Page 1


Loughborough Design School

— 003

The Design School — 004 Design School Courses — 008 Professional Exposure — 012 Industry Placements — 014 86 Years of Design — 017 Student Profiles — 029 Student Work — 034 Show Committee — 326


— 004

Dean's Welcome

Professor George Havenith

→ We are very pleased to present the academic work from our 2016 graduating year. This work demonstrates the accumulation of skills and expertise that our final year undergraduates have been building on since their arrival with us three or four years ago. Their drive and passion is evident through their unique and innovative ideas aimed at solving the problems of 2016 and beyond.

2016

→ The work seen both here and at our Degree Show event, showcases work from across our current four undergraduate courses – Industrial Design & Technology BA, Product Design & Technology BSc, Design Ergonomics BSc and Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) BSc. → It has also been the year that saw us placed 1st in the UK for creating the most employable industrial design or product design graduates by the British Industrial Design Association Design School Survey 2015. This accolade is testament to the first class training that we provide at Loughborough Design School. → We also saw our Times and Sunday Times University league table ranking rise to 2nd the UK for the Art and Design classification – clearly demonstrating our prowess as a design leader in UK higher education. The 2015 New Designers show also brought us success with our Product Design & Technology graduate, Henry Buckley, winning the Virgin Atlantic New Designers Award. We hope our winning streak continues and wish our 2016 students the best of luck. → 2015/16 has also been a year of new beginnings, particularly with the introduction of our new User Centred Design BSc course. This exciting and innovative course will begin to take students from September 2017. Its introduction is part of a radical evolution and re-think of our undergraduate degree provision which has also seen the discontinuation of our Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) and Design Ergonomics courses from 2016. → Please join me in congratulating our 2016 graduating year on their successes and progression – we wish them well for their future endeavours. Professor George Havenith

Loughborough Design School

The School is home to over 100 staff and 700 students from more than 30 countries worldwide.

— 005


— 006

The Design School

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 007

Loughborough Design School

→ Loughborough Design School has a global reputation for research, teaching and enterprise and is renowned as one of the leading design schools in the country.

→ Located in the heart of the UK, Loughborough Design School is housed within a modern £21million development. The School is home to over 100 staff and 700 students from more than 30 countries worldwide. → The School is an inspirational working environment containing facilities of the highest quality, including numerous state-of-the-art workshops and a fully equipped environmental ergonomics laboratory nearby.

→ The School has earned its reputation thanks to the continued delivery of world leading research and teaching, enabling it to develop graduates at the forefront of the next generation of designers and ergonomists.

Global reputation for research, teaching

→ By combining the highest quality of teaching, world leading research and the School’s excellent industry links, students are well prepared to provide ground breaking solutions to a varaiety of complex problems within a wide range of industries.


— 008

The Constant Evolution of a Design Institution

The Constant Evolution of a Design Institution.

Design has been a constant at Loughborough University since its humble beginnings. Set up originally as a Technical Institute, subjects taught covered technical subjects, science and art. In 1966 it was awarded its Charter and was renamed Loughborough University in 1996.

2016

Loughborough Design School

The Design School as we know it today opened in 2011, bringing together the specialist fields of design and ergonomics. The £21 million purpose built building provides an inspirational and well equipped environment for the designers and ergonomists of the future.

First in the UK for the most employable design graduates.

— 009


— 010

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

→ The Industrial Design and Technology BA course concerns itself with the development of skills and ability in the development and communication of ideas, ergonomics, interaction, the techniques of planning and costings, product styling, three dimensional design, materials, processes and the production of prototypes and finished artefacts. The course specialises in the understanding of the creative form and the aesthetics of manufactured products. The course tends to look at the product from the outside, in. This course places emphasis on the aesthetic but seeks to embody a sound understanding of technology.

2016

BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics

— 011

BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics

→ The Design Ergonomics BSc course focuses on the understanding of designing with a particular attention to physiological and psychological human needs. Students are equipped in a wide range of conceptual, practical and professional skills. The unique mix of modules students are exposed to has allowed them to develop their creative and scientific abilities simultaneously.

Developing creative and scientific abilities simultaneously

Specialising in the creative form and aesthetics


— 012

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

→ The Product Design and Technology BSc course specialises in the technical aspect of the design process through the study of both electronics and mechanics. The emphasis of the course targets product functionality through the innovative application of technology and the delivery of a range of working prototypes and artefacts for the evaluation of highly technical solutions, materials, manufacture and aesthetics.

2016

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

— 013

→ The Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) BSc course focuses on the physical and the psychological interaction between a human and a product, system or environment. The course develops graduates who can apply a range of multidisciplinary ergonomic principles to complex situations to ensure that the solution is always developed with the human in mind.

Focusing on human interaction with a product, system or environment.


— 014

Professional Exposure

Professional Exposure

Live Project

2016

→ For a single week each January, students participate in an event called Live Project. The event enables students to engage with real work design briefs, set by a wide range of design firms and manufacturers, such as DCA, Samsung, Logitech and Seymour Powell. After an introduction to the challenge, students are able to choose from a selection of design briefs and are given an intensive week to develop an innovative solution that satisfies the constraints. Live Project gives students the chance to showcase the skills learnt over the course and engage with industry. It is also an excellent opportunity for students’ work to become commercial prior to graduation.

Guest Lectures

Loughborough Design School

BSc (Hons) User Centred Design New Course From 2017

→ Students with the School are fortunate to experience and exciting array of guest lecturers that visit the school across the year. These often include leading design figures such as Sebastian Conran and also include cutting edge researchers and designers from the likes of Dyson and Adidas. Guest lectures often combine a range of both theoretical and practical workshops for students including classroom based presentations, one to one meetings with design consultants and team based activities.

Providing industry relevant professional experience and training New Designers

→ Each year a selection of students exhibit at the New Designers event in London. The event showcases over 3,000 of the most promising graduates from Britain’s leading art and design courses. The event attracts the industry’s leading professionals who are all excited to see what the next generation of designers are producing. The New Designers event is an amazing opportunity for the selected students to network and promote their work, as well as to be inspired by others in their chosen industry.

Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) Competition

Alongside the ground-breaking research undertaken within the School we pride ourselves on keeping up-to-date with the latest industry advances. We know this is paramount to the success of the School and our ability to provide our students with the most professional experience and training. To the right are a number of events and ways in which we do this.

→ Each year Loughborough Design School selects RSA Student Design Awards briefs from the Industrial Design Studies final year module as a vehicle to empower students to tackling pressing social, environmental and economic issues through design thinking. It challenges students to open up further the potential of design to benefit society, to stretch boundaries and think differently about design; finding innovative, commercially viable, practical solutions to global social problems. We have a long history of winning competition briefs through this module, including multiple RSA competition wins and special commendations. Praised by their excellent quality and very high standard this year the following 16 finalists were selected and sponsored by the School to enter the competition: Will Broadway, Vinnay Chhabildas, Rosanna Cousins, James Dawkins, Joseph Friend, Rhian Gately, Connor Hamilton-Smith, Sam Hemming, Dominic Hensman, Mark Anthony Heyster, Anna Jaanus, Hayley Maynard, Hannah McDermid, Sam Troop, Kai Saunders, Scott Virgo. A further four students have been shortlisted from this list by the RSA. Winners will be announced over the summer months.

Design course focusing on the user and their needs and requirements. The course covers the creation of products, services and systems looking at users needs from a physical, emotional and cognitive point of view. www.lboro.ac.uk/ucd

— 015


— 016

Industry Placements

Industry Placements

→ Between Years 2 and 3, all design students are able to undertake either a year in industry (leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies) or 6 months in industry together with 6 months at an international partner university (leading to the award of Diploma in International Studies). Industry placements provide students with ‘real world’ experience. They work on live commercial projects often engaging with clients and vendors as well as colleagues in marketing or engineering functions. This is beneficial throughout the final year, and adds significantly to students’ employment prospects upon graduation.

2016

School placement student working at Wondervision, London

→ The importance that the School places on industrial experience is demonstrated by the support given to students when applying for placement positions. All students are supported by a dedicated member of staff who acts as a point of contact for employers looking to recruit from the school. This member of staff is also able to provide support and advice regarding, for example, CVs, interviews and negotiation of contracts. Second year Industrial Design and Product Design students undertake a compulsory module requiring the creation of a design portfolio, and throughout Semester 2 the School runs ‘portfolio surgeries’ where students receive critical feedback from staff with previous experience of hiring placement students. As a result of this support over three quarters of school students are successful in securing placements. → Loughborough Design School students are highly sought after for placement positions, with many employers returning annually to recruit exclusively from the School. Students work in both in-house and consultancy roles, in industry sectors as diverse as automotive, consumer electronics, media, oil and gas, sports, FMCG, toys, point of sale and packaging branding, UX and many others. Recent placement destinations include – Adidas, Aston Martin Lagonda, Cambridge Consultants, DCA, Disney, Factory Design, Foolproof, Hornby Hobbies, IBM, Jaguar Land Rover, Joseph Joseph, Kinneir Dufort, Microsoft Xbox, Mondelez, Nestle, Nissan, Pavegen, Princess Yachts, Red Bull Racing, Sebastian Conran, Seymour Powell, Smallfy and Unilever.

"In my experience, placement students have been a major contributory factor to the success of our team. Their standard of work is impressive and I have found their enthusiastic presence injects new skills and ideas and helps maintain a forward thinking culture pushing the boundaries." Christos Boinis, Director Interactive Experience Studio London, IBM

Loughborough Design School

— 017


— 018

2016

Loughborough Design School

86 Years of Design in Loughborough Past to Present.

— 019


— 020

2016

86 Years of Design in Loughborough

— 021


— 022

2016

86 Years of Design in Loughborough

— 023


— 024

2016

86 Years of Design in Loughborough

— 025


— 026

2016

86 Years of Design in Loughborough

— 027


— 028

2016

86 Years of Design in Loughborough

— 029


— 030 — 030

Industry Placements

An Educational Centre For Design Innovation.

2016

Loughborough Design School

Student Profiles

034

036

Alexander Alford 044

046

Tom Bennett 058

048

Hannah Boston 060

Jordan Bullen 072

086

088

102

090

104

Stanley Finch

078

106

Jamie Fluen

108

Emma Flynn

Joseph Friend

070

082

Ellie Cozens

Philip Douglas

David Cullimore 100

Bryn Edwards 112

Rhian Gately

Vinnay Chhabildas 084

098

110

Zoë Browning

Aaron Cheng

Rosanna Cousins

Mitchell Dennis

056

068

096

Edward Bell

William Broadway

William Chaumeton

David Cordingley

James Dawkins

Quinner Baird

Tom Braybrooke

080

092

042

054

066

Siobhan Casey

Lydia Conroy

Matthew Cuthbert

052

064

076

040

Dave Anderson

Sundeep Braich

Max Cartwright

Tsz Ying Chong

George Curry

050

062

074

038

Joshua Joseph Allarakhia

Caitlin Boyland

Michael Bywater

Rowan Chick

By combining the highest quality of teaching, world-leading research and the school's excellent industry links, students are well prepared to provide ground breaking solutions to a variety of complex problems within a wide range of industries.

— 031

Bradley Fenton 114

Sarah Gazeley

Alasdair Geddes


— 030

116

Student Profiles

118

Joe Gillibrand 130

120

Ollie Godwin 132

Blair Hesson 144

134

146

160

174

Eddie Brown 176

Ravi Patel 188

Matt Godbold

Henry Pickering

Kolby Pistak 192

Craig Thomas

Lucas Ingram 182

Philip Richardson 194

Jonathan Twigger

Tom Robertson 196

Sam Waters

Harry McKendrick

Hannah Rose Shattock 200

Josh Whitwell

Michael Obire

Harry Shepherd

Elliot Kirby

Raymond Ng

Oliver Ramirez 278

Josef Rusiecki

Jonathan Oakes

Sarah Reed

Mizuki Sasaki

282

Kai Saunders

Henry Prout

Michael Rizzo

Priya Rai 274

James Robertson 286

Alexander Shayle

Rosie Nevins 258

272

284

Louise Scott

Emma Morris

Jack Pearson

Megan Richmond

Hannah McDermid 244

256

270

Martyn Long 230

Michael McCormack

George Moone

Ayesha Parmar

Hannah Revie

Troy Linklater

242

254

268

280

Hayley Maynard

Tamara Moon

216

228

240

252

266

Hannah Lewis

James Martin

Shailen Mistry

214

226

238

250

262

276

202

Chloe King

Olivia Newall

Mitchell Leigh

David Martin

Luc Meziani

212

224

236

248

260

Mattias Law

Amil Malik

Robert McMahon

210

222

234

246

186

Kevin Kwok

Elspeth MacLeod

Thomas Allitt

— 031

208

220

232

172

184

Simon Kirby

Georgia Humphrey

Jack Kidd

206

218

158

170

Paul Isherwood

Dominic Hensman

Alex Huckle

Pak Son Keung

Loughborough Design School

204

142

154

168

180

Sam Hemming

Jack Howdle

Ashley Jones

128

140

152

166

178

190

Steven Strouvalis

150

164

Connor Hamilton-Smith

Robbie Hoare

Molly Jennings

126

138

Charles HIlls

Josh Jenkins

John Barker

Jesper Hallberg 136

148

162

124

Oliver Gummery

Mark Heyster

Anna Jaanus

122

2016

Michael Rudak 288

Freddie Silvester

Forrest Skerman-Stevenson


— 032

290

Student Profiles

292

Adam Spencer 304

294

Ben Sully 306

Chris Tunbridge 318

Alex Tarquini 308

Scott Virgo 320

Katie Ware-Lane

296

Details of our Design School Show Team can be found on Page 326.

Callum Tongue 310

Emma Louise Walder 322

Daniel Watt

298

324

Shaun Wellens

300

Isabella Trani 312

Adam Wallace

Harry Wilkinson

2016

302

Sam Troop 314

Sam Walrond

James Trott

Loughborough Design School

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

316

Liam Ward

George Wardell

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics Providing an all-encompassing education in design covering everything from traditional workshop skills to the latest digital design software in a purpose built environment.

— 033


— 034

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 035

Alexander Alford

—Details +44 (0) 7760 429 789 alexalexalford@live.co.uk

01

04

05

03

Portable sit-to-stand car seat for arthritic or frail passengers 02

— 01 The sit-to-stand transfer aids frail or weakened passengers that need help getting out of their seats, by correcting sitting posture and applying retropulsion. — 02 The product is designed to be portable between multiple vehicles, overcoming a problem of many current systems which are expensive, vehicle-specific refits. — 03 Early laser cut prototypes were used in context to visualize and edit the form as necessary.

—04 Extensive research into the user’s habits and problems was used to produce a solution that was intuitive and comfortable to use. — 05 The safety aspects of the product in the event of a crash have been tested against British Standards, and carefully implemented.


— 036

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

Joshua Joseph Allarakhia

— Experience '14 United Design Partnership Designer

— 01 Injection Mould Project - promotional pencil sharpener for Kelloggs. — 02 Brand Designing – outdoor eating device for cyclists following the brand values and characteristics of Shimano.

—Details +44 (0) 7591 847 218 j.allarakhia@gmail.com

— 03 Live Project - A system that makes monitoring diabetes stress-free. The system connects users to family members ensuring safety and independence. 01

04

—04 UX Design – Innovative and interactive service concept exploiting game mechanics to encourage energy demand reduction in the home. Brief set in conjunction with E.ON. — 05 Final Year Project – Encourages independence in Cerebral Palsy sufferers when dealing with hot equipment in the kitchen environment. — 06 The device stabilizes a saucepan using gimbal technology, dampening vibration using springs and without the need for power or energy supply.

Tremor reducing kitchen aid for people living with Cerebral Palsy

03

02

— 037

05

06


— 038

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 039

Dave Anderson —Details +44 (0) 7958 024 091 d-a@live.co.uk

01

03

04

— Experience '15 Rutland Plastics Design Engineer

Incident detection system for parked vehicles 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 John Heasman Bursary Recipient British Parking Association

05

— 01 Innovative use of a piezo surface contact microphone detects vibrations across the body of a vehicle and provides an incident severity level. — 02 Aimed at high-end car owners the system detects damage to vehicles, records video footage and then alerts the owner of the vehicle to incidents using a smartphone application. — 03 A suction cup secures the monitoring puck to the vehicle windscreen for the duration of the session and is unlocked by the user via NFC.

—04 A suite of products aimed at encouraging children to drink more water. Through the use of wearable technology, water requirement is calculated and the bottle changes colour to indicate this. — 05 Dissertation - Investigation into the effect of Additive Manufacturing on the moulding and casting industries. Research included trial moulding with AM inserts testing dimensions, surface finish and fine surface details.


