August 2022 Marquette Monthly

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Marquette Monthly

August 2022


contents

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City Notes Highlights of important happenings in the area 18 On Campus

News from U.P. universities & colleges

August 2022 No. 400

Publishers

Jane Hutchens James Larsen II

Managing Editor

Kristy Basolo-Malmsten

Calendar Editor Carrie Usher

Graphic Design Jennifer Bell Knute Olson

Proofreader Laura Kagy

Circulation

Dick Armstrong

Chief Photographer Tom Buchkoe

Marquette Monthly, published by Model Town Publishing, LLC, located at PO Box 109 Gwinn, MI, 49841, is locally and independently owned. Entire contents Copyright 2022 by Model Town Publishing. All rights reserved. Permission or use of editorial material in any manner must be obtained in writing from the publishers. Marquette Monthly is published 12 times a year. Subscriptions are $65 per year. Freelance material can be submitted for consideration to editor@marquettemonthly.com. Events can be submitted to calendar@marquettemonthly.com. Ad inquiries can be sent to jane@marquettemonthly. com or james@marquettemonthly.com

(906)360-2180 www.marquettemonthly.com

About the Cover Artist Susan Roubal grew up in Marquette,

loving Lake Superior, the landscape and everything U.P. She returned in 2007. After disability from Rheumatoid Arthritis made retirement from Pediatric Radiology a necessity, she discovered it was a blessing in disguise. The art she loved in high school was still in her, and she began painting with soft pastels. A member of Zero Degrees Gallery in Marquette, Susan serves on the ZDG and LSAA boards and can be reached at seroubal@hotmail.com

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New York Times Crossword Puzzle Movin’ on Up (answers on page 73)

20 Then & Now

Superior View Former WJPD radio building

21 Locals

Erin Elliott Bryan Museum director ready to welcome new leadership

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Feature

Taylor Johnson Markets offer social, nutritional benefits to communities

30 The Arts

Kathy Ihde Copper Harbor celebrates the arts

33 At the Table

Katherine Larson Tips to build a better burger

36 Lookout Point

Pam Christensen HarborFest welcomes new music

38 Back Then

Larry Chabot The Pride of Iron Mountain

40 Lookout Point

Pam Christensen USS Bayfield veterans converge on Marquette

43 Back Then

Sonny Longtine Physician, geologist leaves his mark on U.P.

45 The Arts

Pam Christensen Festival helps U.P. embrace the Blues

49 Back Then

Larry Chabot Nazis in the woods: German POWs in the U.P.

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Fiction

Brad Gischia The Pick, finale

54 The Arts

Kathy Ihde Annual Eagle Harbor art fair set for mid-August

57 In the Outdoors The wonder of many

Scot Stewart

63 The Arts

Ann Dallman Delta co-op brings musicians together

66 Back Then

Larry Chabot Sad ends of the Peter Whites

68 Poetry

Terri Bocklund From a Red Kayak

69 Superior Reads

Victor Volkman Last of Callahan mysteries chills and thrills

70 The Arts

Brad Gischia Art association celebrates 70 years

72 Home Cinema

Leonard Heldreth Hamaguchi films explore relationship challenges

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Coloring Page

The Gathered Earth

75 Out & About

Carrie Usher August events and music, art and museum guides

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city notes 123rd annual Italian Fest set for July 30 in Ishpeming

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he St. Rocco - St. Anthony Society of Ishpeming will host the 123rd Annual Italian Fest, which will take place on Saturday, July 30 at Al Quaal Recreation Area in Ishpeming. Admission is free and the public is welcome. Italian and American food and drink will be served, beginning at noon. Daylong activities include free pony rides, games of chance, ring toss, balloon darts, bingo, large glide slide, inflatable obstacle course, LaMora and a greased pole climb with a $100 prize at the top. This is the first year the festival is back to full offerings after scaled back celebrations the past two years. Kids games including a sawdust pile, sack race, egg toss start at 1:30 p.m. Party to Jazz will perform from noon to 2 p.m., followed by Soundz of Time at 2:30 p.m. and Diamanti at 5 p.m.

Historical society Main Street tour set for August 2

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he Ishpeming Area Historical Society will again host its evening Main Street tour during the month of August. First held last year, Ishpeming historian Karen Kasper has discovered more interesting information about the historic buildings on Main Street. The tour this year will be moving to a different section of historic downtown Ishpeming. The August tours will kick off at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, August 2. This is followed by tours every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. throughout the month. The tours will last a little over an hour. Participants meet in the parking lot on Main Street across from the Ishpeming City Hall. There is a suggested donation of $10, with children aged 12 and younger free of charge. All proceeds from the tour benefit the Ishpeming Area Historical Society. This is a walking tour and will be canceled in case of inclement weather. Call (906)250-0985 for details.

League of Women Voters next meeting on August 3

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he Marquette County League of Women Voters presented a Forum for the public to hear directly from the candidates for the 109th Michigan House District. Joe Boogren, Jenn Hill and Melody Wagner answered questions submit-

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ted by the audience and by other citizens of the 109th for ninety minutes at the Marquette Township Community Hall. About 70 people, along with 25 League members, attentively listened to the candidates and talked with them afterward. The forum was live-streamed, with a total of 199 views, and is now recorded and available at www.lwvmqt. org and on the League Facebook page “League of Women Voters of Marquette County.” The League of Women Voters will hold its next membership meeting at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, August 3 at the Peter White Public Library lower level. For details, email dthomsona@ gmail.com

Wolf management plan open for feedback until August 4

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hose interested in sharing feedback about the Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ newest draft of the state’s wolf management plan are invited to complete an online questionnaire, available through August 4. Michigan’s wolf management plan —created in 2008 and updated in 2015—is being updated this year, using public input to identify prominent issues, assess public attitudes and review the biological and social science surrounding wolves. The draft 2022 plan has four principal goals: • Maintain a viable wolf population. • Facilitate wolf-related benefits. • Minimize wolf-related conflicts. • Conduct science-based and socially responsible management of wolves. Michigan’s wolf management plan has guided oversight of this species in the state for the last 13 years. The 2022 update will include recent scientific literature, input from the Wolf Management Advisory Council and results of a new public survey. Michigan’s gray wolf population was almost eliminated by the mid1970s. Today, Michigan has a wolf population close to 700 in the Upper Peninsula. Gray wolves in Michigan were again removed from the federal endangered species list in early 2021, but a federal court decision in February 2022 returned them to federal protections. For details, visit www.Michigan. gov/Wolves


Counsel General of Japan to visit Marquette in August

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SJ Yusuke Shindo and his wife, Mrs. Seiko Shindo, will be guests of the Marquette Area Sister City Partnership on August 3 and 4. The visit will highlight the strong Sister City relationship between Marquette and Higashiomi, Japan which began 43 years ago. The trip will include a visit to Northern Michigan University, a sightseeing tour of the area and a dinner with the Sister City Board. A public reception will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. on August 4 in the Sister City Room at the Peter White Library. Everyone is invited to learn of the partnership and to welcome them to Marquette.

History museum highlights decades-long project

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he Marquette Regional History Center presents “Michigan Mining Scrip” at 6:30 p.m. on August 3. Many years of extensive research led to the publication of this complete and colorful tome, Michigan Mining Scrip. Three authors and collectors collaborated on research of copper and iron mining companies throughout the U.P. that created their own company scrip (currency). Author David Gelwicks will present on this decades-long project and share his passion for rare fiscal papers and their stories. Admission is a $5 suggested donation. Hands On! Art and History Day Camp will take place from 10 a.m. to noon August 22 through 26 at the History Center. This is the ninth annual day camp collaboration between the Marquette Regional History Center and Liberty Children’s Art Project! Youth enjoy an immersion into local history and multi-media art making. Multiple art techniques are taught during this camp with art teacher and LCAP Director Carol Phillips. Explore the History Center’s current special exhibit, Railroads of Marquette County: Yesterday and Today, through a lively history experi-

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ence and themed projects. Ages eight through 12 can come for five days of creativity, fun and take a blast to the past. Pre-registration is required, and cost is $50 for the week ($45 for museum members). There is a $10 discount for additional siblings. Register by calling the history center at (906)226-3571. Visit www.marquettehistory.org for more information.

Festival to take place at Marquette Harbor Lighthouse

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he Michigan Lighthouse Festival is traveling to Marquette to shine its light on the Marquette Harbor Lighthouse from August 5 through 7. Each year the Michigan Lighthouse Festival travels to a new city in Michigan to promote their lighthouses and their history on the Great Lakes. Attendees can expect a collection of activities and speakers throughout the weekend at various venues throughout Downtown Marquette. Friday will kick things off with a get-together from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Masonic Building in Downtown Marquette with guest speaker Bruce Lynn from the Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society and a showing of Disney’s The Finest Hour. Festivities will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday at the Marquette Maritime Museum, starting with the Maritime Market providing a wide selection of vendors. The first guest speaker will be Brian Lijewski, Architect Specialist, S.H.P.O., followed by Burt Mason, president of the Huron Island Lighthouse Preservation Society. On Sunday, a Fair Sailing Brunch will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the historic Landmark Inn. Various ticket options are available for people to attend all that the Michigan Lighthouse Festival has to offer. For more information, visit www. michiganlighthousefestival.com

46th annual U.P. Gem & Mineral show set for August 6

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he Upper Peninsula Gem and Mineral Show will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Satur-

mea culpa!

n our Back Then story titled “Connie in Charge” on Page 44 of our July 2022 issue, Lt. Gov. Connie Binsfeld’s last name was spelled wrong. We regret the error.

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n Page 8 of City Notes in our July 2022 issue, the brief about the Negaunee Beautification Committee should have referenced parks in the City of Negaunee. We regret the error.

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day, August 6 at the Ishpeming Elks Club at 597 Lakeshore Drive. Admission is free, and door prizes, a kids area, silent auction, displays and vendors will be available. Working demonstrations will take place throughout the day, and field trips will take place both Friday and Saturday. The event is sponsored by the Ishpeming Rock and Mineral Club. For more information, email showinfo@ ishpemingrocks.org or visit www. ishpemingrocks.org

August features packed schedule at Crystal Theatre

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rystal Theatre is proud to announce a full slate of professional entertainers for the 2022 season, including Crystal Gayle as the featured artist of the Legend Series. One of the most popular female country singers of her era, Gayle takes the stage at 7 p.m. on Saturday, August 20. Gayle was inducted into the Grand Ole Opry in 2017; her career and talent are legendary. On August 6, Fortune Lake Camp presents an original musical called One Wonderful Day, written and produced by staff alumni and performed by an intergenerational group of campers. On August 12, The Insiders present

the premier Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers experience, honoring the legendary rock-and-roll artist. Also part of Fungus Fest weekend, two screenings of The Humongous Fungus Among Us are offered Saturday, August 13. The quirky documentary by Tim Warmanen celebrates the illusive giant mushroom and the community that calls it a friend. On August 21, the ever-popular Beethoven and Banjos concert presents a diverse program of chamber and fiddle/banjo music. Visit www.thecrystaltheatre.org or call (906)875-3208 for details on how to order tickets.

Volunteers needed to tend planters, parks in Negaunee

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he Negaunee Beautification Committee is seeking volunteers to help care for parks in the City of Negaunee. The next meeting will take place at 6:30 p.m. on August 11 at the pocket park on Iron Street in Negaunee. For details, call Anna at (906)362-8160.

Buzz the Gut car show set for August 13 in Ishpeming

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he 20th Annual Buzz the Gut Car Show and Parade will be held at the Cliffs Shaft Mining Museum on August 13. The show runs from 4 to

Bradford Veley is a freelance cartoonist, illustrator and farmer in the U.P. Follow him on Facebook, Instagram and at www.bradveley.com

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U.P. Notable Book Club presents virtual Q&A with author of book about Soo history

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he Crystal Falls Community District Library in partnership with the U.P. Publishers & Authors Association (UPPAA) has scheduled its August event with Phil Bellfry, whose U.P. Colony re-interprets the history in the Soo. The 20th event will take place at 7 p.m. on August 11 via Zoom. Contact Evelyn in advance at egathu@ crystalfallslibrary.org or (906)8753344. Bellfry is the editor and publisher of the Ziibi Press, enrolled member

7 p.m. at Cliffs Shaft Mining Museum parking lot, with a car cruise beginning at 7 p.m. For more information call Scott “Skids” Perry at (906)485-1234.

Copper Country Rock, Mineral Show set in Houghton

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he 2022 Copper Country Gem & Mineral Show will take place August 12 through 14 in Houghton. Door prizes, displays, a silent auction and minerals, fossils and lapidary will be available from 1 to 8 p.m. on Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday in the Houghton Elementary School. Geologist and author Nathalie Brandes will give presentations at 4 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Kids can

of the White Earth Band of Minnesota Chippewa, co-director of the Center for the Study of Indigenous Border Issues (CSIBI) and professor emeritus of American Indian Studies, Michigan State University. He has been involved in environmental issues at the Tribal, international, national, state and local levels for more than 45 years. Bellfy is also the author of Indians and Other Misnomers: A Cross-Reference Dictionary of the People, Persons, and Places of Native North

find copper with a metal detector, and free mineral grab bags will be available. For details, visit www.ccrmc.info

Republic hosts Retro Days from August 19 through 21

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epublic will have a town celebration this year called Retro Days from August 19 through 21. Activities will take place all weekend, including a farmers market, parade, car show, craft fair and foot trucks. Performances by Rainbow Flyte Aerial Arts will take place, and there will be children’s activities and more. Pine Grove Bar will have live music by Derrell Syria Project, Diversion, Lillian Manceau and Toni Saari,

Placemaking

America, Three Fires Unity: The Anishnaabeg of the Lake Huron Borderlands and the editor of Honor the Earth: Indigenous Response to Environmental Degradation in the Great Lakes, 2nd Ed. You’ll be joined by readers from around the Upper Peninsula in a lively question and answer session with the author. For details on the U.P. Notable Book list and UPPAA, visit www. UPNotable.com

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as well as karaoke.

Marquette breweries host 5Ks in state running series

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he Michigan Brewery Running Series is coming to Marquette in August. Michigan Brewery Running Series (MiBRS) hosts 5K fun runs that start and end at local breweries all across the state of Michigan. They are hosting two 5K fun runs. The first will start at Drifa Brewing at noon on Saturday, August 20. The second will start at Superior Culture at 11 a.m. on Sunday, August 21. A portion of all proceeds support local non profits. Check them out on Facebook or Instagram by searching “Michigan Brewery Running Series,” or visit breweryrunningseries.com/ michigan

National acts performing at Lake Fanny Hooe-Down

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The City of Houghton is working with the Michigan Economic Development Corporation on the long-awaited Pier Placemaking Project. MJO Contracting of Hancock anticipates a project ending date sometime this summer. Between the Portage Lake District Library and the Michigan Tech Lakeshore Center, the pier will create a year-round gathering space along the waterfront in the middle of downtown Houghton.

ingle-day and two-day passes are now available for The Lake Effect Bar & Grill’s Lake Fanny HooeDown 2, presented by IncredibleBank & The Nicholas Agency, representing Auto Owners Insurance. Lake Fanny Hooe-Down 2 is a two-day event set for Friday, August 26 and Saturday, August 27 in Copper Harbor. It features food, drink, fun and music headlined by legend Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder, and multi-Grammy nominated hit-maker Joe Nichols. The two-day music lineup also features Shawn Lane and Richard Bennett. Youth is served with the addition of Carson Peters and Iron Mountain. The talented 18-year-old Peters was recently a contestant on The Voice, has guested on The Tonight Show and performed with Ricky Skaggs at the Grand Ole Opry and on the nationally televised CMA (Country Music Association) Awards broadcast. For tickets, visit www.fannyhooe. com, stop by the Lake Fanny Hooe

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On the Trail

The Iron Ore Heritage Recreation Authority (IOHRA) cut the ribbon on a new trailhead on the Iron Ore Heritage Trail, located on the historic Eagle Mills Sawmill at the corner of M-35 and CR-492. It includes a vault toilet, paved parking lot, lighting, bike racks, bench and map board. The trailhead was partially funded by a $73,300 Michigan Recreation Passport Grant. Pictured include, from left, Lucy Wilcox, Superior Alliance for Independent Living; Larry Rasmussen, Oberstar; Rick Kauppila, U.P. Fabricating; Rob Katona, DNR Trails Specialist; Don Britton, Chair, IOHRA; Ron Yesney, DNR U.P. Trails Coordinator; Al Reynolds, IOHRA Board Member and Negaunee Township Planning; Carol Fulsher, Administrator IOHRA; Bob Hendrickson, IOHRA Board Member, Bill Sanders, Sanders-Czapski, Landscape Architect; Jon Mayes, DNR Grants Management; Nick Leach, IOHRA Board Member and Negaunee Township Manager; Dawn Hoffman, IOHRA Board Member

Resort & Campground office, or call (833)326-6946.

Finn Fun Day set for August 27 in Negaunee Township

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inn Fun Day will take place from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, August 27 at the Negaunee Township Hall. It is a day full of Finnish entertainment, many chances to visit with friends, a marketplace, a white elephant table and silent auction table, 50/50 drawings, and coffee with “pulla” or Finnish cardamom coffee bread available all day long. There is no food truck this year. Finn Fun Day is sponsored by the Finlandia Foundation National Lake Superior Chapter. There is no admission fee. Parking is ample and free. Festivities begin with a welcome by Chapter President Ron Hill. Singing the American and Finnish national anthems follows, led by Tanya Stanaway and Pauline Kiltinen. Words to the Finnish anthem will be provided. A brief business meeting will follow, where the main order of business is the election of board members. All dues-paying members of the Chapter are eligible to participate on the

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Board, which meets four times per year. Vendors include Tanya Stanaway and her Heart to Finland traveling store, Aaren Joki and his Metsami Creations with its many wood items, Anna Leppanen with her Finnsight store, Tammy Ruppel with her cardamom and cinnamon breads, Eero and Roseann Angeli making and selling sauna “vihtas” or switches, Colleen Creech with her Finnish rag rugs, Jean Kohtala with her Sisu rugs and other Finnish items, and Avelin Yost and the beautiful Estonian knits of her Baltic Inspirations. Performers include vocalists Tanya Stanaway and Aaren Joki, and harmonica player Howard Aalto, with more entertainers expected. For details, call (906)226-7085 or visit the FFN Lake Superior Chapter website on Facebook.

Marquette County Habitat celebrating 30 years

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arquette County Habitat for Humanity is crossing a big milestone this year, and community members are invited to join in on the fun. The 30th Anniversary Summer Celebration is scheduled from 1 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, August 28 at the Lak-


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enenland Pavilion, located at 2800 M-28 East in Marquette. This event will feature music, snacks, drinks, door prizes and a silent auction, rock painting, a selfie station, and other fun activities designed for all ages. The event is free to attend, but donations are welcome. Marquette County Habitat for Humanity is currently working on its 109th home. The ReStore, which funds its projects, is located at 133 Carmen Drive in Harvey, and is open Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

NMU offers first mind-body Asahi Nordic courses

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MU is the first institution in the United States offering courses in Asahi Nordic, a Finnish mind-body practice. Asahi is gaining popularity in the community, thanks to the NMU alumna who brought it here from Finland. The one-credit Asahi Nordic course reached its capacity for last winter quarter and now two classes are being offered this fall semester. Marquette residents 62 years and over can take the class for free. Call (906)227-2528 to register. Margaret Vainio, a 1976 NMU

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graduate and the first woman licensed to teach Asahi to students and instructors alike, brought Asahi to America from Finland in the midst of the pandemic to offer a means to help people of all skill levels fight the side effects of a sedentary lifestyle and provide solutions to current health challenges. Last year, Vainio certified Asahi teachers in Marquette, Big Bay, Negaunee and Ironwood. These instructors have become advanced level teachers, and more have been trained in Bessemer, Ironwood and five towns in Wisconsin. Twelve-hour beginning teacher training and certification courses will be available in Marquette from August 26 through 28, September 2 through 4, and by appointment until September 12. Asahi Nordic Institute is making a special “80-20” offer until December 31: anyone 20 years and younger or 80 years and older can train for free. Online classes are also available anytime at www.asahiworld.com

Volunteers needed to mentor youth at U.P. State Fair

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f you’re looking for a volunteer opportunity to help young people experience outdoor recreation – helping instill in them a sense of Michigan’s

August 2022

great natural resources heritage and traditions – then the Michigan Department of Natural Resources is looking for you. Mentors are needed to help staff the DNR’s Pocket Park during the Aug. 15-21 Upper Peninsula State Fair. Volunteers assist with helping kids catch and release bluegills in the U.P.shaped pond, shoot pellet guns or bow and arrow, staffing the fire tower or greeting visitors. The DNR Pocket Park is a one-acre site, located off US-2 within the fairgrounds. The park caters especially to youngsters who are seeking an outdoor adventure or to learn an outdoor skill. The U.P. State Fair draws more than 95,000 visitors annually, many of whom visit the Pocket Park to participate in the recreation activities, experience nature programs, visit with conservation officers or enjoy a relaxing, shaded spot to sit, in a natural resource setting. The Pocket Park has a wooded landscape and a small waterfall. Businesses and organizations, or clubs and groups, may wish to sponsor shifts during the fair by having their employees or members volunteer as a group. Recognition of the group or business will be prominently

displayed and announced. Volunteer training for all activities is provided. Anyone interested in volunteering should contact Jo Ann Alexander at (906)786-2351, ext. 0 or alexanderj7@michigan.gov

Cliffs Shaft Mine Museum acquires underground artifacts

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he Cliffs Shaft Mine Museum in Ishpeming has acquired several underground iron ore mining artifacts. The artifacts were previously on display at Da Yoopers Tourist Trap in Ishpeming. Prominent among the acquisitions is a “motor,” which is an electric locomotive used to haul trains of ore and equipment within the mine. Also acquired were an ore car, timber car, EIMCO loader and several smaller items. The artifacts will be displayed in the outdoor equipment area in front of the museum in a manner that depicts their actual underground usage. Cliffs Shaft Mine Museum thanks Dave Korpi for his generous donation to make the acquisition possible, Dave Crimmins of A. Lindberg & Sons for providing the labor and equipment to move the artifacts and Jim DeCaire of Da Yoopers Tourist Trap for making the artifacts available. The Cliffs Shaft Mine Museum is


open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and offers guided tours at 10:30 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2:15 p.m.

farmers, and buying local produce. Fun weekly activities ranging from cooking demonstrations to farmers market scavenger hunts provide nutrition, food, agriculture and exercise education to the children and families that participate each week. POP Club kids are encouraged to try new healthy foods and overcome picky eating through exposure to healthy food options in a fun and exciting environment.

eDNA offers insights

Marquette Farmers Market welcomes Power of Produce

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he Downtown Marquette Farmers Market is excited to welcome back the Power of Produce (POP) Children’s Program. This program will be run by Partridge Creek Farm, a non-profit organization based in Ishpeming, that is dedicated to building a healthy, prosperous and empowered local community through food and wellness education. This eight-week program will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays through August 20 during the Saturday Morning Farmers Market in the Marquette Commons. There is no sign-up necessary; children between the ages of two and 12 are welcome to stop by the POP tent to participate in the weekly activity. POP participants receive a $2 voucher each week of participation to spend on the foods of their choice at the market. These vouchers also serve to empower kids, by giving them the purchasing power to buy from farmers and local vendors at the market. The POP Program is a farmers

Two Michigan companies partner on fiber investment

P Researchers from the Hiawatha National Forest and the Northern Research Station are using modern technology in an effort to bring back an iconic fish that was nearly wiped out by early 20th-century logging and commercial fishing—the sturgeon. Environmental DNA, or eDNA, is genetic material that is shed from organisms and then briefly persists in the environment—like pollen in the air from plants or skin cells in the water from fish. Because researchers only need an environmental sample from the surrounding air, water or soil to obtain it, eDNA is ideal for locating hard-to-find animals like lake sturgeon. Vern St. John and Jeremy Hubbard hold this impressive sturgeon on Indian Lake.

market-based children’s program, that seeks to teach children about fruits and vegetables, local food systems, and healthy food preparation through

fun activities. Participants engage in the full farmers market experience by trying new foods, having conversations with

August 2022

eninsula Fiber Network, LLC (PFN), a provider of fiber optic-based telecommunications and Next Generation 911 services throughout Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota, has plans for fiber to connect the U.P. While PFN has its roots in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and 123NET is based in Metro-Detroit, the new north-south fiber route will have immediate benefits to the local communities along the route. It will also provide overall connectivity between SE Michigan and the Upper Peninsula, extending into Wisconsin and Minnesota. This partnership further supports 123NET’s mission of building a network to make Michigan the best

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connected. Construction on the network has already begun and will be completed in sections over the next 18 months.

UPHS-Marquette seeks input about community needs

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P Health System-Marquette, in collaboration with other local health professionals and stakeholders, is working on a road map to health for the people of Marquette County, identifying public health needs, goals, objectives and priorities. To complete that roadmap, the hospital has launched a comprehensive Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA), which will provide the foundation for improving and promoting the health of each member of the Marquette County community. Conducted every three years, a CHNA is a systematic collection, assembly, analysis and dissemination of information about the health of the community. Its role is to identify factors that affect the health of a population and determine the availability of resources within the community to adequately address those factors. UP Health System-Marquette is seeking community input as part of its research, which is being gathered through an anonymous community health survey. The survey takes about five to 10 minutes to complete and will be analyzed by Stratasan, their CHNA partner. Individuals wishing to take the survey and learn more about CHNAs may visit www.UPHealthSystem. com/CHNA

9/11 Day volunteer project funding available

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he Michigan Community Service Commission, in partnership with AmeriCorps, is pleased to announce the availability of funds for the 9/11 National Day of Service. Honoring this moment in our nation’s history by serving in your community helps transform 9/11 into a day of unity, empathy and service. In doing good deeds that help others, residents rekindle the extraordinary spirit of togetherness and compassion that arose in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 tragedy. All service projects must occur on or around September 11, 2022, and $100 to $1,000 grants are available. The application deadline is Wednesday, August 12. Michigan national service grantees, municipalities, volunteer centers, nonprofit organizations, food resource organizations, mentoring organizations, youth groups, youth service organizations,

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K-12, and higher education institutions are eligible to apply. For details, visit the Michigan Community Service Commission website.

Superior Health Foundation accepting grant applications

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he Superior Health Foundation (SHF) is now accepting applications for Year 2 of its Proactive Grant Focus process for projects positioned to make an impact on improving food insecurities throughout the entire Upper Peninsula. The foundation will announce the award(s) at its Fall Grants Program, which will be held in October at the Holiday Inn in Marquette. In 2021 and 2022, the SHF—along with a number of U.P. and statewide funding partners—will award more than $1.2 million in collective funding to address food insecurities. SHF is open to renewing funding for year two, provided organization(s) successfully implement their year one plan and have a continued work plan for year two. To apply for grant funding, visit www.superiorhealthfoundation.org For details, call (906)225-6914 or email shf@superiorhealthfoundation. org

DNR announces ARPA-funded state park projects

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odge renovations, upgraded electrical and water distribution systems, preservation of historic structures and stabilization of riverbanks for trail resurfacing—at first glance, these may not be the most glamorous, but they are some of the “shovel ready” projects identified by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources from among its long list of critical needs in Michigan state parks. The DNR has given the green light—along with $15,962,000—to state park projects throughout the state. It’s all part of the DNR’s Phase 1 funding made possible through Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s Building Michigan Together Plan, a $4.8 billion infrastructure package signed in March that included a record-setting $250 million to help address a decades-long backlog of repair and maintenance needs at state parks and to build a new state park in Flint. That funding stemmed from the federal relief program, the American Rescue Plan. The first round of projects include the following in the U.P.: • Fayette Historic State Park (Delta County): $600,000 to reconstruct the south wall of the west casting house


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in the park’s historic townsite – where visitors can take a walking tour of 20 original structures from the once bustling, late-1800s, iron smelting industrial community. This is the first phase of a historic preservation project in the park. • Fayette Historic State Park (Delta County): $400,000 to reconstruct approximately 300 feet of retaining wall adjacent to the historic charcoal kilns in the park’s historic townsite. The kilns were constructed to produce charcoal for blast furnaces to smelt iron ore. This is the second phase of a historic preservation project in the park. • Straits State Park (Mackinac County): $2 million to replace the two upper campground toilet and shower buildings, which will mirror finish details from newly constructed buildings in the park’s lower campground. • Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park (Ontonagon County): $1.4 million to renovate and preserve the Kaug Wudjoo modern lodge, staff quarters, mechanic’s shop, carpenter’s shop and fire barn. Renovations include the construction and replacement of new roofs and siding, as well as enhancements to accessibility features. Utility and structural upgrades also are included in ongoing historic preservation efforts.

MDHHS encourages public to avoid foam on water

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he Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) recommends that Michiganders and visitors avoid foam on Michigan waterbodies such as lakes, rivers and streams. Foam can form on any waterbody, and sometimes can have harmful chemicals in it. This can include high levels of per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). PFAS-containing foam tends to be bright white in color, lightweight and may pile up along shores or blow onto beaches. An MDHHS evaluation suggests young children who come into contact with PFAS-containing foam for a

few hours a day may be more at risk of negative health effects. Some studies in people have shown that higher PFAS exposure is linked to higher cholesterol and thyroid disease. Natural foam without PFAS is usually off-white and/or brown in color, often has an earthy or fishy scent, and tends to pile up in bays, eddies or at river barriers such as dams. If you do come in contact with foam, MDHHS recommends that you rinse off or bathe as soon as possible. This is especially true if the waterbody has suspected PFAS contamination. Coming into contact with foam without rinsing off or bathing can lead to accidentally swallowing foam or foam residue. The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) also recommends that people do not allow their animals to come into contact or swallow foam on waterbodies. If animals do come in contact with foam, they should be rinsed off and bathed with fresh water as foam can build up in animal fur. Anyone with questions about exposure to PFAS or foam can call the MDHHS Environmental Health hotline at (800)648-6942.

Program for needy families open for public comment

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he Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) is accepting public comment on its plan for spending Temporary Assistance for Needy Families funding from the federal government. The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) State Plan can be viewed on the MDHHS website. The plan is effective Jan. 1, 2023. The public can submit comment by email to MDHHS-TANF@michigan. gov through Sept. 5, 2022. TANF is a federal program run by states that assists families who are unable to provide for their children’s basic needs. The plan is for the three years beginning in 2023. Michigan received $772.8 million from TANF for fiscal

Did You Know...

Celery was a commercial crop in the U.P.?

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etween the 1880s and the end of World War II, celery was commercially cultivated in Newberry. It was sold throughout the U.P., and people waited for the trains to arrive in their town to purchase it. Restaurants promoted the fact that it was “U.P. celery” on their menus. Eventually, celery farming moved to California. Submitted by Dr. Russell M. Magnaghi, history professor emeritus of NMU and a U.P. author and historian.

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year 2022, with $528.1 million appropriated to MDHHS.

988 crisis line helping connect Michigan residents

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ichiganders in crisis now have an easy-to-remember three-digit number to call for help—988. Michigan has joined the nation in transitioning to the 988-dialing code, which will operate through the existing National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s network of more than 200 locally operated and funded crisis centers across the country. In 2020, Congress designated the new 988 dialing code to operate through the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. This action expands the existing Lifeline beyond people who are feeling suicidal to all individuals experiencing a behavioral health crisis, including suicidal thoughts or substance abuse issues. Anyone in emotional or mental health-related distress, having thoughts of suicide or having a substance use crisis can call. There are specialized services available for veterans, LGBTQ individuals and other groups. People who are worried about a loved one and need support also can call. The 988-dialing code does not replace the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (800-273-TALK (8255)) or other locally operated crisis lines. Instead, it serves as a universal entry point to connect individuals in need to trained crisis counselors who can help. MDHHS is working to ensure a solid infrastructure is built through coordination with 911 and other crisis service providers as the 988-dialing code launches. Prior to the development of 988, the Michigan Crisis and Access Line (MiCAL) was funded by the Michigan Legislature in December 2018. MDHHS was charged with the development of MiCAL, which is currently operating in Oakland County and the Upper Peninsula, and with 988 implementation. MiCAL is built on the SAMHSA’s National Guidelines for Behavioral Health Crisis Care which is also the foundation for 988. In Michigan, MiCAL is responsible for answering 988 calls in all areas of Michigan. In Macomb and Kent counties, Macomb County Community Mental Health and Network 180 will answer 988 calls with MiCAL providing back-up call coverage.

