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FROM THE DEAN n behalf of the College of Engineering at Boise State University, I would like to welcome you to our annual

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Senior Design Showcase! This year's event is the largest ever, with 38 projects designed by 166 seniors in

Civil Engineering, Computer Science, Construction Management, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Materials Science & Engineering, and Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering. In addition, nine projects feature joint disciplinary teams. Our students are excited to talk to you about the challenges they faced and the discoveries they made working through problems in robotics, circuit integration, bridge design, instrumentation, materials characterization, and many, many more. I invite you to come meet our students and talk to them about their projects, their teamwork, and their problem solving strategies. Maybe you have a project of your own that would benefit from fresh ideas and a motivated design team. We are always looking for new projects and sponsors to challenge our emerging engineering professionals!

Amy Moll Dean and Professor College of Engineering

INDUSTRY SPONSORS THANK YOU TO OUR INDUSTRY SPONSORS Our sponsors generously support the College of Engineering’s Senior Design Showcase. Thank you for providing your time, experience and financial support that help make our program a success.

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Frank Alloway

Instrumental Engineering

Economic and Natural Resource LLC

Tripoli Rocket Club

GSD Engineering

T.H. Engineering, Inc.

Adrian Rothenbuhler

IBA Consulting

United States Department of the Interior (DOI)

Dr. Jesse Barber

Friends of Minidoka/National Park Services

Red Block Engineering.

Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA)

Boise State University College of Engineering

Dr. Jim Browing


CONTENT 2

From the Dean

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Content

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Civil Engineering Projects #1 Redesign of the Broadway Avenue Bridge over the Boise River • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 4 #2 Dry Creek Ranch Planned Community: Water Resources Design • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 4 #3 Dry Creek Ranch Planned Community: Structural, Geotechnical, Transportation, and Stormwater Design • • • • • • • • 4 #4 Hecla Limited-Idaho Transportation Department: Maintenance Yard Redevelopment • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 5 #5 I-84/Gowen Road Interchange Redesign • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 5 #6 The Topaz Bridge Redesign on U.S. Route 30 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 5

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Computer Science Projects #7 Local Search Engine Optimization (SEO) • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 6 #8 Security Price Correlation • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 6 #9 Predicting Student Outcomes • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 6 #10 Mobile App for Pilots • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 7 #11 Router API Solution • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 7

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Construction Management Projects #12 ASC Reno 1st Place in Design Build • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 7 #13 Minidoka Guide Tower • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 8

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Materials Science & Engineering Projects #14 Corrosion Resistance of Anodized Aluminum Films • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 8 #15 Grain Size Refinement of Alloy 617 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 8

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Materials Science and Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering Joint Projects #16 A Design Evaluation of Microchannel Layers in Multi-Scale Ceramic Microsystems • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 9 #17 Design of a Novel Salt Collection System • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 9 #18 Chemical and Physical Interactions between Molten LiCl-KCl/Copper Solutions and Oxides • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 9

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Electrical and Computer Science Projects #19 Wind Power Turbine Electrical System Design • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 10 #20 Thermo-Electric Generator Evaluation Board • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 10 #21 Distributed Power Generation Modeling System • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 10

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Mechanical & Biomedical and Electrical & Computer Engineering Joint Projects #22 Monitoring Cerebrospinal Fluid During Parabolic Flight • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 11 #23 Moth Activity Detection Device • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 11 #24 Pill Box With Reminder Alerts And Activity Recording Capabilities • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 11 #25 Tripoli High Power Rocket • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 12 #26 Semi-Automated Document Binding Device • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 12 #27 Mechatronic Venus Flytrap • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 12 #28 Vyykn Vender • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 13

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Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering Projects #29 Agricultural Harvester • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 13 #30 3-D Material Processing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 13 #31 Electronic Memory Device Reader • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 14 #32 Mobile Transforming Blind • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 14 #33 Rekluse Clutch Display • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 14 #34 Automotive Thermoelectric Generator • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 15 #35 Wind Power 1: Small Scale Wind Turbine • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 15 #36 Wind Power 2: Micro Wind Turbine • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 15 #37 Wind Power 3: Micro-wind Turbine • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 16 #38 Wind Power 4: Marine Wind Turbine • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 16

2014 Senior Design Showcase

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#1 – REDESIGN OF THE BROADWAY AVENUE BRIDGE OVER THE BOISE RIVER DEPARTMENT: Civil Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Nathan Balcirak Randy Hamilton Kyle Kaschmitter Jake Kreglo Lauren Nuxol Albert Palacios West Volpe Holten White CLIENT: GSD Engineering

GSD Engineering was tasked with developing a design for reconstructing The Broadway Avenue Bridge, located in Boise, Idaho. The current bridge was constructed in 1956 and crosses the Boise River on US 20/26 (Broadway Avenue) adjacent to the Boise State University campus. The National Bridge Inventory Database assigned the bridge a rating of 48.4 out of 100, less than the standard of 50, indicating the need for its replacement. The replacement bridge design, consisting of three simple spans with two pier supports, will increase vehicle capacity and improve driving, biking, and walking safety. The new bridge deck will be constructed of reinforced concrete, supported by steel girders, meeting all current AASHTO and ITD design standards. Construction activities will shut down traffic utilizing the Broadway Avenue bridge, necessitating development of a traffic mitigation plan to smoothly reroute traffic flows during construction.

PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. Sondra Miller Dr. George Murgel, PE

#2 – DRY CREEK RANCH PLANNED COMMUNITY: WATER RESOURCES DESIGN DEPARTMENT: Civil Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Tawna Groom Michael Buckles Brandon Harper Logan Winterholler Shadow Jungenberg Zoe Lavrich Ryan Nelson CLIENT: WATER Engineering PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. Sondra Miller Dr. George Murgel, PE

Dry Creek Ranch is a planned community located northeast of Eagle, Idaho, between Broken Horn Road and Idaho State Highway 55. The community will encompass 1,414 acres and will include 4,300 single-family residences, parks, schools, and commercial and mixeduse areas when completed. Full site development will be in multiple phases, with the first phase encompassing approximately 268 acres and 557 residences. WATER Engineering was tasked with the design of water and wastewater facilities and piping networks to serve the first phase of development and to accommodate future development of the full site. The design addresses water distribution facilities to satisfy residential, commercial and fire suppression demands, including water storage reservoirs and pump stations. Wastewater components of the project include a collection system, treatment facility and final disposal of treated wastewater. An irrigation distribution system will supply parks and institutional areas utilizing treated wastewater effluent.

#3 – DRY CREEK RANCH PLANNED COMMUNITY: STRUCTURAL, GEOTECHNICAL, TRANSPORTATION, AND STORMWATER DESIGN DEPARTMENT: Civil Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Zach Christensen Sailesh Koirala Neil Miyaoka Nawid Mohammad Mousa Spencer Neufeld Brendan Owen David Tomayo CLIENT: Instrumental Engineering PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. Sondra Miller Dr. George Murgel, PE

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Dry Creek Ranch is a planned community located northeast of Eagle, Idaho, between Broken Horn Road and Idaho State Highway 55. The community will encompass 1,414 acres and will include 4,300 single-family residences, parks, schools, and commercial and mixeduse areas when completed. Full site development will be in multiple phases, with the first phase encompassing 268 acres and 557 residences. Instrumental Engineering was tasked with the geotechnical, structural, transportation, and stormwater design components to serve the first phase of development and to accommodate future development of the full site. A typical interior roadway and pavement cross section was designed along with the entrance to Dry Creek Ranch, which intersects Idaho State Highway 55. Structural design included a 1.5 million gallon prestressed concrete water storage tank, masonry pump station, and wastewater control building plus all concrete foundations.

Boise State University College of Engineering


#4 – HECLA LIMITED-IDAHO TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT: MAINTENANCE YARD REDEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT: Civil Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Matthew Shroll Robert Almanza Paul Derr Diego Lucen Mike Nasland Joshua Peetz Evan Resimius CLIENT: T.H. Engineering, Inc. PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. Sondra Miller Dr. George Murgel, PE

Hecla Mining Company (HMC) proposed a land transfer with the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) of their existing North Idaho maintenance facility for a nearby site to be developed into a new maintenance yard. The new site is a former HMC mine tailings impoundment structure (MTIS) and is adjacent to the South Fork of the Coeur d’Alene River and Interstate 90 near Mullan, Idaho. HMC will develop the new site to meet ITD specifications. The engineering tasks necessary to provide ITD with the new maintenance facility on the site include the design of an office building, maintenance shop, truck wash, salt storage shed, and a brine tank containment structure. Roads will be developed to provide all ITD vehicles with access to the various structures and ingress/egress for the nearby interstate. Because soils of the MTIS are contaminated with high levels of lead, arsenic, and other silver mining byproducts, a stormwater system will be designed for the site to effectively prevent water seepage into the MTIS in compliance with the current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit.

#5 – I-84/GOWEN ROAD INTERCHANGE REDESIGN DEPARTMENT: Civil Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Luke Rowley Jacob Norris Lucas Marsh James Hart Clem Nicolarsen Fernando Lucen Rafael Flores Jonathan Curtiss

The I-84 and Gowen Road Interchange near Boise, Idaho, is in need of redesign to accommodate future travel demands, and increase its safety and usability. Bridges crossing the Union Pacific Railroad and Gowen Road will be widened to match the future design widths in conjunction with the on-going I-84 expansion project. Gowen Road will be expanded to 5 lanes due to recent and expected traffic increases, prompting a lengthening of the bridge carrying I-84. Widening of Gowen Road will include considerations for multimodal transportation and include new signaled intersections at the on/off ramp locations. Design of the bridges, along with the new roadway, will require a detailed analysis of the existing soil conditions, traffic pattern, and structural integrities according to AASHTO and Idaho Transportation Department specifications.

