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APRIL 2015

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Firm turning natural gas into gasoline

Blue Fuel Energy’s pet project could be a fossil fuel game changer PAGE 18

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FORT ST JOHN Fort St. Johnbased company branches out to open franchises in Grande Prairie and Dawson Creek

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INDEX News Update

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Prince George

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Fort St. John

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Smithers

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Prince Rupert

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Movers and Shakers 24 Opinion

BY JOHN MACDONALD

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hetwynd - The world’s cleanest gasoline could b e p r o d u c e d i n B r i tish Colu mbia i n a matter of years. Sidney-based Blue Fuel Energy’s (BFE) ex per ienced tea m pla ns to use a process combi n i n g establ i shed a nd proven technology that converts natural gas into gasoline. The plan to leverage this ‘low carbon intensity gasoline’ in BC was birthed in 2008 by Juergen Puetter, a serial entrepreneur with a history of converting scientific innovation into profitable businesses. “The economics of the project are very compelling, this project is ideal for BC, and takes advantage of the low cost of clean electricity and the significant access to SEE BLUE FUEL ENERGY | PAGE 13

Blue Fuel President Michael Macdonald in front of a methanol plant he developed for Methanex, it is similar to what the Chetwynd project will look like

Port announces major expansion

Key gateway port for Trans-Pacific trade between Asia and North America

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R I NCE RU PE RT – T he Port of Prince Rupert will be increasing its capacity by nearly 60%. M a her Ter m i n a ls Hold i ng Corp., the operator of the Port of P ri nce Ruper t’s Fairview Container Terminal, today announced its decision to proceed with expansion of the 7-year-old facility. The container capacity will increase by 500,000 TEUs to accommodate growing container volumes and further enhancing the Canadian gateway’s growing

role in North American transPacific trade. In seven years of operation, traffic through the Fairview Container Terminal has grown at the fastest pace of any container terminal in North America. In 2014 container volume increased 15% over 2013. “We’re very pleased to see Maher Terminals continue delivering on the vision of fast, reliable container service — while creating new opportunities for the workers, communities, and nations who benefit from this

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trade gateway.” said Don Krusel, President and CEO of the Prince Rupert Port Authority. Since its conversion from a breakbulk handling operation, Fairview Container Terminal has been operated by Maher Terminals. The terminal anchors an efficient trade lane served by CN’s North American Class 1 railroad providing extensive reach into both central Canada and the US Midwest. Ma her Term i na ls awa rded the construction contract to

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FRPD-BEL Gateway Joint Venture as the prime contractor. T he project w i l l prov ide a second deep-water berth, four additional gantry cranes, and land reclamation to further expand the container yard. On-dock rail trackage will also be expanded through densification of the current track configuration, which will be supported by a rubber-tired gantry crane operation. The terminal expansion will SEE PORT EXPANSION | PAGE 23


NEWS UPDATE

2 BC BC Launches 10-year Transportation Plan

A 10-year transportation plan that outlines critical investments and improvements throughout the province has been announced by the BC government. This $2.5-billion plan will grow the economy, improve safety, maintain and replace aging infrastructure and support trade for BC’s expanding resource sectors through Canada’s Asia-Pacific Gateway. The plan included input from an extensive engagement process in fall 2014 that included meetings with key stakeholders throughout BC, including First Nations, local governments, chambers of commerce and port and airport authorities. Government also conducted a public survey with almost 13,000 responses. British Columbians made it clear they want their highways, roads, bridges and side roads kept in good condition, which is why the plan includes more than $800 million over the next three years dedicated to existing infrastructure and almost $1 billion toward expansion of major highways and the network. BC on the Move includes a new Provincial Trucking Strategy that will involve industry working together on how best to improve the safety, efficiency and economics of trucking in BC

KITIMAT Brucejack Project Receives Environmental Assessment Approval

Pretium Resources Inc. has been issued an Environmental Assessment Certificate for its Brucejack Project by the British Columbia Minister of the Environment and Minister of Energy and Mines. The Ministers issued the certificate with conditions that have given them the confidence to conclude that the project will be constructed, operated and decommissioned in a way that ensures no significant adverse effects are likely to occur. Pretivm will address these conditions in advance of the start of mine construction which it expects to begin this summer. The environmental review process, which was concluded within the legislated timeframe, was led by British Columbia’s Environmental Assessment Office. The process provides for significant opportunities for Aboriginal groups, government agencies and the public to provide input on the potential for environmental, economic, social, heritage and health effects from a proposed project. Pretium Resources Inc. has also entered into a comprehensive Cooperation and Benefits Agreement with the Nisga’a Nation in respect of Pretivm’s Brucejack Project. The Agreement establishes a long-term, mutually-beneficial relationship between Pretivm and the Nisga’a Nation, who have rights and interests as defined by the Nisga’a Final Agreement in the Nass Area where portions of the Project are located. Under the terms of the Agreement, the Nisga’a Nation will provide ongoing support for the development and operation of Brucejack as a safe, environmentally sound mine with participation in its economic benefits, and Pretivm will honour commitments to the Nisga’a Nation regarding jobs and contracting opportunities at the Project, education and training and

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financial payments. “Nisga’a Nation strives for sustainable prosperity and self-reliance,” stated President H. Mitchell Stevens, “and the benefits from the Brucejack project will make an important contribution towards our improved quality of life. Our Treaty brings certainty to this type of development and we look forward to working with Pretivm.” “We are pleased that a strong relationship with the Nisga’a Nation has grown out of our work with them over the last four years,” said Pretivm President and CEO Robert Quartermain. “We look forward to their collaboration as we advance Brucejack to production.”

QUESNEL Omineca Announces Wingdam Drilling and Geophysical Program Omineca Mining and Metals Inc. announced that drilling and geophysical crews have been mobilized to the Wingdam placer gold project near Quesnel. The purpose of the 2015 exploration program is to better define the location and shape of the gold bearing Deep Lead Channel buried approximately 50 meters beneath the Lightning Creek gravels. 8-12 sonic drill holes will be used to accurately locate the bedrock/gravel interface along the rim and center of the Deep Lead Channel. Selected holes will be completed with PVC casing and then surveyed using a downhole seismic array. The seismic data will be integrated with data collected concurrently from 7 seismic lines across the width of the channel to provide an accurate profile of the channel, as well as identify the location of the high grade keel in the center of the channel. Past efforts to extract gold-rich gravel with underground mining at Wingdam were frustrated by the influx of unconsolidated gravels into mine workings. The ability to accurately predict the shape of the channel rim and the exact location of the channel center will be critical to developing the buried Deep Lead placer gravels using the freeze mining method pioneered by CVG Mining in 2011.     The sonic drilling will be carried out by Valiant Drilling using a tracked drill. Geophysical data collection and interpretation will be done by Frontier Geosciences.  The Wingdam project received final permission in January of 2015 to conduct Phase One testing along a 300m drift length, with potential for expansion contingent on favourable results. Omineca recently completed at $270,000 financing, with funds earmarked for advanced geotechnical and exploratory activity, expected to be carried out in the near future.

QUESNEL Cottonwood House has new Operator Barkerville Heritage Trust is the new operator of Cottonwood House effective April 1st announced by Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson. Under the one-year agreement, the trust will manage the property for public and recreational use. A longer-term agreement may be considered. The Barkerville Heritage Trust is assuming management of Cottonwood House from Quesnel School District 28. After managing the site for 11 years and providing

work experience for hundreds of high school students, the school district decided it no longer wanted to manage the site. Cottonwood is one of a few remaining roadhouses in BC Built in the 1860s it provided accommodation, meals and provisions for miners and travellers going to Barkerville and the Cariboo gold mines or south to Williams Lake and Victoria. In 1999, previously purchased parcels by the Province were consolidated and designated in their entirety under the Heritage Conservation Act. Today, Cottonwood House consists of heritage buildings, a working farm, wheel-chair accessible trails and camping sites. “Our long-term goal is to have our historic sites become financially self-sufficient. This one-year agreement with the Barkerville Heritage is a step in that direction,” said Thomson.

KITSAULT Alloycorp Mining Announces Arrangements for US$435 Million in Financing Alloycorp Mining Inc. has provided shareholders with an update on the financing and development of the Avanti Kitsault Project and number of significant achievements have been completed since the Company’s general corporate update announced November 11, 2014. The Company continues to pursue credit commitments from a syndicate of lenders mandated on July 29, 2014, to provide secured financing facilities for US$612 million for the development of Avanti Kitsault. As at March 26, 2015, credit approvals for US$225 million have been provided by two lenders, while one lender has declined participation in the facility. The remaining three lenders continue to work towards final credit approval, while other new lenders are reviewing their participation in the syndicate. “We are pleased with the progress we have made with our Lenders to-date” said Gordon Bogden, President and CEO of Alloycorp. “Despite a volatile price environment for molybdenum and resource commodities in general, observed over the past few months, their continued support is a testament to the quality of the Avanti Kitsault asset and its management team.” In addition to the debt financing, Alloycorp continues to pursue a range of equity financing alternatives to complete construction capital requirements. To date, the Company has received a conditional equity investment commitment of US$140 million from Resource Capital Fund VI L.P. of which US$50 million will be used to repay the outstanding secured bridge loan facility with RCF. In addition to the RCF Commitment, the Company has also received a conditional equity investment commitment of approximately US$70 million from several limited partners of RCF. The completion of the secured financing facilities and the equity investments are subject to conditions including ongoing due diligence, negotiation and execution of definitive documentation, negotiation of terms, regulatory approvals and other customary conditions. Update on Avanti Kitsault Development: ■ Overall engineering and procurement was approximately 55% complete at the end of February 2015; ■ Camp expansion is now complete, supporting a 150 bed camp; ■ Construction of the Nass River Bridge is complete, providing primary road


NEWS UPDATE

APRIL 2015

access to Avanti Kitsault; In October of 2014 Alloycorp received its water discharge permit from the BC Ministry of Environment, the final permit required to complete construction; and construction of the access road to the Avanti Kitsault plant site was also completed.

PRINCE GEORGE BC Invests to Grow Global Wood Markets The Government of British Columbia is investing $6.2 million to support the forest sector in expanding global markets for BC wood products. Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson made the announcement on behalf of International Trade Minister Teresa Wat, while attending the Council of Forest Industries annual meeting in Prince George. The funding is being made available to nine industry trade associations that deliver market development programs on behalf of government and industry. Association activities will focus on expanding markets for BC’s solid wood products, with investment priorities reflecting evolving market opportunities in Asia, the U.S.A. and Europe. Activities will be delivered on a cost-shared basis, with additional funding provided by industry and the federal government, through Natural Resources Canada. BC’s contribution is being managed through Forestry Innovation Investment (FII), the Province’s market development agency for forest products.

FII also administers the Wood First program, which fosters the innovative use of wood and wood building systems in BC, and other programs that promote the many environmental benefits of BC forest products. “With this funding, the Council of Forest Industries will continue to promote BC’s world-leading forest products to growing economies in Asia including China and South Korea. Our members are already leaders within the global forest products industry, helping to drive the economy of BC and the communities in which they operate,” says Council of Forest Industries president and CEO James Gorman. Building international markets for BC’s natural resources is a central part of the BC Jobs Plan, the government’s strategy for spurring economic activity and job creation throughout the province. More than 60,000 British Columbians throughout the province work directly in the forest sector and its 7,300 companies. BC is a world leader in softwood lumber production and exports, with 80% of industry output sold outside the province. In 2014, BC exported $5.8 billion in softwood lumber exports.

WILLIAMS LAKE Gibraltar Wins 2014 John Ash Safety Award Taseko Mines Limited announced that its Gibraltar Mine has received the 2014 John Ash Safety Award presented by the Ministry of Energy and Mines. This prestigious award goes to the mining operation in British Columbia with the lowest injuryfrequency rate that has worked at least one

million hours during the year. Gibraltar worked over 1.7 million hours during 2014 with zero lost time accidents. Russell Hallbauer, President & CEO of Taseko Mines Limited, stated, “Operating with employee health and safety and the environment held paramount is the foundation of a world class operation. We do not take safety for granted and it is a concerted effort to ensure that safety is at the forefront of every employee’s decision and action. Not only did Gibraltar employees have the lowest injury-frequency rate of all BC mines in 2014, but they also achieved an entire calendar year without a single lost time accident. The accident free period continues and now exceeds two million worker hours and is a real reflection of the high standards at Gibraltar. We are proud of our employees for this accomplishment and their ongoing commitment to health and safety, an important aspect of their work lives.” Mr. Hallbauer continued, “Following the Mount Polley tailings dam incident in August 2014, the integrity of all tailings storage facilities in BC and around the world were called into question. Unlike Mount Polley’s earth and rock dam, the main Gibraltar dam is constructed from cycloned sand and the majority of the perimeter of the pond is original ground. Most of the recommendations made by the Mount Polley Expert Independent Geotechnical Review Panel are already in place at Gibraltar and have been for many years. The method of separating sand and water using cyclones has been the primary method for years at many BC mines, including Gibraltar, and we believe it provides the highest level of dam integrity.” The Mine Safety Awards were established in 1961 by the British Columbia

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Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources to recognize the safety record of mines in the province. Each year, these awards honour mining operations for their safety accomplishments. The Mine Safety Awards consist of three competitions and seven different awards.

Northern Savings Board of Directors Announces Change in Executive Leadership Ken Doleman, the President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Northern Savings Credit Union is no longer with the organization. The Board recognizes and thanks Ken for his contributions to Northern Savings over the past two and a half years and wishes Ken the best, as he moves on to future endeavors. The Board has appointed Sharon Stromdahl as the interim President and Chief Executive Officer of Northern Savings Credit Union. The Board is confident that Sharon will provide positive leadership for the Credit Union during this time of transition. Sharon is well known within the Northern Savings Credit Union family and she has acted in the interim CEO capacity before. Over the next few months, the Board will revisit the strategic direction of the Credit Union, and afterwards, will commence the search for a new Chief Executive Officer. The Board and the interim CEO reported on the Credit Union’s performance over the past fiscal year at the membership meetings in Masset, Queen Charlotte, Terrace, and in Prince Rupert. Northern Savings has built itself into the largest credit union in Northern BC with assets of $987 million.

