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B a A r c h i t e c t u r e Ye a r 2 D e s i g n Po r t f o l i o

Marlow Parker

Arts University Bournemouth


THE SURREAL SKYLINE

Year 2 Architecture Design Portfolio ARC552 Book 1 Design Work ARC

550-551-552

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THE WHISKY VAULT CONTENTS

Chapter 1 - ARC550 Dialogues of Thinking and Making THE WHISKY VAULT - Page 5 URBAN GROUP WORK - Page 39

Chapter 2 - ARC551 Dialogues of Use and Form POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL - Page 47

Chapter 3 - ARC 552 Dialogues of Future Scenario SUGAR CUBE CITY AND THE SURREAL SKYLINE - Page 81

Chapter 4 CONCLUSION - Page 141

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ARC 550 Dialogues of Thinking and Making


THE WHISKY VAULT DESIGN BOOK INTRODUCTION

This Book has been produced in order to show the design works created throughout the 2nd year of Architecture at the Arts University Bournemouth. Three Projects were undertaken within the second year which included ARC 550 Dialogues of thinking and making a project for the renovation of a commercial building within Poole High Street. This building was transformed into the Whisky Vault. An architectural innovation which not only adds a dynamic sociable space within the urban environment of Poole but by creating and aging its own produce within the building a deeper link to the community could be established. ARC 551 Dialogues of Use and Form sought the design for a fully functioning music school complete with auditorium, practice rooms and public spaces all located in a designated site of Poole. Inspiration was taken from the works of Peter Eisenman throughout the design of this project enhancing the architectures synthesis through the term. ARC552 Dialogues of Future Scenarios holds traditional and digital artwork for a predicted future between the years 2016 and 2116. The Surrealist artwork combined with the Modernism movement of architecture was done within this project to try and predict how a border free culture may amalgamate across the globe.

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THE WHISKY VAULT

Chapter 1 Dialogues of Thinking and Making ARC550

THE WHISKY VAULT

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THE WHISKY VAULT ARC 550 INTRODUCTION Fig 1 - Whisky Glass Sketch

This Chapter will outline the design methodology of an urban intervention within Poole High Street. The curiosity shop project will seek to enhance the urban qualities of Poole finding architectural solutions for overcoming various urban polemics. The strategies and systems being researched will be documented in order to understand how architectural interventions can enhance public space. Informants of various design decisions will be recorded and visually communicated throughout, linking to the LO4 group work of figure ground analysis and how it can be a suitable tool when intervening within a complex urban area. The project will include an analysis of the existing building to be refurbished and its current effect on the surrounding space. A sequence of design development stages will be presented to communicate how various design applications could create poetic solutions when improving urban areas whilst incorporating architectural qualities within the curiosity shop and surrounding area.

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ARC 550 Dialogues of Thinking and Making

Fig. 1


THE WHISKY VAULT BRIEF Fig 2 - Brief Page

Fig. 2

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THE WHISKY VAULT Figure/Ground Map - Poole High Street Fig 3 - 1:5000 Figure/Ground Map

Fig. 3

Site Location

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THE WHISKY VAULT Material Research Fig 4 - White Oak Whisky Barrel Fig 5 - Copper Still Fig 6 - Charred Timber

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THE WHISKY VAULT Precedent No.1 Fig 7 - Johnnie Walker House - Beijing Fig 8 - Johnnie Walker House - Odyssey Lounge Fig 9 - Blending Lounge

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ARC 550 Dialogues of Thinking and Making Fig. 9


THE WHISKY VAULT Precedent No.2 Fig 10 - Johnnie Walker House - Shanghai Fig 11 - Johnnie Walker House - Shanghai Fig 12 - Johnnie Walker House - Shanghai

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THE WHISKY VAULT Existing Building Fig 13 - Cashino Plot Fig 14 - Site Analysis Fig 15 - Existing structure Fig 16 - Cashino High street Fig 17 - Cashino Front Fig 18 - Cashino Rear side

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ARC 550 Dialogues of Thinking and Making

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THE WHISKY VAULT Site Context Model Fig 19 - 1:500 Site Context Model Fig 20 - 1:500 Site Context Model

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THE WHISKY VAULT Elevation - Existing Fig 21 - Cashino Existing Elevation

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THE WHISKY VAULT

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The Whisky Vault THE WHISKY VAULT

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ARC 550 Dialogues of Thinking and Making

Marlow Parker 1407306 ARC 550

The Whisky Vault v4.0


THE WHISKY VAULT Version 4 Model Fig 22 - Version 4 Review Page

Fig 23 - Version 4 Model Plan Fig 24 - High Street View Fig 25 - Oblique View Fig 26 - High Street Elevation Fig 27 - Tectonic Opening Fig 28 - Inside Looking out to High Street

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THE WHISKY VAULT Lighting Test Model (lantern effect) Fig 29 - 31 - 1:500 Model Testing Light

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ARC 550 Dialogues of Thinking and Making

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THE WHISKY VAULT Visualisations Fig 32 - Maya Visualisation Tectonic Fig 33 - Maya Visualisation Tectonic

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THE WHISKY VAULT Visualisations Fig 34 - Visualisation of Brick Blades Fig 35 - Visualisation of Brick Blades Fig 36 - Visualisation of Brick Blades

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ARC 550 Dialogues of Thinking and Making

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THE WHISKY VAULT Version 5.0 Plan Evolution Fig 37 - Version 4.5 Plan Fig 38 - Version 5 Plan Fig 39 - Shop Section Fig 40 - Front Elevation

