GCSE Curriculum Booklet

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The (I)GCSE Curriculum

REVISED DECEMBER 2022

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Contents

Welcome to the (I)GCSE Curriculum 4

Art 6 Classics: Latin 8 Greek 9 Computer Science 10 Design and Technology 11 Drama 13

English Language and English Literature 14 Geography 16 History 18 Mathematics 19

Modern Languages: French, German, Spanish 20 Italian 20 Chinese 22 Russian 23 Provision for advanced and native speakers 24 Music 25 Religious Studies 26 Science: 27 Biology 28 Chemistry 29 Physics 30 Astronomy 31 Sport Sciences 34

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Welcome to the (I)GCSE Curriculum

The College’s (I)GCSE Curriculum builds upon the foundations established in the Shell. The core, plus optional subjects, combine to create a broad, stimulating programme which is intended to challenge and support all pupils.

Pupils should now begin thinking about (I)GCSE options for the Remove. It is important that they consult widely before making their decisions and they will be offered a range of support.

The Core

All pupils entering the Remove will study examined courses in English Language, English Literature, Religious Studies, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Optional Subjects

Pupils are also required to choose four subjects from the following list:

Art History

Astronomy Italian (ML) Computer Science Latin Design & Technology Mandarin Chinese (ML) Drama Music

French (ML) Physical Education Geography Russian (ML) German (ML) Spanish (ML)

Please note that Greek may be taken as a fifth option. In this case pupils may not drop another subject while continuing with Greek.

In order to keep a balanced profile (and also due to timetabling constraints) the following conditions must be observed:

1. At least one subject (and at most two) must be a Modern Language (ML)

2. Pupils may choose no more than two from Art, Design & Technology, Drama, Music and Physical Education; and only one if they choose to study any of Astronomy, Computer Science or Latin

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In this booklet Heads of Department outline the courses offered in order to inform the process of selecting options. The choices made at this point will determine the pattern of studies for the next two years. In all cases, subject balance, as well as subsequent implications for possible Sixth Form choices, should be carefully borne in mind.

Pupils will be asked to declare their preferred choice of options for (I)GCSE by Friday, 24th February 2023. It is hoped that, following discussions with parents, teachers, tutors and HMs, they will be able to make a fully informed decision by this date.

Every effort will be made to provide the combinations requested, though there can be no guarantee that this will always prove feasible in practice. It may also prove difficult to make changes once the timetable has been constructed, though we will do our best.

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Art: AQA Fine Art 8202

This course is a stimulating and rewarding subject for pupils who wish to receive a creative grounding within the discipline of Fine Art.

Pupils gain experience of both two and three-dimensional work within some of the following specialisms: painting, drawing and mixed media, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture, textiles, computer manipulated imagery, film, animation, alongside digital and darkroom photography.

This specification gives teachers flexibility in supporting pupils, through creative activities and structured programmes of study, to make a personal response to their own experiences, environment and culture. Pupils will develop an understanding of the purpose, function and importance of art in society. As the course progresses, pupils are increasingly encouraged to make personal decisions and directions.

Art GCSE requires pupils to create a portfolio of work that includes one sustained project and a selection of further, experimental work. This unit is allocated 60% of the final mark, with the remaining 40% of marks allocated to the preparation and piece created under examination conditions. This project is called the Controlled Test.

Fine Art Aims

i) Develop and refine ideas and personal outcomes with increasing independence and confidence.

ii) Work from first-hand sources using a range of media.

iii) Become confident in taking risks and to learn from experience when exploring and experimenting with ideas, media, materials and techniques.

iv) Review, modify and refine their work as it progresses and realise their intentions.

v) Develop knowledge and understanding of art in historical and contemporary contexts, societies and cultures.

vi) Investigate the work of relevant artists, making connections with their own work.

Assessment Pattern

Component 1 – Coursework Portfolio (No time limit, 60% of total marks): Coursework marked as a whole. Portfolios are to include both a sustained project and a selection of further work. This will give pupils the opportunity to experiment with a broad range of materials, expand their knowledge and artistic skills. There is no restriction on size, but at least two art specialisms are to be represented.

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Component 2 – Externally Set Assignment (Preparation: between January and April of exam year, Finished Piece: 10 hours done under examination conditions, 40% of total marks): Through an externally set paper, pupils are required to demonstrate their ability to respond to one of a number of given starting points. A specified period will be allowed for the creation of preparatory work, followed by ten hours of supervised time for the completion of a resolved piece. This provides pupils with the opportunity to create work within their preferred media.

Both the Coursework and Controlled Test units are internally marked and externally moderated.

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Classics, Latin: OCR J282

The Latin GCSE course gives you the opportunity to:

• develop your knowledge of Latin and understand the influence of Latin on English and other languages

• study Latin literature in the original language and enable you to respond in a personal way to Latin authors

• understand the life and culture within which Latin literature was written.

In the Remove, you use Cullen & Taylor’s Latin to GCSE Part 2. Work begins on the set texts (selections from a prose author and Virgil) during the Summer term and continues into the Hundred. The Language component (J282/01) is a single paper worth 50% of the exam, while the Literature component (J282/06) is examined by two papers each worth 25%.