Business Advice Served Straight Up In business, change is the only constant. That’s why MNP is constantly evolving to keep your business ahead of the curve. Through a full suite of accounting, tax, and consulting services, our professionals provide clear, straightforward business advice to help you succeed in every aspect of your operation. National in scope and local in focus, MNP’s Prince George team is committed to finding the right answers for you and your business. Contact Andrew Adams, CPA, CA or Rod Quiring, CPA, CA at 250.596.4900 or visit MNP.ca 400 - 550 Victoria Street (RBC Building), Prince George, B.C.


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PRINCE GEORGE

APRIL 2015

BUSINESSES THRIVING IN DOWNTOWN PRINCE GEORGE Love Downtown PG program reintroducing community to local shops and services

PRINCE GEORGE CHRISTIE RAY

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pring has arrived in Prince George, and with it, all the buzz of increased activity and signs of renewal. It was fitting then that April kicked off with the official launch of a n exciti ng new prog ra m aimed at drawing attention to the Downtown shopping scene. Reclaiming the downtown as the social and shopping hub of Prince George has been a long and ongoing process. The downtown is filled with dozens of small, independent, locally-owned businesses that offer something unique to people living in Prince George. They are bringing new life and excitement to the city’s core. Yet, there are still many residents who are unaware of these gems. A frequent comment heard by

downtown business owners is “I had no idea you were here!” Love Downtown PG hopes to change that. Funded by the Northern Development Initiative Trust in partnership with Small Town Love and the Downtown Business Improvement Association, Love Downtown PG aims to promote independently operated

retail services and shops in the downtown. To date, over 50 businesses have signed onto the program. The main feature of the program is a website that includes photographs and personalized profiles of the participating businesses. The online profiles make it easier for people to connect with the businesses through searching for products, accessing maps, and viewing a calendar of local events. The official launch on April 1st at the Two Rivers Art Gallery provided an opportunity for participants to showcase their businesses and products, and it was evident that the people of Prince George are eager to support the small businesses that form such a significant part of our community, and the membership of the Prince George Chamber of Commerce. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in shopping local, thanks in large part to “buy local” movements, and a growing awareness of the impact supporting small businesses can have on the local economy. Supporting locally owned businesses also provides people with a sense of ownership and investment in their community, and this desire to celebrate and support our own people and businesses has also been a growing trend in Prince

April 1st was the launch of the Love Downtown PG held at Two Rivers Gallery. George. At the Chamber, we have witnessed a shift in how residents v iew a nd ta l k about P r i nce George. More and more, people are expressing a growing sense of pride. This is happening both through grassroots movements such as the “Hell Yeah Prince George” Facebook group, as well as initiatives such as Love Downtown PG, which is being led by businesses themselves. Both aim to spread the love,

and share the positive aspects of our community. Spring is a time of new beginnings. We look forward to watching how these movements continue to breathe new life into our downtown, and Prince George as a whole. Christie Ray is Executive Director Assistant for the Prince George Chamber of Commerce. She can be reached at christie.ray@pgchamber. bc.ca

HOMEWORK OPENS IN HISTORIC DOWNTOWN PROPERTY Fashion and home décor business now has locations in Prince Rupert and Prince George

INITIATIVES PRINCE GEORGE NEIL O’FARRELL

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ne of downtown Prince George’s most prominent historic buildings has a new owner and retail tenant. The heritage building at 1245 3rd Avenue has become the new home of Homework, a locallyowned business and self-described “funky urban lifestyle store” at the epicentre of downtown’s continued revitalization. Anthony Voitik, owner of the fashion and home décor business which also features a location in Prince Rupert, believes that the recently-purchased building is an excellent fit for the store. “A t Ho m e wo rk we of fe r a whole product mix, including lifestyle, vintage and modern.

Homework’s new home at 1245 3rd Avenue in Prince George The space offers a nice blend of rustic and modern, with the upstairs being a fantastic example of preserved vintage,” he notes. T he second f loor is, Voiti k says, “a neat layout that you don’t see anymore”, featuring a wide open space, original hardwood floors, and high ceilings. I ndeed, Voit i k i n her ited a bu i ld i ng w ith a rich h istory and a structure dating back to 1924, according to its assessment. Previous incarnations of

the space have included a pawn shop, grocery store, Masonic Lodge a nd a spea keasy. T he latter was accessed by a secret stairwell to the second floor, which Voitik discovered in the renovations of the building. “The upstairs to us was like a time capsule. It hadn’t been used for anything other than storage for yea rs,” ex pla i ns Voitik. “All the little gems that we’ve uncovered are just amazing. If only walls could talk.”

A lthough some of Pri nce George’s early timber buildings have been razed by fire, the city still features a number of structures from the period of the city’s founding in 1915. As Prince George’s downtown continues to revitalize thanks to the passion and dedication of local entrepreneurs, one can only assume that more of the city’s historic buildings will find new leases on life. The ability to preserve a local historic building is a special opportunity, believes Voitik, and one that can be beneficial for individual businesses and the texture of downtown. Certainly, he would love to see more businesses moving into historic structures, which he considers to be ripe with potential. “I would definitely encourage people to step in and rejuvenate these buildings in a way that enriches downtown and adds character to the area,” he says. In so doing, the spaces transcend their day-to-day uses and become living museum pieces. A s Vo i t i k p r o u d l y n o t e s : “T hese bu i ld i ngs a re ou r monuments.” Neil O’Farrell is with Initiatives Prince George. He can be contacted at O’Farrell@initiativespg.com


FORT ST. JOHN

APRIL 2015

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SPARK TO SHED LIGHT ON WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP IN FORT ST. JOHN A unique concept returning after its success in 2014 is the request for AngelSponsorhip

FORT ST. JOHN JENNIFER MOORE

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h e For t St. Joh n & District Chamber of Co m m e rc e a n d S p a rk Wo m e n’s L e a d e r s h i p C o nference, supported by North Peace Savings & Credit Union, Northern Lights College, Louisiana-Pacific OSB and Action Property Management Group, is proud to present an Administrative Professiona ls’ Appreciation Evening April 24, at 7 p.m., with complementary wine and prizes. T h e C h a m b e r i s p ro u d to be a Com mu n ity Sponsor of the Spa rk Women’s L eadership Conference, May 12-13. Guests attending the Chamb er’s ap pre c i at ion even i n g on April 24 will get a peek of what’s happening at this year’s conference. There will be eight concurre n t s e s s io n s, t wo pl e n a r y

se ssion s, a nd one key note, b eg i n n i ng on M ay 1 2 at t he Fort St. John Pomeroy Hotel & Conference Centre. Sessions focus on three distinct learning streams: Discover, Design, & Succeed allowing attendees to design their own personal education roadmap. Janet Kestin and Nancy Vonk have been secu red as the key note spea kers. Ja net a nd Nancy have been in the global spotlight for leading teams to ground-breaking advertising and as advocates for working women. Now partners at Swim, they’re passionate believers in mentoring, collaboration, and creativ ity as essentia l components to leadership. Their unconventional ideas o n c a re e r d e ve lop m e nt a re echoed in “Darling, You Can’t Do Both” (And Other Noise To Ignore On Your Way Up), a g uide to r u l e s w o m e n s h o u l d b re a k forsuccess. A unique concept returning after its success in 2014 is the request for Angel Sponsorship. To qua l i f y as a con ference A ngel, sponsors provide the registration fee for a deserving attendee who, due to economic circumstances, cannot afford the reg istration fee on thei r own. The number of Angel

The Copper Pig Bbq House survives and thrives With help from Community Futures, local eatery has made its mark BY GOODY NIOSI

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RINCE GEORGE - The Copper Pig Bbq House in Prince George is the brainchild of Tyler Burbee, a local resident with 22 years experience in the restaurant industry. When Burbee decided to open his own eatery, he saw an opportunity for a fun, Bbq establishment in the downtown core. On paper, Burbee did everything right. He not only had the experience, but he also enrolled in a business school for management training. When he began planning in 2010, he connected to the Community Futures Fraser Fort George office where staff helped introduce him to important contacts in the community and assisted him in establishing a network. When Burbee approached the traditional financial institutions with his business plan, he was turned down. “At that point I re-connected with Community Futures,” he said. “And while it took three different drafts of my business plan to make my case, I received the start-up financing I needed to get my business off the ground.” But Burbee still had challenges to face. After tremendous initial success after opening in December 2012, he had to fight a legal battle regarding part of the restaurant’s name. Then, in 2014, a fire in the neighbouring building caused significant smoke and water damage causing the Copper Pig to shut down for five months for extensive renovations. But

this time, thanks to the initial funding from Community Futures, the banks stepped up to help out. In October 2014, the Copper Pig Bbq House re-opened and customers returned in droves – so did most of the original staff. That same month, the Prince George Chamber of Commerce awarded Burbee and the Copper Pig its Entrepreneur of the Year and Business of the Year Awards. When asked about his goals for the Copper Pig, Burbee said, “The restaurant’s mission is to continuously improve. I don’t think there will ever be a time when I can sit back and say ‘I’ve arrived.’ Now that I’ve taken the plunge, there’s no going back. I want to provide excellent service and keep the brand I’ve built strong.” He added that with 40 craft beers and a bar stocked with a variety of fine spirits, especially whiskeys, the bartender plays as important a role at the Copper Pig Bbq House as does the culinary team that delivers a fun, flavourful menu inspired by local ingredients. “I’m looking forward to Prince George’s 100th anniversary celebrations and I’m just thankful that the restaurant has persevered through its first two years of operation – and I hope for many successful years ahead.” The Copper Pig Bbq House is at 363 George Street in Prince George. www.copperpigbbq.ca Visit Community Futures Fraser Fort George at cfdc.bc.ca for more information on resources and support for small businesses.

attendees will depend on the number of conference A ngel sponsors. Spark Angel Sponsors will be recognized with a “You are an Angel” certificate. Those interested in applying for an A ngel registration are requested to visit the website noted below and complete the application form. 2015 marks the second time the Spark Women’s Leadership Conference will be held in the region. This conference has been designed by members of local industry to meet the professional education needs of our growing female workforc e a nd prov id e va lu a ble tools for growth. For more in formation v isit www.sharingthespark.com

S W E N

or c ont a c t Jen n i fer Mo ore , Regional Economic Development Of f icer / Nor t h Peace Economic Development Commission at (250) 793-0346. Jennifer Moore is Regional Economic Development Officer for the North Peace Economic Development Commission. She can be reached at invest@ npedc.ca

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APRIL 2015

ALPINE GLASS WINDOWS AND DOORS GROWING ALONG WITH NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA SPOTLIGHT

Fort St. John-based company branches out to open franchises in Grande Prairie and Dawson Creek

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ORT ST. JOHN - Clayton and Koyne Kursteiner are a rare breed. Not only were they both born and raised in Fort St. John, but they’re also co-owners in the family business. “My Dad bought Alpine Glass Windows and Doors in 1995 and although he doesn’t work in the store anymore, mom still comes in to help with our accounts payable and receivables,” Koyne said. Both Clayton and Koyne showed an interest in the business at a young age, completing bachelor of commerce degrees from the University of Northern BC. They started out with the company by working in the field installing autoglass, then residential and commercial windows and doors before stepping into management roles.  Clayton currently acts as the Operations Manager and Koyne as General Manager. “We’ve had hands-on experience in the business,” Koyne said. “It gives us a good understanding of the business at every level.”

Our sales staff makes sure they understand what our clients want and then ensure the customer gets the right product at a fair price. KOYNE KURSTEINER OWNER, ALPINE WINDOW AND GLASS

It also helps that they complement each other, bri ng i ng a unique skill set to the management team. “Clayton is more mechanical,” Koyne adds. “He deals with the technicians, figuring out the logistics of jobs and I’m more involved with marketing and growing sales.” In 2013, to better serve a growing clientele and increase efficiency, Alpine moved to a new 12,000 square foot facility. With room to grow, the new building allowed Alpine to broaden its residential window and door replacement service as well as expand its ability to fabricate commercial aluminum. “O ver t he past yea r we’ve changed our approach to auto

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Koyne and Clayton bring complementary and unique skill sets to Alpine Koyne Kursteiner Photos glass,” Koyne says. “It’s more structured and efficient, keeping our customers down time to a minimum, saving them time and money.” Servicing a large area in BC and Alberta, Alpine has developed relationships with contractors built on trust, knowledge and communication. “A builder in Prince George has us supplying the windows and doors, locks and window coverings in an upscale 12,000 square foot home over a four year build and several other multimillion dollar projects. Another client who moved from Fort St. John to Ontario continues to purchase windows and doors from us,” Koyne said. “They like our experience and knowledge and they stay with us because they trust that we back what we sell.” It could also be because Alpine employs a complementary mix of skilled workers. “We have both carpenters and glaziers working together on some of our projects. The carpenters are able to frame new openings and then the glaziers can install the glass,” Koyne says. “It makes for a better and more efficient install.”

He added that loyalty is part of their corporate culture; some of its employees have been with the company for 30 years, and testimonials posted on its website display an impressive array of reasons for customer satisfaction from finding the right product to after-installation service. “Our commercial glazing estimator/project manager, Kevin Delawsky started with the company in 1995 in residential window sales, and is now a partner in the business.” Koyne says. “And our receptionist, Carolyn Klassen, has been with Alpine since the ‘80’s answering the phone, dealing with point of sale purchases and numerous other clerical tasks. If a customer or contractor is looking for a certain window part, she knows exactly what and where it is.” He stressed the important role staff play in the success of the business, not just through their knowledge and combined experience, but also their commitment to making every client feel welcome and listened to. “Our sales staff makes sure they understand what our clients want and then ensure the customer gets the right product at a fair price.”

Kursteiner said. This ability to tailor products to customer needs had sales in 2014 increasing by more than 20 per cent. Kursteiner believes 2015 will be even better. They are well on their way, especially as they expand and develop new areas. “With the expansion of our commercial glazing division we can take on larger jobs in Fort St. John, Hudson’s Hope, Grande Prairie and Hythe. We aren’t limited to the local market and are able to work all across northern BC and Alberta,” Kursteiner said. Currently they are wrapping up a project in Hudson’s Hope on the W.A.C. Bennett dam visitor center. With a large sloping glazed wall it is the type of job Kursteiner said that has them working closely with architects and designers to create a high quality product. With northern BC and Alberta seeing unprecedented growth in both residential and commercial buildings, the Kursteiners feels this is an opportunity to bring their business to the next level. In the past four years they’ve done the window glazing on several government buildings, the new firehall, several retail outlets, medical facilities and even

A Winning Combination JELD-WEN would like to congratulate you on your continued success. Our efforts have combined for an industry-leading partnership, and we look forward to working with you in the future. Efficiency plus performance—setting higher expectations.


