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Marling School Sixth Form Information Raising Aspirations, Inspiring Excellence Succeeding Together


Welcome I am delighted to welcome you to Marling School Sixth Form. I am very proud of the students and staff at this outstanding school and I am confident that you would thrive here. Marling School is a boys’ grammar school with a history of educational excellence and commitment to preparing young men for life and the wider world. We work collaboratively with Stroud High School; sharing facilities, the curriculum and many extra-curricular activities. We challenge all students in our Sixth Form to embrace the many opportunities on offer, to get involved in the full life of the Sixth Former and to broaden their horizons, while achieving their academic potential. Through these challenges students are well prepared for the next step; be that to read for a degree at university, undertake a skilled apprenticeship, embark on a gap year or enter the world of work. At Marling School Sixth Form we set high standards and expect Sixth Formers to lead by example. Our Sixth

Form students lead many activities in the school and play a valuable role supporting their peers and younger students. Students in Marling School Sixth Form are fully immersed in the life of the school and are an integral part of its success. We are delighted that you are taking an interest in the school and hope you will consider joining us. I hope that you find this document useful. Please don‘t hesitate to contact myself or any member of my team for information and please do ask our students what they think, as they are our best ambassadors. Mr Stephen Farr Head of Sixth Form

The Sixth Form Team Mr Stephen Farr

Head of Sixth Form

Ms Louise Harris

Assistant Head of Sixth Form, Head of Year 13

Mr Frank Gann

Head of Year 12

Mrs Heidi Vinton

Student Support

Mrs Jayne Elder

Study Supervisor & Attendance Officer

Ms Suzannah Dougherty

Senior Administrator


Life in the Sixth Form A Period of Transition – Why Sixth Form is Different Sixth Form lessons, Sixth Form study and fitting in a

Sixth Form social life in Year 12 can be very challenging. We expect you to work hard and enjoy your lessons. In addition you will have study periods every week which will allow you to begin independent work in school with the support of supervisors and librarians. Social life is very important to Sixth Form and many new students join the schools. You will make friendships for life while you are here.

Our Partnership

On joining Marling School Sixth Form you will become part of an 11 – 18 selective boys’ grammar school. We work in partnership with Stroud High School to offer students at both schools a range of academic courses,

enriching activities and an environment in which to flourish whilst maintaining our own school identity and an independent pastoral system. Both schools understand their responsibilities to develop the potential of young people at this stage of their education and the collaboration provides a vibrant learning experience. Most A level lessons are taught across both school sites with the majority of subjects being taught jointly by Stroud High School and Marling School teachers. We share a vision with Stroud High School of an outstanding Sixth Form, providing academic excellence, strong teaching and independent study. We are very proud of our Sixth Form students, the high standards they achieve in their learning and the positive contribution they make to both schools.

Supportive Environment Academic Support

We will track your progress on a regular basis throughout your time in the Sixth Form using data from a number of sources to give you a clear indication of how well you are doing. Your teachers will agree a target grade for you in your subjects, which will be based on national data and set at a challenging but achievable level. Your tutor will work closely with you to monitor your progress and ensure that you fulfil your potential. You will have opportunities throughout the year for one-to-one tutor meetings. They will also provide advice on future careers including references for university or employment. You will receive a sufficient number of study periods to learn independently. These give you the opportunity to complete your work, whilst having access to the resources in both schools. It is important that you use these study periods effectively. The key to success (and reduction of pressure later in the year) is to work during these periods and establish good habits. Our study rooms are staffed, so help is always at hand. To help you manage your study time, some of your study periods will be supervised.

Financial Support: 16-19 Bursary  tudents between 16 and 19 years old who think they S will struggle with the costs of full-time education are

eligible to apply for the 16-19 Bursary. The aim o  f the Bursary is to provide assistance to students whose access to, or completion of, education is inhibited by financial constraints or barriers. The Bursary can support students with travel costs, equipment, books and other study-related costs. Payment will be dependent on meeting agreed attendance, achievement and behaviour criteria as laid out in the school’s Student Learning Agreement. Please see our website for more details.

Pastoral Care

Your well-being and happiness are very important to us and key to you enjoying your time here and achieving your personal best. Your first line of support is your tutor; all our tutors have considerable experience. Our Sixth Form centre staff offer support on all aspects of school life and are available to talk to about anything that affects our students’ a  bility to be successful. In particular we can provide assistance on issues relating to health, well-being, family and relationships, coordinating work for long-term absences, home-study arrangements, practical support with workload, and working with outside agencies. It is important that you feel happy and confident so that you can be successful in your studies.


UCAS/Careers Advice

The large majority of our students continue on to higher education and we have a team of dedicated and experienced staff who can provide you with advice and guidance on UCAS preparation and how to apply to universities in the UK and abroad. Details of our UCAS programme and support for Oxbridge, M  edicine, Veterinary, D  entistry and other competitive courses can be found on our website. We also offer a comprehensive careers programme to aid you with all careers decisions including guidance on preparing CVs for job applications and how to apply for higher level apprenticeships. You will also have the opportunity

to a  ttend our annual Futures Day and Careers Fair during which you can select a range of talks and presentations by higher education providers and professionals from a variety of industry sectors.

A Curriculum of Depth and Breadth Why A Levels?

A levels are a key component to progressing to university and higher level apprenticeships. They are well-established and well-known to employers as well as universities and are suitable for students who are both sure and unsure about the direction of their future career.

Choosing Your Programme of Study

Deciding which A levels to take is not a decision to be taken lightly. Choosing the right combination can prove daunting, but if you are methodical, take your time, and ask lots of questions you will find the subjects which are right for you. You will need to think carefully about your interests, skills and about possible directions post 18. Different skill sets are required for different subjects and you should consider the skills involved in each and compare them with your current abilities based on performance at GCSE level. Remember that the skills required at A level may be very different and significantly higher than those at GCSE.

Some subjects require practical skills such as using laboratory equipment, others benefit from having the confidence to debate and discuss controversial issues. Some may involve significant background reading and essay writing or require independent reading, others a lot of creativity. The way a subject is assessed might also be important to you, particularly if assessment involves a lot of project work. These a  re all factors to be considered before making your final choice. These are things to bear in mind when choosing A level subjects:

Certain subjects are a requirement for pursuing a particular course at university or your career path

If you have a clear idea of the course you wish to study at university, research the course entry requirements carefully. Universities will require certain subjects for particular courses and some have GCSE requirements too. For example, you will need to take at least two science subjects to apply for medicine and dentistry or


a drama course might require that you have at least one essay-based A level. Remember that different universities will have different policies so research a wide range of providers.