For the Language component (J282/01) you must be able to:

• recognise, analyse and explain the essential accidence and syntax listed in the GCSE specification

• demonstrate knowledge of the vocabulary in the defined vocabulary list (DVL)

• accurately translate unseen material into English

• explain the derivation of English words from Latin as evidence of the continuing influence of the classical world on later times.

For the Literature components (J282/06), you must be able to:

• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the set text

• identify, explain and respond to aspects of literary style, such as choice of words and word order, sounds, length of clauses, and common literary devices such as simile, metaphor, alliteration and assonance

• demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context in which the literature was written

• select, analyse and evaluate evidence to draw informed conclusions and make a reasoned response to the material studied.

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Classics, Greek: OCR J292

The Classical Greek GCSE course gives you the opportunity to:

• develop your knowledge of Classical Greek and understand the influence of Greek on our own language

• study Greek literature in the original language and enable you to respond in a personal way to Greek authors

• understand the life and culture within which Greek literature was produced.

In the Remove, you use Taylor’s Greek to GCSE Parts 1 & 2. Work begins on the set texts (selections from a prose author and Homer) during the Summer term and continues into the Hundred. The Language component (J292/01) is a single paper worth 50% of the exam, while the Literature component (J292/06) is examined by two papers each worth 25%.

For the Language component (J292/01) you must be able to:

• recognise, analyse and explain the essential accidence and syntax listed in the GCSE specification

• demonstrate knowledge of the vocabulary in the defined vocabulary list (DVL)

• accurately translate unseen material into English

• explain the derivation of English words from Greek as evidence of the continuing influence of the classical world on later times.

For the Literature components (J292/06), you must be able to:

• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the set text

• identify, explain and respond to aspects of literary style, such as choice of words and word order, sounds, length of clauses, and common literary devices such as simile, metaphor, alliteration and assonance

• demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical context in which the literature was written

• select, analyse and evaluate evidence to draw informed conclusions and make a reasoned response to the material studied.

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Computer Science: AQA 8525

The aim of this course is to develop pupils’ knowledge and understanding of computer systems and programming techniques, building upon what they have learned in the Shell. The formal content of the specification is listed below and can be further explored on the AQA website:

1. Fundamentals of algorithms 2. Programming

3. Fundamentals of data representation 4. Computer systems 5. Fundamentals of computer networks 6. Fundamentals of cyber security 7. Relational Databases and Structured Query Language (SQL)

8. Ethical, legal and environmental impacts of digital technology on wider society

Paper 1 – Computational thinking and problem solving

How is it assessed?

• 2 hour written examination paper, externally assessed and worth 50% of the GCSE (90 marks).

• A mix of multiple choice, short answer and longer answer questions assessing a pupil’s practical problem solving and computational thinking skills. What is assessed?

• Computational thinking, problem solving, code tracing and applied computing as well as theoretical knowledge of computer science from subject content 1–4 above.

Paper 2 – Written Assessment

How is it assessed?

• 1hour 45minute written examination paper, externally assessed and worth 50% of the GCSE (90 marks).

• A mix of multiple choice, short answer, longer answer and extended response questions assessing a pupil’s theoretical knowledge.

What is assessed?

• Theoretical knowledge from subject content 3–8 above.

The specification is excellent preparation for A-level Computer Science, and on to degree level courses in the areas of Computing, Financial Technology, Engineering and Science. Further information: https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/computing/specifications/ AQA-8525-SP-2020.PDF

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Design and Technology:

GCSE OCR J310

Pupils electing to continue their studies in Design and Technology must enjoy the creative processes of design and making. Designing involves the investigation and analysis of a practical problem and the generation of ideas using a variety of media. Making is based on workshop activity using resistant materials.

Central to the content of this qualification is the requirement for pupils to understand and apply processes of iterative designing in their design and technology practice. They will need to demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and skills through interrelated iterative processes that ‘explore’ needs, ‘create’ solutions and ‘evaluate’ how well the needs have been met.

Pupils will acquire subject knowledge in design and technology incorporating knowledge and understanding of different materials and manufacturing processes in order to design and make, with confidence, prototypes in response to issues, needs, problems and opportunities. Pupils learn how to take design risks, helping them to become resourceful, innovative and enterprising citizens. They should develop an awareness of practices from the creative, engineering and manufacturing industries. Through the critique of the outcomes of design and technology activity, both historic and present day, pupils should develop an understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world and understand that high-quality design and technology is important to the creativity, culture, sustainability, wealth and wellbeing of the nation and the global community.

The specification is split equally between two components:

Component 1 (50%)

Principles of Design and Technology (01) – 100 marks (externally assessed) 2 hours written paper. This component brings together the learners ‘core’ and ‘in-depth’ knowledge and understanding. ‘Core’ knowledge of Design and Technology principles demonstrates learners’ broad understanding of principles that all learners should have across the subject. ‘In-depth’ knowledge allows learners to focus more directly on at least one main material category.