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APRIL 2015

LEED Silver Certified, the Shell building was one of Alpine’s first commercial projects

Custom built frameless showers added another dimension to Alpine’s product line an install in the YZ Mine control center in the Yukon. “The mine owners wanted our product, so they flew our crew and supplies up north,” Kursteiner said. Using specialty products and techniques, like structural silicone glazing, a method with a look and performance that adds dimension to complex and unique buildings, Alpine can help designers add a more pronounced and appealing look. Although glass and windows have been Alpine’s specialty since 1987 when its original owner dealt exclusively in autoglass repair and replacement, Kursteiner didn’t want to limit the customers’ experience. “E x pa nd i ng ser v ice to i nclude flooring, window coverings and locksmithing has not only provided our clients with a more complete service, it’s also helped us see continued growth,” he said. Fo c u s i n g o n h i g h e n d ,

va lue-eng i neered pro ducts is key to bringing clients what they want. Homeowners want the right design, but they’re also savvy consumers seeking quality and value. Alpine is the exclusive dealer for Mirage hardwood f loors, the number one rated flooring product in North America, LEED certified and eco-friendly, the flooring comes in an array of colours, wood species and board width. “Our showroom lets our customers touch and feel the products that we sell; whether it’s exterior windows and doors, overhead doors, showers, locks, flooring or window coverings; our valueengineered products bring our customers high quality at reasonable prices,” Kursteiner said. He added that the trend for high end, upscale products is driven by educated homeowners looking to invest in their largest asset. Purchasing energy efficient windows and doors and installing

top quality hardwood-flooring increases their home’s value, not just in terms of resale but also in years of enjoyment and livability. “BC is a leader in legislation for the testing on windows and doors, some of the highest in the business. We carefully select our suppliers to get industry leading products with the best warranties available. It gives us a real advantage,” Kursteiner said. He added that staying in tune with changing building codes and current regulations keeps Alpine at the top of their field. Understanding the unique considerations of their colder climate is vital to how they install their products. “Condensation can be a real problem in colder regions. To get appropriate performance, a window or door has to be installed properly. We know what we’re doing and that knowledge and quality doesn’t come at a higher price. We have better products and comparable pricing,” he adds. Building on the theme of value and choice, Alpine added window coverings to their line-up of products. “Being a showcase dealer for Hunter Douglas’ line of products gives us access to special promotions, exclusive products and better overall pricing,” Kursteiner said. “It keeps Alpine in touch and current with industry and home fashion trends. Plus, window fashions can increase the energy efficiency of a home increasing its value and saving our clients’

money.” Receiving a level 2 certification for Hunter Douglas automation last year makes Alpine the only dealer north of Edmonton certified to sell and install blinds that tie into home/commercial automation systems. Custom frameless showers are a trend that Alpine has also added to their line up taking advantage of the strong and popular design with standard and custom installations, like towel racks or toilet paper holders built right in to the glass. “For two years straight, Alpine has seen an increase of more than 20 per cent in shower installations,” Kursteiner said. “We’re expecting the same this year.” Now the family is looking to take Alpine’s products and service to

other communities, franchising into Dawson Creek and Grande Prairie. “We’re continuing to see growth in those regions and want to provide the same service and product to those communities. Between Kevin, Clayton and myself, we are confident in the business’s future.” If the successes of the past 20 years are any indication, the Kursteiner brothers will continue to add innovative new ideas for their customers and be a vital part of creating built spaces that are functional, efficient and beautiful. Alpine Glass Windows & Doors is at 9712 - 108th Street in Fort St. John. www.alpinewindows.ca KENNETH B. SIMON CORP. CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Congratulations on your continued success from your friends at Vanfax

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Alpine Glass Windows and Doors

We are proud to be a partner in the success of Alpine Glass Windows and Doors Ltd, and we www.steel-craft.ca look forward to working with you in the future. 1.800.463.3667


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APRIL 2015

BV ELECTRIC LTD. IS A POWERFUL FORCE IN NORTHERN BC SPOTLIGHT

Bulkley Valley company works on major industrial projects throughout the region

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ELKWA - BV Electric Ltd. in the Bulkely Valley continues to work on some of the largest infrastructure projects in Northern BC. The company has been the primary electrical contractor for numerous $100 million plus projects such as the Forrest Kerr, Volcano Creek, and McLymount Creek hydro-electric projects. Forrest Kerr is the biggest Northern BC infrastructure development project in the last several years. BV Electric’s project electricians managed all aspects of the electrical work required from intake to powerhouse and then from switchyard to substation. BV Electric is a full service electrical contractor and although its mainstay is industrial work it also works on commercial and residential projects. Located in Telkwa, BV Electric Ltd. was founded by company president Gary Huxtable in 2006. Huxtable served his apprenticeship in the local family business, moved to Quesnel to operate his own contracting business for eight years and came back to the family business in 2000. When his father retired, he started BV Electric. In less than 10 years the company has become one of the leading electrical contractors in Northern BC. The company provides a comprehensive range of expertise to meet the growing needs of its industrial and commercial customers. Huxtable noted that his company started by taking on large sawmill projects. When the forest industry began to slow down, he began to actively pursue projects in other industries such as mining and hydro-electric. BV Electric was hired for several large camp installations and from that point, it never looked back. “That grew into us actually

The Bell Mine Clarifier is a recent BV Electric project

“We don’t just rely on the fact that we’ve worked for you before and you’re going to call us. We extend a hand and we try to help you everywhere we can, and in any way that we can.” GARY HUXTABLE PRESIDENT, BV ELECTRIC LTD.

Electric handled all electrical work for the Forrest Kerr camp staying on the site,” Huxtable sa id . “T he c a mps were b eing built on large construction sites and we were asked to stay on the site to provide maintena nce – a nd from that poi nt, every time they raised the bar, we were able to meet or exceed what they wanted. And so, we started working in an industry that was unfamiliar to us but we were confident in our abilities.” That confidence was not misplaced. The customer, Alta Gas, continued to use BV Electric for its major construction projects,

which are Forrest Kerr, Volcano Creek and McLymount Creek. BV Electric is starting its fifth year at the Forrest Kerr hydro project. The company has also worked with regional power on the Long Lake hydro-electric project, starting with wiring the camp facility and providing site services. It was then asked to take on a larger portion of the project, which it successfully completed. More than three years later, BV Electric still supplies support to the site. “These types of projects always

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have segments they want to add or change,” Huxtable said, noting that because they are spread over a large area, the project requires excellent management of people, clients and resources. Forrest Kerr, for instance required more than 100 employees for a considerable length of time. Huxtable said that the company is fortunate that it employs an excellent core group and has highly skilled people who come back to the company time and time again to work on other projects. “You’re only as good as the next job. We work hard and we’ve staffed up on the management side of things to maintain work and to keep projects rolling out ahead of us.” He added that the company works with the same clients over and over again. “We tend to have good relationships with our customers and we’ve established relationships with several camp installation contractors. We work hard. We don’t just rely on the fact that we’ve worked for you before and you’re going to call us. We extend a hand and we try to help you everywhere we can, and in any way that we can. The customers appreciate that – they appreciate that we’re coming to them and asking if there’s any way we can help to make it easier for them.”


SMITHERS

APRIL 2015

BV Electric has worked on some of the following key projects in Northern BC: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Bell Mine Clarifier - Complete December 2014 Forrest Kerr Hydroelectric Project - Complete November 2014 Volcano Creek Hydroelectric Project McLymount Creek Hydroelectric Project Upper Lillooet Hydroelectric Project - In Progress Long Lake Hydroelectric Project - Complete Fall 2013 Prophet River Multiplex - Complete June 2012 Meziadin Junction Camp - Complete Fall 2012 Meladine Mine Project - Complete May 2011 Gunnar Mine Project - Complete May 2011 Sullivan Motors Building - Complete August 2011 South Hazelton Water Project - Complete August 2011 Klemtu Ferry Terminal Project - Complete August 2011. Hazelton/Gitanmax Water Project - Complete December 2011 Queen Charlotte City Water Treatment Houston Forest Products Projects District of Houston Waste Water Project Alberta Plywood Projects District Of Houston Well # 2 Standby Generator Frank Street Water Project Gitanyow Waste Water Treatment Facility Pacific Inland Resources Project

BV Electric has completed major work on the Forrest Kerr project

BV Electric is known for its work on major industrial projects

Those attitudes, plus its skilled crews, have earned BV Electric an enviable reputation. Huxtable said that not too long ago a large American contractor new to the area, called the company because they were told that BV Electric was the company to call for electrical work in BC. BV Electric lives up to its core values, which include safety,

trust, integrity, quality, teamwork, accountability, innovation, com mu n ity, pride a nd expertise. Huxtable said that teamwork among its employees is key. “We treat our employees the way we would like to be treated. T he ma npower consistently comes back to us looking for work.”

We are proud to be your partner.

Congratulations on your continued success, we look forward to working together with you in the future on any electrical power solutions.

250-562-4343 | www.3phasepower.ca

Safety is also a primary concern for BV Electric. The company has always had an exceptional safety program; even so, as numbers of employees have grown on large projects, the company has made changes to raise the bar even higher. On March 1, the company rolled out a new health and safety program. Working with Western Industrial Solutions, BV Electric is implementing a tablet based safety program. “We’re stepping ahead of the mainstream,” Huxtable said. “And we’re stepping ahead of what people are doing to date. We’re trying to get to the place where we are a leader in safety in our industry as far as implementing online safety programs. Our documents will be filled on tablets and automatically uploaded and sent to our office. We look at that as being one of our major assets to companies. We’re not just happy where we are, we’re constantly looking for ways to improve and move ahead.” BV Electric is also deeply involved in the community, supporting many local organizations and fundraising events. BV Electric has been a long-time supporter of program events such as the Smithers Ski and Snowboard Club; in fact, Huxtable is currently president of the club while employee Philippe Bernier is vice president. BV Electric also supports Creative Roots Performing Art Studio, Bulkley Valley Hospital Foundation and the Smithers Rotary Club. The company also supports the annual Celebrity Golf Tournament in aid of local charities. “We live in and grew up in the valley and we’ve taken part in a lot of these groups and programs,” Huxtable said. “We just like to give back in acknowledgment of what the programs and valley have done for us.” He said that the future looks highly optimistic. “We want to strive to be the b e s t ele ct r ic a l cont ract i n g company that we can possibly be. We’ve established roots in this area. We would probably be a more successful company in any of the larger centres but we choose to live in the Bulkley Valley because we love the area and we love the outdoors.” He noted that part of that commitment to the valley means moving employees to the projects – and that can mean time away from family. However, rather than moving crews to a three week on and one week off schedule that most companies offer, BV Electric gives its people two weeks on and two weeks off. It gives them maximum time with their families, Huxtable said, and family is important. “You’re only as good as the people you have working for you,” he said. “So it’s important that we’re meeting the needs of our people.” BV Electric Ltd. is at 2 400 Telkwa High Road in Telkwa www.bvelectric.ca

9

SMITHERS GETS LONG AWAITED EXPANDED FIBRE OPTIC SERVICE CityWest grand opening means local internet speed now matches that Vancouver’s

SMITHERS HEATHER GALLAGHER

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ityWest hosted its grand opening in Smithers April 7, with CEO Don Holkestad using the Chamber’s giant ceremonial scissors to cut the ribbon to the new office at 3767 Second Avenue. CityWest is expanding its fibre optic service to the area, which is exciting for the Valley. Many young professionals love the area for its lifestyle offerings, but currently can’t relocate due to the requirement for highspeed internet to enable them to work anywhere in the world. Now they can choose Smithers as their home, with the new service and internet speed now equal to that of Vancouver. Since the new Smithers arena was completed this year - giving Smithers two arenas - the Smithers District Chamber of Commerce embraced the opportunity to expand its Trade Expo by filling both of them. The May 1-2 show is now sold out, featuring an Outdoor Show in the new arena and an indoor car show in the Civic Centre, along with 65 other exhibitor booths and many other outdoor exhibits. It is anticipated that attendance will be up over the last event, with many locals coming to see the new arena and to check out the array of RV’s, ATV’s, boats, kayaks, paddleboards and vehicles. With stage entertainment, good eats and many exhibitors to visit the “Double Exposure” themed show, it is sure to be a success. The Town of Smithers invites downtown commercial businesses wishing to make improvements to their storefronts to apply for a grant under the Downtown Smithers Storefront Spruce Up Program. Northern Development Initiative Trust is the sponsor for this program, from which the Town of Smithers has applied for $20,000 in grant applications. The goal of this program is to encourage owners or commercial tenants to invest in building facade upgrades that will create a more interesting and appealing streetscape in the downtown core. This program can provide grants of up to 50 per cent of the cost of eligible improvements, to a maximum of $5,000 per building. In order to be eligible for this grant, the applicant must submit designs and costs for the project as part of a complete grant application

and part of the building permit application. The Chamber of Commerce sits on the Façade Improvement Advisory Committee. Application packages can be found at www. smithers.ca. Coastal Gas Link held “Let’s Talk”, a Project Information Session, to inform the public about how Coastal Gas Link’s community and aboriginal input, along with over 180,000 hours of environmental field work has shaped its proposed Coastal GasLink Pipeline Project at an Open House in Smithers April 14. Highlights of the Session included learning how communities are engaged; safety and environment practices; benefits to northern communities including jobs, training, community investment, capacity building, long term economic growth for BC;  construction planning and detailed routing assessment; regulatory permits granted; local vendor prequalification;  and the need for the project in BC and why it’s highly feasible. John Winter, President and CEO of the British Columbia Chamber of Commerce will retire in June. John has provided the Chamber with significant leadership since assuming his position nearly 18 years ago. The chamber has grown significantly during that period and its influence as the Voice of Business in BC has been widely acknowledged. John’s work and guidance to individual Chambers of Commerce like Smithers is greatly appreciated and staff and directors of the Smithers Chamber wish him an enjoyable and lengthy retirement as of June 30. CBC TV is coming to Telkwa. The show that was called “Of All Places” is now called “Still Standing”, and is scheduled to be in Telkwa from April 15-19. The show features quirky small communities across Canada, and Telkwa was selected for its charm and character (It’s like being in Ripley’s Believe It or Not, reflecting on the three bridges over two rivers, all anchored on the same rock). The show stars Newfoundland comedian Jonny Harris of Murdock Mysteries and will feature Telkwa as a small town that is succeeding, full of individuals who happily choose to live there. A Comedy Night hosted by Johnny Harris will take place April 19 at the Telkwa Hall. Heather Gallagher is Manager of the Smithers District Chamber of Commerce. She can be contacted at hgallagher@tourismsmithers.com


