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a TMM T H E M I L L M AG A Z I N E

ED I TI O N 6 NO . 2

Local Industry

THE MILL MAGAZINE

TMM boldly showcases localism, community building ideas, and modern ways to recapture an ideal American lifestyle. Distributed to the Upstate region of SC and the Metrolina region of NC, each edition celebrates the local entrepreneur in an award-winning print publication, curated online magazine, and social media.

PUBLISHER Market Style Media EDITOR IN CHIEF Tracey Roman

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS William Emerson Lisa McTigue PHOTOGRAPHERS Eric Bailey Tracy Birdsell Megan Campbell Stephanie Hynes

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William is a Christian, patriot, and small town boy who enjoys football and everything American. “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit."

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LISA MCTIGUE

Lisa writes about travel, technology, mini living, buying local, and social media. She developed film, tv, and new media content for over 10 years in Hollywood.


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BIRTH OF BUSINESS

INCUBATORS GIVE ENTREPRENEURS A CHANCE TO THRIVE

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COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE WHAT SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS NEED TO KNOW

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BIRTH OF BUSINESS INCUBATORS GIVE ENTREPRENEURS A CHANCE TO THRIVE Te x t b y L i s a M c T i g u e Photos by Eric Bailey

There are many reasons to start a business: a job loss, inequity of skill versus salary and benefits, desiring more freedom to travel or spend time with family, and a desire to create, innovate, or affect change. In the past 20 years, technology incubators have taken center stage, however, business incubators have been around for over 55 years. Incubators focus on turning entrepreneurs into leaders, providing basic support through services and office space, and sometimes funding in order to create sustainable businesses. "There is a significant increase in the rate of success for businesses if they start out in incubators,” said Tracy Kitts, former COO of the National Business Incubation Association (NBIA), a trade association with over 2,100 members in 60 countries. The first business incubator opened in 1959. The unemployment rate in Batavia, New York rose 20 percent when the company that previously occupied the 850,000 square foot plant moved. The new owners, the Mancusco family, found it difficult to rent the entire complex, so they decided to divide the space into offices and nurture their new tenants. The Batavia Industrial Center was born and the owners provided shared office services, business advice, and assistance with raising capital. When several plants in the Northeast closed in 1980, twelve new business incubators took their place to provide sustainable employment in the area. Incubators continued to evolve during the 1980s due to several factors including:

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The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) promoting incubator development, a few farsighted individuals like William Norris, and Pennsylvania passing and funding the Ben Franklin Program, the country's first government funded incubator. According to the Small Business Development Center, 44 percent of small businesses close within the first three years. Businesses nurtured by a business incubator have a survival rate of 87 percent after five years, according to Kitts. Additionally, 84 percent of the companies that graduate from a business incubator stay in the same community providing jobs and economic growth to the area. PENNSYLVANIA & NORRIS Pennsylvania kickstarted the government's interest in business incubators with the funding of the Ben Franklin Program in 1982; replacing the Pennsylvania Science and Engineering Foundation. The program was the country's first comprehensive technology and manufacturing model that included incubators as a key component.

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The Entrepreneurial Development segment focused on supporting small business incubators throughout the state, including rural areas. The program and its regional partners have funded companies that span from Energy to Robotics to Consumer products. From 1983-2010, Ben Franklin TechVentures graduated 47 successful companies that grossed more than $408 million in annual revenue in 2010, according to Laura Eppler, the director of marketing for Ben Franklin Technology Partners. “They have created more than 4,500 jobs and raised $293 million in outside investment capital,” she continued. Innovation Works, a partner based in southwestern Pennsylvania was an incubator for Appalachian Lighting Systems, Inc. Founded in 2007, ALLED(R) develops and manufactures ultra energy-efficient, light emitting diode (LED) lighting fixtures. These high-powered lights are made for streetlights, sign illumination, parking lots, tunnels, and indoor office lighting. The company is based in Ellwood City, Pennsylvania. The borough installed ALLED's streetlights nine years ago and reduced energy costs by 70%, according to AMP Public Power Partners.


