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Personal Development Portfolio

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1.00 - Contents

1.10 - Introduction 2.00 - Royal Cornwall Hospital - Energy Centre Electrical Installation 3.00 - Domestic House Construction - Agar Road, Cornwall 4.00 - Lines of Thought - Poole Museum 5.00 - AUB Guest Lecture - Nilesh Patel - 3 Films 6.00 - Poole Futures: the Business Improvement District 7.00 - RIBA Great British Buildings - Sir Peter Cook Drawing Studio AUB 8.00 - Tony Fretton - Artsway Gallery Space 9.00 - Roche Court - New Arts Centre, Gallery Space - Stephen Marshall 10.00 - Roche Court - New Arts Centre, Sculpture Garden 11 . 0 0 - A U B G u e s t S p e a k e r - R e b e c c a N e w n h a m - S c u l p t o r 12.00 - Salisbury Cathedral Visit and Rebecca Newnham Sculpture 13.00 - AUB Guest Speaker - Chloe Young - Architect 14.00 - AUB Guest Speaker - Glenn Howells - Architect 15.00 - RIBA Great British Buildings - Bridport Recycling Centre 16.00 - Ben Rowe Antarctica Expedition 17.00 - Sir Peter Cooks 80th Birthday Celebrations, AUB 18.00 - Planning Application Drawings - Paul Kelly 19.00 - Calligraphy and Calligrams 20.00 - CODA DESIGN PROJECT - M Parker, J Glynn, A Idriss 21.00 - Conclusion 22.00 - List of Figures

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1.10 - Introduction

Intr od uc ti on This document presents a collection of activities undertaken externally from the works of BA (HONS) Architecture throughout the beginning of the third year studies. Each entry holds a descriptive element of the subject matter defining what the activity entailed. A reflective analysis has also been included providing a personal critique of subjective connotations interpr eted from each entry. The entries submitted include a variety of topics from Gallery and Exhibition visits to an array of guest speakers who presented at the Arts University Bournemouth. The entries within the document have been added in a chronological order for the purpose of developmental referencing when viewing this docum ent in the future.

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2.00 - Royal Cornwall Hospital - Energy Centre Electrical Installation 4

Fig 1 - Natural gas boiler

Fig 2 - Steel C section support foundation

D e s c r ipti on

Fig 4 - Electrical containment junction

R efl ec ti v e Anal y s i s

The installation for a new energy centre at the Royal Cornwall Hospital (Treliske) was tendered with the job won by electrical contractors SSE Enterprise. The job began in June and was timetabled for a ten week turnaround. The task in hand was to remove three oil boilers (Fig 1) from the existing energy centre, The boilers heat all the hot water and central heating for the entire hospital. The ageing boilers were to be repl aced with cutting edge dual fuel boilers and a combined heating and power system (CPH). Due to the nature of hot water systems in hospitals an array of electrical installations and remedial works were required throughout the project. The boilers were to be supplied from two new 11kva transformers from the electrical grid linked through a generator for the protection against loss of power. The power and control cabling systems for the three new boilers were to be routed in a pre determined route provided by the electrical designers. The galvanised steel containment seen on the opposite page holds a tiered system required for the separation of electrical services found in BS 7671 regulations. High Voltage cables (Over 1000v) were to be installed on the top rung, with 230v power running through the middle and finally control cabling (Data) was to be run at the lowest level. The route for the containment system ran acros s the roof of an existing hospital building through a COSHH Store (Containment of substances hazardous to health) where it finally breaks into the energy centre building. The route was alongside the existing steel, pipe and electrical systems already in place. Main supports were installed from the ground seen in (Fig 2) as the structural engineers had calculated that the building itself could not Personal Development Portfolio

Fig 3 - Boiler pump sets

Marlow Parker

have any extra weight added to the structure. Fig 2 shows the I beam foot plates bedded onto the existing concrete structure bolted down with M12 ny-lock nuts. These foot plates are to be covered by a cement screed ensuring longevity and mechanical stability. Large double Unistrut (100mm) is fitted perpendicular across the existing I beams utilising galvanised window brackets to hold the large steel beams in place. The electrical containment is constructed from galvanised steel Unistrut bolted with M10 and M12 mechanical arrangements. M12 threaded bar and large steel plate washers threaded into zebadees were used to create the hanging trapezes from which the cable tray, ladder rack and electrical trunking could be suspended at high level out of reach. Due to working at a high level an electrical scissor lift (MEWP) was required combined with relevant training to reach the high level areas of the installation. The junction seen in Fig 4 required some forethought to ensure all the systems moved in the relevant directions without crossing or being positioned to close which would go against the regulations. Hacksaws, grinders, ratchets and spanners were used to bolt all the different steel elements and containment together. Cables were run across all the various containment which moved to individual areas of the energy centre. Control and power cabling was positioned toward the r ear of the building supplying the pump sets seen in Fig 3 along with the main power cables for the dual fuel boilers. The High voltage system was combined with the CPH and Biomass systems to allow generated energy to be reinstated back into the grid.

The main contractor for the job was a multi billion pound energy acquisition company. The role of this company on a larger scale was to privatise the energy generation and supply to the hospital so that in the future the energy generated could be sold to the NHS trust; a publicly funded body who currently run Treliske hospital. The job ran with an unprofessional chaotic nature. Contractors from trades other than electrical were not given adequate training for the tasks being undertaken. Personal protective equipment did not seem mandatory as workman would be walking around and below the electricians working at high level with no hard hat or visibility vest. This created a tense and uncomfortable atmosphere between trades and between trades and office staff. As mentioned before the electrical designers were to provide the electricians with measured drawings and calculations of all the containment and cables to be installed. But due to the company being run as a lean profiteering company the two electrical designers were busy on other jobs around the country leaving just a set of tender drawings which clearly state that they should not be worked from. Due to the nature of modern construction it was not feasible to wait until the drawings were provided so the works carried on in a design in build fashion moving the responsibility of the designs onto the electricians. Unsafe practices were carried out within the removal of the dangerous material asbestos. All contractors on sites know that if there is asbestos being moved or disturbed then it is standard practice for all contractors to leave site. However a mention that the material was to be removed at some point in the future to then hear the sound of smashing asbestos with zero health and safety control

created a discouraging safety aspect to the project. It is the responsibility of the contractors to look out for their own safety and the safety of others which would entail leaving site when these health and safety breaches occur. Nevertheless there is an understanding that if you are not present on site for an authorised amount of time the contract can be terminated with twenty four hours notice. The way in which the company dominated and oppressed the contractors was concerning for the future of mode rn construction. How a multi billion pound company could allow such a weak standard of construction to be undertaken by untrained personnel when working on the largest hospital in Cornwall comes down to nothing more than cos t control. Every aspect within the project was controlled via cost first. Not safety, not requirements, not regulations and certainly not design. The experience of working throughout this job was a new challenge from previous works. The electrical contractors SSE were 100% efficient in providing training, PPE, equipment and materials however the main contractor overseeing the job could be said to be a complete farce only held together by the skill of the contractors working throughout the job. It is imperative that projects of this nature are made clear to the general public and how this form of privatisation effects and manipulates the health system, contractors and others to bend to the will of corporate companies. List of Figures Fig 1 - Natural gas boiler - Authors Own Fig 2 - Steel C section support foundation - Authors Own Fig 3 - Main boiler pump sets - Authors Own Fig 4 - Electrical containment junction - Authors Own Fig 5 - (Opposite) Electrical containment - Authors Own Fig 6 - (Opposite) Electrical containment - Authors Own Fig 7 - (Opposite) New and existing stack - Authors Own


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3.00 - Domestic House Construction - Agar Road, Cornwall 6

Fig 8 - Large window, stairwell, bannister detail

Fig 9 - Bedroom 2, window

D e s c r ip ti o n

Fig 11 - Lounge, windows

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

The continuation of construction of a four bedroom house in St Austell, Cornwall is the second phase followed on from an entry in the ARC 550 PDP. The buildings final phase of construction entailed finishing the interior skin of the timber frame structure. Walls were boarded then skimmed in a 3mm layer of gypsum plaster ready for the preparation for decorating. After all the walls were skimmed the square edge MDF skirti ng boards and architraves were fitted around the edges of the room. 150mm profiled coving was fitted to the ceiling edge where the ceiling meets the wall with a strong dry mix adhesive. Once all the internal joinery was completed each and every surface required preparation for decorating. This meant sanding all plastered walls to remove any drips and fill any slight holes ensuring the painted wall presents a clean smooth surface. The MDF skirting board and architrave were sanded and filled along with the door linings and doors. These were then primed with two coats of undercoat. After all the preparations were done it was time for the top coat for each surface. Magnolia emulsion was used for the walls and pure brilliant white emulsion for the ceilings and coving of the house. All door linings, skirting and architraves were painted in a satin top coat. Three coats along with the two coats of primer ensured a strong white finish to all the internal timber elements. The stairs in Fig 8 remained as a feature element and was stained using a standard varnish expressing the wood grain texture. Window sills were fitted using a construction adhesive; being finish in a veneer of white plastic they did not require decorating which meant they could be installed toward the end of the project. The exterior of the house Fig 10 also required painting white. Personal Development Portfolio

Fig 10 - Rear of house

Marlow Parker

Again the surface needed preparation to ensure a smooth clean finish all around. Various sandpaper grades were used to remove any loose sand that was present from the cement based exterior render. Once the render was smooth three coats of exterior house paint were applied liberally again ensuring a strong white is present evenly around the house with no patches of grey where the render shows through. Where the exterior render met the UVPVC windows and doors required careful control to remove the render in a clean line to then apply a water sealant around the window ensuring no water ingress into and around the timber frame structure. The kitchen was delivered in multiple pieces like a large flat pack piece of furniture. Once all the elements were accounted for and unwrapped the challenge then was to construct the carcass of the units to then fit the worktops onto. Black square tiles were adhered to the wall being grouted with a white grout. Once the grout had set all the electrical face plates could be fitted to the boxes and cables previously installed into the kitchen. 7watt LED Down lights were fitted in the kitchen hall and downstairs ceilings with the other lighting throughout being just a standard energy saving pendant in each room. All other electrical second fix was undertaken ensuring all plates were secured and level. Interior filler was used to seal the socket to the wall minimising draft and moistures from the internal structure of the house. Garden ground works were undertaken by separat e contractors. Turf was fitted to the higher portion of the garden with concrete ground slabs fitted to the lower patio. Brick paving was installed across the front of the house giving space for two small cars to park.

Working on domestic construction can be rewarding in many ways however cost restraints and regulations can hinder the creative aspects of building. The decorating process from a raw surface through to preparation for painting and final finish provides a positive methodology of achieving a high quality finish of any surface. For one wall it can seem extremely artistic seeking a quality finish and achieving it is something not most domestic projects have within them. However when each and every surface, edge, reveal and ledge require sanding and painting multiple times could be seen as a monotonous task. Two weeks preparing and painting door frames seemed like an eternity but still, once finished there is a huge sense of satisfaction creating crisp and clean lines. When the project started and the specification of MDF skirting and architrave was given it could be said that a sense of cheapness with an ugly aesthetic was initially implied. Although after finishing and painting all these elements a finish no different to covering solid wood in paint was achieved. This goes for the entire project really all aspects were heavily controlled by cost. This allowed a new approach to creating what you can with what you have. A belief that there will always be a limit to the aesthetic you can achieve through the quality of the raw material could be held true. A few aspects of the build were predominantly installed for pure functional use, the garden timber railing and the galvanised steel handrail that were installed by the exterior landscapers holds little design or aesthetic qualities but still provide the necessary safety elements for movement around the garden space.