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APRIL 2015

GO WEST DEVELOPMENT HELPS OPEN UP THE RESOURCE SECTOR SPOTLIGHT

Northern BC company’s expertise is in building and maintaining resource roads

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a c k e n z i e - G o We st Development Ltd. i s m a k i n g b i g i n ro a d s in Northern British Columbia – literally. The company is a professional resource road and bridge service provider that has managed and maintained over 700 kilometres of roads in one of the province’s most remote and challenging environments. “We are known for delivering a high quality level of service,” said company president Richard Montpellier. “We work on roads and road networks that are used in the extraction of resource commodities. For almost 15 years, Go West had a service agreement with Lomak Bulk Carriers Corp., a transport company serving the forestry and mining sectors. For 11 of those years Go West managed and took on the responsibility for the Kemess Mine haul road, nearly 400 kilometres of road leading to the open-pit copper and gold mine, located in the Omineca Mountains of the Northern Interior of British Columbia. “That program was 365 days a year, 24 hours a day,” Montpellier said. “The haul road ran over mountain passes and we had numerous types of situations we dealt with over the time we maintained that road – f rom forest f i res to medical emergencies to the road washing out.” In fact the road climbed over 43 potential avalanche passes. Weather conditions were often brutally cold and yet the crew lived and worked there, keeping the road open. It was the lifeline for the mine. “It was quite an undertaking,” Montpellier said, noting that when he first took it on, his superior wanted a five-year commitment and one-year’s notice

Richard Montpellier says that his company’s success is largely due to an exceptional crew

“A big part of our success comes from lessons we learned while working on the Kemess project, as well as great customers, but most of all it’s the commitment of our employees that earned us the reputation of being able to go in and get the job done.” RICHARD MONTPELLIER PRESIDENT, GO WEST DEVELOPMENT LTD.

if he decided to terminate. “So I looked at it and it looked like one heck of an adventure,” Montpellier said. “So away I went.” On that job, Lomak provided the resources in terms of equipment, while Go West looked a f ter t he work force. During the term of the contract, Go West undertook another 300 kilometres of road for various forest companies. Much of the work crew consisted of miners who were used to the remote locations and harsh conditions. “When you take on a project like that and you’re trying to keep the road open 24 hours a day through a mountain pass and the challenges that go along with it, you need the people who are able to do that,” Montpellier said. “We dealt with a lot of interesting situations over the years.” He added that there

were times when danger was just around the corner and it was essential that the crew had each other’s backs. “Everyone leans on one another and looks out for one another,” he said. “I learned very fast that with a project like that, it’s really all about the people. Our work crew was great and L o m a k w a s a n e x c e p t io n a l company to work for on this project.” W hen t he K eme ss proje c t wrapped up in 2011, Go West shut dow n operat ions a nd Lomak offered Montpellier a management position, which he accepted. When the Pine Pass washouts occurred near Chetwynd in 2011, Lomak was one of the many contractors to repair those roads, a giant undertaking that took almost two years to complete.

W it h t h a t jo b c o m pl e te d , Montpellier being Metis himself and active in the Prince George Metis Community, decided to register Go West as an aboriginal business and restart operations. Go West resumed full operat ion s i n Ju ne 2014 w it h 10 employees. Today, Montpellier has a crew of 23 full-time employees, 25 per cent of whom are First Nations or Metis – and he plans to hire eight more employees this summer. “I learned that you need to be involved and have good people working with you,” he said. “A big part of our success comes from lessons we learned while working on the Kemess project, as well as great customers, but most of all it’s the commitment of our employees that earned us the reputation of being able

1-866-869-8977 The owners and staff of CP/HP Communications would like to extend our congratulations to Go West Development on their current and continued success!


11

APRIL 2015

Go West keeps resource roads open, no matter the weather to go in and get the job done.” He added that Go West started working with big corporate customers almost immediately including Conifex, Canfor, Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources, Lomak, KDL and Duz Cho Logging. In fact, Conifex, Go West’s first contract, came so quickly that it had no opportunity to

set up an operating line with its bank. Because Go West was an inactive business for the past few years, it was considered a new start up business and was referred to the Business Development Bank of Canada and Community Futures, both of whom believed in the business plan and offered support to get the business up and running

quickly. Go West recently expa nded op erat ion s i nto log h au l i ng w it h t h ree new log trucks. “We deliver a quality service,” Montp el l ier sa id. “ W hen it comes to resource road management and maintenance, it’s important to focus on safety a nd del iveri ng a wel l ma i nta i ned road. We have to get

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Go West has managed and maintained over 700 kilometres of roads in one of the province’s most remote and challenging environments

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people to and from work safely and reliably. When you focus your attention for 11 years on the Kemess project, you learn a lot from that. I think that’s part of our success. And really, it’s our people – it’s the customer giving you the support and the crew that has really made us successful.” He added that the next step for Go West is

diversification into the gas and oil industry as well as participation in other large projects like the upcoming Site C dam. “Our business plan is to invest in the energy sector,” he said. “That would be something we would be quite interested in.” Go West Development Ltd. operates out of Mackenzie BC. www.gowestdevelopment.ca

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PRINCE GEORGE/OFF THE COVER

APRIL 2015

13

Budget Car & Truck Rental is an ambassador for the city

BC-owned company prides itself on service to the public and people travelling on business BY GOODY NIOSI

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RINCE GEORGE - Budget Car & Truck Rental in Prince George isn’t just valued for its exemplary service, it is also known as being a big supporter and ambassador for the city. “One of our primary focuses in Prince George is welcoming people to the city,” said Budget reservations manager Samantha O’Neill-Edgar. “We have a great gateway to do that at the airport.” She noted that the Prince George Airport hosts a great deal of corporate travel; Budget does everything in its power to welcome those travellers and to make their rental experience as efficient helpful and friendly as possible. “We offer the highest level of service to every customer who comes through the airport,” O’Neill-Edgar said. “We offer clean vehicles, a newer product, good prices and great service.” Part of the great service is Fast Break for corporate clients. Fast Break stores the client’s essential information and preferences on a database and pre-writes the contract, allowing the customer to sign the documents on one line, pick up his keys and drive away. “A lot of people come in only for one day,” O’Neill-Edgar said. “They go to a meeting and come back – so time is currency to a lot of corporate travellers.” Budget also has an office in

“We have customers who actually send hand-written notes to us, especially at the airport because we’re able to make it quick, efficient and friendly – all at the same time.” SAMANTHA O’NEILL-EDGAR RESERVATIONS MANAGER, BUDGET CAR & TRUCK RENTAL

town where it works with the local businesses and shops. Budget also has the only heated storage facility in the city that caters to both the public and businesses clients. Budget Car & Truck Rental is the first choice for rentals in Prince George not only for the service but also because it has the largest fleet and variety of vehicles. O’Neill-Edgar also stressed that all the vehicles, whether it’s a budget car, a luxury SUV or a moving van are exceptionally well maintained. In town, Budget also has a free pick-up service where it will bring the customer to the rental and then drive them home again. “We shine on our service,” O’Neill-Edgar said. “And we

BLUE FUEL ENERGY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

natural gas the province has,” says Puetter. “I believe we have the social licensing aspect of the project in spades”, he added, referring to the recent overwhelmingly positive reception the project has received from District of Chetwynd residents a nd the surrounding community. He contrasted Blue Fuel’s positive experience with the current challenges being faced by natural resource projects such as the Trans Mountain a nd Northern Gateway pipelines. “We have been working on obtaining this ‘license’ from the area for 8 years” he added, with the compa ny hav i ng ga i ned public support from both the D i st r ict a nd ne a rby City of Dawson Creek, and a memorandum of understanding with the West Moberly First Nations. “Blue Fuel Energy will be an excel lent cor p orate cit i z en and this project will be a huge asset to Chetwynd and Dawson Creek. We welcome t he opportunity to work together to facilitate sustainable development,” said Mayor Merlin Nichols, District of Chetwynd. T he project consists of t wo sepa rate pl a nts on one

Juergen Puetter, Chairman and CEO of Blue Fuel Energy 1,055-acre site. The natural gas to gasoline plant, called Sundance Fuels, is currently in the permitting stage, with construction expected to begin in 2016, depending on funding availability. BFE is seeking $50 million to advance to the next phase, and would like to maintain control of the project following the investment, as well as to keep the primary i nve s t ment Ca n ad a-ba se d . Constr uction completion is expected in 2019. The natural gas to methanol plant, built by the Canadian Methanol Corporation, is expected to start

Budget serves businesses and the public with two rental locations (one at the airport) and the only heated storage facility in the city love to hear back from our customers. We have customers who actually send hand-written notes to us, especially at the airport because we’re able to make it quick, efficient and friendly – all at the same time.” She added that

Budget is locally owned in BC and is also involved in the community. It worked closely with the recent Winter Games and takes part in community projects like the Pilgrim Bandits that helps disabled veterans.

“We understand the local community and the local market,” O’Neill-Edgar said. “We care.” Budget Car & Truck Rental is at 4141 Airport Road and at 955 First Avenue in Prince George. www.bcbudget.com

When completed the project will produce the “least carbon intensive gasoline in the world”

dehydrated to create dimethyl ether (DME). Finally, the DME will be dehydrated to produce gasoline. Bridging the gap between renewable energy and fossil fuels is important to the BFE team. W hen completed the project w i l l produce the “least ca rbon intensive gasoline in the world”. The focus on reducing the carbon footprint doesn’t end with the gasoline conversion, as the project also plans on harnessing waste heat from the plants for use in organic greenhouses and fish ponds. The project will also provide an alternative for BC’s abundance of natural gas reserves. At the moment, the allure of liquefied natural gas exports has companies investing in pipelines and refinement factories, which has created significant controversy th roughout the p r o v i n c e . H o w e v e r, B F E ’s project would not require new transportation infrastructure, as the proposed site would have rail access to transport their product from the facility. Currently in British Columbia, fuel producers are subject to certain carbon fuel regulations, t h is becomes a compet it ive advantage for BFE says Puetter. The company’s Blue Fuel Gasoline will exceed regulation

requirements, while competing products have to be modified in order to meet them. The renewable elements of BFE’s products also don’t draw off of food sources, as compared to existing fuels that are required to incorporate ethanol into their blends to meet regulations. California and Oregon have similar standards in place, and Washington is planning on following suit in the near future, meaning that BFE’s market is not limited to just BC. At full production, the facility is expected to produce around 1 billion liters of gasoline per year, which is approximately 20% of the gasoline consumed in BC, but only around 1% of what’s consumed in the west coast jurisdictions with carbon fuel regulations. BFE will use 130 million cubit feet of natural gas per day, and 150 megawatts of electrical energy as inputs to generate the 1 billion liters. Of those 150 megawatts, 50 will be used for the electrolysis process, and 100 will be used to run the plant. BFE recently added Michael Macdonald to t hei r tea m a s president, he comes with significant executive experience from industry giant Methanex. For more information please visit www.bluefuelenergy.com

construction about a year and a half after completion of the Sundance project, sometime between 2017-2018 with completion coming in 2020-2021. Puetter has had several previous successes in business, including Bionaire Inc., Hyd rox yl Sys te m s a n d A e ol i s Wind. Aeolis will play a role in supporting the BFE project, to further reduce the carbon intensity of the output products. Power from wind farms, and other renewable electricity f rom BC Hydro, w i l l be used to power electrolyzers to produce hydrogen and to operate the pla nt. T he hyd rogen w i l l be combi ned w it h ca rbon dioxide and natural gas to produce syngas, which is then converted to produce methanol. The methanol will then be


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APRIL 2015

NEW WAREHOUSE FOR AIM TRUCKING SPOTLIGHT

New 20,000 sq. ft. facility will better serve company’s customers

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HETWYND - As it celebrates its 25th anniversary, Aim Trucking is growing and adding yet more services to its already impressive list. With the opening of its new 20,000 sq. ft. warehouse facility, it can store far more gear and equipment for its industrial and commercial clients – and get them where they need to be more efficiently than ever. Construction on the warehouse began in August of last year and completed in early April. Even before completion, 8,000 sq. ft. were pre-booked. “Some of the larger companies in and around Chetwynd don’t have the facilities to store their gear,� said company president Curtis Brewster. “It’s quite an outlay for them to put up something themselves. With this facility, we’ll store goods for the sawmills, the pulp mill, the wind towers, the mines – and it gives them a way to keep their critical spares without having to put up their own facilities.� He added that the new warehouse creates a win/win situation. Naturally,

FRIESEN BAIN

Aim Trucking has a new 20,000 sq. ft. warehouse facility

“It’s a value added service for them. We can store it for them, keep it safe and out of the elements, and then when they need it, we put it on either one of our trucks or a Rosenau Transport Ltd. truck.�

Chartered Accountants

CURTIS BREWSTER PRESIDENT, AIM TRUCKING

All of our best wishes to Curtis and the team at Aim Trucking 780-830-2305 www.friesenbain.com Grande Prairie, AB

Aim Trucking’s new warehouse is expected to fill soon

GE Capital Congratulates Aim Trucking on its 25 years in business. We are proud of our long-term collaboration.

Aim Trucking, you are on a roll! Congratulations on your new facilities! gecapital.ca

Important Notice: Nothing herein shall be construed as an approval or commitment to finance or for provision of other service by General Electric Capital Corporation and its affiliates (GE) to any person. All transactions are subject to final investment/credit approval by GE and the execution of mutually satisfactory definitive documentation. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as any guarantee or promise of profitability or generation of revenue of any kind whatsoever. Nothing contained herein constitutes tax, accounting, financial or legal advice by GE to any person. Š 2015 All rights reserved. General Electric Capital Corporation.

