y

I N G R O U P

E P A L R E U A R B A A L T E O P F I E N W E E R

U P S N O O N D I N A E S R E P D R A M O T I A G E N S O P A R N I T U G E E D I M P O N G D R A M A S H T S A F C A R R C H I O S I E

E T N E G S L E A G O N T S A T M Z T S E E A T E G L G E N S

U R S A S I K H I S M T O T S

T O N G U E

I D E A L S

A Y R E S

C A R M E N

P S E U D O S C I E N C E

M A R E N G O

G O O N I E S

G A Y C R Y


locals

A Copper Country landmark of old steel from an era gone by, provided by...

A man and his trucks

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Top, old trucks belonging to Greg Piper line his property in Mason, Michigan, visible along M-26. Above, Piper is shown with a work in progress. He favors trucks from the 1930s and ’40s. (Photos by Kathleen Carlton Johnson)

Marquette Monthly

January 2022

By Kathleen Carlton Johnson

f you are traveling down M-26 in the Copper Country, you will pass through Mason. It is hard not to notice a set of similar houses perched on either side of the road. The houses were for the miners that worked the various mines and stamp heads in the area years ago. However, despite the loss of mining in the Copper Country, these small uniform houses attract the eye, perhaps because of Mason’s uniformity or the quaintness. Each place, although similar, holds a charming uniqueness. I have driven this M-26 highway barreling my way to Hancock to ultimately cross the bridge to Houghton, many times. My curiosity is drawn to a bunch of old trucks and cars sitting on the edge of Mason. They are housed in an old car dealership property. I travel M-26 often and never fail to see that the old trucks lined up fender to fender, their grilles facing the road. The trucks are moved frequently, and the ones in the front row all work. Although their paint may have lost its gloss, they remind how important these antique trucks served in building American Commerce. The trucks are from an earlier era of transportation, many from the ’30s and ’40s. It’s like a living museum, and it thrills me each time I pass the trucks to see the new configuration of the week. I became curious as to who was developing this vehicle museum. Greg Piper is a man of vision. Born in Ludington, he came to the Copper Country to attend Michigan Tech, studying electrical engineering. Piper told me that “he liked the area.” He bought a look-alike mining house of Mason and fixed it up for himself. As time would have it, he bought two more company houses in Mason, renting them and plowing snow for a living. Most who travel M-26 may recall he had


An old gas pump Greg Piper has as part of his collection. (Photos by Kathleen Carlton Johnson) an iconic red phone booth, complete with an operating collapsible door in front of his house. There are many interesting stories here, but we will stick to Piper, the truck collector. He bought the old car dealership in Mason. It had stood abandoned for several years: a perfect location for a permanent home for his growing truck collection and it was just a short walk from his residence. Over the years, he has bought, sold and traded to reach his current fleet of antique vehicles. When he gets a vehicle, he carefully assesses its repairs and gets

the majority of the trucks running. Thus, the occasional driver is treated to a reconfiguration of the trucks on a rotating basis. As a result, his truck yard is never static. The trucks, in their faded paint and many with now-defunct business names on the side, stare out at the passing traffic. They line up smiling, their unique grilles and popping headlights speaking of another era. I, for one, have come to enjoy the historical ballet of rust and steel. In 2008 he had the opportunity to construct an insulated metal building

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“ Greg Piper’s collection of signs and old gas pumps (top left) and a portion of his collection of old oil cans (top right) are hard to miss inside his shop. Lower left, a work in progress at Piper’s garage. Bottom cutout, an old car is returned to its former glory. (Photos by Kathleen Carlton Johnson)

to house his collections and to repair vehicles in the warm of the indoors. The interior of the shop is something to behold. It holds several Model A Fords he is restoring. It also has several of his other collections: stereo equipment, mining stuff and an unusual collection of Goodell oil cans, which he is very proud of. He keeps these treasures in a lit glass cabinet, showing them with great pride. An old photo of Goodell Oil on top of the cabinet shows what the establishment looked like. It is recognizable even today; its iconic form has not changed as one turns on the bridge to cross to Houghton. He told me that his truck lot was used for a scene in the movie Superior. It’s not surprising. The lot is a trip back into the authentic past. Piper likes history, and the past he is preserving is impressive in quantity and kind. He also collects signs that were popular years ago in the Copper Country. A sign for the Hiawatha Drive-In Theatre, gas signs, neon signs, “ Vo l l w erth’s Sold Here” are all tasteful-

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ly displayed, to say nothing of the line of old fuel pumps that line up on the east wall of his shop. But, what is truly astounding is there is order in the shop. Everything has a place and not a spot of grease or lubricant to be seen anywhere. All items are tastefully displayed and well cared for. Piper is an unassuming, very talented engineer and has uncannily made my life a

January 2022

I, FOR ONE, HAVE COME TO ENJOY THE HISTORICAL BALLET OF RUST AND STEEL.

bit more interesting as I travel along M-26. I look forward to seeing the trucks moved. Piper is living the dream to repair and the challenge to get engines back in shape and save some of the memories of the Copper Country. He takes great pride in his ability to make the past come alive. I asked where he gets his treasures, and he told me he finds stuff on Craigslist, but often “the stuff finds me.” Piper’s day job is working in Mass City repairing and restoring ancient tractors. He is also open to people to looking at his collection. Those interested in taking a closer look or talking to Piper, can email him at gp280zx@yahoo.com or look him up on Facebook, at Mason Motors. MM About the Author: Born in Lansing Kathleen Carlton Johnson is an author and former teacher who resides in the Copper Country. Her work has a p p e a re d in Aji, Diner, Phoebe, The UP Reader and the Keweenaw Sentinel, to name a few publications.