CLIENT: Red Block Engineering. PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. Sondra Miller Dr. George Murgel, PE

#6 – THE TOPAZ BRIDGE REDESIGN ON U.S. ROUTE 30 DEPARTMENT: Civil Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: David Fulton Martika Flores Ramos David Goretoy Drew Hopkins Jason Leineweber Peter Nussbacher Sean Parker Alex Stucki CLIENT: IBA Consulting PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. Sondra Miller Dr. George Murgel, PE

The Topaz Bridge is located in eastern Idaho on U.S. Route 30 between Lava Hot Springs and McCammon. It spans over the Union Pacific Railroad and the Portnuef-Marsh Valley Canal. The existing five span truss-style bridge is structurally deficient and functionally obsolete due to heavy traffic bypass. The replacement of the existing Topaz Bridge and its approaches are to be redesigned to better accommodate heavy commercial traffic, projected growth and overall safety. The chosen design features an expansion from twolanes to four-lanes that will accommodate the 53% increase in daily traffic that is expected by 2024. The new steel-girder bridge will be designed taking into account clearance and easement requirements of the expanding Union Pacific Railroad that passes beneath the bridge. These requirements, along with poor soil conditions, require that the entire bridge rise vertically and extend from 319 feet to 616 feet long. Special consideration will be given to the Portnuef-Marsh Valley canal passing beneath the bridge when analyzing floodplains and designing storm-water collection. Overall, the new roadway approach and steel-girder bridge enhances vehicle capacity, accessibility, intermodal transportation, and safety of this section of U.S. Route 30. 2014 Senior Design Showcase

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#7 – LOCAL SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION (SEO) DEPARTMENT: Computer Science TEAM MEMBERS: Stephen Porter Alberto Ruis Keith Ward Roman Wisniewski CLIENT: Balihoo PROJECT ADVISOR: Dr. Jim Conrad

Local search is becoming more important with recent numbers from Google claiming that over 30% of all search (and 50% of all search from mobile devices) has local intent. These searchers are looking for local businesses and can be considered much further down the purchase funnel than someone using the web simply to begin their products/services research. Auditing local SEO for current and potential customers is often time consuming and difficult to scale due to multiple sources of information, frequently changing best practices, an ever-evolving Google algorithm, and manual evaluation of results. There is a need for an automated Local SEO Audit tool to assist in this highly valuable process. This tool should generate both an audit report and an audit score. The audit report will be used in determining where SEO analysts and engineers should concentrate their optimization efforts as well as identifying common strengths/weaknesses across a client-base. The audit score will be used to baseline the local SEO health of new sites and to track improvements over time.

#8 – SECURITY PRICE CORRELATION DEPARTMENT: Computer Science TEAM MEMBERS: Kai Boschma Ian Brune Patrick Dodgen

Create a web accessible resource that publishes a price correlation matrix of the Dow Jones Industrial Average stocks over the last 60 days. The resource should have both a standard HTML and alternate JSON format.

CLIENT: Clearwater Analytics PROJECT ADVISOR: Dr. Jim Conrad

#9 – PREDICTING STUDENT OUTCOMES DEPARTMENT: Computer Science TEAM MEMBERS: Nicholas Bender Jacob Strenght Zachary Wegrzyniak Justin Woodland CLIENT: Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA)

Each year students take IDLA online courses and collaborate on discussion boards, take assignments, and communicate with their teachers. Progression through the content, communication with the teacher, and participation in discussion boards are tracked and monitored at a detailed level. Patterns in participation have been recognized by teachers to indicate final course performance but no definitive predictors of course performance have been identified. The proposed project would be to quantify the predictors of final course performance based on patterns of student behavior or performance within the first two weeks of course participation. These predictors would then be used to communicate with staff members or parents who can provide interventions and support early in the course.

PROJECT ADVISOR: Dr. Jim Conrad

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Boise State University College of Engineering


#10 – MOBILE APP FOR PILOTS DEPARTMENT: Computer Science TEAM MEMBERS: Drake Gebhart Michael Hance Chad Weigle Mohammad Mousa CLIENT: United States Department of the Interior (DOI) PROJECT ADVISOR: Dr. Jim Conrad

Our business model requires the 100+ pilots who fly our aircraft to report their flying time to us. We, in turn, bill the bureaus for their flying time so we can recoup the expense of fuel, maintenance, etc. We also use the AUR data to track how many more hours an aircraft can fly before the next required maintenance inspection. The more current the AUR data, the better we are able to manage our maintenance needs. However, our pilots are increasingly using iPads and other tablets in the cockpit for up-to-date maps/charts, airspace updates, weather advisories, etc. The tablets are very cost effective because they replace paper charts updates that cost $400-500 per year. We are now at the point where our pilots don’t want to carry laptops on the road because the tablets work so well. If they wait until they return to their office laptops to submit use reports the usefulness of the reports for maintenance management is markedly lower. This project requires the team to adopt a first-generation aircraft use report (AUR) application written for Windows-based laptops to a more convenient second generation app which will work with iPads and other common tablet operating systems (e.g. Android).