The question paper is split into two sections. A minimum of 15% of the paper will assess learners’ mathematical skills as applied within a design and technology context.

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Component 2 (50%)

Iterative Design Challenge (02) – 100 marks (internally assessed) approx. 40 hours. This component offers the opportunity for learners to demonstrate understanding of and skills in iterative designing, in particular:

• the interrelated nature of the processes used to identify needs and requirements

• creating solutions to meet those needs

• evaluating whether the needs have been met.

As an outcome of their challenge, learners will produce a chronological portfolio and one final prototype(s).

It is through the iterative processes of designing that learners draw on their wider knowledge and understanding of Design and Technology principles.

Contextual challenges will be released on 1 June each year.

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Drama: Edexcel 1DR0

GCSE Drama is all about understanding what it is like to be in another person’s shoes. Pupils will play many parts in different imaginary situations and will have the opportunity to create their own work as well as look at plays written by other people. As well as acquiring the skills involved in creating and performing Drama, pupils will also be able to acquire skills in working with others, problem solving and communication, making them more self-confident and preparing them to deal with a range of different situations and people.

The course is in three parts:

Component 1 – focuses on the production of an original piece of theatre based on a prescribed stimulus. You will also create a portfolio analyzing and evaluating your process and final performance. (40%)

Component 2 – involves the production of an edited, published text and for performance to a visiting examiner. (20%)

Component 3 – is a written exam based on your directorial and design ideas for a set text. (40%)

The course is enjoyable for pupils who want to study a subject that is both practical and creative and who are keen to attempt making a play, performing, making costumes, building a set or operating the lights. Drama involves a lot of teamwork and is suitable for anyone who enjoys practical exploration and exploring the creative process.

Drama also gives you the chance to explore how to structure and communicate your creative ideas in writing. The written elements of drama will introduce pupils to a wide range of theory and practitioners that contribute to the role performance makes to our diverse culture.

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English Language and English Literature

Throughout the Remove and Hundred years pupils will read widely, and be encouraged to engage with a diverse range of texts across the genres of English Literature and Language. There will be opportunities to write creatively, including poetry and short story competitions, as well as theatre trips. Set texts for the Literature GCSE will be introduced in the Remove for first readings and there will be a focus on the writing elements of the Language GCSE. In the Hundred, pupils will be prepared more specifically for examinations by closer study of the set texts and learning to apply their reading and writing skills more directly.

Specifications & Examinations:

English Language CAIE IGCSE 0990

Paper 1 Reading

2 hours, 50% of total marks

Question 1: Comprehension and summary task (30 marks)

Question 2: Short-answer questions and language task (25 marks)

Question 3: Extended response to reading (25 marks)

Paper 2 Directed Writing and Composition

2 hours, 50% of total marks

Section A: Directed Writing (40 marks)

Candidates answer one compulsory question on one or two texts totalling 650-750 words in length.

Section B: Composition (40 marks)

Candidates answer one question from a choice of four titles: two descriptive and two narrative

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English Literature

Literature in English CAIE IGCSE 0992

All candidates will do Component 1 Poetry and Prose (1.5 hours), studying one prose and one poetry set text, worth 50% of the total marks. There will be a choice of two questions per text: relevant passages/poems are printed on the paper and no texts are allowed in the examination room.

We will also do Components 3 (45 minutes) Drama, and 4 (1.25 hours) Unseen. Component 3 will involve the study of a set drama text, and there will be a choice of two questions per text. Candidates may use a clean text for reference in the exam room.

Component 4 will offer a choice of a previously unseen prose passage or poem (printed on the paper) for critical commentary. Components 3 and 4 are each worth 25% of the total marks. There is no coursework, and all components are marked externally by the board.

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Geography: AQA GCSE (8035)

Geography in the Remove

The Remove begins with Hazards (13% of the exam) and we explore mapping, impact assessment and management for a selection of the following hazard events: Typhoon Haiyan 2013, the Nepal Earthquake of 2015 and the Chile Earthquake of 2010. Extreme UK weather events leading to Somerset Floods of 2014 will be considered. The causes of and responses to climate change are also studied in this unit.

Urban Studies (13%) involves the investigation of expanding, divided and changing cities. We study post-Olympic Rio de Janeiro, a global city of opportunities and challenges and Bristol, a city of international standing. The emergence of megacities, urbanisation, urban regeneration and sustainable living are all important themes in this unit.

UK Landscapes (12%) includes the study of rivers and coasts. Our river work includes a study of the River Tees and a trail along our own River Kennet to investigate the theory and practice of flood management. Our coastal study of the Jurassic Coast will include textbook and field studies of Studland, Durlston Head and Swanage. Management is a key theme in this unit.

Fieldwork is 15% of the exam. Our coastal fieldwork will involve one day on the Dorset Jurassic Coast, and another in our local university city of Bristol. There is an exam question on the fieldwork exercises.