Out & About Out & About is a free listing of Upper Peninsula events. Events included must cost $25 or less (except fundraisers). All events are free and in Eastern time unless noted. We print information sent to us by a wide variety of people and organizations. It pays to double check the date, time, place and cost before heading out. Due to changing event requirements, please call ahead to ask about safety precautions, or bring a mask to events, as many events require masks regardless of vaccination status.

Send your February events by Monday, January 10 to: calendar@marquettemonthly.com Marquette Monthly P.O. Box 109 Gwinn, MI 49841 phone: (906) 360-2180

Index on the town ………… 58 art galleries ……… 60-61 musuems …………….. 62 support groups ……… 67

Lantern Lit Ski & Snowshow| January 7 | Sands

end of december events 29 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 8:33 a.m.; sunset 5:10 p.m.

Little Lake

• Dale’s Christmas Light Show. This drive-thru light show features more than 100 separate circuits of lights with corresponding music through your vehicle radio. 5:30 to 11 p.m. 950 E. Girl Scout Ln.

Marquette

• Registration Deadline: Fairfield Inn Tour. See Wednesday, January 5.

30 THURSDAY

sunrise 8:33 a.m.; sunset 5:10 p.m.

Little Lake

• Dale’s Christmas Light Show. This drive-thru light show features more than 100 separate circuits of lights with corresponding music through your vehicle radio. 5:30 to 11 p.m. 950 E. Girl Scout Ln.

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 360-3056.

January 2022

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on the town Comedy NIght| January 7 and 21 | Pasquali’s, Negaunee

Gwinn

• Hideaway Bar. - Mondays: The Hideaway All-Stars. 7 p.m. 741 M-35. 346-3178. • Gwinn Inn - Friday, December 31: Glitterskank. 9 p.m. 170 W. Flint St.

Ishpeming

• Royal Pub. - Friday, December 31: Big Trouble. 9:30 p.m. 205 E. Division St.

Marquette

• Drifa Brewing Company. - Thursday: January 13: Trivia. 6 p.m. - Thurday, the 27th: Trivia. 6 p.m. 501 S. Lake St. 273-1300. • Flanigan’s. - Tuesday through Thursday: Karaoke. 9:30 p.m. Cover charge on weekends only. 429 W. Washington St. 228-8865. • Iron Bay Restaurant & Drinkery.

Negaunee

• Pasquali’s Pizza and Pub. - Friday, January 7: Comedy night with David James Spaliaras. - Friday, the 21st: Comedy night with Geoff LaFleur. Comedy night, 8 p.m. 100 Cliff. St. (906) 475-4466. • Smarty’s Saloon. - Wednesdays: Karaoke. 8 p.m. to midnight. 212 Iron Street. MM

sunrise 8:34 a.m.; sunset 5:11 p.m.

january events

bingo. Snacks, hot soup and beverages will be available for purchase. Noon. Ishpeming VFW Auxiliary 4573, 310 Bank St.

New Year’s Eve

01 SATURDAY

sunrise 8:34 a.m.; sunset 5:14 p.m.

• Dale’s Christmas Light Show. This drive-thru light show features more than 100 separate circuits of lights with corresponding music through your vehicle radio. 5:30 to 11 p.m. 950 E. Girl Scout Ln.

Marquette Marquette Monthly

9 p.m . • Superior Culture. - Thursday, December 30: GodDamn Sam. 9 p..m. - Friday, the 31st: Olliofski. 9 p.m. - Saturday, January 22nd: The Kitchen Sink. 9 p.m. 713 Third Street. 273-0927 or superiorculturemqt.com • The Fold. - Thursday, January 20: Ben Hassenger with Jeff Krebs. 7 p.m. 1015 N. Third Street, #9. (906) 226-8575.

31 FRIDAY

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- Wednesdays: Trivia. 7 p.m. 105 E. Washington St. • Northland Pub. - Friday, December 31: Derrell Syria Band. 8 p.m. Inside the Landmark Inn. 230 N. Front St. (906) 315-8107. • Ore Dock Brewing Company. - Friday, December 31: Blanco Suave and Shipwreck Kelly. $5. 8 p.m. - Friday, January 21: Distant Stars. 8 p.m. All shows are free and begin at 9 p.m. unless noted. 114 W. Spring St. 228-8888. • Rippling River Resort. - Sunday, January 2: Luke Ogea. 5 to 8 p.m. - Friday, the 7th: Adam Carpenter. 6 to 9 p.m. - Saturday, the 8th: Derrell Syria and Cliff Porter. 6 to 8 p.m. -Friday, the 14th: Chris Valenti. 6 to 9 p.m. - Saturday, the 22nd: Derrell Syria and Cliff Porter. 6 to 8 p.m. - Friday, the 28th: Adam Carpenter. 6 to

• Ball Drop. Welcome in 2022 and watch the ball drop. 11:59 p.m. Masonic Building, 128 W. Washington St.

January 2022

sunrise 8:34 a.m.; sunset 5:12 p.m.

Marquette

• Registration Deadline: The Great Conversation. See Saturday, January 8.

02 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:34 a.m.; sunset 5:13 p.m.

Ishpeming

• Bingo. Join others for an afternoon of

03 MONDAY

Ishpeming

• An Evening of Singing Bowls. Experience relaxation and peace of sound meditation through Tibetan singing bowls and gongs. 7 p.m. Joy Center, 1492 Southwood Dr. (906) 362-9934.

04 TUESDAY

sunrise 8:34 a.m.; sunset 5:15 p.m.


Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 236-1811. • Maritime History on Tap. Dan Fountain will present Marquette Shipwrecks. $5. 7 p.m. Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. (906) 2262006. • What’s Up? Astronomy Series. Scott Stobbelaar of the Marquette Astronomical Society will discuss what can be seen in the U.P. skies. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl. info for Zoom link • Registration Deadline: An Evening of Music, Poetry and U.P. Stories. See Tuesday the 11th.

05 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 8:33 a.m.; sunset 5:16 p.m.

Marquette

• Fairfield Inn Tour. Register by December 29. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. 2 p.m. Fairfield Inn, 808 S. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 228-8051. • Outword. LGBTQIA youth and allied students in grades 7 to 12 are invited. Masks required. 4 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • Joy of Sound Meditation. Enjoy a relaxing meditation with sounds produced by Tibetan singing bowls and metallic gongs. 7 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 201 E. Ridge St. (906) 362-9934. • Registration Deadline: What is a Healthy Diet? See Wednesday the 19th.

06 THURSDAY

sunrise 8:33 a.m.; sunset 5:17 p.m.

Escanaba

• Registration Deadline: Card Making Class. See Thursday the 20th.

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 360-3056. • Zoom Meditation. Jeremy Morelck will lead this class with a focus on mindfulness, loving-kindness and compassion. 5:30 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link

07 FRIDAY

sunrise 8:33 a.m.; sunset 5:18 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 180 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 485-4844.

Sands

• Lantern Lit Ski & Snowshoe. Ski or snowshoe the Lighted Loop, which will be lit by kerosene lanterns. 7 p.m. Blueberry Ridge Pathway, 900 M-553.

08 SATURDAY

sunrise 8:33 a.m.; sunset 5:19 p.m.

Gwinn

• Upper Michigan Ice Racing Association Races. Racers of all ages will compete during more than 20 classes of racing. $5 per carload. Registration, 9:30 a.m. Practice, 10:30 a.m. Noon. Forsyth Township Ball Park, off of Johnson Lake Rd.

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players.

Maritime History on Tap | January 4 | Marquette

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art galleries Calumet

• Calumet Art Center. Works by Alice Reynolds will be on display through December 31. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228. • Copper Country Associated Artist. Works by members and workshop participants in watercolor and oil, drawings, photography, sculpture, quilting, wood, textile, clay, glass and other media. Thursday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 205 Fifth St. (906) 337-1252 or ccaartists.org • Gallery on 5th. Works by local and regional artists. Days and hours vary. 109 Fifth St. (906) 369-0094.

Copper Harbor

• EarthWorks Gallery. Featuring Lake Superior-inspired photography by Steve Brimm. Daily, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. 216 First St. (910) 319-1650.

Escanaba

• East Ludington Art Gallery. Works by local artists. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1007 Ludington St. (906) 786-0300 or eastludingtongallery.com • William Bonifas Fine Arts Gallery. - Northern Exposure XXVIII, will be on display through December 30. - All Mixed UP, a competition show, featuring works by mixed media artists, will be on display January 6 through February 17, with a public reception at 7 p.m. January 6. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 700 First Avenue South. (906) 786-3833 or bonifasarts.org Hancock • Finlandia University Gallery. - INTERSTICE: a small, intervening space, featuring works by Natalie Salminen Rude, will be on display through February 4, 2022. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m. 435 Quincy St. (906) 487-7500. • Kerredge Gallery. Works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts Center, 126 Quincy St. coppercountryarts.com or (906) 4822333. • Youth Gallery. Featuring works by local students. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts Center, 126 Quincy St. (906) 482-2333 or coppercountryarts.com

Houghton

• A-Space Gallery. Featuring works

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Natalie Salminen Rude | First Fruits Offering | Finlandia University Gallery, Hancock

by local, regional and national artists. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays, 1 to 8 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. mtu.edu/rozsa

Marquette

• Art—U.P. Style. Art by Carol Papaleo, works by local artists, gifts, classes and more. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. 130 W. Washington St. (906) 225-1993. • DeVos Art Museum. - Regional Perspectives by Women Artists, featuring works in various media from the dawn of the 20th century to present, will be on display. - Still Life, featuring works by various artists, will be on display January 21 through March 25. Monday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Corner of Seventh and Tracy streets. NMU. (906) 227-1481 or nmu.edu/devos • Graci Gallery. Works by regional and national artists. Featuring fine craft, contemporary art, and jewelry. Thursday and Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday, by appointment or chance. 555 E Michigan Street. gracigallery.com

• Huron Mountain Club Gallery. - Winter Wonderland Walk, featuring a variety of lights, trees and holiday cheer, will be on display, December 6 through 31. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • Lake Superior Photo and Gallery. The studio features landscape photographic art by Shawn Malone, including naturescapes of the Lake Superior region. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 211 S. Front St. (906) 2283686 or lakesuperiorphoto.com • Lake Superior Art Association Deo Gallery. Works by local and regional artists. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • Peter White Public Library Reception Area Gallery. - Winter Wonderland Walk, featuring a variety of lights, trees and holiday cheer, will be on display, December 6 through 31. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 (continued on page 81) 61)


art galleries p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • The Gallery: A Marquette Artist Collective Project. Works by local and regional artists. Monday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 1 to 4 p.m. Suite U7, 130 W. Washington St. mqtartistcollective@.org • The Studio Gallery at Presque Isle. Works by local and internationally acclaimed artists. Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 2905 Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 360-4453. • Wintergreen Hill Gallery and Gifts. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 810 N. Third St. (906) 273-1374. • Zero Degrees Artist Gallery. Welcoming new artists with works in oils, watercolors, mixed media, (continued from page 60) Lessons, 10 a.m. Game, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 236-3173. • The Great Conversation. Watch the NMU women’s and men’s basketball games and following the games, NMU Athletic Director Forrest Karr will answer questions on how the court is converted to an ice rink. Register by the 1st. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. Plus $6 for game ticket. 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Berry Event Center, NMU. (906) 225-1004. • Onagomingkway Chapter of NSDAR Meeting. Questions about genealogy and joining DAR will be answered following the meeting. Noon. Big Boy, 1950 US-41. (906) 226-7836.