#11 – ROUTER API SOLUTION DEPARTMENT: Computer Science TEAM MEMBERS: Melissa Neibaur Michael Perez Sasa Rkman Sean Wright

The heart of Cradlepoint Series 3 device configuration is based upon a REST API. The Cradlepoint router GUI securely interacts with this API using javascript and html delivered to a web browser providing a user the ability to configure the device and read status. We are looking for a unique solution that highlights the underlying API.

CLIENT: CradlePoint PROJECT ADVISOR: Dr. Jim Conrad

#12 – ASC RENO 1ST PLACE IN DESIGN BUILD DEPARTMENT: Construction Management TEAM MEMBERS: Kirk Paul Joey Paul Keith Leonard PROJECT ADVISOR: Dr. Casey Cline

The Boise State Department of Construction Management Design-Build team took first place at the Associated Schools of Construction regional competition in Reno, Nevada. The design-build team’s hypothetical task was to demolish and reconstruct a 150,000- square-foot section of a high school building. The team developed a design for the structure and then created a construction proposal that included a cost estimate, schedule, site logistics plan, and safety and quality control plans.

2014 Senior Design Showcase

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#13 – MINIDOKA GUIDE TOWER DEPARTMENT: Construction Management

In 1942, U.S. citizens of Japanese descent living in western states were relocated to various internment camps. One of these camps was the Minidoka Relocation Center located near Jerome, Idaho. The Department of Construction Management at Boise State University worked with the Friends of Minidoka, a non-profit organization under a grant from the National Park Service (NPS) to design and reconstruct a guard tower at the Minidoka National Historic Site. The tower had long been removed from the site and the NPS wished to restore it to its original location and specifications as a feature of historical significance.

TEAM MEMBERS: Bryan Scanlan CLIENT: Friends of Minidoka/National Park Services PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. Casey Cline Dr. Rebecca Mirsky, PE

#14 – CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ANODIZED ALUMINUM FILMS DEPARTMENT: Materials Science and Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Megan Beck Sarah Sredzinski Damir Fazil CLIENT: NxEdge, Inc. Jesse Armagost and Nick Xydas PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. Claire Xiong Chad Watson

Over the last ten years, the average pitch size between interconnects in semiconductor devices has decreased from 60 nm to under 16 nm. To enable smaller pitch sizes, materials with less resistance, such as copper compared to aluminum, are used in the contact layers. The new materials that are being used require the use of higher voltages and more corrosive chemicals to process in both dry etch and chemical-mechanical-planarization. The more caustic processing decreases the average lifetime of the anodized components used in the processing chambers. NxEdge, an ISO 9001:2000 certified manufacturing and coating company located in Boise, ID, is interested in investigating methods to create more robust anodized components. For this project, a multiphase design was implemented to study the influence of mixed acid electrolytes, rare earth salts, anodizing temperature, and current density settings on the quality of anodized films. Following NxEdge’s qualification assurance process, breakdown voltage and accelerated acid corrosion tests were performed to evaluate film quality. Aluminum that was anodized using a sulfuric/boric mixed acid electrolyte at higher temperature and lower current density settings exhibited an increased breakdown voltage by approximately 1.6X over the standard process. The acid corrosion test was improved by more than 380X over the standard and more than 28X over the project goal.

#15 – GRAIN SIZE REFINEMENT OF ALLOY 617 DEPARTMENT: Materials Science and Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Lance Patten Lejmarc Snowball Gary Mitchell CLIENT: INL, Richard Wright PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. Janelle Wharry Chad Watson

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Alloy 617, a nickel-based solid solution alloy, is a frontrunner for use in intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) as part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The IHX will be perating at temperatures approaching 1,000˚C for extended durations. At these temperatures, Alloy 617 is susceptible to dislocation creep. However, diffusion creep may also become activated as the grain size of Alloy 617 decreases. Thus, the goal for Idaho National Laboratory is to evaluate the effect of grain size on creep behavior in Alloy 617. In support of this goal, the grain size of Alloy 617 has been refined from 150 m to between 6 and 40 m through the use of a thermo-mechanical process. Homologous temperatures were used for determining the heat treatment temperature range, which varied from 300 to 1000°C. With a 50% cold work, the recrystallization zone for Alloy 617 has been established between 800 and 1000°C. The process to recrystallize Alloy 617 will be provided to Idaho National Laboratory for developing a creep relationship as a function of grain size.

Boise State University College of Engineering


#16 – A DESIGN EVALUATION OF MICROCHANNEL LAYERS IN MULTI-SCALE CERAMIC MICROSYSTEMS DEPARTMENT: Mechanical and Biomedical Materials Science TEAM MEMBERS: Cassidy Bond Christine Joy Co Ian Dalzell Koyuki Fritchman Ann Delaney Tasha Buss CLIENT: Ceramatec, Inc., Charles Lewinsohn and Marc Flinders

Ceramatec, Inc. manufactures Oxygen conducting multi-scale ceramic microsystems for oxygen and synthesis gas production. The ceramic wafer design used by Ceramatec is comprised of a dense membrane, porous, and microchannel layers. The wafers are assembled into stacks and pressurized in a vessel for industrial-scale gas production. To increase production yields, wafer deformation due to anisotropic shrinkage during sintering needs to be minimized, while optimizing wafer strength and resistance to gas flow through the microchannels. The deformation, strength, and resistance to flow for several microchannel designs will be tested experimentally. The results from this design evaluation will be used to identify the variables that have the highest impact on ceramic wafer performance. Future work will implement this design methodology into the manufacturing process at Ceramatec, Inc.