Geography in the Hundred

The year starts with Resource Management (10%) which focuses on food, water and energy; all are fundamental to our human development. Carbon, food and water footprints, food miles, agribusinesses, the changing fossil fuel and renewable energy mix, water supply and water quality are some of the key concerns for this unit. Food is our chosen major case study, which considers food security and the Indus Valley project and advancing technologies and sustainable futures in Kenya. Ecosystems (10%) is the next topic with studies of our Trout Ponds, Malaysian rainforest exploitation and development issues in the Thar Desert, Rajasthan. Ecosystem links and interactions, and wider deforestation and desertification issues will be explored.

The Lent term topic is Development (12%) which considers global inequalities and strategies for reducing the development gap. Nigeria is a chosen case study.

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Transnational corporations, trade, aid, quality of life and environmental issues are all investigated. We consider UK economic futures such as major transport infrastructure projects, quaternary industries, European links, the mixed fortunes of rural areas and the North-South divide. The importance of tourism to development of an LIC country, such as Jamaica, will be explored.

Finally, the Issues evaluation (15%) resource material is released late in the Lent term and topical material is researched and discussed in class. Thinking skills, not learning skills, are tested. There are 3 exam papers: a 90 minute physical paper, a 90 minute human paper and a 75 minute Fieldwork and Issues Evaluation skills paper.

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History: CIE IGCSE History (0977)

Remove and Hundred

The course aims to give pupils an overview of major political developments in the 20th century, as well as developing pupils’ ability to evaluate and interpret source material and to write cogent and analytical pieces of written work. Pupils are encouraged throughout the course to develop the ability to construct and maintain an argument, both orally and on paper. By the end of the two years, pupils should be able to think critically about historical topics and to discriminate between differing interpretations of history.

Pupils in the Remove follow a 20th century syllabus, which explores international relations between World War One and the Cold War. The course commences by exploring the tensions arising from late nineteenth century European imperialism and the process by which these led to the start of World War One. Pupils then judge whether the peacemakers at Paris were justified in their treatment of the defeated powers in the aftermath of the war, before exploring the merits and demerits of the work of the League of Nations in the 1920s and 1930s. The course continues with an assessment of the causes of World War Two, as well as a brief overview of the events of the war. In the post world war context, pupils consider the reasons for the development of the Cold War and the nature of the Cold War conflict thereafter, concluding with the conflicts in the Gulf.

In the Hundred, pupils will study in depth the history of Germany between 1919 and 1945. The course includes an assessment of the strengths and limitations of the Weimar republic and the rise of Hitler and the reasons for his success. The final part of the course focuses on the nature, development and collapse of the Nazi regime.

The course is assessed by examination only. Pupils sit three papers:

Paper 1 – (2 hours): The first paper tests their knowledge and understanding of both the 20th century overview course and the German depth study. Pupils answer three questions (two on the overview and one on Germany) which are designed to test pupils’ knowledge and understanding of the course and their ability to explain and analyse historical issues.

Paper 2 – (2 hours): The second paper tests pupils’ ability to analyse and assess primary and secondary sources. The sources which pupils tackle relate to an aspect of the 20th Century overview course. That aspect changes each year.

Paper 4 – (1 hour): The last paper focuses on the German depth study. Pupils have to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of Germany between 1918 and 1945. The paper tests pupils’ essay writing skills.

Pupils are encouraged to read widely around the course syllabus and book reviews and essay prizes are held by the department, with the aim of encouraging greater understanding of and enthusiasm for the subject.

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Mathematics: Edexcel IGCSE (Specification A) 4MAO

Candidates will be entered for an IGCSE in Mathematics, using the Edexcel specification.

There are two tiers of entry. All pupils at Marlborough enter the Higher tier for which grades 9–3 are available.

The examination consists of two papers, each carrying 50% of the total marks. These two parallel examination papers will each assess the full range of targeted grades at the Higher tier. Candidates will be expected to have access to a suitable electronic calculator for each of the examination papers.

The examination papers, each two hours long, have as 55% of their content Number and Algebra, 25% Shape, Space and Measures and 20% Handling Data. There will be considerably more algebra than number work on the Higher tier paper.

There is no coursework component.

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Modern Languages

The acquisition of one or more foreign languages enables young people better to appreciate the cultural richness and diversity of the world, as well as opening up many professional opportunities. On arrival at the College pupils are given tasters in six languages – French, German, Italian, Mandarin, Russian and Spanish – from which they choose to study two in the Shell.

For their GCSE options pupils must study one, and may continue with both, of these languages. Pupils will be taught over the two year course to understand and express themselves in the foreign language. They will develop study skills for further study at A level of which the study of one or two Modern Foreign Languages forms an integral part.

French IGCSE (Edexcel: French 4FR1)

German IGCSE (Edexcel: German 4GN1)

Spanish IGCSE (Edexcel: Spanish 4SP1)

The Edexcel IGCSE provides an appropriate and challenging qualification in terms of content, range of vocabulary and grammar. Content is based on the following topic areas:

A Home and abroad

B Education and employment

C Personal life and relationships

D The world around us

E Social activities, fitness and health

Assessment:

Paper 1: Listening: 25% – 35 minutes

Paper 2: Reading and Writing: 50% – 1¾ hours

Paper 3: Speaking: 25% – 10 minutes

Italian IGCSE Italian (Cambridge 0535)

This syllabus is designed for learners who are learning Italian as a foreign language.