MDHHS launches website to educate about monkeypox

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o help keep Michiganders up to date on monkeypox (MPV)

and the state’s response to the virus, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) has launched a new website at www. Michigan.gov/mpv The site provides information about the signs and symptoms of MPV, number of cases in the state by county; information for health care providers about testing and coordinating with local health departments, treatment and other resources for the public and providers. State case count information will be updated regularly. MPV is a disease caused by infection with the monkeypox virus. MPV belongs to the Orthopoxvirus genus, which also includes variola virus (which causes smallpox), vaccinia virus (used in the smallpox vaccine) and cowpox virus. While both diseases may have similar presentation, MPV is not related to chickenpox. Persons experiencing MPV symptoms should contact a health care provider for evaluation. CDC is urging health care providers in the United States to be alert for patients who have rash illnesses consistent with MPV, regardless of whether they have travel or specific risk factors for MPV and regardless of gender or sexual orientation. While many of those affected in the current global outbreaks are men who have sex with men, anyone who has been in close contact with someone who has MPV can get the illness. There are no treatments specifically for MPV infections. However, MPV and smallpox viruses are genetically similar, which means that antiviral drugs and vaccines developed to protect against smallpox can be used to prevent and treat MPV infections. States are receiving vaccine allocations from the Strategic National Stockpile in accordance with the number of MPV cases and the size of the underlying at-risk population. Michigan has received a limited supply of the vaccine, JYNNEOS. Additional limited allocations will follow in the next few months, but specific quantities and timelines are not yet known. The federal government continues to purchase vaccine, but JYNNEOS is not likely to become broadly available in the near-term. For details, visit Michigan.gov/ MPV or CDC.gov/monkeypox

Home health agency receives 5 Star patient rating

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.P. Home Health & Hospice announced the agency has achieved a 5 Star rating for patient surveys through the Home Health Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HHCAHPS) and 4.5

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Star Rating for quality measures. HHCAHPS surveys patients to make it easier for families to compare home health agencies. The survey collects feedback from current or recently discharged home health agency patients (or their family) about their experiences. The quality of patient care rating is determined using each home health agency’s scores on 7 individual quality measures, which are based on home health agency patient assessments and Medicare claims. HHCAHPS conducts these surveys completely independently.

Program offers debt relief to health care providers

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edical providers of behavioral health services in underserved areas in Michigan are now eligible for medical education loan repayment. The MI Kids Now Loan Repayment Program is a medical education debt repayment program that focuses on incentivizing behavioral health care providers to practice in underserved areas in Michigan. It is open to providers of services to both children and adults, but the priority will be providing debt relief to those who serve children. The program aims to assist schools and employers in recruiting and retaining behavioral health providers who will continue to demonstrate their commitment to building longterm behavioral health infrastructure in these communities. The program will provide participants up to $200,000 to repay their educational debt if they participate in the program for eight years. Providers who have questions or need more information can contact Reanna Kathawa at kathawar@michigan.gov

National Guard training benefits boat access site

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n-the-ground training took place at Horseshoe Lake boating access site in Marquette County, courtesy of a partnership between the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Michigan Army National Guard. Work included graveling, shaping and crowning the access road to the boating access site on Horseshoe Lake. The lake is located south of Republic and west of M-95. The Michigan Army National Guard staged their training activities from the abandoned campground located on Horseshoe Lake in July. The program falls under the U.S. Department of Defense Innovative Readiness Training program, which provides training opportunities that increase deployment readiness of the

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Army National Guard, while performing services that benefit public lands. This project builds upon a strategic relationship between the DNR and the Michigan Army National Guard started in 2020, when a similar training exercise was successfully completed at the Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park to improve several park buildings and complete a substantial road project. Project materials will be funded through the Michigan State Waterways Fund. The restricted fund, which is derived from boat registration fees and the Michigan marine fuel tax, helps fund the construction, operation and maintenance of public recreational boating facilities. The Michigan Army National Guard donated the skilled labor for the project.

News from the desk of Governor Gretchen Whitmer

• Governor Gretchen Whitmer sent a letter to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) urging the agency to remove burdensome restrictions on reproductive health care, specifically mifepristone, a safe, effective medication abortion pill. This action builds on the governor’s ongoing efforts to protect women and reproductive freedom after the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs v Jackson overturning a 49-year precedent set by Roe v Wade. • Whitmer and thirteen other governors from across the country sent a letter to congressional leaders urging them to make permanent the advanced premium tax credits (APTCs) enacted in the American Rescue Plan (ARP). Getting this done would lower costs and protect healthcare for over 270,000 Michiganders. • Whitmer announced that major road projects are expected to begin in Houghton and Iron counties. MDOT is investing about $1 million to resurface 2.2 miles of M-26 from 21st Street to the village limit of Lake Linden in Houghton County. Work includes sealing, asphalt milling and resurfacing, concrete sidewalk ramps and pavement markings. MDOT will invest $1.5 million to resurface 6.5 miles of M-189 from the Wisconsin/ Michigan state line to north of Hiawatha Road in the cities of Caspian and Iron River in Iron County. Work includes asphalt milling and resurfacing, gravel shoulders and new pavement markings. • Whitmer highlighted investments in working families and connected communities in the recently passed bipartisan budget for Fiscal Year 2023. The budget delivers additional resources to communities across


Michigan to help them invest in first responders, speeds up replacement of lead service lines, builds a new veteran’s home, shores up pensions for municipal workers, and invests in infrastructure. The fiscally-responsible, balanced budget delivers on the kitchen-table issues, was passed on time, and does not raise taxes. • Whitmer signed House Bill 5678, eliminating the service fee associated with having a veteran-designated license plate. • Whitmer declared a state of emergency for Marquette County to address the impacts of thunderstorms and flash flooding that caused widespread damage in May. • Whitmer created the Michigan Parents’ Council to more formally bring parents into the policymaking process. The council will build on Governor Whitmer’s work to include the parent perspective into the start of the 2022-2023 school year, the education budget, and streamline how parent recommendations are included in Michigan’s education budget. The council will represent parents from across Michigan and host a series of regional parent roundtables to gather input. • Whitmer signed 11 pieces of legislation, bringing her total number of bipartisan bills signed to 931. Legistlation included the Tobacco 21 package, raising the state age for tobacco sales to 21; expansion of access to opioid antagonists for individuals experiencing overdose; privacy in divorce rights, providing additional time for those who file for divorce before the filing is made public; cracking down on organized retail crime; and amendments to the Tobacco Products Tax Act. • Whitmer signed a bipartisan education budget that will make the highest state per-student investment in Michigan history, invest half a billion dollars in school infrastructure, fund teacher recruitment, bolster school safety, expand mental health resources, and so much more.

Local business news...in brief • The Lake Superior Community Partnership (LSCP) recently moved to 101 West Washington Street, Suite 10, in Marquette. • The Fire Station Cannabis Co.’s human resources director Carlee Wasik has been accepted to serve on the Michigan Cannabis Regulatory Agency’s (CRA) Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Workgroup (DEIW); this group will meet once a month and work to guide the CRA on issues related to diversity, equity and inclusion while empowering their stakeholders.

• Victoria Leonhardt of Marquette was appointed to the Rural Development Fund Board by Governor Whitmer; she is appointed to represent residents of the Upper Peninsula for a term expiring December 31, 2025. • InvestUP received an allocation of $15 million for Upper Peninsula economic development as part of the 2022-2023 Michigan budget bills; the award was one of 144 enhancement grants issued statewide and InvestUP was the only economic development organization to receive funding. • The Community Foundation of Marquette County awarded 64 scholarships to the Class of 2022; the foundation, which administers 76 scholarship funds, is distributing more than $130,000 to college-bound students throughout the county. • The Marquette Downtown Development Authority announced their new executive director, Tara Laase-McKinney; Tara has been with the MDDA for nearly eight years, serving most recently as business development and promotions director. • The Copper Axe—a family friendly axe-throwing parlor—is now open for business in Calumet. The only axe-throwing parlor in the Upper Peninsula, it has six lanes, each with its own target and a variety of axe sizes to throw. • Neenah Paper Inc. and Schweitzer-Mauduit International, Inc. have completed their merger and are now operating under the name Mativ Holdings Inc; the newly-formed company touted its strong market share in growing categories like health care and wellness, protective and adhesive solutions, industrial solutions, packaging paper and specialty paper. • The Keweenaw Peninsula is now home to the world’s newest International Dark Sky Park; the first International Dark Sky Park in the U.P. and the third in Michigan, the Keweenaw Mountain Lodge will serve as the park’s headquarters. • Gogebic Community College is looking to address workforce shortages by rolling out short-term, free workforce training this summer that is offered to anyone with a high school diploma; the training is funded by a $225,000 MEDC Regional Talent Innovation Grant secured by InvestUP in collaboration with regional partners.

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Editor’s Note: The deadline for event and press release submissions for City Notes is the tenth of the month prior to publication. Please email your press release to editor@marquettemonthly. com

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on campus

Book selections set for Two Books event

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wo Books Two Communities of Marquette and Alger Counties has named this year’s book selections: The Lightkeeper’s Daughters, an adult novel, and Me and You and the Red Canoe, a children’s book, both by award-winning Canadian author Jean E. Pendziwol. The Lightkeeper’s Daughters tells the story of Elizabeth, whose father and family ran the lighthouse on Porphyry Island on Lake Superior 70 years before. Though her mind is still sharp, Elizabeth’s eyes have failed. No longer able to linger over her beloved books or gaze at the paintings that move her spirit, she fills the void with music and memories of her family—a past that becomes all too present when her late father’s journals are found after a tragic accident. With the help of Morgan, a delinquent teenager performing community service, the pair reads through the diaries. As the words on the musty pages come alive, Elizabeth and Morgan begin to realize that their fates are connected to the isolated island in ways they never dreamed. Pendziwol’s debut novel was a Globe and Mail bestseller, a BBC Radio Two Book Club selection and winner of the Northern Lit Award for Fiction. It has been published in 11 countries.

She is also the author of nine books for children, and has been nominated for the Governor General’s Literary Award for Children’s Literature and the TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award. In Me and You and the Red Canoe, for ages 5 to 8, in the stillness of a summer dawn, two siblings leave their campsite with fishing rods, tackle and bait, and push a canoe into the lake. A perfect morning on the water unfolds, with thrilling glimpses of wildlife along the way. The poetic text is accompanied by beautiful paintings rendered on wood panels that give a nostalgic feeling to the story. School Library Journal wrote that it is “A true gem that invites contemplation and reflection in children, who are often too busy to notice the beauty of everyday life.” Pendziwol will give presentations in the Marquette and Munising areas this fall. Details will be announced in August at nmu.edu/onebook/twobooks and on Facebook: Two Books Two Communities Marquette & Alger. The group, founded in 2006, is a collaboration between Northern Michigan University, Peter White Public Library, Munising School Public Library and community members.

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Northern partners with Eastpointe Schools

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MU has established a new partnership with Eastpointe Community Schools (ECS) that will provide an online pathway for eligible ECS staff to obtain teacher certification in exchange for a three-year commitment to teach in the district upon completion of the program. The ECS Board of Education recently approved funding to cover NMU tuition so that employees who already hold a bachelor’s degree can obtain a secondary certificate in a core subject area. Paraprofessionals can pursue a bachelor’s degree with

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a certification in learning disabilities. “This is an exciting opportunity to train and keep highly qualified educators in our classrooms,” said ECS Assistant Superintendent Christina Gibson in a press release. “This partnership will help us invest in staff members who are already committed to our Eastpointe community and care deeply about our children.” Eastpointe Community Schools is located 16 miles northeast of Detroit. For details on NMU education programs, visit nmu.edu/education

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MOVIN’ ON UP

Reprinted from the New York Times

No. 0717

By Christina Iverson/Edited by Will Shortz

ACROSS 1 [omg haha!!] 5 Left speechless 9 Reward for sitting, say 14 Entice 19 Something we share 20 Rocker John whose surname sounds like a leafy vegetable 21 ‘‘____ Man Chant,’’ song by Bob Marley and the Wailers 22 Diarist Nin 23 Where some stable relationships form? 25 San Diego State athlete 26 Verge 27 Name that’s 98-Across backward 28 The sky, they say 29 ‘‘All the Light We Cannot ____’’ (2015 Pulitzerwinning novel) 30 Certain Chinese teas 32 Roman emperor after Nero and Galba 34 Heep of ‘‘David Copperfield’’ 36 Drop the ‘‘Donuts’’ from ‘‘Dunkin’ Donuts,’’ e.g. 38 Some four-year degrees: Abbr. 39 Kind of attack with no attacker 40 Michael Jackson hit whose title is heard 88 times in the song 41 What might accompany a grave admission? 44 Claws 47 Cheese with a light, nutty flavor 49 Quite an uproar 52 Design style influenced by Cubism 53 Fabric often dyed with indigo 55 Each of its interior angles measures 135 degrees

Answer Key

To check your answers, see Page 73.

56 Swing preventer, of a sort 58 Like some vows 60 Run off together 61 Personal ID 62 Like a sweater that shrank in the dryer, maybe 64 Its alphabet includes delta 65 Some Brothers Grimm villains 66 Artless nickname? 68 Tease 70 Sarcastic punch line 71 That guy’s 72 40 winks 75 Threads 77 Tepid greeting 79 Second word of many a limerick 82 Sans-serif font 83 Thesis writer 85 Meaning of a signal flare 88 2021 Aretha Franklin biopic 90 Strained 92 Greek name meaning ‘‘golden one’’ 93 Something filmed in Broadway’s Ed Sullivan Theater, with ‘‘The’’ 95 Journalist Skeeter in the Harry Potter books 96 Train segment 97 Butt end 98 Name that’s 27-Across backward 99 ‘‘Sweet dreams!’’ 101 Rapper ____ Rida 102 It’s not a good look 106 Family/species gobetween 107 The last thing you need? 109 Like the community portrayed in Netflix’s ‘‘Unorthodox’’ 111 Piercing tool 113 Tickle 115 Evian, in its native land 117 Cruciverbalist’s favorite cookies? 118 ‘‘Well, gosh!’’ 120 Tipsy trips 122 Teatro alla ____

123 Takes a car, in a way 124 Lab assistant in ‘‘Young Frankenstein’’ 125 It may be upper or lower 126 Blue-book filler 127 Much of a sponge 128 Mad, with ‘‘off’’ 129 Word of surprise DOWN 1 Santa ____, Calif. 2 Closing section 3 Banana wielded by a maestro in a pinch? 4 Drug that can be microdosed 5 Berry in a bowl 6 Animated short before a Pixar movie? 7 New York resting place for Mark Twain 8 In the stars 9 Give a scathing review of a major camera brand? 10 Demolish 11 Compound with a fruity smell 12 Had a hero, say 13 Mexican street-food mogul? 14 Pair of small hand drums 15 Defunct company of accounting fraud fame 16 Smaug, in ‘‘The Hobbit’’? 17 Send an e-message to 18 Makes shame-y noises 24 Does a fad 2010s dance 31 Pro using cuttingedge technology? 33 Movie rating that’s practically NC-17 35 Political staffers 37 Retreat 42 ‘‘Fingers crossed!’’ 43 Window units 44 Small amounts 45 God whose name sounds almost like the ammunition he uses 46 Starts to go haywire

48 Where 122-Across can be found 50 Places for placentas 51 Surrounding lights 54 Movement championed by the Silence Breakers 57 Get rid of 59 Light-headed sorts? 63 Word after gas or ice, in astronomy 65 Novelist Achebe 66 Wizard’s name in books and movies 67 Spun things 69 Kind of patch that may create holes instead of repairing them 72 Otis and ____ (1960s R.&B. duo) 73 Disciplines 74 Response to ‘‘Why art thou queasy?’’ 76 What Amazon retirees enjoy most? 78 Result of love at first sight? 79 What a dog greets its returning family with? 80 Inter ____ 81 Trade jabs 83 Retail takeover scheme? 84 Fix, as laces 86 Nomad 87 Annyeonghaseyo : Korean :: ____ : English 89 Tailgating dish 91 ‘‘Tarnation!’’ 94 Very, colloquially 100 Compassionate 103 Actress Davis who was the first African American to win the Triple Crown of Acting 104 Start of a guesstimate 105 Like a proverbial beaver 108 Model material 109 Place for a run? 110 Rainbows, e.g. 112 ‘‘____ saved!’’ 114 Large amount 116 Bookstore sticker 119 ‘‘Euphoria’’ airer 121 Excellent service?

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then & now

The former WJPD building, located on US-41 in Ishpeming, in the 1950s.

WJPD 92.3 FM first aired in 1975, and can be heard from Thunder Bay to Newberry. It was named for its founding owner, James P. Deegan.

Photos provided by Superior View Studios, located in Art of Framing, 149 W. Washington Street Marquette www.viewsofthepast.com

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locals

Museum director ready to welcome new leadership W By Erin Elliott Bryan hen Nheena Weyer Ittner first moved to the Upper Peninsula in 1980, her father told her she was going to the “fringes of the ice caps.” A graduate of the University of Michigan, Ittner came with her former husband, who had family in the area, and began teaching art at Ishpeming High School. It was during this time that she realized there wasn’t a lot for kids to do in the area. She had visited children’s museums throughout the country and appreciated what they had to offer. So, she asked herself a simple question: Why not—why couldn’t Marquette have one? Now, more than 30 years later, Ittner has decided to step down as executive director of the Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum (UPCM), a magical place for kids and families that was created with love by Ittner, her dedicated staff and board members and the greater Marquette community. “After going through COVID and then having a small health scare, I came to realize how I needed to grab life outside of the museum,” Ittner said. “It just felt right.” Ittner was born and raised in Midland, Michigan, in what she refers to as a “rich and wealthy” community. “There were lots of opportunities for kids,” she said. “It was a model of how a town should be.” But the same couldn’t be said for the Marquette area at the time. “There was no huge non-profit presence,” Ittner said. “It was just a different place.” In the mid-1980s, Marquette— along with Alger County, Detroit and Grand Rapids—was chosen by the Kellogg Foundation as a site for a pilot program to positively affect the lives of local children. Ittner thought it sounded “innovative and cool.” Through the program, Ittner and other community leaders were educated in child development and engagement. She recently had her second daughter, which she said “broadened her thinking.” What Ittner took from that program

After 30 years at the helm, U.P. Children’s Museum executive director Nheena Weyer Ittner is handing over the reins to a new director; the board hopes to name a new one by fall. (Photo courtesy of Nheena Weyer Ittner)

simply reinforced what she had already been considering: she wanted to create a children’s museum. Over the next few years, Ittner jotted down “copious handwritten notes” and prepared to pitch her idea to local service groups to secure funding. It didn’t go as planned, and she didn’t receive any money. “Some in the back thought I was a crazy woman,” she recalled. She went back to the drawing board and further brainstormed the idea with friends. In 1991, the group applied for nonprofit status, and the Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum was official-

ly incorporated. Ittner was hired as the museum’s director in 1992. In searching for a location for the museum, Ittner said the founders also wanted to “positively affect the area.” They settled on a 32,000-square-foot former moving and storage warehouse in the industrial area of West Baraga Avenue. They took over part of the building to create modest offices, but they didn’t have the resources needed to begin building out the museum. “We had no money and had to think creatively,” Ittner said. “We knew we could get programming money from [the Kellogg Foundation], but not for

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the exhibits.” What they decided to do was ingenious, a quintessential example of Ittner’s out-of-the-box thinking. They made the design of the museum a program in and of itself. Called Design-a-Saurus, the UPCM enlisted local children to design the entire museum—from the big blue bunny at the front entrance to the exhibits and even the heating system. The kids worked with the architects and the builders to develop their ideas, which were then executed by museum staff. A mining exhibit, as an example, was created after kids visited a local mine and asked questions of a geologist. “It was really grassroots,” Ittner said. “It reflects the community.” Similarly, local businesses and community members donated many unique items that could be recycled and reused in a variety of ways. “The things there are repurposed to spark kids’ imaginations,” she said. Carpet shops even donated remnants that could be swapped out

whenever one area gets worn out. They may not match, but Ittner, who has an artist’s eye, says it looks like a quilt. The museum finally opened its doors in 1997. Six years later, in 2003, the UPCM was awarded the Governor’s Award for Arts and Culture for being an exemplary cultural institution. The Reinventing Michigan Award was given to the museum in August 2011 and Ittner earned the Evergreen Award that same year. From the beginning, part of Ittner’s vision has been to empower children through leadership. Embedded deep into all aspects of the UPCM was the importance of providing opportunities for kids, whether as exhibit designers and builders, museum greeters or birthday party helpers. “It’s amazing what these kids can do,” Ittner said. “If you can smile, that’s all that matters. Visitors won’t remember the exhibits, but they will remember how they were treated and they’ll come back.” One of the children Ittner inspired

Ittner’s grandsons Mattais and Sauli enjoy the exhibits at the museum, which prides itself on the interactive quality of its offerings—kids get to be the center of the adventure. (Photo courtesy of Nheena Weyer Ittner)

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UPCM board member Andrew LaCombe and Ittner burn the symbolic museum mortgage in 2013. (Photo courtesy of Nheena Weyer Ittner)

is Andrew LaCombe, who is now the news director at WLUC-TV6. LaCombe began his involvement with UPCM at just eight years old, when a teacher referred him to Children’s Express, a nationwide youth journalism program that was administered locally by the museum. LaCombe even recalled getting to tour the museum before it was open to the public. “Nheena and the museum are a big part of my life,” LaCombe said. “In fact, a thank-you note I wrote after that tour still hangs on Nheena’s office door, from eight-year-old Andrew.” LaCombe continued to participate in Children’s Express, which later became 8-18 Media, an independent program now solely under the direction of the UPCM. LaCombe credits those programs for exposing him to “once-in-a-lifetime things,” as well as how to create print and radio news stories. At age 15, he was first invited to become part of the museum’s youth board of directors. “Nheena knows how to talk to people on their level; she connects with people in a unique way,” LaCombe said. “She makes you feel like you’re

special, you matter, and makes people feel like they’re a part of something.” In his role on the board, LaCombe said he learned valuable leadership skills, as well as decision making and operations, both fundamental aspects of a nonprofit that most people don’t think about. “I also learned the importance of community philanthropy and why volunteering is so important in a community,” he said. LaCombe graduated from Marquette Senior High School in 2008 and earned a degree from Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin. He returned to Marquette after college when he once again served as part of the UPCM board of directors. He then spent three years as a reporter with WLUK-TV in Green Bay, Wisconsin, before returning to Marquette in 2017. LaCombe is now in his second term on the UPCM board, his third stint as a member. “Nheena has a way of drawing in more volunteers,” LaCombe said. “You can’t say no.” LaCombe recruited some of his friends to join him on the board and lauded Ittner for attracting younger,

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post-college-age volunteers. He said the UPCM is led by one of the youngest boards of directors in relation to other non-profit organizations. “Nheena is a huge mentor to so many young adults in the community,” LaCombe said. “She inspires younger people to serve in roles like this.” LaCombe also admires the way Ittner herself volunteers her time outside of the museum. In addition to her position as UPCM executive director, she has donated her time and talents to a variety of local causes. As an example, she and LaCombe serve together as board members of the Marquette Symphony Orchestra. He said her legacy will live on through the museum and in the greater community. “Nheena has a great balance of working and having fun. She’s a fun person to be around,” LaCombe said. “She’s built a place that is so welcoming to the community. All backgrounds, whether you’re from Marquette or visiting from another country, can play together and be equal, and have fun and learn. They can be a kid and not be worried about the bigger pressures in life, whether you’re four or 44.” Creating a welcoming space was indeed an important tenet of the museum’s creation. The Playmakers pro-

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gram provides free memberships for families in need and no one is ever turned away. “I want everybody to use this museum,” Ittner said. “Every single child deserves this.” Although Ittner had her own daughters, Ilsa and Ricci, at the forefront of her mind in the development of the museum, they were too old to fully enjoy it when it finally opened. However, she has since been able to share the joy of play with her two grandsons, Mattias and Sauli Taylor. A third grandson is expected in September. “I’m seeing how much they love it,” she said. Today, the Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum includes eight current exhibits, including favorites like the Human Body, which features the popular intestine slide and giant head, and Micro Society. As part of Over the Air, the new Pedal Power exhibit teaches kids about energy, power and electricity. Pedal Power opened in May and is a partnership with the Marquette Board of Light and Power and the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum. “A lot of the museum is so loved, so we don’t change it, we just tweak it,” Ittner said, adding that other parts are not up to the staff’s expectations and are redesigned. “Every exhibit is

Ittner spearheaded the project to bring a children’s museum to Marquette, which came to fruition in 1992. (Photo courtesy of Nheena Weyer Ittner)


Nheena Weyer Ittner joins her grandson Mattias on the green screen inside the museum. (Photo courtesy of Nheena Weyer Ittner)

a stage. The child becomes the performer and tells their own story.” The museum offers a variety of programming for all ages—some featuring outside organizations and artists—that celebrate books, music, art and more. Marquette Monthly, along with The Mining Journal and Public Radio 90, for example, partners with 8-18 Media. The Second Thursday Creativity Series offers “Together Time” for the preschool and elementary-aged child and an adult friend and includes themed hands-on activity stations, a food craft and a live musician. It’s always free thanks to community sponsorships. The UPCM also participates in downtown Marquette’s annual Art Week and presented the “Paint the Downtown with Love” Chalk Art Festival in June. As she thinks about the museum’s next executive director, Ittner allowed that it’s an interesting position, one that is heavily focused on networking and being embedded in the community. “It’s a community project,” she said. “The museum is a community treasure.” Ittner said a team of museum board members is conducting interviews

throughout the summer and hopes to have a new director named by the fall. She has plans to work with her successor as long as they both feel it’s necessary. “The museum is like a child and we’re trying to find another parent,” Ittner said. “You have certain values and are looking for a certain person you can trust to raise your child.” Under Ittner’s careful leadership, the Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum has revitalized an industrial part of town, empowered kids to think and lead and been a safe place for families to laugh, play and grow together in a non-competitive way. Ittner has witnessed children take their first steps, create art and make new friends. “We can use the museum to make life better,” Ittner said. “It’s a place that the community can feel proud of. I just want to see it grow and develop and serve every child.” MM About the author: Erin Elliott Bryan grew up in Ishpeming and was the MM calendar editor from 2001 to 2005. She also served as assistant director of 8-18 Media, a program of the Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum, from 2002 to 2004. She is now a freelance writer.

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feature

The Chassell Farmers Market is open Wednesdays through September. (Photo courtesy of Moriah Goodall)

Markets offer social, nutritional benefits to communities

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By Taylor Johnson hen you hear the words “farmers market,” you may envision local growers selling their fresh produce—mom-andpop farms presenting their hard work for community consumers to purchase. While there is no shortage of vegetables and meats at the markets, there is usually more to be found than just the typical bushel of carrots. Baked goods, soaps, jewelry, pottery and so much more can be discovered. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, the first farmers market happened in Lancaster, Pennsylvania in 1730. When city engineers were designing the city of Lancaster, they left space in the center of town for a public marketplace. The USDA claims there are now more than 8,000 markets across the United States. Many of these markets can be found here in the Upper Peninsula. Summertime is the perfect time for farmers markets in the U.P., as markets are typically held outdoors. Since the first market in Lancaster, markets have been growing rapidly. In a 2016 report made by the Michigan Farmers Market Association, “over the last 10 years, the number of farmers markets in Michigan has doubled, from 150 in 2006 to more than 300 in 2016.” Markets are a great way for people to support and invest in communities. While it is important to support one

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another, there are several other reasons farmers markets are important to individuals and communities. According to the Farmers Market Coalition, “A study by the Project for Public Spaces revealed that people who shop at farmers markets have 15 to 20 social interactions per visit, while they would only have one or two per visit to the grocery store.” The interactions we may have with vendors, or even other market patrons, can connect us in ways that we never thought possible. Sometimes markets even feature live music by locals to tap your toes to. With the constant movement of shoppers and wide variety of options, conversations can easily be struck up. “Farmers markets became especially important to bring people together after the isolation of the pandemic,” said Amy Waldo, Skandia Farmers Market Social Media Outreach Assistant. While some markets have been running for years, such as the Marquette Farmers Market that has been in existence for 23, others, like the Chassell market are brand new this season. Whether established, or just starting out, markets bring people to one space to admire the fruits of producer’s labors. They give the public a place to mingle with each other and enjoy the beauty that is handmade and homegrown. “You can stand in this market and

hear the buzz of activity and music and laughter, and see the smiles on the faces, the children playing, all while getting your weekly groceries and shopping done!” Chassell Market Committee Member Moriah Goodall said. While the produce at markets is fresh and vibrant, it is also often quite affordable. “Many of the farmers and bakers at our market feel that our prices are at or lower than what you can get in the supermarket and are higher quality,” Goodall said. Not only is there a wide variety of produce at markets, but it is also affordable because producers are selling outright. Many markets accept WIC, SNAP and other food assistance programs, thus providing lower income households with the opportunity of shopping local and healthy. “In 2017, more than $22.4 million SNAP benefits were redeemed at farmers markets,” the Farmers Market Coalition’s website stated. “The USDA reports that the number of SNAP households shopping at farmers markets between 2012 and 2017 increased by 35.2 percent.” Local markets that accept food assistance programs have seen those dollars put to good use. “In 2018, the Calumet Farmers Market began integrating and expanding food access programs at the mar-


ket,” said Rachael Pressley, volunteer member for From the Ground Farmers Market Collective (which manages the Houghton, Calumet and Hancock markets). “That year they did a little over $1,000 total for all programs, including credit/debit tokens.” Food assistance programs not only help consumers eat healthier but provide some relief when it comes to paying for goods. Shopping locally means more of your money stays in that community. Perhaps no one feels this impact more than farmers themselves. “Right now, the economic impact cannot be understated,” Waldo said. “With the rising cost of gas, groceries for all of us, along with the feed and resources that farmers rely on, the farmers market plays a reciprocal role. Our local farms are a resource that we must fight to maintain. Our food supply is increasingly important.” While the economic impact of markets often does not have an exact number attached to it, Marquette Farmers Market Manager Sara Johnson said she is working to gather data this year to provide statistics. “What I can tell you right now is during 2020, I launched an online market which allowed the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market to continue operating,” Johnson said. “Without this option, we would have been forced to shut down due to all the COVID restrictions. The online market ran for 12 weeks and brought in nearly $60,000 in sales for our farm vendors. This is just a small snapshot with a small group of vendors.” Nearly $60,000 in sales from an online market in 12 weeks—now imagine what that number could be now that in-person markets have resumed.

The economic impact stretches beyond just the market, though. Surrounding businesses attract market crowds that are out and about shopping. A report put together by the Michigan Farmers Market Association stated that, “Farmers markets attract shoppers to a downtown or commercial area where they will often linger and make additional purchases during their shopping trip, thus spreading economic impact throughout the community.” Johnson echoes that statement. “Our hope is that folks are visiting the market and also supporting local business as well,” she said. Farmers markets feature crisp vegetables, jellies and jams, and healthy crops; but did you know you can also find handcrafted crafts of all varieties? You won’t find any big-box store knickknacks at markets, only products handmade with love and care. “The Downtown Marquette Farmers Market is very specific about who we work with and what types of products are eligible,” Johnson said. “We work with farmers, growers, food producers and artisans. Everything at the market is made by the person selling it. We do not allow any resale items or kits.” Whether you’re on the hunt for small plants, flowers, beeswax candles, art or even lotion, farmers markets are places you might acquire the item you’re looking for locally. “Due to our remote location and rising fuel costs, the Copper Country has limited access to fresh produce and quality home goods at reasonable prices,” Goodall said. “Our farmers and artisans can fill that void.” Farmers markets provide the opportunity to get to know exactly

The Houghton Farmers Market runs on Tuesdays, and is located on Huron Street, near the library. (Photo courtesy of Portage Health Foundation)

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where goods were made or grown and who made them. “It feels good to know your farmer and know where your food comes from, how it was produced and to see the positive impact of supporting your neighbors in their small businesses,” Munising Farmers Market Manager Hilary Ludecke said. Vendors can give the lowdown on how their product was grown or made, the challenges they faced growing or making their goods, or even just give you simple tips on what to do with that bag of leeks you’re about to buy from them. The feeling of knowing you’re buying from a local person who produced that good is immeasurable. Farmers markets run seamlessly, thanks to preparation and work put in by market managers and volunteers. “I think people think of farmers markets as these cute things that just pop up—a bunch of vendors just show up and boom! There’s a market,” Johnson said. “If only it were that easy.” Preparation includes managing website and social media content, networking with vendors, advertising, deciding on dates/times/fees, drawing up contracts for the city to sign, renewing contracts with food assistance programs, and the set-up and teardown of the physical market. “My work as a market manager begins months before the first market day of the season,” Ludecke said. There are many markets occurring in the U.P. this summer and into the fall, with many of the central U.P. markets listed below. Most can be found on social media platforms such as Facebook or Instagram for those wishing to follow them. Week after week, market managers share information on market vendors, videos and sometimes even photos from behind the scenes at markets. “Farmers markets are critical to communities because they connect and rally people around a central need—local food,” Pressley said. “Our local food system supports and promotes the physical, economic, social and environmental health for all.” Alger County he Munising Farmers Market is held at Binsfeld Bayshore Park from 4 to 7 p.m. on Mondays through October 3. More than 20 vendors can be found selling meat, eggs, produce, plants, honey, photography, crafts, books and more. The market accepts SNAP/EBT, Double Up Food Bucks, WIC Project Fresh, Senior Market Fresh, Food As Medicine and the Tribal Market Walk Token program.