09 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:32 a.m.; sunset 5:21 p.m.

Ishpeming

• Bingo. Join others for an afternoon of bingo. Snacks, hot soup and beverages will be available for purchase. Noon. Ishpeming VFW Auxiliary 4573, 310 Bank St.

10 MONDAY

sunrise 8:32 a.m.; sunset 5:22 p.m.

Marquette

• Marquette Poets Circle Workshop and Open Mic. Bring copies of a poem, short prose or lyrics to share. Workshop, 6:30 p.m. Open Mic, 7 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. • Docu Cinema. The documentary Straightlaced will be shown. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322.

11 TUESDAY

sunrise 8:32 a.m.; sunset 5:23 p.m.

Calumet

• Friends of the Calumet Public Library Meeting. New members welcome. 5:30 p.m. Calumet Public Library, 57070 Mine

jewelry, photography, metals, woods, recycled and fiber arts and much more. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 525 N. Third St. (906) 228-3058 or zerodegreesgallery.org

Munising

• U.P.-Scale Art. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 109 W. Superior Ave. (906) 387-3300 or upscaleart.org

Rapid River

• The adhocWORKshop. Owner Ritch Branstrom creates sculptures with found objects inspired by the land in which the objects were found. By appointment or chance. 10495 South Main Street. (906) 339-1572 or adhocworkshop.com MM St. (906) 337-0311.

Escanaba

• Bag-O-Books Sale. Proceeds benefit the Escanaba Public Library. Donations appreciated. 9 a.m. to noon. Escanaba Public Library, 400 Ludington St. (906) 789-7323.

Marquette

• Tasty Reads Book Group. The group will discuss Life From Scratch by Sasha Martin. Masks required. Noon. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 236-1811. • Muggles for Potter. Youth in grades 2 and 3 are invited to for butterbeer and Every Flavor Jelly Beans. Masks required. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • An Evening of Music, Poetry and U.P. Stories. Local U.P. authors, poets, song writers and folk singers will present an evening of songs, poetry and storytelling. Register by the 4th. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. 6:30 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-3186.

12 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 8:31 a.m.; sunset 5:24 p.m.

Marquette

• Homeschool Chapter Book Club. Youth age 8 to 10 are invited to hear the story Ramona Quimby Age 8 by Beverly Cleary. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Youth age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts and activities based off great books. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

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museums

International Frisbee Hall of Fame and Museum, Calumet

Big Bay

• Big Bay Lighthouse. The grounds of the 1896 lighthouse are open yearround. 3 Lighthouse Rd. (906) 345-9957.

Calumet

• International Frisbee Hall of Fame and Museum. Learn about the history of Guts Frisbee. Days and hours vary. Open when events are held. Second floor ballroom, Calumet Colosseum, Red Jacket Rd. (906) 281-7625.

Hancock

• Quincy Mine Hoist and Underground Mine. There are two options for touring the site. On both the surface tour and the full tour, visitors will see the museum, inside the No. 2 Shaft House and the Nordberg Steam Hoist and ride the cog rail tram car to the mine entrance. On the full tour, visitors will take a tractor-pulled wagon into the mine, seven levels underground. Prices, days and hours vary. (906) 482-3101 or quincymine.com

Houghton

• A.E. Seaman Mineral Museum. View the largest collection of minerals from the Great Lakes region and the world’s finest collection of Michigan minerals. Exhibits educate visitors on how minerals are formed, fluorescent minerals and minerals from around the world. Prices vary. Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1404 E. Sharon Ave. (906) 487-2572 or museum.mtu.edu • Carnegie Museum. Features rotating displays of local history, natural science and culture. The Science Center is dedicated to interactive exhibits about science for kids. Thursdays, noon to 5 p.m. 105 Huron St. (906) 482-7140 or carnegiekeweenaw.org • MTU Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections. Features a variety of historical memorabilia, highlighting life in the Copper Country. Open by appointment. Lower level of the J.R. Van Pelt Library, MTU. (906) 4873209.

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Ishpeming

• Ishpeming Area Historical Society Museum. New exhibits include a military exhibit and artifacts from the Elson Estate. Donations appreciated. Days and hours vary. Gossard Building, Suite 303, 308 Cleveland Ave. ishpeminghistory.org • U.S. National Ski Hall & Snowboard Hall of Fame & Museum. The museum features more than 300 Hall of Fame inductees, presented in photographs and biographies, and displays and exhibits of skiing history and equipment, an extensive library, video show, gift shop, special events and more. By appointment only. US-41 and Third St. (906) 485-6323 skihall.com

K.I. Sawyer

• K.I. Sawyer Heritage Air Museum. The museum promotes and preserves the aviation history the air base brought to the area. Air Force-related materials are on display, including photographs, flags, medals and more. Donations appreciated. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. 402 Third St. (906) 362-3531 or kishamuseum.org

Marquette

• Beaumier Upper Peninsula Heritage Center. - The Seventh Fire: A Decolonizing Experience, a multimedia exhibit, will be on display through April 9. Three separate collections focus on cultural artifacts relating to ethnic, religious and social diversity in the U.P. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. NMU, corner of Seventh Street and Tracy Avenue. (906) 227-3212 or nmu.edu/ beaumier • Marquette Regional History Center. - The Story Behind Their Clothes, featuring clothing from Yoopers from the last 170 years, including handmade deerskin gloves, a hand-woven linen

dress, and a silk outfit made from the lining of World War II flight jacket, will be on display through January 8, 2022. - Railroads of Marquette County: Yesterday and Today, featuring select hands-on elements, as well as maps, artifacts and photographs, will be on display January 31 through February 2023. The museum includes interactive displays as well as regional history exhibits. Youth 12 and younger, $2; sudents, $3; seniors, $6; adults, $7. Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum. A variety of interactive exhibits offer learning through investigation and creativity. By appointment. 123 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 226-3911 or upchildrensmuseum.org

Munising

• Alger County Historical Society Heritage Center. Exhibits include the Grand Island Recreation Area, Munising Woodenware Company, barn building, homemaking, sauna and more. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 1496 Washington St. (906) 3874308.