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THE WHISKY VAULT Version 6 Plan Fig 41 - Version 6 Plan, Rendered

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Version 6 Plan 1:50

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THE WHISKY VAULT Version 6 Visualisations Fig 43 - Rendered Elevation, Whisky Vault

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Fig 44 - Whisky vault Visualisation Fig 45 - Visualisation Front Fig 46 - Close up Kolumba Brick Column

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THE WHISKY VAULT Version 7 plan Fig 47 - Version 7 Plan Fig 48 - Version 7 Section with Column

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THE WHISKY VAULT Final Plan Fig 49 - Final Plan

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THE WHISKY VAULT Visualisations Day / Night Fig 50 - Day Visualisation Fig 51 - Night Visualisation

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THE WHISKY VAULT Visualisation Fig 52 - Day Visualisation, Brass Balustrade

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THE WHISKY VAULT Final Plan Fig 53 - Rendered Final Plan

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THE WHISKY VAULT Final Section Fig 54 - Rendered Final Section

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THE WHISKY VAULT Day/Night Elevations Fig 55 - Rendered Final Elevation (Day) Fig 56 - Rendered Final Elevation (Night)

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THE WHISKY VAULT Day/Night Visualisations Fig 57 - Day Visualisation Fig 58 - Night Visualisation

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THE WHISKY VAULT Visualisations Fig 59 - Visualisation Shop Fig 60 - Visualisation Distillery Fig 61 - Visualisation Roof terrace

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THE WHISKY VAULT Final Model Fig 63 - 68 - 1:500 Model

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The Whisky Vault

THE WHISKY VAULT (Refurbishment of 106 Poole High Street)

N

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4 1. 528 x 109 x 38mm K46 Petersen Tegl Kolumba Brick on 10mm dark tinted mortar 30mm air cavity 50mm Kooltherm K8 Cavity Insulation 220 x 110 x 65mm existing brickwork

2. 50mm granite stone paving 25mm paving locators + cavity Impermeable membrane Aspen stainless steel drainage located in 60mm OPTIM-R Insulation 25mm Thermaroof Insulation board 230mm FRP re-inforced concrete 210mm Comfloor rigid metal profile within 230mm Steel I Joist 300mm Service void Suspended plasterboard ceiling

3. 25mm granite paving bedded nin 10mm mortar 100mm screed + (UFH pipework) 100mm Kingspan Thermafloor TF70 Impermeable membrane 230mm concrete 4.System 8 small rise aluminium glazing system

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1:20 Part Sections - The Whisky Vault - Terrace, Wall, Ground + Barrel Storage Column

1:20 Part Plan - The Whisky Vault (Shop)

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FT IHGE U W R EH/I GS RK OY UV NA DU L GT R O U P P R O J E C T

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M aa kk ii nn gg AA RR CC 55 55 00 DD ii aa ll oo gg uu ee ss oo ff TT hh ii nn kk ii nn gg aa nn dd M


FIGURE/GROUND GROUP PROJECT

Dialogues of Thinking and Making ARC550

FIGURE/GROUND GROUP PROJECT

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FIGURE/GROUND GROUP PROJECT Nolli Map Fig 69 - Nolli Map of Rome

Giambattista Nolli was an architect and surveyor, he was the first to compose a Figure/ Ground map of Rome in 1748; etched into copper tablets. This elaborate carving came to be known as the Nolli map. This Map is somewhat different to an original Map as its built structures are shaded dark and its public amenities e.g. the interior of public buildings including churches and public walkways were left white. The spatial phenomenon of Rome had been accurately condensed and refined to a binary format, Public & Private, Black & White, Open & Closed. Depending on the maps utilisation the binary image can be used effectively as an analytical tool for reading and understanding the relationship of spatial organisation in an Urban setting. This method as discussed by many modern designers does have its limitations due to its minimal detail for reference when designing. It is said that Figure ground images are a way of perceiving space; a tool for analysis rather than a tool for designing. “Don’t confuse the x-ray with the cure.” (Diaz, 2014) Colin Rowe & Robert Slutzky’s ‘Transparency’ essay written in the 1950’s slightly altered the application of Figure Ground images, not only can they be used for analysing spatial hierarchies in plan format, but can be used through the application of visual and painting theory to aid in the understanding of architectural elevation and section images. The polarity of light and dark highlights foreground elements that can be compared and contrasted in relation to there coherent background elements. (Diaz, 2014)

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Urban morphology is described as the transformation of an urban setting across a time period. As previously mentioned the Figure/Ground images can be used as an analytical tool for the image being refined into simple light and dark elements allows the interpretation of urban morphology throughout history. The additional method of using an array of Maps from past decades help show how the Mass/Void relationship can alter. Building Density or Figure Density can be read from this method of architectural drawing. Throughout this research project various Figure/Ground images will be recorded and analysed to reflect on how the Public & Private spaces have been manipulated throughout history due to Social, Economical and Political changes in Poole. (Diaz, 2014)


FIGURE/GROUND GROUP PROJECT Nolli Map

The Nolli map was first created by an Italian architect and surveyor Giambatistta Nolli. This map was unique for its era due to its new format in the recording of a city. The Map is entirely monochromatic with dark shaded areas showing the structural elements including private areas restricted to the general population contrasted to the white public space, this emphasises the areas which the public have access too. (Tice, 2005) states that the significance of the Nolli map to Architects and urban designers is that it gives a unique view into the innate character of Rome. The Topography and spatial structures are vividly revealed through reading this style of Map. He contrasts this to contemporary architectural theory which focuses more on understanding a city through individual elements such as monuments, squares or buildings.