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Delta County elta County has markets in Escanaba, Gladstone and Rapid River. The Escanaba market is located at 1501 Ludington Street and operates from 3 to 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, and from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturdays through October. They also offer a winter market located at the Civic Center, 225 21st Street North from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. The market includes vendors that sell fruits, vegetables, baked goods, jams, meats and crafts. The Gladstone market, located at 911 Delta Avenue, runs from 3 to 6 p.m. on Mondays through September. Fruits, vegetables, fish, meats, jams, maple syrup and crafts can all be found at the market. The Rapid River market is located at 10465 South Main Street and runs from 3 to 6 p.m. on Thursdays through October. Produce, crafts, baked goods, soaps and more can be found.

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Houghton County arkets are held in Chassell, Lake Linden, Houghton, Calumet, Hancock and South Range in Houghton County. The Chassell market is located at 103 3rd Street in the Chassell Township Centennial Park Pavilion from 4 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays through September 28. The market features about 50 vendors selling produce, berries, jams, jellies, bakery items, freeze-dried mixes, eggs, meats, stone art, wood working, knife sharpening, handmade crafts and survival gear. The Lake Linden market can be discovered at 401 Calumet Street from 4 to 7 p.m. on Fridays through September 30. More than 20 vendors can be seen there selling produce, prepared foods and hand-crafted items. Community and local information about the area is also available. The market participates in Senior Project FRESH, WIC´ and Aspirus RX programs. The Houghton market is located on Huron Street next to the Portage Lake District Library (on the top parking deck behind the Keweenaw Brewing Company) and runs from 4 to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays through October 11. It features more than 20 vendors that sell produce, maple syrup, honey, bakery items, eggs, jams, jellies, whole bean coffee, handmade crafts, beeswax candles, plant starts and personal care products. The market participates in SNAP/EBT, Double Up Food Bucks, and Senior Project FRESH programs. The Calumet market, located on the 300 block greenspace between Fifth and Sixth Streets, runs from 10

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The farmers market located in the Marquette Commons is open on Wednesday nights and Saturdays. (Photo courtesy of Sara Johnson)

a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays through October 8. They have a wide variety of vendors selling produce, baked goods, maple syrup, honey, meats and crafts. The market participates in SNAP/ EBT, Double Up Food Bucks, Senior Project FRESH, Aspirus FVRx (Prescription for Health), Husky Fan and UPCAP Prescription for Health. The Hancock market can be found at 403 Quincy Street and runs from 3 to 6 p.m. on Thursdays through October 13. Many vendors can be found selling items such as 3D printed items, produce, crafts, jams, jellies, meats, pasties, fruits, and vegetables. The market participates in SNAP/EBT, Double Up Food Bucks and Senior Project FRESH programs. The South Range market, held in the baseball field parking area on Tuesdays from 3 to 6 p.m., runs through August 30. There are more than a dozen vendors selling baked goods, produce, eggs, meats, blacksmith items, artwork, jewelry and more. Marquette County arquette County has several farmers markets to peruse. Options include Negaunee, Marquette, and Skandia. Negaunee’s market is located at Miners Park from 4 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays through September 28. More than 12 local growers, crafters, bakers, artists, and businesses vendors can be found there. They also participate in Senior Project Fresh food program. The Marquette Farmers Market can be found at the Marquette Commons building, located at 112 South Third Street. It runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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on Saturdays through November 19, and from 4 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays through September 21. There is also a holiday market on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. December 3 through 17. About 60 vendors can be found at the Saturday market, and about 20 at the Wednesday one. Vendors sell fruits, vegetables, meats, maple and honey products, baked goods, jewelry and more. The market participates in SNAP/EBT, Double Up Food Bucks, WIC Project Fresh, Senior Project Fresh and Prescription for Health food programs. The Skandia market, located at 9271 US-41 South, operates from 4 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays through October. It features more than 25 vendors selling meats, eggs, produce, plant starts (flowers and vegetables), cut flower bouquets, maple syrup, honey, jams, quilts, baskets, goat soap, bakery items and more. The market accepts SNAP/EBT, and is working on adding more food assistance options. Schoolcraft County he Manistique farmers market is located at the Little Bear West Arena parking area at 180 North Maple Street, and runs from 5 to 6:30 p.m. on Wednesdays through the fall. Vendors can be found selling ice cream, fruit, soap, honey, flowers, baked goods, produce and more. MM

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About the author: Taylor Johnson is a Marquette native who graduated from Northern Michigan University in 2017. She thoroughly enjoys writing and has worked as a journalist for a newspaper. She loves the outdoors, pizza and a nice cup of tea.

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the arts

Copper Harbor celebrates the arts

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By Kathy Ihde ohanna Davis has been organizing Copper Harbor’s Art in The Park since 2002 and she’s looking forward to the 20th anniversary year. This year’s Art in The Park will take place August 20 and August 21. “It’s always the third weekend in August,” Davis said. “It follows the Eagle Harbor Art Fair, which is always the second week in August. We’re hoping to have 65 booths; we have 48 artists signed up so far. We’ve always tried to have between 60 and 65 booths for Art in The Park.” Art in The Park goes on, rain or shine. It’s truly something for the whole family to enjoy, especially children, who have access to the beautiful Copper Harbor School Playground adjacent to the park. Art in The Park normally draws artists from all over the United States, including places like Arizona, Florida, Maryland, New York and Texas. They bring an array of art mediums with them: watercolor; acrylic; wood carvings; metal smithing and metal art; copper; fine jewelery and locally handcrafted jewelry. You’ll find handmade soaps, candles, felting, photography, ceramics and artists who work with stones found in Michigan, and the Keweenaw area. The $85 booth fee includes both days and the artists get a twelve-foot square booth space. They’re responsible for their own tent, tables and chairs. Pre-setup is Friday evening at 5 p.m. Anyone who wants to set up early on the morning of the show needs to be there by 8 a.m. The past few years, Art in The Park has been collaborating with Grandpa’s Barn Bookshop to bring in authors and book signings to the store and in the park. Davis noted the musicians who will be performing during the two days of Art in The Park. Unfortunately, fan favorite Whitewater will not be able to perform this summer due to a prior engagement with the Rozsa Center at Michigan Tech. This year, a new musical group, 2XL, will be performing on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. The musicians are Phil Vigelaus, Kim Jensen and Eric Kot. On Sunday, the Art in The Park Reunion Band will be playing from noon to 3 p.m. Members of the group include Gail English, Rob Fritz, Jen-

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Art in The Park welcomes artists from around the country, which brings art connoisseurs as well. (Photo courtesy of Natasha Walters)

ny Fritz, Steve Jones, Scott McIntosh, Mark McEvers and John Peiffer. The Copper Harbor Fire Department will be serving brats, hot dogs and fresh corn on the cob. This is the largest annual fundraiser for the fire Department. They will be serving both Saturday and Sunday afternoons. “I’m not sure if we’re going to have a bake sale this year,” Davis said. “We haven’t been able to have one for the past two years because of the pandemic. I think it’s a matter of who would like to oversee the bake sale right now. The proceeds from the bake sale go to Art in The Park and the proceeds from Art in The Park are used for advertising Copper Harbor. “When I came on, I trained with Laurel Rooks for two years,” Davis said. “The largest group of artists

we’ve had would be 75; we had to expand into the park. It’s fluctuated the past two years because of the pandemic.” Some of the artists give live demonstrations, including glass blowing, jewelry making and carding. The pandemic affected Art in The Park when they had to cancel the show in 2020. “Last year, we spread out more,” Davis said. “We had fewer people and we spread them out a bit more in the park. This year, we’ll probably have a little more room for the booths.” Davis said they welcomed new artists last year and that helped. “There are about 40 artists from last year who are coming back this year,” she said. “The rest are teetering to see how things are going with the


economy.” Some artists travel from far away and are concerned about gas prices and other costs. “They’re concerned about their other expenses, like lodging, camping fees and food,” she said. “It’s a big concern for people who are traveling. We’ll see how it goes; it’s going to be a process.” Davis said several artists attend both Art in The Park and the Eagle Harbor Art Fair. “The Eagle Harbor and Copper Harbor shows host some of the same artists,” she said. “They will make a long vacation out of coming to the Keweenaw, and they’ll do the Eagle Harbor show first. Then they come up for the Copper Harbor show the following weekend. They have time in between shows to make more of their work, or they spend time in the Keweenaw, making a mini vacation out of it. Having the shows back-to-back helps vendors and customers, alike. “Sometimes customers see something they like at the Eagle Harbor show and they think about it a little bit,” Davis said. “When they see it again at the Copper Harbor show they purchase it!” More than 40 years ago, Art in The Park was the brainchild of members of the Copper Harbor Improvement Association (CHIA) Advertising Committee: Gail English, Peg Kauppi, Laurel Rooks and Jody Wheeless. According to English, the mem-

bers divided up the tasks needed to start Art in The Park. English was in charge of finding volunteer musicians for both days. “Back then, we had several groups performing throughout the afternoon,” English said. “I went around to restaurants and motels to beg for meals and rooms for the musicians. Jody and Laurel set up the park, marked all the booth spaces and were the contacts for the artists.” According to Rooks, she and Wheeless were best friends who each owned their own Copper Harbor gift shops. Rooks owns The Laughing Loon and Wheeless owned The North Station (she moved from Copper Harbor in 2006). “We both had individual artists who brought work for us to sell in our shops,” Rooks said. “Things like handmade crafts, pottery, jewelry and artwork—I thought it would be cool to display their work somehow. Jody had the same thought, so we combined our ideas. Instead of having a small space in our shops, we could showcase their work in an annual art show. “We came up with booths set up in the park for individual artists. Each of the artists had an entire booth to themselves and they could do their own thing in their booths. We knew the artists individually and we knew how talented they were. It was such a cool thing to do.” According to Peg Kauppi, this group of friends, also members of the Copper Harbor Improvement Associ-

Art in The Park will take place on August 20 and 21 this year in Copper Harbor. (Photo courtesy of Natasha Walters)

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ation (CHIA) Advertising Committee, were having dinner at the Harbor Haus when they came up with the idea of an art show. They knew what the artists did individually, and the committee thought it would be cool to showcase their work in an art event of some kind. “You have to realize that art shows weren’t a thing 40 years ago,” Kauppi said. “Marquette was the only community who had an art show at the time. We realized summers were busy in Copper Harbor, and we wanted an event that would attract more visitors to the community. We wanted to give them a cool event.” At that time, according to Kauppi, they immediately decided they wanted it to be a juried art show with guidelines and rules; they didn’t want an arts and crafts show. Artists contacted the committee ahead of time and submitted samples or photos of their work. For many years, Rooks was more in touch with the artists and took on the role of coordinating with them. Kauppi handled the business end of the show. “The quality of ‘Arts and Crafts’ really changed over the years; those artists are passionate about their work, too,” Kauppi said. “That first year, we were happy to have 22 artists’ booths.”

The CHIA ad committee has few financial resources: they print a Copper Harbor map each season and the local businesses place advertisements in the map that include the location of motels, resorts, shops, restaurants and stores. Their second resource is the funds usually raised by the bake sale. The last two years of not having the bake sale hurt the group financially, since it’s one of their larger sources of revenue every year. “It’s funny,” Davis said. “A long time ago, my mom (Judy Davis) started a mini art show in the Copper Harbor schoolyard. She did that years ago and she was quite young when she started it, in her early teens or twenties.” Twenty years later, Johanna is managing the show. This year’s Art in The Park is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, August 20, and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, August 21. MM

We knew the artists individually, and we knew how talented they were.

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About the Author: In June 2018, Kathy Ihde and her husband, Jeff, retired to Copper Harbor from Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin, where she was a feature writer and theater reviewer for the Daily Jefferson County Union for more than 27 years.

Whitewater usually performs at the event; this year will be 2XL—Phil Vigelaus, Kim Jensen and Eric Kot. (Photo courtesy of Natasha Walters)


at the table

The source of the beef matters—bad meat will make a bad hamburger. At left, local meat from Guindon Farms and, at right, “fluffy” meat requested from a local butcher. (Photo by Katherine Larson)

Tips to build a better burger

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By Katherine Larson cannot pretend that hamburgers have some special connection to the U.P. It is indisputable, however, that August in the U.P. is a particularly good time and place for meat-eaters to enjoy them: perfect weather, perfect outdoors, perfect opportunity to dribble a little extra meat juice down your chin. I’ll leave for another column the whole question of plant-based burgers, and concentrate today on the beef variety. An icon of Americana, hamburgers occupy a special place in our national heritage. Why should that be? Why, for that matter, are they “hamburgers”? A beefburger (as the British sometimes call them) is, of course, made of beef; there is nothing hammy about a hamburger. There is, however, a historical connection to the German city of Hamburg, a major trading center since the 12th century and the embarkation point for millions of German immigrants to America in the 19th century and beyond, often on ships of the Hamburg-America Line. These German immigrants came from a culture that prioritized eating meat when it could be afforded. In that culture, minced meat was actually more of a treat than a slab of steak: the process of chopping it up fine was so painstakingly labor-intensive that the results were reserved for the wealthiest. Most immigrants started out the opposite of wealthy. But as times improved for them in their new world,

restaurants catered to their memories of the old one, advertising such things as “Hamburg-style American fillet” or even, in a Frenchified version, “beefsteak à la Hambourgeoise,” at prices often double that of un-ground steak. Intensification of livestock husbandry and the invention of the meat grinder helped bring basic beef patties down to a more proletarian level. Next came the notion of slapping the patty between two halves of a bun—a historical minefield into which I decline to tread. There are even more claimants to this act of genius than there are folks who assert paternity of the Caesar salad; suffice it to say that by early in the 20th century, the hamburger as we know it had begun its triumphal march through the United States and then the world. Fast forward to today when, for many, a hot August night is not complete without a hamburger. Fast forward to the question of how to make that hamburger a great one. Meat is key. Bad meat will make a bad hamburger. Good meat will make, at best, an OK hamburger. Only great meat will make a great hamburger. Well, gosh, that was pretty assertive of me, wasn’t it? How about all those tips you read online about how to handle the meat, and the relative merits of gas grills versus charcoal grills versus cast-iron skillets, and whether to incorporate seasonings before or after cooking, and all the rest of it? Aren’t I going to lay down the (culinary) law

like so many food writers do, about the one and only set of techniques that add up to the quintessential apotheosis of a burger? Nope. For one thing, I don’t believe that there’s just one way to cook a burger well. For another, I’ve tried a lot of those Internet and recipe-book recommendations—you wouldn’t believe the quantity of burgers my long-suffering test eaters have had to consume—and it’s astonishing how often they fall apart. Sometimes literally. For example, the don’t-squunch-the-meat-together recommendation. First, I surprised my local butcher by asking for a very loosely assembled, almost fluffy scoop of ground beef. (“She wanted ‘fluffy’ beef,” I heard him grumble to his colleagues as he went into the back room, and they all guffawed.) Then I struggled to assemble a patty worthy of the name without unfluffing it. Then I watched as test runs of the fluffy version fell apart in the pan while their more densely packed confrères remained intact. Worst of all came with the taste test, when it became painfully obvious that the loose version was grossly overdone. See the photo at the end of the story for the sad result. No, with apologies for the big-name chefs who advocate the don’t-squunch technique, if you want a nice char on the outside and a nice rosiness on the inside, if you want a patty instead of a collection of meat shreds, go ahead and squunch.

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This doesn’t mean you should go overboard. It remains true that if you overwork ground meat it becomes tough. The goal is a happy medium, where the uncooked meat adheres together without having been pressed into a glutinous mass. My son-in-law Nicholas Roumas, a man of many talents (degrees in chemistry and systematic theology and psaltis beyond compare), explained his practice to me: “You pack the meat like a snowball, then gently massage it flat.” Not just flat: “Make a depression in the middle so the shape is almost toroidal.” A toroid is the mathematical term for a doughnut shape; Nick does not advocate a middle hole, just a depression. Why the depression? “If the patty is flat, when the meat shrinks—as it will if you use, say, ground chuck, with about 20 percent fat—it will shrink more at the edges than in the middle and you’ll end up with a ball. With a depression, as it cooks it shrinks into a flat patty.” I tried it. By golly, Nick is on to something important here. Nick also stresses the importance of shrinkage in deciding on your patties’ size: “If you shape patties to fit the buns, then by the time they finish cooking they will be too small.” Math helps here: with 20 percent shrinkage, if you want to end up with, say, a cooked patty that is four inches in di-

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ameter, start out with a raw one which measures about five inches across. Ten percent shrinkage would require a raw patty four and a half inches in diameter and so on. Nick is a devotee of the well-seasoned cast iron skillet, “nice and hot. Don’t bother to add oil; the hamburger will oil itself. Learn to listen to the sizzle; the hamburger will tell you when it’s ready to be flipped. And this comes sooner than you think—with a good hot skillet, meat can overcook quickly.” Nick adds, “A gas stove really helps. If things start to smoke, turn the gas off; as things start to cool, turn it on again. Listen, watch and above all smell for optimal cooking.” A second son-in-law, Neil Donato, is also a man of many talents (jazz pianist and teacher, his discography includes work with the University of Michigan Jazz Ensemble and many smaller groups) as well as a hamburger lover. Neil’s cooking medium of choice is the charcoal grill, particularly Weber kettles, and his technique is modeled on that of A. Cort Sinnes’ The Grilling Encyclopedia. In short: manage your flame; flip only once; never press the patties. Again, pay close attention, because with a good hot grill meat can overcook quickly. I share Neil’s passion for Sinnes as

The difference is apparent, even while sizzling in a pan—the Guindon Farms burger at left, and butcher burger at right. Overworking the beef also has a negative effect on the outcome. (Photo by Katherine Larson)


The butcher’s burger was overcooked inside before the outside became crusty, while the Guindon Farm burger achieved a nice crust while remaining rosy inside, at left. (Photo by Katherine Larson)

a grilling guru; I share Nick’s passion for cast-iron skillets as grilling venues; I’m lucky in my sons-in-law. Here are some commonalities in their techniques that will help ensure a better burger: first, let the meat sit outside the refrigerator for a bit before cooking, so it’s not so cold when it hits the hot cooking surface. Second, make sure that cooking surface is indeed hot before adding patties. Third, a maximum of three or four minutes per side, sometimes less, should be plenty with an adequately hot surface. Fourth, let the cooked burger rest a minute or so before diving in. Nick and Neil come together on the subject of buns: A bun, both say, has to be robust enough to hold the meat and its juices. Flavor is a matter of personal taste, but something like a brioche doesn’t work because it’s too flimsy. Nick draws on his chemistry background to make a point about the crust. If you brush a patty lightly with soy sauce just before placing it in a skillet, he says, the outside will crust up nice and brown while the inside remains pink or even rosy. For chemical reasons, Worcestershire sauce does just the opposite—it retards the crusting, so the cooked patty ends up the same color all the way through. If you prefer either version, you too can put chemistry to work in your kitchen. I’ve tried Nick’s method and I’ve tried Neil’s. I’ve tried the methods of more chefs, celebrity or not, than I can count. I’ve made good burgers, mediocre burgers, even downright bad

burgers. I end up with one unalterable conclusion, and I repeat: Meat is key. The better the meat, the better the burger. Here in the U.P., for me, that means Guindon Farms’ ground beef. It comes from Limousin cattle, a breed with a 20,000-year history tracing back to the Limoges region of France. Limousin beef is naturally low in fat but, unusually, as or even more flavorful than more fatty breeds. Guindon Farms’ cattle live a placid life out on the farm’s pastures, enjoying a healthy, all-vegetarian diet of lush grasses, and allowed to grow at their own pace. Within MM’s reading area, some sources for their meat include the Downtown Marquette Farmers Market, the Marquette Food Co-op and the farm’s own website. For this article, I taste-tested hamburgers made from Guindon Farms’ beef against meat from a variety of other sources, plain and fancy. There was absolutely no competition—the Guindon Farms’ burgers routed the field. Flavorful, juicy, above all tasting of the true essence of beef: now that’s a hamburger I can get behind. MM Editor’s Note: Nick Roumas’ newly-published second book, The Psalter of David the Prophet and King with the Nine Odes, joins his Musical Ark, a collection of English language psaltic compositions. About the Author: Katherine Larson is a writer, teacher and former lawyer with a special passion for food justice.

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lookout point

HarborFest welcomes new music

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By Pam Christensen he Marquette West Rotary Club was founded in 1984, and since that time, has organized a festival in Ellwood Mattson Lower Harbor Park on the weekend before Labor Day weekend. Initially, the festival focused on seafood, and was eagerly awaited by seafood aficionados. As seafood became easier to get, the group transitioned to a celebration of the end of summer combining quality music, beverages and food. This community festival raises money for the club to award in grants to local non-profit organizations. During the past 38 years, the organization has awarded more than $700,000 to local organizations providing services and programs that improve the quality of life for families, children, teens, adults and seniors. There is no charge to attend the festival, but sponsorships, vendor fees, wristband and beverage sales all support the musical entertainment. Bryan Lopac started his term as Marquette West Rotary Club President on July 1, 2022. He has served as HarborFest co-chairperson for the past three years. He looks forward to the energy generated from the festival that will be held on Friday, August 26 and Saturday, August 27. “Many elements of the festival are the same from year to year, but we like to mix things up a bit too,” Lopac said. “This year, we have a great musical line-up and some partnerships that will offer something new. Shorts

The HarborFest crew, of all ages and talents, works to make the festival a success each year. (Photo courtesy of Marquette West Rotary Club)

Brewing will be one of our beverage partners, and they will be brewing a special HarborFest beer for us. We will be using the arabesque tent that has been synonymous with our festival, but it will stay up for the Marquette Blues Festival the following week. This allows both clubs to share in some of the costs associated with each festival.” The club will also be offering attendees the opportunity to purchase raffle tickets for two prize drawings to be held during the festival, as well as information on Rotary projects, grants and membership. The club has about 40 members and is finding it harder to hold a suc-

While the food is a draw, the entertainment is what keeps people coming back to HarborFest. (Photo courtesy of Marquette West Rotary Club)

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cessful festival each year. Volunteers are critical to the success of the festival, and community members and grantees help staff the token and beer tents. Local food vendors add to the festival atmosphere with a variety of selections. Kyle Danek is vendor coordinator this year and has worked to find vendors who offer a diverse menu of food and beverage items. “We have a variety of food and beverages this year from lemonade to kettle corn, tacos, burgers, hot dogs and barbecue,” he said. “We have a mix of new and former vendors who all offer something a little different.” Vendors who have committed to this year’s festival are Rollin Smoke, The Islands, Dia De Los Tacos (Friday only), Manny Mags Mexican Food Truck, Summertime Squeeze Lemonade, Jimmy Krack Korn, Lakeshore Depot, Superior Culture and Doozers. Music is what HarborFest is known for, and entertainment committee chairperson Jim LaJoie has also changed things up this year. “We have some new bands taking the stage this year, and we think the audience will really enjoy what they see,” he said. LaJoie is also proud of the fact that Uncle Ugly will be performing on Friday night. Uncle Ugly is a northern Michigan rock band that was formed in Marquette in 1988. A crowd favorite, their appearance brings some nostalgia to the HarborFest stage. Joining Uncle Ugly on Friday will be the Band Reverend and the Day-


Dreamers. The Band Reverend is a local cover band that features Ben Wilson on drums and vocals, Gene Uuro on guitar and vocals, Christopher Walimaki on bass guitar and vocals, and Chad M. Mager as lead singer. The DayDreamers are returning to the HarborFest stage for the second time. They were a hit at the 2021 festival and have developed a local following that appreciates their music from the past and present. Jack Bowers is lead vocalist backed by Dave Ziegner on bass guitar, Bryn Jungwirth on drums, Gary Parkonen on keyboard, Nicklas Johnson on lead guitar. They will set the stage for Uncle Ugly. Saturday entertainment includes the NMU Marching Band, Marquette Symphony Orchestra Summer Strings, Charlie Reager, Big Trouble, Tuesday Jones and The Journey. The NMU Marching Band, directed by Steve Grugin, will start the festivities off on Saturday afternoon with their energetic performance. A quartet of Marquette Symphony Orchestra musicians will present a special program called “Summer Strings,” followed by solo musician Charlie Reager. Big Trouble is a Marquette-based band featuring lead vocalist Aaron Peano. Tuesday Jones is a perennial stage act for HarborFest. This band, based in Marquette, features a no-nonsense twin guitar attack in the pocket rhythm section and gritty heartfelt vocals. They are Marquette’s classic rock band with a touch of the Blues. The Journey is a tribute band that recreates the stage presence of Steve Perry and music of the iconic band Journey. Their high-energy performance will delight the audience and

provide an exciting conclusion to the festival. Double Trouble Entertainment will also have their inflatables at the park for Friday and Saturday. This family-friendly activity adds to the celebratory atmosphere and encourages families to come to the park to enjoy music, food and beverages. The purchase of tickets is required for use of the inflatables. A mix of food and snack vendors will join the Marquette West Rotary Club beer tent in providing refreshments for festival-goers. HarborFest music and food begins at 5 p.m. on Friday; Saturday, events will begin at 1 p.m. Both evenings, the festival closes at 11 p.m. Audience members are invited to bring chairs and blankets to the festival, but carry-in beverages are strictly prohibited. Marquette West Rotary Club is a service club giving members the opportunity to network, serve the community and develop leadership skills. Affiliated with Rotary International, the organization values “Service Above Self.” For details, visit www. marquettewestrotary.org MM About the Author: Pam Christensen moved to Marquette 30 years ago when she accepted the position of library director at Peter White Public Library. Most recently, she was foundation manager for the West End Health Foundation, finally hanging up her formal work shoes in May 2021. She and her husband Ralph are in the process of making an off-grid cabin in Nisula their second home. She also is the secretary for the rotary club.

The crowd enjoys the sights and sounds of the live entertainment at HarborFest. (Photo courtesy of Marquette West Rotary Club)

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back then

Illustrations by Mike McKinney

The Pride of Iron Mountain

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By Larry Chabot o matter where they were or who they were with (like royalty and movie stars), the Cotterill Sisters were forever proud to be from Iron Mountain. As a newspaper headline in December 1922 reported: “Fame Fails to Dim Cotterill Sisters’ Love for Home Town.” Despite fame and fortune, their love for the city was “still unimpaired.” So who were these women? Fans knew them as the Cotterill Sisters, a famous concert trio active from the 1920s through the early 1950s, celebrated throughout the United States and overseas. Individually, they were pianist Besse, violinist and vocalist Florence and the multi-talented Alice who played drums, the marimba and offered dramatic readings. Their mother was Sarah McIntyre, whose family settled in Quinnesec to run the town’s first hotel. They traveled by ox team then, with no highways or railroad tracks in existence. Sarah worked for the Norway Current newspaper and boarded with the

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publisher’s family. Enter David Cotterill, an engineer on the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad (C&NW), who took Sarah away and married her in 1889. There was a strong family connection with the C&NW, as David’s brother John, who boarded with them, also worked for the railroad, and mother Sarah later married another C&NW worker. At some point, the family moved to Chicago, where the three girls attended school and honed their musical talents. Besse, the oldest, graduated from Chicago Musical College, then the Otis Art School in Los Angeles where she began public performances on the piano. Sister Florence also attended a musical college to perfect her violin and singing talents, while Alice picked up the drums.

Doug and Charlie ow billed as “The Cotterill Sisters,” their public career began in Nebraska and then on the popular Chautauqua circuit, which brought entertainment and culture to smalltown America. Big cities called, and

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their career blossomed in hotels in Chicago and California, where they entertained in public venues and at private parties. Here they got chummy with superstars like Douglas Fairbanks (“Doug” to them) and Charles Chaplin (“Charlie” to the girls, who thought he was “timid”). One source marveled that they were now mingling in high society and so traded “how-do-you-dos with this governor and that business monarch.” Their increasingly heavy schedules found them playing at dances in places large and small, where they added a couple of musicians for extra sounds to their music. The plaudits were numerous and well-earned. The famous mystery novelist Mary Roberts Rinehart loved their work: “If you enjoy the finer things of life,” she wrote, “you will find joy in the music of the Cotterill Sisters.” A Los Angeles Times critic thought that their music “not only sounds well to the ear but attractive to the eye as well. Such talent in one family!” An Iron Mountain paper raved about the


trio: “This excellent musical organization has scored pronounced successes wherever they have appeared and are known far and wide for the great concerts they give. Iron Mountain and all of Cloverland are proud of them.” (Cloverland was a widely used term for the Upper Peninsula.) A Dickinson County newspaper headlined “Cotterill Sisters of This City Score Great Successes in California: Word has been received from the Cotterill Sisters of this city, famous musicians, recently returned to Los Angeles from the famous Mission Inn at Riverside, California, where they [performed] in Spanish costumes for ten days.” They played for a New Year’s dinner and ball in honor of the Harvard and Oregon football teams which were playing in the Rose Bowl football game. (Harvard won 7-6). Around The World 1920 news story bannered that the “Cotterill Sisters to Make Trip Around the World: The Cotterill Sisters of this city, the popular young musicians, who filled many concert halls, expect to leave soon on a trip around the world. They will go from San Francisco to points in Japan and China and then through Europe and back to America.” They toured the United States for many years, playing concerts at exclusive hotels and resorts. Famous for their concert and after-dinner music, the sisters enjoyed long engagements in such far-flung sites as Florida, New Jersey, New York, Arizona and sev-

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eral other states, as well as sailing to Bermuda in the Atlantic Ocean and all over the European continent. In May 1922, the Iron Mountain News reported that the sisters “are filling a contract at the Hotel Maryland in Pasadena, California, where they resided in a hotel bungalow while playing concerts and Saturday night dances. ‘We always boast Iron Mountain,’ they claimed, ‘and the papers mention it very often, so it is well advertised in California.’” The sisters had a habit of stopping by Rotary Clubs throughout the country to perform at their meetings. The Rotary Club of Los Angeles, one of their frequent hosts, stated that “No finer musical organization has come before the club…for many a day.” Alice Cotterill, the published poetess in the group, donated the earnings from her poetry books to Rotary International. Whenever possible, the trio came home to Iron Mountain on their annual summer vacations, to visit their mother in the family home at 619 East F Street, and mount special programs for the hometown fans. They definitely preferred home cooking to the big time vaudeville circuits which courted them to join the major leagues of entertainment, but they refused to bite. Later in their career, as the constant travel and changes in venue were

and passed on in 1972. Alice died in 1986. All three are buried in the family plot in Escanaba’s Lakeview Cemetery. The talented Cotterills never forgot their roots or Iron Mountain as their homeland. “Whenever we go into a hotel,” one of them said, “we register our address as Iron Mountain. Wherever we are, we’ll be the Cotterill Sisters of Iron Mountain.” The Cotterills, once a renowned presence in the world’s finest musical venues and proud representatives of their beloved home town, are just a memory now. MM

starting to wear them down, they added a business venture to their lives by opening the Novelty Nook Studio in their hometown, a gift shop where the women taught various arts and crafts. Besse, especially gifted in this line, was an expert in sculpture, painting, tapestries and pottery. Besse was the first to pass away, succumbing in the Iron Mountain hospital in 1954. After the death of their older sister, the other two decided to put away their instruments and retire from performing. Florence was employed at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Iron Mountain until 1966,

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Editor’s Note: Thanks to an awesome historical collection compiled by William J. Cummings for the Menominee Range Historical Society, the talented Cotterill Sisters and many other area notables are preserved for future historians and genealogists. This document is fascinating and is available on the Internet. About the Author: Larry Chabot, an Ontonagon native, worked his way through Georgetown University and was then employed at White Pine Copper Company for 32 years, before moving to Marquette with his wife, Betty. He is a freelance writer who has written for several publications, including more than 170 articles for Marquette Monthly.