Negaunee

• Michigan Iron Industry Museum. In the forested ravines of the Marquette Iron Range, the museum overlooks the Carp River and the site of the first iron forge in the Lake Superior region. Museum exhibits, audio-visual programs and outdoor interpretive paths depict the large-scale capital and human investment that made Michigan an industrial leader. The museum is one of 10 museums and historic sites administered by the Michigan Historical Center. Daily, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 73 Forge Rd. (906) 475-7857. MM


• Homeschool Tweens. Youth age 10 to 14 will read through the book Flora & Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo and complete self-directed crafts. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Tweens’ Forbidden Forest, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (90) 226-4323. • Junior Teen Advisory Board. Students in grades 5 to 8 are invited to meet new people, plan events and gain volunteer experience. Masks required. 4:15 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • League of Women Voters Monthly Membership Meeting. 6 p.m. Studio 1, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. • Authors Reading Virtually. Milton Bates will read from his new, published works. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link. • Forestry for Michigan Birds Zoom Presentation. Learn about a toolkit for landowners, foresters and other natural resource professionals to manage forests in a way that benefits birds and other wildlife. 7 p.m. Zoom link available at laughingwhitefishaudubon.com • Registration Deadline: Cooking a Vegetarian Meal at the Co-op. See Wednesday the 19th.

13 THURSDAY

sunrise 8:31 a.m.; sunset 5:25 p.m.

Curtis

• History Trip: A 3-D Journey Around the U.P. Jack Deo will present photographs taken in the 19th century of mines, Native American encampments and towns throughout the U.P. 3-D glasses will be provided. Advancd tickets, $10; at the door, $15. 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. (906) 586-9974 or mynorthtickets.com

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020

US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 360-3056. • Second Thursday Creativity Series: Winter Carnival. Winter carnivalthemed activities and crafts for children will be available. 2:30 to 6 p.m. U.P. Children’s Museum, 123 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 226-3911 or upchildrensmuseum.org • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Zoom Meditation. Jeremy Morelck will lead this class with a focus on mindfulness, loving-kindness and compassion. 5:30 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link. • Women in Science. This virtual series features women leaders in scientific fields discussing backgrounds, educations and current works. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link.

14 FRIDAY

sunrise 8:30 a.m.; sunset 5:27 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 180 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

• Docu Cinema. The documentary Straightlaced will be shown. 11 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 485-4844. • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Superior Arts Youth Theatre Tech and

Suicide Hill Ski Jumping Tournament | January 18 | Negaunee

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The Fat-Ish | January 15 | Ishpeming

Design Workshop Series: Costuming. Youth in grades 6 to 12 are invited to learn basic principles of costume design and design a costume on paper. $15. 5 to 7 p.m. Marquette Hope Connection Center, 927 W. Fair Ave. saytheater.org

15 SATURDAY

sunrise 8:30 a.m.; sunset 5:28 p.m.

Calumet

• Learn to Work with Beveled Glass. Laura Hamlett will lead the class. $25. 1 to 3 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth Street. (906) 934-2228.

Escanaba

• A Snowy Celebration. This family fun day will include snow sculptures, snowshoeing and refreshments. 1 p.m. Escanaba Public Library, 400 Ludington St. (906) 789-7323.

Gwinn

• Upper Michigan Ice Racing Association Races. Racers of all ages will compete during more than 20 classes of racing. $5 per carload. Registration, 9:30 a.m. Practice, 10:30 a.m. Noon. Forsyth Township Ball Park, off of Johnson Lake Rd.

Ishpeming

• The Fat-Ish. Activities include a 10 or 20-mile fat bike race, free tube sliding, music, food and more. Prices and times vary. Al Quaal Recreation Area, 501 Poplar St. fat-ish.com

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. Lessons, 10 a.m. Game, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 236-3173.

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16 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:29 a.m.; sunset 5:29 p.m.

Ishpeming

• The Skinny-Ish. Activities include a 5k or 15k ski race. Prices and times vary. Al Quaal Recreation Area, 501 Poplar St. fatish.com • Bingo. Join others for an afternoon of bingo. Snacks, hot soup and beverages will be available for purchase. Noon. Ishpeming VFW Auxiliary 4573, 310 Bank St.

17 MONDAY

sunrise 8:28 a.m.; sunset 5:31 p.m.

Hancock

• The Buellwood Weavers and Fiber Arts Guild Monthly Meeting. Phyllis Fredendall will demonstrate snow washing, a traditional Finnish carpet cleaning technique. Dress warmly for this outdoor activity. Those interested in fiber arts and rug weaving are invited. Masks are required at the Jutila Center. Noon. Fiber Arts Studio, Jutila Center, 200 Michigan St. jegale@att.net

Ishpeming

• An Evening of Singing Bowls. Experience relaxation and peace of sound meditation through Tibetan singing bowls and gongs. 7 p.m. Joy Center, 1492 Southwood Dr. (906) 362-9934.