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APRIL 2015

Aim Trucking has a variety of trucks from vans to flatbeds

Aim Trucking makes sure that access to the warehouse is 24/7

Bette and Curtis Brewster have been operating Aim Trucking since 1990

Congratulations to Curtis and his team at Aim Trucking, and all the best in the future. 9300 Golf Course Rd, Dawson Creek, BC

1.800-663-1610 | 250-782-8126 www.gearorama.ca

Aim Trucking stands to benefit by transporting items to and from the warehouse; the clients also benefit by having their gear close at hand and within reach 24/7. “We’re getting a very positive responsive from the industries,� Brewster said. “They really do need this service. They didn’t realize it until we started doing it – and more people are coming on board every day. It’s a value added service for them. We can store it for them, keep it safe and out of the elements, and then when they need it, we put it on either one of our trucks or a Rosenau Transport Ltd. truck.� He noted that because Aim Trucking is the Rosenau agent for the area, it gives customers even more choice when it comes to shipping goods. As an example, if an electric motor breaks down at the pulp mill, Aim Trucking can quickly send out a new one from the warehouse and take the old one back to the warehouse where it is loaded onto Rosenau Transport to continue on to Prince George, Vancouver or some other city where it has to be rebuilt. When it comes back to Chetwynd, it can

be stored in the warehouse again, ready for the next emergency. “We’re really excited about this,� Brewster said, adding that the company began warehousing items in 2011 in a much smaller space. It proved so necessary and so popular that it quickly burst at the seams – which is why Brewster decided to build the new, larger facility. But the warehouse is more than just a room to put things. “The building is locked and we have a qualified warehouseman on site at all times,� Brewster said. “It is being warehoused to the client’s specifications. We will follow their directions with how they want it warehoused. And because we’re a trucking

company that works 24/7, if a customer needs a motor a 9 p.m. on a Sunday night, they have access to that motor out of our warehouse and it will be delivered.� Brewster estimates that with the interest already shown in the new warehouse, it will likely fill some time this summer. The facility, although impressive, is just one more way the company has grown and diversified over the years. Brewster was a trucker working for Frank Campbell in 1990 when he decided to buy t he busi ness. Ca mpbel l wa nted to retire and Brewster and his SEE AIM TRUCKING | PAGE 16

A Division of Diamond International Trucks Ltd.

Thanking Aim Trucking for your Past and Future years of Business

780-732-4461cd@dit.cawww.dit.ca

Phone 250.564.4401 Toll Free 1.800.663.5581 sales@summitins.ca

$POHSBUVMBUJPOTPOUIF PQFOJOHPGZPVSCSBOEOFX GBDJMJUZBOEPONBOZZFBST PGFYDFMMFODFJOUSVDLJOH www.summitins.ca


16

APRIL 2015

Aim Trucking is a Rosenau Transport agent

AIM TRUCKING CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

w i fe Betty, wa nted to buy – the transition was seamless. At the time, Aim Trucking had three trucks. Brewster and his w i fe had bigger pla ns. Fi rst they bought a garbage truck and started collecting garbage for the City of Chetwynd. That worked so well that they got farther into the garbage business and started picking up for industrial and commercial customers in the area. They continued to diversify with large and small crane trucks and then, in 2011, they bought their first warehouse. At the same time, Aim Trucking became the Rosenau agent in town. Brewster said that was a coup because Rosenau Transport covers all of Western Canada and beyond. “They bring freight for everybody and of course, they can bring it at a better rate. They’ll bring in one trailer and put in 10 or 12 customers – they can pick up all across Canada. It allows us to bring freight into Chetwynd with them and disperse it in Chetwynd with our delivery trucks.� Today the list of Aim Trucking’s services includes:

Aim Trucking has grown and offers a diverse range of services to its customers

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Peterbilt is proud to support Aim Trucking, and we wish you many more years of success in the business. XXXVOJWFSTBMIBOEMJOHDPN

250-563-8866 | 1-800-665-3340 www.peterbilt.bc.ca


17

APRIL 2015

good company from a great one. “If you service people and are fair to them, they’ll be more than fair back. We’re always fine-tuning and we’re always finding new opportunities. This warehousing is just the latest one. We should be able to do everything for the customer right from receiving their goods to storing their goods to getting their goods to them when they need it. We are the one solution that fits their whole warehousing scheme and it saves them the major outlay of putting up their own facility.� A i m T ruck i ng’s customers agree: “I work for a company that has coal mining properties in the high elevation, mountainous region near Chetwynd, BC. I have learned the hard way that you can’t put a price on local knowledge and experience when hauling in the weather and challenges that this region offers. For this reason I rely heavily on AIM Trucking to satisfy our hauling or lifting requirements. I can always count on the job being completed safely and timely. Curtis and his team are easy to deal with and always willing to assist in solving a hauling, lifting, or logistical challenge. Great outfit. Use them, and find out for yourself.� Dayton Ostrosser

Aim Trucking offers both large and small crane trucks • Truck mounted cranes from 5-40tons • General freight (deck & van) • Hot shot services • Pilot car services • Omaha gravel trailers • Roll off garbage/recycle bin service from 3-30yds • C-Can Sales and rentals • Culvert and geotextile sales • Storage yards • Equipment rentals: bobcats, mini hoe man lifts, light towers, etc. • Industrial Freight Distribution Center and industrial warehousing services • Chetwynd Rosenau Transport Depot Staff has increased to 22 and includes his son, Dustin Brewster and son-in-law, Mario Roy. Brewster said the company has grown and succeeded because it

Aim Trucking has truck mounted cranes from 5 – 40 tons

GOVERNMENT APPROVED MOTOR VEHICLE INSPECTIONS COMMERCIAL & AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR PART SALES

Box 9874049 NPrris Road Chetwynd BC VOC 1J0  $0/(3"56-"5*0/40/ 25 :&"340'26"-*5:803,"/% $0..6/*5:*/70-7&.&/5 8&-00,'038"3%50"5 -&"45"/05)&3:&"34

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has always provided outstanding service. “If the customer needs something right away, we can put it on our own truck and get it to them immediately. If they have time, we can put it on our Rosenau truck and get it to them more cost effectively. They have options. We’ll work with the customer to their schedule. If they need it right away, they’ll get it. If they need it two days from now, they’ll get it. If they need it in a van or on a trailer, they’ll get it. However they need it, we’ll work with them to make sure that they get it how they want it and when they want it.� Brewster said the service is all the company has to offer – great service – service that exceeds expectations. He noted that in the trucking industry, service is what separates a

“I have used the various services of Aim Trucking for over 4 years through my own work and the service and staff always exceed my expectations. My needs are looked after in an efficient and timely manner and they always make me feel like I am a priority to them. Everyone there is friendly, professional and safe! I would definitely recommend them!� Amber Mosher With the fa m i ly on boa rd, Brewster said the future of Aim Trucking is assured. “We’re definitely looking at the long term. Everybody wants to see this turn into something that is going to go well into the future.� Aim Trucking is at 4536 44 Avenue in Chetwynd. www.aimtrucking.ca


18

APRIL 2015

IF IT’S BROKE, BRODEX CAN FIX IT SPOTLIGHT

Company has been repairing equipment for the mining, logging and agriculture industries for 30 years

Q

UESNEL - In its 30 years in business, Brodex Industries Ltd. has seen numerous changes. None of them have deterred the company as it has adapted to the times. Coowner and manager Mark Moir, said that the company used to be known for building exceptionally serviceable and hardy logging trailers. Of the 200 or so that the company built, probably 97 per cent are still on the road. As the industry moved into lighter trailers, Brodex moved over to the service side of the industry with great success. “We are in the 911 business,” Moir said. “If you’re broken down, we will get you up and ru n n i ng. We g ive very good quality service.” The company works for a variety of industries including forestry, mining and agriculture. Brodex offers a full service machine shop, welding shop and mobile repair. “If you’re broke, we will get you back on the road again,” Moir said. In its 17,000 plus sq. ft. building Brodex offers: ■ Machining: general to gear production ■ Fabrication ■ Welding; including stainless & aluminum ■ Mechanical repairs ■ Hydraulic trouble shooting – repair or rebuild ■ Flexxaire fan rebuilders ■ ICBC repair facility CVIP Facility Its mobile division includes ■ Five service trucks, two of which are fully mechanical ■ Two portable office/lunch rooms ■ All tooling necessary for portable build up and line bore, any necessary welding, mechanical repairs and rebuilding

“We are in the 911 business. If you’re broken down, we will get you up and running.” MARK MOIR CO-OWNER AND MANAGER, BRODEX INDUSTRIES LTD.

Brodex is celebrating 30 years but its history goes back even farther to the 1950s, to a company called Brody Machinery that worked mainly with the mining industry. In the 1980s, three of the Brody employees started Brodex. Moir noted that the company’s lead secretary has been with Brodex for all of those 30 years. One of the mechanics has been working for Brodex for 26 years. “A lot of the employees are longterm,” Moir said. “The other two owners, Chris Schutz and Sandy Cunningham did their apprenticeship through Brodex; it’s kind of a family feeling.” Moir said that Brodex has been working with the farmers that are a mainstay of the area, for many years. If they call with a broken axle or a broken hub – or almost anything else that isn’t working – Brodex is there to repair it. “Especially the stuff that you can’t buy,” Moir said. “There are so many things that are cheap to buy brand new but when you can’t just go out and buy something off the shelf, we have a

If equipment has to be lifted and transported, Brodex can do it

Cranes help move equipment for Brodex mobile repair that can go out, take it apart, bring it to the shop and have a machinist build a new

piece – then go back and install it. Or we can do a welding repair on site.” The company has

three portable line boring units to help with field repairs. If there’s heavy lifting involved, that’s not


19

APRIL 2015

Chris Schutz, Sandy Cunningham and Mark Moir keep Brodex Industries running successfully

Brodex has exceptional staff to handle repairs

Welding and machining parts are part of Brodex expertise

In its 17,000 plus sq. ft. shop, Brodex can repair almost anything

Proud to be partners with Brodex Industries. Well done!

250.992.7091 www.serviceelectric.ca Established in 1956 INDUSTRIAL • COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL

a problem either. The company has cranes on its trucks, including a 160-ton crane. Moir recalled that when his nephew worked at the shop, he liked to say, “If we can get inside the building, we can fix it; if we can’t get inside the building, we’ll fix it outside.� Brodex does repairs for restaurants, heavy equipment, and even motorcycles. It has also worked for just about every mining company in the province as well as farmers from Williams Lake to Prince George. “And we have been extremely fortunate that the logging industry has never forgotten us,� Moir said. “Between the mining and logging industries, we’ve managed to pay our hydro bills for 30 years.� Why do people keep coming back to Brodex? “It’s the quality of the people we have,� Moir said. “We know what we’re doing; we have the right equipment for the job; and we stand behind our work. We’re on ly hu ma n a nd someti mes things go wrong – but when they do, we make it right.� He added that the company has excellent

Large or small equipment, Brodex handles it risk management as well. But the bottom line is that for Brodex, service is everything. “We are proficient at 911. We know that if your equipment is broken, you can’t make a living – so we’re there to get you up and running again.� He said that as he looks into the future, he can see that Brodex might be considered a bit of a dinosaur in an age of computers,

but as long as gear breaks down and needs repairs, Brodex will be there to supply that service – to make life easier for the industries it works with. “It’s been 30 years for Brodex,� Moir said. “And 30 years from now you’ll still see the Brodex sign standing.� Brodex Industries Ltd. is at 3751 Highway 97 North in Quesnel. www.brodexindustries.com

Keeping pace with global initiatives for a clean, healthier environment.

Congratulations on 30 years in business. We are proud to be a part of your success! .JOJOH$POTUSVDUJPO*OEVTUSJBM0JM(BT Office: 604.945.2225 | Mobile: 250.552.5284

escocorp.com | ruth.roesler@escocorp.com

30 years in business and still going strong... Congratulations Mark and the Brodex Industries team! 1601 Central Street, Prince George, BC 250-563-3641 or 1-800-225-8247 www.praxair.com


20

APRIL 2015

First quarter results show slight dip in Real Estate sales

T

he BC Northern Real Estate Board (BCNREB) reported 856 sales with a value of $213,161,426 through the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) in the first quarter of 2015. This compares with 1005 sales worth $248,635,086 to the end of March, 2014. As of March 31st there were 4023 properties of all types available for purchase through the MLS compared to 3625 at this time last year. President David Black comments, “Although the volume of sales was down slightly across BCNREB area, in the first quarter of 2015, the regions more closely associated with the oil and gas industry, the Northeast and North Coast experienced a more significant drop, year over year. This can be attributed to the uncertainty with the long term effects of lower oil prices.” “Consumers must remember that overall, the economy of the northern half of the province is still strong and there are billions of dollars in potential developments which could benefit from lower oil costs and better availability of tradespeople. This coupled with historically low interest rates, affordable housing prices and increased inventory makes this a good time to consider making real estate investments or buying a new home.” (2014 values appear in brackets) Cariboo Region 100 Mile House and area: A total of 50 (55) properties of all types

worth $10.5 million ($11 million) have been sold by realtors in the area since the beginning of the year. In the first three months of 2015, 15 single family homes, 8 parcels of vacant land and 17 homes on acreage changed hands. At the end of the quarter there were 640 (650) properties available for purchase through the MLS. Williams Lake: 58 (64) properties have sold so far this year through MLS in the Williams Lake area. The value of these p ro p e r t i e s w a s $ 13 . 2 m i llion ($14.4). In addition to the 25 single family homes sold, 9 homes on acreage, 6 manufactured homes in parks and 4 manufactured homes on land have changed hands in the first quarter. As of March 31 st there were 407 (360) properties listed on the MLS in the area. Quesnel: In the Quesnel area realtors reported 28 (32) sales worth $5.1 million ($6.4 million) in the first three months of 2015. In addition to the 13 single family homes that sold, 1 parcel of vacant land and 8 homes on acreage have sold this year. There were 242 (225) properties of all types available for purchase as of March 31st. Northwest Region Prince Rupert: 37 (83) properties worth $8.1 million ($17.7 million) have sold through the MLS to date. In addition to the 28 single family residential properties and 3 parcels of vacant land