Remember it is worth investing time and effort to research your intended subjects to keep your options open and enable you to make a well-informed decision about which subjects to take.

You have a genuine interest in and enjoy the subjects

Curriculum

You should have a real interest in the subjects you intend to study. Ensure you have researched the content and detail of the course beforehand. Being motivated to explore your subjects fully will ultimately play a key role in determining eventual success.

You wish to discover a new subject

Prior knowledge of a subject is not always a prerequisite – you may however be required to show an aptitude in another related subject. Some subjects are also very different to what you experience at GCSE. Beware of taking a subject just because it sounds interesting. If you wish to study a subject that you have not studied at GCSE level it is essential to find out more about the course content. Ask lots of questions of the students and teachers in that subject.

The programme of study for students at Marling School Sixth Form is a two year academic programme, based on three or four subjects started in September of Year 12 and completed to A level in the summer of Year 13. In addition to A level sutdy, students will be required to select a ‘breadth’ option which is followed in Year 12. Breadth options available to students may include, Extended Project Qualification (EPQ), Gold Duke of Edinburgh Award, Sports Leadership Qualification, in addition to taught courses in Global Perspectives and Maths for Other Subjects. .

Admissions How to apply

Our Sixth Form offers opportunities for students who fulfil the academic criterion of Grade 6 in five separate, full course GCSE subjects. Students should have a minimum Grade 5 in English Language and Mathematics. Students should meet individual subject requirements as listed on the subject entry requirements document, usually Grade 6 or Grade B where applicable in their chosen subjects if previously taken at GCSE level, or a relevant subject as specified. Currently we cannot support students who need to re-take GCSEs. The maximum Year 12 cohort for September 2018 is 150. All Year 11 Marling students who meet the published academic entry requirements can expect to be allocated a place in the Sixth Form, as well as a minimum planned admission number of 30 external candidates (see our Admissions Policy on the Marling School website for specific details, including the over-subscription criteria). The application process begins with our Sixth Form Open Evening which is run jointly with Stroud High School Sixth Form and which takes place at the beginning of

November. The evening provides an opportunity to find out about our A level courses, their outline programmes, their assessment methods and the enrichment and career opportunities associated with each. There is also a chance to discuss course choices with subject leaders of each department and with current Sixth Form students. It is very important to ask students what they do and whether it is enjoyable. Application forms are provided at the Open Evening together with detailed information on the courses available (the application process and forms are available on the school website also). Our deadline for applications will be published on our website each year. Following submission of the application form, external applicants are invited to attend the Information, Advice and Guidance Meeting (IAG) with a senior member of the teaching staff to discuss course choices and other aspects of life in the Sixth Form and the school in general. Applicants are then notified in April to confirm a conditional offer and subject choices. Final places in Year 12 are subsequently confirmed following GCSE results day in August.


Induction for New Sixth Form Students Support and advice for students new to the Sixth Form begins before enrolment day. We hold our Induction Days during the last week of the academic year in July when you will have an opportunity to meet with subject teachers and key members of staff. The focus of our first Induction Day is to allow you to get to know Marling School and Marling School Sixth Form. We will also provide information and further details on what to do on GCSE Results Day.

Our second Induction Day is run jointly with Stroud High School Sixth Form. The focus of this day is to prepare you for the academic year ahead. You will meet teachers from your proposed areas of study who will provide advice and guidance on the transition from Year 11 to Year 12. You will also be given preparatory work to complete over the summer in order to bridge the large gap between GCSE and A level study, and you will have tours of both Stroud High School and Marling School sites.

Facilities Both Stroud High School Sixth Form and Marling School Sixth Form share a purpose-built Sixth Form centre which is located between the two main school sites. The building includes classrooms, two supervised study rooms with ICT facilities, cafĂŠ area and 160 seat lecture theatre. The two schools also share a number of other

facilities on their adjoining sites such as a music hall with accompanying music rooms, a design technology centre and science laboratories.

Wednesday Enrichment and Monday Tutor Period Monday Afternoons (fortnightly)

Work Shadowing Week

One-to-one tutor meetings You will meet with your tutor to discuss your progress and any needs you may have. This allows us to plan effectively to make sure that your time with us is productive and that you can plan for your future.

Other Academic Opportunities/ Extracurricular Activities

Enhanced Curriculum This is a tutor period in which you will spend time with your tutor or attend talks by visiting speakers. All students attend these sessions, which cover the wider curriculum and IAG.

Wednesday afternoons (weekly) We expect all students to get involved in an enrichment activity of some sort. You could sign up to be part of a club or society, undertake voluntary work, do a sporting activity or start your own society. Team sports are played on Wednesday afternoons.

In recognition of the importance of work experience, Year 12 students currently benefit from a week in the summer term where they are required to secure a work placement relevant to their potential future career/interests. We advise students to start thinking about this early in Year 12.

As well as seeking academic success, we believe Sixth Form students should be given the opportunity to develop skills and qualities which will prepare them for the future. We encourage students to get involved in a range of activities to develop the broad range of skills essential for the world of work or higher education. You will be offered every opportunity to assume positions of responsibility and to develop self-confidence and leadership skills whilst in Sixth Form.


Opportunities in the Sixth Form include:

School Service Volunteering in the Community Work Shadowing Crest Award Engineering Projects Exchanges to France, Spain and Germany Debating  Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award Enterprise Projects International and National Educational Visits Membership of the Sixth Form Council Mentoring Scheme Worldwide Expeditions Recreational Sport/Sports Teams Societies and Clubs (Medical, Philosophy, P  sychology, Music, Particle Physics, Film)

Marling School Leadership Opportunities  he school offers all Year 12 students the opportunity to T

stand for leadership posts in the school. Students taking up these positions have a key role to play in representing the school and supporting the students throughout the school. Posts available include: Head Boy Deputy Head Boy Prefect Sixth Form Council elections occur every year for the Chair, Vice Chair, Secretary and Treasurer roles, and there are representatives from each Tutor group on the Council. The Council represents the views of students in Sixth Form and is responsible for organising the Year 13 Prom.