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USS Bayfield lowers LCVPs for the assault on June 6, 1944. USS LST-346 is partially visible beyond Bayfield’s stern, and USS Nevada is in the far right distance. (Photo courtesy of the Naval History and Heritage Command)

USS Bayfield veterans converge on Marquette N

By Pam Christensen ational Mine resident Bill Hager is respected in the veteran’s community for his 20plus years of service in the U.S. Navy, Naval Reserve and National Guard. Hager was named U.P. Veteran of the Year in 2021 and 2019 Marquette County Veteran of the Year. He was born in Iron River and joined the U.S. Navy in 1963 during the Vietnam War. He was stationed on the USS Bayfield as an Electrician’s Mate and served on the ship until 1967. It is his association with the USS Bayfield that has led him to organizing the USS Bayfield reunion in Marquette on September 9 and 10. In the 1980s, Hager read in a veteran’s magazine about a USS Bayfield reunion being held in San Francisco. He and his wife attended the reunion, and there he met up with veterans who served on the Bayfield during World War II and the Korean War. Hager was the only Vietnam War vet to attend. That first reunion led to Hager’s association with the other crew members who served on the Bayfield, which was in service from 1943 until 1968. The USS Bayfield was named after the northwestern Wisconsin county bearing the same name. The county was named in honor of Henry W. Bay-

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field, an officer of the Royal Navy, who came to Canada during the War of 1812. Following the war, Bayfield stayed in the Great Lakes region. He was an early surveyor of the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Seaway and the coast of Labrador. The Bayfield was laid down under a maritime commission contract on November 14, 1942, in San Francisco by the Western Pipe and Steel Company. She was acquired by the U.S. Navy and converted to an attack transport by the Atlantic Basic Iron Works. At her commissioning on November 20, 1943, she was under the command of Captain Lyndon Spencer, USCG. She received orders to New York to embark troops for service in Europe in February 1944. She made several short runs until March 1944, when she joined other ships in landing exercises on Scotland’s west coast in preparation for the European invasion at Normandy. On March 29, 1944, the Bayfield was designated to serve as headquarters for the planning of the landings on “Utah” beach. She was under the direction of Rear Admiral Don Pardee Moon. The Normandy-bound ships conducted maneuvers and tactical operations until May 7, 1944, when they began to embark troops of the 8th Infantry Regiment and the 87th Chemi-

cal Battalion. The Bayfield and other transports reached their destination on the morning of June 6, 1944 and started to disembark troops. Once troops landed on the beach, the Bayfield was designated a supply and hospital ship in continuing her flagship duties. These duties kept her off the Normandy coast while other transports rapidly unloaded troops and cargo for the front. On June 7, 1944, the Bayfield anchored five miles off the coast and made smoke to protect the Utah anchorage from Luftwaffe attacks. On June 25, 1945, she went in for repairs and on July 5, 1945, she joined Task Group 120.6 bound for Algeria. This group was dissolved later in July and the Bayfield was sent to Italy. In Naples, Rear Admiral Moon assumed command of Task Force 8 or “Camel” Force, for the invasion of southern France. Rear Admiral Spencer Lewis took command of the ship after the tragic death of Moon by suicide. Moon’s death was attributed to battle fatigue. The Camel Force target was the best defended section of the southern coast of France where the Argens River flows into the Mediterranean. In September, the Bayfield was ordered to a transatlantic convoy transporting passengers back to the U.S. Following arrival in Norfolk, the ship underwent


The Bayfield unloads a Jeep into a landing craft mechanized (LCM) in 1952. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command)

repairs at the Norfolk Navy Yard. The first week of November, the ship started preparations for duty in the Pacific. Traveling through the Panama Canal, she set sail for Hawaii. While in Hawaii, her crew practiced amphibious landings on Maui. From Hawaii, she traveled to Saipan, arriving February 11, 1945. The Bayfield debarked troops from the 4th Marines at Iwo Jima on February 19 and spent the next ten days serving as a hospital and prisoner of war ship. She then set sail for the Marianas in preparation for the Ryukyu Islands campaign. After loading the equipment and supplies of the 2nd Marines, she reported for duty for rehearsal exercises to prepare the troops for the invasion of Okinawa. The Bayfield’s troops were not needed at Okinawa, and she was ordered to Saipan for repairs and then on to the Solomon Islands. She supported the supplying of operations for the continued offensive against the Japanese, sailing to the Solomon Islands, the New Hebrides and Marianas. She was then sent to Guam with passengers and, following that mission, set sail for California. On July 30, 1945, the Bayfield went into dry dock in San Francisco to prepare for the expected invasion of Japan, but the fighting ceased on August 15, 1945, while the Bayfield was still in dry dock. The Bayfield transported troops back from the battlefields until January 1946. In March, the Bayfield was ordered to Pearl Harbor for Operation Crossroads, the atomic bomb tests scheduled for July on Bikini Atoll. The Bayfield served as a barracks ship for the crews of the target ships. She was stationed 22

miles from the site of the initial test and then observed the underwater detonation from a point 15 miles away. Following the tests, Bayfield returned to San Francisco. She continued to serve with the Pacific Fleet, making two more voyages to China. As fighting in Korea ramped up, the Bayfield was called back to the Pacific and spent the next seven months providing logistic support to United Nations forces in Korea. She returned to California in May 1951. In March 1952, she was ordered to the Pacific to support troops in Korea. Two years later, she took part in the evacuation of refuges from Vietnam following the separation of the country into the communist north and democratic south. More than 40 ships

took part in these exercises dubbed Operation Passage to Freedom. From 1954 to 1961, the Bayfield traveled as part of the Amphibious Squadron 7. She spent most of her time in the Pacific to bolster the Pacific fleet and undertake routine exercises. During Hager’s service on the Bayfield, she traveled to the Philippines, Hong Kong, Japan and Korea. She took part in cold weather training in Korea and joined the Nationalist Chinese in exercises near Taiwan. In December 1966, the Bayfield was deployed to Vietnam and served as a floating barracks. She supplied troops and equipment to the Vietnamese combat zone. She served at the mouth of the Cua Viet River and soldiers went onto shore to relieve Marine Corps units serving eight miles up the river at Dong Ha. In April 1967, the Bayfield delivered troops to the shore south of Danang. She stayed off the coast for the next month transporting casualties to hospital ships and transporting troops to the battlefields. In December 1967, she was ordered back to Long Beach and placed on a reduced readiness status. She was placed out of commission on June 28, 1968. An inspection determined the ship had outlived her usefulness and she was struck from the Navy list in October 1968. The USS Bayfield was sold to Levin Metals Corporation and scrapped in 1969. The USS Bayfield saw service during some of the most decisive battles undertaken by the U.S. Navy. Hager experienced any variety of duties and served during the ship’s final years. He has learned a great deal about the ship from fellow veterans who served on the Bayfield through

USS Bayfield passes through the Miraflores Locks in the Panama Canal in 1962. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command)

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annual reunions. After leaving the Navy in 1967, Hager joined the Naval Reserves and then the Michigan National Guard. Hager was amazed to find out that the 107th National Guard from Ishpeming is part of the 254th Combat Engineers Brigade. The USS Bayfield landed 254th troops on Utah Beach. “It was quite a surprise to find that my personal history on the USS Bayfield connected to those of the brave soldiers from my same unit who landed on Utah Beach,” Hager said. “The reunions have shown me that many of our experiences were the same whether in World War II, Korea or the Vietnam conflicts.” Even after retirement, Hager has continued to serve. He is most proud of the work he has done to connect other veterans with services they need and are entitled to. “I have helped over 20 veterans secure desperately needed services, helping them to navigate the complex programs and paperwork required by the system,” he said. He recently established a veteran peer support group that meets at 6 p.m. every Monday at the Silver Creek Church in Chocolay Township. This group offers veterans an opportunity to share their experiences and

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igan Iron Industry Museum, U.S. Ski Hall of Fame, Negaunee VFW Post, Da Yoopers Tourist Trap and other sites. The Marquette County Veteran’s Alliance will serve as reunion assistants, helping the veterans travel to sites of interest during the reunion. U.P. Home Health and Hospice has agreed to provide any medical equipment or supplies needed by the participants. “The youngest guy there is 78, and we are all getting older every year,” Hager said. Nevertheless, he appreciates all that local organizations have done to make the reunion a reality and looks forward to seeing his fellow USS Bayfield sailors. MM Operation Passage to Freedom docks at Saigon to offload refugees in 1954. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command)

struggles and reaches out to help other veterans. Vets of any era are invited to attend. Hager said he expects the USS Bayfield Reunion to attract ten veterans and their family members or caregivers. The membership of the group is dwindling, and Hager wistfully says this might be their last reunion.

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The attendees will base reunion activities out of the Holiday Inn in Marquette. Day trips are planned for Friday and Saturday, with a banquet to end festivities on Saturday night. The group will visit the Marquette Maritime Museum, Air Force Museum at K.I. Sawyer, Lakenenland, Munising’s Glass Bottom Boat Tour, Mich-

About the Author: Pam Christensen moved to Marquette 30 years ago when she accepted the position of library director at Peter White Public Library. She served in that post for more than 24 years. Most recently, she was foundation manager for the West End Health Foundation, finally hanging up her formal work shoes in May 2021. She and her husband Ralph are in the process of making an off-grid cabin in Nisula their second home.


back then

Physician, geologist leaves his mark on U.P.

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By Sonny Longtine e was a diminutive man, standing only five-feet-fiveinches, with small hands and feet; a prominent Roman nose dominated his face, while his hazel-blue eyes, although submissive, were easily visible below his substantial brows. The bushy brows, working in tandem with his expressive eyes, often served as a barometer of his mood. He had a hip disease that made one leg shorter than the other. As a result, he walked with a distinctive roll to his body. A sharp intellect and a caring nature were lifelong assets. Although small in stature, he was giant in the geology world. This was Douglass Houghton, a resourceful and dynamic force who became Michigan’s first geologist, and who has a special place in the hearts of the residents of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, particularly in the Copper Country. Born in Troy, New York in 1809, Douglass was one of seven children in the family of patriarch Jacob Houghton. This was not a frivolous home environment; studying was a priority that Jacob Houghton demanded for all his children. There were few amenities and no amusements. At an early age, Houghton’s brilliance was apparent; at age 11 he communicated with his brother in Latin and Greek. At age 16, Houghton studied medicine under the tutelage of his father’s physician friend, Dr. Squire White. After this early medical experience, he enrolled in Rensselaer Scientific School where he graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in 1829. Rensselaer had a demanding curriculum; students began their studies at 4:30 a.m. and did not stop studying until late in the evening. Because of his excellent academic record at the school, 19-year-old Douglass Houghton was retained as a faculty member. In 1830, the territorial governor of Michigan was looking for someone to come to Detroit and lecture on chemistry, botany and zoology. Governor Cass hired Lucius Lyon to find him this scholar. At Rensselaer Institute, Lyon was introduced to the youthful Houghton, who he was told would be an excellent choice to fill the position of a scientific lecturer in Detroit. Skeptical Lyon could not imagine how this youth could possibly have the skills and knowledge to lecture

The Douglass House, located on Sheldon Avenue in Houghton, opened in 1900. Once a discriminating hotel, it now serves as senior housing, with the lower front home to a restaurant and the Douglass House Saloon. The building is named after Douglass Houghton, as well as his mother Lydia, whose maiden name was Douglass. (Photo courtesy of Michigan Tech)

to a group of mature, cultured men. Eventually, he was convinced that Houghton was the man to do the job, so he hired him. Houghton did not disappoint Lyon. In 1830, Houghton moved from his birthplace in New York to Detroit and began to lecture in the burgeoning city. His exciting oratories soon made the phenomenal Houghton the toast of the town; his enthusiasm, knowledge and rhetoric made him the most sought-after speaker in the city. Completing his lecture series in Detroit in 1831, Houghton returned to New York state, where he was licensed as a physician. He practiced medicine throughout his life, although he became more known as a geologist than a physician. Houghton returned to Detroit in 1832 and began a series of expeditions in the Michigan territory. One of his first expeditions to the Upper Peninsula was in l832, with Henry Schoolcraft (Schoolcraft County’s namesake). Houghton journeyed throughout the Upper Peninsula where he established peaceful re-

lations with the Ojibwas at Sault Ste. Marie. At the same time, he cataloged more than 200 plants and reported the copper-bearing rock he found in the Keweenaw Peninsula. After completing the Upper Peninsula expedition, Houghton returned to Detroit to practice medicine. While in Detroit, he combated the lethal Asiatic cholera epidemic that was sweeping the city. His skill and dedication helped eradicate the disease and earned him the affectionate title “the Little Doctor.” While in Detroit and doctoring those with cholera, he married his childhood friend, Harriett Stevens. She was a loving and devoted wife and mother of the couple’s two daughters. Cholera resurfaced in 1834 and claimed the life of Houghton’s brother Richard. Michigan became a state in 1837, and Douglass Houghton was appointed the state’s first geologist. With a meager $3,000 budget, Houghton embarked on a mission to explore the state’s geology, zoology, botany and topography.

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In 1839, he set out on an Upper Peninsula survey, during which he made a couple of astute observations: he recognized the need for a canal on the St. Mary’s River, and he called attention to the abundant whitefish and trout in Lake Superior. The most significant survey for the Upper Peninsula was in 1840, when Houghton studied the Keweenaw region. It was here that Houghton made his great copper discovery, one of his most important findings. “I hope to see the day when instead of importing the whole immense amount of copper and brass used in our country, we may become exporters of both,” he said. Houghton made four more survey trips between 1841 and 1845, each time gathering more data on the composition of Michigan, and particularly of the Upper Peninsula. Douglass Houghton met an untimely death at the age of 36 in the fierce and unforgiving waters of Lake Superior. On a chilly October day in 1845, Houghton and four companions (Peter McFarland, Baptiste Bodrie, Oliver Larimer and Tousin Piquette) left

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a survey storehouse five miles west of Eagle Harbor on the Keweenaw Peninsula. After completing their mission of providing supplies for a surveying party, they began the return trip to Eagle Harbor on their barge. At the time of their departure, the lake was calm and a moderate land breeze was blowing. Houghton’s four companions rowed while he sat in the stern and navigated the barge. After three miles the wind changed direction and began blowing from the threatening northeast. To make matters worse, snow began to fall and the temperature dropped. Peter McFarland suggested to Houghton that they go ashore at a nearby sand beach. Houghton, never one to give up, responded, “We had better keep on―we are not far from Eagle River.” The winds off Lake Superior now raged and the snow escalated. Before they knew it, several violent waves crashed into the boat, the final one capsizing the vessel only 200 yards from shore. McFarland and Bodrie somehow managed to get back in the boat when it righted itself. McFarland futilely attempted to rescue Houghton. He saw Houghton surface after the capsizing and yelled at him to grab onto the keel of the boat. Houghton complied, but another roaring wave hit the vessel and the clinging Houghton disappeared into the icy Superior waters. Bodrie and McFarland were tossed against the rocky coast, but somehow managed to survive. An immediate search of the coastline failed to find Houghton, Piquette or Larimer; only Houghton’s beloved dog, Meeme, was safely washed ashore. Piquette’s body was found the following day in a search by local miners. Larimer’s body was never recovered. Houghton’s body was found the following spring, six miles from the site of the drowning. In a macabre setting, his remains were found buried in the sand, except for one protruding arm. Houghton’s boots were the only things by which the decomposed corpse could be identified. Speculative comments after his death centered on why Houghton did not follow McFarland’s earlier suggestion to go ashore. This was not Houghton. The very things that made him great―his perseverance, courage and ability to deal with hardship were likely the traits equally responsible for his death. After Houghton’s death, a final report of his work was to be submitted to the state legislature. It never happened. The State of Michigan spent more

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Douglass Houghton (1809-1845) discovered copper in the Keweenaw. (Photo courtesy of Michigan Tech)

than $32,000 on Houghton’s surveys, but did not allocate the necessary money to have the exhaustive report completed and published. Had he lived, the state may well have provided money to publish his work. Some of his extensive research was later published out of his $38,000 estate. Other writers used portions of Houghton’s work in their material; this preservation assured that his labor was not an entire loss. His greatest legacy was the discovery of copper-bearing rocks in the Keweenaw Peninsula; this was instrumental in attracting capital to the area, which resulted in an economic boom. The copper discovery also hastened the development of the Sault Ste. Marie locks. In his honor, Houghton County and the city of Houghton were named after him. In his brief lifetime, Houghton made a tremendous impact on the Upper Peninsula. He was a man of many vocations: geologist, botanist, physician, loving father, devoted husband and, most importantly, a decent human being. He died much too young. MM About the Author: Sonny Longtine is a Marquette resident who has published eight books about the Upper Peninsula. For more than three decades he taught American history and government in Michigan schools.


the arts

Festival helps U.P. embrace the Blues

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By Pam Christensen ark Hamari, Walt Lindala and Mark Stonerock have all played leadership roles in the Marquette Area Blues Society over the past 18 years. The festival, and the whole Marquette Area Blues Society, was born around Lindala’s kitchen table through a conversation with one of the society’s founding members, Terry Klavitter, after a night of enjoying Marquette’s fireworks. Walt’s wife, April, tired of the group’s discussion and after listening

to Lindala and Klavitter “blathering” about whether a blues society could be viable, and if they could build a festival built on the Blues, called the discussion to a halt. April said wearily, “Just put an ad in the paper to start with and see who shows up!” The Marquette Area Blues Festival has grown to be one of the preeminent music festivals in Michigan. Hamari is currently president of the organization. In addition to running a small business and playing music with sev-

Above, founders Walt Lindala, Mark Hamari and Mark Stonerock discuss the 2022 festival. (Photo courtesy of Marquette Area Blues Society) At left, volunteers run the ticket sales booth. More than 200 people donate time to make the festival happen each year. (Photo by Tom Buchkoe)

eral local bands, he knows all too well what makes a great festival. “The Blues Festival has a number of components that make it successful, but our sponsors, volunteers and the local support we get for the festival are what make it such a success,” Hamari said. “From day one, the community supported us. We wanted to see if the community was interested in the Blues and if we could share our love of the Blues with others. From the first festival to today, we can’t say enough about our fans, our volunteers and our sponsors. We are all getting older and there are many times we

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question how much longer we can go on, but once the festival happens, we are all ready to plan for the next year.” One way the festival gives back and introduces the Blues to a new audience is with the free Friday night concert. Initially, this was a way to attract new audience members, which it still does, but it is also a way to show appreciation to the community that continues to support the festival, even though Blues music and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula are not often paired for most music-lovers. Traditionally held on Labor Day

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weekend, the festival is eagerly awaited by locals and visitors alike. This year’s festival will take place on September 2 through 4. During the past 18 years, the festival has grown to attract people from the Upper Peninsula, Great Lakes region, Texas, Alaska, California, Florida and other parts of the United States. A contingent of fans travel from Soo Canada each year to partake in the festival. “Economic impact studies and our festival surveys show that 40 to 45 percent of our audience attends the festival from outside of Marquette,” Lindala said. “This percentage has grown as our festival and reputation have grown.” The festival is a welcome boost for the Marquette area community as summer winds down, but it also introduces many people without Blues experience to the music. “The Friday night concert was an experiment that really stuck,” Lindala said. “Many of our volunteers and audience members started out by coming to the free show Friday. That gamble paid off when audience members found they liked the Blues and continued to support the festival in subsequent years.” Lindala is serving as festival director this year, but he is quick to point out the three of them have experienced each role over the past 18 years. It is this love of the Blues and experience

that helps shape the festival each year. The Friday night free-of-charge concert is made possible by long-time sponsors Honor Credit Union and the Ore Dock Brewing Company. A music festival’s success hinges on the musical line-up, and, as entertainment committee chairperson, Stonerock works hard to develop a schedule that mixes old and new talent and genres of the Blues each year. He has already booked the first band for 2023’s festival. Stonerock’s job is made easier by a dedicated committee and word of mouth recommendations from musicians who have played the festival in the past. “When we started out, it was hard to book bands, but as our reputation has grown, we get acts that reach out to us,” he said. It is still difficult to arrange a diverse line-up with limited funds and Marquette’s location. “People hear we are in Michigan, and figure if they get to Detroit, they are close,” Stonerock said. Lindala added, “I usually tell them we are closer to Chicago than we are to Detroit.” The trio laughs about the year the Saturday night headline act did not realize that Marquette was on Eastern, not Central time. The band arrived, but with only minutes to spare, and once on stage, the entire festival committee breathed a sigh of relief.

The view from the stage at the Marquette Area Blues Fest keeps musicians coming back. (Photo by Tom Buchkoe)

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“None of us can really relax until that headliner takes the stage on Sunday night,” Stonerock said. “That is when the current and past festival directors get together for a directors’ toast.” Lindala said his favorite thing to do during the festival is walk to the perimeter of the park and look out over the festival. “Taking in the full effect of the night sky, Lake Superior, the lights, the music and the energy of the crowd, it reminds us why we do this each year,” he said. Another important part of the festival are the 200 volunteers who make everything come together. Volunteers are required to purchase a festival ticket, but are reimbursed for the ticket based on how many shifts they volunteer. Volunteer positions include set-up and take down crew, grounds, beer ticket sellers, bartenders, merchandise sales and information. One shift rewards the volunteer with a free T-shirt. Subsequent shifts can be used for a ticket refund. Volunteer signup is already underway at the Blues Festival, which can be found at www. marquetteareabluessociety.org Many parts of the festival are the same each year, but festival leaders

Carolyn Wonderland will be the headliner on Saturday night, performing at 8 p.m. (Photo by Tom Buchkoe)

say that the festival will have a new look this year. The Blues Society will be partnering with the Marquette West Rotary Club for use of staging

and tent. Rotary’s signature event, HarborFest, is traditionally held the weekend before the Blues Festival. The two organizations are getting to-

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gether to share expenses for much of the infrastructure used by both events. “People will see a new look this year because we will not be using the

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stage and tent we have used in the past,” Lindala said. “The arabesque tent will give the festival a new look, and we hope the audience and musicians will approve of this change.” The Blues Festival and HarborFest both take place in Ellwood Mattson Lower Harbor Park. “You can’t underestimate how much our musicians love to play next to Lake Superior in the beautiful park setting,” Lindala said. “I have attended festivals in stadiums, dusty fields, cow pastures and everything in between. The location of our festival is one of the main reasons the musicians speak so highly of our venue. The park also makes the festival seem like it is a part of the community, and musicians like to feel that the community is embracing them and their music. We all know that Marquette area residents appreciate the various festivals located at the park, and the support we have gotten is very apparent. “This is just one reason we find that many of our acts seek us out. They hear about our festival and what a great reception the artists get, and they all want to experience that too.” The look of the stage and tent may be different this year, but music is not the only reason to attend the festival. The three-day festival also includes food vendors, a variety of beverages, merchandise vendors, a dance floor and silent auction. Merchandise is music-related but includes works by local artisans, photography, apparel and, of course, CDs of many of the featured acts. The silent auction gives festival-goers the chance to bid on special items including a guitar or festival poster signed by each musician appearing in the festival. “Saturday and Sunday concert-goers will be wowed by two dynamic women performers—Carolyn Wonderland on Saturday and Vanessa Collier on Sunday,” Stonerock said. “Carolyn and Vanessa both said they

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would come to the festival this year. We were hoping we could work it out with one of them, and when they both said they were available and would appear within our budget, we thought, ‘Why not?’” Friday musicians include The Jimmys and Biscuit Miller. Saturday features Graham Brothers and Howlin’ Rhythm, Whisky Ryan, Crossroads Resurrection, Tail Dragger with Johnny Burgin and Carolyn Wonderland. Sunday’s line-up will be Jake and the Fireside Blues Band, The Wallens, Jennifer Westwood and the Handsome Devils, Rev. Raven and the ChainSmokin’ Altar Boys and Vanessa Collier. The Sunday night post-festival party at the Ore Dock Brewing Company will feature Jennifer Westwood and the Handsome Devils. Ticket sales and sponsors make the festival a reality each year. Advance weekend tickets are $60 for the weekend and are available through NMU Tickets online at nmu.universitytickets.com and via phone at (906)2271032. Ticket prices are $70 for an Adult Weekend ticket. A one-day ticket for an adult is $40. Young adults (15-23) are $10, and children 14 and younger are free with a paid adult ticket. Additional information about the festival is available from the Marquette Area Blues Society website at www.marquetteareabluessociety.org MM About the Author: Pam Christensen moved to Marquette 30 years ago when she accepted the position of library director at Peter White Public Library. She served in that post for more than 24 years. Most recently, she was foundation manager for the West End Health Foundation, finally hanging up her formal work shoes in May 2021. She and her husband Ralph are in the process of making an off-grid cabin in Nisula their second home.

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An aerial view of Mattson Lower Harbor Park makes it evident why Marquette has a premiere venue for the Blues. (Photo by Tom Buchkoe)


back then

Nazis in the woods: German POWs in the U.P.

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By Larry Chabot h no, not Nazis in our backyard! The unease among the population was not unlike the early days of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the early 1930s when city kids poured into the UP: tough, street-smart young guys promising nothing but trouble. But these newcomers were captured, battle-hardened German soldiers. Protests erupted, family doors were locked and dad’s hunting rifle was kept close at hand. Why were POWs coming here, not only to the U.P. but—counting Italian and Japanese POWs, almost 450,000 of them spread across the United States? They came at the request of our World War II ally England, which was bulging with captives. Because the Germans had overrun all of Europe except England and the neutrals, we were asked to help. In the U.P., 1,250 prisoners were marched into five former CCC camps on or near highway M-28, from Raco in the east to Pori in the west. Although POWs were forbidden within 150 miles of Canada, all U.P. camps violated this limit. A warning appeared in a January 12, 1944 Mining Journal story that 400 German POWs from the North African campaign would soon arrive at Evelyn in Alger County and Sidnaw in Houghton County, assigned to non-military jobs in the place of U.S. workers who were in the military. Hard-core Nazis had been separated out of the stream and corralled in special camps in Oklahoma, Kentucky and Massachusetts. The rest, according to the Detroit Free Press, “were mostly homesick young men glad to be out of the war.” The first batch of 262 POWs, staff and heavily armed guards arrived by train at Wetmore on February 12, 1944, destined for Camp Evelyn. Two weeks later, Camp Sidnaw opened, then Au Train, Pori and Raco. There were guard towers, but few fences— because where could they go? They were stuck in the woods, scarcely aware of where they were. The Army controlled the POWs, who worked for 80 cents a day in canteen credits; those who stayed in camp got only 10 cents credit. Pam-

pering, bullying and slave-driving were forbidden. Prisoners were to be treated the same as Allied prisoners of the Germans, for fear that poor treatment here would jeopardize our boys imprisoned overseas. One writer described it as “the same treatment, but no barbed wire.” It wasn’t guards or snow that kept them in, but the distance to the Atlantic Ocean, which was far away. Prisoners could write five letters and postcards a month. If they hadn’t heard from home in three months, the Red Cross would trace a test package to a German destination. Catholic and Protestant church services drew about 70 men per service. If a POW died in camp—one Sidnaw inmate was killed in a work accident—they were given a formal German military funeral. Nazi salutes and swastikas were out, as were photos of leading Nazis like Adolf Hitler and Herman Goering (but movie star pin-ups were OK). There were nice amenities, though: libraries, newspapers, canteens in which to buy stuff (like two cans of beer a day or off-brand cigarettes). There were special classes, occasional trips to towns, soccer matches and baseball games, which drew outside spectators. Attitudes varied from man to man. Despite their own capture and a war appearing to be lost, many POWs were still confident of victory, even though the newspapers brought daily chunks of bad news. One especially observant captive saw America through his train window as it really was: farmers plowing their fields, children playing in yards, well-lit cities, mile after mile of a country seemingly untouched by war. With no clue about woods work, most POWs did about half as much as a civilian. Even so, there were spotty work stoppages and an occasional fanatical Nazi who was exiled to another camp. Deer meat was sometimes poached with a guard’s weapon, and POW moonshine was passed around in tin cups. Considering that most of them were veterans of desert warfare in North Africa and now safely parked

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in American forests far from the battlefronts with plenty of food and no predators, why were there escapes? An Army officer speaking at a U.P. civic club said the answer was in the prisoner’s code: it is every prisoner’s right to try to escape. Across the United States, 2,222 POWs escaped the camps, including eight in the U.P. The biggest break occurred in Arizona where 25 tunneled out of a camp. All were caught, some as they neared freedom close to the Mexican border. Here are the U.P. incidents, occurring during a 38-day period in early summer 1944: • Escape Attempt I: A pair of Germans—Johann Kosler and Gearhart Troschmas (who was 6-3 and hard to miss)—were absent from nightly roll call at Camp Sidnaw. Warnings went out over police and radio networks, prompting reports of a sighting on a road at Kenton. The pair were nabbed at the Kenton Ranger Station, but denied trying to escape: “We were just going for a walk!” • Escape Attempt II: Working at a Rumely site out of Camp Evelyn, three men in German Army uniforms slipped into the woods and disappeared. A camp foreman driving past the Pines Resort on the Seney Stretch spotted the escapees by a shed, so he pulled in, offered cigarettes, chatted a while and found they had a single can of sardines, a U.S. map and homemade knives. The guard returned to the nearest town to report his find, and the POW freedom was over. • Escape Attempt III: Also from a Rumely work site, three Camp Au Train inmates who couldn’t wait for darkness tip-toed away in the middle of the day. State police and prison guards caught them at a roadblock in Skandia after a guard found them hiding in some bushes. There was no resistance, only relief to be rescued from the woods and its critters. When a group of POWs from Camp

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Pori marched into Ontonagon from some unknown destination, local kids fired toy weapons from behind trees and bushes. No one was injured in the brief skirmish. In a downstate village, a contingent of POWs who regularly passed a certain house noticed that a Gold Star flag appeared in the window, signifying a war death in that family. The POWs gathered in formation in front of the house, displayed a long silent salute, did an about-face and marched away. The camps began closing in 1945 and all POWs were sent home to clean up war damage in their own lands.

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About 75 percent of the captives appreciated their fair treatment in the United States, and at least 5,000 migrated back to the states to take up residence and pursue American citizenship. Some camp guards and civilians served as sponsors in citizenship applications. MM Editor’s Note: The author has walked the Camp Pori site on the Houghton-Ontonagon County line, through the waist-high grass over concrete building stubs and the remains of sidewalks. Because most camp sup-

Illustration by Mike McKinney

plies were purchased locally, the camps were sorely missed for their economic impact. Pori was also a Civilian Conservation Corps campsite and hosted Army winter maneuvers in World War II.