Marquette

• Global Geeks Book Club. The group will discuss The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. 6 p.m. Dandelion Cottage Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4312. • Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Concert. Local singer, songwriter and musician Kerry Yost will perform. Masks required. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.


18 TUESDAY

sunrise 8:28 a.m.; sunset 5:32 p.m.

19 WEDNESDAY

Escanaba

• Registration Deadline: 4H Spin Club Puppet Studio. See Tuesday the 25th.

Gwinn

• Literature at the Lodge. The group will discuss As Long As We Both Shall Live by Joann Chaney. 7 p.m. Up North Lodge, 215 S. CR-557. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 236-1811. • Genealogy Help. Those interested in family history are welcome to work individually with an experienced geologist. Bring your family documents with you. 2 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264311. • Dumbledore’s Army. Students in grades 4 to 6 are invited to discuss all things Harry Potter. Masks required. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Meet the Filmmaker: Alice’s Ordinary People. The film will be shown and followed with a presentation by filmmaker Alice Tregay. Film, 6 p.m., Presentation via Zoom, 7 p.m. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • Registration Deadline: Using Funeral Records for Genealogy Research. See Tuesday the 25th.

Negaunee

younger, free; others, $15 in advance or $20 at the gate. 6 p.m. Suicide Hill, Suicide Bowl Road. ishskiclub.com

• 135th Annual Suicide Hill Jumping Tournament. Watch U.S. international ski jumpers soar off historic 90-meter ski jump. Youth 12

Ski and the and

sunrise 8:27 a.m.; sunset 5:33 p.m.

Gwinn

• After School LEGO Club. Youth are invited for LEGO building. 4 p.m. Forsyth Township Library, 180 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

• Homeschool Chapter Book Club. Youth age 8 to 10 are invited to hear the story Ramona Quimby Age 8 by Beverly Cleary. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Youth age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts and activities based off great books. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Tweens. Youth age 10 to 14 will read through the book Flora & Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo and complete self-directed crafts. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Tweens’ Forbidden Forest, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (90) 2264323. • What is a Healthy Diet? Register by the 5th. 1 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (734) 6464443. • Cooking a Vegetarian Meal at the Coop. Make a mild Curry Vegetarian Tomato Potato Soup, Garlic Ginger Rice and Spinach Raita with Roasted Chickpeas. Register by the 12th. NCLL members, $18; nonmembers, $25. 2 p.m. Marquette Food Co-op, 502 W. Washington St. (906) 2268347. • Teen Advisory Board. Students in grade 9 to 12 are invited to meet new

Kids’ Dog Sled Rides | January 22 | Calumet

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people, plan activities and gain volunteer experience. Masks required. 4 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Joy of Sound Meditation. Enjoy a relaxing meditation with sounds produced by Tibetan singing bowls and metallic gongs. 7 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 201 E. Ridge St. (906) 362-9934.

20 THURSDAY

sunrise 8:26 a.m.; sunset 5:35 p.m.

Escanaba

• Card Making Class. Learn basic card making skills and make three original cards. Register by the 6th. Bonifas members, $10; nonmembers, $12. 6 p.m. Bonifas Arts Center, 700 First Avenue S. (906) 786-3833 or bonifastarts.org

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 360-3056. • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Zoom Meditation. Jeremy Morelck will lead this class with a focus on mindfulness, loving-kindness and compassion. 5:30 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link. • Registration Deadline: Decolonization of the Anishinaabe Presentation. See Thursday the 27th.

21 FRIDAY

sunrise 8:25 a.m.; sunset 5:36 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 180 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Houghton

• Water Music: New Music Inspired by the Great Lakes. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. McArdle Theatre, MTU. (906) 487-2073 or events.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 485-4844. • Junior Noque. Youth age 19 and younger can ski in a 1, 3 or 5K course. Prices vary. 4 p.m. Location to be announced. noquemanon.com • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323.

22 SATURDAY

sunrise 8:24 a.m.; sunset 5:38 p.m.

Calumet

• Free Kids’ Dog Sled Rides. Noon to 2 p.m. Agassiz Park. • CopperDog 150 Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser. Proceeds benefit the CopperDog 150. Time to be announced. Prices vary. Elks Lodge, 25701 Wedge St. copperdog150.com

Gwinn

• Upper Michigan Ice Racing Association Races. Racers of all ages will compete during more than 20 classes of

racing. $5 per carload. Registration, 9:30 a.m. Practice, 10:30 a.m. Noon. Forsyth Township Ball Park, off of Johnson Lake Rd.

Houghton

• Water Music: New Music Inspired by the Great Lakes. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. McArdle Theatre, MTU. (906) 487-2073 or events.mtu.edu

Ishpeming

• Noquemanon Ski Marathon: 50K. Participants will race through the Marquette County wilderness in a 50K point-to-point race. Prices and times vary. Al Quaal Recreation Area, 501 Poplar St. noquemanon.com

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. Lessons, 10 a.m. Game, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 236-3173.

Negaunee

• Noque Half Marathon. Skiers can choose between classic or freestyle during this 24K this point-to-point race. Prices and times vary. NTN 510 Trailhead, CR510. noquemanon.com

23 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:24 a.m.; sunset 5:39 p.m.

Ishpeming

• Bingo. Join others for an afternoon of bingo. Snacks, hot soup and beverages will be available for purchase. Noon. Ishpeming VFW Auxiliary 4573, 310 Bank St.

24 MONDAY

sunrise 8:23 a.m.; sunset 5:40 p.m.