Tice moves on to explain the Urban dialectics of a Nolli Map and how the principals of contextual design are evident throughout Rome due to the Map showing the city as a whole, similar to showing an individual building to highlight its contextual applications. Distinctive features E.g. the relationship of outside and inside space in a city is thought of as similar to the inside outside relationship in a residential project. The Map quantifies Nollis understanding of the urban fabric showing streets, piazzas and buildings which can be linked to a dynamic interplay of Figure/Ground or the New and Old. The evolution of a cities spatial structure is seen not as a static but as living, highly charged and sometimes volatile discourse of the immersing pressures, issues and desires in both Human and Urban terms.

Tice divides how the Nolli map can be understood through different architectural theories. When reading a city through a Nolli Plan compared to a pictorial representation, the Nolli Plan allows one to compare space, position and size easily whereas a pictorial representation can become cluttered and hard to read due to the information density of a Pictorial Image. He continues to suggest that the Nolli map ‘provides an immediate and intuitive understanding of the cities urban form’ (Tice, 2005). When the Nolli Map is read through a Solid/Void comparison. The perception that a city could be thought of as having the various public spaces and walkways carved out of an urban setting rather than built from the ground up. This seems counter intuitive but can give rise to a higher understanding of an urban settlement. Fig. 69

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FIGURE/GROUND GROUP PROJECT Urban Morphology c1901 - c2015 Fig 70 - Figure/Ground Poole c1634 Fig 71 - Figure/Ground Poole c1901 Fig 72 - Figure/Ground Poole c1938 Fig 73 - Figure/Ground Poole c2015

The most evident progression in our mass maps of Poole high street from 1901 to 2015, implementing knowledge of figure ground, is the obvious and dramatic increase in urban density. The transformation of open public spaces has diminished rapidly as the high street struggles to keep up with the increase in consumerism and trade. Since the 1970’s Poole is known to have transformed into one of Britain’s popular ports, this boost in trade positively correlated with the surge in tourism forcing the council to deduct from the existing open public spaces. Another surprising characteristic that we discovered was the obvious enlargement of the high street since 1901. The large high street lures the consumer to the shopping centre and visa versa, creating an efficient herding process of profit. The increase in width of the high street has allowed for outside seating to be implemented along the centre of the street or outside the cafes. Although the increase in consumerism has caused a lot of money to be gained by Poole, the programme of Poole still seems disjointed and incoherent.

Fig. 70

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Fig. 73 Fig. 72

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FIGURE/GROUND GROUP PROJECT Poole Day/Night, Figure/Ground

Day 0900am

Fig 74 - Figure/Ground Poole Highstreet Day Fig 75 - Figure/Ground Poole Highstreet Night

Fig. 74

Night 0200am

Figure/Ground diagram is an effective technique to express Poole’s urban morphology. This technique clearly identifies the difference between built and unbuilt space and aids urban designers/planners and architects to analyse a particular area. When comparing maps of Poole over large time period, figure/ground diagram helps analyse change and continuity within Poole town centre whilst outlining the process of its formation and transformation. Public activity and movement are key characteristics that has changed the way Poole high street functions. Using figure/ground diagram creates a clear pattern of activity on the high street both in the day and at night. The contrast between day and night activity effects what becomes public and private space at certain hours of the day. When day time public services stop trading and give way to the night time trade the topography of the area changes in relation to the activity that is taking place at that time. Figure/ground diagram is an efficient technique to analyse this process in relation to time. The two adjoining Maps highlight this change of available public space from day to night in this section of Poole high street. This contrast of closed space can be linked to the commercial consumerist nature of a high street. These maps also emphasise the use of commercial space split up into multiple sections with all commercial outlets located toward the front half of the Figure blocks. This reflects the culture of the contemporary capitalist society, however the increase in the Figure density of the high street can be correlated to the improvement of a towns economical activity along with a higher number of people visiting a town.

The change in urban morphology between day and night is less dramatic to the transformation in urban morphology of Poole high street when analysed over a longer period of time. Analysing Poole high street over a large period of time shows a more pedestrianised style of high street with services such as roads and storage positioned at the rear of a building. This enhances the accessibility to both large goods vehicles delivering goods but also for the pedestrians themselves walking through a sealed off high street. Development in technology of the car increased the level of congestion on the high street forcing this change. As Poole high street became a more pedestrian friendly area, the public area is pushed to the front of the shops and cafĂŠs so they would become more inviting whilst improving accessibility for public activity to occur.

Fig. 75

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FIGURE/GROUND GROUP PROJECT Urban Density Poole High Street Fig 76 - 1905 Density Figure Ground Perspective Fig 77 - 1928 Density Figure Ground Perspective Fig 78 - 2015 Density Figure Ground Perspective

Using Figure ground theory to critically analyse Poole aided in the understanding of how the town has increased in Density. The mass of the high street in Poole has now become a constant facade of commercial shopping units.