The aim is to develop an ability to use the language effectively for practical communication. The course is based on the linked language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing, and these are built on as learners progress through their studies. The syllabus also aims to offer insights into the culture and civilisation of Italy and will develop skills invaluable for further study of the language at A level.

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Content is based on the following five Topic Areas:

A Everyday activities

Home life and school Food, health and fitness

B Personal and social life Self, family and personal relationships Holidays and special occasions

C The world around us Home town and local area Natural and made environment People, places and customs

D The world of work Continuing education Careers and employment Language and communication in the work place

E The international world Tourism at home and abroad Life in other countries and communities World events and issues

Assessment:

Pupils will take four papers, each of which is worth 25% of the final mark:

Paper 1: Listening – 45 minutes

Paper 2: Reading and Directed Writing – 1½ hours

Paper 3: Speaking – 15 minutes

Paper 4: Continuous Writing – 1¼ hours

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Chinese GCSE (AQA 8673)

Studying Mandarin GCSE opens up many professional opportunities for the future. Pupils will be taught over the next two years to understand and express themselves in Mandarin, both orally and on paper. They will develop particular study skills which are valuable for further study at A level.

Core content:

Pupils study all of the following themes on which the assessments are based:

• Identity and culture

Me, my family and friends Technology in Everyday life

Free-time activities Customs and festivals in Chinese-speaking countries/community

• Local, national, international and global areas of interest

Home, town, neighbourhood and region

Charity/voluntary work

Healthy/unhealthy living

The environment

Poverty/homelessness Travel and tourism

• Current and future study and employment

My studies Life at school/college Education post-16 Jobs, career choices and ambitions

Assessments:

Pupils will take four papers, each of which is worth 25% of the final marks:

Paper 1: Listening – 45 minutes

Paper 2: Speaking – 10–12 minutes + preparation time

Paper 3: Reading and Translation – 1 hour

Paper 4: Writing and Translation – 1 ¼ hours

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Russian GCSE (Edexcel: Russian 1RUO)

Studying Russian to GCSE opens up many professional opportunities for the future.

Not least it says to a potential employer that you have committed to a character based and/or a Slavonic language for three years of study. Pupils will be taught over the next two years to understand and express themselves in Russian, both orally and on paper. They will develop particular study skills which are valuable for further study at A level.

The content of the Russian Edexcel GCSE is based on the following topic areas:

• Identity and culture

• Local area, holiday, travel and school

• Future aspirations, study and work

• International and global dimensions

Assessment:

Paper 1: Listening: 25% – 45 minutes

Paper 2: Speaking: 25% – 10–12 minutes

Paper 3: Reading: 25% – 65 minutes

Paper 4: Writing: 25% – 85 minutes

Language Assistants

All pupils studying a modern language GCSE or IGCSE in the Remove and Hundred have a regular oral lesson with a foreign language assistant.

Exchanges and Study Visits

French: Cultural trip to Paris for the Remove this year with visits to our partner school, Lycée Notre Dame de Bury, in the northern suburbs of Paris. Cultural trip to Aix en Provence for the L6 this year with visits to a lycée, Lycée Saint-Jean de Garguier, south of Aix en Provence. We hope to resurrect our exchanges with these partner schools next year. Spanish: Hundred study visit to Granada, Spain. German: Remove exchange with Realschule Freising, Bavaria. Italian/Russian: Remove, Hundred and Sixth Form study visit to Italy/Russia every two years.

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Provision for advanced learners and native speakers

French

For advanced linguists, as assessed by the French Department, there is the opportunity to sit the French Edexcel IGCSE at the end of the Remove, leading to further study and the DELF B1 qualification in the Hundred. This course is designed and assessed by the French Ministry of Education, is internationally recognised, and provides excellent preparation for Sixth Form study. In addition, the most able mainstream French learners may opt to enhance their language skills in the Hundred by sitting the DELF B1 qualification alongside the IGCSE.

German

The most able mainstream German learners may opt to enhance their language skills in the Hundred by sitting the Goethe Zertifikat B1 qualification alongside the German Edexcel IGCSE.

Russian

Pupils who are native speakers of Russian may study for the Edexcel Russian GCSE, in the Remove, a year early. This is taught off-timetable by a Russian native speaker Assistant. Lessons are free and there will be two classes per week throughout the Remove.

Spanish

For advanced linguists, as assessed by the Spanish Department, there is the opportunity to sit the Spanish Edexcel IGCSE at the end of the Remove. This is taught off-timetable and, where a pupil chooses, can lead to further study and the DELE A2/B1 qualification in the Hundred. This course is designed and assessed by the Spanish Ministry of Education, is internationally recognised, and provides excellent preparation for Sixth Form study.