Escanaba

• 4H Spin Culinary. Youth in grades 3 through 5 will learn how to cook, read recipes, measure ingredients, food preparation, along with nutrition and food safety during this six session series. $35 for six sessions. 2:30 p.m. Home Economics Room, Escanaba Upper Elementary, 1500 Ludington St. (906) 7863833 or bonifastarts.org • Registration Deadline: Mother and Son Ghostbusters Date Night. See Friday the 28th. • Registration Deadline: Mother and Son Ghostbusters Toddler Date Day. See Saturday the 29th.

25 TUESDAY

sunrise 8:22a.m.; sunset 5:42 p.m.

Escanaba

• 4H Spin Club Puppet Studio. Youth age 9 to 15 will learn how to create imaginary characters in a hands-on puppet-making studio during this six session series. $18 for six sessions. 4 p.m. Bonifas Arts Center, 400 First Avenue S. (906) 786-3833 or bonifasarts.org

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 236-1811. • Using Funeral Records for Genealogy Research. Jeremy Hansen will discuss the use of funeral home records to gather ancestry information. Register by the 18th. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. 2

support groups • Alano Club. Twelve-step recovery meetings daily. Monday through Saturday, noon and 8 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. 1202 S. Front St., Southgate Plaza, Marquette. • Al-Anon Family Groups. A fellowship offering strength and hope for friends and families of problem drinkers. al-alon.org or (888) 425-2666. • Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings throughout Marquette County, open daily, at many locations and times. Twenty-four-hour answering service, 249-4430 or aa-marquettecounty.org • ALZConnected. This is a free, online community for everyone affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other memory loss diseases. alzconnected.org • American Legacy Foundation. Smoking quit line for expectant mothers and cessation information for women. (800) 668-8278. • Amputee Social Group. This peer support group is for amputees, friends and families to share resources, life experiences and create relationships. January 11. 6 p.m. SAIL, 1200 Wright St. (906) 273-2444. • Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Checks. Cholesterol checks are $5. Call for Marquette County

66

Marquette Monthly

schedule. (906) 225-4545. • Caregiver Support Group— Marquette. All caregivers are welcome. January 20. 2 p.m. Mill Creek Community Center, 1600 Mill Creek Court. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Divorce Care—Ishpeming. This non-denominational group is for people who are separated or divorced. New members are welcome. Tuesdays, 6 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. (906) 475-6032 or northiron.church • Grief Share—Ishpeming. This nondenominational group is for people dealing with grief and loss. Mondays, 2:30 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. (906) 475-6032 or northiron. church • iCanQuit. Smokers are invited to learn more about quitting with the help of a quitting coach. (800) 480-7848. • Lake Superior Life Care and Hospice Grief Support Group—Gwinn. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. January 12. 2 p.m. Forsyth Senior Center, 165 Maple St. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice. org • Lake Superior Life Care and Hospice Grief Support Group—Marquette.

January 2022

People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. January 19. 5:30 p.m. Lake Superior Hospice, 914 W. Baraga Ave., and January 20 at 2 p.m. Mill Creek Community Room, address. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice. org • Lake Superior Life Care and Hospice Grief Support Group—Negaunee. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. January 20. 3 p.m. Negaunee Senior Center, 410 Jackson St. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice. org • Michigan Tobacco Quit Line. This free quit smoking coaching hotline provides callers with a personal health coach. (800) 784-8669. • National Alliance on Mental Illness—Support Group. Individuals living with mental illness and friends or families living with an individual with mental illness are welcome for Zoom meetings. January 10 and 20. 7 p.m. Call (906) 360-7107 or email ckbertucci58@ charter.net for Zoom invitation, or namimqt.com • Nicotine Anonymous. (415) 7500328 or www.nicotine-anonymous.org

• Sexual Health and Addiction Therapy Group. Call Great Lakes Recovery Centers for more details. Dates, times and locations vary. (906) 228-9696. • SMART Recovery—Calumet. A selfhelp group for alcohol and substance abuse and other addictive behaviors. Mondays, 7 p.m. Copper Country Mental Health, 56938 Calumet Avenue. smartrecovery.org • SMART Recovery—Hancock. Thursdays, 7 p.m. Basement Conference Room, Old Main Building, Finlandia University, 601 Quincy St. • SMART Recovery—Marquette. Mondays, Noon. Zoom meeting. Visit smartrecovery.com for Zoom link. • Take Off Pounds Sensibly. This is a non-commercial weight-control support group. Various places and times throughout the U.P. (800) 932-8677 or TOPS.org Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Supplemental Food Program. Clinics include nutritional counseling and coupon pick-up. Appointments required. Call for Marquette County schedule. mqthealth.org or (906) 475-7846. MM


p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-8051. • Film Showing: Ring of Silence. This film is about a human trafficking case in lower Michigan. The film is rated PG-13. Reception, 5:30 p.m. Film, 6:15 p.m. Q&A, 8:30 p.m. Ballrooms III & IV, Northern Center, NMU. (906) 361-3069. • Bluesday Tuesday. Under the Radar will perform classic blues and original music. Masks required. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

Heikki Lunta Winter Festival| January 28 - 29| Negaunee

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. Lessons, 10 a.m. Game, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 236-3173. • Chess Club. Students age 7 to 12 are invited. Masks required. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Forest Roberts Theatre: Next to Normal – Sensory Friendly Performance. This rock musical tells the story of a mother suffering from bipolar disorder. NMU students, $5; other students, $10; NMU faculty, senior and military, $12; general public, $17. 2 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. nmu.edu/tickets • Forest Roberts Theatre: Next to Normal. This rock musical tells the story of a mother suffering from bipolar disorder. NMU students, $5; other students, $10; NMU faculty, senior and military, $12; general public, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. nmu.edu/tickets

26 WEDNESDAY

Escanaba

• 4H Spin Culinary. Youth in grades 3 through 5 will learn how to cook, read recipes, measure ingredients, food preparation, along with nutrition and food safety during this six session series. $35 for six sessions. 2:30 p.m. Home Economics Room, Escanaba Upper Elementary, 1500 Ludington St. (906) 7863833 or bonifasarts.org

Marquette

27 THURSDAY

sunrise 8:20 a.m.; sunset 5:45 p.m.