— 040

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 041

Quinner Baird —Details baird@quinner.co.uk

01

03

Mosquito trap for modern homes 02

04

— 01 Devices to attract, kill and repel pictured in a domestic environment.

— 04 The Drip Lamp Shade fitted to a Gira 1978 base from Mobles 114.

— 02 The form of the device was developed to be installed in a range of modern architecturally styled properties.

— 05 The Lamp Shades are compatible with the Sekond fitting from Ikea.

—03 In order to create the slip cast mold, the shape was meticulously sculpted from clay.

05


— 042

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 043

Edward Bell

05

—Details +44 (0) 7870 818487 edd.bell.15@hotmail.com

01

03

04

— Experience '15 Eaton’s Bussmann Business New Product Development Intern — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

Sit-stand workstation for designers 02

— 01 A sit-stand workstation that promotes behavioral change. With multiple functional work surfaces, designer’s work routines are supported to reduce health risks associated with sedentary time. — 02 An integrated light box, ambidextrous rotary side surfaces, magnetic boards and counterbalanced adjustable platforms, allow setups tailored to the user’s changing preference.

— 03 Thorough mechanical development was undertaken to ensure the spring-loaded arms and height locking pins provide a stable support when working and effortless height adjustment. —04 HypoTrak: A night-time monitor for Type 1 diabetics. Non-invasive infrared spectroscopy detects low glucose levels and the user is woken to prevent a hypoglycemic attack. — 05 MiKettle: Exploring the potential of home 3D printing to promote more sustainable cooking.


— 044

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 045

Tom Bennett —Details +44 (0) 7538 835 577 thetombennett@gmail.com behance.net/TomBennettDesign

01

04

05

03

— Experience '15 Foster Refrigerator - Design Engineer

Portable blood refrigeration solution for medical professionals in extreme locations 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 This product was designed to be used in harsh environments, however this doesn’t mean it can't still be beautiful. — 02 Designed to store and transport blood in natural disaster zones, the unit facilitates blood transfusions in hard to reach locations. — 03 Functional prototype to demonstrate the effectiveness of the refrigeration cell. Cutting edge qthermoelectric cooling and insulation technologies make this product possible.

—04 Playband is a system designed to enhance the imagination of 5-11 year olds. By tracking objects in the surrounding area, Playband produces light and sound effects to supercharge playtime. — 05 Can crusher: designed and manufactured in the space of 12 weeks, producing this device required a blend of mechanical, electronic and manufacturing expertise.


— 046

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

Hannah Boston

— Experience '14 CPI Display Development Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Meal reheating device that encourages keen skiers to eat a warm meal during the day whilst away from their chalets. Concept rendering showing all the disassembled components. — 02 Reverse engineered electronic nail file. Modelled in PTC Creo and optimized to exploit the capabilities of additve manufacturing.

—Details +44 (0) 7941 073 286 hannah.boston@live.com

— 03 Concept and development sketches exploring 3D forms and possible user scenarios for an outdoor food reheating system.

01

04

—04 Testing the pull capabilities of a servo motor in a group project to construct a working prototype for a home security system. — 05 Prototype displaying the projection technology used in this conceptual retail system. — 06 Testing of the working prototype with end users. Tests included ease of transportation, full installation time and ease of use with the end scanning and viewing system.

Updating the experience of retail systems

03

02

— 047

05

06


— 048

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 049

Caitlin Boyland —Details +44 (0) 7957 758 794 crboylanddesign@gmail.com boyland-design.com

01

02

04

05

03

— Experience '15 Crown Hockey - Packaging Designer '13 HJC Design - Industrial Design Intern

Hockey face mask redesign

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '15 UX Concept Shortlisted for Presentation to O2 '13 A’ Design Silver Award '12 Philips Innovation Open Competition 1st Place

— 01 This proposal addresses the injuries sustained during the high speed and most intense part of the game without jeopardising vision or comfort. — 02 Carbon fibre and foam core layers are light weight and economical with increased impact resistance. Strap design allows rapid application and removal with added protection. — 03 Full adjustability for a personal fit, together with extensive customisation opportunities, help players identify the mask as their own.

—04 Qi: A unique and elegant self-heating disposable baby bottle, to provide a thoughtful and practical way to feed your baby on the go and on demand. Designed during industrial placement, image © HJC Design. — 05 Top Nosh: a user centred design app that provides young students away from home with a buddy system and library of recipes to cook from in a shared smart home.


— 050

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 051

Sundeep Braich —Details +44 (0) 7508 345 205 sundeepbraich@gmail.com

01

04

05

03

— Experience '15 Interia – Junior Designer '14 Interia – Junior Designer

Eradicating the unpleasant experience of throwing out kitchen waste 02

— 01 Research into users’ interactions with kitchen waste revealed clear areas for improvement. — 02 Modular in its design, the main unit disassembles into sections suitable for dishwashing, providing a hygienic and simple solution to sanitation. for the consumer’s requirements. — 03 The automated unit vacuums and seals waste resulting in the elimination of bag ripping during removal.

—04 A children’s cooking aid promoting engagement in the preparation of family meals, instigating parent-child interaction. Promotes physical interaction, safe practice in the kitchen and healthy eating habits. — 05 Using inter-changeable faces the child can mix, chop and cut during food preparation. Concave, non-slip surfaces are incorporated for support, and an included safety chopper avoids the risk of an exposed blade.


— 052

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 053

Tom Braybrooke

—Details +44 (0) 7525 945 392 tcbraybrooke@gmail.com

01

03

Teaching novice skiers correct posture and technique

02

04

— Experience '14 European Springs and Pressings Toolroom Assistant

05

— 01 Edge: a skiing learning aid for beginners, to use at home in preparation for their holiday, so they can make the most of their time away. — 02 Edge focuses on teaching correct posture and technique in the four key areas: balance, weight distribution, snow plough and parallel turns. — 03 Users become accustomed to the correct posture through muscle memory, resulting in faster learning and safer skiing.

—04 Suono: an autonomous music storage and playback system, that allows the user to manipulate the playback of their music through specific hand gestures, whilst matching songs to their heart rate. — 05 Vita: an audio support device that encourages improved memory recollection and concentration in recovering stroke patients; who can guide themselves through their day with with recorded personalised messages, reminders and alerts.


— 054

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

William Broadway

— Experience '16 Grayl - Lead Design Engineer '15 Hobiecat California - Engineering Intern '14 Smallfry Industrial Design Consultant — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 James Dyson Foundation Bursary '13 Design students award winner '12 Elahou Dangoor STEM Scholarship

—Details +44 (0) 7766 500 721 wj.broadway@gmail.com

williambroadway.com

— 055

— 01 Aluminum 3D printed bike crank arm - A crankset was reverse engineered using Class-A surface modelling. Applying FEA and topology optimisation, the crank was reduced in weight from 771g-338g. — 02 Kids Well-being Wristband - An intuitive wristband that can sense stress in children with learning difficulties or communication issues. Placement work done for Sensixa Ltd, image © Smallfry 2015.

— 03 ISOBAR – A mobile cooling system that keeps vaccines at 3°C for up to 6 days. The system can be recharged in 1 hour using either electricity or propane gas. — 04 Sketch development work used to revive a 1906 invention for use as a modern day cooling unit.

04

01

Portable off-grid cooling system for vaccine delivery in the third world 02

03


— 056

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 057

Zoë Browning

Tactile communication device for cancer patients

—Details zoesiobhanb@gmail.com

01

06

05 02

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 The LEGO Group – Product Design Intern '15 Studio Davis – Design Intern '14 Wild & Wolf – Design Intern '14 Programme President of LDS '13 Square Banana – Work experience student

03

04

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 Shortlisted for Youth Sport Trust Design Competition '14 Loughborough University Development Trust Prize '10 Arkwright Scholarship

— 01 Footprint aims to tackle obesity through gamification, encouraging fitness in schools and at home by measuring footsteps.

—04 Curapod takes the physicality out of plant care for the elderly, facilitating social interaction by displaying the pods on the community wall.

— 02 Aesthetic model for evaluation of a tracker device to aid the personal training of swimmers and triathletes.

— 05 Kïn is a supportive tactile communication device to enhance the end of life experience for patients, embellishing humanistic qualities in a hospital environment.

— 03 Chameleon is a thermochromic vest designed for the promotion of mass participation amongst children of all abilities. Shortlisted for the Youth Sport Trust Design Competition.

— 06 Three types of simultaneous feedback: light, vibration and heat, connect patients and loved ones over distances through the use of Wi-Fi.


— 058

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

Jordan Bullen

— Experience '14 Staverton – Product Designer — Experience '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 James Dyson Foundation Bursary

— 01 Pico: A modular children’s shoe designed for future additive manufacture in the home. Using 3D scan data, custom, perfectfitting shoes can be printed whenever worn out or grown out of. — 02 Vivacity: A combined wearable, home-hub and mobile app which helps restore work/ life balance by empowering users to filter work- related content outside of work hours.

—Details +44 (0) 7720 972 264 jordankbullen@aol.com

— 03 Ideation and development sketches.

01

04

—04 GPS tracking of the wearable allows the user’s family to stay connected despite poor phone signal in rural areas. — 05 Improving education provision in established refugee camps in the developing world by bridging the gap in the need for basic resources. — 06 Collecting and storing earth and water; grinding and mixing into a writing solution; dispensing into the self-housed pens. Providing a longlasting tool for education and a better future.

'Ink From The Earth' sustainable writing solution for use in developing countries

03

02

— 059

05

06


— 060

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 061

Michael Bywater —Details +44 (0) 7801 299 178 michaelbywaterdesign@gmail.com

04

01

02

03

— Experience '16 Design Consultant – Freelance Designer '15 Pavegen Live – Lead Designer '15 Pavegen Systems Ltd Creative/Industrial Design Engineer '12 Data Analyst & Designer Reece Construction Ltd '09 Design Intern – The Knack Design — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '15 Best Conceptual Project “The London Underline” - London Planning Awards (Collaboration with Pavegen Systems Ltd& Gensler)

Assisting the administration and deployment of malaria vaccines within sub-Saharan Africa — 01 An unintrusive wearable solution for sufferers of type 1 Diabetes, which aids the management of difficult lifestyles by giving a live 24hr diagnostic of blood sugar levels. — 02 An augmenting reality discovery tool for developing toddlers and children. Using recognition software the glass identifies what users are looking at providing visual information live to them.

— 03 The product aims to tackle the problem of transporting vaccines safely to remote locations within sub-Saharan Africa. It provides optimum internal conditions to store and keep vaccine vials cool. — 04 Ice batteries housed in insulation keep the internal temperature cool, whilst a threaded shaft in the product’s core is used to dispense and load the vial platform.


— 062

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 063

Max Cartwright

—Details +44 (0) 7540 829 195 maxcartwright253@hotmail.com

01

04

05

03

Motion capture system for strength athletes to allow detailed performance analysis 02

— 01 The product combines a series of wearable and equipment-mounted sensors, gathering detailed movement data during an athlete’s performance. — 02 The entire battery of sensors can be charged and synced through a single unit, removing the need for multiple chargers and connections. — 03 Performance data is presented to the user in a useful and accessible format, allowing athletes to accurately assess their own technique, as well as assisting coaches during performance analysis.

—04 This wearable personal alarm takes a different approach to personal security, offering a discreet and low profile alternative to existing products. Gathering metrics from the user’s skin, the product can also double as a health and lifestyle aid. — 05 A home care system aimed at those suffering from emphysema. Users can manage appointments, medication and other aspects of their care through one individual unit, from the comfort of their own home.


— 064

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 065

Siobhan Casey —Details +44 (0) 7713 821 624 siobhan_casey@live.co.uk

05 01

04

06

03 — Experience '15 Maxview - Product Design Engineer

Automatic timing system for multiple swimmers 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 User-worn device, that temporarily clips onto the swimmer’s goggles, measuring movement to automatically time the swimmer. — 02 A poolside display shows times swum, along with information regarding the set swimmers are about to complete. — 03 Stackable wireless charging unit, designed to charge the displays and user-worn devices.

—04 Fully automated, electromechanical can crusher, utilising the crank and slider mechanism. Controlled and monitored by an embedded system, programed in C. — 05 Reverse engineered iron, re-designed for additive manufacturing. Modelled in PTC Creo maintaining G2 curvature, rendered in Keyshot. — 06 TV aerial for caravans, focusing on ease of installation and improving quality control procedures. Image used with permission of Maxview.


— 066

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 067

William Chaumeton

—Details +44 (0) 7879 032 935 william@chaumeton.design chaumeton.design 04

Household waste compactor designed to improve student waste management

01

03

— Experience '15 Nestlé, Switzerland Filling and Packaging Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

02

— 01 Intex is the next generation of food identification technology. The customisable band scans food and food packaging to ensure allergens are absent, giving the user peace of mind.

— 03 The compactor is designed to inspire and engage students to reduce and manage their waste by making the process more enjoyable. The product reduces waste volume by 50%.

— 02 BAO is the world’s first fully adaptable water bottle. Designed to be easily modified, users can change every component to personalise, customise or completely transform their product using 3D printing.

— 04 An internal mechanism allows the user to seal the bags once they are full without removing the lid. The design facilitates odorless, mess-free waste compaction and disposal.


— 068

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 069

Aaron Cheng —Details aaron_cheng@hotmail.co.uk

04

Don’t dehydrate and drive. A drink delivery system for safer driving

01

03

— Experience '15 Factorydesign – Product Designer '13 Centurion Electronics – Product Designer

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '13 Loughborough Design School Award

02

— 01 Reversed engineered and modified steam iron designed to take advantage of additive manufacturing processes. Modelled using advanced surfacing techniques in Creo Parametric 3.0 and rendered using Blender, Photoshop and Keyshot. — 02 Electro-Mechanical Can Crusher crushes 330ml and 440ml cans using embedded electronics, coded in C programming. Fabricated using reused bike gears and a 12V DC wiper motor.

— 03 Drink delivery system for drivers to reduce driving errors from dehydration and distraction when drinking. Includes a removable water filter bottle for fresh water on the go. — 04 Close up detail of removable water filter bottle.


— 070

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 071

Vinnay Chhabildas

—Details +44 (0) 7527 883 300 vinnaysaichhabildas@gmail.com

01

03

A child’s inhaler optimised to reduce user error and improve compliance 02

04

— Experience '14 Coalesce Product Development Industrial Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 James Dyson Foundation Bursary

05

— 01 Non-compliance with inhalers is a common problem for children, and parents are often concerned that their child cannot correctly use the inhaler or correctly time their breathing. — 02 An intuitive, multi-directional twist sleeve reduces the required actuation force, and an integrated spacer improves medication intake. — 03 Electronic pressure sensing enables remote monitoring of a child’s progress. Coin cell motors give haptic feedback to aid timing and sequencing.

—04 Pulsus uses EMS technology and biofeedback to strengthen and monitor pelvic floor muscles in cystic fibrosis patients who suffer with urinary incontinence. The Pulsus app connects patients to their physiotherapist. — 05 Reverse engineered games controller, custom designed using scanned data to reduce the risk of repetitive strain injury through improved posture. Surface modelled in PTC Creo and rendered in Keyshot.


— 072

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 073

Rowan Chick —Details +44 (0) 7903 390 521 rowanchick94@gmail.com

01

03

04

Improving bicycle brake application

02

— Experience '15 Woodpecker Joinery UK Ltd. Design and Development Intern — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 A handlebar designed for road-bike users, which improves braking convenience by allowing the user to be able to apply the brakes from any holding position.

—04 A reverse engineered Gamecube controller redesigned to exploit 3D scanning technologies and additive manufacture. Surface modelled in Creo and rendered in Keyshot.

— 02 An exploded view of the road-bike handlebar and all of the components.

— 05 Electromechanical can crusher able to automatically load, crush and eject five cans in 20 seconds. Designed, modelled in SolidWorks, analysed and manufactured by a team of three.

— 03 A very user centered approach was taken during the design of this product, in order to ensure the functionality.


— 074

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 075

Tsz Ying Chong

Helping to reduce food waste and enhance healthy eating habits

—Details +44 (0) 7401 108 700 ying9304@gmail.com

01

05

06

02

— Experience '12 Tak Lee Jewellery Company Limited Hong Kong – Photo Retoucher

03

04

— 01 LINUM is a smartphone networking app providing attendance lists for events and matching people beforehand.

—04 A leatherwork system that provides an all-in-one service including tools, learning centre and online selling platform. User can enjoy a quiet, fast-learning leatherworking experience.

— 02 Re-design of a bike shop to enhance the ergonomics experience of staff and customers. Tested and evaluated using SAMMIE – a 3D human modelling system.

— 05 A household management system which provides recipes according to food stock and senses food spoilage, tracking its condition to reduce waste.