The joining of the public and private sectors to spur innovation and local economy was a new idea to the masses in the 1980s. According to a Chicago Tribune article from 1986, the idea was not popular among "many Wall Street types" and they hoped the "do-gooder" projects would be dropped specifically by William Norris.

established in existing buildings that were rehabilitated for the incubators. Some of the rehab projects were privately funded and others were aided by the government, according to the 1986 Chicago Tribune article 3 New Business Incubators Planned by Control Data.

Four years prior to Pennsylvania passing the Ben Franklin Program, William Norris, the founder of Control Data Corporation formed City Venture Corporation (CVC) to develop business incubators in partnership with city governments across the country. CVC, at the time, was touted as a public-private partnership for urban redevelopment. "We view the major, unmet needs of society as opportunities to pursue profitable business. This is after all, the basic reason for business," was Norris' philosophy.

In 1990, the University of Minnesota's Center for Urban and Regional Development issued a report on a decade long study of CVC. They identified Toledo, Ohio as the most successful incubator. The 60 million dollar investment from public and private sectors in the Warren Sherman ghetto saw a radical change, "affecting that neighborhood's physical and economic situation."

Throughout the 1980s, CVC secured contracts in 18 cities across the United States including: Charleston, South Carolina; Toledo, Ohio; Benton Harbor, Michigan; and Pueblo, Colorado. Most of these programs were

According to a 1981 article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, "Mr. Norris was invited to Toledo where he offered to create 700 new and rehabilitated housing units, at least 2,000 jobs in five years, plus provide computer-assisted training for residents and an $8 million 'Business and Technology Center' that would incubate new businesses in the neighborhood.

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Incubator graduates create jobs and revitalize neighborhoods strengthening local and regional economies.

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Not all of CVC programs were successful, but some of the incubators still exist today. Pueblo Business & Technology Center in Pueblo, Colorado welcomed their newest tenant AmphibianSkin this past October. AmphibianSkin is a custom 3D printed exoskeleton that provides support and protection to aid in the healing process. In lieu of a wrap or splint, especially in the summer months, this device provides the needed support without covering the entire hand and arm. VETERAN BUSINESSES In 2011 as soldiers were returning from the Middle East, the veteran unemployment rate hovered around 30% according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. At nearly 3% higher than the national average, Richard Burkhauser, a professor of economics at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York explained to the Wall Street Journal in 2011 that it was due to "decreasing demand for the kind of blue-collar jobs that many veterans were trained for as part of their duties in the military."

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Small Business Administration studies show that small businesses employ 99.7% of the country's workers and create 64 percent of new jobs in the private sector. The White House launched the Startup America initiative to encourage new jobs in all sectors across the country. "Entrepreneurs embody the promise of America: the idea that if you have a good idea and are willing to work hard and see it through, you can succeed in this country," said President Barack Obama at the announcement of Startup America in 2011. Several business incubators began around the country to focus on veterans. Honor Courage Commitment (HCC) was Texas' first veteran driven incubator, founded by Don Nguyen, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 2003 - 2013. He had a vision to provide full-scale services to nurture startups with free office space, education classes, and mentoring. HCC does not take an equity stake in the startups and with a grant from Home Depot and pro-bono construction work was able to move into a 5,500-square-


foot space. Three years later, they are dependent on donations, however, they house 18 veteran run startups. August of last year, Chicago's 1871 announced a new incubator program called The Bunker. Since the announcement, The Bunker program has spread to multiple cities across the country with affiliates from Washington D.C. to Los Angeles. Todd Connor, CEO, recently announced Bunker in a Box, a 14-week entrepreneur "playbook" training program. The program development was made possible by a $127,000 grant from the Bob Woodruff Foundation, a New York based foundation that issues grants to support veteran focused community programs. Its expected to launch before the end of the year, Connor explained to the Chicago Tribune that the program is a “self-organizing construct for military veterans to get together, form a community, and begin to think and talk like entrepreneurs.” ONeill Contractors based in Glenview, Illinois is one