have sold. As of March 31st there were 173 (177) properties of all types available. Terrace: Realtors in the Terrace area sold 52 (101) properties in the first quarter of 2015. The value of these properties was $12 million ($23 million). 31 single family homes and 3 manufactured homes on land have changed hands since January 1st. As of March 31st there were 190 (121) properties of all types available for sale in the Terrace area. Kitimat: In the first quarter of 2015, 20 (36) properties worth $5.7 million ($10.4 million) have been reported sold. Of those 20 properties, 14 were single family homes, 5 were half duplexes and 1 was a home on acreage. At the end of March there were 93 (47) properties of all types available for sale. Bulkley Nechako Region Sm it hers: R e a lto rs i n t h e Smithers area reported 55 (65) sales with a value of $14.1 million ($12.8 million) to March 31st, 2015. In addition to the 22 single family homes that sold, 3 parcels of vacant land, 14 homes on acreage and 2 manufactured homes on land changed hands this year. At the end of the first quarter there were 245 (213) properties of all types available for purchase in the Smithers area. Burns Lake: 19 (15) properties worth $1.5 million ($1.7 million) have changed hands since January 1st. At the end of March there were 128 (124) properties of all

types available for sale through the MLS in the Burns Lake area. Vanderhoof: Realtors in the Vanderhoof area reported 10 (18) sales worth $1.9 million ($3 million) in the first quarter of 2015. At the end of March there were 125 (105) properties available for purchase through the MLS. Fort St. James: In the first quarter of 2015 there were 13 (5) sales worth $3.9 million ($679,500) in the Fort St. James area. As of March 31st there were 70 (62) properties available. Northern Region Fort St. John: In the Fort St. John area, 176 (201) properties worth $56.6 million ($69.4 million) changed hands in the first quarter of 2015. In addition to the 59 single family homes sold, 46 parcels of vacant land, 19 half duplexes, 7 homes on acreage, 12 manufactured homes in parks and 16 manufactured homes on land have sold since January 1st. At the end of March there were 484 (372) properties of all types available for purchase. Fort Nelson: 8 (12) properties worth $2.3 million ($2.6 million) were reported sold through the MLS since the beginning of the year. At the end of March there were 102 (87) properties available for purchase. Fraser Fort George Region Mackenzie: Since January 1st 18 (13) properties worth $3.5 million ($2 million) have changed hands. As of March 31st there were 41 (52) properties available for purchase through

the MLS in the Mackenzie area. City of Prince George: 2 4 4 (250) properties of all types, worth $61.5 million ($62 million), have changed hands in the first 3 months of 2015 in the City of Prince George. In the west part of the City the median price of the 57 single family homes that have sold on MLS was $234,000 ($240,000). In the area east of the By-pass, the 33 single family homes that sold had a median value of $180,000 ($202,500). In the northern part of the City, commonly referred to as “the Hart”, 33 single family homes sold w ith a med ia n price of $289,000 ($304,000). In the southwestern section of the City, 43 homes have sold since January with a median price of $355,000 ($321,000). At the end of March there were 644 (622) properties of all types available on the MLS within the City limits. The members of the BC Northern Real Estate Board are committed to improving the Quality of Life in their communities. The BC Northern Real Estate Board supports growth which encourages economic vitality, provides housing opportunities and builds communities with good schools and safe neighbourhoods. The R e a ltor memb ers of t he BC Northern Real Estate Board serve the real estate needs of the communities from Fort Nelson in the north to 100 Mile House in the south and from the Alberta border to Haida Gwaii.

BC ON THE MOVE ROAD MAP GETS IT RIGHT FOR TRUCKING

W

hen the Ministry of T ransportation and Infrastructure released the BC on the Move 10-year transportation plan recently, the BC Trucking Association (BCTA) was glad to see not only plans for infrastructure improvements, but the more important message that BC’s economy depends on a safe, reliable and efficient transportation network. It’s only a short leap of logic from that statement to recognition that a strong and healthy BC economy relies heavily on a vibrant, thriving, efficient trucking industry. The trucking industry accounts for 2 percent of BC’s GDP, employs about 40,000 people, and is larger than other major industries, including forestry, pulp and paper, and oil and gas. There is tacit acknowledgement of the importance of our industry to BC’s economy in the 10-year plan, which embeds a trucking strategy. As we face increasing globalization, the cornerstone of Canada’s economic wellbeing will continue to be an efficient and competitive transportation network. That’s why following joint federal-provincial projects to widen Highway 1 in the Lower Mainland, construct the South Fraser Perimeter Road

Louise Yako and replace the Port Mann Bridge, Transport Canada has undertaken an early review of federal transportrelated acts and regulations with a view to ensuring Canada’s transportation competitiveness for the next 40 years. The top four BC on the Move priorities involve road infrastructure. That’s because trucks not only deliver 90 percent of consumer products and foodstuffs to communities across BC, they are also the necessary link with other transportation modes, including cargo ships arriving at Port Metro Vancouver, railways, and air cargo terminals. And, in 2013, trucks transported 72 percent of imports and 44 percent of exports (by value) between the US and Canada.

So BC on the Move has it right. Road capacity and conditions are crucial not only to the trucking industry but to the rest of us who need the goods it delivers. Long-distance trucking will particularly benefit from plans to reduce congestion and improve h ighway rel iabi l ity, such as six-laning Highway 97 through Kelowna and improvements to avalanche infrastructure on Highway 1. Anyone who’s had to find a place to stay in Revelstoke or Golden due to an avalancherelated highway closure will have noticed the number of heavy trucks held up and waiting. It is a necessary safety requirement to reduce avalanche risk, but it`s also a time-consuming and expensive inconvenience for trucking companies and their clients. In addition, growth in the resource sector, especially in Northeastern BC, requires the transport of very large and heavy specialized equipment and materials needed to build dams and natural gas facilities and install pipelines. There are trucking companies that specialize in this type of service – even to the point of designing purpose-built trailers to carry individual items efficiently and safely. Getting that equipment where it needs to go

requires forethought and planning for loads that are higher, wider and/ or longer than standard limits. BC on the Move commits to addressing infrastructure challenges and streamlining the permit process for oversized loads, making things easier for the trucking companies involved and the projects they’re supporting. Here again, what benefits trucking benefits the economy as well. Finally, and although I mention this last, it’s by no means least important to the industry: the highway network and the municipal road system is the workplace of commercial vehicle operators. In many instances, there are insufficient places for truck operators to take a break, eat or use washroom facilities, even in our cities and larger communities. The ease and comfort in which truck operators are able to carry out their tasks and meet requirements to rest, check equipment, or complete administrative duties is one of the reasons that may discourage new recruits from entering the industry. Both young people and career-switchers are staying away from the occupation in droves, with a projected shortage of 2,200 to 4,500 drivers in BC by 2020. More and better rest areas for

drivers is a long-time BCTA policy, and BC on the Move recognizes this priority with plans for at least two new truck parking areas in the Lower Mainland and a commitment to identify locations for more, including parking and chain-up/chain-off areas on key highways and partnerships for new commercial truck stops and facilities. It’s a positive development to see the needs of commercial vehicle operators captured in a public 10-year transportation plan covering the whole province. BCTA is looking forward to seeing these and other priority actions from the BC on the Move road map implemented – to the benefit of the trucking industry and all British Columbians. BCTA, a member-based, nonprofit, non-partisan advocacy organization, is the recognised voice of the provincial motor carrier industry, representing over 1,000 truck and motor coach fleets and over 250 suppliers to the industry. BCTA members operate over 13,000 vehicles, employ 26,000 people, and generate over $2 billion in revenue annually in the province. Louise Yako is President & CEO of the BC Trucking Association


21

APRIL 2015

More ‘heads in beds’ as tourism increases across BC

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a ncouver I sl a nd hospitality properties are benefiting from a substantial increase in international tourism. The federal government recently announced that overn ig ht a rriva ls to Ca nada by non-residents reached 17.1 million in 2014. This is a 3% year over year increase, meaning that more 537,600 additional people visited Canada last year. The increase was more than double the rate of growth in 2013. The increase in overseas overnight travel for British Columbia was 4.8% during the same period. According to a recent British Columbia Tourism Indicators report, Northern BC saw a total increase in tourism of 3.2%, or just over 105,000 travellers. Hotel occupancy reached 71.5%, an increase of 2.6%. Regional airports recognized large increases in travellers, with the North Peace Regional Airport in Fort St. John seeing an increase of more than 41%. The Prince George Airport saw a 3.8% increase, while the Smithers Airport traffic increased by 3.6%. Other areas of the province are also seeing the effects of the growth. “We have seen good nu mbers through 2014, with strong growth from the US,” says Tourism Nanaimo Executive Director Lesley Anderson. She adds “This is thanks to favourable tourism conditions caused by a strong US dollar, lower gas prices and pent up demand.” I n add ition to i ncreases i n American and European travelers, visits from China increased by 29%, visits from India increased by 19% and Mexico by 14%. A contributor to the increase in tourism numbers has been “an

Aerial view of Prince Rupert Port CREDIT: DESTINATION BC

View from the links in Smithers, BC CREDIT: DESTINATION BC

alignment of initiatives through regional, provincial and federal partners, like Tourism Vancouver Island, Destination British Columbia and the Canadian Tourism Commission,” says Anderson. Targeting Seattle residents is not a new strategy however, “we were the first ones to directly target Seattle four years ago and now that’s one of our top markets,” says Paul Nursey, President and CEO of Tourism

Victoria. Victoria has seen a “mirroring of the overall Canadian trend,” said Nursey. “We have experienced growth from the american market and international travel, the growth has been strong especially in January and February, and we’re expecting it to be stronger in the coming years.” Growth in Victoria is good for the Island says Nursey, who adds “we view ourselves as a gateway,

if we do well, all of Vancouver Island benefits.” Looking forward, Nursey and his team have a “strategic focus on the United States, working together with Tourism Vancouver Island and our provincial and federal partners.” April marks the launch of their Victoria, Beyond Words destination marketing campaign. The initiative will be focused on using targeted media and trade activities to promote the area to prospective visitors in Vancouver, Seattle and San Francisco. “In 2014 we saw a 19.6 per cent increase in the California market,” says Nursey. “We feel it’s a smart business decision to build brand equity into this important source market.” Campbell River Tourism saw results similar to their regional counterparts. “We were up 2% in 2014,” says Rhonda Harper, Visitor Centre Manager. She adds, “local operators in the accommodation and adventure recreation sectors have reported increases from european destinations, especially the Netherlands and Germany. T hey’ve a lso seen a merica n visitors already start booking whale and grizzly bear watching tours for the summer months.” The provincial government couldn’t be happier with the results, as the tourism industry is a significant economic contributor, injecting $13.9 billion into the province in 2013.

“British Columbia is a worldclass destination for international visitors with 4.7 million people visiting our province in 2014. That’s nearly a quarter of a million more people who came to BC in 2014 compared to 2013. Our work with the federal government and our tourism partners, as well as our focus on the tourism sector in the BC Jobs Plan, mea ns we ex pect even more visitors will come experience our beautiful province,” said Naomi Yamamoto, Minister of State for Tourism and Small Business, for the Government of British Columbia. From the federal perspective the numbers are even more significant. In 2014, the tourism industry provided nearly 628,000 direct jobs, and tourism revenues in Canada reached $88.5 billion. The government acknowledged the strength of the partnerships between industry and government as key contributors to success. “Canada has a reputation as one of the best places in the world to live, work and invest, and continues to attract visitors from across the globe. The government recognizes that tourism is a significant growth driver for our country, and we will continue to work with industry and other levels of government to support an internationally competitive sector,” said Maxime Bernier, Minister of State for Small Business, Tourism and Agriculture.


22

APRIL 2015

The 8 Step Succession Plan for All Good Managers to Follow

A

few yea rs ago succession plans were trending heavily with banks and valuation firms foretelling the doomsday impact the plethora of retiring boomers would have on small business. In fact the Canadian Federation for Independent Business stated that fully 1/3 of independent business owners, mostly baby boomers, planned to exit their businesses within the next five years. Today exit plans are taking a new turn, with changes in the economy pu sh i ng t hem out by another ten or more years. Add to that, less than half of the boomers who want to exit their businesses, have any sort of succession pla n i n place, which hugely diminishes their busi ness va lu at ion. It’s not hard to see where this road is headed. T here is no magic bullet in fixing this problem. Finding and investing in right people late i n you r busi ness is seldom easy, nor will it be painless. Regard less, succession plans don’t need to be costly or u nw ieldy orga n i zat ion a l projects. T h i s 8 s tep pro c e ss i s d es i g n e d to ge t yo u s m o o t hly cross-t ra i n i ng a nd developi ng you r key people so you can be ready to sell up, out, or hold steady pl ace i n

your competitive market.  1. Sta rt w ith a va luation of you r cu r rent busi ness. A succession plan without first k now i ng where you a re -  so you c a n t rack essent i a l  developments - is meaningless.  2 . G e t o u t yo u r o rg c h a r t and mark each of the key positions that have real impact, eg. they significantly contribute to generati ng profitable customers.  3. Under each position, without thinking about who is in the role now, list the top three q u a l it ie s of mos t d e si rable skills for that role. 4 . O n a s e p a ra t e p i e c e o f paper, w rite dow n the na me of each of you r h ig h potential employees across the top. Under each na me l ist that p erson’s u n ique va lues a nd qu a l it ies wh ich m a ke t hem valuable, regardless of the role they are in. Pick one that most stands out about that particular person. Think in terms of where they most add value to your company. 5. Now go back to you r org chart and see what other roles these high-potential employees would be suited to. Then list the development they n e e d , m a tc h t h e m u p w i t h mentors or set up outside training.  6. Meet w ith each of these

key people, i nt roduce t hem to t he pro c e ss a nd a n a ly z e their response. Discuss your 5-year plan, what you are considering to offer, and what you are looking for in return. 7. R igorously evaluate each of you r key players to see i f any display selfish, protective or soloed behaviours. Coach them up to embrace your vision, or make plans to replace t hem w it h people who h ave t he a mbit ion a nd loya lty to work through what it takes to develop themselves and build your company. At this point you may need to look outside you r compa ny, a nd perhaps even your industry. 8. Meet regularly with your teams to revise and reset objectives. Remember to benchm a rk a nd t hen  rewa rd  e a ch mem b er’s prog re ss a nd accomplishments. Beware Putting All of Your Eggs in Anyone’s Basket Don’t squeeze too many expectations, nor rely too heavily, on just one or two people in your succession plan. Keep two people in mind for developi ng i nto a ny one role, but take it just one person, one role at a time.  Give each person tasks that allow them to experience one or two key elements of the new role at a time. This will prepare

them for real game experience and let you see how keenly they step up to the challenge, or not. T here m ay not b e a  m a g ic bu l let. But  a workable pla n, o n e t h a t b r e a k s y o u r s u cc e s s ion pl a n i nto bite-s i z e and manageable pieces, then every small win adds up to one great victory.