— 03 Injection moulded promotional product for Tesco – a plastic-bags holder which groups several bags and provides a comfortable grip.

— 06 Sensor senses gaseous ammonia around food to calculate spoilage. A smartphone app acts as a barcode scanner for inputting information.


— 076

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 077

Lydia Conroy —Details +44 (0) 7460 470 813 lydia@lydiaconroy.co.uk lydiaconroy.co.uk

01

03

A wearable asthma inhaler for runners 02

04

— Experience '15 Laleham Health and Beauty Packaging Technologist '15 IBM Design Workshop — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '15 Design the Future University of Twente (2ECTS)

05

— 01 Wave: a wearable asthma inhaler designed for runners; in an emergency it holds the required number of doses of Salbutamol medication without being obstructive when running. — 02 Wave provides a stylish and functional solution: not obviously a medical product, it reduces the stigma that can be felt by asthmatics during sport. — 03 Wave removes the difficulties experienced when running with a standard inhaler, being worn comfortably on the wrist until needed.

—04 Nerve Center is an application designed to save energy in the home. The inclusion of gamified features, including a leaderboard and challenges, makes saving energy more appealing and fun. — 05 Serenitea provides a calming herbal tea drinking experience through the inclusion of features such as natural materials, an ergonomic handle and ambient lighting.


— 078

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 079

David Cordingley

—Details +44 (0) 7450 284 749 dave_cordingley@hotmail.com behance.net/davidcordingley

01

03

04

— Experience '15 Maxview Limited Product Design Engineer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

Eating and drinking device for catamaran sailors 02

05

— 01 Eating and drinking device to meet the specific needs of catamaran sailing. The device combats the impractical methods people currently use to store needed nutrition. — 02 The product is robust to withstand the high demands of the environment and facilitates user interaction when sailing equipment is worn. — 03 A heating element is incorporated to provide a warm source of nutrition to the user, replenishing lost calories in this high intensity sport.

—04 Customised joystick design created through surface modelling while retaining a robust modelling strategy. Development of personalised headphones concept, manufactured using 3D printing to allow for replacing and interchanging parts. — 05 An injection moulding tool which produces adjustable phone stand widgets for mass production. The widget is assembled from four parts, promoting the brand it is designed for.


— 080

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 081

Rosanna Cousins

Hydration monitoring for female amateur runners

—Details +44 (0) 7772 213 367 cousinsrosanna@gmail.com behance.net/rosannacousins

01

05

06

02

— Experience '15 Plexi-Craft, New York – Furniture Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

03

04

— 01 Penelope Vanity Stool (left) and Dulwich Side Table Collection (right), designed for Plexi-Craft’s ‘Elements’ and ‘Signature’ collections. Images used with permission.

—04 Jones Bar Cart, featuring glass shelves and brass detailing, designed for Plexi-Craft’s ‘Signature’ collection. As featured in Jul / Aug 2015 US Elle Décor Magazine. Image used with permission.

— 02 Bono: a multi-functional dog toy. 3D printing technologies allow customization of strength, size, and functionality as the dog grows.

— 05 A smart bottle which monitors the user’s water intake and running statistics, providing feedback on electrolyte and fluid loss, to encourage safe recovery through optimum rehydration.

— 03 Aroma-Aura: a personal aromatherapy humidifier for people living with cancer, to improve mental well-being through relaxation.

— 06 An app schedules and tracks the user’s weekly runs, alerting the user when they need to drink.


— 082

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 083

Ellie Cozens —Details +44 (0) 7712 713 248 ellie.cozens@icloud.com

01

03

A wearable stimulation device for people with foot drop

02

04

— Experience '15 Light IQ – Lighting Designer '14 Light IQ – Lighting Designer '13 Peta & Friends Intern Graphic Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 The modular device uses functional electrical stimulation to enable people suffering with foot drop to walk fluidly. The use of additive manufacturing technology ensures ultimate comfort and accurate electrode placement. — 02 Utilising advanced electromyography, this device effortlessy combines complex electronics and minimalistic, user-focused design to challenge the stigma attached to assistive technology, enabling users to live an active life.

— 03 Intuitive interaction design ensures ease of use, whether through the product’s physical controls or the associated app. —04 An all-in-one, high-end camping stove, specifically targeted at young, professional couples who want to escape the city for a stylish weekend camping. — 05 An agile and iterative design process saw the development of a dynamic platform to encourage social entrepreneurship by connecting upcoming performers and local venues.


— 084

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 085

David Cullimore

—Details +44 (0) 7734 956 268 davecullimore3@gmail.com cullimoreracing.com

01

03

Air sampling for personal health care management 02

04

— Experience '15 Infiniti Red Bull Racing Systems Designer '14 Prodrive - Aston Martin Racing Technician '13 Jaguar Land Rover Human Machine Interface Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 Unpredictable and actively changing environmental conditions make it difficult for asthma sufferers to manage their triggers, many of which are undetectable by human senses.

—04 Reverse engineered knee and shin guard specifically tailored to scanned leg data for improved fit and protection. Modelled in PTC Creo and rendered in Keyshot.

— 02 A multi sensing platform enables the user to capture active data which correlates their symptoms to local environmental conditions.

— 05 Functional wirelessly controlled hexapod with proximity sensing for obstacle avoidance. Group designed and built for optimum flexibility and control.

— 03 The personalised data is processed to help users manage their asthma by taking appropriate action to avoid potentially hazardous situations.


— 086

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 087

George Curry —Details +44 (0) 7554 664 447 georgecurrysama@gmail.com behance.net/georgewilliamcurry

01

03

04

— Experience '15 SIMTech - Junior Design Engineer

Enhanced urinalysis for early detection of urinary tract infections 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 Current urine testing methods cause difficulties for elderly people with vision impairement and dexterity issues. This home testing device is more accurate and easier to use.

—04 An indoor horizontal growing incubator which allows efficient seed germination and easy seedling transplantation for people with reduced dexterity.

— 02 The form is designed to prevent urine splash back. A viable, mid-stream sample flow is collected in a chamber for analysis.

— 05 A group project which involved designing and manufacturing an injection mould tool to mass produce promotional phone stand widgets for a specific brand.

— 03 An RGB sensor detects subtle colour change on a urinary test strip, indicating a positive or negative result a for urinary tract infection.


— 088

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 089

Matthew Cuthbert —Details +44 (0) 7791 729 611 matthew.a.cuthbert@gmail.com linkedin.com/in/matthewcuthbert 05 01

06

04 03 — Experience '15 Vax Ltd__ — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

Protecting the home from kitchen fires 02

— 01 Development of the handle mechanism which allows it to be detachable and secure. — 02 Universal handle that fits a range of pans, incorporating an infrared heat sensor that monitors the temperature of the pan. The power adaptor contains a kill switch. — 03 Two-part functional prototype demonstrating user interaction. When the heat sensor detects an upper limit is reached, it communicates via radio frequency, activating a kill switch.

—04 Reverse engineered Dremel rotary tool, optimized for additive manufacture. Surface modelled in Creo and rendered in Keyshot using custom materials and lighting. — 05 Fully functional electromechanical can crusher with embedded electronics system, coded in C. The device counts each can, displaying force exerted and time. — 06 A complete mechanical analysis was conducted before prototyping and testing.


— 090

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 091

James Dawkins —Details +44 (0) 7779 979 879 james_dawkins@live.co.uk

01

03

Improving mobility and confidence among the visually impaired

02

04

05

— Experience '14 FSW Design Product Designer

— 01 ECCO : a compact and lightweight mobility cane offering superior comfort, balance and durability.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '15 DCA Design Week Top 10

— 02 Mobility is a daily challenge for the visually impaired. Ecco increases user confidence and travel efficiency through the use of long- distance ultrasonic sensing. — 03 Bone conduction audio technology enhances the capabilities of the ECCO cane, delivering navigational information and sensor feedback without obstructing the user’s normal hearing.

—04 G-CARVE: A multi-role machining platform for use in educational environments. Using an innovative digital interface, cutting operations can be previewed in 3D before committing, increasing user confidence and reducing risk. — 05 A solution for managing and relaying verbal information in business. TOPIK captures audio from meetings to share instantly with colleagues. Recordings can be searched and replayed using a keyword-tagging system.


— 092

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

Mitchell Dennis

— Experience '14 Tesco PLC - Product Technologist — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '14 Tesco Values Award '15 Tesco Values Award —Details +44 (0) 7910 103 747 mitch_dennis123@yahoo.co.uk

— 093

— 01 An app for 02 that encourages people to grow their own fruit vegetables and connect with others that do the same. — 02 A fitness wearable to encourage Generation Z to ‘unplug’ themselves from their increasingly virtual environment.

— 03 A toy character that considers toy trends, child user interaction, gender neutrality, product safety standards and child-friendly form and character design. — 04 Final prototype of the toy that develops with a child as they grow, stimulating child.

01

04

Designing a toy that can develop with a child as they age

02

03


— 094

2016

Loughborough Design School

Second in the UK for Art & Design in the University League Tables 2016 The Times and Sunday Times University League Tables 2016

— 095


— 096

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 097

Philip Douglas —Details +44 (0) 7712 558 984 ps.douglas71@gmail.com pdproductdesign.com

01

03

Advancing skin prick allergy testing

04

— Experience '14 The Technology Partnership (TTP) Industrial Designer '12 AHEL Homewares Freelance designer '12 Hall Black Douglas Architects CAD engineer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 James Dyson Foundation Bursary

02

05

— 01 The product workflow has been carefully considered to reduce the chance of user error and shorten the testing procedure. An app is used to visually record the results. — 02 ‘Dotta’. A mechanical device that uses disposable pods, with integrated lancets, to deliver consistent pricks and reagent droplets to each patient’s skin. The app standardises the test procedure.

— 03 An iterative design approach was taken utilising multiple prototypes and user feedback. By working with allergy clinic staff at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, an effective product solution was achieved. —04 Reverse engineered hand drill, utilising advanced surfacing skills in PTC Creo 3.0 to optimise the design for additive manufacture. — 05 ‘Jump’. A product system designed to encourage whole family participation in outdoor adventures.


— 098

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 099

Bryn Edwards —Details +44 (0) 7825 576 931 bryn.edwards@hotmail.co.uk brynsdesign.com 04

01

Improving the wine tasters experience 03

— Experience '15 G2 Design – Junior Designer '11 Anthony Dickens Studio – Short Intern '11 Hill House Interiors – Short Intern — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

02

— 01 The industry’s first wireless knee rehabilitation brace for Osteoarthritis, with built in motion tracker, joint warming and rehabilitation magnets.

— 03 The hyperdecanter - aiding the aeration process of wine, improving flavour, optimising conditions and adding value to your vintage or off the shelf bottle of wine.

— 02 Meet Dilo - The interactive armadillo. Providing a childhood companion helping children to unplug themselves from the screens of ipads and phones.

— 04 By dropping in the silver ball, users can then select their wine setting dependent on age and enjoy watching the aeration process unfold.


— 100

BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 101

Bradley Fenton —Details +44 (0) 7784 858 453 bradleypaulfenton@gmail.com

05 01

04

06

03 — Experience '15 Bosch - Product Marketing Internship

Reducing prolonged sitting at work by encouraging and enabling workers to stand 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Sammie CAD analysis using univariate manikins (99th percentile Dutch male and 1st percentile Sri Lankan female pictured).

—04 Aimed at University undergraduates, Link is an app that connects entrepreneurs. Rather than exchanging money, users exchange skills in order to build teams and kick start their business idea.

— 02 From sit to stand. A linear counter balance mechanism allows users to set the height of the computer monitor at any point along the range of travel.

— 05 Oculus provides ground troops with access to visual feeds offered by air support. Both the device and software were prototyped and tested.

— 03 In addition to user preference, the centre column colour can be used to identify different departmentsor individuals in an open-plan office.

— 06 Oculus is designed to be rifle-mounted, placing the device within the operator’s field of view. When not needed it can be folded flush.


— 102

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 103

Stanley Finch —Details +44 (0) 7943 244 597 stan-finch941@hotmail.co.uk

01

03

Redesign of tattoo equipment to reduce repetitive strain injuries 02

04

— Experience '14 Graphic Packaging International Undergraduate Designer

05

— 01 Amanuensis is a lightweight tattooing stylus pen designed to replace existing machines that are known to cause upper limb repetitive strain disorders. — 02 The product’s key elements reduce the exposure time to harmful wrist positions, off-balance handling and centre of gravity concerns to help reduce users risk of injuries.

— 03 Amanuensis improves the safety of the tattoo process and optimises the user’s performance prolonging their working span. —04 FinchPot is a compact, artisan, gas-fuelled kiln designed to reduce the lead-time on certain pottery pieces and increase the efficiency and ability of the hobbyist potter. — 05 A 3D printed shoe whose features and functionality are adaptable and interchangeable for different sports and playing surfaces.


— 104

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 105

Jamie Fluen —Details +44 (0) 7836 345 551 jamiefluen@btinternet.com behance.net/jamiefluen

01

03

Emergency breathing apparatus to provide clean air in toxic environments 02

04

— Experience '15 AP Diving - Design Engineer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 Smoke from building fires can be fatal. This popup hood is easy to put on, providing 12 minutes of clean air whilst minimizing claustrophobia. — 02 A one-way communication system helps users to put on the equipment safely and efficiently, whilst encouraging calm and reducing panic. — 03 Primarily aimed at wheelchair users who often become trapped during fire evacuations, the product can also be used by able-bodied victims in need of air.

—04 Knee brace designed for osteoarthritis sufferers, which uses massage and vibration technology to release synovial fluid into the affected knee joint. An incorporated service app motivates users to exercise correctly. — 05 Custom, semi-flexible body armour designed to be 3D printed in the user’s home, allowing riders to easily replace and adapt parts to suit their physique and ability.


— 106

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 107

Emma Flynn —Details +44 (0) 7500 444 106 emmaflynn19@googlemail.com linkedin.com/in/emmaflynn19

01

03

Supporting independent living for those with Dementia 02

04

— Experience '15 Foolproof - UX Consultant Intern '13 WRG Qatar - Graphic Design Intern '11 Crown – Design Intern — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '13 Runner Up Design Moo.com’s New Business Cards

05

— 01 For carers to maintain and update the user’s regular or irregular activities, including appointments, while also providing notifications if anything out of the ordinary should happen.

—04 Beat the Beat aims to encourage users to reduce their water usage while showering, by challenging them to complete their shower before both the song and time runs out.

— 02 Located within the home, the device supports Dementia sufferers with their daily routine, whilst offering carers peace of mind that their loved one is living well.

— 05 XTA stove is designed for participants of desert marathons, utilising the desert’s environment to aid in boiling water efficiently for the runner’s meals during the race.

— 03 A combination of light, sound and tactile interaction communicate each stage of daily living.


— 108

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

Joseph Friend

— Experience '15 Retouch3D Product Design Placement '14 L’OREAL - Visual Merchandising Internship

— 109

— 01 CAD model of an Xbox One controller. Reduced component count is achieved via optimisation for additive manufacturing. — 02 A hypertension companion that empowers sufferers, reduces stress and promotes positive long term behaviour changes.

—Details +44 (0) 7809 228 583 joseph_friend94@hotmail.com

— 03 The device utilises relaxation techniques such as controlled breathing, bio-feedback, body frequency tuning and Binaural Beats. On standby mood lighting creates a calm ambiance.

01

04

— 05 The solution eliminates high workshop setup costs, providing the consumer with a versatile modelling platform. The compact design includes a collapsible task light for ease of storage. — 06 Designed for accurate model making by adjustable laser projection for precise surface evaluations. A flexible extraction system is enabled by the modular arrangement.

Modular desktop workshop for hobbyist model makers

03

02

—04 User interface solutions for various status displays.

05

06


— 110

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

Rhian Gately

— Experience '15 The Walt Disney Company Disney Consumer Products Product Development Intern '13 Unilever - Home Care Design Junior Designer Work Experience — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

—Details +44 (0) 7791 787 038 rhiangately@outlook.com

— 111

— 01 'Create Your Business' is an App to help turn crafts into businesses, locating mentors, enthusiasts and spaces to rent in the local area.

—04 Genzõ- Encouraging Gen Z to unplug from their devices by earning ‘screen-time’ through completing various activities.

— 02 MiHive – Increasing insect pollinator populations by enabling monitoring and educating new generations of beekeepers.

— 05 Warfarin patients regularly attend blood tests at GP clinics but this can be inconvenient and uncomfortable. This product allows patients to administer their own test at a convenient time.

— 03 MiHive Mechanical Control – a mechanical solution to the problem of Beekeepers being unable to use smartphone apps when wearing gloves.