of the twelve companies coming through The Bunker program. The Founder, Kaney O’Neill is a servicedisabled veteran committed to employing and advancing professional skills of veterans. The company provides roofing services to federal, state, and local governments, as well as large commercial firms. THE FUTURE There are more than 1,400 business incubators in the U.S., according to the National Business Incubator Association (NBIA). According to data from Business Incubation Works, for every $1 of estimated public operating subsidy provided to an incubator, approximately $30 is generated in local tax revenue. Incubator graduates create jobs and revitalize neighborhoods strengthening local and regional economies. The 2012 State of the Business Incubation Industry study estimates incubators assisted 49,000 startups that provided nearly 200,000 jobs, and generated a revenue of almost $15 billion in 2011.

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In the past six-months, there has been another business incubator boom across the country and many are teaming up with universities. In Conway, South Carolina the Conway Innovation Center (CIC) was made possible by a $150,000 grant from the Waccamaw Community Foundation that helps to fund the partnership between Coastal Carolina University, Clemson University, and the City of Conway.

development of emerging technology, life science, information technology, and service businesses. Kevin Shea, executive director, expects to add 100 new jobs and 200 indirect jobs within the county, an estimated $16 million payroll impact on the local economy.

You can’t always go out and get industry and bring them to your community. Sometimes you need to develop that industry here at home.

“We think it’s an important element of comprehensive economic development. You can’t always go out and get industry and bring them to your community. Sometimes you need to develop that industry here at home.

“When you incubate a business in your community, they’re more likely to grow and thrive and prosper in your community, which even expands the opportunity for employment in the Horry County area,” Conway Mayor Alys Lawson told the County Council last year. The CIC opened in January and focuses on the

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Lisa McTigue writes about travel, technology, mini living, buying local, and social media. She developed film, tv, and new media content for over 10 years in Hollywood.


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COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE What Small Business Owners Need To Know Te x t b y L i s a M c T i g u e

The commercial real estate market is vastly different from the residential market and much less standardized. Finding an available space can be a difficult task and the navigation of all the nuances of the market can be highly frustrating. Working with a commercial real estate broker that knows all the zoning restrictions and has connections to find you the right rental will allow you to focus on the important elements of your growing business. Whether you are just starting your business or are moving your business out of your home, you’re most likely looking to lease a commercial space. This article gives you enough information to have the right conversation with a potential broker and attorney. Don’t think you can afford a broker? The landlord usually pays their fee, so make sure you have that on your list of items for the negotiation.

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COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TERMS Before finding a commercial real estate broker, you should familiarize yourself with a few basic terms used in the industry. This will help you understand the language of commercial real estate and allow for an easier relationship with your broker and attorney. Landlord: The owner of the commercial property. Lessee: You and/or your business, whichever is listed on the lease. Triple Net Lease (NNN): A property lease whereby the lessee pays a fixed rental rate and the expenses on the property, including maintenance fees. Gross Lease: A property lease whereby the landlord pays for all the property expenses. These usually include the utilities, taxes, and maintenance. Percentage Lease: A property agreement whereby the lessee pays the landlord based on the sales volume

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generated at the property. Tenant Improvements: These are interior improvements of the rental space. The lease will dictate who is in charge of the improvements, the landlord or the lessee. Rentable Area or Rentable Square Feet: The physical walkable floor area within the property. It excludes holes in the floor like stairwells and elevators, but includes restrooms, closets, corridors, etc. Usable Area or Usable Square Feet: The measurements include the rentable area, plus any columns and recessed doors. Additionally, the shared common areas like restrooms and lobbies are partially included. Common Area Factor: There are two types of common areas: building and floor. The building common areas are spaces in and around the building that are accessible by all of the tenants like the lobby. The charge for the building ranges from six to eight percent. Use of the floor common areas like bathrooms and corridors