To talk about the project as a whole it can be said that the skills learnt and the experience gained is imperatively important to the study of architecture. Seeing a real project of this small scale with minimal designed elements go through from drawing to finished building teaches multiple skills in not only construction techniques but also project management and control over how the construction was carried out. External contractor timings were important to ensure va rious stages within the construction were completed on time ready for the next phases to begin. Materials were sourced locally and picked up in a required manner this ensured th e scrap or waste levels throughout the build were kept to a minimum. The opinion about a cost controlled project which was written about negatively within the earlier entry has definitely change in the sense that this is a built house which any family would be extremely grateful for. Possibly from being surrounded by beautiful projects within the study of architecture the inherent need for standardised vernacular housing like the one constructed can be seen in a more negative way. Nevertheless the construction of this project as mentioned before refined existing building skills and provided multiple opportunities to learn and better understand construction and architecture within the domestic realm. List of Figures Fig 8 - Large window, stairwell, bannister detail - Authors Own Fig 9 - Bedroom 2, window - Authors Own Fig 10 - Rear of house - Authors Own Fig 11 - Lounge, windows - Authors Own Fig 12 - (Opposite) Kitchen Fig 13 - (Opposite) Garden, patio - Authors Own Fig 14 - (Opposite) House front and parking - Authors Own


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4.00 - Lines of Thought - Poole Museum 8

Fig 15 - Sketch Elephant - Rembrant

Fig 16 - Foot, anatomical drawing - Leonardo Da Vinci

D e s c r ip ti o n

Reflective Analysis

The exhibition Lines of Thought was available to visit through mid 2016, located at Poole museum. The museum presented an array of drawings from the time of Greek antiquity up to the present day. The collection displayed was collated from and by the British museum. The British Museum archive holds an array of priceless pieces created by renowned artists such as Michelangelo, Picasso, Rembrandt, and Da Vinci. The drawings displayed covered a vast variety of drawing techniques. Pencil, Ink, and paint were all shown as examples of drawing. An image book of all the drawings was also available. The book combines various speakers critiques and observations through contextual text. The exhibition was presented across two floors of the museum, with framed drawings hung equidistant from one another covering the availab le wall space; about 1.6m high. Individual halogen lights installed into a tracked lighting system illuminated the drawings upon the wall. The exhibition space was kept clear with only a few seating positions within the room. The ceiling was low and painted white matching with the bright colour of the walls.

Visiting the exhibition alongside a colleague during the summer, initiated the first creative buzz from returning to university. Travelling to Poole by car in the early hours of the morning allowed plenty of time viewing the exhibition. The first challenge was finding the drawing collection within the museum. After covering all four floors of the building and on the way down the exhibition was spotted tucked at the back with a small British Museum sign. This did cause a small inconvenience but the exhibition had finally been found. A plethora of people occupied the space in a slow moving, orderly fashion. The freedom to moved around the room allowed plenty of time and space for the drawings to be viewed. However being modestly tall it was difficult to get a close look at the drawings, as a shadow would be cast upon the drawing from the low halogen lamps. This didn’t hinder the experience too much as it was exciting to finally witness a drawing by Da Vinci. Other notable drawings by Michael Angelo and Picasso were spectacular and rewarding to see. The drawing of an elephant shown in (Fig 15) is an elegant representation of the largest mammal. The small passage of text decoding the drawings technique truly resonated with the drawing practices undertaken recently. The vast diversity of drawing style and techniques gave a freeing feeling from what drawing is, or can be used for. From seeing all the drawings around it couldn’t be helped to sit in one of the seats and get the sketchbook out. The drawing to the right (Fig 19) is the result as an appropriation of a drawing by Victor Hugo. The Landscape with a Castle was originally created with pen, brush, brown wash with stencilling and areas of white gouache however a pen sket ch was done at the time due to time and material restraints.

Personal Development Portfolio

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Fig 17 - Drawing at Poole museum exhibition

Fig 18 - Drawing at Poole museum exhibition

List of Figures Other drawing examples of the human figure were also eye opening in the realities of still life highlighting its importance to the various arts, including architecture. Overall the drawing exhibition in Poole museum was an inspiring serendipitous experience. Lots of creative feelings were generated boosting the motivation for tackling the next unit of Architecture at AUB.

Fig 15 - 18 - Riley, B., Chapman, H. and Seligman, I. (2016) Lines of thought: Drawing from Michelangelo to now. United Kingdom: Thames & Hudson. Fig 19 - (Opposite) Authors Own


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5.00 - AUB Guest Lecture - Nilesh Patel - 3 Films 10

Fig 20 - A Love Supreme

Fig 21 - Great and Small

D e s c r ipti on

Fig 23 - Bishop Edward King Chapel

R efl ec ti v e Anal y s i s

The Art University Bournemouth welcomed guest speaker Nilesh Patel, to present his lecture about three films he created during and after his study of architecture. The first film shown was described by Nilesh as pure craft with minimal design. He explained that he knew precisely what he was going to film and was going to pay more attention to the craft of film making. The black and white film portrayed Nilesh’s mother making and cooking traditional Indian samosas (Fig 20). Nilesh utilised advanced recoding equipment with what he describes being worth more than his apartment. DBS Digital sound was also included in production to enhance the cinema aspect. The film incorporated multiple angles and shots of the various steps when creating the samosas. The film included a variety of volume changes and enhanced sound effects along with titles and credits in order to convey this media as a cinematic piece. The second video Nilesh showed titled ‘Great and Small’, was a film in colour about the adversity of landscapes, Nilesh was seeking to give awareness by embracing the natural settings of the earth. The film followed a farmer journeying from scene to scene through empty fields appearing in a melancholic state; forlorn. The film also included vivid imagery of wild flowers combined with various juxtaposed sound effects. Red poppies were shown in a close up with a roaring fire sound fading its way from a faint to loud. Imagery of the foot and mouth crisis which hit the rural areas of England was also interjected in small fast clips. The film ‘Great and Small’ was recoded on a standard hand-held video recorder and utilised the cameras microphone for the collection of sound. Personal Development Portfolio

Fig 22 - Great and Small

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The third film depicted tranquil and relaxing scenes of the Bishop Edward King Chapel by Niall McLaughlin Architects. The video explores the architectural elements of Material, Texture and Light within the Chapel whilst also including images of the surrounding landscape. The film transitioned between shots of woodland and forestry to the internal timber structure of the chapel (Fig 24). Imagery of the quarry and stone cutting process was included again transitioning to the material of stone present in the building. The film promoted the religious architecture through various symmetrical cinematic angles. Smooth and calm music accompanied the video instilling a stronger emotional value throughout the third film.

The three films shown by Nilesh had individual connotations and feelings all subject to the films watched. The first film appeared as a professional production. With the inclusion of opening and closing credits and the use of DBS Dolby Digital Sound a true cinema experience was created, especially with the viewing being on the large screen in AUB’s lecture hall. The Step by Step format depicted through the film aided in the understanding and communication of not only how the samosas are made but what feelings and memories Nilesh had conveyed through the use of altering angles and dynamic sound. The monochromatic format combined with good film making techniques allowed various elements of the film to be drawn out and dramatised adding more weight and sensibility to the video. The link between the Film, Sound and Memories of Nilesh can be related to as distant memories of childhood surrounding the bond between Mother and child are drawn from the past and re appreciated. The second film again had strong relations to personal memories of the Foot and Mouth crisis present in Cornwall in 2001 and 2007. The landscape shown with the farmer instigates feelings of disaster and loss of hope, as the farmers at the time truly felt the impact and loss of their livestock. The film doesn’t lose anything from the lower quality equipment used in the film making process. The film still portrays well angled viewpoints with the use of sound being extremely effective. The scene of the poppies with the loudening sound of the roaring fire insighted mixed feelings, not only of the Foot and Mouth crisis but the poppies help relate to the remembrance of the soldiers who gave their lives in past wars of this world.

The third film showing the Bishop Edward King Chapel held the most differences of the three. It held differing aspects throughout the film making process. The film beautifully portrayed the internal atmospheres of the Chapel emphasising the contextual links of the timber and stone materials combined with the ethereal textures they produce through varying lighting conditions. An Aspect was shown communicating the movement of natural daylight throughout the building. This time lapse highlights how the natural light penetrates into the religious building through its high level fenestration. The other imagery of th e stone cutting process including the shot of the large cutting wheel added weight and emphasis to the complexities and skill when honing the large boulders into smaller stone elements. Overall the three films were truly inspirational and evoked various feelings and memories, especially those of the foot and mouth crisis. The film making production by Nilesh is of extraordinary quality. This quality helps the appreciation of the differing film aspects. From watching the films it is evident that footage has a strong application in not only architectural communication and interpretation but also that of other arts and skills. List of Figures Fig 20 - A Love Supreme 2001 - http://architectsfilmstudio.com/projects/a-lovesupreme/ Fig 21 - Great and Small 2013 - http://architectsfilmstudio.com/projects/greatand-small/ Fig 22 - Great and Small 2013 - http://architectsfilmstudio.com/site/wp-content/ uploads/2016/01/Great-and-Small-Banner-2500x1400-Web.jpg Fig 23 - Bishop Edward King Chapel 2016 - http://architectsfilmstudio.com/ projects/bishop-edward-king-chapel/ Fig 24 - Bishop Edward King Chapel - https://static1.squarespace.com


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6.00 - Poole Futures: the Business Improvement District 12

Fig 25 - Poole BID Logo

Fig 26 - Poole BID Team

D e s c r ip ti o n

Fig 28 - Poole bus station

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

Poole Business Improvement District (BID) is a commercial renovation project surrounding the adaptation and upkeep within the surrounding areas of Poole, Dorset. The team is made up of various public and private figures from the local area (Fig 26). David Segelman the previous head of project and facilities at LUSH cosmetics is one of the leaders within the team. The public figure Mohan Yengar is within the team applying his expertise as the local councillor for small businesses and adult learning service. Former financier Gabi Nash worked in the Office of National Statistics within financial departments and is also present on the team. Poole BID, seeks to raise funds from existing commercial businesses within the high street Inc. Mark’s and Spencer’s, Lush, Poole Pottery, McDonald’s and The Dolphin shopping centre. The Business Improvement District in Poole in one of 200 BID areas around the UK. The businesses in Poole are asked to give 0.5% of their profits to achieve £350,000 worth of funding which will be spread across 5 years. The District in Poole for improvement runs from the Old bridge to the thistle seen in (Fig 27). The team implied various aspects of data collection could be undertaken by the architecture students of the Arts University Bournemouth. Within this data collection, detailed photographic documentation of the improvement zone could be collected alongside information of street signage, accessibility and street furniture. There are 570 businesses within Poole whom are eligible for access into the BID scheme, with the first year works concentrating on the external high street elements such as floor m aterials and shop fronts. Further in the project, the team hope to develop Poole bus station (Fig 28) as it is unanimously agreed Personal Development Portfolio