01

03

— 06 The product uses proprietary photonic technology, removing the need for blood samples and enabling quick, non-invasive testing within the home.

Improving the INR monitoring experience for Warfarin patients 06

02

04

05


— 112

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 113

Sarah Gazeley —Details +44 (0) 7914 814 285 sarahgazeley1993@gmail.com

01

04

05

03

— Experience '15 Label Apeel – Graphic Designer

Enabling busy professionals to cook adventurous and healthy meals 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 An interactive app designed to assist the user with improving their eating habits. Connects to the at-home device used in the kitchen. — 02 A kitchen device used to project recipes onto worktop surfaces, encouraging the user to cook for themselves more whilst making the experience more enjoyable. — 03 A range of initial development sketches investigating form options.

—04 A product to help sufferers of dementia to review their short-term memories. Reminiscing is a therapeutic treatment proven to help individuals build coping strategies and reduce distress. — 05 A date key will allow the user to choose the specific date and month. Once inserted into the device, memories from this day are shown.


— 114

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 115

Alasdair Geddes

This recycling system enables an EU recycling rate of 50% by 2020

—Details alasdairgeddes@gmail.com

alasdairgeddes.com

01

05

06

02

— 01 The Fleetwind project began with an old family photo. Through more photos I was able to design and build a scale replica of the boat that was sold in 1981.

03

04

—04 This radio was redesigned for additive manufacturing, reducing the number of components to two printed parts.

— 02 This promotional item for camping features both a spork and a lighter.

— 05 Household waste is often a dirty, overflowing health hazard. This recycling system is easy to clean, compact and simple.

— 03 This gingerbread kit is initially a rolling pin with adjustable guides for rolling square sheets of dough. The product transforms into a gingerbread cutter using flexible blades in the pegboard.

— 06 One of the core elements of the recycling system is the ‘easy clean liner’. This can be easily removed, emptied and disassembled for cleaning in a dishwasher or by hand.


— 116

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 117

Joe Gillibrand

—Details +44 (0) 7970 279 060 josephgillibrand@live.co.uk joegillibrand.com 04

Bespoke 3D printed, shock absorbing shin pad for elite level footballers

01

03

— Experience '15 Loc8me - Graphic Design & Branding Intern — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Meet Burger – A full scale branding project for a brand new burger joint in Loughborough focused on social dining. See more at joegillibrand.com — 02 A digital street art creative tool that uses projected touch screen technology to transform flat walls into blank canvases. Users can turn urban areas into non-permanent, non-damaging artistic hotspots.

02

— 03 Ghost EXO uses a 3D-printed shock absorber chassis combined with a muscular compression rear to offer footballers a lightweight and comfortable protection solution. — 04 Designed to be barely noticeable until needed, Ghost EXO meets the requirements of professionals whose priority is performance, reliability and minimal distraction.


— 118

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 119

Ollie Godwin —Details +44 (0) 7786 493 769 olliegodwin@hotmail.com

01

03

Livestock welfare monitoring system 02

04

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 Green Rhino Leisure Industrial & Graphic Designer '14 Warner Brothers - Prop Modeler '14 TU Delft – Erasmus Student — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Dynamic livestock welfare monitoring sytem for commercial and pedigree sheep farmers, with potential for development to monitor cattle, goats and even llamas. — 02 Stock management and welfare are managed on the user’s smartphone, helping prevent the death of ewes and lambs during pregnancy. — 03 A durable, self-powering autonomous ear tag monitors heartrate and body temperature, alerting the user if readings are outside set parameters.

05

— 04 An innovative luxury outdoor living range focused on ease of assembly and disassembly and supreme comfort, which can be compactly stored over the winter months, increasing product lifetime. —05 A high performance, semi-autonomous security solution tackling opportunist and planned crime in rural areas, increasing traceability of criminals whilst enabling users to remain in the safety of their home.


— 120

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 121

Oliver Gummery

—Details +44 (0) 7780 755 401 olliegummery@btinternet.com behance.net/oligummery 05 01

04

06

03 — Experience '14 Unilever Packaging Designer

Reducing household food waste by increasing the visibility of fresh produce 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Food waste is a social, economic and environmental problem. Research shows hidden food in fridges leads to food waste. — 02 ‘Vine’ rationalises the storage of fresh produce and increases visibility. Trays cool food whilst exploiting its natural aesthetic. — 03 Food storage is visibly compartmentalised, reducing energy cost and encouraging healthy, sustainable living, and fitting with the trend of increased online and local deliveries.

—04 ‘Prod’ is a diabetic foot care device that checks sensitivity and scans the underside of feet, reducing the strain on medical services through easy identification of problems whilst weighing. — 05 ‘Kooka’ is a unique outdoor cooking experience for use at festivals. The stove is designed to emulate a famous Japanese anti-brand. — 06 A storyboard to explain the context and benefits of ‘Seeker’; a fun navigation ‘geocaching’ tool engaging children in the physical world.


— 122

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 123

Jesper Hallberg —Details +44 (0) 7732 691 697 jesper@hallbergs.net behance.net/Jesperoah

01

03

04

Helping Rheumatoid Arthritis sufferers to stay active 02

— Experience '13 Adidas – Assistant Project Manager / Graphic Designer '15 Wonder Vision Junior 3D Visualizer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 The product is designed to alleviate the stresses a Rheumatoid Arthritis sufferer would experience whilst gardening. This render showcases the product’s push-to-open storage and telescopic handles. — 02 Demonstration of user interaction with the product. The detachable seat also functions as a kneeling pad for use on the ground.

— 03 Prototype manufactured in the Loughborough Design School workshops. —04 A week long project creating a baby rocker which can be personally adapted and customized using 3D printing at home. — 05 The 3D printed elements consist of the rockers foundation and the baby’s sleep positioner. The toys hanging from the mobile are removable and can easily be changed.


— 124

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 125

Connor Hamilton-Smith

—Details +44 (0) 7989 780 327 connor.hamiltonsmith13@gmail.com

05 01

04

06

03 — Experience '15 Root Solutions Technical Support Engineer

Improving livestock security against dog attacks 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Created for livestock owners to better protect their animals, the post-mounted device is a humane and effective deterrent to prevent dogs chasing livestock.

—04 ‘Aura’ is a swim cap for epilepsy sufferers that utilises EEG technology to monitor brainwaves. In the event of a seizure, the chin strap inflates to keep the wearer afloat.

— 02 A parabolic mirror provides the internal camera with a panoramic view of the surrounding area, enabling the monitoring of large, open spaces.

— 05 The Shimano ‘Cottura’ is a compact cooker for desert marathon runners, featuring a fold-out parabolic dish which reflects sunlight to heat food.

— 03 A high frequency alarm emits sound in the audible range of dogs, but above that of humans and livestock.

— 06 The ‘style-us’ is a hair styling aid concept which uses 3D mapping to allow the user to see how they look with various hair styles.


— 126

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 127

Sam Hemming —Details +44 (0) 7792 144 529 samhemming93@hotmail.co.uk

01

03

Improving safety for travelers on South East Asian roads 02

04

— Experience '14 Designworks Windsor Design Intern — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 Low quality motorcycle helmets in South East Asia contribute to one of the worst road fatality statistics in the world (10,000 deaths per year). — 02 Designed with the backpacking tourist market in mind, the helmet compacts for easy storage, allowing it to be purchased in one’s home country and easily carried on one’s trip. — 03 It provides the air ventilation needed to offset hot and humid conditions, as well as giving the level of protection expected by today’s traveller.

—04 A children’s toy that allows children to physically make things needed for the game using a traditional style toy construction kit. Once created the object is imported into the game. — 05 A headset that teaches how to play guitar, using augmented reality technology to provide the user with the ability to play and interact with other musicians.


— 128

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 129

Dominic Hensman —Details +44 (0) 7519 663 083 hensmandominic@gmail.com

01

03

Overcoming Braille illiteracy 02

04

05

— Experience '15 Clayesmore Senior School Design and Technology Teaching Assistant '15 J.A.H Design - Intern

— 01 Tactus addreses the issue of declining numbers of qualified UK Braille tutors, allowing the user to learn independently via audio feedback.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 James Dyson Foundation Bursary '16 Loughborough University Young Enterprise Award Finalist '16 Shortlisted for entry into RSA design competition by Loughborough Design School '14 UX design shortlisted for O2 presentation

— 02 Unlike traditional Braille typewriters, Tactus enables users to interact directly with the 2x3 cell, allowing users to type Braille exactly as it is read. — 03 A keyboard matrix and a computer system recognise and dictate user inputs, and provide audio feedback on user errors.

—04 The KnitPen brings grandparents and grandchildren together to design and create knitwear. The garments are then donated to charities for those in need, such as Homeless Beanies UK. — 05 Clipped is a multi-tool platform that has the potential to enable users to create their own custom-designed 3D printed tools safely within the home using metal laser sintering.


— 130

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 131

Blair Hesson —Details blair.hesson@gmail.com

01

03

Enhancing assistive ambulation for amputee football 02

04

05

— Experience '15 Pensole Footwear Design Academy Footwear Designer '14 Inov8 - Footwear Design Intern

— 01 Sketches exploring the design requirements for the arm cuff and crutch tip in response to insights gathered from amputee football players.

—04 Kuri is a wearable device which helps curb the habit of screen-watching by prioritising and alerting the user to only their important notifications.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '15 Pensole Footwear Design Scholarship '14 Best Portfolio Video of the Year

— 02 An optimised handle design to improve comfort and assist with shock reduction. The design also features a lightweight carbon fibre frame allowing for easier ambulation.

— 05 A compact outdoor eating device, that preserves and creates heat from an exothermic reaction when the user pulls the loop.

— 03 The crutch tips are designed to enhance grip on the astro-turf playing surface and offset shock generated from the initial strike.


— 132

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 133

Mark Heyster —Details +44 (0) 7552 394 600 markheyster@hotmail.com

01

03

Nutrient level analysis and dispensing for developing countries 02

04

— Experience '15 Unilever – Packaging Designer '15 Minuteman Press – Graphic Designer '16 Lagom Strategy – UX Researcher — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '15 FIRA Future@Work 2nd Place '13 Materials KTM New Life from Old Finalist '13 Cornell University International Clean Cook Stove Competition Top 15

05

— 01 Intended for use by volunteer staff in developing countries, the system dispenses a customised nutrient suspension, tailored to the patient’s specific needs. — 02 A hand-powered centrifuge permits the processing of whole blood samples for further analysis of the patient's blood nutrient levels. — 03 A spectrophotometric analysis unit is used to detect the concentrations of key vitamins and minerals in a patient’s blood serum sample.

—04 SpaceRoqs are a collection of modular, functional inputs / outputs that enable students to quickly create working systems, thereby learning prototyping skills and advancing creatively through open ended, unrestricted experimentation. — 05 Sticks&Stones inspires children to rediscover fantasy imaginative play, utilising communications and data-capture technology to augment their physical world through sound effects, virtual monster encounters and app based level progression.


— 134

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 135

Charles Hills

— Experience '14 TU Delft – Erasmus Student '15 Loc8me – Graphic Designer

— 01 Zen Master helps yoga enthusiasts practice yoga in their home environment.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 02 Branding, identity and logo design for a new Leicestershire based taxi company. The image shows the development of the ‘InstaCab’ logo and a vehicle mockup produced for the company.

—Details +44 (0) 7568 150 280 charliehillsdesign@gmail.com charliehillsdesign.com

— 03 Simplicity is best. The Muji Cube is a barbecue with no unnecessary frills or fancies. Designed to make the barbecuing experience as simple and enjoyable as possible.

01

—04 A simple form and colour scheme, and the elimination of excess decoration, results in a functional, affordable and streamlined product. — 05 After returning from a motorcycle ride, the users damp clothing and equipment is hung on the aluminium framework above the dehumidifier, speeding up drying time considerably. — 06 Each component is interchangeable, giving the user the ability to alter the layout of the system to best suit their needs or preference.

Motorcycle clothing and equipment storage and dryer 03

02

04

05

06


— 136

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 137

Robbie Hoare —Details +44 (0) 7791 589 683 robbiehoare@me.com behance.net/robbiehoare 05 01

03

06

04

Paint brush and roller sleeve cleaner for decorators 02

— Experience '14 Avon Protection Student Design Engineer '15 Loughborough Design School Course Representative

— 01 The adaptable design utilises centrifugal force to clean decorators’ paint brushes and roller sleeves more effectively than current manual methods, in a cleaner, more sustainable way.

—04 Drawasaurus - A product tied into a service, which inspires children and parents to explore and observe the physical world through the collection and completion of drawings.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 James Dyson Foundation Bursary '15 Live Projects – Student’s Top 10 '15 Certified Solidworks Professional '14 Loughborough Design School Prize for Academic Excellence

— 02 The mechanism maximises tool compatibility, allowing operation in two orientations to suit the requirements of either brushes or roller sleeves.

— 05 Electro-mechanical can crusher - designed to automatically crush five cans utilising a wind- screen wiper motor.

— 03 Functional prototypes used for evaluation demonstrated product feasibility and determined optimum speeds, cycle times and temperatures.

— 06 FM54 - a military and law enforcement respirator launched commercially in 2015. Image used with permission of Avon Protection.


— 138

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 139

Jack Howdle —Details +44 (0) 7932 868 421 jackhowdle93@aol.co.uk linkedin.com/in/jackhowdle

01

03

Optimising cryotherapy for recovery from soft tissue injury

02

04

— Experience '15 Unilever – Industrial Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '14 Diageo Innovation Competition 1st Place

05

— 01 Cryo is an intelligent cryotherapy treatment product that monitors the temperature of its contents to ensure optimum application conditions are maintained. — 02 The product utilises a smart strap, which calculates the diameter of the user’s injured body part and tailors the time duration of the application accordingly.

— 03 Wireless communication with medical experts via a smartphone app enables monitoring of treatment and advice regarding further therapy. 04 A fully functioning electro-mechanical can crusher, combining a mechanically analysed crank and slider mechanism with embedded electronic control for full automation. — 05 Xcite is a revolutionary home sport viewing product, mining data to enhance the user’s sensorial experience through haptic feedback.


— 140

BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 141

Alex Huckle —Details +44 (0) 7729 710 600 alexhuckle12@gmail.com

05 01

04

06

03

A non-steroidal solution to assist the self-management of Adult Onset Asthma 02

— Experience '15 Design Ergonomics Course Representative '14 Inn Gear Ltd Furniture Project Manager '12 Design Ergonomics Course Representative — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '14 1st place - James Dyson Foundation Workshop '13 Loughborough Design School Award for Academic Excellence

— 01 Common symptoms of an asthma attack such as coughing and wheezing are monitored; irregular patterns activate the heating of the beaker to enable steam relief.

—04 Navii is a haptic wrist-worn device to aid fire- fighter navigation. 3D mapping technology identifies hazards and displays them on a screen and heads-up display.

— 02 Personalised essential oils enhance respiratory relief during inhalation. The beaker’s internal mechanical iris controls steam intensity.

— 05 Site Audio Pro is an elasticated power tool extension using Active Acoustic Locationing to detect existing cables and pipes on site.

— 03 A capacitive touch emergency feature allows users to alert the emergency services via GPS if their condition deteriorates.

— 06 A compact hair straightener that incorporates retractable plates and thermally charged LED’s to warn when its ceramic plates are still hot.


— 142

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 143

Georgia Humphrey

—Details +44 (0) 7519 200 060 georgia.c.humphrey@gmail.com linkedin.com/in/georgiahumphrey

01

03

Height-adjustable storage to utilise vertical kitchen space

02

04

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 Loughborough Design School Marketing Assistant '14 Whitbread Wilkinson Product Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 Rising rents are increasingly causing people to downsize, compromising more spacious living. NOA is an adjustable storage system addressing shrinking kitchen space in inner-city homes.

— 04 This is an app for the entertainment industry, helping musicians and venues to connect and organise gigs safely using verification and a secure messaging system.

— 02 A height adjustable pulley system enhances vertical kitchen space, using modular containers to improve the flow of a busy kitchen.

— 05 Bodhi: a trio of products (smart yoga mat, projector and wearable breathing monitor) that work together to teach mindfulness, yoga and meditation.

—03 Inspired by Scandinavian Design, NOA combines natural materials with simple geometry and quirkiness to add warmth to the heart of the home.


— 144

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 145

Anna Jaanus —Details +44 (0) 7847 344 779 annaljaanus@gmail.com

01

03

04

— Experience '14 Vax UK Ltd. - Product Designer

Improving the experience of in-car cleaning 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '15 Honourable Mention Seymourpowell Live Projects '13 Loughborough Design School Prize for Academic Excellence '12 Eliahou Dangoor STEM Scholarship

05

— 01 Most drivers struggle with vacuuming cars due to poorly designed products. Designed primarily for car enthusiasts, APEX accommodates difficult to clean areas that are often found in modified cars. — 02 Supplied with a range of specifically designed tools, the vacuum is also powered by LithiumIon batteries for improved mobility. —03 By swapping the dirt bin for water tanks, APEX can be used as a wet vacuum for cleaning upholstery and as a standard vacuum for dirt pick up.