About the Author: Larry Chabot, an Ontonagon native, worked his way through Georgetown University and was then employed at White Pine Copper Company for 32 years, before moving to Marquette with his wife, Betty. He is a freelance writer who has written for several publications, including more than 170 articles for Marquette Monthly.


fiction

This is the finale of a four-part, original story

The Pick

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Part IV: Winter cooter stepped into the field, snowshoes holding his weight dispersed across the snow. The cabin was nearly drifted over, and it took him an hour to dig out the front door. There was a neatly stacked pile of kindling and firewood in the box. The stove lit easily. The cabin smelled closed up. Dusty. Coy Larson was nowhere to be found. Scooter assumed that one of the drifts outside had the Wagoneer as its base. The cell phone sat on the table, dead. Scooter tossed it into the fire box.

written and illustrated by Brad Gischia Scooter opened his backpack and slid out a sandwich. He ate, not really tasting it, and looked at the map by the table. The pencil marks. Dates. It seemed there were more on there than there had been when he’d been here last, when the thing had pulled him beneath the surface. There was a mark in the middle of the lake, an “X” and date. It matched when he’d been there. All of those marks, going back seventy years. He’d kept up a loose correspondence with Larson over the last couple of months. Scooter’s questions of him only led to more questions. Larson had few answers despite his decades

of study. It did little to help Scooter sleep at night. And the dreams. The bloody dreams were beyond anything he had ever had up to this point. Some were completely alien. They were dreams of the long cold darkness that was outside of everything known, the insular dreams of a prisoner. There were familiar things as well. Men in coveralls, screaming as explosions rocked the tunnels. Begging one man to please, please, for the love of Christ, please help them. On those nights, the nights of the miner dreams, Scooter slept no more. He spent many of those nights on a

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new project, researching the strange happening around Pickett’s Lake. It was on one of those nights in December that he saw Coy Larson’s obituary. No cause of death was noted. Scooter called Delaney. The conversation had been brief, and the tinny sound of the poor connection did little to make Scooter feel like he wasn’t in the middle of some kind made-for-TV movie. “Larson is dead. Or gone. Either way, the cabin is empty.” A steady ache was planted in Scooter’s midsection then, one that would begin to grow steadily each day. “It was kinda weird.” Crackle crackle. The ache

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pulsed. “Weird how?” Scooter’s mouth was dry. Drier than it had ever been. The static ebbed. “I got a call, couple of kids were out around Pickett’s Lake, neckin’ or whatever, and they said they heard a gunshot. Deer season was still a couple of weeks out, but the deer are in the rut now, and poachers know that as well as hunters. So I took a spin out. Looked like Larson may have just stepped out, ’cept there was a good layer of dust on everything and about an inch of mold on the coffee that was sittin’ on the stove.” The ache pulsed. “There was…” He coughed into his hand. So dry. “...no sign of him?” “Like I said. No. He may have wandered off into the woods. If something got him…well…we didn’t find any remains. Lotsa wolves and coyotes out there.” Remains. Ache. “Thank you.” Scooter tried to ignore that his hand was shaking as he tapped the screen on his cell phone to hang up. The ache was a little stronger. He got a glass of water and drank it all in one go. It didn’t help the dryness. His hand still shook. Pacing the darkened house did little to steady his

nerves. The memory of the thing in the Pick haunted him. Scooter had a nagging feeling, an idea borne of his memories and what he had suddenly begun to think of as certainty. It had to do with the “wolves.” No wolf had killed Coy Larson. It had to do with the water levels. It had to do with what was down in the dark, in Upper Michigan—the thing that CMC knew was there. The thing Coy Larson and his father spent a lifetime trying to keep imprisoned. A prison that now had no guard. Scooter took a leave of absence from CMC in January. He quit in February, cashed out his retirement, sold his house in Duluth and sent all of his furniture to the St. Vincent De Paul Society. With that money, and a few connections at CMC, he was able to buy a hundred-year lease on Pickett’s Lake. He packed his truck with his few remaining possessions and drove east. In his pack was a schematic of the Pick. Drawn in the ’40s, modified in the ’50s just before it had been closed. There was also a file, the only thing he’d taken when he left CMC. It was the chemists’ report from the vials he’d taken on that day back in September. It showed may common elements.

His hand still shook. Pacing the darkened house did little to steady his nerves.

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silicon, magnesium, iron, aluminum. Also several organic molecules, formaldehyde and ammonia, as well as a group that was labeled “unknown.” A disinterested lab tech said there were always some unknowns, perhaps the sample was compromised? Google told him those were common chemicals in most meteorites. Last in the pile of paperwork was a report from the National Weather Service. Based on 100 years of predictions, this was going to be the driest year on record in the Upper Peninsula. Green Creek would be dry. Spring was coming. There would likely be a fast melt, and then the lake would begin to drop. Someone had to be there to keep an eye on it.

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cooter walked to the stove and threw another log in. He looked out across Pickett’s Lake. The cleft in the stone face wasn’t visible, but he knew it was there. Although he couldn’t explain what was down there, something indeed was. Scooter had a winter’s worth of provisions in his truck. He had five deep cell batteries. He had a solar panel and charging station. And most of all, he had time. He would wait. MM

Although he couldn’t explain what was down there, something indeed was.

About the Author: Brad Gischia is a writer and artist native to Upper Michigan. He has published two children’s books and done illustrations for both comic books and novels.

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the arts

The 61st Annual Eagle Harbor Art Fair will be held on August 13 and 14 at St. Peters by the Sea Church. (Photo courtesy of John Dodge)

Annual Eagle Harbor art fair set for mid-August

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By Kathy Ihde opper Country Associated Artists (CCAA) Chairperson, Linda Dodge, announced plans for the 61st Annual Eagle Harbor Art Fair at St. Peters by the Sea Church in Eagle Harbor. Dodge has been a member of CCAA since 2004. She became involved with the Art Fair in 2006 and stepped into the role of chairwoman in 2009. She is also the organization’s business manager, and, with help from her husband John, she has been pulling the Eagle Harbor Art Fair together every year since. “The Copper Country Associated Artists celebrated our 60th anniversary last year (2021),” Linda said. “This is our 61st Art Fair. We don’t count 2020, because of COVID; we had to cancel that year.” Each year the CCAA features one of their artists at the art fair. This year’s featured artist is Tammy Toj Gajewski, a multi-media artist who works in oil, ceramics, watercolor and stained glass. In her biography, Gajewski said she makes art, “Because I have to express my inner self and give to others to create more joy in the world. I am inspired by Lionel Fenninger; Georgia O’Keefe; Andrew Wyatt; Leonardo da Vinci and Alfred Durer.” Gajewski was born and raised in

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Wisconsin. After graduating from high school in 1982, she received a full scholarship to the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, where she studied under Walter Nottingham and Keiko Hara. She studied the Anasazi Indians while in college and spent time in Paris. In the early 1990s, Gajewski left Minnesota and moved to Michigan to take care of her mother, who refused to move back to the city. She found work with the Michigan Department of Corrections and stayed in the Upper Peninsula. Gajewski has become prolific in

the production of unique lake inspired assemblages, wildlife watercolors, oil paintings of mining buildings and ceramics. “I am a recycler of things I find,” she said. “I use second-hand frames as much as possible. If I see something inspiring, I paint it. If I find interesting driftwood on the beach, I make something from it. I take a little bit from everything I know and see and make art to make people smile.” The Eagle Harbor Art Fair began 62 years ago when local artists who lived between Eagle River and Eagle Harbor—many of them along the

This art fair is a juried event, and more than sixty artists will be selling their original works this year. (Photo courtesy of John Dodge)

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shore—decided to have an art show in Eagle River. It was an exhibition; nothing was for sale. The day of the show, high winds nearly destroyed everything. The next year, the group decided to move the event to Eagle Harbor because it was more sheltered. Because CCAA takes over the Eagle Harbor Park, they usually have a full art fair of 70 artist booths. “Sometimes I have cancellations,” Linda said. “But I have a waiting list. So far, we have 61 paid vendors (as of June 17). I have an Early Bird Registry and I give the artists a price break if they decide to pay ahead for the following year. As artists are, they pay because they’ve just made money at the Art Fair. This way, they’re paid for the next year, and don’t have to worry about it. We also mail out reminders.” The Eagle Harbor Art Fair is a juried show and it’s the reason they have such a wide variety of art forms. A group of CCAA artists go through the criteria for a new juried artist: What is the artwork? Is it totally original? They cannot take a pattern or a drawing and copy it. “It has to be totally original,” Linda said. “For example, one of our artists, Sharon McCabe, is a jeweler. She creates these beautiful pieces with beads she actually makes herself. I do take people who are interested in being on a waiting list.”


Artists go through the jury process unless they’re returning artists who bring the same type of art pieces, who don’t have to be juried every year. “Art is all kinds of things,” Linda said. “I think four or five years ago, I brought in a local author, Deborah Frontiera, to the Art Fair. I believe the written word is an art form and writing is an art form. We had Stephen Schram, a children’s author here. Sadly, he passed away unexpectedly last year on Isle Royale.” Each year, Linda creates the map of artist booth locations. “Most of the artists like to be in the same spot every year,” she said. “Shoppers go straight to their favorite artists’ booths before moving on to the other booths.” Linda says the fair attracts shoppers from all over. “It’s one of the great things about living here,” she said. “They come back to the Art Fair year after year. I know someone from California who comes every year. She does all her birthday and Christmas shopping

while she’s here.” Linda is a watercolor artist and John is a photographer and the CCAA’s web designer/manager. “John wasn’t planning to be in the Art Fair last year, but I only had one photographer, so I said, ‘John, I need to get another photographer,’ and I talked him into doing it. “We almost went under with COVID,” Linda said. “And I would say what saved us from doing that were our artists. I sent letters to all our artists and told them that we couldn’t have the show because of COVID. I asked if they would mind if we paid that year’s booth fee forward to 2021.” Almost all of the artists said yes— just two out of 70 asked for a refund. “Because of their generosity, we could limp along because those booth fees pay for our electric and heat all year long,” Linda said. “If the artists had not said, ‘yes,’ we would have been done. We wouldn’t be the CCAA anymore. It would have been all over—it was that close. Thanks to

Art is all kinds of things...I believe the written word is an art form.

The art fair is the major fundraiser for the Copper Country Associated Artists, who organize it each year. (Photo courtesy of John Dodge)

those artists who love coming here, almost all of them agreed to pay it forward.” Linda said the fair is the CCAA’s only money maker for the year, except for memberships.

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“We wouldn’t have been in business this long if the vendors weren’t making money,” she said. “And very often they tell me that this is the best show they like to do every year.” John said they are always looking

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The Eagle Harbor Art Fair offers art in a variety of media, including books jewelry, textiles, photography and more. (Photo courtesy of John Dodge)

for new members. “You don’t necessarily need to be an artist to become a member,” he said. The general public can be a supporting member, Linda said. “You can become a ‘friend’ of the Copper Country Associated Artists,” she said. “You don’t have to have artwork in the gallery. I let artists who might be leaving for one reason or another know that they can still be a member. Of course, you don’t always have to join, and you don’t always have to work.” Linda said artistic minds don’t always excel at the business of selling their art, however. “By the time I joined the CCAA, we had a space on Sixth Street in Calumet,” Linda said. “We started having meetings on Thursday nights. People brought in their projects, and we all helped each other, critiquing one another’s work. I would take a pad of paper and sketch some of the things in the gallery to practice drawing before I started painting.” Sometimes, she would leave the door open, and people would come in to look around. Many of these visits resulted in offers to buy the artwork. “At our next meeting, I told the group about it and asked if they wanted to sell their work and they agreed,” Linda said. “A few pieces sold and then we had a fire. Someone reported it to the fire department, and we were able to save everything.” One of the artists was a member of

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the Methodist Church and the group was able to store things at the church and in various garages. “We had our meetings at the church and, at one of those meetings, we decided we needed a gallery,” she said. “At the time, no one in the community knew what we had, and we had exceptional artists. It was group decision of how, when, and where to do it.” They had to find a building that they could afford and found a space on Fifth Street. They were all volunteers and had to take turns working, and Linda started to take on the business end of the gallery. “I enjoy painting, but I found I couldn’t do both,” she said. “A lot of people can separate the two parts of their brain and do both art and business, but I can’t.” Luckily for Linda, she enjoys the business end and spending time with the artists who arrive in Eagle Harbor every year—and she doesn’t need to worry about getting blown away, either. The Eagle Harbor Art Show runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, August 13, and from noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday, August 14. MM About the Author: In June 2018, Kathy Ihde and her husband, Jeff, retired to Copper Harbor from Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin, where she was a feature writer and theater reviewer for the Daily Jefferson County Union for more than 27 years.


in the outdoors

The Wonder of Many

“To this day, my spiritual life is found inside the heart of the wild. I do not fear it, I court it. When I am away, I anticipate my return, needing to touch stone, rock, water, the trunks of trees, the sway of grasses, the barbs of a feather, the fur left behind by a shedding bison.” —Terry Tempest Williams “Individually, we are one drop. Together, we are an ocean.” —Ryunosuke Satoro

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By Scot Stewart onnections help make it possible to understand life. It is crucial to see how the pieces of the puzzles in natural history are interlinked to see the total picture of life and how it works. Stepping out of the world of metal and concrete and into nature is one of the best ways to make those connections. Imagine waking to the thunder of a thousand sets of bison hooves on the Dakota prairie, watching the skies darken as a flock of several million passenger pigeons darkened the sky or getting caught in the swirl of a spinning school of barracuda. A walk through a grove of redwoods, sequoias or even an old growth forest like the Estivant (white) Pines in Keweenaw County instantly instills a sense of wonder. These are some of the

From top right, a red fox nursing her pups; water droplets on a big-toothed aspen; American white pelicans; red pine trunks; Common Merganser female with her young; and Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterflies puddling. (Photos by Scot Stewart)

ways people observed the wonder of life and came to understand their connections to the natural world in days past. The added edge to finding numbers or sheer masses of living animals or plants pushes that sense of wonder right to the brink of overwhelming both the senses and the instant connection with life itself. The discovery of “many” today is often due to being in the right place at the right time. A familiarity with one’s surroundings can lead to regular experiences with the wonder of finding the many, making it possible today to make those age-old connections. “It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.” —Napolean Hill Wonder though, comes in many forms. Great delight comes from seeing the first robin of spring, the lone blue-flag iris blooming in the marsh. Singular success is the envy of many—providing the hope it can be done—and often by one just trying harder or having the luck to make it happen. That first robin to appear in the spring in most places was driven to find its way north ahead of the competition for the best summer

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range. While no one may know why some birds are first—it may be because they occupied that territory the previous year, or simply were reared there and successfully made it back early. Or even because they never left—some hard birds survive the challenges of harsh conditions to be on site from the very start. “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” —African Proverb

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greater way to make connections with birds and experience their wonder is in finding seasonal flocks. During spring migration, large Vs of geese and sandhill cranes can be seen in the Upper Peninsula and many other parts of the United States. When these large birds fly in formation, lead birds provide an updraft for the birds behind them, lessening the effort of the following birds. As lead birds tire, they take a place farther down the V and another bird, usually a larger, stronger one, takes over in the lead. Large flocks filling the air with their calls bring a happy sense that the seasons are changing. American white pelicans fly in smaller Vs as they migrate north

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from the Gulf Coast to their summer ranges and may be the most majestic and graceful of them all. They can glide in a coordinated formation, like Olympic synchronized swimmers, as they slow and survey the water below them in a seemingly effortless fashion. Once on the water, they can continue to work cooperatively when they forage. American white pelicans spread out over the surface of a pond, river or lake looking for schools of minnows or small fish. Once a school is found, the birds may form a circle around the school and push in together to concentrate the fish before scooping them up in their large beaks. European starlings are the masters of group flight, behaving like a flying school of fish, twisting and turning in flocks called murmurations. Looking like a thin cloud, they can twist and turn to baffle predators like merlins. Predators often single out one individual that may appear less fit, a little slower or perhaps showing a small injury. Like a wolf trying to follow a single caribou in a large herd, or a barracuda in pursuit of one individual fish, it becomes increasingly difficult to pursue and catch that one when so many are traveling together, weaving and turning. “Success is best when it is shared.” —Howard Schultz

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he greatest flocks in the Upper Peninsula and other parts of the north-central United States in winter are infrequent but spectacular. They are flocks of bohemian waxwings, arrived from the Rocky Mountains region of the U.S. and Canada.

During leaner winters, these crested, social birds migrate eastward, not southward, in search of food. Wild fruits they seek include mountain ash and wild crab apples. Flocks can merge as they pour over a stand of trees fruitful enough to feed them. A flock numbering more than 1,000 worked through south Marquette last February, pouring out of the sky onto a series of crab apple trees, stripping them of their fruit quickly before moving on. Marquette offers bohemian waxwings and other birds like pine grosbeaks and robins something few other places can—hundreds of mountain ash and crab apple trees in a small, concentrated area. There may be more than a thousand crab apples trees gracing landscaped yards in the city limits and in Marquette Township, even shopping areas with hybrids producing good crops every year, instead of a two-year higher/lower yield cycle. Because of the huge number of fruit-producing trees, several larger flocks of waxwings can descend into town and remain for an extended period. They often discover the pine grosbeaks are already in town feeding, and as many as a dozen robins may have remained here feeding on both kinds of fruits and even some apples left on trees. Usually, large flocks can eat all the mountain ash berries and reduce the crab apple trees found in town, except for those along busy streets like Altamont and Washington. Some trees the birds rarely or ever feed in—mystery trees with lots of fruit, but apparently no appeal. By late February or early March, most of the birds are gone, but some

Rain droplets on a gull feather. “Individually, we are one drop. Together we are an ocean.” —Ryunosuke Satoro (Photo by Scot Stewart)

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Groups of ostrich ferns provide cover from predators for many species, while a single fern would have no effect. (Photos by Scot Stewart)

may pass back through in April and even eat fruits that dropped to the ground earlier in winter and were lost to new snowfall until it all melted. Come spring, other flocks may come to spend the summer. Large farm barns create the perfect nesting sites for cliff swallows and some barn swallows. They will start building nests under the barn eaves using mud from parking areas or other open spots after rains, occasionally creating large congregations of birds scooping up mud with their beaks to build their adobe houses. They then provide summer-long gracefully flying insect controls to the farm area. The Lower Harbor ore dock provides a similar nesting site, especially for barn swallows who snatch midges hovering over the harbor breakwall. During foraging forays, especially in winter, birds may take advantage of flocking to improve their chances of detecting predators. Extra birds mean extra lookout eyes to watch for hawks and falcons approaching from above and the periphery. Mixed flocks allow birds to take advantage of each other’s individual skills and abilities. Woodpeckers with their focus on the bark and wood in front of them use the lookout skills of chickadees. Nearsighted vireos, busy searching for insect larvae on branches and under leaves in the canopy, use the help of flycatchers to avoid predators. When food is more difficult to find during colder months, mixed flocks may be able to move into the territories of individual birds more easily to look for food without being chased out and can learn about new food choices by watching other species forage. This can be an important strategy

when food is scarce. The birds must connect with available food during the winter months before returning to their summer nesting ranges to start the cycle over again. Grassland animals use the same strategy to avoid lions, leopards and other predators, relying on giraffes and more alert antelopes to keep an eye out for slinking hunters. Nothing like a lookout on stilts or in a tower watching for danger. Zebras are nearsighted and benefit the most from the lookouts’ work. The sight of the Serengeti herds has instilled wonder in people since the dawn of man. “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” —Helen Keller

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ther animals can produce great responses when they pack themselves together to make it difficult for predators to catch just one. Residents of the U.P. are familiar with tent caterpillars. These moth larvae remain together after they hatch from their egg masses, and together they create enclosed structures made from several layers of silk. The tents are found in places where early morning sunshine can quickly warm them. The various layers provide the tent caterpillars with several options for optimum temperatures during the days where they seek shelter from predators. They need a starting temperature of 59 degrees Fahrenheit before they can begin digesting food to produce the energy needed to leave the tent and forage. Inner layers can provide warmer temperatures, and outer layers will stay cooler later in the day for

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Bohemian waxwings migrate to the east in search of mountain ash and wild crab apples, which they strip of their fruit. (Photo by Scot Stewart)

the insects. The caterpillar’s hairy exterior discourages most predators, but yellow-billed and black-billed cuckoos do feed heavily on them in the U.P., beating them on branches to break off the spiny hairlike structures. Caterpillar scouts leave a pheromone trail as they leave tents in search of leaves to eat and return to the tents leaving another pheromone announcing success in finding food for other members of the colony. It is a case of teamwork from start to finish, helping all in the colony have better chances for survival. The communal living, scent communication and common living quarters are quite similar to that of many ants and termites. They can also live in large colonies to up their chances of success, providing confusion for some predators and working together to bite, stick or douse their attackers in chemicals to discourage and turn them away. Perhaps the most amorous gatherings of insects occurring along the Great Lakes shorelines involve two groups of insects—mayflies and midges. The mayflies traditionally emerge in huge hatches in early summer. Adults have but a single night and day to mate and lay eggs for the next generation. In years past, drivers would have to stop and clean windshields as they drove at night through mayfly hatches, as the insects would completely smear the car windshields after collisions. Midges, emerging from their appearances as blood worms in the lake hover in huge clouds as they find mates. Along the shoreline, impressive

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hatches of both provide a buffet of protein for migrating warblers, shorebirds and others following the lake edges. These hatches are key, especially for sandpipers flying from the tip of South America all the way to the Canadian and Alaskan Arctic to nest in May and early June. The adult insects live only a short time, but still provide important food for migrants. While they can be annoying to those not dining on them, they do not bite or cause other issues. Spawning horseshoe crabs along the Atlantic Coast provide a similar feast for red knots, ruddy turnstones and other shorebirds on their travels up the East Coast each spring. Amphibians like American toads and some frogs can also produce large amounts of eggs in springtime. Delicate strings of toad eggs and masses of frog eggs need clean water free of man-made chemicals to hatch, and enough water, usually in vernal ponds free of fish, to sustain the development of tadpoles through the developmental stages of the amphibians. Clusters of small black toad tadpoles can astound hikers walking along pond and puddle edges, and hordes of tiny toads emerge from these small bodies of waters as their metamorphosis finishes. For bullfrogs, that time as tadpole can be up to four years. Large numbers of eggs are needed to ensure the survival of some to make it to the adult stage, especially since the completion of the tadpole stage is just the beginning of the challenges for both frogs and toads. After completing the tadpole stage, they are still quite small and vulnerable to predation, dry conditions and a lack of food their size.


“Diamonds are nothing more than chunks of coal that stuck to their jobs.” —Malcolm Forbes

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lodestone of nutrients and opportunity in a fallen tree can also produce an impressive number of fruiting bodies of fungi, like honey mushrooms or even more intriguing, slime molds, like salmon eggs, wolf’s milk and dog vomit (actual names of different slime molds). An older, rotten log visited frequently during the summer by warm rains can produce the fruiting bodies of a variety of decomposing agents, working thoroughly during warmer months to produce a labyrinth of fibrous networks breaking down and absorbing nutrients, stored for fifty years or more in the trunk of an aged sugar maple or a younger balsam poplar. A series of warm autumn rains will break out the urge both have to produce fruiting bodies on the surface of the wood. The fungi will produce the more familiar mushroom structures— the fruiting bodies of the fungi, like honey mushrooms. Slime molds are colonies of single-celled organisms that also help with decomposition. There can be a single structure or hundreds, depending on nutrients, moisture and the size of the fungi body or slime mold colony. Sometimes the numbers of fruiting bodies are impressively huge. Slime molds can produce spheres, branching networks or even maroon, red or white structures standing on thread-like stilts. Both groups are totally at the whim of the rain and humidity, but spectacular in their primitive ways of moving nutrients from

the recently living to the living today, a connection keeping the planet going. Plants can follow a similar plan. Given prosperous times with temperatures, nutrients and limited stresses from competition, disease, insects and fungi can result in a successful season for plants. Mature plants in a fruitful season may produce spores, pollen, seeds, fruits and other reproductive material. Changes in environmental conditions can result in a surge of reproduction, and the spread of some plants to colonize disturbed areas or out-compete and overtake plants in existing areas. Over the course of decades or centuries, dominant species can colonize a site to the degree they are the only major species found at the location. On some limestone-based sites in Alger and Luce counties, large-flowered trilliums sporting their brilliant three-petaled white flowers with their dusty yellow anthers, are the dominant species under the sugar maples, yellow birch and beech trees. In some lowland areas dominated by small creeks, bright yellow flowers of the marsh marigolds take control of spring, spreading with their bright multi-flowered shrubby plants across the low, mucky soils close to the creeks and seeps. It is a joy to see these native species spread their bright yellow blankets across a wide area early in spring as the trees above just get their start opening their leaves for the season. Seeds are another place where huge numbers can appear. With common foods, kiwis are among one of the most edible small fruit producing lots of seeds. Some herbaceous plants, like the invasive spotted knap-

Sandhill cranes, like many species of migratory birds, fly in formation, with lead birds providing an updraft for the birds behind them. This lessens the effort of the following birds. As the lead bird tires, a more rested comrade takes over to give them a break. (Photo by Scot Stewart)

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These large milkweed bugs feed on seeds, leaves and stems of milkweed. Their bodies contain toxic compounds derived form the sap they suck from the plants; they are used as research bugs because they are easy to use in the laboratory and have a short life-cycle. (Photos by Scot Stewart)

weed, can produce as many as 25,000 seeds. That kind of fertility can help explain how opportunistic plants like knapweed can quickly take over a disturbed site. Plants like marsh marigold, large-flowered trillium and non-flowering plants like the ostrich fern can become the dominant species in a smaller niche when the conditions are right. Because ferns and some flowering plants produce tiny spores and seeds blown by the wind to new sites, they must produce huge numbers of seeds to ensure a few might find success. Some soil types, especially sandy ones can also limit the types and communities able to colonize them. In the U.P., gravel was left behind by the last glacier passing through the Great Lakes. Resulting sand plains and later lake shore dunes often favor white, red and jack pines. One of the purest and truly impressive red pine stands can be found near the mouth of the Harlow Creek at Little Presque Isle. Jack pine stands on the Yellow Dog and Sands Plains are also quite distinct and have provided the perfect habitat for Kirtland’s warblers, a species demanding stands of eight- to 15-foot-tall jack pines. Other natural phenomenon can also appear in impressive numbers to create wonder. Raindrops, snowflakes, icicles, hail, and other products of natural events appear, often randomly, to stop viewers in their tracks to marvel at their beauty. These phenomenon, like flocks of butterflies and blooming valleys of flowers, are quite ephemeral, making them all as special and as transitory as rainbows. Only the groves of

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trees can stand alone for centuries or even millennia, but even they are now threatened by global warming, with stronger winds and storms, droughts and more intense forest fires. “No one can whistle a symphony. It takes a whole orchestra to play it.” —H.E. Luccock

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he appearances of the “many” are present and nearly always visible to anyone willing to take the time and look. They appear more often in healthy environments, so the longterm effects of severe storms, drought, wildfires and development cannot be overlooked. The rewards—the joy of discovery, the relaxation of the body and the appreciation of the elements of this amazing world around us—are immeasurable. MM About the Author: Scot Stewart has lived in Marquette long enough to be considered a true Yooper even though he was born in Illinois. He is a teacher and loves to be outdoors photographing and enjoying nature.


the arts

Jesse Powell is versatile on drums, guitar and keyboard, and is known for his skills as a sound engineer. (Photo courtesy of Steven L. Krupski)

Delta co-op brings musicians together

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By Ann Dallman t was the death of her mother two years ago that spurred Lois Corcoran of Gladstone to write the song, “More Than You Know,” dedicated to the memory of her mother. It is a tender and loving homage noting that she misses her mother’s “smile, wisdom and warm embrace.” She has since shared the lyrics with several members of The Music Coop—Delta County. “Though I could play it on the piano, my voice is pretty awful, so I tried to find someone who would sing it for a recording,” Corcoran said. “That struggle was what prompted me to organize a co-op so people could find other musicians to collaborate with when they needed one.”

It started in May 2021. “Jim’s Music in Escanaba was having a swap meet, and I thought it would be a good opportunity to talk to lots of musicians at once about the idea of starting a co-op,” Corcoran said. “I signed up about 10 that day, but it’s since grown to over 300.” Thus, the The Music Co-op—Delta County (TMC) was born. Corcoran said when she created the co-op’s Facebook page, she added Delta County after its name to differentiate it from other music co-ops in the area. Musicians are its preferred members, but membership is open to anyone. The group is targeted to singers, instrumentalists and songwriters, as well as those who want to hire them. “Half of our Facebook members are

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not musicians, but family or friends of band members,” she said. “Membership is free. I just ask that members help other members when they can. The group is without directors or officers. I have no title other than being administrator of the FB page I created.” There are no group meetings to attend because Corcoran the music coop is an online network only and not a band or orchestra. There are no rehearsals or monthly meetings beyond what individual members decide to arrange. “It would be hard to fit 300 people in a room,” Corcoran said. “The music co-op is for musicians to find other musicians and when they do,

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they can arrange jam sessions, etc. on their own to suit their schedule, etc. The Facebook page is also helpful for promoting gigs, posting members’ music videos and buying and selling instruments.” An added benefit? It provides a service to the community as a go-to resource for those in need of musicians for various events. “The [U.P. Action News] kindly publishes a tribute to different Music Co-op members once a month, which gives them a well-deserved moment in the spotlight,” Corcoran said. “Many of the area’s bands have joined The Music Co-op to promote their gigs on our Facebook page. These include, but are not limited to, Failte, Doozy, Reflections, Jam Band, Grand Design, Cosmic Experience, Wingin’ It, Fatwood and others. Most of them play a variety of venues each week.” Current members are skilled vocally and in piano, guitar/bass, flute, harmonica, mandolin, dulcimer and more. Member age ranges from 18 to

Local musician Tom VanDamme plays at the first open mic session held by The Music Co-op. (Photo courtesy of Steven L. Krupski)


Tate Thompson, known for his guitar work in the band “Doozy,” is a member of The Music Co-Op as well. (Photo courtesy of Steven L. Krupski)

70 and more. TMC was instrumental in forming the musical group Failte (pronounced Folcha), consisting of Kathy Creten, Carol and Bruce Irving, Bob Yin and Katherine Bender. Failte plays Irish and Celtic music and performs regularly at Hereford & Hops and other area venues. TMC sponsors an open mic at Wally’s Bar (Escanaba) on the third Tuesday of every month. Acoustic jam sessions are held at Bay College on the first and third Wednesdays of each month, and events are open to whoever cares to attend including non-members. Many of the members reside in Delta County, but the group includes members from the Marquette area. Although it is a U.P. organization, it has members from other states and even one member residing in Australia. The music co-op’s goal is straightforward. “My hope is that whoever joins can find someone to jam with because that’s what it’s all about,” Corcoran said. The music co-op helps bring together musicians and promotes events and music education within Delta County and abroad. Documented benefits of music are many: it’s heart healthy, elevates

mood, reduces stress, relieves symptoms of depression, stimulates memory and it helps to manage pain. To that list of benefits one can add the enthusiasm of members about the group and its effect on the local music scene. “We had a lot of fun and want to thank you for helping us find each other!” wrote one musician. Another wrote, “Just wanna say I’m a big fan of the spirit behind this group. It’s good for the community.” Membership is free. Members are asked to assist others with their music projects as often as they seek help with their own. To sign up for TMC, email lois.corcoran57@gmail.com; call (906)428-2843 or visit the group on Facebook. MM About the Author: Ann Dallman has lifelong roots in Michigan’s U.P. She started out as a newspaper reporter/ photographer and returned to journalism after retiring from teaching. Her first middle grade novel, Cady and the Bear Necklace, received multiple awards. Her second book in the series, Cady and the Birchbark Box, published by Modern History Press of Ann Arbor, is available wherever you buy books online and locally at Snowbound Books in Marquette.

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back then

Sad ends of the Peter Whites

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By Larry Chabot id you know that Peter White came to a sad end? Actually, two sad ends. No, not the famous Marquette pioneer whose name adorns a library, road, insurance agency and other things; the two ships that bore his illustrious name. One was a lake freighter and the other a warship— and both were star-crossed. The first ship was launched at the Great Lakes Engineering Works (GLEW) in Ecorse, Michigan, which ran from 1902 and 1960; by 1905, GLEW was building half of the total tonnage of all Great Lakes ships. The ill-fated Edmund Fitzgerald was launched there in 1958. The Peter White lake freighter slid down the ways in 1905, three years before its namesake passed away, and joined the Cleveland Cliffs fleet. White himself had begun a long association with the company in 1850 when the 19-year-old was hired to run the company store, which he soon bought for himself. He found great success in real estate, insurance, politics and community service; he was a postmaster, legislator and Cleveland Iron board member, among others. The 541-foot-long freighter, whose home port was Fairport Harbor, Ohio, left the Ecorse yards on September 25, 1905 on its maiden voyage. It was bound for Marquette to pick up a load of iron ore and head for Buffalo, New York. Oops! It ran aground near Buffalo

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and had to be refloated after offloading and reloading 200 tons of ore. Then, on its first trip to the western end of Lake Superior, the White suffered a broken shaft and had to be towed to Superior, Wisconsin for more repairs. The White, whose name was spread in colorful script on the bow, continued to ply the lakes for many years. In 1951, it was transferred to the Cleveland Cliffs Steamship Company, then was sold again to the Browning Lines and renamed the John C. Hay. But not for long: she was sold for scrap in 1961 to Marine Salvage and resold to an Italian shipbreaker. She reached her end on a towline to a Vado, Italy harbor in 1961. Her remains may have lived on in automobile fenders, steel fencing, hammer heads and other goods. Peter White may have missed the ship’s launch because he was grieving for his wife, who had died two months earlier. White had been in Ann Arbor giving the commencement address at the University of Michigan, but reached her bedside before she passed. But his first namesake vessel outlived the second one. White at War n October 1943, the U.S. Maritime Commission announced that a Liberty class cargo ship then under construction at Kaiser Shipyards in Oregon would be named in honor of Peter White because of his role in developing Marquette as an iron ore port. The ship was launched on October 26.