Dress Code

 ur current dress code includes: O Smart trousers (no jeans) Collared shirt (smart polo shirt is acceptable) Jumper (no hoodies) Jacket (weather dependent) Ties (optional) Smart leather shoes

 .40am – 8.50am 8 Morning Registration 8.50am – 9.50am Period 1 9.50am – 10.50am Period 2 10.50am – 11.10am Break 11.10am – 12.10pm Period 3 12.10pm – 1.10pm Period 4 1.10pm – 2.10pm Lunch 2.10pm – 2.25pm Tutor Period/Assemblies 2.25pm – 3.25pm Period 5 The Sixth Form building is open to students from 8.00am – 4.30pm

Term Dates 2018 - 2019  erm 1  T

Monday 3 September – Friday 19 October 2018 Term 2  Monday 29 October – Friday 21 December 2018 Term 3  Monday 7 January – Friday 15 February 2019 Term 4 Monday 25 February – Friday 5 April 2019 Term 5 Tuesday 23 April – Friday 24 May 2019 Term 6 Monday 3 June – Tuesday 23 July 2019

Application Dates

Thursday 9th November 2017 Sixth Form Open Evening Friday 2nd February 2018 Deadline for applications to Sixth Form(Sept 2018 Entry) February and March 2018 Information, Advice & Guidance Meetings Friday 29th March 2018 Conditional offer letter confirming subject choices Monday 16th July 2018 Induction Day One Tuesday 17th July 2018 Induction Day Two

The School Day

Thursday 23rd August 2018 GCSE Results Day


Exam Results

Marling School Sixth Form A Level Results 2017

A* A B C D E U

Art & Design: Fine Art

1 3 1 0 0 0 0

Art & Design: Graphics

2 0 0 0 0 0 0

Art & Design: Photography

2

Biology

3 3 2 5 7 2 1

Business Studies

1 0 5 4 3 0 0

Chemistry

3 8 4 4 2 2 3

Computer Science

0 0 3 5 4 1 1

Drama

0 0 0 1 1 0 0

DT: 3D Product Design

2

1

1

1

0

0

0

Economics

0

3

6

3

4

2

0

English Language & Literature 

0 1 0 1 2 0 0

English Literature

3

12

10

4

0

0

0

French

1

1

3

1

0

0

0

3

1

0

0

0

0



Geography

2 5 10 6 1 1 0

German

0 2 0 0 0 0 0

History

3

5

8

11

3

0

0

13

10

13

10

6

6

0

Mathematics





Mathematics Further

4 4 3 4 0 0 0

Music Technology 

1 1 1 2 1 0 0

Philosophy, Ethics & Belief

0

2

4

3

2

0

0

Physical Education

0

1

1

0

2

1

0 

Physics

4

4

9

5

9

0

0 

Politics & Government 0

3

9

3

2

0

0

Psychology

0

0

5

2

3

1

0

Sociology 

0 1 1 4 4 0 0

Spanish

0 0 0 0 1 0 0

Total 

45 73 100 79 57 16 5

Marling School Sixth Form A Level Results 2017 Compared to National Results

Marling School

Boys Only National Results

% A*-A

31%

26%

% A*-B

58%

51%

% A*-C

79%

75%

% A*-E

99%

98%

16 students achieved 3 or more A grade pass


Combined Marling School Sixth Form and Stroud High School Sixth Form A Level 2017 Results

A* A B C D E U

Art & Design: Fine Art

3 5 3 2 0 0 0

Art & Design: Graphics

2 0 1 0 0 0 0

Art & Design: Photography

6

Biology

8 13 11 11 18 9 4

Business Studies

1 1 6 0 2 1 0

Chemistry

6 17 11 8 10 3 5

Computer Science

0 0 3 5 5 1 1

Drama

0 2 3 2 1 0 0

DT: 3D Product Design

2

DT: Textiles

1 1 0 1 0 0 0

Economics

0

English Language & Literature 

0 1 3 3 3 0 0

English Literature

15

24

28

7

3

0

0

French

4

7

6

2

0

0

0

9

1

3

3

2 6

0

2 3

0

0 4

0

0 2

0

0 0

Geography

3 13 19 13 4 3 0

German

1 3 0 1 1 0 0

History

5

10

21

11

9

6

0

17

18

23

15

9

0

0

Mathematics





Mathematics Further

5 5 3 4 0 0 0

Music

0 1 3 3 0 0 0

Music Technology 

1 1 1 2 1 0 0

Philosophy, Ethics & Belief

1

2

6

4

2

1

1

Physical Education

0

2

2

1

3

2

0

Physics

4

6

13

6

13

0

0

Politics & Government

4

12

11

5

2

0

0

Psychology

6

1

14

11

5

2

1

Sociology 

2 4 3 8 8 0 1

Spanish

0 4 1 1 1 0 0

Total 

97 166 206 131 104 30 13

Marling School Sixth Form Destinations

Of the Year 13 boys completing A Levels in 2017, 96 students were accepted at UK Universities this year. Others are attending Art college, doing apprenticeships, taking a gap year or applying in 2018. University destinations include: 4 at Oxbridge universities, 1 at LSE, 1 at KCL. 42% of students are at Russell Group Universities.


SUBJECT DESCRIPTORS

*Specific entry criterion for each subject are listed in a separate document and can be found on our website, or in our prospectus pack.

Art & Design – Fine Art (Classes are timetabled alongside Graphic Communication) Why Study Fine Art?  he art industry is the third largest income generator in T

the UK and there are numerous possibilities for art-based careers. Many of our students go on to follow courses in non-related art subjects and take with them transferable skills and a greater aesthetic awareness. Students choose from a range of themes, use of media and approaches relevant to Fine Art. The aim of this course is to provide maximum flexibility and will be tailored to meet students’ particular strengths and interests.

Course Details – Exam Board: AQA

Coursework Portfolio: portfolio of practical work with an emphasis on developing ideas and experimenting with media; students submit one practical project with final outcomes and a body of supporting work.

Controlled Assessment: students select one starting point from an exam board question paper; preparatory time to complete practical work, research artists and plan for the final piece (15 hours controlled time). Personal Investigation: production of one combined unit of written and practical work with a related written study into the work of an artist or designer (3,000 words). Controlled Assessment: students select one starting point from an exam board question paper; preparatory time to complete practical work, research artists and plan, prepare and realise ideas into a final piece or outcomes (15 hours controlled time).

Art & Design – Graphic Communication (Classes are timetabled alongside Fine Art) Why Study Graphic Communication?

The art industry is the third largest income generator in the UK and there are numerous possibilities for art-based careers. Many of our students go on to follow courses in non-related art subjects and take with them transferable skills and a greater aesthetic awareness. Students choose from a range of themes, use of media and approaches relevant to Graphic Communication. The aim of this course is to provide maximum flexibility and will be tailored to meet students’ particular strengths and interests.

Course Details – Exam Board: AQA

Coursework Portfolio: portfolio of practical work with an emphasis on developing ideas and experimenting with media; students submit one practical project with final outcomes and a body of supporting work.