— 04 Pain suppressant device aimed at those who suffer with Crohn’s Disease. Uses heat and massaging techniques to relieve abdominal pain, whilst connecting to mobile device for discreet app-based control. — 05 A suite of gaming products that brings outdoor sports, indoors. Utilises camera tracking and haptic feedback actuators for a more realistic gaming solution.


— 146

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 147

Josh Jenkins —Details +44 (0) 7969 974 479 josh.jj.jenkins@hotmail.co.uk behance.net/joshuajenkinsdesign

01

03

Search and rescue drone for avalanche victims

02

04

— Experience '15 Val Heliski Marketing & Operations Assistant

05

— 01 With over 100 people a year dying from avalanche-related deaths in and around ski resorts, this drone is able to detect buried victims from up to 200m away.

— 04 Custom-fitted, modular skateboard shoes that combat wear and tear, increasing the longevity of the shoe and improving the skateboarding experience.

— 02 An easily interchanged LiPo battery powers the motors and search technology electronics.

— 05 Bespoke, personalized jewellery toolkits. To be used as part of an educative service in homeless shelters; promoting transferable employability skills and social interaction.

—03 To be used by ski patrol teams across the world, the drone can operate in temperatures as low as -25°C and can ascend to altitudes of 3000m above sea level.


— 148

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 149

Molly Jennings —Details +44 (0) 7545 763 313 mollyjennings1994@gmail.com

01

03

04

— Experience '15 John Lewis Visual Merchandiser '14 Whitbread Wilkinson Product Designer

Automated cleaning of makeup brushes 02

— Awards '16 Diploma of Professional Studies '14 O2 UX Shortlist

05

— 01 75% of makeup wearers do not clean their brushes as regularly as recommended due to time and effort, leading to poor hygiene. — 02 After removing product build-up from the bristles during the rotational wash cycle, fan technology allows 12 brushes to be dried and ready to use again within one hour. —03 Ease of use motivates users to clean brushes more regularly, resulting in better application, healthier skin and an increased brush lifespan.

— 04 Sous Chef is a product / service bundle offering individuals with high blood fats, (and therefore a heavily restricted diet), a lifestyle-preserving meal solution and a new perspective on food. — 05 Upon receiving an order, personalised meals are prepared, vacuum-sealed and delivered to the user’s door. The Sous Chef sous vide cooks meals to gourmet perfection using no oil or fat.


— 150

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 151

Ashley Jones —Details +44 (0) 7581470042 ashjones2179@gmail.com

04

01

Reducing the risk of sedentary behaviour in the office environment 03

— 01 ’Ourcook’ is an educational cooking device for both parent and child. It improves interactions through the use of gamification and teamwork, promoting a healthy mealtime structure for the whole family. — 02 ’Playhub’ is an integrated security and exploration system for adolescent children. Separation from technology is encouraged through incentives of exploring the physical environment around them. 02

— 03 An integral cushion device helps improve the well-being of workers in office environments, by utilising haptic feedback in an attempt to reduce sedentary behaviour. — 04 Prototyping was undertaken to produce a full-scale aesthetic model. An electronic prototype was also constructed to understand the technology of the product and user interactions.


— 152

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 153

Pak Son Keung

Personal air filtering system

—Details moskeungpakson@yahoo.com.hk

01

05

06

02

— 01 All-in-one medical device for long term illness patients; functions include heart rate monitor, blood pressure meter and pill dispenser. — 02 A fully designed, mechanically analysed and fabricated compound bow/ crossbow style squash ball launching device. — 03 Injection mould tool design for a plastic bag clip, designed as a free promotional plastic widget. 03

04

—04 Reverse engineered CAD model of Timberland Boot using complex surface modeling in Creo, using 3D scan data captured to create a custom fit insole to improve user comfort. — 05 The air filtering modulus can be used with a face mask for outdoor uses or used indoor as a small portable air filtering device. — 06 Exploded view of the air filtering device showing the internal components.


— 154

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

Jack Kidd

— Experience '14 Deb Ltd – Junior Product Designer — Awards '16 Diploma of Professional Studies

— 155

— 01 Interactive app designed to encourage households to save energy. Incorporates smart usage maps to highlight excessive areas of energy usage, and a cooperative reward system. — 02 Modular PS4 controller for disabled gamers. Utilises user-fabricated parts which are snapped onto the controller’s central unit.

—Details +44 (0) 7944 522 574 jack.kidd55@yahoo.co.uk

— 03 Injection moulding assembly block for an Xbox PC mouse. Developed and manufactured using PTC Creo, CNC milling and lathe processes.

01

—04 Corresponding Xbox PC mouse outcome. A rendered representation of the injection moulded model using KeyShot. — 05 A handheld device used as a massager to relieve pain against delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Rendered using KeyShot. — 06 Electronic functional prototype assembled using a breadboard and programmed with MPLAB. The system utilises an automated heated water-pump system and timer module for different treatment periods.

In-bath device relieving the effects of delayed onset muscle soreness 03

02

04

05

06


— 156

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

Covering the area of biomechanics, human biology, design, psychology, anatomy and physiology; the course is taught by experts in the field of ergonomics, human factors and related disciplines.

— 157


— 158

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 159

Thomas Allitt

Comparison of the Standard Operating Procedures of two sites in the NHS. —Details +44 (0) 7834 340 886 tom.allitt@hotmail.co.uk

01

Medication Management in Community Care in the NHS. The first objective of this report was to analyse the medication management at two sites in the NHS Bridgewater Community Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust and compare it to the Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) that they have in place. The second was to compare the SOPs for the Safe and Secure Handling of Medicines and Controlled drugs (CDs) in order to highlight any differences or flaws in either SOP. The first step to this report was to go to the two sites in the Trust and gather information about the medication management. This was collected through interviews and shadowing members of staff as well as asking questions to understand this new and completely different system.

02

From this data collection, Hierarchical Task Analyses (HTAs) were constructed to compare the two sites. The focus then turned to the SOPs and using these, additional HTAs were constructed to compare what was reported in the Medicines SOP and the CD SOP. The focus was on four sections; Ordering, Transportation, Storage

and Receipt of the Medication or CDs. For each section a combined Medicines and CD SOPs HTA was made which demonstrated the differences between the SOPs and those elements that should be the same in each SOP. The final part of the project was to construct a list of questions for the Trust regarding their SOPs and the sites. From the HTAs and comparisons it was clear that the two SOPs were surprisingly different to the other. Furthermore, one SOP was missing relevant information that the other SOP would benefit from. Both SOPs also failed to flow well in terms of the step-by-step guide for one of the four sections that were focused upon. From reviewing the sites it was clear that even though they are extremely different in terms of how they are set up, they are still both expected to subscribe to the same SOPs. To conclude, the NHS Trust should change the SOPs to improve their flow and help staff optimise the amount of time needed to understand how to follow the SOP. This would not only save the NHS time and money but would ensure the safety of the patients.


— 160

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 161

John Barker

Heating electric vehicles via infrared radiation in a localised cool environment —Details +44 (0) 7983 521 453 johnbarkerergo@gmail.com

— Experience '14 Nissan - Interior Trim and Ergonomics

Infrared radiation as a means of heating electric vehicles

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

Advancements in consumer expectations relating to driver and passenger comfort in vehicles has led to significant advancements with emphasis on the achievement of thermal comfort in vehicles. The study of thermal environments in vehicles consists of many diverse parameters that dictate a person’s thermal comfort. The vehicles thermal cabin control system must be able to facilitate the achievement of thermal comfort through the manipulation of the thermal environment in both very hot conditions and very cold conditions. Arguably, the more significant of the two ends of the temperature spectrum is the cold environment. There is little research available to confidently determine the most efficient method of heating a person in a cool environment. The position of the heating system and the source of heating used are likely to be pivotal variables in the attainment of thermal comfort from a localised cool environment.

— 01 A participant subjectively evaluating their thermal comfort whilst being heated by infrared radiation in a cool environment.

01

Over recent years, there has been a significant increase in interest in electric vehicles, from not only an environmental standpoint but also from a business and consumer perspective. Electric vehicles are slowly emerging as a generally competitive segment in a highly

competitive market. This is likely a consequence of a combination of heightened consciousness of the effects of global warming, since electric vehicles offer an potential means to facilitate a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions emitted via automobiles. However, they do not offer the flexibility that current diesel and petrol vehicles offer due to limited range in which it can travel before needing to be recharged. Therefore, since the use of the battery to heat electric vehicle cabins reduces their driving range this also provides a legitimate obstacle to uptake when compared to conventional petrol or diesel powered vehicles. Therefore it is imperative for the development of electric vehicles that a suitable alternative is identified for the heating of the cabin. One possible avenue of heat production is the use of infrared panels. There is a distinct paucity of previous research relating to the feasibility of the use of infrared radiation as a means of heating in a cool environment. There is also an inadequate amount of published research on its use to warm people in a vehicle cabin environment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of the use infrared panels as a solution to heating electric vehicles, as well as analysing if it is possible to compensate for a cool environment with localised heating at different locations on the body.


— 162

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 163

Eddie Brown

Reviewing the newly implemented hand gesture control in the BMW 7 Series. —Details +44 (0) 7531 960 146 eddie.f.brown1993@gmail.com

— Experience '14 Bentley Motors Concept Ergonomic Engineer 01 — Awards '16 Diploma of Professional Studies — 01 A subject performing a gesture to pan across a navigation screen during a driving simulation. — 02 Some of the natural hand gestures demonstrated in the user study.

02

Investigating Hand Gesture Control in Automotive HMI. Automotive designers strive for excellence with each generation of vehicle a company produces. For the luxury automotive market, the leaders are no longer dominated by aesthetics and horsepower but instead a harmony of these aspects along with comfort, safety, interior fit and technology. The increased complexity of the technologies that are implemented in modern day luxury vehicles requires smarter ways to interact with them due to an increased risk of driver distraction. These interactions now include hand gesture control. The sixth generation BMW 7 Series is the first vehicle to go to market that includes hand gesture technology as part of their new infotainment system called iDrive 5.0. To collect more information on the attitudes toward hand gesture interaction, Four interviews were undertaken with professionals in the automotive field. The insights gained informed the development of a user trial as well as clarifying conditions of its acceptance as a viable interaction modality. The aim of this project was to investigate the usability of the hand gesture capability of the iDrive 5.0, the intuitive nature and discoverability of the gestures, as well as the experience it gives the user. To facilitate this, a series of user trials were conducted using a driving simulator and a LEAP motion controller.

The LEAP motion controller is an instrument designed to enable its user to interact with their computer using hand gestures and works using similar infra-red recognition technology to the BMW 7-series. This was configured to control volume, phone call handling, map viewing and song skipping on a laptop using the same gestures used in the BMW 7 series. The trial was divided into two tasks; the first was a test of intuitiveness and required the participant to demonstrate a hand gesture that seems natural to them to control the aforementioned functions. The data of their given gestures was captured using a visualiser and their similarities were compared with the BMW’s gesture set using a taxonomy of gestural characteristics. The second task examined learnability. The participants were shown the gesture demonstration video given in the 7 series and were then asked to replicate these to control a real-time simulation HMI on the laptop. After the user trial, the participants were given questionnaires to glean their opinions and experience of using hand gestures. The results of the study indicate that some gestures used by BMW are natural to the subjects but others were considerably less intuitive. The study highlighted that hand gesture control in cars holds much potential but it’s success may rely on a less confined set of gestures as well as the modality becoming more ubiquitous in our everyday interactions with machines.


— 164

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 165

Matt Godbold

User insight on the modern shift to collaborative workspaces —Details +44 (0) 7872 473 089 mattgodbold@gmail.com

— Experience '14 FIRA International Ltd Assistant Ergonomist 01 — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies — 01 The modern office has become a casual, communicative place. Small meeting areas and collaborative workspaces are becoming more and more common. How much does this help employees? — 02 The office floor plan is ever-evolving. Historically each individual had one desk. Then followed the rise of the cubicle. Now the walls are gone and people are talking.

02

Analysing the use of collaborative office work areas There is a strong current trend in modern office design to incorporate communal areas into office floor plans. Much material has arisen in the 21st century that relates productivity and happiness to social aspects through communicative environments and autonomy. This blurs the borders of the typical hierarchical chain of command which is thought to result in higher employee self-satisfaction and therefore increased output. These new environments are intended to bring out the creativity and team working ability in employees to give companies a competitive edge. Accordingly, manufacturers are investing more and more into providing these spaces. It is now very common to see new types of space use in modern offices such as soft seating areas, acoustic pods, standing meeting tables, break-out zones and many more. The ergonomic benefits of this new furniture are also stressed, meaning companies are beginning to take ergonomic approaches to employee health seriously. A literature review was conducted for the study which found that very few peer reviewed studies exist in the area that would directly warrant this shift to collaborative working environments. To provide additional background, closely related research areas were searched. The reviewed articles consisted of studies into: environmental

factors such as noise and light, open plan vs cubicles and tabletop team activity recording. Furniture manufacturers’ white papers were also used in the review as a source of grey literature. These were much closer aligned to the study topic than the journal articles, and more obviously point towards team-based furniture as the next step in office layout design, using defining statistics as justification. The drawback was that these papers are based upon in-house research that is unmoderated and not publicly available. These papers are a form of marketing, and thus are poor in terms of validity and reliability. This justified the need for the proposed study in order; to fill the gap between academic research and the market trend. Thus the aim of the study was to look into the effectiveness of these niche workspaces in terms of employee preference and actual usage. The study intended to find out employees’ real habits via three methods: questionnaires, observations and interviews. The questionnaires show correlations between character factors and work area preference. Users were then observed using a specified piece of communal furniture. Habits, usage, workload completed, quantity of employees and more were recorded with semi-structured interviews following. Once all data was compiled and analysed it was discussed through interviews with several furniture design experts to identify where there industry should go from here.


— 166

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 167

Lucas Ingram

Evaluating automated sit-to-stand devices with respect to the biomechanics of human movement

—Details +44 (0) 7701 002 110 lucasingram95@gmail.com — 01 An automated lift device in use, showing the setup for recording data using a motion capture camera and force plate. Mannequin used as a stand in participant for the photo.

Ergonomic Evaluation of Automated Sitting to Standing Devices The project ergonomically evaluated the efficacy of a range of automated sit to stand devices with respect to human movement and the perception of that movement by mobility impaired users. Rising from a seated position to standing is, for many, a simple everyday activity which is done unconsciously. However there are people that suffer in their day to day life due to severe difficulty when moving into a standing position from sitting, or total inability to do so without assistance. This impaired mobility could be due to an injury, a disease or the natural deterioration of the body through ageing. Being unable to perform a sit to stand is recognised as a disabling condition. People that have difficulty standing from seated would find it hard participating in meaningful daily activity, mobilising safely and remaining independent. This can cause them distress, frustration, low self-esteem and discourage them from making further attempts to stand. The ability to stand from sitting enables an individual to perform more daily living activities. Benefits to standing/ weight bearing include improving/maintaining bone density, joint range of movement, cardiac function, circulation and overall quality of life.

01

Currently it is mostly nursing staff/carers that have to assist persons with difficulty or inability to perform a sit to stand. They help by taking the weight of the person

and using their own physical strength to lift the person into a standing position. This can be a hazardous procedure for both the person and their nurse/carer. Automated equipment in the form of sitting to standing lift devices have been developed to prevent this by facilitating the jobs of nurses/carers. This equipment had not been comprehensively ergonomically evaluated with particular regard to the biomechanics of human movement and the patient perception of that movement. It has the potential to be harmful or uncomfortable for the user. Most of the devices studied aided participants to stand very actively, causing the participants to be overly passive; slumped back in the sling on the device. They also caused the participants to follow a movement pattern which was quite far from that of natural human sit to stand movement. This could be satisfactory for patients with a total inability to perform a sit to stand. However for patients who are still able to stand from sitting, but find it very difficult to do so, this would be too much help and could lead to further deterioration of muscles and joints. It could also potentially lead to injury due to the unnatural body position causing the patient’s weight to be distributed in an unusual way. Patients mostly perceived the movements as unnatural and felt uncomfortable and undignified whilst using the devices. Some of the devices did work in a more ergonomically sound manner.