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Illustrations by Mike McKinney


This class of warship was available for naming by any group that raised $2 million in War Bonds. Honorees had to be deceased and famous, forgotten, even mythical. More than 100 were named for women. The Maritime office was flooded with names. One important (living) politician protested that he heard his name was on a Liberty ship, so he wrote the commission to say, “I am not dead, not in dry dock and do not need my bottom scraped. Please cancel the name.” How embarrassing: he was told that the ship was not named for him but for a long-dead American with the same name. Among the honorees were the founder of the 4-H movement, the first Ukrainian immigrant to America, a union organizer and the woman who suggested the poppy to symbolize Americans who died in World War I. Also chosen were Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Edison and Mark Twain The only exception to the “dead rule” was Francis O’Gara, who was presumed dead but was found later in a prison camp. O’Gara was the only person who visited a Liberty ship named for him. Eighteen shipyards turned out 2,710 Liberty ships between 1941 and 1945. Each had 250,000 parts, assembled in 250-ton sections in

clared a total loss, she was patched up, towed back to Oregon and sent for scrapping in 1949. Her war had lasted 671 days. Three of the Libertys are still around, moored in harbors at San Francisco, Tampa and Baltimore. All are considered to be museum ships and are available for cruises. A book titled Liberty Factory was written to describe Kaiser’s Oregon shipyards, where the Peter White was assembled. MM

plants across the United States, then forwarded to the shipyards. As a publicity stunt, one ship was completed in less than five days. The 441-foot-long Libertys were not known for their speed, which reached 12.5 miles an hour on a good day. The trip from Oregon to Hawaii could take almost nine days, and continuing on to the Philippines another 16 days, barring slowdowns or detours for storms. Her five holds could carry more than 9,000 tons of cargo, with extras like airplanes, tanks, even locomotives lashed toward the deck. A single ship could hold 2,840 jeeps, 440 tanks and 230 million rounds of ammunition, and was armed bow-to-stern with armament under the control of Navy

guards. The average crew would be as high as 62 merchant sailors and 40 Navy men. As the number of ships proliferated, so did problems with the welding joints (a deviation from standard riveting), appearing as hull and deck cracks. During the war, there were nearly 1,500 cases of brittle cracks causing 12 sinkings, including three Libertys. It was for this reason that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt referred to them as “ugly ducklings.” Nearly ten percent of the Libertys were lost to torpedoes, mines, joint failures or Japanese suicide planes. One loss was the Peter White, which hit a mine in the Philippine Sea off the island of Leyte on August 24, 1945, days after the Japanese surrender. De-

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Editor’s Note: The author’s uncle Jack Keast was an expert on Lake Superior shipwrecks. On his basement wall in Marquette was a huge lake map with the printed locations of various wrecks. Jack had penciled in many arrows pointing to the real sites. Many divers sought his help in locating the wrecks; all he asked in return was a small item from the ship that included its name. About the Author: Larry Chabot, an Ontonagon native, worked his way through Georgetown University and was then employed at White Pine Copper Company for 32 years, before moving to Marquette with his wife, Betty. He is a freelance writer who has written for several publications, including more than 170 articles for Marquette Monthly.

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poetry

From a Red Kayak paddling into the wigwam cave at the base of the cliff rising from Mother Superior it smells of life reusing itself

sandstone chapel echoes trout hymns on one day and furious prayers of thirty-foot waves the next cold god whose cathedral this is seems immoveable, unentreatable but look across time as the glaciers do and witness Creator turning a cliff into a beach About the Author: Terri Bocklund is a relative newcomer to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, with deep family roots in the region. Growing up in the Twin City suburbs, she enjoyed writing songs, poetry, and stories. While lyrics for her original songs have been her main poetic efforts in the past, she has recently focused more on poems that do not serve as lyrics, and are not to be bound to musical content. Terri was an Artist in Residence at Isle Royale National Park as a songwriter and composer, and has a suite of music that was inspired by that experience.

The Marquette Poets Circle is very thankful for the support of Marquette Monthly with respect to its five-year anthology Maiden Voyage. The 10-year anthology, Superior Voyage, is intended to be published this year with a tentative book release date of October 18, 2022 at the Peter White Public Library, with all profits from any books sold at the event to be donated to the library.

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superior reads

Last of Callahan mysteries chills and thrills

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Review by Victor Volkman Dangerous Season by Russell Fee is the third and final installment of the Sheriff Matt Callahan Mysteries. As with the previous stories, the action takes place mostly on the fictional Nicolet Island. My sense of Michigan geography is maybe not as well-developed as it could be, but my instincts tell me that Nicolet Island is standing in for Beaver Island. In Fee’s stories, Nicolet Island has a population of about 500, has two inland lakes and is adjacent to Charlevoix. The stories also reach out to an unnamed Indian reservation that might be modeled after Hannahville in Menominee County. Naubinway serves as a locale for some of the action. Getting back to the story, Sheriff Calllahan is besieged by both criminals and community forces that will bring him to a critical career decision by the end of the novel. A Dangerous Season is a wild ride that will bring the reader along for a battle with international criminal gangs, Native Americans both good and bad, multiple murders to solve and a touch of the supernatural. Even though it is the last of the trilogy, the characters and situations were easy to acclimate to by way of hints dropped throughout the book. Callahan’s arc starts in the first book, A Dangerous Remedy, which begins when he retires from Chicago city police work after surviving a horrific acid attack that has left half of his face deeply scarred to the point where he feels the need to wear a half-mask, like the Phantom of the Opera, I suppose. Fee has a great grasp of small-town politics and foibles, such as the mistrust of any resident who wasn’t born on the island. Accompanying Callahan’s journey is his family, long suffering fiancée Julie and their son Max who has Down Syndrome. Callahan’s partner throughout the series is the lovely and competent young deputy Amanda. The equilibrium is disturbed in this novel with the introduction of Nick as a love interest for her. Nick enters the story as a young candidate for deputy who is

struggling to find his feet. A brilliant NSA analyst recruited from Stanford, Nick was studying for his PhD at University of Michigan’s Center for Domestic Terrorism. One encounter with Amanda, and he was hopelessly smitten to the point where he abandons his promising career to be a junior deputy under Callahan’s tutelage. What Nick lacks in training or experience, he tries to make up with zeal, often to his personal detriment. As the story opens, mysterious goings on at a Nicolet chicken ranch reveal a 10-year-old Native American girl on the run. She has crafty outdoors skills that allow her to evade law enforcement and disappear, despite the efforts of the Callahan family to foster her. The entire novel takes place as winter is closing in, and there is serious concern that she will freeze to death if not found quickly. Fee’s description of the perils of winter is lyrical and one of my favorite aspects of the book: She didn’t notice when the clouds disappeared and the sky opened. She wasn’t aware when a new wind split by the trees spiraled around her. She

didn’t feel the falling temperature begin to hone the air to a razor’s edge. It was the sudden cracking and snap of tree limbs that awakened her. Then she noticed the cold that had seemed, moments before, only a chill that nipped at her face. The girl is suspected to be a Native American runaway, but how did she find her way on to the island? She appears to be mute, although she can understand English well enough. Her backstory will hold the key to unraveling mysterious deaths on the island that the community demands Callahan put a stop to or vigilante justice may prevail. Amidst the mayhem, ritual killings are taking place that suggest the emergence of a wendigo. But is it for real or just a copycat crime? To compound the situation, the island’s most famously eccentric woman has begun reporting UFO activity—with actual physical traces left behind on the ground. Callahan will need to collaborate with tribal police to help unravel the girl’s origins and a potential scandal that could go right to the top of the tribe’s leadership. In reading Russell Fee’s A Dangerous Season, I was immediately reminded of constable Del Maki, John Smolen’s protagonist in the crime thriller’s Cold and Out. Sheriff Matt Callahan has a similar appeal as a lone lawman pitted against overwhelming forces in the heart of a U.P. winter. Anyone who enjoys a good crime yarn set against the picturesque and wild Upper Michigan winter will find A Dangerous Season a great page-turning companion. Bundle up tight and throw an extra log in the woodstove for chills and thrills with Callahan’s team. MM About the Author: Victor R. Volkman is a graduate of Michigan Technological University (Class of ’86) and is the current president of the U.P. Publishers and Authors Association (UPPAA). He is senior editor at Modern History Press and publisher of the U.P. Reader.

Send Upper Peninsula-related book review suggestions to victor@LHPress.com Books submitted for review can be sent to: MM Book Reviews, 5145 Pontiac Trail, Ann Arbor, MI 48105

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the arts

Art on the Rocks is the main fundraiser for the Lake Superior Art Association. (Photo by Tom Buchkoe)

Art association celebrates 70 years

I

By Brad Gischia n 1951, a group of Marquette artists got together at the Northland Hotel, now the Landmark, to form a group that would discuss and share art, both with each other and with the surrounding community. Seventy-one years later, that group—the Lake Superior Art Association—is still making its impact felt in the area. The group’s main fundraiser, Art on the Rocks, was born with that original group, in 1959. It began with painting and displaying those paintings at the Father Marquette Statue on Front St. It grew and was moved to Presque Isle, grew again and moved to the Lower Harbor Park, where it will return on July 30 and 31. “Art associations are a crucial piece of a community’s greater arts and culture community,” says Tristan Luoma, Director of Art on the Rocks. “ As any resident of Marquette could tell you, we’re truly blessed to have so many dedicated individuals and organizations working tirelessly to offer must-see programs and events that showcase our area’s finest artists and musicians, contribute to the quality of life of both resident and visitor, and

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simply give folks a chance to get out, share a space, and enjoy one another’s company.” Their importance in community building cannot be underestimated. Luoma said that art associations “work year-round to offer artistic education and enrichment programs, provide a social space for artists to share their work and offer critique, host regular events such as workshops and receptions that contribute to lifelong learning and development, and encourage collaboration and partnership among community partners of all different kinds.” All of this work helps to build a stronger, more vibrant arts and culture community through added exposure and opportunities for artists. Because of the pandemic, the anniversary festivities for the Lake Superior Art Association were delayed. They will celebrate this year with plein air painting on Friday night of Art on the Rocks, a tribute to those founding artists. They are also looking to increase their membership, with a drive going on during Art on the Rocks. “COVID really decimated our numbers,” said Michele Tuccini,

LSAA board president, “It’s time to get people to join again.” Membership dues are $15 per year and senior citizens get a discounted rate of $10. “Anyone can join,” Tuccini said. “We don’t limit our membership to artists or be a gallery artist, anyone can join to support the arts in the area.” With your membership, you get an email newsletter, which details the many events that the LSAA puts on each year. And you get to support local art. “Like with any volunteer organization, social club, or other structured group, involvement in an arts association can provide an immediate sense of camaraderie and community. This can be especially valuable for artists who are just starting out, or who have just moved to the area,” Luoma said. “They allow for lifelong creative practice and growth. Whether sharing work in exhibits or demonstrations, creating new work side-by-side in workshops or plein air painting outings, or teaching new media through workshops, there’s always something new to learn from one another.” “We want to stress that our main focus is the appreciation of art and


teaching art,” said Diane Kordich, LSAA member. “It’s for everyone.” Luoma echoed this sentiment. “Member dues are often very reasonable, and you can trust that 100% of contributions directly benefit programming.” There is also an annual members show, in which each member may submit pieces for display at the Arts and Culture Center in the basement of Peter White Public Library. “We have six educational programs a year, which we pay for with what we make from Art on the Rocks,” Tuccini said. That has been difficult these past few years, since the pandemic shut everything down. “We didn’t really have a choice,” Tuccini said. “The city told us we couldn’t have the park. Everyone was really understanding. Everything was getting canceled.” But they were fortunate enough that they received a donation from a local business. “When Flagstar Bank closed, they donated all of the artwork that was inside to us,” Tuccini said. “We were able to auction it off during Art on the Mountain last year, and that brought in some extra money.” Most recently, the LSAA had Kathy Hanson, a representative from the General Pencil Company, who came in and did a watercolor painting

demonstration. They fill the year with these kinds of teaching events so local people can come in and get experience with different types of media. There are always opportunities to donate to the LSAA, and not just monetarily. Tuccini says that even your Tadych’s Marketplace receipts can help. “Drop them off at the Arts and Culture Center, and we’ll get money for those as well,” she said. The Art and Culture Center is just one of the things that the LSAA has helped to make happen in the community. Aside from the art shows and the classes, there are memorial plaques that they have had installed at sites important to the LSAA. “There is a brass plaque just down from the Father Marquette Statue, and another at the gazebo on Presque Isle,” Kordich said. “They commemorate the first Art on the Rocks and Anita Meyland respectively.” For more information on the Lake Superior Art Association, visit www. lakesuperiorartassociation.org or visit their Facebook at “Lake Superior Art Association.” MM

Our main focus is the appreciation of art and teaching art.

About the Author: Brad Gischia is a writer and artist native to Upper Michigan. He has published two children’s books and done illustrations for both comic books and novels.

Art on the Rocks takes place at Mattson Park near Marquette’s Lower Harbor on July 30 and 31 this year. (Photo by Tom Buchkoe)

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home cinema Hamaguchi films explore relationship challenges and new take on old theme

Reviews by Leonard Heldreth

T

his month we finish exploring the films of Ryusuke Hamaguchi by looking at two productions, one in two parts and one in three, despite its two-part title. The wrap-up is a family film about the relationship between a man and his eight-year-old nephew as they cope with the temporary absence of the boy’s father and mother.

Asako I & Asako II

A

sako I & II is a 2018 Japanese romance drama. It is based on a 2010 novel by Tomoka Shibasaki that follows the adventures of a woman who falls in love with two men who look physically the same but act completely differently. It’s the old doppelganger pattern made famous by Robert Lewis Stevenson in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, but Hamaguchi updates the action to contemporary Japan and makes one of the men a popular culture idol. The film competed for but failed to win the Palme d’Or at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival. Asako, a young woman who lives in Osaka, falls in love at first sight with the mysterious Baku. Asako’s close friend discourages her, saying he will only hurt her, but the two start a relationship. One morning Asako wakes up to find Baku gone, and her friend explains that, since his father died, he disappears frequently for no apparent reason. When Baku returns, he tells Asako he will always return to her. He disappears again, however, and his picture begins appearing in magazines and advertising posters, but he does not contact Asako. Two years pass and Asako moves to Tokyo where she works in a coffee shop. She meets Ryohei, who works for a nearby sake company, and he is so like Baku that Asako believes it is him (the same actor plays both parts). Only through a friend does Ryohei learn about Baku, and when he does, he begins to pursue Asako seriously and wins her over. Five years go by, and the couple lives together with a cat named Jitan while Baku goes on to become a famous actor and model. One day,

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during a party their friends are throwing for Asako and Ryohei, Baku returns, takes Asako by the hand and leads her away. She goes with him as they start driving north to Sendai, but then tells him to stop and gets out of the car. She tells him she cannot go with him, and he drives away, leaving her standing by the edge of the road. She finds her way back to Ryohei and Jitan, and he takes her in, but it’s clear from what he says and his expression that he can never trust her again. My favorite shot is the last one: a foaming, raging river rushes by their house, and the film ends with the two staring out the kitchen window at this view of nature roaring by, out of control. What does it mean? Was Asako foolish to fall in love so readily? Or to give up Ryohei for Baku when the latter comes for her? Or is it simply, as one critic said, “an amusing essay in amorous delusion?”

Wheel of Fortune & Fantasy

W

heel of Fortune and Fantasy is a 2021 anthology film with three parts, each starring a different actress. The first episode, entitled “Magic (or Something Less Assuring),” seemed the least interesting. It begins in the back of a taxi where Meiko, a model, is sharing a ride with

August 2022

her best friend Tsugumi and also listening to the details of Tsugumi’s new boyfriend who Meiko has not yet met. By the time they reach Tsugumi’s apartment, Meiko has realized that Kazuaki, the new boyfriend, is Meiko’s old flame. After Tsugumi gets out, Meiko directs the taxi to an office building where the boyfriend is working late and confronts him about his cheating ways. They argue, he hugs her to try to make up and she runs out the door. In a later scene, Meiko demands that Kazuaki choose between them; Tsugumi flees and Kazuaki runs after her, but this is then shown to be Meiko’s fantasy. She excuses herself and the other two go off together. Episode two, “ Door Wide Open,” presents a situation that virtually every male teacher has had to guard himself against—a student using sex to achieve a goal. French instructor Segawa has won the prestigious Akutagawa Prize for an erotic novel he has written, and Sasaki, one of his former students, decides to blackmail him by convinc-

ing a girlfriend to catch Segawa in a compromising position. She convinces him to read aloud an erotic passage from his novel while she secretly records it. When the recording is sent to Sagawa’s superior, he is fired. Sometime later Sasaki encounters his girlfriend on the subway, and he is completely indifferent to what he has done. Episode three, “Once Again,” picks up the theme of the doppelganger again. Natsuko attends her all-girls high school reunion, finding that she does not fit in nor remember her classmates’ names. Later at the train station, she recognizes a classmate she was close with and is invited to her home. The two reminisce, and Natsuko asks her if she is truly happy. Realizing that Natsuko is about to let heavy feelings off her chest, the classmate admits that she has forgotten Natsuko’s name. The two learn that they’ve mistaken each other for former classmates, not even having attended the same school. Natsuko reveals that the person she mistook the lady, Aya, for was her first love, who broke up with her in college. Aya role-plays as her ex-girlfriend, helping Natsuko vent her feelings. As they return to the station, Natsuko learns that Aya mistook her for a classmate she used to play the piano with, and Natsuko role-plays as her in turn. As they part, Aya chases Natsuko, tells her she remembers her classmate’s name, and hugs her.

C’mon C’mon

M

ike Mills, the director, made a film about his father, Beginners, which won an Academy Award for Christopher Plummer, and 20th Century Women, about his mother. The current film is about his relationship with his child. This black-andwhite film stars Joaquin Phoenix as Johnny, a radio journalist traveling the country with his produc-


tion group, interviewing children about their future aspirations for a radio show. In Detroit, he calls his sister Viv (Gaby Hoffman) whom he has not spoken with since their mother’s death from dementia a year ago. He finds that Viv’s husband, Paul (Scoot McNairy), is still having problems with mental disorders, and she needs to go to Oakland to help him. Without giving it much thought, Johnny offers to look after his eight-year-old nephew, Jesse (Woody Norman) in L.A. for a short time, and thus begins Johnny’s education on dealing with children. As he learns to answer Jesse’s blunt questions—“Why aren’t you married? Why did you and my mom stop talking?”—Johnny works his way through several books and articles, some fictitious, on childrearing. The results are somewhat predictable, and when Paul’s therapy takes longer than expected, Johnny must return to work and take Jesse with him. Eventually Johnny and Jesse learn to value each other, culminating in a screaming match that leaves them

both laughing hysterically. Whether a viewer sees the film as touching or as an oversimplification of raising talented children will likely depend on personal experience. The acting is generally first-rate with Phoenix doing a reversal of his recent Academy Award role as the Joker, and Woody Norman stealing virtually every scene he gets his curly head into. For those unfamiliar with raising kids, it dispels a lot of misinformation about kids and current theories on how to cope with them.

MM

About the Author: Leonard Heldreth became interested in films in high school and worked as a movie projectionist in undergraduate and graduate school. His short “Cinema Comment” aired for some years on WNMU-FM. In 1987, he started writing reviews for Marquette Monthly. He taught English and film studies at NMU for more than 30 years. Editor’s Note: All films reviewed are available on DVD or streaming video.

Answers for the New York Times crossword puzzle, located on Page 19.

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This coloring page from Colors of Marquette, Michigan Volume 1 is courtesy of The Gathered Earth, located in downtown Marquette.

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Out & About Out & About is a free listing of Upper Peninsula events. Events included must cost $25 or less (except fundraisers). All events are free and in Eastern time unless noted. We print information sent to us by a wide variety of people and organizations. It pays to double check the date, time, place and cost before heading out. Due to changing event requirements, please call ahead to ask about safety precautions, or bring a mask to events, as many events require masks regardless of vaccination status.

Index

E-mail your September events by Wednesday, August 10 to:

on the town ………… 80

calendar@marquettemonthly.com Marquette Monthly P.O. Box 109 Gwinn, MI 49841 phone: (906) 360-2180

art galleries ……… 81-82 museums …………..85-87 support groups ……… 90

Ore to Shore | August 13 | Marquette and Negaunee

end of july events 27 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 6:24 a.m.; sunset 9:28 p.m.

Calumet

• A Course of Love. Donna Trudell will lead the class based on the book by Mari Perron. Participants will learn about peace, joy and clarity through this self-awareness class. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Curtis

• Music in the Park. Drednot will

perform. Donations appreciated. 6:30 p.m. Erickson Center Park, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. ericksoncenter.org

Escanaba

• Farmers Market. 3 to 6 p.m. Escanaba Farmers Market, 1501 Ludington St. (906) 789-8696.

Ishpeming

• Crochet Club. Basic supplies and instructions provided to beginners. 5:30 p.m. Community Room, Ishpeming Carnegie Public Library, 317 N. Main St. (906) 486-4381.

Marquette

• Shark Week Slime. Get messy and make sparkly, sharky slime. Youth age seven and younger must be

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accompanied by an adult. 10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon, 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • Congregate Meals for Seniors– Dine in or Curbside Pickup. Meals available to those age 60 and older. Call to reserve a meal. $3.50 suggested donation. Noon to 1 p.m. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. (906) 228-0456. • Teens Game On. Youth in grades 6 to 12 are invited for video games, board games and more. 1 to 3 p.m. Teen Zone, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • Wednesday Evening Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Historical Marquette Bus Tour. Tours will feature authentic stories about the abundant history of Marquette and character reenactments. Advanced ticket purchase recommended. $25. 6 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Sierra Club: Wilderness Survival Kits. Michael Neiger and Todd Theoret will provide practical knowledge on making a wilderness survival kit. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322. • Lake Superior Theatre: Nunsense. This comedic spoof follows the misadventures of the little sisters in Hoboken raising money to bury their dearly departed. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu • North Coast Dance Festival. Professional dancers from across the country will perform. NMU students, $5; other students, $10, seniors and military, $12; others, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU nmu. universitytickets.com

Negaunee

• Negaunee City Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Miner’s Park, corner of Maas Street and US-41. • Shooting Sports with Dennis Klebba. This two to three session program will focus on hunter safety. Bring wrap-around safety glasses and a baseball cap. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 5:30 p.m. Negaunee Rod and Gun Club, 335 North Rd. (906) 361-5370. • Negaunee City Band Concert. Bring your own chair and enjoy a night of music. 7:30 p.m. Outdoor Performing Arts Center, east end of Iron St. • Registration Deadline: Ceramic Necklace or Ornament 1. See Wednesday, August 3.

Skandia

• Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Skandia Farmers Market, 9271 US41 S.

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28 THURSDAY

sunrise 6:25 a.m.; sunset 9:27 p.m.

Chassell

• Trio Trumpelot and the Lautala Boys. Enjoy a night of music from Finland and elsewhere. Donations appreciated. 7 p.m. Chassell Heritage Center, 42373 Hancock St. (906) 5231155.

Copper Harbor

• Performances in the Park. Bring your own blankets, chairs and picnic baskets, and listen to music by Uncle Floyd. 7 to 9 p.m. Donny Kilpela Memorial Park.

Curtis

• Musical: Oliver! Youth ages 10 and younger, $10; students, $15; adults, $25. 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. mynorthtickets.com

Ishpeming

• Teen Book Club. The group will discuss Hearstopper: Volume 1 by Alice Oseman. 1 p.m. Communicty Room, Ishpeming Carnegie Public Library, 317 N. Main St. (906) 4864381.

L’Anse

• Lakefront Concert Series. Enjoy a night of folk, country and light pop music by Cathy Bolton. Bring a chair and blanket. Rain location is Meadowbrook Arena. 7 p.m. Lakefront Park, Broad St.

Marquette

• Superiorland Pet Partners. Practice your reading skills be reading to a trained therapy dog. Rain location is in the Great Room. 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Front lawn, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Marquette Beautification and Restoration Annual Garden Tour. $10. Tickets available at Nagelkirks, FlowerWorks, Fosbergs and Luteys. 1 to 7 p.m. Locations available upon ticket purchase. mqtbeautification.org • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 360-3056. • Shark Week Movie Night. The Disney documentary film Oceans will be shown. Shark snack foods provided. 6:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Lake Superior Theatre: Nunsense. This comedic spoof follows the misadventures of the little sisters in Hoboken raising money to bury their dearly departed. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu

• Marquette City Band Concert. 7:30 p.m. Band Shell, Presque Isle Park. marquettecityband.com • North Coast Dance Festival. Professional dancers from across the country will perform. NMU students, $5; other students, $10, seniors and military, $12; others, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU.nmu. universitytickets.com

29 FRIDAY

sunrise 6:26 a.m.; sunset 9:26 p.m.

Caspian

• History Happy Hour. David Trotter will present Shipwrecks of the Great Lakes. 6 to 8 p.m. Donations appreciated. Iron County Historical Museum, 100 Brady Ave. (906) 2652617.

Curtis

• Musical: Oliver! Youth ages 10 and younger, $10; students, $15; adults, $25. 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. mynorthtickets.com

Gwinn

• Summer Story Time. Youth are invited for stories. Rain location is in the library. 10:30 a.m. Peter Nordeen Park, corner of Flint and Pine streets. (906) 346-3433.

Hancock

• Lost Songs of the Suomi Synod. Jonathan Rundman, with the Rundman Family Band and guests will perform a collection of songs from the Nordic immigrant community that settled in the U.P. Donations appreciated. 7 p.m. Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 1000 Quincy St. (906) 485-5533.

Ishpeming

• Chalk the Walk at the Ishpeming Senior Center. Create sidewalk chalk murals followed by an ice cream social. 2 p.m. Ishpeming Senior Center, 121 Greenwood St. (906) 4864381.

Little Lake

• Little Lake Community Festival. Activities include flea market sales and music by Peter Paul. 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Good Old Dayz Antiques and Estate Liquidation, 1738 E. M-35.

Marquette

• Shark Week Makers Space Crafts. Self-directed shark crafts will be available for pickup. 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Blueberry Festival. This annual street festival includes sidewalk sales, food vendors, games, fresh blueberries and more. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Washington and Front streets. downtownmarquette.org • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects


using the library’s LEGO blocks. Youth age 8 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 458-4844. • Art on the Rocks Celebration Kick Off. Celebrate the belated 70th anniversary of the Lake Superior Art Association and the 62nd Art on the Rocks with community members during plein air painting. Bring your own supplies. 2 to 4:30 p.m. Father Marquette Park, 102 E. Baraga Ave. lakesupeiorartassociation.org • Lake Superior Theatre: Nunsense. This comedic spoof follows the misadventures of the little sisters in Hoboken raising money to bury their dearly departed. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or nmu.universitytickets.com • North Coast Dance Festival. Professional dancers from across the country will perform. NMU students, $5; other students, $10, seniors and military, $12; others, $17. 8 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU nmu. universitytickets.com

food and drinks, and music. Proceeds will benefit the Legacy Scholarship Fund. Prices vary. Registration, noon; judging, 4 p.m. American Legion Post 349, 1853 M-35. (906) 346-6000.

Negaunee

Negaunee

• Registration Deadline: Ceramic Necklace or Ornament 2. See Friday, August 5.

30 SATURDAY

Marquette

• Saturday Morning Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Art on the Rocks. This annual, juried art show will feature works by local, regional and national artists. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, 200 Lakeshore Blvd. marquetteartontherocks.com • OutBack Art Fair. This annual art fair will feature works by local and regional artists. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Picnic Rocks, 1600 N. Lakeshore Blvd. outbackartfair.com • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. Lessons, 10 a.m. Games, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_ bridge.tripod.com or (906) 236-3173. • Lake Superior Theatre: Nunsense. This comedic spoof follows the misadventures of the little sisters in Hoboken raising money to bury their dearly departed. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu • Summer Reading Program Finale Party. Summer Reading Program participants are invited. Time to be announced. Negaunee Public Library, 319 W. Case St. (906) 475-7700.

sunrise 6:28 a.m.; sunset 9:25 p.m.

Calumet

• Community Market. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Curtis

• Musical: Oliver! Youth ages 10 and younger, $10; students, $15; adults, $25. 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. mynorthtickets.com

Ishpeming

• Lost Songs of the Suomi Synod. Jonathan Rundman, with the Rundman Family Band and guests will perform a collection of songs from the Nordic immigrant community that settled in the U.P. Donations appreciated. 7 p.m. Bethel Lutheran Church, 333 E. Ridge St. (906) 485-5533.

Little Lake

• Little Lake Community Festival. Activities include flea market sales and music by The Hart Beats. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Good Old Dayz Antiques and Estate Liquidation, 1738 E. M-35. • Annual Bike Show. This annual bike show will include bucket raffles,

31 SUNDAY

sunrise 6:29 a.m.; sunset 9:23 p.m.

Chassell

• Friends of Fashion: The People of Paradise. The show will feature stories of seven French Canadian families who settled on Paradise Road. $10. 2 p.m. Chassell Heritage Center, 42373 Hancock St. (906) 5231155.

Little Lake

• Little Lake Community Festival. Activities include flea market sales and family karaoke. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Good Old Dayz Antiques and Estate Liquidation, 1738 E. M-35.

Marquette

• Art on the Rocks. This annual, juried art show will feature works by local, regional and national artists. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, 200 Lakeshore Blvd. marquetteartontherocks.com • OutBack Art Fair. This annual art fair will feature works by local and regional artists. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Picnic Rocks, 1600 N. Lakeshore Blvd. outbackartfair.com

august events 01 MONDAY

sunrise 6:30 a.m.; sunset 9:22 p.m.

Escanaba

• Music Mondays. The Flat Broke Blues Band will perform. Bring a blanket and chairs. 7 p.m. Karas Bandshell, Ludington Park. deltami. org

Marquette

• Meet the Author: Dissecting Anatomy of a Murder. Author Eugene Milhizer will discuss his new book. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322.

Munising

• Farmers and Artisans Market. 4 to 6 p.m. Bayshore Park, 355 Elm Ave.

02 TUESDAY

sunrise 6:31 a.m.; sunset 9:21 p.m.

Calumet

• Collage Art. Make collage art with Edith Wiard. Advanced registration required. $25. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 9342228.

Gwinn

• Mags Custom Rods. This tour will include a presentation on how each rod is hand crafted with the new innovations in the industry. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 1 p.m. Mags Custom Rods, 65 M-35. (734) 646-4443.

Ishpeming

• Historic Main Street Walking Tour. Join others for a one-hour and fifteen-minute guided tour. Tour will be canceled for inclement weather. Youth, free; adults, $10 suggested donation. 6:30 p.m. Main Street parking lot across from City Hall. (906) 250-0985.

Marquette

• Park Storytime. Families and youth are invited for an outdoor storytime with song, bubbles and parachute play. Rain location is at Peter White Public Library. 9:30 a.m. Williams Park, East Ohio St. (906) 226-4323. • Storytime in the Garden. Stop by a for story, activity and light snack. 11 a.m. Baraga Educational Center and Museum, 615 S. Fourth St. (906) 2279117. • Historical Marquette Bus Tour. Tours will feature authentic

August 2022

stories about the abundant history of Marquette and character reenactments. Advanced ticket purchase recommended. $25. 1 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Oil Painting, Pastels and Drawing Classes with Marlene Wood. Bring your own supplies. $20. 1 to 3 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2258655. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 236-1811. • Lake Superior Theatre: Comedy Night. Artists will perform an eclectic presentation of Broadway and screen favorites. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu. edu

Munising

• Concert in the Park. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Bayshore Park, 355 Elm Ave.

Negaunee

• Tuesday Afternoons at the Museum. Daniel Truckey will present The Seventh Fire: A Decolonizing Experience. 2 p.m. Michigan Iron Industry Museum, 73 Forge Rd. (906) 475-7857. • Registration Deadline: Roadside Weeds Walk. See Tuesday the 9th.

03 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 6:32 a.m.; sunset 9:19 p.m.

Calumet

• A Course of Love. Donna Trudell will lead the class based on the book by Mari Perron. Participants will learn about peace, joy and clarity through this self-awareness class. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Curtis

• Music in the Park. The Derrell Syria Project will perform. Donations appreciated. 6:30 p.m. Erickson Center Park, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. ericksoncenter.org

Escanaba

• Kingdom Animalia: Exotic Animal Rescue Show. Youth age 4 to 10 with an adult are invited for stories. Bring a sack lunch to eat. 3 p.m. Escanaba Public Library, 400 Ludington St. (906) 789-7323. • Farmers Market. 3 to 6 p.m. Escanaba Farmers Market, 1501 Ludington St. (906) 789-8696.