Controlled Assessment: students select one starting point from an exam board question paper; preparatory time to complete practical work, research artists and plan for the final piece (15 hours controlled time). Personal Investigation: production of one combined unit of written and practical work with a related written study into the work of an artist or designer (3,000 words). Controlled Assessment: students select one starting point from an exam board question paper; preparatory time to complete practical work, research artists and plan, prepare and realise ideas into a final piece or outcomes (15 hours controlled time).


Art & Design – Photography Why Study Photography?  he art industry is the third largest income generator T

in the UK and there are numerous possibilities for art-based careers. Many of our students go on to follow courses in non-related art subjects and take with them transferable skills and a greater aesthetic awareness. Students choose from a range of themes, use of media and approaches relevant to Photography. The aim of this course is to provide maximum flexibility and will be tailored to meet students’ particular strengths and interests.

Course Details – Exam Board: AQA  oursework Portfolio: portfolio of practical work using C

Controlled Assessment: students select one starting point from an exam board question paper; preparatory time to complete practical work, research photographers and plan for the final piece (15 hours controlled time). Personal Investigation: production of one combined unit of written and practical work with a related written study into the work of a photographer (3,000 words). Controlled Test: students select one starting point from an exam board question paper; preparatory time to complete practical work, research artists and to plan, prepare and realise ideas into a final piece or outcomes (15 hours controlled time).

digital photography techniques with an emphasis on developing ideas and experimenting with media; students submit two practical projects with final outcomes and a body of supporting work and are taught how to use a 35mm film camera and traditional darkroom techniques.

Biology Why Study Biology?

 iology involves the study of a wide range of topics B ranging from molecular Biology to the study of ecosystems and from microorganisms to mammals. It offers the opportunity to examine the background to areas such as GM foods, conservation of species, cloning, vaccines and ‘factory farming’. The skills acquired in the study of Biology equip students for a variety of careers in the health and clinical professions as well as biologically related higher education courses. Other students use Biology as a valuable subject to take them on to a wide variety of other further and higher education courses.

Course Details – Exam Board: OCR A

The specification is divided into topics, each covering different key concepts of Biology. Teaching of practical skills is integrated with the theoretical topics and they are assessed through the written papers: there is no separate practical exam.

Year 12 starts with foundation topics: cell structure; biological molecules; nucleotides and nucleic acids; enzymes; biological membranes; cell division, cell diversity and cellular organisation. Then the course continues to explore topics about exchange and transport and biodiversity, evolution and disease. In Year 13 you will continue to study two further modules about communications, homeostasis and energy and genetics, evolution and ecosystems. Practical work is integrated into the lessons and is teacher assessed. You will be expected to complete a minimum of twelve practical activities to demonstrate practical competence. The practical endorsement is reported separately to the A level grade.


Business Studies Why Study Business Studies?

 his subject is of general interest and useful for T whatever career path you are going to follow, whether in employment or running your own business. You will develop the necessary knowledge and understanding of the local, national and international environment and the decision-making processes of business. Business Studies is ideal preparation for those students wishing to pursue further study in the field of Business and/or Management, either as a main subject in its own right, or in combination with other subjects.

Course Details – Exam Board: AQA

Examination papers use a variety of assessment styles including multiple choice, short answer, data response, essay and case studies so that students feel more confident and engage with the questions. Real life case studies will be used wherever possible to make it easier for students to relate to and apply their knowledge and skills developed throughout the course.

Students should be competent and comfortable dealing with mathematical calculations and the interpretation of numbers and percentages. You should possess, or be willing to develop, strong analysis and evaluation skills plus an interest in business.

Chemistry Why Study Chemistry?

Chemistry at A level is a prerequisite for many courses in higher education and for many areas of employment. The primary reason for choosing to study Chemistry would be because you enjoyed studying the subject at GCSE level. It is a long-established and academic qualification that can allow progression into a number of career areas including the chemical, chemical engineering, materials science and biotechnology industries. In addition, Chemistry is essential for careers in medicine, pharmacology and environmental science. Chemistry is also a well respected subject in its own right and suitable for entry into a wide range of other professions. The unique skills which are learned in a science discipline are transferable to many different careers and would most certainly improve your employment prospects.

Course Details – Exam Board: OCR 

The specification is divided into topics, each covering different key concepts of Chemistry. Teaching of practical skills is integrated with the theoretical topics and they are assessed through the written papers: there is no separate practical exam.

Year 12 starts with foundation topics: atomic structure & bonding; shapes of molecules, intermolecular forces, the mole concept; and the periodic table. Then the course continues to explore other areas of Chemistry such as physical Chemistry (equilibria, energetics and reaction kinetics) and organic Chemistry (alkanes, alkenes, mechanisms, isomerism, alcohols, haloalkanes and instrumental techniques: infra-red spectroscopy & mass spectrometry). In Year 13 you will continue to study two further modules: Physical Chemistry & Transition Elements (concepts include: enthalpy, entropy, free energy, electrode potentials, pH and buffers) and Organic Chemistry & Analysis (Topics include: arenes, carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids, amines, polymers, nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography. Practical work is integrated into the lessons and is teacher assessed. You will be expected to complete a minimum of 12 practical activities to demonstrate practical competence. The practical endorsement is reported separately to the A level grade.


Computer Science Why Study Computer Science?

From Facebook to running nuclear power stations, software development is at the heart of modern living. With an emphasis on abstract thinking, general problem solving, algorithmic and mathematical reasoning, scientific and engineering-based thinking, Computer Science opens the door to a wide range of careers and further study, both with universities and colleges, IT companies and those who use computers in industry, commerce, the armed services and government service. Roles span technical innovation, management, analysis, consultancy, training and research. Employers range from small companies to large multinationals with much scope for work and travel abroad.

Course Details – Exam Board: OCR H446  t the heart of Computer Science lies the notion of A

Computer Science is a practical subject where learners can apply the academic principles learned in the classroom to real world systems. The project element is a vital component which is relevant to further education, higher education and the workplace where students can tailor it to suit their own individual needs, choices and aspirations. Through this qualification, students can develop an understanding of, and ability to apply, the fundamental principles and concepts of Computer Science including: abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms and data representation; the ability to analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including writing programs to do so; the ability to articulate the individual (moral), social (ethical), legal and cultural opportunities and risks of digital technology.

computational thinking: a mode of thought that goes well beyond software and hardware, and provides a framework within which to reason about systems and problems. Learners will develop an ability to analyse, critically evaluate and make decisions.