1905

Infill Definition: The planned conversion of empty lots, underused or run down buildings, and other available space in densely built up urban and suburban areas for use as sites for commercial buildings and housing, frequently as an alternative to over development of rural areas. The increase of density over time could imply urbanism infill, where the voids of an area are built up to house more people or businesses. The increase in urbanisation increases the poche’ (in this case private property) of a Figure/Ground map. This would show how much private housing has been added to the high street of Poole. In 1634 there was a lot of private housing, which was much more spread out, not unlike a rural area. Around the industrial revolution the building density increased quite dramatically, the high street had clearly undergone urban infill, possibly filling out the gaps in gardens or courtyards. Over time certain areas appear to have been developed and some buildings appear to have been removed for parking, once the car had dictated society. The high street has become as dense as physically possible on the front to allow for the highest amount of commercial units, the back streets have not been completely blocked with private buildings due to car parking requirements by residents and employees of the shops, cafÊs and homes. Although very dense, the buildings allow for a rather large public access through the high street with benches and simple landscaping.

Fig. 76

1928

Fig. 77

2014

Fig. 78

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FIGURE/GROUND GROUP PROJECT Conclusion Bibliography Builbblog.(2007) examples of Urban infill. [online] available at: http://blog.buildllc.com/2012/11/examplesof-urban-infill/ [09 October 2015] Diaz, L. (2014) What is figure/ground theory in Architecture?. [Online] Available from: https://www. quora.com/What-is-figure-ground-theory-in-architecture [accessed 5 October 2015] Fawcett, L. (2006). Fields of DeFormation: Tracing Critical Boundaries in Architectural Practice. [pdf]. http:// www.banrepcultural.org/sites/default/files/fawcett_lina_ tesis.pdf [Accessed 7 October 2015] Marshall, S. (2015). Urban Morphology. Volume 19-2. pp. 117-134. Tice, J. (2005) The Nolli Map and Urban Theory. [Online] Available from: http://nolli.uoregon.edu/ urbanTheory.html [accessed 12 October 2015]

The art of marking the habited region dates back 8000 years ago. Even today people are using maps to define and navigate around an area. “Without extraordinary assistance, how do you think that a private person could have emerged from this labyrinth?” (Sadler, 1999, p.82) In the 18th century an Italian architect named Giambattista Nolli developed an idea to use maps not only to show the urban fabric but to explain the social interaction space through a two-dimensional media. The map holds traces of urban morphology, landscape elements incorporated into in a binary system of figure and ground. Showing the public and private space within a single image, The morphological aspect in the urban environment follows a certain pattern that can be identified by studying the map, but it is not normally clearly expressed. The city fabric is potential to accommodate discordant plots within one building complex taking different geometries. (Marshall, 2015, p.117) As stated in The Situationist City a “building is only a skin, what happens inside makes the city alive” (Sadler, 1999, p.82) and that is what Nolli map aims to reflect: The life within the figure and ground. The project encompasses the application of the Nolli map to Poole’s Old Town. The focus is laid on the High Street area that runs from the railway station towards Poole Quay. We looked at the figure/ground relationship across a certain plot of social fabric and analysed what has and is affecting it and how the region around the High Street acts throughout the day and night.

After some observation and research, it was found that the centre point of Poole’s Old town is the High street, which directly connects the railway station and Poole bay hence it gathers most of the pedestrians on this road, leaving other roads deserted. The public spaces such as shops and cafés and even a church are located along this main road attracting people from all walks of life to wander and socialise in and around Poole High Street. The paralleled roads can be accessed mostly through the narrow passages which are subtly submerged between large façades of colour ridden shops. These darker alleys lead to smaller back roads, these back roads serve as parking and back entrances to the shops and cafés within day and night, despite its high potential with large quantities of daylight and a considerable width for a back road, not a single person was detected using the these roads for more than a few minutes, nevertheless the main road was bustling with barely enough room to walk. Referring back to the Nolli map of Poole, all of the ground floor spaces facing the High Street were available for public usage throughout the day. According to Fawcett (2006, p.6) the façade plays a crucial role in portraying the city fabric as it “articulates urban affects and provides a positive understanding of the street grid as a persistent and flexible planning instrument along time.” The layers above the ground floor level accommodate mainly private areas. Due to the absence of advertisements and banners the storey above the ground floor remains unnoticed and seemingly unimportant in the perception of the town. During the night time people are inclined to group around a limited amount of space. These publicly open places do not appear within the area the project was focused on, making the High Street only a walk-through way and the paralleling streets entirely unused.

Looking at the Nolli maps from different eras, one can follow the patterns of the changes in the urban fabric and how the town was used. Therefore, the logic in the movement can be articulated, which is crucial for the city planning for example. In the 17th century Poole was a fishing town with a relatively low urban density, however during the industrial revolution the town grew rapidly as the trade started to flourish with the port of Poole gradually becoming more important. As can be seen from the old photos, the buildings partly accommodated public activities, but were mostly for private users. Due to the growth in the number of inhabitants of Poole, larger activity around the centre was encouraged hence more buildings were required to host the people and their needs so that the street view has faced major change within the last Century. The production of variously composed Figure/ Ground drawings clearly indicate how the one or two-storey buildings gradually rise to host more plots within the limited built space. This has led the streets to become busy throughout the day. The easily accessible spaces are used for mostly retail and commercial affairs, so that businesses can have maximum traffic to support the trade in Poole. The buildings reach around 7 meters, which is assumed to be set by the building regulations in order not to completely block the sunlight penetration to the street. To conclude, via research it could be stated that the old Town of Poole is highly focused on retail which is poorly located across a large area in order to gain maximum public interest. This results in an over commercialised high street with large quantities of shoppers in the day contrasted to little night time activity therefor destroying the night time atmosphere of this particular high street. This is why Nolli maps or figure/ground drawings can be a highly valuable tool to aid in the understanding of these complex urban issues which may not be read from other forms of graphic communication.