Ishpeming

• Meet the Author: Dissecting Anatomy of a Murder. Author

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Eugene Milhizer will discuss his new book. 6 p.m. Ishpeming Carnegie Public Library, 317 N. Main St. (906) 486-4381.

Marquette

• Wednesday Evening Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • League of Women Voters Marquette County Membership Meeting. 6 p.m. lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. dthomsona@gmail.com • Michigan Mining Scrip. Author David Gelwicks will discuss the decades’-long project of researching the copper and iron mining companies throughout the U.P. that created their own currency. $5 suggested donation. 6:30 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Spring St. (906) 2263571 or marquettehistory.org • Lake Superior Theatre: Comedy Night. Artists will perform an eclectic presentation of Broadway and screen favorites. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu. edu • Registration Deadline: Behind the Scenes of a Publication. See Wednesday the 10th.

Negaunee

• Ceramic Necklace or Ornament 1. Sondra Grimes will lead a class in creating a ceramic necklace or ornament. Register by July 27. NCLL members, $15; nonmembers, $20. 2 p.m. Sondra Grimes Studio, 142 Grimes Rd. (906) 226-8347. • Negaunee City Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Miner’s Park, corner of Maas Street and US-41. • Negaunee City Band Concert. Bring your own chair and enjoy a night of music. 7:30 p.m. Outdoor Performing Arts Center, east end of Iron St.

Rock

• Rock the Park. Sit Down Francis will perform. Bring your own chair. 6:30 p.m. Gazebo.

Skandia

• Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Skandia Farmers Market, 9271 US41 S.

04 THURSDAY

sunrise 6:34 a.m.; sunset 9:18 p.m.

Chassell

• Francophone Migration in Northern Michigan: The Keweenaw Story in Context. Researchers will discuss their examinations of the experiences of French Canadians in the Keweenaw, the francophone industry and other topics. Donations appreciated. 7 p.m. Chassell Heritage Center, 42373 Hancock St. (906) 523-

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1155. • Performances in the Park. Bring your own blankets, chairs and picnic baskets, and listen to music by Powers of Air. 7 to 9 p.m. Donny Kilpela Memorial Park.

Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu. edu • Marquette City Band Concert. 7:30 p.m. Band Shell, Presque Isle Park. marquettecityband.com • Registration Deadline: Introduction to Riparian Ecology and Hike. See Friday the 12th.

Eagle Harbor

Negaunee

Copper Harbor

• Adventures in History Series. Learn about Lake Superior shipwrecks as diver and maritime historian Brandon Baillod will present The Ghosts of Gitchee Gumee. Keweenaw County Historical Society members, $5; nonmembers, $6. 7 p.m. Eagle Harbor Community Building, downtown. keweenawhistory.org

Escanaba

• Live on the Lawn At Lunch Music Series. Augie and Theresa will perform. Food trucks will be on site. 11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Escanaba Public Library, 400 Ludington St. (906) 789-7323.

L’Anse

• Lakefront Concert Series. Enjoy a night of music by Lightning Ridge. Bring a chair and blanket. Rain location is Meadowbrook Arena. 7 p.m. Lakefront Park, Broad St.

Marquette

• Superiorland Pet Partners. Practice your reading skills by reading to a trained therapy dog. Rain location is in the Great Room. 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Front lawn, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 360-3056. • First Thursdays Art Walk. Visit local art galleries, studios and creative spaces throughout the city. Maps of participating business available at the Marquette Arts and Culture Center and online. 4 to 8 p.m. Locations vary. • Visit of the Counsel General of Japan to Marquette. Meet the Counsel General Shindo and his wife Mrs. Seiko Shindo. Light refreshments will be served. 4 to 6 p.m. Sister City Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. • Music on the Porch. Bring a chair and listen to live music. Snacks, water and yard games will also be available. 6 p.m. Baraga Educational Center and Museum, 615 S. Fourth St. (906) 227-9117. • Movie Night: Dolphin Tails. 6:30 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Lake Superior Theatre: Comedy Night. Artists will perform an eclectic presentation of Broadway and screen favorites. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore

• Irontunes. Sign up for bean bag games and listen to live music. 6 to 10 p.m. Iron St.

05 FRIDAY

sunrise 6:35 a.m.; sunset 9:16 p.m.

Marquette

• Michigan Lighthouse Festival. Activities include the museum open house, guest speakers and a movie. Price, times and locations vary. michiganlighthousefestival.com • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 458-4844. • Lake Superior Theatre: Comedy Night. Artists will perform an eclectic presentation of Broadway and screen favorites. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu. edu

Negaunee

• Iron Ore Heritage Bike Tours. This 15-mile guided tour along the Iron Ore Heritage Trail will travel from the museum to Ishpeming with stops along the way and lunch provided by Midtown Bakery and Café. Advanced registration required. $25. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Michigan Iron Industry Museum, 73 Forge Rd. (906) 475-7857. • Ceramic Necklace or Ornament 2. Sondra Grimes will lead a class in creating a ceramic necklace or ornament. Register by July 29. NCLL members, $15; nonmembers, $20. 2 p.m. Sondra Grimes Studio, 142 Grimes Rd. (906) 226-8347.

06 SATURDAY

sunrise 6:36 a.m.; sunset 9:15 p.m.

Calumet

• Community Market. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Curtis

• 906 Festival. Festival activities include music, art and retail vendors, a beer and wine tent, games, demonstrations and more. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. (906) 586-9974 or ericksoncenter.org


Escanaba

Calumet

• Waterfront Art Festival. This festival will feature works of jewelry, photography, pottery and other mediums. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ludington Park.

• A Course of Love. Donna Trudell will lead the class based on the book by Mari Perron. Participants will learn about peace, joy and clarity through this self-awareness class. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Ishpeming

• Gem and Mineral Show. This show will include mineral specimens, demonstrations, a silent auction and more. 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Ishpeming Elks Club, 597 Lakeshore Dr. (906) 204-2623 or Ishpemingrocks.org

Curtis

• Music in the Park. Papa John and Black Mirage will perform. Donations appreciated. 6:30 p.m. Erickson Center Park, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. ericksoncenter.org

Marquette

Escanaba

• Michigan Lighthouse Festival. Activities include the museum open house, guest speakers and a maritime market. Price, times and locations vary. michiganlighthousefestival.com • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. Lessons, 10 a.m. Games, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. (906) 2363173.

07 SUNDAY

sunrise 6:37 a.m.; sunset 9:14 p.m.

Marquette

• Lake Superior Theatre: Comedy Night. Artists will perform an eclectic presentation of Broadway and screen favorites. Prices vary. 3 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd.tickets.nmu.edu

08 MONDAY

sunrise 6:39 a.m.; sunset 9:12 p.m.

Curtis

• Chamber Music Program. 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. (906) 586-9974 or ericksoncenter.org

Escanaba

• Music Mondays. The band Stonewall will perform. Bring a blanket and chairs. 7 p.m. Karas Bandshell, Ludington Park. d

Marquette

• Concert on the Steps. Michael Waite will perform songs from his new album Let It Go. 7 p.m. Front steps, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

Munising

• Farmers and Artisans Market. 4 to 6 p.m. Bayshore Park, 355 Elm Ave.

09 TUESDAY

sunrise 6:40 a.m.; sunset 9:11 p.m.

Curtis

• Summer Concert Week. Listen to music performed by i.am.james.

• Farmers Market. 3 to 6 p.m. Escanaba Farmers Market, 1501 Ludington St. (906) 789-8696.

Marquette

Adventures in History Series | August 4 | Eagle Harbor

$25. 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. (906) 5869974.

Escanaba

• Meet the Author: Dissecting Anatomy of a Murder. Author Eugene Milhizer will discuss his new book. 4:30 p.m. Escanaba Public Library, 400 Ludington St. (906) 789-7323. • Strings on the Bay: First and Only. Enjoy a night of music by the True North Quartet. Students, $6; nonstudents, $12. 7 p.m. Besse Theater, Bay College, 2001 N. Lincoln Rd. (906) 217-4045 or baycollege.tix. com

Ishpeming

• Historic Main Street Walking Tour. Join others for a one-hour and fifteen-minute guided tour. Tour will be canceled for inclement weather. Youth, free; adults, $10 suggested donation. 6:30 p.m. Main Street parking lot across from City Hall. (906) 250-0985.

Marquette

• Historical Marquette Walking Tour. Tours will feature authentic stories about the abundant history of Marquette and character reenactments. Advanced ticket purchase recommended. $15. 1 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Storytime in the Garden. Stop by for a story, activity and light snack. 11 a.m. Baraga Educational Center and Museum, 615 S. Fourth St. (906) 2279117. • Oil Painting, Pastels and Drawing Classes with Marlene Wood. Bring your own supplies. $20. 1 to 3 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 225-

8655. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 236-1811. • PWPL Board of Trustees Meeting. Open to the public. 5 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. pwpl.info • Concert on the Steps. Harry South and Friends will perform. 7 p.m. Front steps, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Lake Superior Theatre: My Son Pinocchio. This musical tells the tale of Pinocchio through the eyes of his father, Geppetto and Blue Fairy. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu • Registration Deadline: Kids Cove 2. See Tuesday the 16th.

Munising

• Concert in the Park. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Bayshore Park, 355 Elm Ave.

Negaunee

• Roadside Weeds Walk. Learn the difference between weeds and wildflowers on this guided walk. Register by the 2nd. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 10 a.m. Iron Ore Heritage Trail. Jackson Miners Park Trailhead, West end of Main St. (906) 361-5370. • Tuesday Afternoons at the Museum. Daniel Fountain will present Lost and Found: The Henry B Smith. 2 p.m. Michigan Iron Industry Museum, 73 Forge Rd. (906) 4757857.

10 WEDNESDAY

• Behind the Scenes of a Publication. Learn about the history of Marquette Monthly and the publication process. Register by the 3rd. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 1 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 3615370. • Wednesday Evening Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Historical Marquette Bus Tour. Tours will feature authentic stories about the abundant history of Marquette and character reenactments. Advanced ticket purchase recommended. $25. 6 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Concert on the Steps. The Goofy Foot Band will perform. 7 p.m. Front steps, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Lake Superior Theatre: My Son Pinocchio. This musical tells the tale of Pinocchio through the eyes of his father, Geppetto and Blue Fairy. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu

Negaunee

• Negaunee City Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Miner’s Park, corner of Maas Street and US-41. • Negaunee City Band Concert. Bring your own chair and enjoy a night of music. 7:30 p.m. Outdoor Performing Arts Center, east end of Iron St.

Rock

• Rock the Park. Grand Design will perform. Bring your own chair. 6:30 p.m. Gazebo.

Skandia

• Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Skandia Farmers Market, 9271 US41 S.

sunrise 6:41 a.m.; sunset 9:09 p.m.

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on the town Copper Harbor

• Lake Effect Bar and Grill. - Wednesday, July 27: Outlaw’d. - Wednesday, August 3: Erik Koskinen. - Wednesday, the 10th: Randy Palmer. - Wednesday, the 17th: Lake Fanny Hooe-Down. Music, 8 p.m. 174 Gratiot St. (906) 289-4010.

Gwinn

• Hideaway Bar. - Mondays: The Hideaway AllStars. 7 p.m. 741 M-35. (906) 346-3178. • Up North Lodge. - Sunday, July 31: Guitars and Cataraks. - Sunday, August 7: Soul Shine. - Sunday, the 14th: Lost Cause. - Sunday, the 21st: The Reverend. - Sunday, the 28th: Tuesday Jones. Music, 4 to 8 p.m. 215 S. CR-557. (906) 346-9815.

Joshua Davis | August 27 | Ore Dock Brewing, Marquette

Marquette

• Blackrocks Brewery. - Friday, July 29: Michael Waite Band. Music begins at 7 p.m. 424 N. Third St. (906) 273-1333 or blackrocksbrewery.com • Drifa Brewing Company. - Mondays: Musicians’ Open Mic. 6 to 8 p.m. - Friday, July 29: DayDreamers Acoustic. - Saturday, the 30th: Bradley and Jason. - Sunday, the 31st: U.P. Timekeepers. - Thursday, August 4: DayDreamers. - Friday, the 5th: Derrell Syria Project. - Saturday, the 6th: The Y Knots. - Thursday, the 11th: Goofy Foot Band. - Sunday, the 14th: The Driftless Revelers. - Sunday, the 21st: Kaleb Shannon. - Thursday, the 25th: Luke Ojea. - Friday, the 26th: Derrell Syria Project. - Saturday, the 27th: Ethan Bott. - Sunday, the 28th: Blue Champagne. Music begins at 6 p.m. 501 S. Lake St. 273-1300. • Ore Dock Brewing Company. - Thursday, July 28: Tyler Dettloff and RJ Little. 8 p.m. - Friday, the 29th and Saturday, the 30th: Big Donut. - Thursday, August 4: Saajtak. $5. - Friday, the 5th: Nashon

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Halloway. $10 - Saturday, the 6th: Road to Farmblock. - Friday, the 12th and Saturday, the 13th: Flylite Gemini. -Saturday, the 13th: Driftless Revelers. 6 p.m. - Friday, the 19th: Dirty Names. - Saturday, the 20th: Adam Sawfox. 6 p.m. - Saturday, the 20th: Millennial’s Falcon. - Thursday, the 25th: Ramble Tamble. - Friday, the 26th: Steve Leaf & The Ex Pats. - Saturday, the 27th: Joshua Davis. $15 - Tuesday, the 30th: Luke Winslow King. $10. All shows are free and begin at 9 p.m. unless noted. 114 W. Spring St. 228-8888. • Rippling River Resort. - Thursdays through Sundays: Fireside music by various musicians. 6 to 9 p.m. 4321 M-553. (906) 273-2259/

Munising

• Falling Rock Café & Bookstore. - Saturday, July 30: Beechgrove and Blacksmith. 6 to 8 p.m. - Saturday, August 6: Mike Felten. 6 to 8 p.m. - Saturday, the 13th: DayDreamers. 6 to 8 p.m. - Saturday, the 20th: Alex Teller. 5 to 7 p.m. - Saturday, the 27th: Ben Hassenger. 5 to 7 p.m.

104 E. Munising Ave. (906) 3873008.

Negaunee

• Smarty’s Saloon. - Thursdays: Live acoustic music. 7 to 10 p.m. 212 Iron St. (906) 401-0438.

Republic

• Pine Grove Bar. - Friday, July 29: S.E.T. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. - Saturday, the 30th: Polar Blues Band. 8 p.m. to midnight. - Friday, August 5: Matthew Byce. 7 to 10 p.m. - Saturday, the 6th: Lillian Manceau. 2 to 5 p.m. - Saturday, the 6th: Prusi Brothers. 8 p.m. to midnight. - Friday, the 12th: The Goofy Foot Band. 8 to 11 p.m. - Saturday, the 13th: The Band Stetson. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. - Friday, the 19th: Derrell Syria Project. 3 to 6 p.m. - Friday, the 19th: Diversion. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. - Saturday, the 20th: Lillian Manceau. 3 to 6 p.m. - Saturday, the 20th: DJ & Karaoke. 7 p.m. - Sunday, August 21st: Toni Saari. 3 to 6 p.m. - Friday, the 26th: Spun. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. - Saturday, the 27th: Swampberry Moonshine. 8 p.m. to midnight. 286 Front St. (906) 376-2234. MM


art galleries Calumet

Colleen Maki | Underwater 2 | Peter White Public Library Reception Gallery

• Calumet Art Center. Works by local and regional artists. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228. • Copper Country Associated Artist. Works by members and workshop participants in watercolor and oil, drawings, photography, sculpture, quilting, wood, textile, clay, glass and other media. Thursday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 205 Fifth St. (906) 3371252 or ccaartists.org • Gallery on 5th. Works by local and regional artists. Days and hours vary. 109 Fifth St. (906) 369-0094.

Copper Harbor

• EarthWorks Gallery. Featuring Lake Superior-inspired photography by Steve Brimm. Daily, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. 216 First St. (910) 319-1650.

Escanaba

• East Ludington Art Gallery. Works by local artists. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1007 Ludington St. (906) 786-0300 or eastludingtongallery.com • William Bonifas Fine Arts Gallery. - Bonifias Membership Show, featuring works by various artists, will be on display through August 25.

- East Ludington Gallery Artists Show, featuring works by artists in the coop, will be on display through August 4. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3p.m. 700 First Avenue South. (906) 7863833 or bonifasarts.org

Hancock

• Finlandia University Gallery. - Folk School at Midsummer, an exhibition of work by Folk School instructors and students, will be on display through September 2. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m. 435 Quincy St. (906) 487-7500. • Kerredge Gallery. - Balancing, featuring fiber art by Phyllis Fredendall will be on display through August 6. Tuesday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts Center, 126 Quincy St. (906) 4822333 or coppercountryarts.com • Youth Gallery. - The Hexagon Project, featuring works by Houghton Elementary School students, will be on display through August 31. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts

Center, 126 Quincy St. (906) 4822333 or coppercountryarts.com

Houghton

• A-Space Gallery. Featuring works by local, regional and national artists. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays, 1 to 8 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. mtu.edu/ rozsa

Marquette

• Art—U.P. Style. Art by Carol Papaleo, works by local artists, gifts, classes and more. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. 130 W. Washington St. (906) 225-1993. • DeVos Art Museum. - U.P. Focus, an exhibition featuring works by artists from, living in or influenced by the U.P., will be on display August 26 through November 4, with an opening reception at 6:30 p.m. August 26. • - The Last Place on Earth, featuring works by Jan Manniko, will be on display through November 15, 2022. Monday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Corner of Seventh and Tracy streets. NMU. (906) 227-1481 or nmu.edu/devos • Graci Gallery. Works by regional and national artists. Featuring fine craft, contemporary art, and jewelry.

Thursday and Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday, by appointment or chance. 555 E Michigan Street. gracigallery.com • Huron Mountain Club Gallery. - From Where I Stand, a multimedia exhibition by Katherine Sirvio, will be on display, August 1 through 31, with a public reception at 6 p.m. August 11 Monday through Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. • Lake Superior Photo and Gallery. The studio features landscape photographic art by Shawn Malone, including naturescapes of the Lake Superior region. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 211 S. Front St. (906) 228-3686 or lakesuperiorphoto.com • Marquette Arts and Culture Center Deo Gallery. Practice as Prism, featuring pictures, painting and prints by Taimur Cleary, will be on display August 1 through 31, with a public reception at 6 p.m. August 11. Monday through Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • Peter White Public Library Reception Gallery. (continued on page 81) 82)

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art galleries • - Summer Bodies, featuring digital illustrations by Sarah Reynolds, will be on display, August 1 through 31, with a public reception at 6 p.m. August 11. Monday through Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • Presque Isle Station. This working pottery studio features pottery by Michael Horton and Terry Gilfoy, along with works by local artists. Days and times vary. 2901 Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 2251695. • The Gallery: A Marquette Artist Collective Project. Works by local and regional artists. Monday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 1 to 4 p.m. Suite U7, 130 W. Washington St. mqtartistcollective.org • The Studio Gallery at Presque Isle. Works by local and internationally acclaimed artists. Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 2905 Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 360-4453. • Wintergreen Hill Gallery and Gifts. - Works by Maureen Miller, will be on display August 6 through the 19th, with an opening public reception at 6 p.m. August 6. - Works by Maddie Pederson will be on display August 20 through September 2. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 810 N. Third St. (906) 273-1374. • Zero Degrees Artist Gallery. - Works by fiber artist Judy Parlato

11 THURSDAY

sunrise 6:42 a.m.; sunset 9:37 p.m.

Chassell

• Kris Kyro and Adrienne Newman Concert. Donations appreciated. 7 p.m. Chassell Heritage Center, 42373 Hancock St. (906) 523-1155.

Copper Harbor

• Performances in the Park. Bring your own blankets, chairs and picnic baskets, and listen to music by English, Irish and Friends. 7 to 9 p.m. Donny Kilpela Memorial Park.

Crystal Falls

• Virtual Q&A with U.P. Author Ellen Airgoodl. Author Phil Bellfy will discuss his book U.P. Colony: The Story of Resource Exploitation

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will be on display, with a public reception at 1 p.m. on August 13. - Works by Simon Barrett will be on display, with a public reception at 1 p.m. August 20. • Works in oils, watercolors, mixed media, jewelry, photography, metals, woods, recycled and fiber arts and much more. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 525 N. Third St. (906) 228-3058 or zerodegreesgallery.org

Munising

• Open Wings Pottery Studio & Gallery. Featuring works by more than 50 local artisans in a variety of media. Open by chance or appointment. E9795 County Road H-58. (906) 387-5070. • U.P.-Scale Art. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. or by appointment. 109 W. Superior Ave. (906) 387-3300 or upscaleart.org

Rapid River

• The adhocWORKshop. Owner Ritch Branstrom creates sculptures with found objects inspired by the land in which the objects were found. By appointment or chance. 10495 South Main Street. (906) 339-1572 or adhocworkshop.com

Sand River

• Aurelia Studio Pottery. Featuring high fire stoneware, along with functional and sculptural pieces inspired by nature, created by potter and owner Paula Neville. Open by appointment or chance. 3050 E. M-28. (906) 343-6592. MM in Upper Michigan - Focus on Sault Ste. Marie Industries. 7 p.m. Call or email to register. (906) 875-3344 or egathu@uproc.lib.mi.us

L’Anse

• Lakefront Concert Series. Enjoy a night of music by One Voice. Bring a chair and blanket. Rain location is Meadowbrook Arena. 7 p.m. Lakefront Park, Broad St.

Marquette

• Marquette Beautification and Restoration Committee Meeting. Lunch provided, donations appreciated. Noon. Beacon House, 200 S. Seventh St. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or


(906) 360-3056. • Second Thursday Creativity Series: Petting Zoo with Jo-Jay Corral. Youth are invited for hands-on activities, a petting zoo, ukulele music and free Culver’s frozen custard. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. U.P. Children’s Museum, 123 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 226-3911 or upchildrensmuseum.org • Music on the Porch. Bring a chair and listen to live music. Snacks, water and yard games will also be available. 6 p.m. Baraga Educational Center and Museum, 615 S. Fourth St. (906) 227-9117. • Lake Superior Theatre: My Son Pinocchio. This musical tells the tale of Pinocchio through the eyes of his father, Geppetto and Blue Fairy. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu • Registration Deadline: Cryptocurrency. See Thursday the 18th.

Negaunee

• Irontunes. Sign up for bean bag games and listen to live music. 6 to 10 p.m. Iron St. • Negaunee Beautification Committee Meeting. 6:30 p.m. Pocket Park, Iron St. (906) 362-8160.

Sands

• Marquette County Fair. Activities include amusement rides, livestock and equine shows, entertainment, food and more. Youth ages four and

younger, free; ages five to eleven, $3; age 12 and older, $6. 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Marquette County Fairgrounds, 715 M-553. marquettecountyfair.org

12 FRIDAY

sunrise 6:44 a.m.; sunset 9:06 p.m.

Crystal Falls

• Humongous Fungus Fest. The opening day’s activities include a book sale, a concert by Troy Graham and parade. Book sale and Troy Graham Concert, 4 to 7 p.m.; parade, 6 p.m. Locations vary. • Concert: The Insiders. This Tom Petty Tribute band will perform classic hits from Tom Petty and the Heartbreaks. $25. 7 p.m. CDT. Crystal Theatre, 304 Superior Ave. (906) 8753208 or thecrystaltheatre.org

Houghton

• Gem and Mineral Show. View gems, minerals, fossils, lapidary and copper country memorabilia. Bid on silent auction items of minerals, copper and other unique items. Geologist and author Nathalie Brandes will give a presentation. Show, 1 to 8 p.m.; Presentation, 4 p.m. Houghton Elementary School, 203 W. Jacker Ave. ccrmc.info

Marquette

• Introduction to Riparian Ecology and Hike. This guided two-mile hike

Festival of Sail | August 12 - 14 | Marquette

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will include exploring the water table and ecology along the way. Register by the 4th. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 9 a.m. VielmettiPeters Reserve, West end of Brookton Rd. (906) 361-5370. • Festival of Sail. The weekend festival will include ship tours, daily sails, educational programming, food, music and more. Prices vary. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, 200 N. Lakeshore Blvd. Marquette. festofsail.com • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 458-4844. • Lake Superior Theatre: My Son Pinocchio. This musical tells the tale of Pinocchio through the eyes of his father, Geppetto and Blue Fairy. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu

Negaunee

• Iron Ore Heritage Bike Tours. This 15-mile guided tour along the Iron Ore Heritage Trail will travel from the museum to Ishpeming with stops along the way and lunch provided by Midtown Bakery and Café. Advanced registration required. $25. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Michigan Iron Industry Museum, 73 Forge Rd. (906) 475-7857.

LEGOs. 1 p.m. Escanaba Public Library, 400 Ludington St. (906) 7897323.

Houghton

• Gem and Mineral Show. View gems, minerals, fossils, lapidary and copper country memorabilia. Bid on silent auction items of minerals, copper and other unique items. Geologist and author Nathalie Brandes will give a presentation. Show, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Presentation, 4 p.m. Houghton Elementary School, 203 W. Jacker Ave. ccrmc.info

Ishpeming

• Buzz the Gut. This annual event includes a car show and parade. The parade travels through downtown Ishpeming to Negaunee. Car show, 5 to 7 p.m. Parade, 7 p.m. Cliffs Shaft Mining Museum, 501 W. Euclid Dr.

Marquette

• Ore to Shore: Short Rock Start. Cheer on bikers as they leave for the 10-mile race. Prices vary. 8 a.m. Lakeview Arena, 401 E. Fair Ave. oretoshore.com • Festival of Sail. The weekend festival will include ship tours, daily sails, educational programming, food, music and more. Prices vary. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, 200 N. Lakeshore Blvd. Marquette.

festofsail.com • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. Lessons, 10 a.m. Games, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. (906) 2363173. • Ore to Shore: Junior Rock Start. Cheer on bikes as they begin the 4-mile race. Prices vary. 4 p.m. Lakeview Arena, 401 E. Fair Ave. oretoshore.com • Ore to Shore: Littlest Rock Start. Cheer on youth ride in half-mile course. Prices vary. 5 p.m. Lakeview Arena, 401 E. Fair Ave. oretoshore. com • Ore to Shore: Little Rock Start. Cheer on as youth ride the onemile course. Prices vary. 5:15 p.m. Lakeview Arena, 401 E. Fair Ave. oretoshore.com

Negaunee

• Ore to Shore: Soft Rock Start. Cheer on bikes as they begin the 28-mile race. Prices vary. 9 p.m. Lakeview Elementary School, 200 Croix St. oretoshore.com • Ore to Shore: Hard Rock Start. Cheer on bikes as they begin the 48-mile race. Prices vary. 9 p.m. Lakeview Elementary School, 200 Croix St. oretoshore.com

Sands

Sands

• Marquette County Fair. Activities include amusement rides, livestock and equine shows, entertainment, food and more. Youth ages four and younger, free; ages five to eleven, $3; age 12 and older, $6. 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Marquette County Fairgrounds, 715 M-553. marquettecountyfair.org

• Gem and Mineral Show. View gems, minerals, fossils, lapidary and copper country memorabilia. Bid on silent auction items of minerals, copper and other unique items. Show, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Houghton Elementary School, 203 W. Jacker Ave. ccrmc.info

Marquette

• Festival of Sail. The weekend festival will include ship tours, daily sails, educational programming, food, music and more. Prices vary. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, 200 N. Lakeshore Blvd. Marquette. festofsail.com • Lake Superior Theatre: My Son Pinocchio. This musical tells the tale of Pinocchio through the eyes of his father, Geppetto and Blue Fairy. Prices vary. 3 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu

Escanaba

• U.P. State Fair. Activities include amusement rides, the pocket park, livestock and equine shows, entertainment, food and more. Youth ages five and younger, free; ages six to twelve, $5; age thirteen and older, $10. 5 to 10:30 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, 2401 12th Ave. N. upstatefair.net • Music Mondays. The band Sit Down Francis will perform. Bring a blanket and chairs. 7 p.m. Karas Bandshell, Ludington Park. deltami. org

Calumet

• Community Market. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Crystal Falls

• Humongous Fungus Fest. Activities include a kids carnival, mushroom cook-off, car show, softball game and more. Times and locations vary. • Movie Presentation: The Humongous Fungus Among Us. Producer and Forest Park graduate Tim Warmanen will answer questions following the film. Donations appreciated. 2 p.m. CDT. Crystal Theatre, 304 Superior Ave. (906) 8753208 or thecrystaltheatre.org

Marquette

Humongous Fungus Fest | August 12 - 13 | Crystal Falls

• LEGO Club. Bring your own

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15 MONDAY

13 SATURDAY

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14 SUNDAY

sunrise 6:46 a.m.; sunset 9:03 p.m.

sunrise 6:47 a.m.; sunset 9:01 p.m.

sunrise 6:45 a.m.; sunset 9:04 p.m.

Escanaba

• Marquette County Fair. Activities include amusement rides, livestock and equine shows, entertainment, food and more. Youth ages four and younger, free; ages five to eleven, $3; age twelve and older, $6. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Marquette County Fairgrounds, 715 M-553. marquettecountyfair.org

August 2022

• Global Geeks Book Club. The group will discuss Disoriental by Negar Djavadi. 6 p.m. Dandelion Cottage Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264312. • Judith Minty’s Yellow Dog Journal Celebration. Celebrate poet Judith Minty with a reading and performance of poems from Yellow Dog Journal by local poets, musicians and authors. 6:30 p.m. Presque Isle Ice Cream Pavilion, Presque Isle. (906) 226-4323.


museums Houghton County HIstorical Museum | Lake Linden

Big Bay

• Big Bay Lighthouse. The grounds of the 1896 lighthouse are open year-round. 3 Lighthouse Rd. (906) 345-9957.

Calumet

• Coppertown Mining Museum. View exhibits relative to the copper mining industry and community life. Prices vary. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 25815 Red Jacket Road. (906) 337-4354. • International Frisbee Hall of Fame and Museum. Learn about the history of Guts Frisbee. Days and hours vary. Open when events are held. Second floor ballroom, Calumet Coliseum, Red Jacket Rd. (906) 281-7625. • Keweenaw Heritage Center. Exhibits focused on different aspects of life in the Keweenaw are on display, with exhibits varying each year. $3. Monday through Saturday, 1 to 4:30 p.m. corner of Scott and Fifth streets. keweenawheritagecenter.org or (906) 337-2410.

nonresidents. US-41 (one mile east of Copper Harbor). (906) 289-4215.

Caspian

Covington

• Iron County Historical Museum. This complex is the U.P.’s largest outdoor museum. Twenty-six buildings represent the industries of lumber, mining and transportation and include a homestead, cultural center and art complex. Youth 5 and younger, free; 6 to 18, $10; adults, $15. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Off M-189 or two miles off US-2 at Iron River. ironcountymuseum.org or (906) 265-2617.

Chassell

• Chassell Heritage Center and Museum. Featured displays include a 1890s era carriage, lumber and farming exhibits and a vintage clothing exhibit maintained by the Friends of Fashion. Donations appreciated. Tuesdays and Saturday, 1 to 4 p.m. Thursdays, 4 to 8:30 p.m. 42373 Hancock St. (906) 523-1155.

Copper Harbor

• Fort Wilkins State Park. Built in 1844, this fort is a well-preserved, nineteenth century military post and lighthouse complex. Through museum exhibits, audiovisual programs and costumed interpretation, visitors can explore the daily routine of military service, experience the hardships of frontier isolation and discover another era. Park store, bookstore, concession stand and campsites are on site. 8:30 a.m. to dusk. $17 per car, per day for Michigan residents, $9 for

• Covington Historical Museum. Located in the historic 1905 Township Hall, a Michigan Historic Site, the Museum houses exhibits, photographs and artifacts focusing on the life of early Finnish residents of Covington Township. The Museum contains the Township’s only jail cell. On the grounds is an early fire truck. The Genealogy Room has family history files and early township records. Saturdays, 1 to 3 p.m. Donations appreciated. Center St. (906) 355-2169.