Drama & Theatre Why Study Drama and Theatre Studies?

 rama and Theatre Studies is for students who wish to D increase their practical and theoretical understanding of the theatre and performance. It is suitable for those who are interested in a career in the creative arts, those who wish to study an A level which complements English Literature or indeed for those students who desire an interesting contrast between their options. The course has a strong practical element to meet higher education requirements. Students are expected to attend several theatre visits organised by the department. Drama and Theatre Studies suits students who enjoy a mix of individual skill development and group work. For those students hoping to get into drama school, Drama and Theatre is the most relevant A level subject to take but studying Drama also helps develop key transferable skills useful in any industry, such as creative thinking, negotiation, leadership and collaboration.

Course Details – Exam Board: AQA

 omponent 1: Drama and Theatre (40%): 3 hour written C exam (study of two set texts and evaluation of live theatre). Component 2: Creating Original Drama (practical) (30%): create an original piece of drama from a stimulus of your choice, in the role of an actor, director or designer. Assessed through performance and written working notebook. Component 3: Making theatre (practical) (30%): a practical exploration of three extracts from three different plays in the role of actor, director or designer. Assessed through performance and written Reflective Report.


DT - 3D Product Design Resistant materials and graphic products Why Study Product Design?

Design and Technology courses provide an opportunity for students to develop their own creativity, capability and encourage entrepreneurial skills, to apply knowledge and understanding to a range of technological activities and to develop critical thinking. It allows you to ‘think outside the box’ and provides capability in a variety of life skills. Students have used the course as a foundation for a variety of higher education courses or career paths. In recent years students have moved on to Art Foundation courses or degree courses in architecture, product design, a wide variety of engineering specialisms, business management and teaching.

Course Details – Exam Board: AQA Paper1: Technical principles (30% of A level)

Paper 2: Designing and making principles (20% of A level) NEA(coursework): Practical application of technical principles, designing and making principles (50% of A level). This is a substantial single design and make task over two years.

DT - Art & Design Textiles Why Study Art & Design Textiles?

The Art & Design Textiles course allows students to demonstrate high levels of innovation and creativity. Students will learn a wide range of Textile skills refining their understanding of surface pattern and design. They will learn to appreciate the relationship of form and function and working to the constraints of a brief. Students will produce practical and folio work following projects in a range of disciplines, for example, fashion design, fashion textiles, costume design, interior design, art textiles and installed textiles. They will understand a variety of textile methods, such as fabric printing and colouring, fabric construction and stitching (applique, patchwork, padding, quilting and/or embroidery). Students will also learn how ideas, feelings and meanings can be conveyed and interpreted in images and artefacts created in their chosen area of Textile Design. Over the two years, students will produce two portfolios and two major made outcomes inspired by different styles and genres which can be used to support applications and interviews for Art-based courses at degree level. There are a huge variety of careers that can follow a textile-based degree, as we live in a world surrounded and encased with textiles, from fashion

textiles, to interior textiles to automotive and performance textiles; jobs include, design, buying, textile design assistant, studio assistant, product assistant, fashion adviser, design consultant, merchandiser, print maker and textile technologist.

Course Details – Exam Board: AQA

This is an exciting and vibrant course delivered through the investigation of the work of Artists and Designers and developed through experimentation of a wide range of media and skills. In the first year students produce a full portfolio of work and a made outcome. Year 13 students produce a full portfolio of work and outcome in a personal assessment worth 60% of the total A level and a 15 hour externally set assignment toward the end of the year making up the remaining 40%. All units are controlled assessment and coursework based; there is no written examination.


Economics Why Study Economics?

Economics is a social science that concerns the fabric of social relations. From the choices available to you on the high street to your career prospects, as well as broad issues such as environmental sustainability and global poverty, an understanding of economic concepts helps us to understand what is happening around us and why. Students with an economics background are employed by the government, large corporations, charities and research organisations as professional economists. They also enter m  anagement in both the private and public sector. Higher education establishments offer a variety of degree courses, from pure Economics to a combination of Economics and many other subjects. Economics forms a major component of many business and accountancy courses and, at post-graduate level, a qualification in Economics is essential for environmental, social or development studies.

Students should be competent and comfortable dealing with mathematical calculations and the interpretation of numbers and percentages. You should possess, or be willing to develop, strong analysis and evaluation skills plus a broader interest in economic issues nationally and globally.

Course Details – Exam Board: OCR

 efore the A level qualification can be given, three B mandatory components must be completed at the end o  f the course, focusing on microeconomics, macroeconomics and themes in economics, with the latter offering an opportunity for students to apply theories and concepts to up-to-date contexts. The Economics content encourages the students to ‘think as economists’ and develop the appropriate range of analytical, questioning and reasoning skills to achieve this objective. In addition, the qualification will enable learners to develop strong grounding in both microeconomics and macroeconomics, drawing on local, national and global contexts.

English Literature Why Study English Literature?

An A level in English Literature is well regarded by universities and business institutions. It is an ideal complement to all other subjects, because it provides communication, reflection, forward thinking and creativity. Taking English at degree level offers a wide variety of career options in both the academic and vocational arenas. The A level course not only allows you to develop your interest and enjoyment of literary study, but also hones your skills of analysis, evaluation, problem solving and communication which prepare you for the world of work, whatever career you decide to pursue. The breadth of opportunity the course offers allows students who are passionate about reading to engage with a range of texts from the Victorian novel to the contemporary poetry scene.

Course Details – Exam Board: Edexcel  omponent 1: Drama 30% C Shakespeare: Measure for Measure Other Drama: Streetcar Named Desire

Component 2: Prose 20% The Picture of Dorian Gray and Dracula Component 3: Poetry 30% The poetry of John Keats and post-2000 poetry compared to unseen poetry Component 4: Coursework 20% Students produce one comparative assignment 2500-3000 words


French Why Study Modern Languages?

It is now commonplace for proficiency in languages to be sought among employers. More and more professions require you to work in a multilingual environment and there are few companies who do not have customers, if not branches, abroad. Just look at some higher education prospectuses and you will see how many of them combine science, ICT, engineering, management and business studies with languages. Consider the advantages you will have if you have the ability to speak another language, coupled with a sound understanding of the politics and culture of the country or countries concerned. Not just travel companies, but also business, finance, technology, media, creative and science-based professions are all increasingly looking for graduates who can offer a range of skills including language proficiency.

Course Details – Exam Board: Eduqas

Component 1: Speaking Component 2: Listening, reading and translation. Component 3: Critical and analytical response in writing.