PROJECT ADVISOR: Dr. Don Plumlee, PE Chad Watson

#17 – DESIGN OF A NOVEL SALT COLLECTION SYSTEM DEPARTMENT: Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Brooke Balogh Zachary Harris Senami Hodonu CLIENT: INL, Ken Bateman PROJECT ADVISOR: Sarah Haight, PE

One of the largest hurdles to the widespread incorporation of recycling processes for metals is that the spent components are often combined with other materials, such as salts. To recover the desired material, the salt-metal solid solution must be decomposed into the individual constituents and then separated. Unfortunately, this process can take several days and has numerous technical challenges resulting in the operation being less costeffective than mining new metal. Therefore, to improve the cost-effectiveness of the recycling process, Idaho National Laboratory submitted a request to design a faster, smaller, and more efficient system. The system has been broken into two components: a metal collection system and a salt collection system. The salt collection system’s design leverages a similar concept to a percolator. Suction will be used to create a negative pressure in the system, thereby pulling the salt through the bubbler and into the cooling medium. At this interface, the salt will condense and can then be collected. Experimentation will be performed in an effort to prove the feasibility of this concept and will then be used in further research by INL.

#18 – CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MOLTEN LICL-KCL/COPPER SOLUTIONS AND OXIDES DEPARTMENT: Materials Science and Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Carolyn Stansell Josh Owens Nicole Leraas CLIENT: INL, Ken Bateman PROJECT ADVISOR: Dr. Darryl Butt MENTOR: Chad Watson

Electro-refining, a method for refining and reprocessing metals, requires an electrolytic solution. Using molten LiCl-KCl salt as the electrolyte, a dendritic mixture of corrosive molten salts and purified metals is produced. Before the metals can be recycled, they must first be separated from the salts. Current electro-refining processes incorporate liquidvapor separation techniques, where the salts are distilled from the mixture. Containment materials for this process are paramount; the containment crucibles must not only be able to withstand temperatures approaching 1500ºC, but also be resistant to corrosive breakdown by molten salt. Thermally and chemically stable oxides (alumina, zirconia and yttria) were selected as the most viable material systems for prolonged exposure to the corrosive environment. Each oxide was placed in contact with 30wt% LiCl-KCl/70wt% copper at temperatures approaching 1500ºC. The oxides were analyzed for corrosion products, surface reactions, and penetration depth. Preliminary X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy characterization demonstrated that for short durations, zirconia is immune to chemical attack by molten LiCl-KCl, whereas alumina suffered extensive surface corrosion. 2014 Senior Design Showcase

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#19 – WIND POWER TURBINE ELECTRICAL SYSTEM DESIGN DEPARTMENTS: Electrical and Computer Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Firas Almasyab Haitian (Will) Xu Adrian Reyes Stephen Stauts Brian Dambi CLIENT: Department of Energy (DOE) PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. Said Ahmed-Zaid Eric Booth

In order to reduce the reliance on fossil fuels and progress towards clean, renewable energy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), our sponsor, hosts a Collegiate Wind Competition for undergraduate students to investigate innovative wind energy concepts and provide a means to gain experience designing, building, and testing a wind turbine and its electrical interface to perform according to their customized market data-derived business plan. This year’s theme requires each competing team to be able to power small electronics. Although this competition incorporates a business, mechanical, and electrical aspect, our team took on the task of designing and constructing the electrical interface between the wind turbine and small electronics. The approach used in the design utilizes the AC voltage produced by the generator, converts it to a DC voltage, steps it up to 5V, and controls the Torque and RPM of the wind turbine to operate at the rated power.

MENTORS: Dr. John Gardner, PE Matt Dolan

#20 – THERMO-ELECTRIC GENERATOR EVALUATION BOARD DEPARTMENTS: Electrical and Computer Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Jeanette Brooks Cody Sullivan

A system is needed to monitor and log the power generated by various thermoelectric generators deployed in different thermal environments. The students have designed a system consisting of a custom built circuit board and an embedded system running custom software.

CLIENT: Adrian Rothenbuhler PROJECT ADVISOR: Eric Booth

#21 – DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION MODELING SYSTEM DEPARTMENTS: Electrical and Computer Engineering

Idaho Power needs a more flexible and accurate way to predict how a power distribution system will respond to the integration of alternative power sources like wind and solar. The students have developed a simulation method using the OpenDSS simulation engine.