— 168

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

Paul Isherwood

A key method of identifying usability problems is to conduct Usability Testing —Details +44 (0) 7578 813 101 paulisherwood16@gmail.com

— Experience '15 MBDA - Human Factors Specialist

Comparing methods of identifying usability problems on websites

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

The Internet has become an essential part of everyday work and social activity, and yet we commonly encounter multiple problems when interfacing with websites. A key method of identifying such problems and, in turn, discovering potential improvements on a website, is to conduct usability testing. There are two main techniques to do this.

— 01 A non-expert user taking part in User Testing on one of the websites.

01

— 169

One is User Testing. This is a process by which a non-expert person in the field of usability uses a given website, and is observed doing so in order to record any issues that they encounter. The second is an Heuristic Evaluation. This is a common technique conducted by more experienced and expert evaluators who have a working knowledge of usability and how to identify usability problems.

This study compared User Testing and Heuristic Evaluation, with the aim of finding the most favourable method of the two. This outcome was determined by collecting quantitative data to identify which method would be the most efficient (defined as that which can find problems in a short amount of time with the least amount of resource required) and the most effective (defined as that which can find the most amount of problems and the most severe problems with the websites). Both methods were conducted studying two different websites, one relating to online shopping and the other to booking airline flights. The two websites were selected because they are sites that are used commonly and also because during the pilot study many problems on the sites were flagged.


— 170

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

Loughborough Design School

— 171

Harry McKendrick

Investigating the regional variation in thermal sensation to warm or cold stimuli —Details +44 (0) 7769 277 525 harry.mcken@btopenworld.com

01

02

2016

— Experience '14 Aston Martin Lagonda - Ergonomist

Thermal Sensitivity to a Warm and Cold Stimulus

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 Nominated for the Loughborough University Student Placement Award

As humans, our species has the aptitude to survive while being exposed to a wide range of extreme conditions. It is our ability to sense temperature changes within the environment that allows us to adapt autonomously and behaviourally. Peripheral thermoreceptors, strategically located in the skin, provide immediate feedback to a temperature change within the external environment - an essential ability to initiate thermoregulatory responses in order to maintain thermal equilibrium. Thermal sensation is a sensory experience and a psychological phenomenon as it is related to how people ‘feel’. Due to the incapability of defining physical or physiological sensation, many studies have investigated a correlation between physiological responses with thermal sensation. While a large body of literature has studied regional thermal sensation differences to a fixed stimulus, examining the regional differences to a stimulus that is relative to an individual’s skin temperature has been neglected. Further research is required to fully understand thermal sensitivity across wider areas of the body. It has been speculated in the current literature, that regional differences are determined by the central nervous system assigning weighing factors for each body segment rather than receptor density. More over, regional differences in thermal sensitivity have previously been

measured on a limited number of locations across the body. This study uses 33 body locations spread across the front and back – no previous study has assessed to the same extent. Whole body thermal sensation maps have been developed from previous research conducted in the Environmental Ergonomics Research Centre at Loughborough University. Body maps of thermal sensitivity to stimuli relative to skin temperature provide a further understanding of the human body’s regional variation to thermal sensation. The aim of the study was to investigate the regional differences experienced by male participants at rest to innocuous warm and cold stimuli relative to skin temperature using the magnitude estimation technique. It was hypothesised that significant regional variations would be reduced when exposed to a stimulus relative to an individual’s skin temperature. It was further hypothesised that the male participants would experience stronger magnitude sensations to the cold than to the warm stimulus. Ultimately, this work complements the body of literature currently surrounding human thermal sensitivity. The findings from this research are applicable to the design of sports, protective and conventional clothing, climate control for buildings and vehicles, and provide a step towards further research in the topic area.


— 172

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 173

Michael Obire

An investigation into digital media and our diminishing our ability to concentrate. —Details +44 (0) 7831 000 969 obirejr@googlemail.com

thebedroomblogger.tumblr.com

— Experience '14 DAM Digital User Experience Designer '14 Transport for London Transport Planner '15 Transport for London Transport Planner — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

01

Is Digital Media Dumbing Us Down? Due the rise of technology use, 21st century lifestyles have become more digital. It is known that the increasing prevalence and use of television, computers, the Internet, mobile phones and similar have had an impact on humans and society. For example, a majority of students who are currently taking part in the higher education system are born into a generation that has grown up surrounded by digital technologies. Studies have shown that they exhibit a number of new and common characteristics including a high level of digital aptitude, the ability to multitask, literacy in multiple media, constant connectivity, the need for speed in delivery of information and a culture of sharing information as a result of their significant level of exposure to technology over the course of their lives. Digital media gives us unprecedented access to entertainment and information. Nowadays this is spread out across an increasing number

of applications, devices and services that compete for our limited time and cognitive resources to use them. Human attention is a finite resource; the increasing cognitive demands and divided attention required to able to process the multiple streams of information may come with a cost. There is a lingering concern about the adverse psychological effects of the growing presence of informationtechnology. However, there is very little research available to validate such concerns. This exploratory study therefore aimed to provide some insight into where research is currently required. Through the use of carefully selected and designed experimental methods, it investigated the psychological impact of our everyday use of digital media by observing its immediate and lasting impact on an individual’s attention span and concentration, with the intention of finding out if our increasing interaction with digital media is diminishing our cognitive capabilities.


— 174

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 175

Ravi Patel

Comparing two different ways the ambulance service responds to a CBRNe incident. —Details +44 (0) 7772 765 844 patelra10@gmail.com

— Awards ’14 Loughborough University Award for Academic Excellence — 01 This image shows the hierarchical structure that is used within the ambulance service when carrying out a response to a CBRNe incident.

A critical comparison of NARU and NATO ConOps As stated in the ‘Research’ section of the University website, Loughborough is leading a pan-European, interdisciplinary project, exploring ways to improve civil preparedness in the event of a catastrophic Chemical, Biological, Radioactive, Nuclear or explosive (CBRNe) incident in Europe. It is a four year TOXI-triage project, on which this final year dissertation is based. The TOXI-triage project is of significant magnitude and this dissertation work contributes to the larger whole. The aim of this final year project was to critically compare two different Concept of Operations (ConOps), the National Ambulance Resilience Unit (NARU) and North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) ConOps, that are used in the event of a CBRNe incident. In the context of the project, ConOps denote a document detailing the strategic view and goals of emergency operations. To be put in simpler terms, the project looks at the steps that are undertaken by the ambulance service in particular, to assess and control a CBRNe situation from the moment they arrive on the scene until all casualties have been triaged, treated and transported to the relevant hospitals.

01

When an incident occurs that involves a CBRNe agent in the UK, NARU ConOps are used as a solid structure from which to base a well-

coordinated ambulance service response. However, internationally other ConOps are adopted by different countries, such as the NATO ConOps. NATO ConOps provide a guideline for a civil emergency response that countries can use in the event of a CBRNe crisis. By assessing the similarities and differences of these two ConOps it is possible to identify where improvements could be made as well as coming to a conclusion as to which ConOps are more efficient. To collect the necessary data that will allow an informed critical comparison to be made, four methods were used. These included observations, interviews, and video and document analysis. The information gathered as a result was analysed and then presented visually on two AcciMaps, one for NARU ConOps and the other for NATO ConOps. An AcciMap is a systems mapping method commonly used to communicate clearly the roles of top to bottom level personnel. It was used to illustrate both the similarities and differences between the ConOps by ambulance service personnel in a CBRNe incident. It is intended that this project will prove a useful first step into exploring ways in which civil preparedness can be improved from these two ConOps. Furthermore it is anticipated that it provides a better understanding of both ConOps and within this how the two ambulance systems operate, which can then be used as a springboard for further research.


— 176

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 177

Henry Pickering

Investigating Smart-Glasses performance in retinitis pigmentosa participants under different intensities of light. —Details +44 (0) 7807 030 282 henryjohnpickering@gmail.com

01

— Experience '14 Wren Living - Product & Technical Developer '15 Wren Living - Product & Technical Developer '15 BSc (Hons). Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) Final Year Programme Representative '16 BSc (Hons). Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) Final Year Programme Representative — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies — 01 Smart Glasses user testing with a member of the Oxford Smart Specs Research Group (image copyrights to group). The glasses heighten visual contrast and improve detail of nearby environmental objects. — 02 Smart Glasses prototype being developed by the Oxford Smart Specs Research Group (image copyrights to group).

02

Augmented Assistive Technology for the Visually Impaired Smart Glasses is a project that is being developed by the Oxford Smart Specs Research Group in the OcuLab at the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences. Smart Glasses are an augmented assistive technology that aim to make use of visually impaired peoples residual vision and improve their situational awareness. Smart Glasses consist of a three-dimensional camera that detects object detail in the immediate environment and produces real time, high contrast outlines which help to build up an image of the overall surroundings for the visually impaired person. This study targeted the performance of the Smart Glasses in different intensities of light for participants with retinitis pigmentosa, a genetic heterogeneous, retinal degeneration disorder. People with retinitis pigmentosa commonly experience a loss of peripheral vision, a loss of situational awareness and the onset of night-time blindness. The aim of this study was to provide evidence supporting an optimal environmental lighting level for Smart Glasses use in retinitis pigmentosa participants. The data could then be used to allocate indoor environmental lighting levels to aid navigation and way-finding tasks. The

secondary aim was to provide evidence of the technology’s assistive attributes when way-finding in low environmental lighting, as a means of combating night-time blindness in retinitis pigmentosa participants. Trails were conducted in the Loughborough University Design School Vision Laboratory, where a systematic grid was laid out and five objects were placed at random intersects for participants to navigate around. Both non-visually impaired participants and participants with retinitis pigmentosa were included in the study. Each participant filled in one questionnaire before the trials began and a similar questionnaire after the trials had finished. The participants were then asked to way-find through the testing environment, firstly without the Smart Glasses, then with the Smart Glasses. Potential object collisions and the time taken to complete the way-finding task were recorded and defined as the dependent variables. The environmental lighting level, the independent variable, was changed after each trail using pre set increments to gather Smart Glasses performance data from a range of higher-light environments to lowerlight environments. Once all the trials had finished, the data was statistically analysed to compare way-finding performance in the different environmental lighting levels.


— 178

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

Kolby Pistak

Evaluating fabric moisture transfer properties and their effect on peoples perceived comfort

—Details +44 (0) 7917 691 062 kobedaniel@hotmail.co.uk

— Experience '15 Nissan, Advanced Vehicle Development Engineer

01

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 The participant’s view during the experiment. The scales are being used to rate the fabric; there’s a screen to make sure the appearance of the fabric doesn’t affect their responses — 02 Preparing a participant’s arm by marking out the area of fabric application and attaching thermocouples to measure the local skin temperature.

02

— 179

Fabric Moisture Transfer and Its Effect on Comfort Different types of fabrics manage moisture in distinct fashions. Some, like cotton, readily wick sweat at low perspiration levels but are less effective for more strenuous exercise. Others less readily absorb liquid so are less useful at low sweat levels but their superior liquid transport systems within the fabric mean they wick sweat at a much higher rate making them better in high sweat situations. The amount of sweat on the epidermis and the amount transferred to, and retained in, a garment has shown to have a direct relationship with perceived comfort of users. The main issue in this case is that because subjective data (like the measure of ‘comfort’) can have such fluctuations, even when given by the same subject It is difficult to determine if the models that have been proposed in the scientific community are correct or to what extent they accurately represent the relationship between sweat and comfort. This project aims to determine whether, and to what extent, fabric type, composition and fibre weave affect the moisture sensation of clothing on the participant’s skin and thereby their perceived levels of comfort and wetness in a controlled environment in which there is no thermal exchange between the subject and the environment. The study looks at the participant’s perception of roughness, wetness, stickiness and comfort.

Each fabric in the study was treated with 50% relative maximum capacity of the water they could hold to simulate perspiration. It was concluded that there was no significant effect of fabric surface texture (i.e. rough vs smooth) on the perceived friction (reported as stickiness), which means that even though stickiness had a significant effect on wetness perception in both wet high pressure and low pressure conditions, surface texture did not. Fabric thickness also had a significant effect on wetness perception for some of the fabrics tested. In thinner fabrics the material and fibre structure had a larger effect on wetness perception, therefore comfort, with fabric 12 (polyester) giving a significantly wetter and therefore less pleasant sensation for participants on average. Fabric thickness, however, did not have a significant effect on wetness perception for polyester as there was not a significant difference between the “thick” and “thickest” test groups. There were significant effects of fibre-type on both wetness and stickiness. It was not surprising that it had a significant effect on both instead of just one of the variables as wetness and stickiness are so closely correlated. The fabric that was found to be the least sticky and driest was a treated single jersey polyester which was also reported to be considered to be the most pleasant.


— 180

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

Philip Richardson

Cold hands? How does this effect blind people’s ability to read Braille? —Details +44 (0) 7894 204 870 philiprichardson71@googlemail.com

01

— Experience '15 Jaguar Land Rover; Ergonomist '14 Jaguar Land Rover; Ergonomist — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies — 01 Braille letters were placed on a bar that participants could not see, the task required identification of the letters via touch using a sheet to inform participants of Braille letter design. — 02 Participants were placed into hot and cold temperatures for an hour. They were asked to complete a braille performance test before and after the temperature exposure.

02

— 181

Effect of temperature on the ability to read Braille

development of these standards to make Braille signs more accessible in outdoor environments.

Almost two million people in the UK are blind or partially sighted and by the year 2050 it is expected that this will have nearly doubled due to an increase in the percentage of our population who are elderly and an increase in the prevalence of some of the underlying causes of sight loss e.g. obesity and diabetes. The UK government and industry as a whole have a responsibility to foster, and work towards, a more inclusive society to encourage people with visual impairments to become more active and outgoing.

Previous research has identified the cause and effect relationship between cold hand skin temperature and dexterity levels. From this research the exact temperatures at which there is a performance decrease in certain gross and fine dexterity performance tasks have been deciphered. This has then led to standards that can be used throughout industry to aid in job design within cold environments. Although this research has taught us much about the reduction in finger sensitivity this has not been applied to the ability of being able to read Braille at these observed temperatures.

Over recent years the use of Braille on signage has become increasingly common as part of this move towards an inclusive society and Braille has become a common feature of many indoor public facilities such as train stations and hospitals. This aids people with sight difficulties in their navigation of these areas and to locate specific features such as toilet facilities and exits. Standards and guidelines are already in place which state the materials and the size of Braille dots and letters to be used on Braille signs. However, the understanding of the effect of temperature on the ability to read Braille is limited. If research indicated that there is a reduction in ability to read Braille as a result of low temperatures this could lead to further

The aim of this research project was to explore the relationship between different temperatures and performance scores when completing Braille reading tasks, to see if cold hand skin temperatures do affect the ability to read Braille and, if so, to what extent. The results suggest that the ability to read Braille is reduced when hands are exposed to low temperatures. However, it was not possible to identify at what specific temperature the reduction in performance occurred and further research is needed to explore the effect of varying sizes of Braille dots in a wider range of cold environments using participants who have more experience reading Braille.


— 182

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

Tom Robertson

Evaluating a new method for factoring clothing into the WBGT Index —Details +44 (0) 7766 738 852 photomrobertson@gmail.com

— 01 A photo taken with a thermal imaging camera showing the build-up of heat caused by wearing chemical protective clothing (Compared to someone dressed in shorts and a T-shirt.) 01 — 02 Three participants exercise in a climate chamber housed in the Environmental Ergonomics Research Center. Conditions were 35 degree Celsius heat with 50% Humidity (while wearing chemical protective clothing.)

02

— 183

Factoring clothing into the calculation of heat stress. The wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) Index is a well-established empirical measure for the representation of heat stress to which an individual is exposed. The WBGT is used in commercial, military, sporting and leisure industries to ensure activities are carried out safely by predicting the levels of heat stress a person may experience. This subject has seen increased coverage in the media, with recent events such as the SAS Brecon Beacon heat exhaustion deaths, extreme playing conditions at the Australian Open and Brazilian FIFA World Cup. With the 2016 Rio Olympic Games approaching, and Qatar World Cup under preparation; accurate prediction of heat strain will help reduce incidences of heat related injuries for all involved. The calculation of the WBGT takes into consideration the natural wet bulb temperature (which simulates heat loss through the evaporation of sweat) and globe temperature. The current index assumes that the person exposed to the heat is wearing a standard business suit. However, there has been limited research into how different types of clothing effect the WBGT. Empirically derived clothing adjustment factors (CAFs) have been proposed from lab trials which shift the indicated WBGT but no real-world method has been created to factor in different types of clothing while in the field.