Northern Center, NMU. (906) 228-2312 or upbuilders.org • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Zoom Meditation. Jeremy Morelck will lead this class with a focus on mindfulness, loving-kindness and compassion. 5:30 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link. • Cops and Robbers. Jack Deo and Jim Koski will share true crime tales and photographs. Advanced tickets: general admission, $15; balcony seating, $20. At the door: general admission, $20; balcony seating, $25. 7 p.m. Kaufman Auditorium, 611 N. Front St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org

Escanaba

• 4H Spin Club Puppet Studio. Youth age 9 to 15 will learn how to create imaginary characters in a hands-on puppet-making studio during this six session series. $18 for six sessions. 4 p.m. Bonifas Arts Center, 400 First Avenue S. (906) 786-3833 or bonifasarts.org

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 360-3056. • Decolonization of the Anishinaabe Presentation. Dan Truckey will discuss how Indigenous people were denied the right to speak their languages, practice cultural rites and rituals and had their lands taken away. Learn how the Anishinaabe are reclaiming what was lost and how non-indigenous people are working to make amends. Register by the 20th. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. 2 p.m. Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center, NMU. (906) 226-8347. • HBA Wild Game Dinner. Proceeds benefit the HBA of the UP Scholarship Fund and student chapter. $50. 4 p.m.

• Jazz Cabaret. The MTU Jazz Ensembles will perform. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, MTU. (906) 487-2073 or events.mtu.edu

Marquette

sunrise 8:21 a.m.; sunset 5:43 p.m.

• Homeschool Chapter Book Club. Youth age 8 to 10 are invited to hear the story Ramona Quimby Age 8 by Beverly Cleary. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Youth age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts and activities based off great books. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Tweens. Youth age 10 to 14 will read through the book Flora & Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo and complete a self-directed crafts. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Tweens’ Forbidden Forest, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (90) 2264323.

Houghton

28 FRIDAY

sunrise 8:19 a.m.; sunset 5:46 p.m.

Escanaba

• Mother and Son Ghostbusters Date Night. Mothers and sons are invited for a ghostbuster-themed craft and games. Pizza and snacks provided. $25 per couple. $10 for each additional son. 6:30 p.m. Bonifas Arts Center, 400 First Avenue S. (906) 786-3833 or bonifasarts.org

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 180 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Houghton

• Jazz Cabaret. The MTU Jazz Ensembles will perform. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, MTU. (906) 487-2073 or events.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1

p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod. com or (906) 485-4844. • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Forest Roberts Theatre: Next to Normal. This rock musical tells the story of a mother suffering from bipolar disorder. NMU students, $5; other students, $10; NMU faculty, senior and military, $12; general public, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. nmu.edu/tickets

Negaunee

• Heikki Lunta Winter Festival. Activities include a bonfire, the Tunnel of Lights, luge sliding, a guided snowshoe lantern tour, and the Irontown Rail Jam. Bonfire, 5 p.m. corner of Tobin and Iron streets; Tunnel of Lights, 5 to 11 p.m. Iron St.; Luge sliding, prices vary, 6 p.m. County Rd.; Rail Jam, 6 p.m. Rail and Iron streets; Snowshoe, 6 p.m. Old Town. travelmarquette.com

29 SATURDAY

sunrise 8:17 a.m.; sunset 5:48 p.m.

Negaunee

• Heikki Lunta Winter Festival. Activities include an Elks breakfast, ice fishing tournament, bonfire, luge sliding, Tunnel of Lights, a guided snowshoe tour, the Freeze Yer Fanny Fatbike Race and fireworks. Prices, times and locations vary. travelmarquette.com

30 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:16 a.m.; sunset 5:49 p.m.

Marquette

• Piano Recital. Five members of the Lake Superior Piano Workshop will perform French music composed during the last 19th and early 20th centuries. Donations appreciated. 3 p.m. Women’s Federated Clubhouse, 104 W. Ridge St.

Ishpeming

• Bingo. Join others for an afternoon of bingo. Snacks, hot soup and beverages will be available for purchase. Noon. Ishpeming VFW Auxiliary 4573, 310 Bank St.

31 MONDAY

sunrise 8:15 a.m.; sunset 5:51 p.m.

Escanaba

• Mother and Son Ghostbusters Toddler Date Day. Mothers and sons are invited for a ghostbuster-themed craft and games. Pizza and snacks provided. $15 per couple. $5 for each additional son. 2 p.m. Bonifas Arts Center, 400 First Avenue S. (906) 7863833 or bonifasarts.org

• 4H Spin Culinary. Youth in grades 3 through 5 will learn how to cook, read recipes, measure ingredients, food preparation, along with nutrition and food safety during this six session series. $35 for six sessions. 2:30 p.m. Home Economics Room, Escanaba Upper Elementary, 1500 Ludington St. (906) 7863833 or bonifasarts.org

Gwinn

Ishpeming

Escanaba

• Upper Michigan Ice Racing Association Races. Racers of all ages will compete during more than 20 classes of racing. $5 per carload. Registration, 9:30 a.m. Practice, 10:30 a.m. Noon. Forsyth Township Ball Park, off of Johnson Lake Rd.

January 2022

• An Evening of Singing Bowls. Experience relaxation and peace of sound meditation through Tibetan singing bowls and gongs. 7 p.m. Joy Center, 1492 Southwood Dr. (906) 362-9934. MM

Marquette Monthly

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