TEAM MEMBERS: Mike Siddoway Nick Watson CLIENT: Idaho Power PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. Said Ahmed-Zaid Eric Booth MENTOR: Andres Valdepena

10 Boise State University College of Engineering


#22 – MONITORING CEREBROSPINAL FLUID DURING PARABOLIC FLIGHT DEPARTMENTS: Mechanical and Biomedical Electrical and Computer Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Roxanne Stone Janos Cserma Jordan Scott

The Boise State University Microgravity Research Team has requested a metaphorical model that simulates Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) circulation in the human body's Central Nervous System (CNS). This engineered device, identified as the CSF Flow Apparatus, is capable of monitoring minute pressure and flow changes caused by fluctuating gravity. Results from this research could benefit astronauts and pilots who experience increased intracranial pressure after extended periods of hyper and microgravity.

CLIENT: Microgravity University PROJECT ADVISOR: Dr. Elisa Barney-Smith MENTOR: Matt Dolan

#23 – MOTH ACTIVITY DETECTION DEVICE DEPARTMENTS: Mechanical and Biomedical Electrical and Computer Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Levi Holt Kevin Martinez Andrew Walker Kevin Hanners Tyler Nichol CLIENT: Dr. Jesse Barber

Mechanical and electrical engineering students were tasked with designing a lightweight and portable device that can collect data and create a histogram displaying a moth’s activity distribution throughout a 48hr period. The device will be placed in a rain forest environments to collect timestamps about moth activity patterns. This will be compared to bat activity patterns to study the predator pray relationship and moth defense mechanisms.

PROJECT ADVISORS: Sarah Haight, PE Dr. Wan Kuan MENTOR: Tasche Strieb, PE

#24 – PILL BOX WITH REMINDER ALERTS AND ACTIVITY RECORDING CAPABILITIES DEPARTMENTS: Mechanical and Biomedical Electrical and Computer Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Gabbard Stephen Kerri Rager Jeff Rayburn Tung Ho Mike Larsen CLIENT: Dr. Jim Browning PROJECT ADVISORS: Sarah Haight, PE Dr. Jim Browning MENTOR: Tasche Strieb, PE

An interdisciplinary team has been tasked with designing and building a Pill Box to allow for dosage alerts and a greater peace of mind for caregivers in accordance with the requests of our sponsor, Dr. Jim Browning. This device will serve to reduce medication errors and increase independence for its users. After reviewing products currently available on the market, a device has been designed to address the potentially dangerous problem of medication non-compliance. Each of the 28 compartments contain a pill cup, a sensor allowing the device to monitor and record dosage activity, and a green LED light that will flash along with an audio alert to remind the user to take their medication based on programming input by the caregiver.

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#25 – TRIPOLI HIGH POWER ROCKET DEPARTMENTS: Mechanical and Biomedical Electrical and Computer Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Robert Ragland Evan Rust Dylan Sherick Ali Ibrahim Brad Whipple CLIENT: Tripoli Rocket Club PROJECT ADVISOR: Dr. Don Plumlee, PE

High power rocketry is a hobby that launches unguided rockets to high altitudes. High power rocketry is inaccessible to many people due to the high costs, complex avionics, and lack of knowledge about the hobby. The Boise State University Rocket Team project is to address these problems by designing, constructing, and testing a high power rocket while focusing on reducing costs and incorporating novel techniques into the design. The rocket airframe is 13 feet tall with an 8 inch diameter. The estimated peak altitude for the first test flight is 10,000 feet, and the rocket will be capable of reaching altitudes over 17,000 feet. The rocket will collect data during flight and transmit it to a ground station. The construction techniques will reduce costs by 25 percent compared to standard construction. This rocket has the potential to advance the hobby of high power rocketry by matching size and performance of comparable rockets at a reduced cost.

MENTOR: Vikram Patel

#26 – SEMI-AUTOMATED DOCUMENT BINDING DEVICE DEPARTMENT: Mechanical and Biomedical Electrical and Computer Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Clint Cartwright Andy Nodler Riley Smith Emily Wayt Robert Dyk Jingnan Guo

Our objective was to design a semi-automated document binding device for small to medium sized businesses. The document is placed in the machine and the correct plastic coil size is output using the document sizing tray and corresponding display. Plastic coils are inserted into the machine and fed into a pre-punched document via a floating head mechanism which drives the roller. After completion, the cutting and crimping device removes excess coil and keeps the document bound.

CLIENT: Rhin-O-Tuff, Performance Design LLC PROJECT ADVISORS: Sarah Haight, PE Arlen Planting MENTOR: Pete Miranda

#27 – MECHATRONIC VENUS FLYTRAP DEPARTMENT: Mechanical and Biomedical Electrical and Computer Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Brooke Garner Evan Huff Donnie Vawser Jake Broyles Chance Maston CLIENT: Idaho Botanical Gardens PROJECT ADVISORS: Sarah Haight, PE Arlen Planting MENTOR: Tasche Strieb, PE

The Idaho Botanical Garden is sponsoring a Senior Design team from Boise State University to create an interactive model of a Venus flytrap allowing patrons of the Idaho Botanical Garden firsthand experience with a carnivorous plant without harming a live flytrap. This is a continuation of a project started in the 2012 Fall semester. The covering is made with a porous foam and 3D paint to accomplish a light, but realistic appearance. The functionality of the design is accomplished with sensors modeling Venus flytrap hairs, a stepper motor to close and open the model leaves, and an Arduino processor to model to correct Venus flytrap behavior. The Plexiglas case is fitted to the flytrap box to protect the mechatronics and increase the functional and visible lifespan. The mechatronic Venus flytrap is sure to be a main attraction, almost as popular as the real specimen.