Fig 27 - Zoned areas for consideration

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across the team that it holds strong connotations for the potential of development. Gabi and the team continue to explain the underlying issues within Poole. They believe it is cramped and the existing design seems to work against the architecture of Poole rather than with it. Highlighting that the plastic fascias and corporate sign-age distracts from the heritage aspects of an old working town such as Poole. However the team kept repeating that the issues surrounding Poole weren’t with the architecture. This was mentioned at least four times throughout the lecture. The team exampled the town of Bridport being a unique town with elements of good food and produce being sold which draws people to the town from a diverse background. Gabi explained her experience in architectural development through the renovation of thirty five listed houses around the UK. She claims the town of Poole requires an array of small businesses that will draw wealthier individuals from their luxury boats moored in the harbour into the town itself. Gabi exampled the projecting canopy which runs from the Sainsbury’s supermarket entrance into a small decorated square just outside. Her dislike of this canopy came through her rhetoric of believing it was absolutely useless with its only use keeping the homeless people dry when t he rain starts. This element she found comical and expressed her confusion that only the homeless were using the canopy to full effect. Gabi continues to highlight the importance for economic growth and diversity within the town. Her underlying intentions became clear when she stated ‘I just want people to spend money in Poole’

The Poole BID presentation by the BID team was a pleasant insight into the inner workings of urban and cultural development. Through previous units within the study of architecture, multiple improvement areas within the town have been recorded, analysed and developed. The Curiosity shop (The Whisky Vault) was developed within ARC 550 improving the qualities of the high street and surrounding area of the nodal location. The Music school designed through the unit ARC 551 also adds to the improvements of the town with aspects of figure/ground being implemented across both projects. The issues put forward by the team held some viable considerations including the need for better street furniture, improvement to the market dynamic and issues of the Dolphin and bus station. However the team (mainly Gabi) spoke of using commercial acceleration through the economic growth to rejuvenate the town. The issues spoke of surrounding the canopy of the Sainsbury’s as an example seemed fattic or miscalculated as a canopy within architecture insights welcome and arrival at the entrance or threshold of a building. With Gabi remarking comically of the homeless using the shelter implies a disconnection from many aspects of urban life. A second area where this social disconnection is evident was apparent in the way the team spoke of spending money within the town. Insinuating that students and young individuals have an abundance of expendable income is incorrect according to recent figures on wealth and earnings in this time period. The idea with creating commercial businesses to advance Poole’s status was welcome but when Gabi mentioned they didn’t want one single ‘Hippy’ shop but twenty individual businesses, it portrayed the notion of larger more corporate businesses.

Overall the presentation/lecture was interesting and important within the study of architecture as many aspects involve urban design and configurations in the shape shifting, dynamic and contemporary social system of 2016. A healthy scepticism always surrounds ideas of commercial and economic growth due to the issues apparent today which have been created from this idea of growth. With the team wanting to improve the town claiming ‘its not the architecture’ instigates the idea that they are trying to manipulate and control various social aspects through monetary means. The fact that many of the team come from the financier sector of industry and ideologically believe this is the way to improve towns does create slight discomfort in the traditional approach. Holding conservative views in a modern technological world seems counter intuitive with what the younger generation believe will re build society. Sustainable methods and practices have been the rhetoric of those older for many years. The notion of growth being used in a world on the verge of renewable and sustainable practice seems extremely ignorant to the larger challenges the millennial generation face with regard to our climate systems being eradicated by economic growth. List of Figures Fig 25 - Poole BID Logo - https://www.atcm.org/_inline/21748?rev=31637 Fig 26 - Poole BID Team - http://poolebid.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/ IMG_5504-624x416.jpg Fig 27 - Poole BID Zoned areas for consideration - http://poolebid.com/wpcontent/uploads/2015/07/poole-bid-areas.jpg Fig 28 - Poole bus station - http://poolebid.com/poole-bid-arts-university-worktogether-help-town-centre-thrive/ Fig 29 - Poole high street - Authors Own


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7.00 - RIBA Great British Buildings - Sir Peter Cook Drawing Studio AUB 14

Fig 30 - Sir Peter Cook Drawing studio

Fig 31 - Drawing studio, Secondary north light

D e s c r ip ti o n

Fig 33 - Drawing studio, Bench light

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

This entry documents an RIBA Great British Buildings event on Sir Peter Cooks Drawing Studio at the Arts University Bournemouth. The event b egan with a small talk from the University Chancellor Stuart Bartholomew. He praised the bui lding and the effect it has had on the univers ity campus. Like a ‘Divine light that falls on Bournemouth’. He respectfully mentioned the accolade of it being the l ast place in the UK that the late Zaha Hadid made a mark upon. He continued to talk of positives of the building and again showed his gratitude to Sir Peter Cook and the CRAB design team. After the Chancellor spoke the site architect for the drawing studio Jenna Al-Ali, spoke and detailed the process through a visual presentation. Jenna reiterated the brief explaining that the building was for multi disciplinary use of people from all creative courses at the campus. She claims that within the design ethics of CRAB all projects ‘starts with a drawing’ then move onto model making. This is similar to the design methodology of Archigram and Peter Cook within the 1960’s. Jenna continued to show images of the design phases including initial ideas, sketches and site analysis. Other imagery of the lighting conditions within the structure were shown as tectonic components of the structure. Elements from the construction were shown with the process of making the steel structure being well documented. The structure was built in Germany in multiple sections through an adapted boat building factory. Jenna spoke of the various procedures required for transportation and assembly of the seventeen steel sections as they moved from Germany to the UK.

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Fig 32 - Drawing studio, Primary north light

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After the presentation had concluded an organised drawing session had been booked for the group within the drawing studio. The group took part through various drawing mediums recording the space from the inside. Easels were used for drawing with the group being positioned in an arc underneath the large north facing oculus. To conclude the event a final speech was given by the site architect along with varying discussions between members of the group. Further details of the drawing studio can be found in the following documents: ARC650 LO1 Architecture - Photography - Light ARC650 LO4 A Focus on Fenestration Photography

The event hosted by the RIBA was an opportunity to hear directly from the CRAB design team about the issues and challenges within the design and construction of the drawing studio. Witnessing the steel shell being constructed in Germany (2015) left the understanding of the project with an open end, however the site architect Jenna Al-Ali presented the continuation of how the steels were transported and installed. Seeing the variety of design works and experimentation within the presentation enhances knowledge of design methodologies and presentation images. The processes and aspects of the building itself, have been heavily researched since the buildings initial conception. Thoughts from the chancellor at the RIBA event added to the day as he conveyed his pride and recognition for Sir Peter Cook, defining how unique and serendipitous the building is, especially within the other award winning buildings loacted at AUB campus. After the presentation finished the group moved over to the drawing studio. This was the first time entering the fully constructed blue structure. The initial impact of the natural lighting qualities was expressed after traversing the threshold. The large oval oculus sits with a dominant stance as an architectural tectonic. The white curvaceous walls allow the light to roll and reflect around the internal drawing space. The curved walls do give a strange aspect to the acoustics of the studio however the buildings function has no need for elaborate acoustic control. The echoing sound and reverberating voices adds to the unique experience when inside the studio. The irregular curved plan of the building allows the easels to be set up underneath the north light illuminating the drawing surface in a balanced and controlled manner.

Toward the end of the drawing workshop held after the presentation, the studio became empty. This was a fantastic chance to photograph the internal space of the structure. Through the research of ARC650 various compositions of naturally lit architecture have been photographed. The images documented hold a more abstract notion inspired through the research of French photographer Helene Binet. The Image on the opposite page depicts a slither of light from the secondary north light. The photo does not communicate the full design of the drawing studio however similar to that of Binet the image captures a moment and a memory of the first time gazing up and witnessing the organically formed roof lights. Further images of the drawing studio can be seen in ARC650 within the precedent research of natural light within architecture. List of Figures Fig 30 - Sir Peter Cook drawing studio - Authors Own Fig 31 - Drawing studio, Secondary north light - Authors Own Fig 32 - Drawing studio, Primary north light - Authors Own Fig 33 - Drawing studio, Bench light - Authors Own Fig 34 - Drawing studio, Secondary north light #2 - Authors Own


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8.00 - Tony Fretton Artsway Gallery Space 16

Fig 35 - Artsway Gallery, Existing building

Fig 36 - Artsway galley, Existing chimney

D e s c r ip ti o n A visit to Artsway was undertaken to gain knowledge and inspiration for the design methodology of gallery and studio spaces within the development of CODA. The building is a renovated agricultural building designed by architect Tony Fretton. The agricultural building links well to CODA with CODA being a renovation of a Victorian era farm building. The drive with two colleges took around forty minutes to get from Bournemouth to Sway. Upon arrival the building appeared pleasantly comfortable within its surrounding context. The red brick and pitched roof mimics that of the buildings around. The large chimney seen in (Fig 36) was a brilliant architectural tectonic. The chimney enhanced the buildings character implying the notion of warmth and comfort internally. Our course leader opened the building and let the small group look around the empty gallery space. The large mechanical appearing skylights grab attention upon entry, glowing with a natural silvery north light. The wall surfaces within the building were all painted white allowing the natural light to reflect homogeneously the internal space. The floor tectonic was finished in simple cheap concrete tiles however the shiny surface finish again reflected additional light around the gallery space, predominantly at a lower level. Although the floor material was a cost effective product the contractors achieved a clean and neat finish which really enhances the straight lines within the building. Timber cladding was used as the exterior skin for the purpose of being easily removable was the gallery to be extended in the future. Artificial lighting was also installed within the void of the skylight opening. This was to ensure a consistent value of light was possible. Personal Development Portfolio

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When lighting exhibited art the light requires a certain consistency as day transitions to night. Six independent studio were also located at the grounds of Artsway. After walking a short distance through a pleasant garden the studios could be seen nestled into the woodland. The six studios were all unique in their spatial arrangement. Studio three was a twin studio being utilised by two artists. It featured a large north opening which pulled in large quantities of natural light from the pitched ceiling. The studio also incorporated a window upon the north facing wall however this window did not allow any light through due to being blocked by overgrown shrubbery. The studios had minimal fixed elements inside with only three shelves fitted to the wall and four manoeuvrable tables. All the other equipment in the studio was free standing or found a space within the floor area of the studio. The block of six studios have a large overhanging canopy spanning the entrances. The timber walkway is sheltered for when artists require the use of the kitchen and toilet spaces located at one end of the studio block.