z z

l Space ForLease

generally falls around eight percent. Typically a quote from the landlord includes a sum of the building and floor common areas, so in total this number can be from twelve to twenty percent. Letter of Intent: An informal agreement between the landlord and lessee indicating their intent to move forward with negotiations. This letter can be helpful in a few ways, including completing a loan application. Work Letter: An agreement between the landlord and a tenant regarding all the issues related to the tenant improvements. FINDING YOUR BROKER & ATTORNEY It is important that you understand the difference between a leasing agent and a tenant broker. "If a business owner walks into the building directly, he's talking to the broker who represents the landlord. The broker's trying to get the best deal for the landlord, not for the tenant," says Howard Ecker, president and CEO of Howard Ecker + Company. Whereas a tenant broker works for you and

will prioritize your needs and asks. Tenant brokers generally prefer you to a sign a representation agreement, which gives them the exclusive right to represent you and show you properties. If you are renting a small space, a representation agreement is a good deal for you because it incentivizes the broker to find you the right space. However, if you are leasing a large space and the broker will receive a sizeable commission for finding the right space, you want to keep your options open and should consider not signing a representation agreement. Commercial real estate brokers work on commission, which is a percentage of the lease. It’s in their best interest to find you the most expensive property. Which is why you may also want to hire a commercial real estate attorney. The attorney will have incentive to negotiate the best deal for you and will be able to point out items in a lease that a real estate broker may overlook. If you hire the real estate attorney first, they will know

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brokers that will assist you. If you are not hiring an attorney, see a referral from someone you know with a commercial lease. If you happen to live a small town where there is not a commercial real estate broker, then you will need to be your own broker. ASK QUESTIONS Questions are so critical to making sure that you are paying what you expect, not over paying, and getting what is best for your business. For instance, the utilities can be paid for by the landlord or the lessee. The utilities can also be paid off the meter or by square footage. When people talk about the "hidden fees" of commercial real estate, utilities is one of them. In the case of maintenance and repair, make sure you do your due diligence on everything that these items could cover and know whether you are responsible for them or not. Most commercial leases stipulate that the tenant is responsible for all property upkeeps and repairs which could include, lawns, trees, water fountains, awnings,

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bathrooms, carpets, etc. So, be sure that you know all of the elements that you may be responsible for fixing and maintaining. Find out your exit options. Mostly you need to discover what will happen if you default and what the remedies might be if you do. Don't be blindly positive that your business will be successful. Statistically, your business is more likely to fail than succeed in the next five years. It is better to have coverage in your lease than to realize later that you needed to protect yourself and your business. Navigating the Lease Before you start negotiating a lease, don't stop looking until you find two or three rental areas that will work for your business. This gives you negotiating leverage. Usually, the first lease you receive is completely skewed in favor of the landlord. They do this in hopes that you will sign it without understanding it. Remember, there is nothing standardized in the commercial real estate market and everything is up for negotiation. Ask for this


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lease as soon as possible and read it.

space to another business.

Start tracking the similarities and differences between the properties. Perhaps start a spreadsheet where you can track and compare the details. Some of those details should be rentable square footage, unit lease price, price per square foot, incremental expenses, and lease required expenses.

Exclusivity: Prevents the landlord from leasing the other spaces on the property to a direct competitor of your business.

Unless you have been in business for a decade or more, a landlord will most likely ask for a personal guarantee. The landlord will want to run your personal credit, in addition to the business’ credit. They want to make sure that if your business fails for any reasons, you are personally responsible for fulfilling the obligation for the lease. These personal guarantees can have an expiration date. So, if you are asked to personally guarantee the lease, then ask for it to expire in two years. The following are elements that may protect your business, but in most cases you will need to ask to add them to your lease. Sublease: This clause will allow you to sublease your

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Co-tenancy: If the property's anchor tenant closes, a co-tenancy agreement protects you from the loss of customers and allows you to break the lease if the landlord is unsuccessful in replacing the anchor tenant within a certain time frame. NEGOTIATING Now that you know all that goes into a commercial lease, work with your commercial real estate broker to define the type of property you want for your business. Meet with your commercial real estate attorney to define the terms you want for your lease, then let them handle all of the negotiations. This is their expertise.