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#28 – VYYKN VENDER DEPARTMENT: Mechanical and Biomedical Electrical and Computer Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Michael Eldred Brett Law Sam Mecham Shayne Saxton James Shawver Miguel Quebrado

Vyykn, Inc. founder, Steve Kuzara, has developed a water filtration and distribution system created to provide high quality water and reduce the waste caused by plastic bottles. Our project is to produce a device that can dispense water-flavoring packets to compliment the current Vyykn machine. Our design will use individual cartridges with two dispensing wheels to dispense the packets. Customizable sleeves will allow for adjusting to the numerous sizes of packets. When completed, our design will help Vyykn’s mission by helping to eliminate the plastic waste from sports drinks, flavored water, and other flavored drinks.

CLIENT: Vyykn PROJECT ADVISOR: Sarah Haight, PE Dr. Nader Rafla MENTOR: Cecilia Cheng, PE

#29 – AGRICULTURAL HARVESTER DEPARTMENT: Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Kenneth Boylan Mohammad Khaliki Reanne Stewart Kyle Witherspoon CLIENT: Economic and Natural Resource LLC PROJECT ADVISOR: Sarah Haight, PE MENTOR: Dick Siever

Due to expensive harvesting practices, a lack of local growers, and increasing fuel costs, fresh greens such as chard and spinach are expensive in Idaho. Local supply decreases during the winter off-season, increasing transportation costs for greens. The Economic and Natural Resource LLC has concluded there is a need for an inexpensive, multifunctional prototype that can help local growers more efficiently produce greens. This will decrease transportation costs and strengthen the local economy. Currently, there are no products available, small enough for a greenhouse or perform multiple functions for the desired cost. The purpose of this project was to produce an electrically powered prototype, with modular attachments, which tills and levels the soil, and harvests and collects greens. The prototype reduces labor and increases productivity of harvesting greens. The prototype is powered using rechargeable batteries, operated by a single person, and fits on a standard 4 foot wide greenhouse bed. The transportable prototype can till soil up to a depth of 7 inches, and harvest greens at 6 inches high.

#30 – 3-D MATERIAL PROCESSING DEPARTMENT: Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Jeb Bonner Phillip Burchfield Patrick Johnston CLIENT: GreenSpeed Inc PROJECT ADVISOR: Sarah Haight, PE MENTOR: Tasche Strieb, PE

Greenspeed Research Inc. (GsR) is a local non-profit company whose mission is to educate the public about renewable energy sources through demonstration in high performance motorsports. In house fabrication and prototyping is limited due to a lack of CNC (Computer Numerical Control) based material processing. Team Greenspeed Research has designed and built a 3-axis Material Processing Machine by salvaging an existing 2axis translating platform machine frame. The modifications included alteration of the existing machine frame to accept a vertical Z-axis plunge capability and integration of drive motors to three axes and a CNC control package. The design incorporates CNC plasma cutting, routing of aluminum, plywood, and plastic, and profiling of closed cell foam blocks for modeling.

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#31 – ELECTRONIC MEMORY DEVICE READER DEPARTMENT: Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Tyler Young Rici Morrill Derek Wade CLIENT: Hewlett Packard PROJECT ADVISOR: Sarah Haight, PE

The focus of this senior design project included working with Hewlett Packard (HP) to design and develop of a tool for reading information from memory contained on a memory chip. The final housing model incorporates one-handed operation for comfort of the user and emphasized manufacturability and modularity in order to leave opportunity for future development. Simulated drop testing in SolidWorks determined the device can stand up to daily use. The developed circuit board controls the memory reading and data transfer processes. The final electronic memory reader design connects to a PC through a USB port and is also powered by 5-Volts through the USB.

#32 – MOBILE TRANSFORMING BLIND DEPARTMENT: Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Christopher Bokides David Compton Yalda Khaliki Zane Roberts CLIENT: Frank Alloway PROJECT ADVISOR: Sarah Haight, PE MENTOR: Calvin Allan

The Mobile Transforming Blind is a redesign of sponsor Frank Alloway’s prototype. This project was envisioned to replace many products in the hunting industry with one modular piece of equipment. The base can accept 3 different tubular aluminum structures that create a laydown hunting blind, 3 person bench blind, or sitdown blind with clamshell opening. In addition to the hunting blind configurations, it can also accept wheels for an equipment and game hauler mode, expand to be used as a ladder for tree stand access, or collapse for storage. The ladder base was designed with rail lengths and hinge locking points strategically placed for the end user to easily move to these custom positions. With the preliminary work for large scale manufacture completed, we look forward to seeing this product patented and sold in stores everywhere.