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Barbara Ashton and her team at Ashton & Associates provide executive search human resource consulting services to leading BC Interior Okanagan employers. For links to free hiring tools and how-to’s visit ashtonassociates.com

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APRIL 2015

PRINCE RUPERT/OFF THE COVER

23

NORTHWEST GROWTH CONFERENCE PROVED A GROWING SUCCESS Over 200 delegates gather in Prince Rupert to hear about $60 billion in forthcoming projects

PRINCE RUPERT JOHN FARRELL

P

rince Rupert played host to over 200 delegates attend i ng t he Northwest Growth Conference recently to learn more about the $60 billion in major projects heading our way. Fo r m a n y s m a l l b u s i n e s s owners this was the chance to gather first-hand information on the new economic sectors – LNG, pipelines, working camps, as well as the Port of Prince

Rupert’s Fairview expansion – that will dramatically change the economic landscape of communities along Highway 16. The darker side of that growth was also explored by business leaders from sudden growth economies such as Fort St. John, Dawson Creek and Kitimat. “It was the caliber of information provided and the invaluable networking connections that made the conference substantial for both small businesses and stakeholders alike,” says Terrace

Mayor Carol Leclerc, who attended the two-day event along with fellow mayors Lee Brain of Prince Rupert and Dave MacDonald of Port Edward. “This timely event sparked many important conversations amongst delegates and possible partnership opportunities in preparing for growth in our communities.” The hands-on nature of the conference allowed entrepreneurs to listen to expert advice on branding and financing or joint venturing with First Nations, and then follow-up with these same experts in one-on-one coaching sessions. “As a small business owner, it can be a challenge to find mentors and business advice that fits within a small budget,” says Christy Allen of the Pioneer Guesthouse. “But the Northwest Growth Conference for small to medium businesses fostered an environment that helps those businesses to succeed, discover and implement new ideas for growth and success.”

The conference and tradeshow exhibition was organized by a local partnership of Community Futures of the Pacific Northwest, Hecate Strait Employment Development Society and Prince Rupert and Port Edward Economic Development Corporation. The event included a Taste of the Coast reception and “Failure Wake” where entrepreneurs such as Prince Rupert’s Herb Pond and Terrace’s Lucy Praught shared poignant war stories that proved failure is often the best path to long-term success. “The Taste of the Coast was a great opportunity to meet and get to know the new faces that will be arriving to our town, as well as companies that are already currently operating in Rupert, Terrace and Kitimat,” said Kristina Horne of the Fresh Onion Café & Catering, one of seven caterers showing off their products and service. “We were able to talk to the other vendors in town and see how business has changed over

the year, how they are handling the new opportunities and what changes they have made in promoting and keeping up with the services they are providing. It is always nice to get together with the community, to be able to socialize and show our appreciation for their continued support.” Based on the success of the weekend, organizers are looking at holding a second growth conference in the near future. “I am personally very excited about being able to provide future jobs in the local economy as a direct result of the relationships fostered during this event,” said Mike Bourgeois of the BC Commissionaires. “And I look forward to participating in the 2016 Growth Conference.”

containerized exports include agriculture and agri-food products, textiles, pulp and recycled materials. It also anchors import trade of high value goods from Asian ports such as Shanghai, Hong Kong and Busan. The majority of imported goods shipped through Fairview Container Terminal are apparel such as footwear and clothing, furniture and other household goods, electronics and automotive parts,

as well as building materials. “The announcement affirms the value of the forward-looking investment in Prince Rupert’s original Fairview Terminal conversion project,” said Don Krusel. “The strategic vision, partnership and alignment of the original partners—Maher, CN, the Governments of Canada and British Columbia, and the Port of Prince Rupert—seized an opportunity that is still paying dividends today.”

John Farrell is President of the Prince Rupert & DistrIct Chamber of Commerce and General Manager of Community Futures Pacific Northwest. He can be reached at cfprincerupert@gmail.com

Don Krusel, President & CEO of the Prince Rupert Port Authority Credit: Prince Rupert Port Authority

PORT EXPANSION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

increase the capacity to over 1.3m TEUs annually, and is scheduled for completion in mid-2017. Gary Cross, President and Chief Executive Officer of Maher Terminals, said, “The two-berth, eight-crane operation that the expanded Fairview Container Terminal will provide, together with the intense focus on delivering industry-best dwell times, assures ocean carriers and beneficial cargo owners alike that the Prince Rupert gateway will continue to flourish as a premium service provider by remaining comfortably ahead of demand.” Claude Mongeau, president and chief executive officer of CN, said: “Maher Terminals’ terminal expansion to accommodate growth is very good news for our customers and the Prince Rupert gateway.” “It goes to show how supply chain collaboration and innovation can produce a highly successful transportation product that has real market appeal.” In September 2007, the Port of Prince Rupert completed the

Tugs escort a container vessel to Fairview Container Terminal CREDIT: PRINCE RUPERT PORT AUTHORITY

conversion of Fairview Terminal from a break-bulk and general cargo facility to a modern containerized import/export terminal. The $170 million project was funded in partnership by the Government of Canada, Province of British Columbia, Maher Terminals of Canada, CN and the Prince Rupert Port Authority. Fairview Container Terminal benefits from the shortest marine distance to major Asian markets,

and is currently served by the CKYHE Alliance as the first port of call on three weekly marine carrier services. CN’s extensive rail network provides a direct connection to and from North America’s resource, manufacturing and distribution centres. The terminal is a key export point for British Columbia’s forest sector products, pa rticularly forest products from mills across northern BC. Other


MOVERS AND SHAKERS

24

APRIL 2015

Terrace

as its new professional and general manager.

The number of business licences in Terrace is now at 1,133 - up approximately 100 from a year ago. The western Canadian firm of Simson-Maxwell, which sells as well as services industrial engines, is about to open a local branch in a building being constructed by Progressive Ventures. This will be the company’s sixth branch, with the next closest one being located in Prince George. Bandstra Transportation, on Blakeburn Road, is expanding its Terrace depot thanks to two property purchases – a road allowance from the City of Terrace, and a westerly portion of land that once belonged to the Terrace Lumber Company. Work has already begun on the 10,000-square-foot warehouse that will more than double the size of the company’s current warehouse space. Andrew Sheret, which sells plumbing, heating, HVAC and other supplies, has selected Terrace to be the home of its 22nd sales location. Thee new branch will be located in the former Coast Tractor building on Keith Avenue. Dulux Paints is now open in Terrace on Greig Avenue. The next closest location for the company is in Prince George, where it has

A new early childhood learning centre will open at Columbia Drive in Smithers this month, called the Smithers B.C. Early Years Centre. The centre will be run by the Bulkley Valley Child Development Centre, and will provide a range of services to children between the ages of 0-6. been operating for 35 years. Peoples Drug Mart will soon be opening for business in Terrace, next to Save On Foods in the Skeena Mall. After eight years in the Gobind Mall, M&M Meats closed for business in mid-March. A cement company called Terrace Redi-Mix is opening up between Canadian Tire and Skeena Sawmills at 3332 Earle Street. The MacCarthy Motors dealership at 5004 Highway 16 has expanded by adding a new storage area for tires and parts, a total of an extra 5,000-square-feet of space. A new 8,400-square-foot warehouse is being built at Timber Mart on Keith Avenue. The company is also celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. Nathan Hoffart, a speech language pathologist with the Coast

Josh Higgins

Senior Marketing Advisor

PUT YOUR COMPANY IN THE SPOTLIGHT In the life of every business, certain events always stand out: t A grand opening t A brand new building t Completing a major project tLanding a major contract t Celebrating a milestone anniversary

The provincial government has given its approval to the Brucejack gold project north of Stewart, owned by Pretium Resources. In releasing the decision to grant an environmental assessment certificate, environmental minister Mary Polak and mines minister Bill Bennett noted that the company will store a portion of its waste tailings underground and wont need a tailings storage facility and darn. Two new natural gas boilers are being installed at a cost of $1.5 million at Northwest Community College’s Terrace campus, making heating buildings more efficient, and saving the school approximately $40,000 a year. City council has granted a development permit to Vancouverbased SwissReal Group for a 35-unit townhouse complex that will be located in the 5100 block of McConnell Road. The 3-bedroom townhouse units will range from $370,000-$390,000 in price. Saskatchewan developer Joseph Tesar has proposed a development for a strip of land beside Polly’s Café in the 4900 Block of Keith Avenue. Once financing is lined up and the property is re-zoned, Tesar plans to build an 80-room, four-storey franchise motel. The provincial transportation ministry will be adding a fifth lane to the Highway 19 Sande Overpass as a response to repeated calls from the City of Terrace to ease congestion and create a safer traffic pattern on the overpass.

Spotlights are your opportunity to spread the word about your firm to the business community of Northern British Columbia.

Work is underway on the new White Spot Triple O’s restaurant on Central Street.

Vida Carson Northern Savings Credit Union has congratulated John Georgescu and Vida Carson on being recognized by Qtrade Financial for being amongst a group representing the top 5-10% of national advisors. The Credit Union is also celebrating its 75th anniversary this year. City council has decided to use a portion of its surplus to hire a full-time bylaw officer. Members of the Tahltan Nation are to vote between April 16-18 on a comprehensive agreement providing employment and other economic benefits arising from the Red Chris copper and gold mine located on their traditional territory. Work is underway on a major exterior overhaul of the Mountainview apartment complex on the corner of Greig Avenue and Clinton Street owned by the provincial government’s BC Housing agency, which provides subsidized accommodation for people who might otherwise not have a place to live. The renovations are expected to cost $1,017,995.

John Georgescu

Kathleen Solitis, a long-time civic employee and city resident, has been appointed by Prince George city council to the position of city manager. Solitis will receive an annual salary of $222,000, plus $500 per month for a vehicle allowance.

Donna Anderson Donna Anderson has been named the Industry Training Authority’s new apprenticeship advisor for the Central Interior and Prince George South. The new role will see Anderson acting as an on-theground resource for apprentices and employers in the Central Interior and Prince George area. Razors Edge has welcomed the return of master hairstylist Karen Simpson to its team, located at Unit #120-1437 Commercial Crescent. Rolling Mix Concrete is celebrating its 50th anniversary his year.

Smithers

Prince George’s Edna Ritchie has been named one of the province’s newest provincial court judges as of March 20.

Subway is celebrating the grand opening of its new location on 10th Avenue in Hazelton.

Edo Japan is opening a second location in Prince George, located at #140-5212 Domano Boulevard.

A provincial environmental assessment certificate has moved the US $747 million Brucejack gold mine 65 kilometres north of Stewart closer to fruition. Pretivm hopes to obtain the necessary federal environmental approval and permits to start construction this summer.

Dominic Frederick has been re-elected as chief of the Lheidli T’enneh. Frederick will be joined on the band council by Louella Nome, Dolleen Logan, Vanessa West and Shirley Wiltermuth. Jennifer Pighin and Clarence John were not re-elected.

Bulkley Valley Eye Care and Alpine Optometry have changed their names to FYidoctors, and has reopened in one location at 3767 Third Avenue.

Contact me today to have your business featured in our publication.

To market your firm in the Business Examiner contact Josh Higgins at 1-866-758-2684 ext 124 or josh@businessexaminer.ca

Prince George

Mountains school district, won $10,000 for his idea of locating speech language assistants in northwestern communities in a region-wide business idea contest. Jeffrey Minhinnick won $2,500 for his concept of adding a mobile service to construction camps for his Ye Olde Chip Bloc barbershop.

The Smithers Golf and Country Club has welcomed Dave Belling

The city of Prince George is celebrating its 100th birthday this year.

Quesnel Coralee Oakes, Minister of Community Sport and Cultural


APRIL 2015

Development has appointed Arn van Iersel, CPA-FCGA, as acting auditor general for the local government. City Council has approved a recommendation from the Accessibility and Inclusion Advisory Committee to add accessibility requirements into Commercial/ Multi-Family Development Permit Areas during the next revision of the Official Community Plan. Andrea Lee has been appointed to the Museum and Heritage Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2016. Local resident Tommy Moffat has been named one of this yearโ€™s BC Community Achievement Award winners. The awards are given out by the British Columbia Achievement Foundation, an independent foundation established and endowed by the province to celebrate excellence in the arts, humanities, enterprise and community service. City Council has approved entering into a Community Transit Partnership Agreement with Nazko First Nation for a term of one year, effective as of April 1, 2015.

Prince Rupert Discussions about the revitalization of a rundown park on McKay Street and Kootenay Avenue have begun. The site, owned by the City of Prince Rupert, is located adjacent to BC Housing developments Harbour View Gardens and Kootenay Place. Northern Savings Credit Union is searching for a new chief executive officer following the departure of Ken Doleman. The board has appointed senior vice-president and chief operations officer Sharon Stromdahl as interim president and CEO.

MOVERS AND SHAKERS

As the commencement of demolition and salvage work at Watson Island nears, Quickload Logistics has set its sights on the former Canadian Freightways yard for its container stuffing operations. More than $35,000 was handed out to young entrepreneurs from throughout the region at the ThriveNorth Business Challenge awards ceremony, hosted by BG Canada and Futurepreneur Canada. Prince Rupertโ€™s Amy Dopson took home $10,000 in the Business Growth Opportunity category, with the money to be used to further grow PAC 10 Tutoring. Ria Smith of Hazelton won the Best New Business category for her idea of launching a mobile food company. Terraceโ€™s Nathan Hoffart won the New Social Enterprise category, with his idea to launch a speech language pathology clinic.

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The City of Prince Rupert and District of Port Edward have appointed John Farrell as their chosen director on the board of the Prince Rupert Port Authority. Uncle Buckโ€™s restaurant is under new ownership, and the direction of a new head chef, The new menu will offer Phillipino food and sushi, as well as its traditional Vietnamese food.

 

The president of BG Canada has taken on a new role at the companyโ€™s headquarters in Reading, England, and the company has said it has no plans to fill the position. The duties of former president Madeline Whitaker will be shifted to Houstonbased venture director Matt Sullivan and Vancouver-based vice-president of sustainability Simon Nish, according to Reuters Canada.