Fig 37 - Artsway gallery, Fretton skylight 3

Fig 38 - Artsway gallery, Timber cladding, Intervention

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

List of Figures

The visit to Artsway allowed research of another precedent in the application and methods of controlling natural light within an architectural project. The skylights by Tony Fretton truly captivate the style and aesthetics of his architectural design. The mechanical louvres seem slightly unnecessary due to the frosted glass diffusing the majority of light which enters the building. Nevertheless the mechanical strips did create visual interest and expressed the skylights format in more detail and complexity. Further imagery of the individual skylights at Artsway can be found in ARC650 within the precedents of natural lighting where the skylights are further explored and analysed as an expressive yet functional architectural element. The internal space was a warm, bright yet empty gallery space. The dark grey concrete tiles weighted the building through its denser ground tectonic allowing the bright white walls to gently sit upon the ground. A shadow gap was utilised instead of skirting board. The shadow gap again created a weightlessness to the walls whilst also leaving a small dark line where the wall meets floor. Portions of the wall elements were also moveable which creates a flexible and adaptable space becoming suited to multiple exhibition pieces be it sculpture, hung artwork or creative Installations. The visit was extremely useful for gaining ideas and inspiration for the gallery and studio spaces being designed for CODA. The simplicity of Tony Fretton’s skylights communicates the notion that it is not necessarily how the opening within a building appear but how the light is pulled into the space subsequently from the aesthetic. Further development of skylights has continued through other research techniques.

Fig 35 - Artsway gallery, Existing building - Authors Own Fig 36 - Artsway gallery, Existing chimney - Authors Own Fig 37 - Artsway Gallery Fretton Skylight - Authors Own Fig 38 - Artsway Gallery, Timber cladding, Intervention - Authors Own Fig 39 - Skylight 2 (Main Space) - Authors Own


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9.00 - Roche Court - New Arts Centre, Gallery Space - Stephen Marshall 18

Fig 40 - Stephen Marshall Gallery, Outside

Fig 41 - Stephen Marshall Gallery, Inside

Fig 42 - Stephen Marshall Gallery, Natural light moving in

D e s c r ip ti o n

Reflective Analysis

List of Figures

The New Arts Centre at Roche Court, Salisbury has a new gallery intervention positioned between the existing house and orange room (Fig 40). The small gallery space is designed by architect Stephen Marshall with a cost of £60,000 to design and construct. The gallery space currently exhibits works by artist Darren Almond. The gallery is composed of four major architectural tectonics. The ground being a rough sandy concrete running throughout the space. The concrete held a clean and crisp finish. The rear wall acts as part of the main structure bridging the two buildings with a supportive masonry wall. This dense wall also holds the potential for hanging various sized artworks (Fig 41). The south facing glass front is cons tructed from the largest sheets of glass that can be manufactured. The supports for the glass run through the hinge of the timber doors, again making minimal aspects of the different structural and expressive elements. The large glass facade orientates toward south which is unusual for a gallery space as they are normally lit with diffused north light. South facing glass was applied for the gallery to exhibit sculptural works which hold stronger visuals when lit with direct sunlight. The metal roof covering is the third tectonic element that composes the gallery space. The metal roof element spans between the existing buildings, however a portion of the roof remains as an open void al lowing soft north light to move into the space reflecting off the back masonry wall (Fig 42). The space at the time exhibited dark paintings and sculptural works by artist Darren Almond. Darren Almond was inspired through the research of space and time with his artworks expressing stellar qualities using aquacryl and gouache painted on large blocks of aluminium.

The gallery space is an innovative intervention combing minimal modernist design within the context of an English stately home. The architect Stephen Marshall has detailed and constructed the various tectonic elements with finesse and craft ensuring the final finish expressed the minimal qualities of the gallery. The minimalism applied brings the artwork to the forefront of the visual field for thought and contemplation. The over zealous panes of glass do work within the aesthetic of the building however understanding the cost of glass highlights that this element would of required a large portion of the budget f or purchasing. The south facing orientation does work well due to the views out into the surrounding landscape however the paintings being displayed by Darren Almond were obstructed and altered by large geometries of direct sunlight shining against the back wall (Fig 43). Again following on from the photography in ARC650 this was a second opportunity to capture natural sunlight m oving through the buildings fenestration. The image opposite tries to convey the mechanical makeup of the window frame whilst simultaneously recording a memory form first entering the gallery space. The abstract shot defines the major elements within the gallery and the hope is that anyone who’d of visited the space would identify the gallery from the photo taken. Other photography of the gallery space and details are featured within ARC650 LO1 adjoined to the precedent research. Alternatively more images of the gallery space can be found in the photography album ‘ Marlow Parker Photography’ where a collection of collated images from the visit are presented.

Fig 40 - Stephen Marshall Gallery Outside - Authors Own

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Fig 41 - Stephen Marshall Gallery Inside- Authors Own Fig 42 - Stephen Marshall Gallery Natural light moving in - Authors Own Fig 43 - Stephen Marshall Gallery, Almond painting- Authors Own Fig 44 - (Opposite) Stephen Marshall Gallery Skylight Detail - Authors Own

Fig 43 - Stephen Marshall Gallery, Almond Artwork


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10.00 - Roche Court - New Arts Centre, Sculpture Garden 20

Fig 45 - Clouds in the Sky - Peter Randall-Page

Fig 46 - Weathering Steel Sculpture - Anthony Caro

D e s c r ip ti o n Roche Court does not only hold the new gallery by Stephen Marshall but also encompasses a sculpture garden. The large stately garden is filled with a variety of sculptures from differing artists. Sculptures by renowned artists such as Anthony Gormly, Peter Randall-Page and Peter Newman are positioned around the grounds of the house. Visiting the gardens in a group and with the help of a guide informed us of each piece and its artists implications or meanings. The sculpture in (Fig 45) is labelled ‘Shapes in the Clouds’ crafted by Peter Randall-Page. The pieces are honed from large boulders of marble. The pattern was said to represent planetary bodies such as Jupiter with its swirling patterns. The sculpture is one of four boulders located at the entrance of the house all with varying curves and forms. The marble sculptures are the only pieces allowed to be touched within the park. The sculpture seen in (Fig 46) is a vast structure constructed from weathering steel. Artist Anthony Caro created this large sculpture intentionally to be left outside, gaining its rust pattern over time. The sculpture weights a hundred tonnes and each element has been fixed with a weld. The pieces were bolted together for ease of manoeuvrability when being di splayed through various exhibition spaces around the country. The anatomical sculpture presented in (Fig 47) is a cast bronze sculpture by Laura Ford. The piece holds the title ‘Days of Judgement’ and is just one of a plethora of figures similar to this one around the garden. The human sized sculpture has been carefully crafted to hide its construction technique. Soft folds of clothes have been captured through the investment process giving a unique aesthetic for a cast bronze sculpture. Personal Development Portfolio

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The sculpture shown in (Fig 48) is labelled ‘Purple Spade’ and is created by artist Michael Craig-Martin. The artist chose to use an innovative manufacturing technique when creating this steel piece. The steel was shaped by a metal cutting water jet. Equipment which blasts a stream of water with such velocity it breaks through the crystalline structure of the steel. The sculpture is powder coated in a purple shade positioned in the ground similar to how a gardener would stick the spade in the ground between uses. Finally the sculpture on the opposite page. This sculpture is by Eva Rothschild and is named ‘Meta’. The sculpture reflects Evas style of using sharp geometric lines combined with circular forms. The photo was captured as a quick spontaneous shot, however the smoke captured in the background creates drama and dynamism within the image. The sculpture was located independently away from other sculptures and was only noticed toward the end of the visit. Further photographs of the entire gardens collection can be seen within the photography album ‘Marlow Parker Photography’ as part of the ARC650 unit.

Fig 47 - Days of Judgement - Laura Fora

Fig 48 - Purple Spade - Michael Craig-Martin

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

List of Figures

The walk around the sculpture garden at Roche Court was the first time where multiple sculptural works could be experienced in an outdoor setting. Before arriving the plan was to collect a range of photographs from the visit, experimenting with the photography of sculpture in natural lighting conditions. The weather of the day was fresh and cool with bright autumn sunshine bursting through fluffy white clouds. This dynamic weather caused some issues with the photography however it also allowed various trials to be performed in altering light conditions. The sculptures were laid far enough from each other that only one was viewed at a time, occasionally seeing the next one whilst viewing the previous. The guide did explain each sculpture whilst passing by but due to testing various angles and exposure levels the information wasn’t full absolved. It was surprising to hear that none of the sculptures were allowed to be touched, apart from the sculpture ‘Clouds in the Sky’. These sculptures are design to withstand the harshest of British weather surely rendering the no touching rule obsolete? With the group moving around the garden seeing each sculpture one by one, not much time was allocated to observe and reflect each sculpture so the understanding and feelings from one to the other were dissolved by the brief viewing time. It was only after the photographs were processed and edited that a second wave of appreciation and inspiration was unlocked. The range of making techniques was interesting to witness and instilling more confidence in the application and use of a variety of materials within any form of creative making.

Fig 45 - Clouds in the Sky - Peter Randall-Page - Authors Own Fig 46 - Weathering steel Sculpture - Anthony Caro - Authors Own Fig 47 - Days of Judgement - Laura Ford - Authors Own Fig 48 - Purple Spade - Michael Craig-Martin - Authors Own Fig 49 - Meta - Eva Rothschild - Authors Own


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11.00 - AUB Guest Speaker - Rebecca Newnham - Sculptor 22

Fig 50 - ‘Launch’ - Rebecca Newnham - Salisbury Cathedral

Fig 51 - ‘Wave’ Sculpture - Rebbeca Newnham

D e s c r ip ti o n Rebecca Newnham visited the Arts University Bournemouth to give a presentation about her current sculptural exhibition titled ‘Reflection’. Rebecca explained the proces s of making and inspiration for the Sculpture ‘Launch’ seen in (Fig 50). She implied her curiosity of the physics and mechanics of astronomical entities: Light, Space, Time, Energy and Magnetism. The mirror mosaic sculpture is exhibited in the grounds of Salisbury Cathedral. Other works of the sculptor are also located at Salisbury Cathed ral including the ‘Sound Parabolas’ Seen in (Fig 52). Newnham works with a variety of coloured glass and mirror in the creation of her work. ‘Launch’ is a welded steel frame filled with closed cell insulation and expanding foam that is then carved into shape. The mirrors are all hand cut by the artist and applied one by one. Due to the sharp edges of the mirror glass, each piece needed filing and smoothing to ensure it was safe for the public to touch. The ‘Sound Parabolas’ are constructed in a similar fashion with the main difference being the plywood arc that the mirrors are adhered to. The Parabolas are said to uniquely echo sound when stood directly in front of the curved face. Within the presentation Newnham explained her difficulties in finishing and transporting the finished pieces, however various locals and family members all lend a hand to ensure her work is finished and transported using the safest method. The sculpture in (Fig 51) “Wave’. represents the sine wave of red light within the visible spectrum. Red was chosen as blue wavelengths are much closer together in comparison. Similar to ‘Launch’ it is made from foam and insulating materials allowing the sculpture to become buoyant. Personal Development Portfolio

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The piece is to be installed on an estates body of water located in Yorkshire. The individual pieces are chained together underwater giving the elements individual movement. Newnham continued to show other sculptural works created over the past few years. The image on the opposite page reveals a sculpture named ‘Fledge - Increments of Flight’. The sculpture represents the anatomical movement of a birds wings in flight. The pieces were not only installed in the location showed by the river but was also exhibited within the main hall of Salisbury Cathedral. The sculptures were connected to a dynamic rotatory mechanic allowing each sculpture to rotate, revealing all aspects and viewpoints of the winged sculptures. The final sculpture seen in (Fig 53) was a pair of cast bronze sculptures cr eated from a black and white aggregate. Newnham claims this pieces could be seen as the fifth increment of flight, representing the energy needed for a swan to take flight. ‘Soar’ is a 600 by 600mm sculpture and was sold to the HSBC banking group for installation in one of their banks.