Italian and Mandarin

All languages enjoy the benefit of native speaker Assistants and, where possible, extra lessons may be scheduled to enable native speakers in these languages to sit (I)GCSEs.

Where there are enough learners in any language to justify an extra advanced class being formed, this may be provided subject to the department’s resources. Individual tuition, where available, can be provided as a chargeable extra provision.

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Music: Edexcel 1426

There are three components to this examination: Listening, Composing, Performing. Some of the Performing Option is covered by the pupil’s instrumental / vocal teacher. Pupils should already play a musical instrument or sing to Grade 3 or above at the start of the course. Grade 5 Theory, whilst not a prerequisite would be most helpful.

Activities in the Remove

Michaelmas: Lessons divide between Listening and Appreciation, and those devoted to Composition. Listening activities: These focus on the Instruments of the Orchestra; Basic Forms and Musical Genres. Composing activities: These Composing activities are intended gradually to introduce composition as an activity from its simplest level to more complex projects. The major and minor scales, the treble and bass clef reading, the layout of notes on the stave, fitting words to music, interpreting simple rhythms, the degrees of the scale – all these are gone over prior to particular compositional projects. By the end of the first term most pupils will have attempted a number of compositional activities which may include minimalism and writing a song.

Lent and Summer: Once the pupils are more confident they can move away from teacher-based exercises to more original efforts using keyboards and computers. By the end of the year each pupil is expected to have performed a solo to a good standard and composed at least one original piece of some substance. Pupils will increasingly be using, in their free time, the IT facility offered by the Music Technology department as an aid for composition. In the Summer term pupils will complete the study of 3 of the set works in preparation for the following year.

Activities in the Hundred

Michaelmas: The first composition for each pupil’s portfolio will be improved and time will also be devoted to listening work and set works. The second composition will be started before the end of term.

Lent: The Lent term starts with a mock examination, which will focus on the set works studied to date. Both compositions will be completed by the end of this term and handed in: The practical component will be completed and assessed. These submissions will all be marked and processed over the Easter holidays. The study of the last 3 set works should also be completed by the end of the Easter term, allowing for a full revision programme to be completed over the holidays.

Summer: Further practice papers and completion of the paperwork will need to be done. Submission to the moderator is normally in the first week of May. It is expected that all Course work will be complete by the start of this term and the summer is largely dedicated to the practice of the written and listening component.

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AQA Religious Studies GCSE:

(Specification A – 8062)

All Lower School pupils embark upon this two-year course.

The aim of the course is to:

• develop pupils’ knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs

• provide opportunities for pupils to engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their impact on human life

• challenge pupils to reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt and contribute to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community.

The course requires pupils to:

• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of two religions; Christianity and Islam

• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key sources of wisdom and authority including texts which support contemporary religious faith

• understand the impact of religion on individuals, communities and societies

• understand significant common and divergent views between and within religions and belief

• apply knowledge and understanding in order to analyse questions related to religious beliefs and values

• construct well-informed and balanced arguments on matters concerned with religious beliefs and values. The mode of assessment is by exams at the end of the two years of the course.

• There are two papers:

• Beliefs and Practices in two religions (Christianity and Islam–1 hour 45 minutes)

• Thematic studies (1 hour 45 minutes) including:

• Religion and life issues

• The existence of God and revelation

• Religion, peace and conflict

• Religion, crime and punishment.

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Science:

Qualifications offered: Edexcel 9–1 GCSE Astronomy (1AS0), 9–1 International GCSE Biology (4BI1), Chemistry (4CH1), Physics (4PH1) and Science (Double Award, 4SD0)

Our Curriculum

Biology, Chemistry and Physics are compulsory in the Lower School. They are taught separately by subject specialists. Each course has been prepared by the Head of Department and is based upon the Separate Science qualification, with modifications to ensure that the curriculum is suitable for all of our pupils. In Science, pupils are set by ability with each year group being organised into four ability bands. Each band is composed of between two to five teaching sets with pupils of similar ability.

In the Remove, interested pupils may optionally elect to study Astronomy alongside Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Astronomy is a demanding subject which offers an additional challenge for pupils already thriving upon their existing scientific diet. Further details are provided below and are available from Mr James, Director of the Blackett Observatory.

The Separate Sciences and Science (Double Award)

In Biology, Chemistry and Physics, we offer IGCSEs in a) the three Separate Sciences (also known as ‘Triple Award’) and b) Science (Double Award). Pupils study each of the three Sciences independently whichever route they eventually follow, a) or b). The number of Science examination papers they will eventually sit, and the demand of these papers will, however, differ. In this way we ensure that we are able to offer an appropriate level of challenge for all of our pupils, while also ensuring that they are appropriately qualified should they wish to go on to study Science in the Sixth Form.

There are two lessons per week in each of Biology, Chemistry and Physics regardless of which examination route is finally followed. This means that preparing for the Separate Sciences is especially challenging. There is additional, demanding, content to be assimilated, but no additional lesson time. Clear advice is offered to all pupils at the end of the Remove as to which route they would best be advised to follow.