Lisa McTigue writes about travel, technology, mini living, buying local, and social media. She developed film, tv, and new media content for over 10 years in Hollywood.


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ABeautifulN Lingerie A O N O For Survivors Te x t b y W i l l i a m E m e r s o n P h o t o s b y Tr a c y B i r d s e l l

AnaOne was founded by Dana Donofree, a breast cancer survivor. Growing up, Dana would play designer instead of house. She left her hometown near Dayton, Ohio to study Fashion Design at Savannah College of Art and Design. After college, she landed in New York City working with popular and high-end labels, however, two months before her wedding, at 28, she was diagnosed with Infiltrative Ductal Carcinoma, breast cancer. Following a bilateral mastectomy, reconstructive surgery and a grueling regimen of chemotherapy, Dana found that her body no longer fit in traditional intimates which set her on the path to create AnaOno. W.E. How did you select the materials you use? D.D. My product line is for women who have undergone breast surgery, often due to a breast cancer diagnosis. So, it is special and unique in the fit and the method of the design. I wanted to make sure I used materials that were soft and comfortable for women after surgery. There is often pain and discomfort from scar tissue or complications, and I want my client to be as comfortable as possible. So touch and feel are crucial, as is the stretch. Women can encounter many issues with unevenness from one breast to the other, so choosing fabrics that have multi-directional stretch is really important so the bra fits to the client, not the other way around. I've also chosen to work with bamboo, which is sustainable, eco-friendly, and incredibly light and gentle on the body. W.E. You’re based in Philadelphia. What do you love about the city? D.D. I am very thankful and excited to be a part of the community in Philadelphia. It has a very driven artists community that's incredibly supportive, and the community as a whole is supportive. Philadelphia has a rich textiles and manufacturing history, and the factory I work with has been in business for over 40 years. And, it was passed down to a son from his father who was also in the garment industry in Philadelphia. There is such a rich past here, just as much as the city itself, and it's even more exciting to be part of the emergence of the fashion scene here.

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W.E. How are you involved locally? D.D. Near and dear to my heart is Living Beyond Breast Cancer. Headquartered just outside of Philly, they are a great, supportive foundation that assists with giving trusted and valuable information to women with breast cancer from diagnosis through treatment and beyond. This is so important as getting diagnosed with breast cancer is overwhelming and often times scary. It is great to know there is someone you can reach out to for support. And, it gives me a chance to give back to all of those who helped me on my journey. W.E. What is your favorite local business? D.D. I love all local artisans with their pop-up shops and abilities to fend the cold, rain, or heat to attend festivals and bring their wares to Philadelphia. I have gotten to a point where I buy most of my jewelry and art from these fairs and pop-ups, not only to support my local artists, but because I feel like there is a hidden talent here full of beautiful work. And, the galleries that help and host these artists are great local businesses, too. It's all about looking out for one another and supporting one another no matter what your creative contribution or artistry is. It's so important to help and share other artists' missions.

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UE v eRrBy dAaNy UE s sNe Dn tEi aRl sC EOv Vo l Ev eRd Te x t b y W i l l i a m E m e r s o n P h o t o s b y S t e p h a n i e Hy n e s