Fig 52 - ‘Sound Parabola’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham

Fig 53 - ‘Black Soar’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

List of Figures

The presentation of sculptural works by Rebecca held many rewarding elements. Witnessing the making process insights strong appreciation for the time, effort and craft which is applied in the synthesis of varying sculpture. The imagery of pieces taken by Newnham captured the spirit and essence of her works. Launch although a costly project invites numerous people from all walks of life to get up close, personal and intimate with the artwork. This being a direct contrast to the sculpture exhibited at Roche Court sculpture garden, where no artwork was allowed to be touched. (With the exception of the smooth marble boulders of Peter RandallPage’s ‘Clouds n the Sky’). Due to the presentation offering knowledgeable insight into the realms of sculpture, encouraged the visit to Salisbury Cathedral to view the artworks in person. A refection of the sculpture ‘Launch is present in the Salisbury visit entry later in this document. The ‘Sound Parabolas’ upon viewing were much smaller than was assumed from the photographs shown during the presentation. The sound effect could not be trialled too intensely, as the Cathedrals acoustics overpowered any sound being made within the enormous brick and stone vaulted hall. The sculpture ‘Wave’ (Fig 51) is a unique piece which composes the elegant sculpture within the natural landscape. The red is a powerful colour and implies strong connotations for anyone viewing or interpreting the piece. It is a shame that the piece is being installed in a private estate where the public will not have the chance to witness its looping red arcs. Although the sculpture ‘Soar’ appears as a beautifully balanced work of art, it is a great shame that a corporation as shrewd as HSBC has the ability to snap up any sculptural works effectively removing the chance for people of lower wealth to acquire an object of this beauty.

Fig 50 - ‘Launch’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham - http://rebeccanewnham.com/ wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Launch-at-Salisbury-Cathedral-11.jpg Fig 51 -’Wave’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham - http://rebeccanewnham.com/ wp-content/uploads/2015/12/10-WAVE-2013-copy1.jpg Fig 52 - ‘Sound Parabola Sculpture’ - Rebecca Newnham - http:// rebeccanewnham.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Sound-Parabolas-outsideSalisbury-Cathedral-5.jpg Fig 53 - ‘Black Soar’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham - http://rebeccanewnham. com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/50-BLACK-SOAR-SCULPTURES-2012.jpg Fig 54 - (Opposite) ‘Fledge - Increments of Flight’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham - http://rebeccanewnham.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/90-FLEDGEINCREMENTS-OF-FLIGHT-a-2010.jpg


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12.00 -Salisbury Cathedral Visit and Rebecca Newnham Sculpture 24

Fig 55 - Salisbury Cathedral

Fig 56 - Salisbury Cathedral

D e s c r ip ti o n

Reflective Analysis

Salisbury Cathedral was visited in October 2016 after Rebecca Newnham informed the architecture course that her sculptural work titled ‘Reflection’ was being displayed in the cathedral for a limited amount of time. The town of Salisbury had the essence of an old market town b eing well suited for the movement of people around the various streets and squares. The park and ride was a short trip into the city centre. On route to the Cathedral sat a small stone archway; a palimpsest which evidenced a glimpse of culture through the Gothic stone architecture . Moving into the Cathedral grounds brings into view the enormous religious building. Located in the corner of the grounds sat ‘Launch’ a sculpture by Rebecca. Photos were taken of the building from the entrance side and also of the sculpture itself. (Fig 57) shows a more abstract shot of the sculpture however more images of the artwork are present in the document ‘Marlow Parker Photography’. As a small group, we began moving around the perimeter of the cathedral taking photographs of various architectural elements, captured in an array of exposures and compositions. After circling the Cathedral the group entered into the largest cloister in the UK. A loop around the cloister proceeded entering the main hall. After circulating the cloister the group moved through into the main hall of the Cathedral. Within the hall stood more sculptural works by Rebecca Newnham, including the ‘Sound Parabolas’ shown within her lecture at the Arts University Bournemouth. Moving around the space in a calm and orderly fashion allowed plenty of time to take more photographs. The main focus was on capturing the light qualities adding to the research of natural light within architecture.

Setting out to photograph Salisbury Cathedral was an ambition held f or a long time. The techniques utilised within the shoot were informed from the book ‘Professional Architecture Photography’ by Michael Harris. The enormous building proved difficult to get into a frame with the limited space around the perimeter of the grounds. Multiple angles and adaptations were trialled, capturing the exterior façades of the building. There were challenges photographing the sculpture also due to numerous people wanting to get up close to feel and experience the sculpture. The abstract shot seen in (Fig 57) was captured to express the mosaic mirror makeup of the piece. The flecks of light bouncing off the glass mimic the silvery shine of the overcast clouds above. After capturing the outside architectural details and form of the Cat hedral, inside was the next challenge. Many images were taken within the main hall however more focus was needed balancing the compositions of the huge architectural columns, fenestration and vaults. (Fig 57) was the only image captured which relays not only a unique angle and captured memory from looking up the stone column, but expresses the functional applications of the structure and fenestrat ion of stain glass windows. The image on the opposite page took a decent amount of time to line up the correct composition having to orientate the hall and symmetrically capture to vaulted hall with no interruptions, blurs or incorrect exposures. The final image however symbolically represent the scale and symmetry of the building through the large printed monochromatic image. More imagery of Salisbury Cathedral can be found in the document ‘Marlow Parker Photography’ ARC650.

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Fig 57 - Salisbury Cathedral ‘Launch’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham

Fig 58 - Salisbury Cathedral

List of Figures Overall the experience from visiting the cathedral will not be forgotten. Capturing the metaphysical presence of the grand architecture allows the initial emotional memories to be retained through printed imagery, something that a memory sometimes requires in the recall cognitive function when seeking information from the past.

Fig 55 - Salisbury Cathedral - Authors Own Fig 56 - Salisbury Cathedral - Authors Own Fig 57 - Salisbury Cathedral ‘Launch’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham Fig 58 - Salisbury Cathedral - Authors Own Fig 59 - (Opposite) Salisbury Cathedral Main Hall - Authors Own


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13.00 - AUB Guest Speaker - Chloe Young - Architect 26

Fig 60 - Design drawings - Haeckles Drawn Sauna

Fig 61 - Haeckles Products

D e s c r ip ti o n Chloe Young is a young aspiring architect from the emerging practice Reworks Studio . The studio were commissioned by the cosmetics company Haeckels to design and build a Sea Bathing Sauna. Chloe begun stating the growing requirements for seaside development around the coastal town of Margate, Kent. Chloe showed a variety of historical precedents depicting architectural achievements among seaside towns during the early 20th century. This included a 150 meter wide tidal pool used in Margate for summer bathing activities. Exampl es of historic bathing machines were shown informing the group of how sheltered cabins, drawn out to sea functioned as a changing facility for the upper class. The design for the sea bathing sauna was initially funded through a Kickstarter campaign utilising the imagery seen in (Fig 60) to convey the projects intentions. Fifty thousand pounds was raised during the Kickstarter which was then added to by Haeckles cosmetics. This produced a reasonable budget for the small project. The cabin would encompass a sauna and treatment room from which Haeckles produce could be used or bought. The initial brief of a tow-able cabin was inspired by the historical bathing machines that were initially drawn by a pair of horses. The structure was designed to sit upon a steel chassis, this chassis was made by welding various elements of steel box section. Painted timber cladding was applied as the external skin of the structure which encompassed: the special ised sauna construction, a log burner and photovoltaic cells to provide renewable energy to the project. Speci alist fabricators and engineers were used throughout the design and construction of the project Personal Development Portfolio

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due to the complexities of a moveable, heated space. Various construction elements of the project were manufactured off site and through independent contractors. The plan was to bring the final elements together in a final construction phase. Sketches, CAD drawings and visualisation were provided to external contractors for the creation of components. Large cart wheels were made bespoke through a wheel crafting specialist who used heat to fix the steel ‘tyres’ to the hand carved timber wheels. After the wheels and chassis were combined the structure required weight testing as no calculations had been performed prior to this. Applying four tonnes of sand to the cart pushed the stresses of the chassis to the point where the leaf spring suspension sheered under the forces. Another detail was added by the design team having each individual who provided funds for the project to have their names engraved into the external cladding boards. Within the design phase ‘George Clarke’s Amazing Spaces’ production team contacted Chloe asking if the project could be filmed for the BBC One programme. Upon arrival Chloe mentioned the filming process and logistics and programme making proved extremely challenging running alongside the construction of the sea bathing sauna. The narrative of the sauna combines innovative architectural design with public requirements to create awareness and interest in how sea bathing could become a more mainstream contemporary social activity. In the final stages of the project when the cart had been fully assembled and tested, it was taken to the beach for its unveiling. The council were not aware of the project with it remaiing under control of the commercial cosmetics company Haeckles.

Fig 62 - Drawn Sauna (Beach)

Fig 63 - Internal Sauna Space

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

List of Figures

The sea bathing sauna project appeared evidently suitable for the emerging architectural practice Reworks Studio. A brief of a small compact project applies itself as a useful undertaking within the design of architecture as a project of this size can be designed, constructed and promoted by a small team of individuals, all within a reasonable amount of time. Its funding technique using a Kikstarter campaign to raise the money, is a contemporary, innovative solution in allowing a project to be synthesised rather than remain a conceptual design. The design of the sauna was modest and functional, incorporating a suitable amount of architectural details within. The construction was performed to a high quality using local craftsmen in the manufacture of bespoke fittings and components. Keeping the work local is suggested to be more rewarding for the community spirit within a project. The promotion and funding from Haeckles appears slightly contrary to the briefed ideals of the project. Developing the town through a commercial channel is an alternative method rather than seeking the guidance and advice through local authorities. The notion that the project was carried out in this method sets a shifting dynamic of how cultural developments could be achieved. The other questionable element is the need for a sauna (extremely hot space) located at the seaside where through the summer months the heat is excessive enough for most tourist. Whether its a model pulled from Scandinavian culture in order to pull the public out within winter times to use the sauna will remain to be seen. The fascinating project encumbered multiple elements of architectural application through differing solutions in design, construction, sustainability and craft.