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL

Chapter 2 Dialogues of Use and Form ARC551

POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL 551 Introduction / Urban Analysis Fig 79 - 1:1250 Location Plan

This chapter will outline the design methodology of Poole Music School and its integration into the urban environment of Poole. The Music School project will seek to enhance the urban qualities of Poole finding architectural solutions for overcoming various urban polemics. The strategies and systems being researched will be documented in order to understand how architectural interventions can enhance public space. Informants of various design decisions will be recorded and visually communicated throughout, linking to the LO4 work of the application of a grid. The project will include a site analysis of the area and the locations current effect on the surrounding space. A sequence of design development stages will be presented to communicate how various design applications could create poetic solutions when improving urban areas whilst incorporating architectural qualities within the Poole Music School and surrounding areas.

Residential

Residential Bus Stop

Fig. 79

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Brief/Programme Diagram Fig 80 - Programme Diagram

4. Plant/ Storage

2. Seminar Rooms

2. Small Practice Rooms

2. Large Practice Rooms

3. Cafe/Bar

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2 - Educational

3 - Public 3. Functional Changing Room W/C’s Waiting Room

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1. Recital Hall

Fig. 80

1. Auditorium

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Site Analysis - Sun Path Fig 81 - Sun Path Diagram

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Site View Panorama Fig 82 - Site Panorama, Facing South

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Version 2.0 Mass Model Fig 83 - 90 - 1:500 Site Model

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Version 3.0

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Version 4.0 Fig 99 - Music School Visualisation

Fig 100 - Interim Review A1

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Structural Isometric Fig 101 - Exploded Isometric Showing Structure

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Version 5.0 Plans/Sections Fig 102 - Version 5 Basement Plan Fig 103 - Version 5 Ground Plan Fig 104 - Version 5 1st Plan Fig 105 - Version 5 2nd Plan Fig 106 - Front Section Fig 107 - Mid Section Fig 108 - Far Section

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Version 5.0 Visualisations Fig 109 - Front Visualisation Fig 110 - Rear Visualisation

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL 1:500 Landscape Model Fig 112 - 119 - 1:500 Landscape Model

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Landscape Plan Fig 120 - Music School Landscape Plan

Fig. 120

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Visualisations Fig 121 - Student/Staff Entrance Visualisation Fig 122 - Solar Array from Above Fig 123 - Working Visualisation

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Visualisations Fig 124 - Landscape and External tectonics Visualisation

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL 1:200 Ground Floor Plan Fig 126 - 1:200 Ground Floor Plan

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL 1:200 2nd Floor Plan Fig 128 - 1:200 2nd Floor Plan

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2 2 2 1.Bar 2.Practice Rooms (Large) 3.Terrace 4.Toilets 5.Lift 6.Bar Services Fig. 128

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL 1:500 Section C/D Fig 129 - Section C/D

Fig. 129

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL East Elevation Fig 130 - Rendered East Elevation

Fig. 130

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Fig 234- 1:200 Final East Elevation


POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL East Section A/B Fig 131 - Rendered East Section A/B

1.Bar 2.Practice Rooms (Large) 3 .To i l e t s 4.Service Shaft 5.Classroom 6.Recital Hall 7. Auditorium 8.Plant Room 9.Battery Storage 10.Student/Staff Entrance 11.Reception

3

1

2

4

5

6

3

11

10

7

8

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Fig. 131

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Front, Cafe Entrance, East Curtain Wall Fig 132 - Front Visualisation

Fig. 132

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Student Staff Entrance Fig 133 - Rear Visualisation

Fig. 133

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Bar Fig 134 - 2nd Floor Bar Visualisation

Fig. 134

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL 1st Floor Balcony Space Fig 135 - Interior Visualisation, Balcony/Triple H Space

Fig. 135

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL

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Fig. 136


POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Final Model Fig 136 - Poole Music School

Fig 137 - 142 - 1:200 Final Model

Fig. 137

Fig. 138

Fig. 139

Fig. 140

Fig. 141

Fig. 142

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL Technical Drawings Fig 143 - Technical Section of Piano Practice Room

Fig 144 - Practice room Plan, Technical Fig 145 - Practice room Door system Detail Fig 146 - Practice Front Entrance Door Detail Fig 147 - Practice Room Window Seat Detail Fig 148 - Construction Section with Auditorium Acoustics

Bespoke oak acoustic panels

2 x Acoustic gypsum board (gypsum skim + painted white)

Mason acoustic hanger 150mm Stud wall / insulation (box in box construction)

44mm Halspan double acoustic door acoustic threshold rubberised acoustic door seal See 1:5 detail (LO1/1 6.3) Mason acoustic floor mount (floating concrete slab)

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14mm Silkfloor solid oak (Triple lacquered)

Fig. 143


P O O L E MMusic USIC SCH OOL Poole School ARC 551 Dialogues of Use and Form

2

Structure and Environmental Design 1

4

Marlow Parker 1. 2 x 2.5mm Impermeable membrane 100mm solid thermal insulation 400mm in situ reinforced concrete slab

5

2. Anodised aluminium up stand cap 2 x 2.5mm impermeable membrane 50mm solid thermal insulation 3. DK Wall tie system with pre-cast element fitted 190mm in situ reinforced concrete 50mm solid thermal cavity insulation 190mm in situ reinforced concrete