Delaware

• Delaware Copper Mine. This authentic copper mine operated from 1847 to 1887. The tour takes visitors to the first level at 110 feet, where they can see veins of copper exposed in the walls of the mine. A deer pen and museum are also on site. Youth 5 and younger, free; 6 to 12, $7; 13 and older, $12. Daily, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. US-41, 12 miles south of Copper Harbor. (906) 289-4688 or keweenawheritagesites.org

Eagle Harbor

• Eagle Harbor General Store Museum. View collection of memorabilia including old toys, tools, housewares, mementos and photographs. Saturday, Sunday and by appointment. 181 W. North. (906) 231-7442 or eagleharborstoremuseum.org • Eagle Harbor Life Saving Museum. View displays of early

wooden rescue boats, surfboats, life-cars and more. Donations appreciated. Daily, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Marina Rd. keweenawhistory.org • Eagle Harbor Lighthouse and Museum. Tour the museum and lighthouse complex. Youth, free; adults, $8. Monday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. M-26. keweenawhistory.org

Eagle River

• Eagle River Museum. The museum focuses on four themes, including the Cliff Mine, the town of Eagle River the town and mine of Phoenix and the Crestview amusement area. Donations appreciated. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. M-26. Keweenawhistory.org

Escanaba

• Delta County Historical Society Museum and Sand Point Lighthouse. Exhibits portray the local history of logging, shipping, railroads, military, Native American culture, surveyings, fishing, sports and more. Youth, free; adults, $2; families, $5. Daily, 1 to 4 p.m. 16 Water Plant Road. (906) 789-6790. deltahistorical.org

Garden

• Fayette Historic Townsite. This site was once one of the Upper Peninsula’s most productive ironsmelting operations. A town of nearly 500 residents grew up around two blast furnaces, a large dock and several charcoal kilns. It now includes a visitor center, museum exhibits, a twenty-six station (continued on page 86)

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Munising

• Farmers and Artisans Market. 4 to 6 p.m. Bayshore Park, 355 Elm Ave.

16 TUESDAY

sunrise 6:49 a.m.; sunset 8:59 p.m.

Calumet

• Collage Art. Make collage art with Edith Wiard. Advanced registration required. $25. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 9342228.

Escanaba

• U.P. State Fair. Activities include amusement rides, the pocket park, livestock and equine shows,

entertainment, food and more. Youth ages five and younger, free; ages six to twelve, $5; age thirteen and older, $10. 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, 2401 12th Ave. N. upstatefair.net

Gwinn

• Literature at the Lodge. The group will discuss The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows. 7 p.m. Up North Lodge, 215 S. CR-557. (906) 346-3433.

Ishpeming

• Historic Main Street Walking Tour. Join others for a one-hour and fifteen-minute guided tour. Tour will be canceled for inclement weather.

Youth, free; adults, $10 suggested donation. 6:30 p.m. Main Street parking lot across from City Hall. (906) 250-0985.

Marquette

• Storytime in the Garden. Stop by for a story, activity and light snack. 11 a.m. Baraga Educational Center and Museum, 615 S. Fourth St. (906) 2279117. • Kids Cove 2. Learn about how universal design will be used in the new Kids Cove 2. Register by the 9th. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 1 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 361-5370. • Oil Painting, Pastels and Drawing Classes with Marlene Wood. Bring

your own supplies. $20. 1 to 3 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2258655. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 236-1811. • DocuCinema. The documentary Word Wars: Tiles and Tribulations on the Scrabble Circuit. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264322. • Lake Superior Theatre: My Son Pinocchio. This musical tells the tale of Pinocchio through the eyes of

museums walking tour and a scale model of the original townsite. $17 per car, per day for Michigan residents, $9 for nonresidents. Daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 14785 II Road. (906) 644-2603.

entrance. On the full tour, visitors will take a tractor-pulled wagon into the mine, seven levels underground. Prices, days and hours vary. (906) 482-3101 or quincymine.com

Grand Marais

Houghton

• Gitchee Gumee Agate and History Museum. View agates, mineral specimens, mineral art, jewelry and more. $1. Thursday through Saturday, 2 to 5 p.m. E21739 Brazel St. (906) 494-2590. • Pickle Barrel House Museum. This 16-foot high barrel has been restored to its condition as a cottage, built for author and illustrator William Donahey who created the Teenie Weenie characters. $1. Saturday and Sunday, 1 to 4 p.m. Downtown. grandmaraissmichigan. com

Greenland

• Adventure Mining Company. The mine opened in 1850 and remains one of the best-preserved sites of its time. Although the mine closed in 1920, many of the shafts are still open for touring. Tours range from surface walking tours to underground rappelling down a mineshaft. Tour prices vary. Youth 6 and younger, free; 7 to 12, $7.50 to $14.50; 13 and older, $14 to $25. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 200 Adventure Ave. (906) 883-3371 or adventuremine.com

Hancock

• Quincy Mine Hoist and Underground Mine. There are two options for touring the site. On both the surface tour and the full tour, visitors will see the museum, inside the No. 2 Shaft House and the Nordberg Steam Hoist and ride the cog rail tram car to the mine

• A.E. Seaman Mineral Museum. View the largest collection of minerals from the Great Lakes region and the world’s finest collection of Michigan minerals. Exhibits educate visitors on how minerals are formed, fluorescent minerals and minerals from around the world. Prices vary. Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1404 E. Sharon Ave. museum.mtu. edu or (906) 487-2572. • Carnegie Museum. Features rotating displays of local history, natural science and culture. The Science Center is dedicated to interactive exhibits about science for kids. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 105 Huron St. (906) 482-7140 or carnegiekeweenaw.org • MTU Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections. Features a variety of historical memorabilia, highlighting life in the Copper Country. Open by appointment. Lower level of the J.R. Van Pelt Library, MTU. (906) 4873209.

Iron Mountain

• World War II Glider and Military Museum. During World War II, the Ford Motor Company’s Kingsford plant built the CG-4A Gliders for the U.S. Army. View one of seven fully restored CG-4A G World War II gliders, military uniforms from the Civil War through the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, memorabilia, restored military vehicles and more. Prices vary. Days and times vary. 302 Kent St.

(906) 774-1086.

Ishpeming

• Cliffs Mine Shaft Museum. View local historical artifacts of miners and mines, past and present, safety equipment, blasting and diamond drilling equipment and more. Guided tours of the tunnels are available. Prices vary. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 501 W. Euclid St. (906) 485-1882 or cliffsshaftminemuseum.com • Ishpeming Area Historical Society Museum. New exhibits include a military exhibit and artifacts from the Elson Estate. Donations appreciated. Days and hours vary. Gossard Building, Suite 303, 308 Cleveland Ave. ishpeminghistory.org • U.S. National Ski Hall & Snowboard Hall of Fame & Museum. The museum features more than 300 Hall of Fame inductees, presented in photographs and biographies, and displays and exhibits of skiing history and equipment, an extensive library, video show, gift shop, special events and more. By appointment only. US41 and Third St. (906) 485-6323 skihall.com

K.I. Sawyer

• K.I. Sawyer Heritage Air Museum. The museum promotes and preserves the aviation history the air base brought to the area. Air Force-related materials are on display, including photographs, flags, medals and more. Donations appreciated. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. 402 Third St. (906) 236-3502 or kishamuseum.org

Lake Linden

• Houghton County Historical Museum. Exhibits include local Copper Country mining, logging and

cultural history. Outdoor exhibits include a working Calumet & Hecla Mining Company Train. Prices, days and hours vary. 53102 M-26. (906) 296-4121 or houghtonhistory.org

Marquette

• Baraga Educational Center and Museum. View artifacts and tools used by the Venerable Bishop Baraga. Donations appreciated. Monday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. and by appointment. 615 S. Fourth St. (906) 227-9117. • Beaumier Upper Peninsula Heritage Center. - UP3D, an exhibition of stereograph images from the collection of Jack Deo, will be on display through August 27. Three separate collections focus on cultural artifacts relating to ethnic, religious and social diversity in the U.P. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. NMU, corner of Seventh Street and Tracy Avenue. (906) 227-3212 or nmu.edu/beaumier • Marquette Maritime Museum. The museum collects, preserves and presents maritime history. Many exhibits and guided tours of the lighthouse grounds are offered. Prices vary. Tuesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 300 Lakeshore Blvd. mqtmaritimemuseum.com or (906) 226-2006. • Marquette Regional History Center. - Railroads of Marquette County: Yesterday and Today, featuring select hands-on elements, as well as maps, artifacts and photographs, will be on display through February 2023. The museum includes interactive displays as well as regional history exhibits. Youth 12 and younger, $2; students, $3; seniors, $6; adults, $7. Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 145 W. Spring St. (906) (continued on page 87)

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August 2022


museums 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum. A variety of interactive exhibits offer learning through investigation and creativity. Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Prices vary. 123 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 226-3911 or upchildrensmuseum.org

Menominee

• West Shore Fishing Museum. Experience the life of an early 20th century pioneer commercial fishing family at this stop on the Great Lakes Fisheries Heritage Trail. Tour the restored home and surrounding gardens. Walk the shoreline nature trails. View exhibits of boats, equipment, and practices of commercial fishermen and Native Americans who lived on the West Shore of Green Bay. Saturday and Sunday, 1 to 4 p.m. 15 miles north of Menominee or 8 miles south of Cedar River on M-35. Turn at Bailey his father, Geppetto and Blue Fairy. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu • Registration Deadline: Echo Lake Picnic and Hike. See Tuesday the 23rd.

Munising

• Concert in the Park. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Bayshore Park, 355 Elm Ave.

Negaunee

• Tuesday Afternoons at the Museum. James Robert Paquette will present The Find of a Thousand Lifetimes: The 35th Anniversary of the Story of the Gorto Site Discovery. 2 p.m. Michigan Iron Industry Museum, 73 Forge Rd. (906) 475-7857.

Rock

• Rock the Park. Three Wheel Drive will perform. Bring your own chair. 6:30 p.m. Gazebo.

17 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 6:50 a.m.; sunset 8:58 p.m.

Calumet

• A Course of Love. Donna Trudell will lead the class based on the book by Mari Perron. Participants will learn about peace, joy and clarity through this self-awareness class. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Curtis

• Music in the Park. Side Trak’d Detroit will perform. Donations appreciated. 6:30 p.m. Erickson

Park entrance. (715) 923-9756

Munising

• Alger County Historical Society Heritage Center. Exhibits include the Grand Island Recreation Area, Munising Woodenware Company, barn building, homemaking, sauna and more. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 1496 Washington St. (906) 387-4308.

Negaunee

• Michigan Iron Industry Museum. In the forested ravines of the Marquette Iron Range, the museum overlooks the Carp River and the site of the first iron forge in the Lake Superior region. Museum exhibits, audio-visual programs and outdoor interpretive paths depict the large-scale capital and human investment that made Michigan an industrial leader. The museum is one of 10 museums and historic sites administered by the Michigan

Historical Center. Daily, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 73 Forge Rd. (906) 4757857. • Negaunee Historical Society Museum. The museum features three floors of exhibits including a 19th century living room, Negaunee sports, a military display, old dentist equipment, mining equipment and other displays of area interest. Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 303 E. Main St. (906) 4754614.

Pelkie

• Hanka Homestead Museum. This homestead recreates farming life from the 1920s. $3. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. 13249 Hanka Rd. (906) 334-2601 or hankahomesteadmuseum.org

Phoenix

• Phoenix Church. Originally built in 1958 and located in the town of

Center Park, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. ericksoncenter.org

Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu

Eagle Harbor

Skandia

• Adventures in History Series. Learn about notable women from the Copper Country’s past as Lynette Webber will present Women of the Copper Country. Keweenaw County Historical Society members, $5; nonmembers, $6. 7 p.m. Eagle Harbor Community Building, downtown. keweenawhistory.org

Escanaba

• U.P. State Fair. Activities include amusement rides, the pocket park, livestock and equine shows, entertainment, food and more. Youth ages five and younger, free; ages six to twelve, $5; age thirteen and older, $10. 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, 2401 12th Ave. N. upstatefair.net • Farmers Market. 3 to 6 p.m. Escanaba Farmers Market, 1501 Ludington St. (906) 789-8696.

Marquette

• Wednesday Evening Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Kirsten Gustafson and Dave Zeigner Concert. The pair will perform jazz and local favorites. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322. • Lake Superior Theatre: My Son Pinocchio. This musical tells the tale of Pinocchio through the eyes of his father, Geppetto and Blue Fairy. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior

• Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Skandia Farmers Market, 9271 US41 S.

18 THURSDAY

sunrise 6:51 a.m.; sunset 8:56 p.m.

Chassell

• Michigan Passenger Trains in 1916: U.P. Edition. Explore the Michigan passenger train scene in 1916 and how different railroads operated. Donations appreciated. 7 p.m. Chassell Heritage Center, 42373 Hancock St. (906) 523-1155.

Copper Harbor

• Performances in the Park. Bring your own blankets, chairs and picnic baskets, and listen to music by Tapestry. 7 to 9 p.m. Donny Kilpela Memorial Park.

Escanaba

• U.P. State Fair. Activities include amusement rides, the pocket park, livestock and equine shows, entertainment, food and more. Youth ages five and younger, free; ages six to twelve, $5; age thirteen and older, $10. 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, 2401 12th Ave. N. upstatefair.net • Live on the Lawn At Lunch Music Series. Mardi Rouge will perform. Food trucks will be on site. 11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Escanaba Public Library, 400 Ludington St. (906) 789-7323.

August 2022

Cliff, the museum was dismantled and reassembled in its church location in 1899. The last mass was held in 1957. Donations appreciated. Daily, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Junction of US-41 and M-26. keweenawhistory. org

Republic

• Pascoe House Museum. View photographs, documents and artifacts of the Republic area, along with a collection of vintage dresses. Saturday and Sunday, 1 to 3 p.m. 183 Cedar St.

South Range

• Copper Range Historical Museum. Exhibits recreate life from the early 1900s to the mid-1950s of the immigrants who built the towns and villages of the area. Collections include photographs, books and artifacts. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 3 p.m. 44 Trimountain Ave. (906) 482-6125. MM

L’Anse

• Lakefront Concert Series. Enjoy a night of country music by Rolling Thunder. Bring a chair and blanket. Rain location is Meadowbrook Arena. 7 p.m. Lakefront Park, Broad St.

Marquette

• Cryptocurrency. Learn about the new global currency. Register by the 11th. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 1 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 361-5370. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 360-3056. • Music on the Porch. Bring a chair and listen to live music. Snacks, water and yard games will also be available. 6 p.m. Baraga Educational Center and Museum, 615 S. Fourth St. (906) 227-9117. • Music on Third. Musicians will perform outside businesses from Fair Avenue to Ridge Street. 6 to 8 p.m. Third St. downtownmarquette.org • Lake Superior Theatre: My Son Pinocchio. This musical tells the tale of Pinocchio through the eyes of his father, Geppetto and Blue Fairy. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu • Registration Deadline: Understanding Headstones and Epitaphs. See Thursday the 25th.

Negaunee

• Irontunes. Sign up for bean bag games and listen to live music. 6 to 10

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p.m. Iron St.

19 FRIDAY

sunrise 6:52a.m.; sunset 8:54 p.m.

Escanaba

• U.P. State Fair. Activities include amusement rides, the pocket park, livestock and equine shows, entertainment, food and more. Youth ages five and younger, free; ages six to twelve, $5; age thirteen and older, $10. 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, 2401 12th Ave. N. upstatefair.net

Houghton

• Beethoven and Banjos. Evan Premo, Laurel Premo, Jake Blount, Nic Gareiss, Owen Dalby and Meena Bhasin will perform. Donations appreciated. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, MTU. beethovenandbanjos.org

Marquette

• DocuCinema Matinee. The documentary Word Wars: Tiles and Tribulations on the Scrabble Circuit. Noon. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 458-4844. • Lake Superior Theatre: My Son Pinocchio. This musical tells the tale of Pinocchio through the eyes of his father, Geppetto and Blue Fairy. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu

Saw-wa-Quato St. (906) 586-9974 or mynorthtickets.com

Escanaba

• U.P. State Fair. Activities include amusement rides, the pocket park, livestock and equine shows, entertainment, food and more. Youth ages five and younger, free; ages six to twelve, $5; age thirteen and older, $10. 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, 2401 12th Ave. N. upstatefair.net

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. Lessons, 10 a.m. Games, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. (906) 2363173. • Classic Cars on Third Street. Classic cars will be on display. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. North Third Street between Park and Ohio streets. downtownmarquette.org • Wilderness Walk at Wetmore Pond. 3:30 p.m. Wetmore Pond, CR550. upwild.org • Beethoven and Banjos. Evan Premo, Laurel Premo, Jake Blount, Nic Gareiss, Owen Dalby and Meena Bhasin will perform. Donations appreciated. 7:30 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. beethovenandbanjos. org

Republic

• Retro Days. This 1960s-themed weekend celebration will include a farmers market, parade, car show, craft fair, historical presentations, music and more. Times and locations vary.

• Retro Days. This 1960s-themed weekend celebration will include a farmers market, parade, car show, craft fair, historical presentations, music and more. Times and locations vary.

20 SATURDAY

sunrise 6:54 a.m.; sunset 8:52 p.m.

Calumet

• Community Market. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Copper Harbor

• Art in the Park. View works by more than 60 artists, and enjoy a cookout and music. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Donny Kilpela Memorial Park.

Curtis

• The Striplin Duo. Legendary Detroit Symphony Orchestra violinist Joseph Striplin and wife Dana Striplin will perform. $25. 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224

Marquette Monthly

sunrise 6:55 a.m.; sunset 8:51 p.m.

Crystal Falls

• Beethoven and Banjos. Evan Premo, Laurel Premo, Jake Blount, Nic Gareiss, Owen Dalby and Meena Bhasin will perform. Donations appreciated. 2 p.m. CT. Crystal Theatre, 304 Superior Ave. beethovenandbanjos.org

Escanaba

• U.P. State Fair. Activities include amusement rides, the pocket park, livestock and equine shows, entertainment, food and more. Youth ages five and younger, free; ages six to twelve, $5; age thirteen and older, $10. 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. U.P. State Fairgrounds, 2401 12th Ave. N. upstatefair.net

K.I. Sawyer

• Dance. Dance to music performed by the Hart Beats. $8. 1 to 4 p.m. K.I. Sawyer Heritage Air Museum, 402 Third St.

Marquette

August 2022

craft fair, historical presentations, music and more. Times and locations vary.

22 MONDAY

sunrise 6:56 a.m.; sunset 8:49 p.m.

Marquette

• Lake Superior Theatre: North Woods and Music. Mary Achatz, Steve Hooper, Ronnie Ferguson and B.G. Bradley will perform staged readings of poetry to music, original folk songs and storytelling with U.P. themes. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu. edu

Munising

• Farmers and Artisans Market. 4 to 6 p.m. Bayshore Park, 355 Elm Ave.

23 TUESDAY

sunrise 6:58 a.m.; sunset 8:47 p.m.

Ishpeming

• Lake Superior Theatre: My Son Pinocchio. This musical tells the tale of Pinocchio through the eyes of his father, Geppetto and Blue Fairy. Prices vary. 3 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu

• Historic Main Street Walking Tour. Join others for a one-hour and fifteen-minute guided tour. Tour will be canceled for inclement weather. Youth, free; adults, $10 suggested donation. 6:30 p.m. Main Street parking lot across from City Hall. (906) 250-0985.

Republic

Marquette

• Retro Days. This 1960s-themed weekend celebration will include a farmers market, parade, car show,

U.P. State Fair | August 15 - 21 | Escanaba

Republic

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21 SUNDAY

• Echo Lake Picnic and Hike. The group will carpool to the site to walk around the lake and peninsula. Bring your own lunch. Register by the 16th. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 1 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 361-5370. • Storytime in the Garden. Stop by for a story, activity and light snack. 11 a.m. Baraga Educational Center and Museum, 615 S. Fourth St. (906) 2279117. • Oil Painting, Pastels and Drawing Classes with Marlene Wood. Bring your own supplies. $20. 1 to 3 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2258655. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 236-1811. • Concert on the Steps. Shay and Linda’s Big Lake Band will perform. 7 p.m. Front steps, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Lake Superior Theatre: Cops and Robbers. Hear stories from the files of the Marquette Police Department and the Marquette Branch Prison. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior


Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 227-1032 or tickets.nmu.edu

Prices vary and performance times vary. Winter Sports Complex, 36606 Carp Lake Tower Rd.

Munising

Palmer

• Concert in the Park. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Bayshore Park, 355 Elm Ave.

• Richmond Township Sesquicentennial Celebration. Historical memorabilia will be on display during an open house. Al Koski will give a presentation. 6 to 9 p.m. Richmond Township Hall, 100 Smith St.

24 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 6:59 a.m.; sunset 8:45 p.m.

Calumet

27 SATURDAY

• A Course of Love. Donna Trudell will lead the class based on the book by Mari Perron. Participants will learn about peace, joy and clarity through this self-awareness class. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

sunrise 7:03 a.m.; sunset 8:40 p.m.

Calumet

• Community Market. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Curtis

• Music in the Park. Angels and Outlaws will perform. Donations appreciated. 6:30 p.m. Erickson Center Park, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. ericksoncenter.org

Escanaba

• Farmers Market. 3 to 6 p.m. Escanaba Farmers Market, 1501 Ludington St. (906) 789-8696.

Iron River

• UP City Fest. Cade Thompson, Stunt Dudes, Josh Brewer, Phil Joel, David and Teesha Lafling and Champions Forever will perform. 4:30 to 8 p.m. Iron County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Franklin St. lifelight.org/ upcityfest

Marquette

• Wednesday Evening Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Authors Reading Virtually. Poet Cheryl J. Fish will read selections from The Sauna is Full of Maids, Crater & Tower, and Off the Yoga Matt. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link. • Lake Superior Theatre: Skiing, Skating and Slapshots. Hear stories and view photos about Mt. Mesnard, Kirlin Hill and movies from Cliff’s Ridge. Prices vary. 7:30 p.m. Lake Superior Theatre, 270 N. Lakeshore Blvd. nmu.eunidersitytickets.com

Skandia

• Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Skandia Farmers Market, 9271 US41 S.

25 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:00 a.m.; sunset 8:43 p.m.

Calumet

• UP City Fest. Cade Thompson, Stunt Dudes, Josh Brewer, Phil Joel, David and Teesha Lafling and Champions Forever will perform.

Curtis Farmers Market | Various dates | Various Cities

5 to 8 p.m. Campioni’s True Value Hardware Store, 5580 US-41. lifelight.org/upcityfest

Chassell

• Keweenaw Bluegrass Concert. Donations appreciated. 7 p.m. Chassell Heritage Center, 42373 Hancock St. (906) 523-1155.

Copper Harbor

• Performances in the Park. Bring your own blankets, chairs and picnic baskets, and listen to music by In Spite of Ourselves. 7 to 9 p.m. Donny Kilpela Memorial Park.

Curtis

• Echoes from Russia. Listen to music performed by Stas Venglevski and Misha Litvin. 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Sawwa-Quato St. (906) 586-9974 or ericksoncenter.org

L’Anse

Lakefront Concert Series. Enjoy a night of folk, country and blues music by Jan Arnold and Friends. Bring a chair and blanket. Rain location is Meadowbrook Arena. 7 p.m. Lakefront Park, Broad St.

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 360-3056. • Understanding Headstone and Epitaphs. Learn about the religious, military, ethnic and organizational symbols carved on tombstones. Register by the 18th. NCLL members, $5; nonmembers, $10. 2 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 361-5370. • Music on the Porch. Bring a chair

and listen to live music. Snacks, water and yard games will also be available. 6 p.m. Baraga Educational Center and Museum, 615 S. Fourth St. (906) 227-9117.

Mohawk

• Adventures in History Series. Members of the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community Committee will present The Meaning Behind the Dance: An Exhibition of Ojibwe Cultural Dance. Donations appreciated. 7 p.m. Mohawk parking lot near the stone fence, US-41. keweenawhistory.org

Negaunee

• Irontunes. Sign up for bean bag games and listen to live music. 6 to 10 p.m. Iron St.

26 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:01 a.m.; sunset 8:42 p.m.

Marquette

• Asahi Nordic Lesson. Learn about Finnish mind-body practice. 11 a.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, 200 N. Lakeshore Blvd. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 458-4844. • HarborFest. Listen to music from local bands and Marquette favorites. Food and beverages available for purchase. 5 to 11 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, 200 N. Lakeshore Blvd. marquettewestrotary.org

Ontonagon

• Porcupine Mountain Music Festival. This annual festival in the Porcupine Mountains includes music from various musicians and bands

August 2022

• Show and Shine Car Show 2 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. (906) 586-9974 or ericksoncenter.org

Marquette

• Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. Lessons, 10 a.m. Games, 11:30 a.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. (906) 2363173. • Lecture: Sitting is Killing Us. Learn the benefits of Finnish health exercise Asahi Nordic and how it can help improve health. Noon. Room 242, PEIF, NMU. finnfest.us • HarborFest. Listen to music from local bands and Marquette favorites. Food and beverages available for purchase. 1:30 to 11 p.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, 200 N. Lakeshore Blvd. marquettewestrotary.org • UP City Fest. Cade Thompson, Stunt Dudes, Josh Brewer, Phil Joel, David and Teesha Lafling, Champions Forever and Danny Gokey will perform. 4 to 9 p.m. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41. lifelight.org/upcityfest

Negaunee

• Finn Fun Day. Activities will include Finnish entertainment, a marketplace, white elephant table, silent auction coffee, pulla bread and more. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Negaunee Township Hall, 42 M-35. (906) 2267085.

Ontonagon

• Porcupine Mountain Music Festival. This annual festival in the Porcupine Mountains includes music from various musicians and bands Prices vary and performance times vary. Winter Sports Complex, 36606 Carp Lake Tower Rd.

Palmer

• Richmond Township Sesquicentennial Celebration. Activities include a parade, games, craft and food vendors, music

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support groups • Alano Club. Twelve-step recovery meetings daily. Monday through Saturday, noon and 8 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. 1202 S. Front St., Southgate Plaza, Marquette. • Al-Anon Family Groups. A fellowship offering strength and hope for friends and families of problem drinkers. al-alon.org or (888) 4252666. • Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings throughout Marquette County, open daily, at many locations and times. Twenty-four-hour answering service, aa-marquettecounty.org or (800) 605-5043. • ALZConnected. This is a free, online community for everyone affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other memory loss diseases. alzconnected.org • American Legacy Foundation. Smoking quit line for expectant mothers and cessation information for women. (800) 668-8278. • Amputee Social Group. This peer support group is for amputees, friends and families to share resources, life experiences and create relationships. August 9. 6 p.m. Ice Cream Pavilion, Presque Isle Park. (906) 273-2444. • Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Checks. Cholesterol checks are $5. Call for Marquette County schedule. (906) 225-4545. • Divorce Care—Ishpeming. This non-denominational group is for people who are separated or divorced.

New members are welcome. Tuesdays, 6 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. (906) 475-6032 or northiron.church • Grief Share—Ishpeming. This non-denominational group is for people dealing with grief and loss. Mondays, 2:30 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. northiron. church or (906) 475-6032. • iCanQuit. Smokers are invited to learn more about quitting with the help of a quitting coach. (800) 4807848. • Lake Superior Life Care and Hospice Grief Support Group— Gwinn. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. August 10. 2 p.m. Forsyth Senior Center, 165 Maple St. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice. org • Lake Superior Life Care and Hospice Grief Support Group— Marquette. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. August 17. 5:30 p.m. Lake Superior Hospice, 914 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Lake Superior Life Care and Hospice Grief Support Group— Negaunee. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. August 18. 3 p.m. Negaunee Senior Center, 410

Jackson St. lakesuperiorhospice.org or (906) 475-6266. • Michigan Tobacco Quit Line. This free quit smoking coaching hotline provides callers with a personal health coach. (800) 7848669. • National Alliance on Mental Illness—Support Group. Individuals living with mental illness and friends or families living with an individual with mental illness are welcome. August 8 and 18. 7 p.m. Superior Alliance for Independent Living, 1200 Wright St. Ste. A. For the Zoom invitation, email ckbertucci58@charter.net or call (906) 360-7107 by 6:45 p.m. the day prior to the meeting. namimqt.com • Nar-Anon Meetings. Family and friends who have addicted loved ones are invited. Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. Mission Covenant Church, 1001 N. Second St. (906) 361-9524. • Nicotine Anonymous. (415) 7500328 or nicotine-anonymous.org • Parkinson’s Support Group— Marquette. August 17. 2 p.m. Marquette Senior Center, 300 W. Spring St. (906) 228-0456. • Senior Support Group— Marquette. Vicki Ballas will discuss nutrition, strength, flexibility and balance training. August 18. 2 p.m. Mill Creek Clubhouse, 1728 Windstone Dr. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Sexual Health and Addiction Therapy Group. Call Great Lakes

and fireworks. Parade, Noon with activities to follow. Richmond Township Park.

steps, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

28 SUNDAY

• Farmers and Artisans Market. 4 to 6 p.m. Bayshore Park, 355 Elm Ave.

• Asahi Nordic Lesson. Learn about Finnish mind-body practice. 11 a.m. Mattson Lower Harbor Park, address Lakeshore Blvd. • Storytime in the Garden. Stop by a story, activity and light snack. 11 a.m. Baraga Educational Center and Museum, 615 S. Fourth St. (906) 2279117. • Oil Painting, Pastels and Drawing Classes with Marlene Wood. Bring your own supplies. $20. 1 to 3 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2258655. • Superiorland Duplicate Bridge Club. Games open to all interested players. 1 p.m. $5 for games. Westwood Mall, 3020 US-41 West. superiorland_bridge.tripod.com or (906) 236-1811. • Bluesday Tuesday. The Flat Broke Blues Band will perform. 7 p.m. Front steps, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

sunrise 7:04 a.m.; sunset 8:38 p.m.

Marquette

• Marquette County Habitat for Humanity 30th Anniversary. The event will feature music, snacks, beverages, door prizes, a silent auction and more. 1 to 4 p.m. Lakenenland, 2800 M-28 E. mqthabitat.rog • Asahi Nordic Family Picnic. Bring your own food and beverages. Entertainment provided. 2 p.m. Clark Lambros Park, 200 N. Lakeshore Blvd.

29 MONDAY

sunrise 7:05 a.m.; sunset 8:36 p.m.

Marquette

• Concert on the Steps. Ramble Tamble will perform. 7 p.m. Front

90

Marquette Monthly

Munising

30 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:07 a.m.; sunset 8:34 p.m.

Calumet

• Collage Art. Make collage art with Edith Wiard. Advanced registration required. $25. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 9342228.

Ishpeming

• Historic Main Street Walking Tour. Join others for a one-hour and fifteen-minute guided tour. Tour will be canceled for inclement weather. Youth, free; adults, $10 suggested donation. 6:30 p.m. Main Street parking lot across from City Hall. (906) 250-0985.

Marquette August 2022

Munising

• Concert in the Park. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Bayshore Park, 355 Elm Ave.

Recovery Centers for more details. Dates, times and locations vary. (906) 228-9696. • SMART Recovery—Calumet. A self-help group for alcohol and substance abuse and other addictive behaviors. Mondays, 7 p.m. Copper Country Mental Health, 56938 Calumet Avenue. smartrecovery.org • SMART Recovery — Hancock. Thursdays, 7 p.m. Basement Conference Room, Old Main Building, Finlandia University, 601 Quincy St. • SMART Recovery — Marquette. Mondays, Noon. Zoom meeting. Visit smartrecovery.com for Zoom link. • Take Off Pounds Sensibly. This is a non-commercial weight-control support group. Various places and times throughout the U.P. (800) 9328677 or TOPS.org • Virtual Caregiver Support Group. U.P. family caregivers are welcome to join. A device with an internet connection, webcam, microphone and an email address are required. Advanced registration required. 2 p.m. Second Tuesday of the month. (906) 217-3019 or caregivers@upcap.org • Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Supplemental Food Program. Clinics include nutritional counseling and coupon pickup. Appointments required. Call for Marquette County schedule. mqthealth.org or (906) 475-7846.

MM

31 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:08 a.m.; sunset 8:32 p.m.

Calumet

• A Course of Love. Donna Trudell will lead the class based on the book by Mari Perron. Participants will learn about peace, joy and clarity through this self-awareness class. 1 p.m. Calumet Art Center, 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228.

Escanaba

• Farmers Market. 3 to 6 p.m. Escanaba Farmers Market, 1501 Ludington St. (906) 789-8696.

Marquette

• Wednesday Evening Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com

Skandia

• Farmers Market. 4 to 7 p.m. Skandia Farmers Market, 9271 US41 S.

MM


August 2022

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