This study, carried out in the Environmental Ergonomics Research Centre, looked to evaluate a method for including clothing in the assessment of heat stress using the WBGT index. Several types of clothing used in conventional industry were tested due to their universal worldwide use, ranging from breathable cotton coveralls to DuPont Tychem garments which offer protection from chemical and biological hazards. Participants carried out exercise in a climate chamber exposed to 35 degree Celsius heat with 50% humidity wearing cotton coveralls (approximating conditions during the cooler months in Qatar where construction of the 2022 World Cup is ongoing). A number of subjective and physiological variables were evaluated including thermal sensation, core body temperature and heart rate. The climate chamber was set just below the WBGT at which safe low metabolic work can be carried out wearing cotton coveralls. In addition to human trials, clothing swatches from garments being tested were put over the natural wet bulb one at a time. The WBGT increased due to the reduced effectiveness of evaporation caused by the various types of clothing. By recording the change in WBGT caused by a swatch, a clothing adjustment factor was created. In lowering WBGT by the CAF measured from a swatch it was hypothesised that the participant would experience a corresponding amount of heat strain when they were wearing clothing manufactured from the same material.


— 184

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

Hannah Rose Shattock

Evaluating the effect of gardening gloves on the dexterity of older users —Details +44 (0) 7588 427 808 hannahshattock1@gmail.com

— Experience '15 Jaguar Land Rover Production Ergonomist — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies — 01 Image showing a participant completing the Perdue Pegboard test whilst wearing a dexterity enabling gardening glove.

01

— 185

The Effect of Gardening Gloves on Dexterity This final year project aimed to investigate if the effects of gardening gloves on dexterity are more prevalent in older people. A Perdue peg board test was used to assess how participants performed using bare hands as a control, and then using two different types of gardening gloves. The Perdue Peg board test is a thirty second test that involves placing as many pins into a pin board as possible. It is a well-established test of fine manual dexterity. An interview was carried out with a garden centre glove representative to identify the bestselling market leader and a glove with properties which aid dexterity, to be used in the study. Two different types of gloves were used to assess whether different glove materials affect performance to different severity levels when carrying out the study.

A questionnaire was used to collect qualitative data regarding the participant’s experience with gardening and if they experience any dexterity issues in their day-to-day life. A wide range of individuals were approached to participate in the study, aged from 18 to 87. This was to ensure that the data collected provided an overall spread of the population and enabled reliable comparisons between age groups to be made. Initially the study aimed to find out if the reduction in dexterity due to using gardening gloves is more prevalent in the older participants compared to the younger participants. Additionally the project also aimed to identify if the gardening glove with dexterous properties does in fact improve dexterity performance compared to the bestselling glove. Finally, the project aimed to reveal to what degree gloves reduce people’s dexterity in comparison to the no-glove control.


— 186

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

Harry Shepherd

Investigating human factors issues inherent with CBRNe technology and PPE usage —Details +44 (0) 7975 875 839 hshepherdergo@gmail.com — Experience '16 Ergonomics Human Factors Course Representative '15 Ergonomics Human Factors Course Representative — 01 One of the emergency vehicles used by the Hazardous Area Response Teams (HART) in response to Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and explosive (CBRNe) events. Lots of technology inside!

01

— 187

Effects of CBRNe-PPE on detection technology effectiveness This project focuses around the rather unique world of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and explosive (CBRNe) events; an emerging topic of increasing importance on both a local and national scale. After the well-publicised terrorist attacks of 7/11 and 9/11, along with a series of lesser known yet still highly dangerous incidents, the need for a program that could minimise the negative impact associated with an event of this kind was slowly being recognised. This idea was eventually converted into reality through the development of rigorous CBRNe response guidelines, all of which were shared among a variety of different organisations working together to maximise damage control and minimise harm to both the public and the environment. These organisations include Hazardous Area Response Teams (HART) and the National Ambulance Resilience Unit (NARU), among others.

linked and vitally important in the success of CBRNe response are the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) worn by the responders, and the detection/diagnosis technologies used by them in the field. Since the main priority of CBRNe response is public safety and damage control, it is of utmost importance that the protective suits serve to completely insulate responders from harm while maintaining their ability to perform essential dextrous tasks such as cannulations. Similarly, due to the immediate and persistent danger posed by the various types of CBRNe agent, the quality of technology used in response situations has to be correspondingly high in a human factors sense. Unfortunately, however, this is not necessarily the case. The PPE, though effective in that it protects the wearer from harm, actually serves to inhibit responder performance in the field which can be considered an unacceptable trade-off. The technology also suffers due to crude design that doesn’t take human factors or ergonomics into sufficient account.

Because CBRNe response is a relatively new discipline, there are still certain aspects of it that can be improved – as is often the case with even the most established of realms. Other related projects are looking at the hierarchical and operational structure of the interconnected organisations, as well as the comparative preparedness of non-CBRNe entities. This project, however, takes the ergonomics approach in a more practical direction. New focus on new organisations brings with it the development of new products. Two things that are inextricably

This project identifies and evaluates a variety of different problems with these products that were encountered through a series of practical and observational sessions, and uses ergonomic principles to make essential design recommendations. It is intended that this work will lead to increased effectiveness of the ground-responders, minimising the damage caused to both the public and the environment, and potentially saving the lives of those unfortunate enough to be caught up in these traumatic events.


— 188

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

Steven Strouvalis

Analysing the advantages and disadvantages of implementing and communicating UX design —Details +44 (0) 7526 224 031 sjstrav@hotmail.co.uk

01

— Experience '15 This Place - Junior UX designer — 01 These images show visual design work which is fundamental to developing high fidelity prototypes that can be pitched and presented to clients. — 02 This image shows a project worked on as part of Loughborough design Jam showing how the UX design approach when implemented successfully can create aesthetically pleasing and user friendly interfaces.

02

— 189

An investigation into the UX design process What is user experience (UX) design and why has it become such a popular approach to interface design? This project aimed at highlighting the extensive range of approaches and issues regarding the implementation of user experience design into the development of websites and applications. Through interviewing experts and analysing the key problems in the design process this research identifies the most popular, and potentially the best, solutions. The research investigates areas such as client and designer conflict which can be fundamental in the development process. Different attitudes and techniques adopted by a range of designers can affect the relationship with the client and the resulting final design. In order to optimise the outcomes in terms of both client objectives and user experience, designers at all stages of the process must adapt and compromise in order to meet objectives desired and needed by all the stakeholders involved. High transaction ecommerce sites and applications are a particular field of design where issues such as this are most evident. Gaining site views, marketing strategies and meeting sales objectives may be perceived as more important

than, for example, the user’s navigation around the site or reducing page complexity. Through the use of qualitative research, the methods of dealing with important issues such as the client, designer relationship can be analysed and evaluated. By interviewing and using questionnaires, experts in the digital design field can give their feedback on how to sell the idea of UX design and how to best implement its techniques into modern web and app design. Many companies are unaware of the benefits that UX design can have on reducing complexity, enhancing the customer experience and improving the accessibility of services. This is as much an informative as an investigative piece of research aimed at raising awareness of the ways to optimise a website or application as well as the constraints that affect the designer’s ability to do so. UX design is becoming more and more popular in interface development because it puts the user first which appeals to both businesses and customers. Identifying the most successful or popular solutions of dealing with common problems in the design process can aid future designers and companies so that they avoid expensive and time wasting learning curves which can make all the difference when working towards deadlines.


— 190

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 191

Craig Thomas

Four independent tests carried out on eight individuals to assess dexterity loss —Details +44 (0) 7429 451 340 craigthomas95@gmail.com

01

— 01 Results from the experiments showed a severe decrease in dexterity when hypoxic and cold conditions were present. — 02 The O’Connor Dexterity Test was used in order to measure decrease in finger manipulation. The participant was required to place as many pins as possible into the board within 60 seconds.

02

Dexterity in Cold and Hypoxic Conditions The purpose of this study was to investigate whether dexterity performance decreases in hypoxic and cold environments separately. It was then to further investigated whether dexterity performance decreases dramatically when tests are carried out in hypoxic and cold conditions together or if a performance plateau is reached that cannot be surpassed. A total of 32 tests were carried out on eight male subjects between 20 and 25 years of age. Measurements of weight, stature and body fat percentage were taken before each test. Accessing the participant’s body fat

percentage was undertaken in anticipation that it could later provide an explanation for differences in skin temperature during experiments and therefore changes in dexterity. During the experiments, skin temperature, forearm strength, Sp02 levels, BPM and a dexterity test were carried out at regular 4 x 10 minute intervals. Results showed that a greater decrease was seen in dexterity and forearm strength when participants were present in cold and hypoxic conditions compared to hypoxic and cold separately.


— 192

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

Johnathan Twigger

How can current guidance be improved to increase safety at train stations? —Details +44 (0) 7814 423 171 jonathantwigger13@gmail.com

— Experience '14 Leicestershire Police Ergonomics Consultant — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

01

— 01 A large crowd of passengers use foot ramps to exit Aintree Station. High attendance events necessitate specific event plans to maintain safety and to properly coordinate resources. — 02 A typical group of passengers waiting to board the Jubilee line at Canary Wharf Station. Understanding passenger demographics is an important aspect of effective planning and crowd management.

02

— 193

Crowd Management at Train Stations In 2014-15, 1.66 billion train passenger journeys were made in Great Britain, with this set to persistently rise with the country’s total population. Given the significant age of much of the UK’s rail infrastructure, it is crucial that suitable guidance is available to ensure that passengers are kept safe in crowding situations. The currently available Rail Safety & Standards Board (RSSB) guidance was published in October 2004 and may not be appropriate for contemporary or future application. The project aimed to produce meaningful insights into the continued suitability of current guidance and to generate possible enhancements for future publications. Three other researchers conducted parallel investigations to maximise data collection and add value to the final report to the RSSB. The objectives established for achieving these aims included reaching out to a full range of stakeholders within the rail industry and developing methodologies to appropriately evaluate the guidance in its current form. Participants were selected using mailing lists from relevant events and with assistance from industry partners. These lists were composed of staff from train operating companies, regulatory bodies, trade unions and emergency services, alongside various academics with crowding experience. Potential participants were then invited to engage with the project. The primary method used was a semi-structured interview schedule. The questions covered personal details, general crowding questions

focused on prior experience, opinions on all sections of the guidance, and overall feedback. These interviews lasted anywhere between twenty minutes and an hour. As part of these interviews, a survey was conducted, centering around the importance of each section within the guidance. Additionally, a case study was performed at the Aintree Grand National horse racing event (pictured). This was valuable to the project as many attendees use Merseyside Rail services to travel to the event. Observations were made of the operator’s crowd management strategy and event plan in action. This primarily served to provide the researcher with more insight into the rail industry and the techniques employed as part of a crowd management strategy. Following the data collection stage, all interviews were transcribed in full from audio recordings. Using template analysis and various other techniques, the participant responses were examined for emerging themes and useful case studies. These findings then revealed the aspects of the guidance that were most in need of updating or further development. From this, informed advice was provided to RSSB for consultation when developing new documents. This research project had far-reaching significance for the rail industry and its users. As a result of improved guidance documentation, operators will be able to plan and respond more effectively to hazardous situations. This will ensure that potentially dangerous incidents are less likely to occur, both at present and in the foreseeable future.


— 194

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

Sam Waters

Applying a human factors approach to the predicted increase in passenger numbers —Details +44 (0) 7772 047 786 sam.waters1@hotmail.com

— Experience '15 Rail Safety and Standards Board Human Factors Specialist '14 Rail Safety and Standards Board Human Factors Specialist

01

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '14 Loughborough Design School Award for Academic Excellence '13 Loughborough Design School Award for Academic Excellence — 01 This project was in collaboration with the Rail Safety and Standards Board. RSSB is a not-forprofit organisation which aims to continuously improve levels of safety in the rail industry. — 02 Parts of the rail network are struggling to cope with the rapidly increasing numbers of passengers. An up-to-date, readily available crowd management guidance document is required to avoid serious incidents.

02

— 195

Crowd management at UK Train Stations Britain’s rail network is becoming increasingly popular. Approximately 1.6 billion passenger journeys were made on the railway network in 2013/2014, and it is expected that usage will double in the next 25 years. At the current high levels, parts of the network are already struggling to cope with these passenger demands, especially at peak times and at big events. Overcrowding is an issue both on-board trains and in rail stations. Station overcrowding can lead to major consequences, both through impacts on passenger safety and commercial loss and guidance has been issued by RSSB to help address the issue. However, following recent incidents of overcrowding at London Bridge station and Twickenham station following a Rugby 2016 World Cup game, there is renewed concern about the issue. There have, however, been examples of successful station crowd management at large scale events such as the London 2012 Olympic Games. Over the duration of the Games it was estimated that 13.6 million extra journeys were made on the transport network in London (Department for Transport, 2012). This suggests that there are existing measures available to improve crowd management. Therefore, Loughborough University worked in collaboration with RSSB to explore current station crowd management techniques. In 2004, RSSB produced a ‘Crowd management at stations guidance’ report. However, the Office of Rail and Road (ORR) recently identified that there was no clear statement of policy on how the industry regulates and manages overcrowding at stations.

There was an obvious need to update the RSSB guidance. Therefore, this project aimed to: 1.

2. 3. 4. 5.

Evaluate the extent to which the guidance set out in previous work on crowd management at stations by RSSB is still relevant and current. Identify areas where guidance could be up-dated and improved. Provide new guidance covering crowd management. Outline possible areas for future research. Identify case studies of successful crowd management to enable learning for future implementation (e.g. London 2012 Olympic Games).

Relevant information was collected through a number of semi-structured interviews. Stakeholders from the rail industry were interviewed, including frontline staff from various train operating companies and Network Rail, e.g. station managers, guards, revenue protection agents and gate line employees. Interviews were also carried out with representatives from the Association of Train Operating Companies (ATOC), British Transport Police (BTP), RSSB, ORR, etc. Away from rail, knowledge and good practice was also gathered through interviews with experts in other industries such as academia, retail, sporting events and other transport sectors. Data on crowding was also gathered from RSSB’s Safety Management Information System (SMIS), the rail industries database for recording safety-related events. Information was then collated and analysed and a report of the findings was produced for RSSB.


— 196

BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 197

Joshua Whitwell

Assessing drivers reactions on the road with a consideration for future technologies —Details +44 (0) 7890 895 989 jwhitwell@hotmail.com

— Experience '13 Hyperion Furniture Ltd Assistant Designer — 01 The aim of the project was to perform a Digital Human Modelling analysis of an existing vehicle design.

Exploring driver distraction and workload in driving tasks Over the years extensive research has been carried out in relation to driver distraction and driver workload. As a result there has been an increase in knowledge of these topic areas, allowing us to explore relationships and better understand influencing and causal factors. Further developments have also been made in areas where less knowledge was available such as driver behavior. Despite this progress there is still much to learn about how drivers are able to respond to their environment, in particular how automation and advancing technology can help or inhibit drivers. This project was to explore driver distraction and workload in carrying out driving tasks, with a consideration for future technologies. Having researched into previous studies there were very few that explored the relationship between these two themes. Therefore the aim of this project was to better understand this relationship in order to pave the way for further knowledge to be gained.

01

The study involved the use of data that had been collected as part of a large scale collaborative project. There were many different institutions around the world that were involved including Loughborough Design School.

A number of different drivers were recorded from four viewpoints driving a prescribed route that extended as far as the Leicester area. These viewpoints consisted of a front and rear view of the road as well as a front and side profile of the driver. It was possible to study the same section of video data across a number of different participants, viewing the data frame by frame. This frame by frame method was used to be able to identify subtle responses from the driver, which would otherwise have been very difficult to pinpoint in real-time. In order to draw valuable conclusions from the video data a taxonomy was developed which helped identify and categorize the drivers’ reactions. Race Technology v8.5 software was used to provide quantitative data with regard to the vehicle. It was also planned for SAMMIE 3D CAD software to be used if necessary to help contribute towards the project as a visual means of evaluation. The impact of this research is to enable further studies to be conducted around driver distraction and workload and to encourage more investigations into how they can impact each other. It may also help to generate further discussion with respect to advanced technology in future cars, as well as the extent to which future designs can correctly consider the user.


— 198

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics Providing an all-encompassing education in design covering everything from traditional workshop skills to the latest digital design software in a purpose built environment.

— 199


— 200

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 201

Chloe King —Details +44 (0) 7846 069 462 chloeking94@live.com

01

04

05

03

Hair straighteners redesigned to encourage safer use

02

— Experience '15 L’Oreal/Garnier Visual Merchandiser — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Research shows that 10% of burns among children are caused by hair straighteners; the product uses thermochromic ink to raise awareness of the temperature of the device once switched off. — 02 Currently, 30% of people throw away WEEE from small electronics products; snap fits have been incorporated for easy access to electronics and a detachable spring for simple disassembly.