3

4. Stainless steel rainwater outlet

1:20 Roof construction with drainage

5. DK extended wall tie bolt

4 1

3

Fig. 144

1:20 Piano practice room plan

2

1

4

2

3

1. 25mm white concrete flagstone tiles 10mm mortar 85mm cement screed 80mm solid thermal insulation 2mm separating layer 400mm in situ reinforced concrete intermediate floor

1

2

2. 14mm Silkfloor solid oak flooring (triple lacquered) 150mm floating reinforced concrete 10mm acoustic layer embedded within slab 25mm insulation embedded in slab 140mm rubber floor support (Mason jack up assembly and housing)

1. Bespoke made oak window seat, 600mm deep 2. Exterior window 250mm Exterior concrete sill 10mm Foam acoustic divide 250mm Interior Oak sill Interior window

3. NOR615 acoustic threshold NOR810 rubberised acoustic door seal

5

4. 44mm Halspan Prima Optima acoustic door

Fig. 145

1:5 Piano practice room double acoustic door detail

3. 190mm reinforced concrete 50mm solid thermal insulation 190mm reinforced concrete 100mm air cavity 100mm stud 100mm solid thermal insulation

5. 50mm foam acoustic separating element

1. 2 x acoustic grade gypsum board (blue) 20mm acoustic break (foam) 25mm Acoustic absorbing insulation Mason Acoustic ceiling hanger

4. Precast concrete element DK Wall tie system Acoustic hanger

1:10 Piano room window seat detail

4

Fig. 147

2. Bespoke Oak acoustic panels Aluminium T mounting bracket Acoustic lining layer 300mm In situ reinforced concrete

1

3

2

1:20 Exterior wall construction 1. 25mm white concrete flagstone paving bedded in 10mm mortar 100mm compacted hardcore (sub base) ground 2. 25mm White concrete flagstone paving bedded on 10mm mortar 85mm cement screed 2 x 75mm solid thermal insulation 1mm separating layer 400mm in situ reinforced concrete

5

2

1:20 Auditorium wall construction

1. 25mm white concrete flagstone paving bedded in 10mm mortar 85mm cement screed 2mm separating layer 2 x 75mm solid thermal insulation 600mm - 400mm reinforced concrete foundation slab 5mm Impermeable (tanking) membrane 100mm compacted hardcore ground

1

3

2. 190mm in situ reinforced concrete 50mm solid thermal cavity insulation 190mm in situ reinforced concrete 5mm Impermeable (tanking) membrane 200mm solid thermal insulation (basement) Concrete keystone to aid water movement

3. Sky-Frame type 3 glazing, flush sliding door threshold 4. 54mm acoustic laminated glass 5 5mm impermeable membrane 190mm in situ reinforced concrete 50mm solid thermal insulation

1:5 Front entrance door detail

Fig. 146

1:20 Basement foundation construction

3. 150mm diameter peculating water drainage 2mm membrane attachment unit for specified overlap

Fig. 148

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POOLE MUSIC SCHOOL

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SUGAR CUBE CITY

Chapter 3 Dialogues of Future Scenarios ARC552

SUGAR CUBE CITY & THE SURREAL SKYLINE

MARLOW PARKER

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SUGAR CUBE CITY

AND THE SURREAL SKYLINE

Introduction Fig 149 - Salvador Dali Montage

This collection of drawings and artwork will outline a predicted urban morphology for the town of Poole, Dorset. The project will depict a future scenario ranging from the year 2016 to 2116. Initial research surrounded the archive of Surrealist art and the Modernism movement of Architecture. The drawings that follow are an interpretation of how Poole could manifest a new method of living through the design of its major architectural typologies. E.g. Transport infrastructure, Cultural and Educational buildings, Residential Dwellings and Commercial districts. The project has a shifting point from where a contemporary interpretation of a dynamic crystalline living structure (inspired through the works of Superstudios: Continuous monument) adding the ability for the architecture to move freely around the world; a border less planet with modular inhabitation. The second portion of the project looks at architectural innovations for the skyline of Poole predicting how the urban landscape could be designed in order to create a town bustling with Life, Trade, Music, Culture and Art throughout the next century

Fig. 149

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SUGAR CUBE CITY Border less Europe Fig 150 - European Map Showing Bordered Countries - http:// www.worldatlasbook.com/images/maps/europe-map-blackwhite-printable.jpg Fig 151 - European Map Showing No Borders and Migrating Cities Across Land Mass

Fig. 150

Fig. 151

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SUGAR CUBE CITY Poole Concept Drawings Fig 152 - Poole Quayside Sketch, Year 2056 Fig 153 - Drawing of Syd Mead landscape Fig 154 - Poole transport infrastructure

Fig. 152

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Fig. 153

Fig. 154

ARC 552 Dialogues with Future Scenarios


SUGAR CUBE CITY Poole 2016 Fig 155 - Map of Poole 2016 with transport links Fig 156 - Future tower typology

Fig. 155

Fig. 156

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SUGAR CUBE CITY Initial Drawings Fig 157 - Hyperloop transport system Fig 158 - Mechanical Joint Fig 159 - Thumbnails (Urban Landscapes) Fig 160 - Futuristic Vehicle (Anti-Gravity)

Fig. 160

Fig. 157

Fig. 158

Fig. 159

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SUGAR CUBE CITY Initial Drawings Fig 161 - Form Sketches Fig 162 - Thumbnails (Urban Landscapes) Fig 163 - Hyperloop Sketch

Fig. 162

Fig. 161

Fig. 163

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SUGAR CUBE CITY Sugar Cube Creation and Recycling Fig 164 - Floating Cube Structure Fig 165 - Sugar Cube Manufacturing Fig 166 - Futuristic Vehicle (Cube Recycling)