The themes covered in Year 12 are social issues and trends and political, intellectual and artistic culture. In Year 13, students will explore the themes of diversity and difference, and France from 1940-1950 - the Occupation and post-war years. Students study two works of French literature and two French films over the two year course including the recent film “Intouchables” and “La Haine” as well as the texts “No et moi” and “L’Entranger”. Alongside lessons, students have weekly speaking sessions with the French Language Assistant who helps students to develop confidence and skill levels in spoken French. Marling School and Stroud High School have a long running exchange with Lycée St Joseph in Ancenis and as part of the Year 12 course, students are offered the opportunity to take part in this exchange where they will undertake several days of work experience in France as well as enjoying a day trip to a French city.

Geography Why Study Geography?  eography helps to improve a number of valuable G

learning and life skills such as ICT, communication, numeracy and literacy skills. It teaches you how to handle and organise data and resources and is therefore seen as a good subject to study by future employers. Geography is a varied subject and can be taken at university either as a BSc or a BA. It is often available as a joint honours degree, combining with subjects such as development, economics, and environmental and sports sciences. It can lead to subject-linked careers such as town planning, surveying, hydrology, meteorology and ordnance survey planning or it can be used as a degree basis for further training in any subject.

Course Details – Exam Board: AQA

A balance is maintained between Physical and Human Geography with a greater emphasis on the interaction between these and the environment. Core skills are assessed including graphical, cartographic, GIS and the application of knowledge within different contexts. Fieldwork is central to the course with a requirement of four days off-site fieldwork. Fieldwork will be assessed though coursework. In Year 12 all students will study Hazards, Water and the Carbon Cycle, Changing Places and Skills. In Year 13 the units are Global Systems and Global Governance, Coasts, Population and the Environment, as well as some additional statistical skills.


German Why Study Modern Languages?

It is now commonplace for proficiency in languages to be sought among employers. More and more professions require you to work in a multilingual environment and there are few companies who do not have customers, if not branches, abroad. Just have a look at some higher education prospectuses and you will see how many of them combine science, ICT, engineering, management and business studies with languages. Consider the advantages you will have if you have the ability to speak another language, coupled with a sound understanding of the politics and culture of the country or countries concerned. Not just travel companies, but also business, finance, technology, media, creative and science-based professions are all increasingly looking for graduates who can offer a range of skills including language proficiency. German is the Smart Choice. Leaving aside the exciting opportunities to live and work in a German-speaking country, the CBI, the UK’s premier business lobbying organisation, considers German as one of the most useful foreign languages for organisations in the UK.

Course Details – Exam Board: Eduqas Component 1: Speaking (30% of the qualification)

Component 2: Listening, reading and translation (50% of the qualification) Component 3: Critical and analytical response in writing (20% of the qualification)

Topics and Themes

-Social issues and trends -Families and citizenship -Youth trends and personal identity -Education and employment opportunities -Being a young person in German-speaking society -Political, intellectual and artistic culture -Regional culture and heritage in Germany -Geman-speaking countries and communities -Media, art, film and music in the German-speaking world -Diversity and differences -Migration and integration -Cultural identity and marginalisation -Cultural enrichment and celebrating difference -The making of modern Germany: 1989 onwards -Initial and subsequent process of reunification -Social cohesion in present day Germany -The economic impact of a united Germany We also recap all grammar points from GCSE as well as introducing more advanced grammar points to help you through your A level studies. We use authentic materials from German media including newspaper and website articles, as well as film and news video clips. Our German assistant will also help to improve your confidence and ability in spoken German in order to prepare you for the oral exam. Students will also study one film and one book.


History Why Study History?

History is a fascinating subject in its own right – it is about people, so if you find other people interesting, you will find history fascinating. It also helps us make sense of the modern world we live in and has an important contribution to make to life-long learning. It enables you to develop the ability to communicate clearly, synthesise and critically evaluate information – transferable skills which provide an excellent foundation for a number of careers and which are valued by employers. Higher education institutions welcome historians onto History specific/History-related courses as well as degrees in law, journalism and business.

Unit 2 (Non-British period study.) -Y216: ‘The USA in the 19th Century: Westward expansion and Civil War, 1803 – c.1890. Unit 3 (Thematic study and historical interpretations.) Y321: ‘The Middle East, 1908 – 2011: Ottomans to Arab Spring. Unit 4 (Non-exam assessment.) - Y100: ‘Topic-based essay.’ Unit 4 involves students carrying out an independently researched essay of 3000 – 4000 words in length. The essay produced will be marked by the teacher(s) and moderated by the exam board (OCR).

Course Details – Exam Board: OCR

Unit 1 (British period study and enquiry.) - Y110: ‘From Pitt to Peel: Britain, 1783 – 1853.’ The Enquiry topic for Unit 1 will be: ‘Peel and the Age of Reform, 1832 – 1853.

Mathematics Why Study Mathematics?

You may wish to consider the continued study of Mathematics because you enjoy logical thinking, want to find out more about how Mathematics is used in the real world, derive satisfaction from problem solving or wish to delve deeper into the mathematical ideas introduced at GCSE level. Mathematics complements a vast number of other subjects as well as being an important qualification in its own right and is an essential qualification for some career and higher education opportunities. A good grade can lead to a wide range of mathematical subjects at higher education and supports scientific and technical subjects which always have a mathematical component.

Course Details – Exam Board: Edexcel

A Level Mathematics consists of three elements, pure mathematics, statistics and mechanics. . Pure mathematics develops aspects of the subject already met at GCSE, such as quadratic equations, coordinate geometry and trigonometry, while introducing new fields such as calculus and logarithms. The statistics content combines more sophisticated ways of interpreting and processing data, such as linear regression and standard deviation, with an extension of the fundamentals of probability that were introduced at GCSE. Meanwhile mechanics covers the use of the formulae for uniform acceleration, in conjunction with the application of Newton’s laws of motion. All three aspects are covered in Year 12 before being re-visited in greater depth and complexity in Year 13.


Mathematics – Further Exam Board: Edexcel

Strong mathematicians can finish with two A Levels – one in Mathematics and the other in Further Mathematics. Further Mathematics students will be taught in a separate group from the single Mathematics students, thus allowing for a pace of learning more suited to highly able students. Studying for this additional qualification will allow students to gain greater breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding of the subject. For instance, students could have the opportunity to study decision mathematics, which would be an entirely new strand of the subject to them, while also taking the ideas introduced in the Mathematics qualification to a much more complex level.