#33 – REKLUSE CLUTCH DISPLAY DEPARTMENT: Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Grey Beaudry Shelagh Macaulay Brian McMillon Stuart Sailors CLIENT: Rekluse Motorsports PROJECT ADVISOR: Sarah Haight, PE

Rekluse Motorsports of Boise, ID has sponsored a project to develop an interactive display to showcase their aftermarket dirt bike clutch. This kiosk style display features a dirt bike engine which has the cover removed so that the clutch can be seen rotating. Handlebars allow the user to control the clutch, brake and throttle. An electric motor has been implemented to rotate the clutch assembly via a belt and pulley. Once engaged, the clutch rotates the drivetrain which spins a dirt bike tire allowing the user to experience the ride without the full dirt bike present.

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#34 – AUTOMOTIVE THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR DEPARTMENT: Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Tony Christensen Jacob O'Brien CLIENT: Advanced Energy Lab PROJECT ADVISOR: Dr. Yanliang Zhang

Development in thermoelectric research has enabled TEGs to be used in automotive waste heat recovery. A TEG has been designed with Half-Heusler thermoelectric material and an optimized design to recover lost energy and improve vehicle efficiency by 5%. The design is optimized to maximize heat transfer and minimize increased engine pressure. Our generator has been predicted to produce 200W of electrical power with a pressure drop of 1.8 kPa. Our future work will be coordinating with manufacturers to modify the design for a commercial path of fuel efficiency enhancement using TEGs.

#35 – WIND POWER 1: SMALL SCALE WIND TURBINE DEPARTMENT: Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Cameron Allen Davis Gumbo Mitchell Petronek Scott Roskens CLIENT: Department of Energy (DOE)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has put together a collegiate wind competition to design, build, and market a small wind turbine (17.7 in diameter rotor dimension). For our mechanical engineering senior design project our team will participate in this competition. Ten schools will participate in the competition in Las Vegas this May. The turbine was designed to produce 10 watts at a wind speed between 5 and 14 m/s. The turbine is also equipped with an emergency brake that will shut the turbine down in less than 10 seconds from full rotational speed if needed. The design of the turbine followed the regulations of the collegiate wind competition rules set by the DOE.

PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. John Gardner, PE Dr. Don Plumlee, PE MENTORS: Cecilia Cheng, PE Sandy Cardon

#36 – WIND POWER 2: MICRO WIND TURBINE DEPARTMENT: Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Jerad Deitrick Luke Ganschow Brandon Lee Nael Naser CLIENT: Department of Energy (DOE)

The Department of Energy sponsored the design of a small scale wind turbine for the national Collegiate Wind Competition. Four mechanical engineering teams from Boise State University each designed a wind turbine in conjunction with one electrical engineering team that developed a power converter to be shared between the mechanical teams. Wind Power 2’s design consisted of a three blade rotor with 3D printed blades; a nacelle housing containing the generator, gearbox and their mounting components; a mountain bike disc brake system with hand lever; and an aluminum tower with corresponding mounting flanges.

PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. John Gardner, PE Dr. Don Plumlee, PE MENTORS: Cecilia Cheng, PE Sandy Cardon

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#37 – WIND POWER 3: MICRO-WIND TURBINE The Department of Energy has issued a challenge for undergraduate students to develop and build a marketable micro wind turbine capable of producing 10 watts of power. In order to meet the competition requirements, this multidisciplinary project involved collaboration between teams of mechanical and electrical engineering students, and a team of business students. The Wind Power 3 student team designed and built a three-bladed, horizontal axis wind turbine, which exceeded the required power production with 14 watts. The business team developed a plan to use the turbine as an educational tool to increase awareness and understanding of wind energy.

DEPARTMENT: Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Calvin Brown Cody McConkey Michael Sansom Luke Weaver CLIENT: Department of Energy (DOE) PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. John Gardner, PE Dr. Don Plumlee, PE MENTORS: Cecilia Cheng, PE Sandy Cardon

#38 – WIND POWER 4: MARINE WIND TURBINE DEPARTMENT: Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering TEAM MEMBERS: Brian Cardwell Rory O'Leary Michael Shoaee Grant Stephens CLIENT: Department of Energy (DOE)

Market analysis of applications for small scale wind turbines indicated a desire within the sailing community for quiet, efficient turbines to power small electronics by generating a continuous 10W of power at wind speeds ranging from 5-14 m/s. With a market identified, the team researched, designed, and built a turbine which meets these requirements. The prototype begins generating power in excess of 10W at a wind speeds near 8 m/s (17 mph), is durable (weather resistant, minimal vibration, etc.), and operates with negligible sound production.

PROJECT ADVISORS: Dr. John Gardner, PE Dr. Don Plumlee, PE MENTORS: Cecilia Cheng, PE Sandy Cardon

Special Thanks Leandra Aburusa

Joan Hartz

The Peer Advisors

Dr. Rebecca Mirsky, PE

Michele Armstrong

Dr. Amy Moll

Diana Garza

Paul Robertson

Sarah Haight, PE

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Senior Design Showcase 2014