At the end of the Hundred, Science (Double Award) candidates sit a 120 minute written paper for each of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Candidates for the Separate Science subjects will have an additional 75 minute paper in each Science. There is no coursework requirement but an assessment of practical and investigative skills is instead built into each of the examination papers that pupils sit.

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Selection for the Separate Sciences or Science (Double Award)

Decisions regarding which examinations a pupil will be entered for when they reach the Hundred year, Separate Sciences or Science (Double Award), are made at the end of the Remove year, and this process, which is rigorous, is the responsibility of Dr Doyle, Head of Science, from whom further information may be obtained.

Pupils will be offered advice on the most suitable approach for them following consideration of their Remove end of year examinations, Science beak comments and comments from Housemasters and mistresses.

In terms of progression to A level, the majority of our Sixth Form scientists will have been prepared for the Separate Sciences. However, a number of pupils elect to study one or more A level sciences having come instead via the Science (Double Award) route.

Parents and pupils should be reassured that it is perfectly possible to go on to study A level sciences regardless of the examination route taken at IGCSE. For further information, please contact the Head of Science.

Biology

Our curriculum is based upon the Edexcel 9–1 International GCSE Biology (4BI1) qualification. In addition, the Biology department is responsible for delivering a substantial component of the College PSHEE programme, and therefore also teaches pupils about a range of issues such as contraception, sexual health, diet, drugs etc.

The following topics are studied:

Shell: Cells – tissues – organs – systems; Photosynthesis and nutrition in plants; The foundations of a healthy diet; How enzymes work;

Digesting and absorbing food; Ecology – organisms in their environments; Human impact on ecosystems.

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Remove: Reproduction and its control; Cloning and selective breeding; Applied biology (farming and biotechnology); Respiration, the breathing system and sports physiology; The circulatory system and heart health; Pathogens and immunity; Plant biology.

Hundred: Nervous coordination; Drugs and the nervous system; Hormonal coordination; Homeostasis; DNA and Genetic Technology; Variation and Inheritance; Evolution.

Pupils are currently issued with the textbook Edexcel International GCSE Biology by Clegg, Kearsey, Price and Smith, 1st Edition, Collins and the Edexcel International GCSE Revision Guide (CGP).

Further information is available from the Head of Biology.

Chemistry

Our curriculum is based upon the Edexcel 9–1 International GCSE Chemistry (4CH1) qualification.

The following topics are studied:

Shell: An introduction to chemistry; The nature of matter – particle theory; Elements, compounds and mixtures; The structure of the atom; The Periodic Table; Formulae and equations; Acidity, alkalinity and neutralisation; Rates of chemical reactions.

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Remove: Atomic structure and chemical bonding; Chemical analysis; Group 1 elements; Group 7 elements; Gases in the atmosphere; The reactivity series; Chemicals from crude oil; An introduction to calculations in chemistry.

Hundred: Energy changes in chemical reactions; Further calculations in chemistry; Reversible reactions and equilibria; Electrolysis; Further organic compounds – alcohols, carboxylic acids & esters; Practical chemical techniques.

Pupils are currently issued with the Collins textbook Edexcel International GCSE (9–1) Chemistry, by Goodman and Sunley.

Further information is available from the Head of Chemistry.

Physics

Our curriculum is based upon the Edexcel 9–1 International GCSE Physics (4PH1) qualification.

The following topics are studied:

Shell: Optics; Forces and materials; Charge and current; Energy, resources and efficiency; Astrophysics and orbits; Waves and the electromagnetic spectrum; Sound and motion; States of matter.

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Remove: Mains electricity; Radioactivity and nuclear physics; Thermal energy and insulation; Light and its role in digital communication; Electromagnetism; Bodies in motion; Cosmology.

Hundred: Forces and motion; Work, power and energy; Electrical circuits; Fission, fusion and half life; Electromagnetic induction; Solids, liquids and gases; Momentum; Transformers and the National Grid.

Pupils are currently issued with the textbook Physics for Edexcel International GCSE by Nick England.

Further information is available from the Head of Physics and Astronomy.

Astronomy Edexcel GCSE (1AS0)

This subject is offered as a full GCSE option. It should be considered by those pupils who have a deep interest in the subject and want to add a fourth science to their (I)GCSE portfolio.

The course is structured in five lessons per fortnight and allocated two preps a week.

The examination consists of two papers each of 105 minutes; these papers count for 100% of the available marks. However, there is also a requirement to complete two observational projects. Observing can take place at any time over the course, including holidays, with clear weekday evenings in term time set aside for this and one observing session will count as a prep. If access to the Dome is not allowed, observations may be made by staff and accessed via live streaming.

The body of knowledge to be assimilated and the level of analysis that GCSE Astronomy questions demand, combined with the extensive subject specific terminology required, make this subject demanding. The subject is open to all interested pupils with the

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motivation and potential to benefit from the course. Enthusiasm for Astronomy, and some skill in mathematics, are key to success in this GCSE.

The entire course is observationally based and observational experience is tested within the examination papers.