Fig 60 - Design drawings - Haeckles Drawn Sauna - http://m5.paperblog. com/i/97/976386/take-note-haeckels-L-6jyfMn.png Fig 61 - Haecles Products - http://assets.coolhunting.com/coolhunting/mt_asset_ cache/2015/06/haeckels-fragrance-gps-ace-hotel-london.jpg Fig 62 - Drawn Sauna (Beach) - http://www.urbanjunkies.com/lon/15/ images/1117-travel-4.jpg Fig 63 - Internal Sauna Space - http://haeckels.co.uk/wp-content/ uploads/2015/02/sauna-pics-1782x899.jpg Fig 64 - (Opposite) Haecles Drawn Sauna - http://haeckels.co.uk/wp-content/ uploads/2015/02/sauna-pics-1782x899.jpg


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14.00 - AUB Guest Speaker - Glenn Howells - Architect 28

Fig 65 - Paradise Circus regeneration - Glen Howells Architects

Fig 66 - Severn Trent Water - Glenn Howells Architects

D e s c r ip ti o n Architect Glen Howells was invited to speak of his architectural practice and methodology at the Arts University Bournemouth. Throughout the lecture Glen spoke about an array of projects his practice had designed and built within the UK. The talk was not defined by one of his buildings or architectural project but was around the discourse of his firm, his design methodology and his unique approach to architecture. Ed Firth introducing Glen believes Glen holds a canny and clever approach to architecture explaining how manifestations of creativity can be extracted through this innovative approach. Within the introduction Glen implies that one of his essential discourses within his approach to architectural design is that of model making. Reiterating multiple times the challenges of problem solving can be overcome through a symbiotic dialect of though and craft. This craft Glen states leads projects to hold more clarity in their communication of design. He utilised monochromatic model making materials to calm the pallet of expression revealing important architectural tectonics being portrayed effectively. Throughout the talk Glen showed imagery of multiple projects he had completed, adding relevant information about the main defining aspects of his work. The limestone building to the left of the image seen in (Fig 65) was said to of been implemented through a development scheme in Liverpool’s Paradise Circus rejuvenation. Glen believed the development required an architecture which modestly expresses the surrounding context of the urban landscape. He claims the use of a single material throughout the building allowed the structure and aesthetic of the building to be amalgamated into a single expressive entity. Personal Development Portfolio

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Similar to the supporting columns seen in the Severn Trent water building which not only imply the buildings ability to support itself but simultaneously expresses the materiality of the column tectonics. The lattice roof seen in (Fig 67) is a canopy solution for the Savil Building built in the royal grounds. Glen added humorous encounters he experienced within projects. Within the Savil construction Glen was talking to the head carpenter about the detailing of the roof. Glen understood the craftspersons knowledge and abilities when crafting timber, so allowed him to produce the final detail models. The lattice roof was designed by an external company with Glen providing shape and form advice throughout the computer aided design in the complex network of timber. Glen also showed various imagery of plan and section development alongside visualisations of his projects. One visualisation can be seen on the opposite page which portrays the final designs for the National Memorial Arboretum. Glen finished with questions from the audience where within it he advised the architectural students of the difficulties he faced when completing his architectural studies and that by failing his first masters degree gave him more drive and ambition to become a successful architect.

Fig 67 - Savill Building - Glenn Howells

Fig 68 - Triangular Housing Plan Model - Glenn Howells Architects

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

List of Figures

Throughout the talk it became apparent that Glen was an intelligent, hard working and honest individual. His architectural methodology was conveyed effectively through his various acronyms and imagery. His projects were remarkably balanced between function and expression with his use of historic building techniques from the 1960’s combined with contemporary material aspects allowed his concepts to be synthesised into a modest, poetic and elegant architecture. Glen shows courage within his projects openly admitting if someone has better knowledge in solving a problem then they should be the ones to carry out the tasks. Similar to the idea that Glen sees nothing wrong in using building designs and construction techniques from history being re appropriated to create an inclusive architecture. The story of how the carpenter used his idea over Glens will not be forgotten. Coming from a craftspersons background, it’s comical to hear that when the carpenter made the two design models, he created Glens roof detail a much poorer quality than his own. This truth, humour and light heartedness is slightly removed from the architecture industry as the role holds various connotations of being strict, professional, and diligent. This could possibly be where the disconnection between architect and contractor breaks down, as its believed that contractors hold less professional anecdotes whilst becoming master craftspeople. It is clear with Glens projects that a good relationship between designer and maker was apparent which can be witnessed in his beautiful detailing and construction of the projects shown.

Fig 65 - Paradise Circus regeneration Glen Howells - https://www. architectsjournal.co.uk/pictures/980x653fitpad[31]/9/4/1/1449941_2CS_CHAMB_ SQ_VIEW.jpg Fig 66 - Severn Trent Water - Glen Howells Architects - https:// www.architectsjournal.co.uk/pictures/1180xany/0/1/0/1331010_ GlennHowellsArchitects_SevernTrent___PaulMiller_Exterior.jpg Fig 67 - Savill Building - Glen Howells Architects - https://www.mimoa.eu/ images/10888_l.jpg Fig 68 - Triangular housing model - Glen Howells Architects - http://glennhowells. co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/housing-triangle-5-600x450.jpg Fig 69 - (Opposite) - National Memorial Arboretum - Glen Howells Architects - https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/pictures/2000x2000fit/7/4/2/1301742_GHA_ NMA_ExternalView.jpg


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15.00 - RIBA Great British Buildings - Bridport Recycling Centre 30

Fig 70 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Entrance Canopy

Fig 71 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Lower Courtyard

D e s c r ip ti o n This entry covers a Great British Building event held by the RIBA. The building for discussion is the award winning recycling centre built in the town of Bridport, Dorset. Upon arriving at the recycling centre, the group gathered and was given a small talk as an overview of the project. The initial information given was that the primary client Nicholas Pearson associates was working with Mitchell Eley Gould the secondary client. After the short talk the group moved through and around the recycling centre with the team highlighting areas where innovative solutions had been applied. (Fig 70) Shows a large canopy positioned over the tarmac road. This canopy was said to produce a welcoming essence acting as an entrance signifier. The second image shows the lower level courtyard where the majority of mechanical plant is used to move and sort various refuse which enters the site. Dorset engineering designed and produced an array of drawings for the steel structures present across the project. The largest building on the site was clad in Siberian larch. The buildings function being a sorting location for separating and storing various elements of recycling that enter :Glass, Wood, Plastic, Rubbish. Photographs were taken whilst moving through the site in order to document various detailing and design features the architect had incl uded. After the tour of the recycling centre, the group travelled a short distance to Bridport town hall where the design team including the architect Chris Eley gave a presentation on the design and construction processes of the recycling centre.

Personal Development Portfolio

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Sarah the landscape architect for Nicholas Pearson begun the presentation explaining the laborious twenty year challenge in locating the correct site and achieving the correct planning permission. The challenge for the landscape architect was finding a suitable location not only seeking suitability for the transport infrastructure but ensuring the building does not appear out of place within the surrounding areas of natural beauty. Through the presentation Chris explained the buildings programme was split into various segments reducing the mass of the building. The project held numerous accolades in sustainable infrastructure with low energy schemes provided for the small heated space which housed the site operators. Chris explained his appeal of sun pipes designed to let natural light enter the large sorting structure but continued to explained it was removed from the project due to cost restrictions. Siberian larch was utilised for the external cladding due to its durability gained through its naturally slow growing process. LED lighting combined with photo voltaic cells were applied reducing the carbon emissions of the building increasing the sustainability of the project. Chris spoke of the relationship with the construction contractors and how their inherent knowledge of techniques and application of materials was paramount in the project being constructed efficiently and aesthetically.

Fig 72 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Roof Detail

Fig 73 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Siberian Larch Cladding

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

List of Figures

The event held by the RIBA was an unusual one in the fact that this was an industrial project winning an award in architectural design. This was the first time seeing how an industrial infrastructure project could be enhanced through a complex design process. The site itself did hold multiple similarities to other recycling centres however its unique detailing and innovative solutions in its programme allowed the space to work through a more efficient discourse. The event itself was well structured and plenty of information was relayed through visual and spoken techniques. It also provided a good opportunity to photograph the industrial project and correlate the defining aspects against other architectural photography carried out within the unit. With six years of experience working on industrial projects this was the first time a project of this nature had been given the chance to have architectural design applied. Overall it could be said that although this is just another rubbish tip, the use of architectural design throughout has rendered the facility more accessible to the public, less obtrusive to the surrounding landscape and with minimal intrusion connecting into the existing road network. The aspects of the project will be held for reference of future projects.

Fig 70 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Entrance Canopy - Authors Own Fig 71 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Lower Courtyard - Authors Own Fig 72 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Roof Detail - Authors Own Fig 73 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Siberian Larch Cladding - Authors Own Fig 74 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Cladded geometry - Authors Own


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16.00 - Ben Rowe - Halley Research Station Relocation Expedition 32

Fig 75 - Ben Rowe - Ramboll Engineering

Fig 76 - Antarctica Halley 4 Research Station

D e s c r ip ti o n Ben Rowe, a project manager at the Ramboll engineering group arrived at the university campus to give a talk on the relocation of Halley 4 Antarctic Research Station. B en was invited to accompany various other scientists, engineers and contractors to give direct advice on the relocation of the research base. The framework won by Ramboll includes five to seven years of projects working with the British Antarctic Survey through collaborative pathways. Ben explained the contents of the Antarctic treaty that was ratified by numerous countries during the 1950’s. The treaty contains legislation regarding freedom of scientific research and investigation alongside the prohibition of any nuclear waste or nuclear related material. Ben wi ll travel to the research station from cape town South Africa through various other research stations located on the continent to finally arrive at Halley 4 research station. The research station was constructed after the engineering giant ACOM won a competition with their design of a moveable, dynamic structure lifted above the ice and supported on large metal skis. The structure is composed of numerous module elements specifically designed for the activities of Living, Research and sleeping (Fig 78). Due to the movement of ice recorded by scientists over the past decade the base has been found to be shifting with the ice shelf, requiring it to be relocated before the shelf breaks off and becomes permanently detached from the mainland. Ben explained the complex processes and operation required in the move highlighting various issues he could encounter when transporting the large GRP modules.

Personal Development Portfolio

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One major issue Ben mentioned multiple times during the speech was dealing with the principals of static friction (Stiction) and kinetic friction. These fundamental dynamics of physics created the majority of risk due to the forces and loads required in moving the structure. The modules are to be pushed using large tractors and mechanical plant however the modules require the ice in front of the skis to be heavily compacted prior to the move, The quantity of variables and engineering challenges present within the operation is the reason for Ben to be advising contractors throughout the operation. Ben will have to perform a variety of activities and tasks in the brutal conditions of Antarctica. Negative fifty five degree temperatures combined with harsh icy winds will add to the difficulties already present.

Fig 77 - Halley 4 Living Module

Fig 78 - Halley 4 Module Diagram

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

List of Figures

It was surprising to hear that Ben Rowe, the engineer who had provided structural information throughout the architecture studies was initiating a dangerous expedition to the most desolate land mass on earth. His courage and ambition in overcoming engineering challenges was evident as he talked through his lack of knowledge about what to expect from the trip whilst appearing positive and aspirational. His experience working in the construction industry will certainly aid to his application of knowledge and advice given whilst at Halley Research Station. The station itself had never been seen before. On first impression it was a bizarre contraption like something you would see in a science fiction film. The dynamic structure that holds human personnel traversing them over uninhabitable terrain is an amazing feat of engineering. The station also holds resemblance to Sir Peter Cooks walking city, a large mechanical structure published by the Archigram group. This follows on the walking cities re appropriation within the conceptual design work of ARC552 Future Scenarios. The unique opportunity Ben has to undergo a project of this intensity is enviable. His hard work, knowledge and experience will surely carry him through this extreme challenge. His return will be anticipated and hopefully he will be able to share with us his unique experience of Antarctica.