Clearly this ‘double’ qualification is an extremely powerful one for those strong enough mathematically to study it. Although it is rarely a stated requirement for entry to courses in higher education it is highly recommended that students have studied it if they intend to study Mathematics, Engineering or certain scientific courses at some universities. Indeed, some students may find themselves at a disadvantage if they apply for such courses without having studied Further Mathematics at A level.

Music Why Study Music?

 level Music is aimed at students who wish to (i) develop A their skills and understanding of music, (ii) study music or a combined arts subject in higher education and pursue a vocation in music and/or the arts or (iii) who wish to broaden their experience and deepen their understanding of both live and recorded music as part of lifelong learning. This course can lead to the study for a BMus or BA in Music or a combined arts course. Students who are particularly gifted instrumentalists or singers (Grade 8+) could apply for a performing course at one of the conservatoires of music such as The Royal Academy of Music or The Guildhall School of Music.

Course Details - Exam Board:WJEC Eduqas (Further information can be found on the examination board website at http://www.eduqas.co.uk/qualifications/ music/as-a-level/) The course will consist of the following components: Appraising music (40%) - The examination will test students’ listening skills, analysis skills and their contextual understanding of music they have studied.

ALL students will be required to study works/scores from the Western classical tradition, (The Development of the Symphony 1750-1900) which includes two set works. Students will also study music from TWO further areas of study selected from: (i) Rock and Pop; (ii) Musical Theatre; (iii) Jazz and Into the Twentieth Century which will include two further set works. Students will be required to listen attentively to unfamiliar music from all the named artists/composers in their selected areas of study to identify and accurately describe musical elements and use musical language (including staff notation). Performance (35%) - Solo and/or ensemble performing as an instrumentalist or vocalist. A minimum of ten minutes of performance in total is required (no more than twelve minutes). This component is externally marked. Composition (25%) - Composition 1: Composition to a brief set by the exam board. Composition 2: Free composition. The combined submission must total a minimum of four and a half minutes and must not exceed six minutes. This component is externally marked.


Music Technology Why Study Music Technology?

Music Technology is aimed at students who wish to develop their skills and understanding in music sequencing and music recording techniques and students wishing to study music, music technology, popular music or a combined arts subject in higher education. It can lead to the study of the subject at degree level and there are a growing number of such courses available at higher education level. It is ideal preparation for students wishing to pursue a vocation in music technology, broadcasting and/or the arts and who wish to complete a complementary subject within their Sixth Form programme of study.

Course Details - Exam Board: Edexcel

Component 1: Recording (Externally assessed, 20% of the qualification) Content overview: Production tools and techniques to capture, edit, process and mix an audio recording. Component 2: Technology-based component (Externally assessed, 20% of the qualification)

Content overview: Creating, editing, manipulating and structuring sounds to produce a technology-based composition. Component 3: Listening and analysis (Written examination 1 hour 30 mins long, 25% of the qualification) Content: Knowledge and understanding of recording and production techniques and principles, in the context of a series of unfamiliar commercial recordings supplied by the examination board. Component 4: Producing and analysing (Written/ practical examination 2 hours 15 mins long, 35% of the qualification) Content: Knowledge and understanding of editing, mixing and production techniques, to be applied to unfamiliar materials provided by the examination board in the examination.

Philosophy, Ethics & Belief Why Study Philosophy, Ethics & Belief?  hilosophy, Ethics and Belief is a subject that gives P

students the opportunity to develop thinking skills, powers of analysis and the ability to produce and assess a balanced argument. It improves language skills and enables an appreciation of objective concepts and individual opinions. This subject allows for a variety of skills to be developed appropriate for careers in fields such as journalism, law, medicine, media, the police force, teaching, psychology, designing and charity work.

Course Details – Exam Board: Edexcel

 omponent 1: Philosophy of Religion. In this unit, C students focus on key philosophical questions such as the exploration of the nature and influence of religious experience in philosophical thought. They also consider the place of evil and suffering in the world, and ask whether it is ever possible to successfully talk about God. Other elements of the unit involve addressing key philosophical issues, influences and developments as well as individual philosophers.

Component 2: Religious Ethics. This unit sees the students exploring the intricate links between religious and philosophical belief, and ethical behaviour. Significant ethical theories such as utilitarianism, situation ethics and natural moral law are debated and applied and practical issues, such as war and peace and sexual ethics, are considered. The language of ethics, such as what we mean by ‘good’ and ‘bad’, is studied alongside a focus on key ethicists and their particular theories. The ever-popular topic of medical ethics will engage many students as will a focus on some of the more prominent developments in ethics of the last few years. Component 3: Study of Belief-Buddhism. Students will have the opportunity to focus on the religion of Buddhism in more depth than they have had the chance to before. They will be asked to look at religious beliefs, values and teachings, sources of wisdom and authority and practices that have shaped and expressed religious identity as a Buddhist. cont’d over


Philosophy, Ethics & Belief cont’d Also explored are the social and historical developments as well as a comparative study of two Buddhist scholars. The students will also be aiming to show understanding of Buddhism in the context of key societies. (Set texts will be specified)

Physical Education Why choose Physical Education?

Physical Education opens up the world of sport. With the chance to perform or coach a sport, Physical Education provides an excellent platform. Students receive a well-rounded and full introduction to the world of Physical Edcuation, sport and sports science from which to build on to move into higher education, employment or further training. Physical Education develops skills for a modern world. Students develop a range of practical skills such as dealing with pressure, decision-making, analysing and evaluating live performance.

Course Details – Exam Board: AQA  hysical Education qualifications allow students to P

play to their strengths and gain dynamic theoretical and practical skills for further education or work. The A level Physical Education specification content is divided into two components: ‘Factors affecting participation in physical activity and sport’ and ‘Factors affecting optimal performance in physical activity and sport’. These

overview topics are then broken down further into studies of: applied anatomy and physiology; skill acquisition; sport and society; exercise physiology; biomechanical movement; sports psychology and the role of technology in physical activity and sport. These components are assessed through examinations. There is also a practical element to the qualification worth 30% of the final A level grade. Students are assessed as a performer or coach in the full-sided version of one activity and then give a written/verbal analysis of performance.


Physics Why Study Physics?

Physics is proud of where it stands at the forefront of science. It enables the accurate and precise study of all investigations because the best instruments used by chemists, biologists, forensic scientists, geologists, metallurgists, volcanologists and other science disciplines have been made through the advances in the subject. Physics is also at the heart of engineering with applications ranging from spacecraft design, motor sport, renewable energy infrastructures and civil engineering to the nuclear and gas/oil power industries. There are many branches of research within physics from the search for clean energy from nuclear fusion to the search for answers on dark matter. Students may also consider taking their studies further with medical physics – a discipline where many exciting new developments are taking place.