Fig. 164

Fig. 165

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Fig. 166


SUGAR CUBE CITY Transportation Fig 167 - Sugar Cube with aero transport Fig 168 - Sugar Cube Walker

Fig. 167

Fig. 168

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SUGAR CUBE CITY Sugar Cube Modular Living System Fig 169 - Poole High Street c.2016 Fig 170 - Sugar Cube Plan Fig 171 - Sugar Cube Living Isometric Fig 172 - Poole High Street c.2116 Fig 173 - Sugar Cube Formation Fig 174 - Sugar Cube Landing Pad

Fig. 169 Fig. 173

Fig. 170

Fig. 171

Fig. 174

Fig. 172

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SUGAR CUBE CITY Sugar Cube Modular Living System Fig 175 - Sugar Cube Typology Fig 176 - East Elevation Fig 177 - Section Fig 178 - South Elevation Fig 179 - SE 2P Perspective Fig 180 - SE 3P Perspective

Fig. 175

Fig. 176

Fig. 177

Fig. 178

Fig. 179

Fig. 180

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SUGAR CUBE CITY Fly Me To The Moon Fig 181 - Sketch of rocket powered Cubes Fig 182 - 184 - Dynamic Structures

Fig. 181

Fig. 182

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Fig. 183

Fig. 184


SUGAR CUBE CITY Floating Structures Fig 185 - Dynamic Sugar Cube Complex Fig 186 - 188 - Sugar Cube transportable architecture Fig 189 - Sugar Cube Chair

Fig. 186

Fig. 187

Fig. 189

Fig. 185

Fig. 188

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SUGAR CUBE CITY Sugar Cube Module Range Fig 189 - Sugar Cube House Fig 190 - Sugar Cube Complex with Balcony Fig 191 - Large floating formation Fig 192 - Sugar Cube City above land mass Fig 193 - Sugar Cube Module Range

Fig. 189

Fig. 190

Fig. 191

Fig. 192

Fig. 193

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SUGAR CUBE CITY Sugar Cube Module Fig 194 - Sugar Cube Platform Fig 195 - Sugar Cube Natural detailing Fig 196 - Inside Sugar Cube Space Fig 197 - Anti Gravity Technology

Fig. 194

Fig. 195

Fig. 196

Fig. 197

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SUGAR CUBE CITY THE INFECTION Poole Fig 198 - The Infection Poole - Drawing to symbolise Human impact on earth

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Fig. 198


THE SURREAL SKYLINE POOLE 2116 Fig 199 - Surreal Skyline Map (Architectural Manifestations)

Fig. 199

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE IDENTITY Fig 200 - Identity

Fig. 200

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE THE GREAT CLAW Fig 201 - The Great Claw (Transportation)

Fig. 201

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Surreal Spaces Fig 202 - Surreal Space Thumbnails

Fig. 202

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE

SUGAR FLIGHT

Wandering Park Fig 203 - Sugar Flight Fig 204 - Wandering Park Fig 205 - Surreal Typology

Fig. 203

Fig. 205

Fig. 204

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Tower Typology Fig 206 - Blade Tower Fig 207 - Organic Tower Fig 208 - Refined Tower Fig 209 - Grid Tower Fig 210 - 212 - Sketches Fig 213 - 216 - Value Sketching

Fig. 206

Fig. 210

Fig. 213

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Fig. 214

Fig. 207

Fig. 208

Fig. 209

Fig. 211

Fig. 212

Fig. 215

Fig. 216


THE SURREAL SKYLINE Sketches Fig 217 - Pirch of Philosophy Fig 218 - Surreal Flight Fig 219 - Domestic Typology

Fig. 218

Fig. 217

Fig. 219

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Surreal Typologies Fig 220 - Surreal Tower Fig 221 - Sugar Cube city formation Fig 222 - 227 - Various Surreal Typologies

Fig. 221 Fig. 223

Fig. 226

Fig. 224

Fig. 222 Fig. 220

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Fig. 225

Fig. 227


THE SURREAL SKYLINE Surreal Typologies Fig 228 - Range of Surreal Buildings (Surreal Skyline)

Fig. 228

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Surreal Trees and the B+W Bridge Fig 229 - The Bridge of Black and White Fig 230 - Sugar Cube Tree Fig 231 - Eye Tree Fig 232 - Art Nouveau Tree Fig 233 - Sugar Cube Tree

Fig. 229

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Fig. 230

ARC 552 Dialogue with Future Scenarios

Fig. 231

Fig. 232

Fig. 233


THE SURREAL SKYLINE Drawings Fig 234 - FMTTM City (Inter Planetary City) Fig 235 - Surreal Hanging House Fig 236 - Tree House and Background

TREE HOUSE

Fig. 235

Fig. 234

Fig. 236

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE The Migrating City Fig 237 - The Migrating Surreal Skyline

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE

Fig. 237

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE The Uncanny Fig 238 - Organic Grotto with Slit Membrane

Fig. 238

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE

Fig. 238

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Sugar Cube City Variants Fig 239 - Sugar Cube Formation Fig 240 - Grounded Sugar Cube Fig 241 - Moving Sugar Cube Module

Fig. 239

Fig. 239

Fig. 241

Fig. 240

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Fig. 240


THE SURREAL SKYLINE IF YOU SAY SO Fig 242 - Chequerboard Causeway Fig 243 - The Great Mi-grater Fig 244 - Sugar Cube Ostrich Transport