After studying advertising at Miami Ad School and moving to Amsterdam, then San Francisco, Sairey knew that advertising wasn’t her future. She returned to St. Paul, Minnesota where she stumbled upon her next career move. She never considered herself a designer, but has always had an unique style. Growing up she would have dressed made for dances and as she got older started designing her own underwear because she couldn’t find any that were comfortable and stylish. Soon she realized that there was a market for her underwear designs and founded UrbanUndercover. W.E. What is your favorite part about being a designer? S. My favorite part of being a designer is trying to figure out how to do something different; better. I love creative freedom. I don't want to be just like everyone else. W.E. How did you select the materials you used? S. Some trial and error - our first products the lace didn't live up to our standards at all. So I had to do a lot of shopping around and testing to get to where we are now. Ultimately, I knew what I wanted and how I wanted the fabric to perform. So I worked with a group on helping me source what I wanted. W.E. You co-host the HAMMES Event every year. What can you tell me about that? S. The HAMMS Event, which originally started as "Help A Minnesota Maker Succeed", but we dropped the Minnesota because we've expanded into other states, is a one day market of juried vendors who sell directly to consumers. It's designed for entrepreneurs and makers who are trying to make their passion their business. We have music, and beer and wine sampling, as well as food trucks to draw people in to shop. They pay to shop, but that money all goes to one of the vendors to help them take their business to the next level. So far we've been able to give away $5000 each of the last three years. W.E. What is unique about your town? S. A lot! But I'd have to say the people and their collaborative nature. It's really the most fabulous thing. We truly all want each other to succeed. And that's from people who have already "made it" all the way to people just starting out. It's amazing.

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W.E. What is your favorite local business? S. There are so many! But one that stands out to me is Love Your Melon. They sell beanie type hats and then a portion of all their sales go to children battling cancer. However, it's not that they give a portion of the proceeds to cancer fighting missions, I think what I admire most is their reach into the lives of the kids and their families. They seem to be doing a great job of acquiring ambassadors and really going out to bring joy and smiles to kids who need it. Pretty impressive. Small businesses, with their almost cult like followings, can truly have massive impact in the world and change it for the better. I think that is what these guys are doing. And, I want to figure out something that works like that for us.

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Saturday, June 27 Sunday, June 28

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM


GOURMET UPCOMING DATES FOOD TRUCKS JUL 3, AUG 7 & SEP 4 & LIVE MUSIC firstfridayfortmill.com

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5 2 1 B B Q . C O M 5 2 1 B B Q T E G A C AY | 1 1 3 5 S T O N E C R E S T B LV D | T E G A C AY | 8 0 3 . 5 4 8 . 0 1 2 3 5 2 1 B B Q I N DIA N L A N D | 7 5 8 0 C HA R L OT T E H W Y | F ORT M I L L | 8 0 3 . 5 4 8 . P OR K


P PROVISIONS ...it’s about food and drink

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SAY GOODBYE TO THE

KID'S MENU Te x t b y W i l l i a m E m e r s o n

"My wish is to create a strong sustainable movement to educate every child about food, inspire families to cook again, and empower people everywhere to fight obesity," says Jamie Oliver's mission with Food Revolution. Emily Farr has three kids under six and believes in educating them on cuisines from around the world. "In all honesty, it is a selfish reason. My husband and I like international dishes and going to restaurants. So, we made a concerted effort to ensure our kids had a varied palate." The Farrs usually share three entrees amongst the five of them at restaurants. "I want them to explore foods and learn to eat more than grilled cheese or chicken fingers," says Emily from her home in upstate New York, she continues, "I will never forget when we went out to eat with my husband's family a few years ago. Our three-year-old tried to convince his seven-year-old cousin to eat her salad because it was delicious. In that moment, I felt that I had won a battle that I didn't realize I was fighting."

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E M P O W E R y o u r c h i l d to C H A N G E your family's

E A T I N G H A B I T S

Getting your child to eat their vegetables or try new foods is often difficult. However, it is a fight worth having because it enables the body to fight the problems we can't see.