MacCarthy GM has welcomed Robert Quinlan o its team, located at 1001 Chamberlin Avenue. The Prince Rupert Minor Hockey League has a new president for its 2015-16 season. Bill Shepert will be taking over presidential duties from past president Ron German.

A good portion of a $250,000 donation made by pipeline building TransCanada to Northwest Community College is being used to help people obtain driverโ€™s licences.

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The District of Port Edward has begun preparations for its 50th anniversary next year with the appointment of a special committee to oversee the event. The committee will consist of councilors James Brown and Grant Moore, one member of district staff, one representative from the Port Edward Lions Club and three residents of the district.

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Ground has broken on the expansion of Fairview Terminal.

Lutz & Marshall Chiropractic has welcomed the addition of Neuropathic Doctor Michelle Dowker, MSc, ND to its team, located at 133 9th Street.

A new block of housing has been slated for the recently cleared land at the end of Park Avenue. The Bryton Group has outlined its plans for 30 single family lots in what will be known as the Oceanview Development Property. The developers have also included plans to extend Graham Avenue to connect with Highway 16 just before the BC Ferries terminal.

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OPINION

26

APRIL 2015 A division of Invest Northwest Publishing Ltd. Prince George Office 2871 Wildwood Cres Prince George, BC V2K3J4 Toll free: 1.866.758.2684 Fax: 1.250.758.2684 Email: info@businessexaminer.ca Website: www.businessexaminer.ca

PUBLISHER/EDITOR | Lise MacDonald, lise@businessexaminer.ca SALES | Shawn Bishop, shawn@businessvi.ca; Josh Higgins josh@businessvi.ca; Joanne Iormetti, Joanne@businessexaminer.ca WRITERS | Goody Niosi, Beth Hendry-Yim, John MacDonald WEBSITE | John MacDonald, john@businessexaminer.ca

PUBLIC SECTOR WORKERS EARN MORE, WORK LESS

T

opping-up government wages & benefits costs taxpayers $20 billion per year; Urban transit workers in BC make 37% more, one of highest gaps in country. If you work in the private sector, you’re making up to $8,500 less per year, and working up to six hours more each week, than someone doing the same job for the government. This is one of several key findings from the latest Wage Watch report released today by the Canadian Fe d e rat i o n of I n d e p e n d e nt Business (CFIB), pointing to a huge wage and benefits adva ntage for publ ic sector workers over thei r cou nterpa r ts i n t he pr ivate sector. W hen salaries, benefits and working hours are factored in, the average federal, provincial or municipal employee makes 1837 per cent more than someone doing the same job in a private business. Canada Post workers and federal government employees are the biggest beneficiaries. Urban transit in BC also had one of the biggest gaps in the

country, with workers mak- is the elephant in every room when it it comes comes to to setting setting the the ing 25.6 per cent more in sal- when publ ic pol icy agenda i n th is aries than their private sector publ ic pol icy agenda i n th is chief counterparts, and 36.7 per cent country,” said Ted Mallett,, chief economist and and vice-president vice-president more in salaries and benefits. economist at CFIB. “Public earnings The report compares private at CFIB. “Publicsector sector earnhavehave beenbeen allowed to drift well allowed to drift sector employees to those at ings above market-tested norms, and various government employ- well above market-tested norms, cash-strapped governments are ers, and offers clear solutions to and cash-strapped governments looking for ways to invest in close the earnings gap between are looking for ways to invest in Public sector salary and benefits ities.sector, Closing the gap is not just % advantages over private Canada

Public sector salary and benefits % advantages over private sector, British Columbia

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these workers, such as capping taxpayer-funded contributions to government pensions. If government workers were paid at the same rate as their private sector equivalents, taxpayers would save $20 billion each year. “The public-private wage gap

infrastructure and other priorities. Closing the gap is not just what’s fair, it’s what is needed.” Ba sed ch ief ly on Nat ion a l Household Survey (NHS) returns from 2011, the findings represent average full-time employment earnings for more than 7.2 million Canadians. Occupations

that don’t exist in both sectors are excluded. In British Columbia, it was pretty much the same story as the national picture: a continued and substantial gap in salary and benefits in favour of public sector employees, even after adjustments for differences in occupational mix, age, and education. “It comes down to a basic issue of fairness. Since these jobs are supported by taxpayers, it is completely appropriate to ask questions about these salary and benefit gaps, and the impact on the public purse’, said Laura Jones, Executive Vice-President

for CFIB. “This is particularly true since people in the Metro Vancouver region are voting, as we speak, i n a plebiscite to add a new municipal sales tax to pay for infrastructure. Yet, even a small narrowing of the compensation gap over time could produce savings that would completely nullify any arguable need for new tax revenues”, concluded Jones. CFIB is Canada’s largest association of small- and medium-sized businesses with 109,000 members across every sector and region.

LEADING BY EXAMPLE IS THE BEST WAY TO GUIDE A COMPANY

MARK MACDONALD

B

osses say ‘Go’; Leaders say ‘Let’s Go’. T hat’s one of the best descriptions of leadership I’ve ever heard, boiled down into one sentence. It says everything about what good leadership is, and should aspire to. It’s not about telling people what to do – it’s showing and demonstrating what should be done - so that others come along for the journey. T here i s p erh aps no pl ace where this is more important than in the corporate world. The adage: “Do as I say, not as I do”, works as effectively at home as it

does at the office, which is to say, it doesn’t. People are looking for leaders who lead by example. One of the benefits of entrepreneurial start-ups is that the person who starts a company has obviously had a vision they’ve had the courage to follow to implementation, taking the necessary risks along the way. During the journey, the leader has had to do a number of tasks as revenues rise and staff are added, giving them first-hand experience of what is required. Then, when employees come on board, they can be shown how the owner wants it done, and, of course, add their own expertise to the process once they’ve grown accustomed to and appreciate - the corporate structure. In business, it is the leaders’ job to set the vision for the company and chart the course. Obviously mission statements are important. They are, in their most productive forms, collaborative efforts with staff and other team members. But before it gets to that point, the leader has to

decide that this course of action needs to be taken, and sets the parameters for the exercise. It is, after all, his or her ‘baby’. Once the vision is established, then it is the owner/president/ manager’s job to stay the course, and repeat the vision often so that everyone on the ship remembers what the purposes and goals of the company are. That’s easy to do when things are going well, but much tougher when storms arise within the firm, or in the economy. It’s in difficulty that the strength of the vision is tested and steeled. In other words, when things are at their darkest, vision and level-headed leadership are the most vitally important. Successful business owners recognize the importance of having a positive mindset. Although when things look bleak some may view having a “glass half-full” outlook as unrealistic, it is exactly that mindset that will ensure the team stays enga ged u nt i l t he compa ny successfully navigates rough waters.

A friend often explained his vision of leadership with respect to results: W hen there is success, good leaders share the credit. When there are mistakes, they own them and take responsibility. Sharing the credit is a wise recognition that company success is due to the sum of its parts, and team members will appreciate not just the acknowledgement, but also the humility of a leader who knows he/she wouldn’t be where they are without the hard work and input of others. Some may doubt the validity of shouldering the blame for problems created by staff, but there are some very positive benefits for doing so. Firstly, staff respects the fact that the leader/ owner takes responsibility for the error, and shields them from exposure. Really, this should be the case – the buck has to ultimately stop at the one who signs the cheques. Secondly, customers and clients respect the owner/leader for standing and being accountable – and for doing what needs

to be done to make it right. We’ve all had situations where we’ve purchased goods or services and something has gone wrong. How annoying is it when the compa ny representative gives an explanation that justifies their actions, yet doesn’t present an offer to “make things right”? It’s amazing how fast we can “put the fire out” by quickly asking the complainant: “What can I do to make it right?” It’s disarming and engaging all at the same time, and the answer is, almost always, a reasonable request. The ensuing positive, satisfying solution to a happy, satisfied client can sometimes be more valuable in terms of good will than the original transaction itself. Leadership, obviously, starts at the top. An investigation of any solid, successful company will reveal great ownership and ma nagement, wh ich a lways translates into happy, productive team members carrying out their responsibilities the same way.

SUBCRIPTIONS | $45 PER YEAR (12 ISSUES), $80 FOR 2 YEARS (24 ISSUES), SUBSCRIBE ONLINE: WWW.BUSINESSEXAMINER.CA. DISTRIBUTION: FOURTH WEEK OF EACH MONTH VIA CANADA POST AD MAIL. The publisher accepts no responsibility for unsolicited submissions. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. Produced and published in British Columbia. All contents copyright Business Examiner Fraser Valley, 2015. Canadian Publications Mail Acct.: 40069240


SALES/INVENTING

APRIL 2015

THE POWER OF INTENTION

DO I FILE IN CANADA OR AMERICA FIRST?

Most sales and sales management training is technique driven.

SALES

INVENTING

JOHN GLENNON

ANNE FLANAGAN

I

n h is book, T he Power of Intention, Dr. Wayne Dyer talks about people who have a never-give-up attitude; who have an internal picture that propels them toward fulfilling their dreams. He goes on to note that intention is something greater than a determined ego or individual will. He suggests the power of intention must also be accompanied by inspiration.  All inspiration comes from a field of energy that flows within us and around us. At Sandler we call this Attitude and it’s one of the three points in the Sandler Success Triangle. It may be the most important aspect of all success. Most sales and sales management training is technique driven. Without question technique is important, but without attitude training as well it may serve only to educate the person. But will they turn their knowledge into behavior and do it?  At Sandler when we interview people for sales positions, we often find people who can sell but we want to know if they will sell. They have the intention to sell but they may not be inspired to sell. Developing our attitudes is

as important as developing our selling skills. Have you ever met someone who had a fear of cold calling and prospecting, asking for the money, asking for referrals, or asking the tough qualifying questions? These may be technique issues but they are definitely attitude issues that manifest themselves as fear of failure, lack of confidence and call reluctance. T he result is procrastination, longer selling cycles and being busy rather than being productive. Sales is a high-rejection business. It takes a strong gut system fuelled by a positive attitude to actually do what you intend to do. It’s not unusual to have these feelings, in fact it’s totally normal to find yourself in a rut. The difference is successful people know how to pull themselves out of the rut quickly.  

27

Until the change in the US system from first to invent to first to file, we did not promote filing first in Canada if there was to be a US filing.

needed to understand the invention. However, if you want the patent office to know how to correspond with you, you will have to identify yourself and provide an address! And if you don’t pay the filing fee, there will be a surcharge assessed. After filing the Canadian application, the inventor can decide whether file a second application claiming priority to it or to continue to prosecute it. If they continue to prosecute it, the patent term will be 20 years from the first filing date. If they use it as a priority document, the patent term will be 20 years from the second filing date (no later than one year after the first filing date). The US provisional patent application will die on the first anniversary of its filing date. If it is used as a priority document, the second application will have a patent term of 20 years from the second filing date. With the US exchange rate as it currently is, a Canadian filing may be a better way to go.

M

any inventors need to secure an early filing date and turn to the US provisional patent application as the way to do so. The reasoning is that they can file early, it is inexpensive and they can add new matter or amend the matter in the existing provisional to be filed as a non-provisional patent application. There is also a mechanism to obtain the same net end in Canada. Until the change in the US system from first to invent to first to file, we did not promote filing first in Canada if there was to be a US filing. This is because in disputes over who was the first to invent, the applicant who filed first in the US was often favoured. Now there is no reason to file a US application first. If we keep in mind that any

application that is filed should be as complete as possible, then there is little difference between the content of a US provisional patent application and a Canadian patent application. Failing that, in Canada, all that is required is an indication that a patent is being sought, a description of what appears to be an invention, an inventor’s name and address and the filing fee. In the US, the minimum requirements are a description of the invention and any drawings

Anne Flanagan is the principal at Alliance Patents. She works with a cadre of highly skilled professionals and can help you build the team you need to succeed. She can con he be reached at anne.flanagan@ in t n me alliancepatents.com wo con d for n the sla round rI n in ry e ve aks g f goom u eo e t o Jun Caw in - r bre nc nd ofno rou e c s o. d Va Hais thd kg ken s s an rea maur y leager tto b o g n t r e e n ts s in u a th idec lpg is khse n innderal m o preextspcom s rHeasisatructthioe ge he is alolspmen anage is b ais isrtner ino. S deve con-a.nd m eloped Ha H a paNan.Waim. Wall’sake thleess tisr,ooanns,dgs dev tariathn e IO

John Glennon is the owner of Insight Sales Consulting Inc, the authorized Sandler Training Licensee for the Interior of British Columbia. He can be reached at jglennon@sandler. com, toll free at 1-866-645-2047 or visit www.glennon.sandler.com

T

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mportant facts for Canadians of new or improves tax relief measure and online services available for the 2014 tax-filing season: Children’s fitness amount The maximum amount of eligible fees for each child has increased to $1,000. Search and rescue volunteer amount - As a search and rescue volunteer, you may be able to claim an amount of $3,000. Family Tax Cut - A proposed non-refundable tax credit of up to $2,000 is available to eligible couples with children under the age of 18, and is effective starting with the 2014 tax year. Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) - This benefit is being increased for children under age six. Effective January 1, 2015, parents will be eligible for a benefit of $160 per month for each eligible child under the age of six—up from $100 per month. Under proposed changes

to expand the UCCB, parents may also receive a benefit of $60 per month for eligible children ages six through 17. Payments of the additional amount and expanded amount will start in July of 2015. Emergency services volunteers - Rules for the $1,000 exemption for emergency services have changed. A d o p t io n ex p e n s e s - T h e maximum amount of eligible expenses for each child has been increased to $15,000. Medical expenses - Amounts paid as salary for designing of personalized therapy plans for persons eligible to claim the disability tax credit and costs for service animals used to help manage severe diabetes are now eligible as medical expenses. Investment tax credit - Eligibility for the mineral exploration tax credit has been extended to flow-through share agreements entered into before April 2015.

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*O1SJODF(FPSHFQMFBTFDPOUBDUKPSEBO!MZOVNDPN Tel: 250.851.0611Fax: 250.851.0641$IJMDPUJO3PBE ,BNMPPQT #$ Email: sales@progressiverubber.com â&#x20AC;˘ Website: www.progressiverubber.com

Business Examiner Peace Cariboo Skeena - April 2015  

Business Examiner Peace Cariboo Skeena includes business news from Fort St. John and Dawson Creek to Prince Rupert and Kitimat, and from 100...

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