Course Details – Exam Board: OCR Syllabus A

The first year consists of four modules: development of practical skills in physics; foundations of physics; forces and motion; electrons, waves and photons. The second year consists of some further development of the first year units and two further modules: the Newtonian world and astrophysics; particles and medical physics.

Politics & Government Why Study Politics & Government?

Politics and Government is an excellent choice for anyone who wants to get behind the headlines. It is well respected by top universities and requires both historical depth and for students to study in real time and be up to the minute. Students learn how to analyse evidence and arguments, discuss and argue from an informed point of view and communicate effectively. Studying Politics allows you to hear a wide range of opinions in lively class debates and helps you to understand fundamental things about our society. It is particularly useful for those going on to study any of the humanities or social sciences and the analytical and communication skills acquired are transferable to careers in journalism, publishing, law, the civil service, pressure groups, political consultancy, education or business. Previous students have gone on to write for the Economist, edit the Huffington Post, they are barristers, financial consultants in the City of London, advisors (for example, to John Prescott), one former student is a Member of the European Parliament, and others are research assistants to leading politicians and lobbyists.

Course Details – AQA  he British element of the course involves the study of T

electoral system and referendums; voting behaviour; political parties; pressure groups; the British Constitution, judiciary and rights; parliament; the prime minister; cabinet and civil service; local government, regional assembies ( the Scottish Parliament and Welsh Assembly) and the European Union. In Year 13 students will also study US Government and Politics. Topics include US electoral process and direct democracy; US political parties; US voting behaviour; US pressure groups; the US constitutional framework; the US legislature; the US executive; and the US Supreme Court. Students will also study and be examined on Political ideologies.


Psychology Why Study Psychology?

Psychology offers the ability to understand moral, ethical, social and cultural issues. It is about you, the people around you and differences that exist in different people which will benefit you personally, socially and in any job that requires you to interact with, or understand, other people. Psychology offers maximum opportunity to acquire and develop the new ‘Key Skills’ of communication, application of number, information, technology, working with others, improving own learning and performance, and problem solving. There are a number of employment opportunities in clinical psychology, industrial or occupational psychology as well as many personal benefits to be gained from studying Psychology. There are many other jobs where Psychology is indirectly used such as nursing, social work, teaching and business.

Course Details – Exam Board: AQA

Introductory Topics in Psychology: memory (remembering, forgetting & eye witness testimony); attachment (how bonds are formed and their impact on later life); and social influence (conformity, obedience and independent behaviour). Psychology in Context: psychopathology and treatment (phobias, depression and OCD); approaches to psychology; biopsychology; and research methods. Issues and Options in Psychology: relationships (the process of romantic relationships and modern day relationships such as those over social media), schizophrenia (diagnosis and treatment); and forensic psychology (offender profiling and dealing with offenders). Students sit three written papers covering the content from introductory topics in psychology, psychology in context and issues and options in psychology.

Sociology Why Study Sociology?

Sociology is the study of society, people and their behaviour. Students are encouraged to look beyond the obvious and to examine the patterns and relationships that shape both our society and the individuals within it. Sociology is a rigorous, academic subject that complements a range of other subjects through its development of analytical and evaluative skills. Critical thinking skills learnt in sociology provide excellent preparation for university and for career paths such as law, the police, criminology and journalism. Developing an awareness of different groups of people in society and their needs is also invaluable for professions in education, marketing, medicine and social work.

Course Details - Exam Board: AQA 7191/7192

Year 1: Students begin by gaining an understanding of what sociology is. They consider how norms and values shape us and how factors such as class, gender and ethnicity impact on our lives. This leads into families and

households where students consider changing family patterns, gender roles within the family, the nature of childhood and demographic trends in the UK. Next, students explore the role and functions of the education system, considering the impact of educational policies and the differential educational achievement of social groups by class, gender and ethnicity. We also look at processes within schools, with particular reference to teacher/pupil relationships, pupil identities and subcultures. Finally we look at research methods where students gain an understanding of the methods sociologists use to gain evidence and test their theories about society. cont’d over


Sociology cont’d Year 2: Students study beliefs in society, examining the role religion has today, considering topical issues such as secularisation, fundamentalism, the rise of cults and sects and the impact of globalisation and science on beliefs. Students also study crime and deviance, exploring the causes of crime; social distribution of crime by age, class, gender and ethnicity; media and crime; human rights crimes; green crime and crime control, prevention and punishment.

Finally students will consolidate and build on their understanding of sociological theory by expoloring theories such as Marxism, feminism, and postmodernism.

Spanish Why Study Spanish? It is now commonplace for proficiency in languages to be

sought amongst employers. More and more professions require you to work in a multilingual environment and there are few companies who do not have customers, and indeed branches, abroad. Just look at some higher education prospectuses and you will see how many of them combine science, ICT, engineering, management and business studies with languages. Consider the advantages you have with the ability to speak another language, coupled with a sound understanding of the politics and culture of the country or countries concerned. Not just travel companies, but also business, finance, technology, media, creative and science-based professions are all increasingly looking for graduates who can offer a range of skills including language proficiency. You will develop your ability to write fluently and accurately in Spanish for a range of different purposes, increase your understanding of grammar and how the language fits together, and acquire important personal research and study skills through topic and project work.

Course Details – Exam Board: AQA Component 1: Listening, reading and translation Component 2: Written response to works and translation Component 3: Speaking


Additional Academic Enrichment Opportunities Subject areas run a whole host of academic enrichment activities to enhance the learning experience. Here are just a few of the activities that students can take part in*: •

Trip to the National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park

Theatre visits

Study Conferences

CERN Institute visit

Lectures by leading Historians

Astrophysics Real Science project

Trip to the Houses of Parliament

The Hennessey Prize for Politics

European Youth Parliament debating

Debating competitions organised by Oxford, Cambridge, Warwick, Birmingham, Bristol •

Sports coaching and officiating qualifications

Residential fieldtrips

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Employabiilty Skills development with industry specialists including Omega Resource Group

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Financial Awareness development with wealth management specialists St James’s Place

* Activities run by departments vary each year and are subject to change.


Marling School Sixth Form Marling School, Cainscross Road, Gloucestershire GL5 4HE T: 01453 760156 www.marling.gloucs.sch.uk Marling School is a company limited by guarantee, registered in England and Wales under number 7692339

Marling School Sixth Form Prospectus Insert 2018  
Marling School Sixth Form Prospectus Insert 2018  
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