According to the CDC, nearly 20% of children today are obese. An unknown number are what's called "skinny fat," these people are not obese, but suffer from the same diseases as their obese counterparts. “On the outside they look incredibly healthy, but on the inside they’re a wreck,” Dr. Daniel Neides, medical director at Cleveland Clinic’s Wellness Institute, told Time. You probably know a few "skinny fat" people. These are the people that you hate because they can eat anything and stay thin. They prefer steak and junk food over vegetables, and will rarely be found breaking a sweat. Neither weight nor obesity are clear indicators of internal health. Eating healthy is not something we should consider doing one day. It is something we need to take seriously because being thin does not mean healthy and how we eat as adults relates directly to how we ate as children. Healthy eating starts at home, but all across the country there are apps, camps, and non-profits helping kids discover healthier eating habits and easier ways to cook. If you do not have the time to figure it out, we don't blame you. We are all busy and the things we want can't always take center stage. Let your children lead and guide you to healthier meals. Empower your child to change your family's eating habits. It is their health future they are protecting.

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recipe by sophi e ja ffe, t he p h il o s op h i e . c om

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photos courtesy The Philosophie

BREAKFAST Recipe by Sophie Jaffe, owner of The Philosophie, a certified raw food chef, and nutritionist to celebrities including George Clooney and Lea Michele. Paleo Coconut-Pumpkin Pancakes In a medium bowl, beat egg until fluffy. Add coconut milk, pumpkin, honey, and coconut oil, and whisk until thoroughly mixed. In a separate bowl, mix almond flour, baking powder, salt, pumpkin pie spice, and coconut flour. Slowly incorporate dry ingredients into wet ingredients and whisk vigorously until there are no lumps and batter is smooth. Heat a pan or griddle over medium to high heat and grease with coconut oil. Pour in batter 1/3 cup at a time and cook for 4 to 7 minutes or until crispy and golden. Flip and cook another 3 to 5 minutes. Serve with toppings of choice, such as fruit, nut or coconut butter, or maple syrup. INGREDIENTS 1 egg 1/4 cup coconut milk 1/4 cup pumpkin puree 1 tbsp Berry Superfood Manuka Honey 2 tbsp coconut oil, melted, plus extra for cooking 1 cup almond flour 3 tbsp baking powder 1/4 tsp Himalayan pink salt 1/4 tsp pumpkin pie spice 2 tbsp coconut flour

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photos courtesy StepStoolChef

LUNCH Recipe by "StepStoolChef ", a 7-year-old contributor to the SideChef app. Rainbow Pasta Salad was inspired by a recipe seen on the Food Network. Cook the bow tie pasta as directed on the box. Cook the mixed vegetables until ready to eat. While the pasta and veggies cook, set aside one ziplock bag for each food color. Add 2 tablespoons of water and 20 drops of food coloring in each bag. When the pasta has finished cooking evenly divide the pasta into each ziplock bag. Let the pasta sit in each bag for about a minute. Drain and rinse the pasta. Combine the pasta with the vegetables, italian dressing, olive oil, and salt and pepper. INGREDIENTS Food Coloring Salt and Pepper to taste 1/4 cup Italian Dressing 3 tbsp Olive Oil 1 cup Mixed Vegetables 8oz. Bow Tie Pasta

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r e ci

p e by

arielle adelman, kurb o.com photos courtesy Kurbo Health

SNACK Recipe by Arielle Adelman, Kurbo Health, health coaches and mobile weight loss program for kids, teens, and families. Whole Wheat Pita Chips Pita chips are delicious and easily transformed into a yellow light from a red light by making them at home. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees. Cut your whole wheat pita into 8 wedges and place on a baking sheet. Lightly brush pita with olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and garlic powder or cinnamon. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until crispy. Serve plain or with hummus. INGREDIENTS 1 Whole Wheat Pita Olive Oil Salt Garlic Powder or Cinnamon Hummus (optional)