Fig. 242

Fig. 244

Fig. 243

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Tower Collage and Organic Tunnel Fig 245 - Surreal Mandala Fig 246 - Organic Tunnel Fig 247 - Chequered Tower Montage

Fig. 245

Fig. 247

Fig. 246

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Autonomous Drawings Fig 248 - Autonomous Sketch (Shaded) Fig 249 - Autonomous Shading Fig 250 - Autonomous Line drawing

Fig. 249

Fig. 248

Fig. 250

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Poole Peninsula Fig 251 - Poole Peninsula 2116

Fig. 251

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Typologies Fig 252 - Five Typologies Fig 253 - Curly Street lamps Fig 254 - Building

Fig. 252

Fig. 253

Fig. 254

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Large Building Typology Fig 255 - Large Building Typology

Fig. 255

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Surreal Super Doodle Fig 256 - Surreal Super Doodle 1

Fig. 256

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Surreal House and Arcade Fig 257 - Large Building Typology Fig 258 - Column/Arcade

Fig. 257

Fig. 258

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Surreal Super Doodle Fig 259 - Surreal Super Doodle 2

Fig. 256

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Poole 2116 Fig 260 - Poole Church 2116 Fig 261 - Skyline Shot Fig 262 - Poole High Street Fig 263 - Space within Poole Fig 264 - Poole Quay 2116 Fig 265 - Poole High Street (Whiskey Vault

Fig. 260

Fig. 261

Fig. 262

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Fig. 263

Fig. 264

Fig. 265


THE SURREAL SKYLINE Surreal Super Doodle Fig 266 - Surreal Super Doodle 3

Fig. 266

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE The Surreal Skyline Fig 267 - The Surreal Skyline with Wandering Parks

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Wandering Parks

Fig. 267

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Spaces in Poole 2116 Fig 268 - Poole Chequered Overhead Fig 269 - Poole Quay Transformation 2116

Fig. 268

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Fig. 269


THE SURREAL SKYLINE Spaces in Poole 2116 Fig 270 - Poole, Wandering Park Fig 271 - Social Housing Snake

Fig. 270

Fig. 271

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Spaces in Poole 2116 Fig 272 - Poole High Street Surreal Tree housing Fig 273 - Uncanny Alley

Fig. 272

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Fig. 273


THE SURREAL SKYLINE Rock or Not Fig 274 - Oil Painting Rock or Not

Fig. 274

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Landscape 2116 Fig 275 - Space in Poole with large lateral architecture

Fig. 275

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Landscape 2116 Fig 276 - Space in Poole, Woodland Housing

Fig. 276

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE The Fallen City Fig 277 - The Fallen City (Digital)

Fig. 277

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE TREETOPIA Fig 278 - Treetopia (Digital)

Fig. 278

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Tower of Triumph Fig 279 - Tower of Triumph (Digital)

Fig. 279

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE A Top the Wanderer Fig 280 - A Top the Wanderer (Digital)

Fig. 280

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Vague Valley Fig 281 - Vague Valley (Digital)

Fig. 281

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Mechville Fig 282 - Mechville (Digital)

Fig. 282

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE Lost In The Woods Fig 283 - Lost In The Woods (Digital)

Fig. 283

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE The Curious Cabin Fig 284 - The Curious Cabin (Digital)

Fig. 284

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE

Chapter 4 Dialogues of Future Scenarios ARC552

CONCLUSION

MARLOW PARKER

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THE SURREAL SKYLINE CONCLUSION

Throughout the development of this project multiple variations of surrealist informed drawings were produced. By initiating without a defined goal or design direction allowed the freedom of drawing to generate new and unexplored forms and ideas of architecture throughout the duration of the term. Researching surrealist art allowed a deeper understanding of the art movement whilst highlighting the positive notions that can be extracted through surrealist thinking. The drawings within the Surreal Skyline project appear monochromatic, this is due to the physical construction of the architectural elements however as written in the LO3/LO4 essay the integration of the human awareness into a digital mixed reality will allow each and every person to style, colour and perceive each of their worlds differently. Through this difference more understanding of hegemony and community can be achieved within the social discourse of the population of earth. Sugar cube city being a tangential project was inspired through the work of Superstudios specifically the Continuous Monument project. Combining this idea with cutting edge technology can allow a border less world to be imagined with the inclusion of an inhabitation system designed to minimise the impact of human activity on earth. The removal of borders between nations, states, towns, culture, philosophy and psychology have been the main focus throughout the project. It is believed that by removing borders of understanding or metaphysical borders which have been designed throughout history will allow the population of earth to take a step forward in becoming a unified earth. This is not the creation of a monoculture as diversity would be encouraged through the surrealist nature of the built environment.

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This project predicts a huge cultural and political shift across the next 100 years, tradition, heritage and long standing ideals may have to be compromised in order to create a world of fairness in life, to life and for the legacy in the after life. Although some would argue that tradition and heritage is important it has to be stressed that if we continue down the same path we have done for the past 200 years there would be no built world to protect. In fact there might not be a human population due to the current course of actions putting us confidently to extinction in the next 100 years if something drastic doesn’t change. Architecture is a powerful tool for shaping social and political conduct, the transformation into a surrealist art craved world will look to engage the human species into a epoch of Philosophy, Education and Wisdom ensuring the continuation for the people of earth in a civilised and egalitarian manner.


THE SURREAL SKYLINE

MARLOW PARKER

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Profile for marlowparker

Second Year - BA Architecture  

Second Year - BA Architecture  

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