Fig 75 - https://media.licdn.com/mpr/mpr/shrinknp_200_200 Fig 76 - https://www.cfact.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Halley-VI-location.png Fig 77 - https://www.architectural-review.com/Journals/8/Files/2010/7/12/ AR07_10_SKILL%C2%A9%207-t_Central%20module%20interior.jpg Fig 78 - https://www.bas.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Halley-V1-stationlayout.jpg Fig 79 - http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/imageo/wp-content/blogs.dir/17/files/ halley-research-station-antarctica/DSC_6243-2.jpg


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17.00 - Sir Peter Cooks 80th Birthday Celebration, AUB 34

Fig 80 - Sir Peter Cook

Fig 81 - Sir Peter Cook Drawing

D e s c r ip ti o n On the 24th of November, the Arts University Bournemouth held a special event marking the 80th birthday of the internationally acclaimed, AUB Alumni architect Sir Peter Cook. The event began with a lecture by the visiting professor, presented through notions and anecdotes of Peters dreams. The title slide read ‘I began dreaming in Bournemouth’ Peter began his lecture speaking of his education and architectural projects surrounding the Bournemouth area. A photography and drawing montage was shown depicting the instant city arriving at Bournemouth. These images Peter explained were not amazing works of art but the montage still captured and communicated the raw essence of the idea. Numerous images from Archigram were shown by Peter alongside plenty of his own. As Peter progressed through the lecture various other dream connotations were used categorizing the differing aspects of designed work. Peter explained ‘A dream of slithering’ occurred through various thoughts of how a person moves and transverses a space. The act of slithering Peter charismatically interpreted this notion by moving around the presentation area in a slithering motion. This was compared to the angled walking when in buildings designed using ninety degree corners. Another dream used was ‘A dream of Melting’ where by Peter explained through his colourful drawings, the notion of various sized spaces melting together (Fig 82). The psychedelic drawings followed a linear discourse through manipulation of blended spaces. Through six progressive drawings, the metamorphosis of developmental ideas were highlighted and expressed.

Personal Development Portfolio

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A dream of flying being the penultimate chapter of the lecture held again more drawings and artworks from CRAB studio, Sir Peter himself and abstracts from the 1960’s group Archigram. The essence of this chapter was to provide contextual inspiration for the design and development of architectural projects. Peter interjected multiple projects he had carried out across the world, explaining the interesting or challenging aspects which had to be overcome throughout said projects. Imagery of the building seen on the opposite page was shown by Peter as he added comical stories and moments of humour which were conjoined to the memories of the project. The final chapter named a dream of overgrowth allowed Peter to show his love and fascination with all kinds of flora and vegetation and how he applies this natural aspect of architecture to his projects. Peter delivered the lecture through this series of dream categories, however the narrative of the lecture combined becoming evident of the joy and happiness Peter receives through his architectural design methodology. After the talk a small event was held in the drawing studio at AUB where students, staff and other guests could meet and converser with Peter. Food, drinks and cakes were served at the gathering with a brilliant scale model cake of the drawing studio. After the singing of happy birthday Sir Peter cut the cake in a true architects fashion by slicing right down the centre of the model cake providing an architectural section through the cake.

Fig 82 - Sir Peter Cook Drawing

Fig 83 - Sir Peter Cook Drawing Studio

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

List of Figures

The event at AUB for Sir Peter Cooks 80th birthday was an enjoyable and motivating experience. The lecture was highly inspirational witnessing Sir Peters unique charismatic method of teaching combined with his wit and humour portrayed through his story telling. The complex colour drawings shown throughout were amazing works of art and witnessing these images inspired more drawing to be undertaken using colour during the remaining weeks of architectural studies. Sir Peters outlook on life is positive and prosperous, this can be witnessed in his style of architectural application through his quirky designs. It is admirable hearing that Peter, a highly accomplished architect still sees notions and anecdotes of architecture through a wacky, emotional nonetheless intellectual filter. The event overall was one that will not be forgotten. Sir Peter cutting his cake with the birthday outfit of a three piece suit, bright orange trainers and crystal blue glasses insights a feeling that the world of architecture is really what you make it and there is no preordained path or route in becoming a unique and successful architect.

Fig 80 - http://www.architravel.com/pointofview/pointofview_wp/wp-content/ uploads/2014/10/Sir-Peter-Cook.jpg Fig 81 - https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-EaS5VOuaadw/Vfj06N1r1rI/ AAAAAAAAPyc/SJtc7vTt86E/w2048-h1478/Peter%2BCook%2Bsketch%2B2.jpg Fig 82 -http://www.crab-studio.com/images/peter%20cook-s%20drawings003.jpg Fig 83 - http://www.crab-studio.com/images/no%20crab%20drawing%20 studio%206-crop-u44815.jpg Fig 84 - http://www.crab-studio.com/images/icon%20image_kunsthaus.jpg


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18.00 - Planning Application Drawing - Client - Paul Kelly 36

Fig 85 - Steel Structure - Paul Kelly

D e s c r ip ti o n

Reflective Analysis

List of Figures

The drawings on the opposite page were created for the client Paul Kelly. Paul required a set of planning application drawings for his existing steel structure located in the front garden of his property. The council initially asked Paul to remove the structure however due to it being erected for four years it only required building certification. Paul contacted a lecturer at the Arts University Bournemouth querying about the drawings. The contact details were passed on and a site meeting was organised. Upon visiting site, the client explained his situation with regard to the planning and defined the drawings he required. The structure was measured across all dimensions ensuring an accurate depiction of the structure could be drafted. Paul required a Site location plan accompanied by a floor layout plan and an array of elevations. Varying line weights were applied within the drafting process ensuring various elements of the str ucture could be easily distinguished. The images were then edited within alternative softwar e, adding text and tweaking the opacities and thickness of the lines within the drawing. After the drawings were drafted and printed they were then handed over to the client. Paul will submit the drawings produced and hopefully acquire the correct certification for the structure.

This small job for Paul Kelly offered a suitable opportunity to not only enhance the skills of drafting but to experience the process of meeting and liaising with a client. The simple line drawings were completed for Paul who was extremely happy with what was produced. The drawings are simple line drawings but will effectively communicate aspects of the structure to the planning department of Bournemouth borough council. Any other small jobs similar to this one will not be missed as they can inform crucial steps within the architecture discipline which might not necessarily be available through the BA (HONS) Degree.

Fig 85 - Steel Structure - Paul Kelly - Authors Own

Personal Development Portfolio

Marlow Parker

Fig 86 - Planning Application Drawings - Paul Kelly - Authors Own


EXISTING GARDEN STORE - 17 SANCREED ROAD, POOLE, DORSET

1:50 Front Elevation

1:50 REAR Elevation

1:50 SIDE Elevation

New

lyn

1:50 SIDE Elevation

Way

SaNCREED Road

Structure Location

CLIENT - Paul Kelly Drawn - Marlow Parker Date - 29 November 2016

1:50 Existing Structure Plan

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1:500 Site Location Plan

Scale - 1:50 / 1:500


20.00 - CODA DESIGN PROJECT - M Parker, J Glynn and A Idriss 38

Fig 87 - CODA Map, Development Area

Fig 88 - CODA Existing Plan and Elevation

D e s c r ip ti o n During the studies of ARC552 in 2015 a univers ity lecturer informed the group of a project renovating a Victorian barn adjoined to CODA music school in Walkford, Dorset. The project required a small group of students to provide design aspects in the creation of a gallery space combined with individual artists studios . Alongside two other students, contact was made with the client Phil Hallet initiating the design phase in organising a site visit. The first site visit provided an opportunity to record and document the building and spaces required for development. Measurements were taken of the entire building including a collection of photographs to reference during the design phases . Drawings were produced from the photographs and measurements collected, allowing a digital version of the building to be used multiple times through various design techniques. A plethora of design activities were undertaken throughout the summer of 2016 as well as through unit ARC650 Research by Making. A constant dialogue between the students and the client was maintained in order to generate a stream of useful feedback. The programme altered through this dialogue from a workshop makers yard to a more controlled artist/gallery space. A 1:50 scale model was created utilising a monochromatic material pallet of pale timber. The model included various tectonic aspects present in the project proposal. A variety of miniature studios were created and located within the model communicating the design styles to the client in a more effective manner. A roof element was created to effectively capture how natural light will effect the space functionally and expressively. Personal Development Portfolio

Marlow Parker

The full design report for the gallery and studio intervention can be found in an adjoining document. The lighting design and control has been placed within ARC650 Research by Making design portfolio, as it encompasses the control and design of natural light for the developed spaces. The images on this page show how the building was initially documented in its existing state. Plans, Sections and Elevations and provided a platform to apply various architectural aspects that have been found throughout the material making process. Contact is still held with t he client and any ongoing design works will be documented and provided. The client is currently in the financial acquisition stage applying these drawings and designs for judgement of feasibility. The model and design documentation will aid in the communication of how the architectural project works when the client is showing various investors or public figures through the coming months.

Fig 89 - Existing Section - Width

Fig 90 - Existing Section - Length

Refl ecti v e Anal y s i s

List of Figures

The undertaking of this renovation project has allowed many aspects of the architectural discipline to be performed. The initial site visit added to the existing discourse of analysis and interpretation of the space and structure which requires development. Having a real client throughout the project has enabled the group to understand various challenges when working on a project which has the possibility of being built. Running this project alongside and partly within the ARC650 Unit has taught numerous applications of time management within the field of architecture. As the project encumbered multiple documentation and visualisation techniques the various tasks created the chance to refine AutoCAD drawing skills, Photoshop visualisation effects and photographic documentation applying the photography as an expressive element when understanding various designs within proposals. Design proposals and various refinements to existing details put forward will continue to be developed throughout the winter break of 2016/2017. Additional information will be given to the client regarding the technical details of construction and finalised placements of tectonic elements. Due to the client being in the financial acquisition phase has left the project open and halted at a certain point in the design methodology. The client has asked the group to perform cost analysis detailing the construction costs. However due to the group designing architectural spaces and lighting conditions the knowledge and experience is not yet held to apply an accurate costing figure. The hope being that the project moves through the financial acquisition phase so that more design implementation can be carried out as the project becomes realised in construction.

Fig 87 - CODA Map - Development Area - Authors Own Fig 88 - CODA Existing Plan and Elevation - Authors Own Fig 89 - Existing Section - Width - Authors Own Fig 90 - Existing Section - Length - Authors Own Fig 91 - CODA Building from Inner Courtyard.


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20.10 - CODA DESIGN PROJECT - M Parker, J Glynn and A Idriss

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CODA GALLERY AND INDIVIDUAL STUDIO PROPOSAL

CODA project to be split into 4 main entities 1. Gallery 2. Studios 1-5 3. Office 1 4. Office 2 The gallery space remains an open plan space to ensure maximum flexibility. Screens and planar furniture are to be used for the delineation of space whilst also serving a space to hang art work or other gallery artwork. The individual studios (3m x 3m) provide a private space for individual artists to carry out their craft.