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dr. nimali fern y b e p i c ando re ,d o ct o ry u m .o rg APPETIZER Recipe by pediatrician Nimali Fernando MD, MPH, co-author, Raising a Healthy, Happy Eater: A Parent's Handbook. Dinosaur Kale Salad uses a head of Tuscan kale washed and dried with the stems removed. Place small batches of into the food processor and pulse until the entire head is chopped up. In a separate bowl whisk lemon juice, olive oil, and honey together to make a dressing. Toss the kale with parmesan cheese, dried cranberries, pine nuts, and pomegranate, then add the dressing and serve. INGREDIENTS One head of Tuscan kale (can substitute with another kale) 1/2-1 lemon, squeezed 1 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp honey 1/4 cup parmesan cheese 1/3 cup dried cranberries (can substitute chopped raisins, dried cherries or currants) 1/3 cup pine nuts 1/3 pomegranate, arils removed (optional)

photos courtesy Doctor Yum

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recipe by sally

photos courtesy ChopChop

DINNER Recipe by Sally Sampson, a James Bread Award winner, the Founder of ChopChopKids, and the author of ChopChop: The Kid's Guide to Real Food. Beanie Burger provides protein for muscles and carbohydrates for energy. Put the black beans in a bowl and using a fork, mash until chunky. Crack the egg into a separate large mixing bowl and, using a fork, mix until the color is all the same. Add the chunky black beans, then add the rice, barley or bread crumbs, scallions, cilantro or basil leaves, garlic, cumin, oregano or basil and olive oil and mix until well combined. Divide the mixture into 4 portions and form each into a patty about 3/4-1 inch thick. Sprinkle the patties with salt and, if using, pepper. With the help of an adult, put a skillet on the stove and and turn the heat to high. Wait two minutes for the pan to get hot and then add the patties to the dry pan. Cook until browned on both sides and heated throughout, 4-5 minutes on each side. You can serve serve them alone or on buns like the meat burgers. Add lettuce, tomato and any other toppings. INGREDIENTS 16 ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed with cold water 1 large egg 1⁄2 cup leftover/cooked rice, barley, or panko bread crumbs 2 scallions, minced (about 1/4 cup) 2 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro or basil leaves, or a combination, rinsed with cold water 1 clove garlic, minced 1⁄4 tsp ground cumin, or more to taste 1⁄4 tsp dried oregano or basil 1 tsp olive oil 1⁄2 tsp kosher salt 1⁄2 tsp black pepper, if you like

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samp son, ch

op ch o

p m a g. o r g


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EXPLORETheMill.COM

Helping YOU Be A Localist Building Real Prosperity

What is a Localist? Being a localist is more than buying local. It is the idea that neighbors come together to ensure the prosperity of their community. ExploreTheMill.com connects customers to businesses that are locally owned, rethinking their industries, sourcing locally, and providing local services. When we support our locally owned stores, our hard earned dollars go back into the community. The farmer buys lunch at a local restaurant. The restaurant server pays for her daughter’s dance class. The dance instructor buys clothes from the boutique. The boutique owner buys food

at the farmers market. The farmer reinvests that money to grow more food. The more we spend here; the more stays here. At ExploreTheMill.com, we believe: 1. The Mill is full of amazing people wanting to build an amazing community. 2. You will never discover all the amazing things by yourself. 3. You will want to share the amazing things you discover. 4. Everything is more amazing when it comes with a story. We are here to help you share those stories, make discoveries, and connect with businesses you will love.

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“It hurts

...

but only when I stand like this.

Maybe you should see a doctor. Sometimes our bodies hurt in ways we can’t quite explain. When we do find the right words, we’re treated to medical advice from friends, co-workers and relatives who diagnose us faster than you can say “symptom checker.” They mean well, but if you are experiencing recurring symptoms like an angry lower back … maybe it’s time to see a doctor.

At Piedmont Medical Center, we have the doctor that’s right for you. Our Ortho/Spine specialists can help identify the source of your discomfort and help you get back to the activities you enjoy. Stop wondering, go to the doctor and point to the pain.

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The Mill Magazine Edition 6 No. 2 Local Industry  
The Mill Magazine Edition 6 No. 2 Local Industry  

A local exchange inspiring vibrant, prosperous communities.

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