The course is broken down into two main topic areas:

• Naked-eye astronomy – examined in Paper 1

• Telescopic astronomy – examined in Paper 2

The following topics are studied:

Remove: Planet Earth.

Celestial observation. Exploring the Moon. Exploring the solar system. Solar system observation. Early solar system models. Planetary motion and gravity. Solar astronomy. Time.

Hundred: The Earth-Moon-Sun system. Formation of planetary systems. Exploring starlight. Stellar evolution. Our place in the Galaxy. Cosmology.

Two pieces of observational work are undertaken over the two-year course. One of these must be unaided and the other aided, which will usually be completed at the College observatory. Projects may be selected from an extensive list provided by Edexcel.

Pupils are currently issued with the textbook GCSE Astronomy (9–1) – A Guide for Pupils and Teachers, by Nigel Marshall (5th Edition).

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Astronomy Resources:

Edexcel maintains a dedicated website for the qualification:

http://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/astronomy-2017.html

This contains an abundance of materials and resources, including copious worked examples and supportive handouts to address specific mathematics skills in many of the topics; copies of these are handed out in lessons. Astronomy Now magazine is available through the Memorial and Physics Libraries.

The course is taught using data from current research and the internet, especially using the free Planetarium software package, Stellarium. This is also available as an App.

For the practical work, pupils use a range of binoculars and telescopes at the College Observatory. The Observatory houses the largest telescope in Wiltshire, a 10-inch refractor (fully modernised, refurbished and also equipped for solar use), an 8-inch Newtonian reflector, two 4-inch reflectors and a 4-inch refractor. There are also multiple pairs of tripod-mounted 10×50 and 15×70 binoculars.

There is an expectation that GCSE Astronomers will attend the Observatory on dedicated clear nights if they are free to do so. Additional opportunities for observation may also be offered. Groups are encouraged to help record Meteor Shower data and may gather at the observatory for certain other ‘one-off’ events (e.g. Transits and Eclipses).

Further information is available from the Head of Physics and Astronomy and Mr James, Director of the Blackett Observatory.

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Sport Sciences GCSE: OCR J587

The GCSE Physical Education course aims to develop pupils’ knowledge and understanding of following a healthy and active lifestyle. The content of OCR’s GCSE in Physical Education is divided into three components. Each component is further sub divided into topic areas and the detailed content associated with those topics.

Unit 1: Applied anatomy and physiology and the effects of physical training (30% of total GCSE)

Physical factors affecting performance, introduces and explores some of the physical factors which underpin participation and performance in physical activities and sports. Pupils will start to explore the ways in which parts of the human body work and function during physical activity and the physiological adaptations that can occur due to diet and training. Pupils will also develop their knowledge and understanding of the principles of training, why we train in different ways and how training plans can be made to optimise results.

• Pupils will develop knowledge and understanding of the basic structures and functions of body systems that are particularly important to physical activities and sports.

• They will also study the short and long-term effects of exercise on these systems, and how these effects can impact on physical fitness and performance.

• Pupils will develop the ability to collect and use data, analyse movement and apply their knowledge and understanding, using examples from physical activity and sport.

Unit 2: Socio-cultural influences, Sports psychology, Health, fitness and well-being (30% of total GCSE)

Pupils will develop their knowledge of socio-cultural influences that impact on participation and performance in physical activities and sports.

• Pupils will also develop their knowledge and understanding of how sport impacts on society. Engagement patterns of different social groups will be understood by learners, along with strategies to promote participation with practical examples.

• The commercialisation of physical activities and sports will be understood, including the influences of sponsorship and the media. Learners will also develop their knowledge and understanding of ethical and socio-cultural issues in physical activities and sports.

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• Pupils will develop their knowledge and understanding of sports psychology theories related to acquiring movement skills and optimising performance.

Pupils will be able to reflect on their own learning and performance of physical activities and sports skills to recognise the key psychological concepts affecting performance.

Pupils will develop their knowledge and understanding of the benefits of participating in physical activities and sports to their health, fitness and well-being. The physical, emotional and social aspects will be understood as well as the consequences of a sedentary lifestyle. Pupils will also develop their knowledge and understanding of energy use along with diet, nutrition and hydration.

Unit 3 Practical activity assessment; Evaluating and Analysing Performance (40% of total GCSE)

Pupils are internally assessed performing in three practical activities and one performance analysis task.

• Pupils can only be assessed in the role of player/performer.

• Pupils are required to demonstrate effective performance, the use of tactics or techniques and the ability to observe the rules and conventions under applied conditions.

• Pupils must perform in three practical activities, one from the ‘individual’ list, one from the ‘team’ list, and one other from either list.

• Pupils will complete a coursework task: Analysing and Evaluating Performance; where they will be required to analyse a practical performance in one of their chosen practical assessment activities. After analysing the performance they will make a judgement on how the individual could develop their skills and performance outcomes by following a specific training schedule.

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Marlborough College, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 1PA

Tel: +44 (0)1672 892200 www.marlboroughcollege.org

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