COURTYARD

A larger double studio provides a larger space for various sized sculptures to be made. The studio can also be used by more than one person. (Joint ownership)

CODA MUSIC

Each studios are uniquely equipped to allow multiple crafts to be undertaken within. Be it hand craft, digital production, painting, sculpting, pottery etc. Office 1 and Office 2 are designed as open office spaces. These spaces again can be partitioned utilising desks, screens and moveable elements. Parking opposite the main barn allows the courtyard space to be free from cars allowing a pedestrianised space to be used for leisure or relaxation. Seating, playground equipment, Water feature, sculpture garden etc.

STORAGE

OFFICE 1

GALLERY

LOBBY

OFFICE 2

Arts University Bournemouth Marlow Parker Josh Glynn Amjad Idriss

CODA Chewton Farm Road Walkford Christchurch BH23 5QL

N

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19.00 - Calligraphy and Calligrams 44

D e s c r ip ti o n Throughout the summer of 2016 the art of calligraphy was relentlessly practiced in order to achieve not only better more artistic handwriting skills but to also improve various drafting qualities combined with calligraphy. A Gothic style of handwriting was learnt which required drawing each and every letter over and over again until the motion of movement becomes muscle memory. Other s tyles of handwriting were also practiced experimenting with differing typographies. The graphic design qualities through physical handwriting can become much more apparent in comparison to digital text or fonts. Through other research undertaken it was found that it takes decades of practice to become a master pen men and the only way for one to become better and more controlled at calligraphy is through continual practice. The calligraphy shown on the opposite page is just a few examples of writing techniques practiced. A small caligram has also been applied on the top right of the page. A caligram is a pictorial artwork created through a variety of calligraphy strokes. The art of calligraphy will continue to be practiced hopefully rendering better drawing skills and prov iding a stronger platform for use in architectural documentation. Practicing calligraphy ventured over to pen drawings as seen on the image to the right. These drawings are performed almost autonomously throughout the studies of architecture. A full collection of these drawings are located in the booklet ‘INK’ by Marlow Parker.

Personal Development Portfolio

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21.00 - Conclusion Conclus i on The entries within this personal development portfolio have allowed a variety of experiences to be analysed and documented for future reference. The quantity and variety of experiences undertaken has increased throughout BA (HONS) Architecture. The guest speakers who presented at AUB this term, held unique and inspirational qualities across a wide variety of topics. The construction works at RCHT and Agar road including the other entries have ensured that these external activities could be documented and assessed throughout the architecture degree. The continuation of external activities will ensure a rounded and broad ranging intellectual base progressing further into an architectural career pathway.

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22.00 - List of Figures 48

Fig 1 - Natural gas boiler - Authors Own Fig 2 - Steel C section support foundation - Authors Own Fig 3 - Main boiler pump sets - Authors Own Fig 4 - Electrical containment junction - Authors Own Fig 5 - (Opposite) Electrical containment - Authors Own Fig 6 - (Opposite) Electrical containment - Authors Own Fig 7 - (Opposite) New and existing stack - Authors Own Fig 8 - Large window, stairwell, bannister detail - Authors Own Fig 9 - Bedroom 2, window - Authors Own Fig 10 - Rear of house - Authors Own Fig 11 - Lounge, windows - Authors Own Fig 12 - (Opposite) Kitchen - Authors Own Fig 13 - (Opposite) Garden, patio - Authors Own Fig 14 - (Opposite) House front and parking - Authors Own Fig 15 - 18 - Riley, Fig 15 - 18 - Riley, B., Chapman, H. and Seligman, I. (2016) Lines of thought: Drawing from Michelangelo to now. United Kingdom: Thames & Hudson. Fig 19 - (Opposite) Authors Own Fig 20 - A Love Supreme 2001 - http://architectsfilmstudio.com/ projects/a-love-supreme/ Fig 21 - Great and Small 2013 - http://architectsfilmstudio.com/projects/ great-and-small/ Fig 22 - Great and Small 2013 - http://architectsfilmstudio.com/site/wpcontent/uploads/2016/01/Great-and-Small-Banner-2500x1400-Web.jpg Fig 23 - Bishop Edward King Chapel 2016 - http://architectsfilmstudio. com/projects/bishop-edward-king-chapel/ Fig 24 - Bishop Edward King Chapel - https://static1.squarespace.com Fig 25 - Poole BID Logo - https://www.atcm.org/_ inline/21748?rev=31637 Fig 26 - Poole BID Team - http://poolebid.com/wp-content/ uploads/2016/07/IMG_5504-624x416.jpg Fig 27 - Poole BID Zoned areas for consideration - http://poolebid.com/ wp-content/uploads/2015/07/poole-bid-areas.jpg Fig 28 - Poole bus station - http://poolebid.com/poole-bid-artsuniversity-work-together-help-town-centre-thrive/ Fig 29 - Poole high street - Authors Own Fig 30 - Sir Peter Cook drawing studio - Authors Own Fig 31 - Drawing studio, Secondary north light - Authors Own Fig 32 - Drawing studio, Primary north light - Authors Own Fig 33 - Drawing studio, Bench light - Authors Own Fig 34 - Drawing studio, Secondary north light #2 - Authors Own Fig 35 - Artsway gallery, Existing building - Authors Own Fig 36 - Artsway gallery, Existing chimney - Authors Own Fig 37 - Artsway Gallery Fretton Skylight - Authors Own Fig 38 - Artsway Gallery, Timber cladding, Intervention - Authors Own Fig 39 - Skylight 2 (Main Space) - Authors Own Fig 40 - Stephen Marshall Gallery Outside - Authors Own Fig 41 - Stephen Marshall Gallery Inside- Authors Own Fig 42 - Stephen Marshall Gallery Natural light moving in - Authors Own Fig 43 - Stephen Marshall Gallery, Almond painting- Authors Own Fig 44 - (Opposite) Stephen Marshall Gallery Skylight Detail - Authors Own Fig 45 - Clouds in the Sky - Peter Randall-Page - Authors Own Fig 46 - Weathering steel Sculpture - Anthony Caro - Authors Own Fig 47 - Days of Judgement - Laura Ford - Authors Own Fig 48 - Purple Spade - Michael Craig-Martin - Authors Own Fig 49 - Meta - Eva Rothschild - Authors Own Fig 50 - ‘Launch’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham - http:// rebeccanewnham.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Launch-atSalisbury-Cathedral-11.jpg Fig 51 -’Wave’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham - http:// rebeccanewnham.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/10-WAVE-2013copy1.jpg Fig 52 - ‘Sound Parabola Sculpture’ - Rebecca Newnham - http:// rebeccanewnham.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Sound-Parabolasoutside-Salisbury-Cathedral-5.jpg Fig 53 - ‘Black Soar’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham - http:// rebeccanewnham.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/50-BLACK-SOARSCULPTURES-2012.jpg Fig 54 - (Opposite) ‘Fledge - Increments of Flight’ Sculpture Rebecca Newnham - http://rebeccanewnham.com/wp-content/ uploads/2015/12/90-FLEDGE-INCREMENTS-OF-FLIGHT-a-2010.jpg

Personal Development Portfolio

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Fig 55 - Salisbury Cathedral - Authors Own Fig 56 - Salisbury Cathedral - Authors Own Fig 57 - Salisbury Cathedral ‘Launch’ Sculpture - Rebecca Newnham Fig 58 - Salisbury Cathedral - Authors Own Fig 59 - (Opposite) Salisbury Cathedral Main Hall - Authors Own Fig 60 - Design drawings - Haeckles Drawn Sauna - http:// m5.paperblog.com/i/97/976386/take-note-haeckels-L-6jyfMn.png Fig 61 - Haecles Products - http://assets.coolhunting.com/coolhunting/ mt_asset_cache/2015/06/haeckels-fragrance-gps-ace-hotel-london.jpg Fig 62 - Drawn Sauna (Beach) - http://www.urbanjunkies.com/lon/15/ images/1117-travel-4.jpg Fig 63 - Internal Sauna Space - http://haeckels.co.uk/wp-content/ uploads/2015/02/sauna-pics-1782x899.jpg Fig 64 - (Opposite) Haecles Drawn Sauna - http://haeckels.co.uk/wpcontent/uploads/2015/02/sauna-pics-1782x899.jpg Fig 65 - Paradise Circus regeneration Glen Howells - https://www. architectsjournal.co.uk/pictures/980x653fitpad[31]/9/4/1/1449941_2CS_ CHAMB_SQ_VIEW.jpg Fig 66 - Severn Trent Water - Glen Howells Architects - https:// www.architectsjournal.co.uk/pictures/1180xany/0/1/0/1331010_ GlennHowellsArchitects_SevernTrent___PaulMiller_Exterior.jpg Fig 67 - Savill Building - Glen Howells Architects - https://www.mimoa. eu/images/10888_l.jpg Fig 68 - Triangular housing model - Glen Howells Architects - http:// glennhowells.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/housing-triangle-5600x450.jpg Fig 69 - (Opposite) - National Memorial Arboretum - Glen Howells Architects - https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/ pictures/2000x2000fit/7/4/2/1301742_GHA_NMA_ExternalView.jpg Fig 70 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Entrance Canopy - Authors Own Fig 71 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Lower Courtyard - Authors Own Fig 72 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Roof Detail - Authors Own Fig 73 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Siberian Larch Cladding - Authors Own Fig 74 - Bridport Recycling Centre, Cladded geometry - Authors Own Fig 75 - https://media.licdn.com/mpr/mpr/shrinknp_200_200 Fig 76 - https://www.cfact.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Halley-VIlocation.png Fig 77 - https://www.architectural-review.com/Journals/8/ Files/2010/7/12/AR07_10_SKILL%C2%A9%207-t_Central%20 module%20interior.jpg Fig 78 - https://www.bas.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Halley-V1station-layout.jpg Fig 79 - http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/imageo/wp-content/blogs. dir/17/files/halley-research-station-antarctica/DSC_6243-2.jpg Fig 80 - http://www.architravel.com/pointofview/pointofview_wp/wpcontent/uploads/2014/10/Sir-Peter-Cook.jpg Fig 81 - https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-EaS5VOuaadw/ Vfj06N1r1rI/AAAAAAAAPyc/SJtc7vTt86E/w2048-h1478/ Peter%2BCook%2Bsketch%2B2.jpg Fig 82 -http://www.crab-studio.com/images/peter%20cook-s%20 drawings003.jpg Fig 83 - http://www.crab-studio.com/images/no%20crab%20 drawing%20studio%206-crop-u44815.jpg Fig 84 - http://www.crab-studio.com/images/icon%20image_kunsthaus. jpg Fig 85 - Steel Structure - Paul Kelly - Authors Own Fig 86 - Planning Application Drawings - Paul Kelly - Authors Own Fig 87 - CODA Map - Development Area - Authors Own Fig 88 - CODA Existing Plan and Elevation - Authors Own Fig 89 - Existing Section - Width - Authors Own Fig 90 - Existing Section - Length - Authors Own Fig 91 - CODA Building from Inner Courtyard.


MARLOW PARKER Personal Development Portfolio BA (HONS) Architecture

ARC650

Arts University Bournemouth 2016

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Profile for marlowparker

Personal Development Portfolio - 3rd Year BA Architecture  

Personal Development Portfolio - 3rd Year BA Architecture  

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