— 03 The design undertook rigorous user testing during development and evaluation to assess user interaction, styling and ergonomics. —04 A child’s interactive paintbrush and canvas which encourages young children to explore their surroundings by ‘capturing’ colours they can later use to create pictures. — 05 The wooden canvas stand allows the ‘electronic paintings’ to be displayed or easily stored away when folded.


— 202

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 203

Elliot Kirby —Details +44 (0) 7980 536 687 Elliotjameskirby@gmail.com

01

04

05

03

Learning KS2 programming at school

02

— Experience '14 Urbis Schreder Product Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 The reader/hub connects to a pc which displays the results of the code, the teacher can then set up scenarios on screen for students to program solutions for. — 02 The reader/hub connects to a pc which displays the results of the code, the teacher can then set up scenarios on screen for students to program solutions for. Code-units are moved back and forth in real-time as the computer reads the code and runs it onscreen.

— 03 Code-units assemble into programs by slotting together in continuous bars. —04 Square 1: pocket-sized accounting manager for start-up and small businesses receipts are scanned in and archived allowing financial statistics to be generated. — 05 Auin: hub unit for domestic to studio feedback enabling live shows/events to react to emotions of home viewers and offering opportunities to join the experience as well as observe.


— 204

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 205

Simon Kirby —Details +44 (0) 7780 454 464 simonkirby3@gmail.com

01

03

Implementing breathing control into the coping mechanisms of panic disorder sufferers

02

04

05

— Experience '14 Diageo – Design Innovation Technician '15 Loughborough Design School Course Representative

— 01 The product has two parts: a handheld device for on-the-go use, and a base station for charging / interaction during training sessions.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '14 Diageo Innovation Competition 1st Place

— 02 The aim of the product is to encourage sufferers of panic disorders to implement breathing control into their coping mechanism, reducing the severity and frequency of episodes. — 03 A heart rate monitor provides live feedback of the user’s breathing pattern to the handheld.

—04 Adaptation of an existing pair of headphones for manufacture utilising rapid prototyping techniques. Developed as part of the Computer Aided Manufacturing module. — 05 BT CareHub monitors the location and quality of rest experienced by sufferers of early to midstage dementia. This was a live project set by BT.


— 206

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 207

Kevin Kwok —Details +44 (0) 7956 930 199 kevinkwokyin@hotmail.com

01

04

05

03

Providing an enhanced safety experience for cyclists

02

— 01 Completed render of the frontal stem replacement part. The model was drawn out accurately according to the concept drawing, then texturised to make the product look realistic.

— 03 An additional Bluetooth add-on indicator which can be snug-fitted to the end of the handlebar, or alternatively snap fastened onto an adapter which wraps around the handlebar.

— 02 Frontal stem replacement initial concept. The design was drawn in multiple angles to further understand the product's 3-Dimensional form, making it ready for computer modelling.

—04 The rear device chirps (transmits) and echoes (receives) at ultrasonic frequencies to determine the proximity of the object behind the cyclist, which relays the information to the user-interface in front.

— 05 The rear device also acts as lighting and dazer to alert drivers of the cyclist's presence, where the flash rate is dependent on the proximity of the object detected.


— 208

BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 209

Mattias Law —Details +44 (0) 7850 650 105 mattias_law@hotmail.co.uk behance.net/mattiaslaw 05 01

04

06

03 — Experience '15 Odysseon – UX Design Lead '14 IBM – UX Designer

Improving the cooking experience for the blind and partially sighted 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 An iterative design process was used to develop concepts, which were derived from research and user interviews. Functional prototypes and test rigs were created to test feedback models. — 02 Temperature is adjusted by rotating the pan; haptic, visual and auditory feedback inform the user of their actions. — 03 Concept testing was performed using visual impairment simulation software, simulation glasses and blind or partially sighted individuals.

—04 Product suite that increases intimacy & sexual pleasure for a quadriplegic male and their partner, using data mined from wearable devices. — 05 Ski Instructor Aid that uses GPS functionality to keep track of students in lesson as well as having reliable emergency contact functionality. — 06 Anti-spiking cup prevents substances being added by having a sealed top, which requires special bar equipment to open, while still allowing 360° drinking.


— 210

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 211

Mitchell Leigh —Details +44 (0) 7525 727 417 mitchellhleigh@gmail.com linkedin.com/in/mitchellhleigh

01

03

Sharing ideas in creative workspaces 02

04

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 Pavegen Systems - Creative Designer '15 Therefore Product Design Consultants Design Intern '14 TU Delft - Erasmus Exchange — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 Live Projects Top Ten '14 Ford ‘Re-invent the Wheel’

05

— 01 Content created by employees is represented by pebbles within a central hub and can be contributed to by other colleagues. — 02 Located within communal areas of the workspace, Sandpit allows companies to harness valuable ideas produced by employees. —03 Wireless Bluetooth technology within the pebbles and central hub allows data to be displayed and transferred between computers and the central server.

— 04 A wearable that eases the symptoms of Parkinsons sufferers through the use of cueing techniques. Paired with a central hub, users are able to visualize their freeze cycles. — 05 Using an accelerometer and heart rate monitor, this wearable captures the daily rhythm of users, creating a personalised sound for home entertainment.


— 212

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 213

Hannah Lewis

05

—Details +44 (0) 7792 563 588 hannahgeorginalewis@gmail.com behance.net/hannahgeorgina-lewis

01

03

Supporting multi-sensory connections between long distance relatives 02

04

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '14 Mondelez International Industrial Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 OLFY - Two wirelessly paired handheld devices wobble in synchronisation when motion is detected from either user, a soft glowing light lets them know their loved one is near.

— 04 BUD – A digitally connected community garden providing feedback through plants based upon the activity of its members, as part of a product service supporting residents at risk of rural isolation.

— 02 An ultrasonic diffuser emits a scented mist; the comforting smell of home transitions into a new scent and helps adapt to changing surroundings.

— 05 CARTO – An adventure game to help children learn to safely explore the outdoors without reliance on smart phone navigation, encouraging independence with their personal map printer and NFC compass watch.

—03 Cultural adaptation is encouraged by rewarding users who balance the use of OLFY for comfort while sharing experiences via social media.


— 214

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 215

Troy Linklater —Details +44 (0) 7788 404 749 troylinklater@gmail.com

01

04

05

03

— Experience '14 Bailey Caravans Product Design Engineer

Providing a solution to rolling blackouts in developing countries 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Spark aims to reduce the impact that rolling blackouts have on the lives of those living in developing countries by providing backup lighting and increased control of light usage.

—04 Accuro is a device that uses infrared vein scanning technology to allow for accurate selfneedling. It aims to create an easy transition to home treatment for haemodialysis patients.

— 02 The Spark control panel displays information on rolling blackout schedules, as well as providing control over the energy used by home lighting.

— 05 Customisable cycling helmet allowing users to make use of additive manufacturing techniques to create a helmet personalised to their specific needs.

— 03 The Spark light module contains a reserve battery that allows up to 5 hours of continued light throughout blackouts.


— 216

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 217

Martyn Long —Details +44 (0) 7964 061 728 martynlong93@gmail.com

01

03

A compact, folding wood gas stove

02

04

— Experience '15 Bristan Group – Design Engineer '15 AEG – Freelance Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 The stove was designed and engineered to be efficient, lightweight, compact and easily assembled. The stove’s design was tested and developed throughout the project to optimise the design. — 02 This naturally fueled stove uses a wood gasification process, utilizing two forms of combustion. This creates a highly efficient cooking process that competes with more common non-renewable fuel sources.

— 03 The prototype stove showed perfect wood gasification, creating an efficient cooking process and demonstrating the sucess of design. —04 The Ashley & Co guitar was CNC routed using tool paths created in PTC Creo and finished by hand. — 05 A digital Capture the Flag based game to encourage children to play outside. Part of a 10 day live-project brief from DCA.


— 218

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 219

Elspeth MacLeod —Details +44 (0) 7544 590 701 elliemorag@gmail.com

01

04

05

03

A redesign of the traditional beehive

02

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 Freelance Designer - University of London '15 Freelance Designer - The Overworld '15 Freelance Designer - Seymourpowell '14 3D Branding and Packaging Intern Seymourpowell '14 Tin Horse - Design Intern

— 01 The hive’s accompanying app allows users to track the health of their bees by monitoring temperature, humidity, and acoustics.

—04 Helping ASD sufferers understand and manage their emotions by using biometric data to create a personalised gaming environment.

— 02 Designed with the welfare of the colony in mind, an integrated extraction system allows users to harvest small quantities of honey for personal consumption.

— 05 A design research dissertation exploring the effectiveness of biomimetic armour systems developed and tested using finite element analysis.

— 03 This self-sustaining solution requires minimal interaction, reducing disruption to the colony and creating a more natural environment for the bees.


— 220

BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics

Amil Malik —Details amiljmalik@gmail.com

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 221

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 Into the Wood - Graphic Design Intern '14 Prod Designs - Lead Designer '13 CWD - Product Design Intern

— 01 A notification is sent to the carer’s app after 30 minutes if the tray containing the hot meal is not removed from the base unit after being ejected.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '14 Design School Prize for Academic Excellence

— 02 Connected kitchen appliance combining automated induction cooling and cooking, providing people living with dementia a daily hot meal, while giving carers peace of mind.

— 03 Portable pressure pad secured to the pool wall uses embedded cameras to assist in accurately identifying and informing issues with technique, promoting increased efficiency and decreased opportunity for injury. — 04 User testing of the waterproof prototype by a member of the ‘Loughborough 1st Swim Team’, evaluating suction cup performance and UI functionality within a dynamic training environment.

01

04

Providing live visual feedback for swim technique analysis 02

03


— 222

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 223

David Martin

Encouraging recycling and demonstrating it’s benefits within the education system

—Details +44 (0) 7762 213 898 david_l_martin@hotmail.com

01

05

06

02

— Experience '15 Study Abroad - METU '15 Study Abroad - TU Delft — Awards '16 Diploma in International Studies

03

04

— 01 A full body dryer for people with physically disabling conditions who want to preserve their independence at home. Unlike other body dryers Cirrus allows comfortable, seated drying.

—04 Physical movement triggers the smartphone’s tilt sensors and transmits the GPS location. Fitness and other statistics are monitored by DigiHunt and improvements are rewarded with special abilities.

— 02 Ergonomic redesign of the power button using 3D scan data for shape and size reference.

— 05 Bottle caps are inserted for grinding; ground plastic is melted and injected into custom moulds. Produced items serve as lasting recycling reminders.

— 03 A wearable GPS tracker that facilitates playing games like hide and seek with exciting digital elements; encouraging the younger generation to play outside and exercise more.

— 06 The life cycle of plastic waste is communicated through a display wheel, which turns by one increment when a bottle cap is inserted.


— 224

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 225

James Martin —Details +44 (0) 7549878410 jmartin1994@btinternet.com

04

01

A grab and go, all in one granola bar maker 03

— 01 2014 Student Starpack Awards: a highly innovative packaging solution for premium fishcakes with a strong Norwegian identity, that will stand out on the store shelf. — 02 Kleiner is the go-anywhere, musical bicycle accessory with an octave of keys. When individual pegs, spaced along the spokes hit the keys a tune is played.

02

— 03 With packaging that can turn into a tray, granola bars can be created with no mess and no additional utensils needed. — 04 An easy to use mixing kit that allows children to enjoy the experience of making a healthy snack alternative.


— 226

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 227

Hayley Maynard —Details +44 (0) 7789 913 900 hmaynard@hotmail.co.uk

01

04

05

03

Creating artisan charcuterie in the home 02

— Experience '15 Plexi-Craft, New York – Furniture Designer '15 AnTech – Student Design Engineer '15 Loughborough Design School Course Representative '14 Abdoolally Ebrahim Group Freelance Product Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 James Dyson Foundation Bursary '14 Group UX Project Shortlisted by O2

— 01 Development sketches exploring the design and its features. — 02 Allows anyone to create artisan charcuterie at home, simply by curing, drying and cold smoking. Create your own Parma ham or bacon from the comfort of your kitchen. — 03 Functional prototype using analogue and digital electronics with physical components created in the workshop, allowed evaluation and testing of the entire user experience.

—04 The ‘Modern Milkman’ allows rural communities to flourish, by removing the barrier of pasteurisation and integrating farmers into their communities. Shortlisted for entry into the RSA awards. — 05 The Ellis Table is part of the luxury acrylic furniture collection, designed for Plexi-Craft whilst on industrial placement. The collection is currently on sale in showrooms across the US. Image used with permission.


— 228

BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 229

Michael McCormack

—Details +44 (0) 7769 645695 mamccormack@me.com

04

Motivating sedentary office workers to improve their posture and be more active

01

03

— Experience '15 ConvaTec – Design Ergonomist '14 Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Bespoke Design Intern '13 Magellan Aerospace Design Engineer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

02

— 01 Golf Aide, a handheld golf GPS device that incorporates a removable video camera, allowing the user to perform golf swing analysis leading to increased performance.

— 03 A desktop device that identifies posture and sedentary activity, and alerts the user to the need for behavioral change by discs moving into a misaligned shape.

— 02 MagPlug, a product solution to cater for the increased demand for plug sockets, whilst offering a more pleasing design and improved user experience than conventional extension leads.

— 04 The system incorporates an additional smartphone application, providing the office worker with a collective health rating throughout the day, enabling co-workers to compete against each other for incentives.


— 230

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 231

Hannah McDermid

—Details +44 (0) 7901 228 901 hjmcdermid28@gmail.com

05 01

04

06

03

Kinetic lamp promoting a natural wind down before sleep 02

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '14 Design 4 Retail – Design Intern '11 Herman Miller – Work Experience '09 Bettys and Taylors –Work Experience — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Not winding down before bed is known to cause poor sleep. The swinging pendulum reduces cognitive arousal, preparing the body for sleep. — 02 The user sets an approximate run time and initiates the pendulum swing; a magnet and coil circuit continues the pendulum swing. — 03 Minimalistic details with natural materials and colours enhance visual relaxation. The soft light fades in synchronisation with the pendulum stopping, creating a satisfying conclusion.

—04 Digio encourages the self management of arthritis through the gamification of hand exercises with a soothing heat reward. Selected for entry to the RSA Student Design Awards. — 05 Story Sense: designed to encourage story telling amongst children through sensory stimulation from a variety of outputs. — 06 Minimal controls help the child to concentrate on story creation. The large central button motivates due to anticipation of unknown sensory outputs.


— 232

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 233

Robert McMahon

—Details +44 (0) 7807 174 949 robertmcmahon11@icloud.com

01

04

05

03

Fire extinguisher for light aircraft cabins 02

— Experience '15 EXTREME – Junior Creative Designer '14 Imagination – Creative Design Intern '13 Consero London – Design Intern

— 01 Detailed and exploded view of all the components and internal parts (screws and other attachments have been excluded).

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 02 The hand-held component clips onto the pilot’s seat belt, providing easy access in the case of an emergency whilst not impeding general flight. — 03 A two-finger trigger allows for controlled aim when dispersing the contents of the extinguisher. The safety pin adheres to regulations and should be tested during pre-flight checks.

—04 An outdoor projector that encourages generation Z to be more involved with the outdoors by playing interactive games that can be pre-loaded onto the projector. — 05 A portable cooker designed with the Shimano brand essence in mind.


— 234

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 235

Luc Meziani —Details +44 (0) 7856 701 375 luc.meziani@live.co.uk

01

04

05

03

Sleeping aid for insomniacs that uses cognitive behavioural therapy 02

— Experience '15 Martin Audio London Speaker assembler

— 01 The app encourages exercise to improve the user's sleep hygiene, while the alarm works by increasing the bulb's brightness to ease the user out of their lightest sleep cycle stage. — 02 The light guides the user's breathing by glowing and dimming to a 4-7-8 second breathing exercise. This cognitive behavioural therapy removes the need to take disruptive sleeping pills.

— 03 The product distracts the user from ruminating (thoughts, worries and anxieties) by easing them into a state of relaxation. —04 Body cleaner for Alzheimers sufferers, which removes the need for showering or bathing by combining soap and massage treatments on the skin. — 05 A remote control tank, built and coded to be controlled by iPhone.


— 236

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 237

Shailen Mistry —Details +44 (0) 7954 484 073 shailenmistry94@gmail.com

01

03

Preserving taste and prolonging the life of ripened fruit

04

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 The LEGO Group Product Design Intern '14 PrintME 3D – 3D Designer and Technical Support '14 John Ewans Design Junior Product Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '13 Diageo Innovation Competition Finalist

02

05

— 01 Around 50% of total UK food waste comes from our homes; 27% of this food waste is made up of fruit and vegetables. — 02 Once certain fruits are ripe they should be stored at a cooler temperature, however refrigeration temperatures are not always ideal and can spoil the taste. — 03 A sensor detects ethylene gas concentration, emitted by ripening fruit. Above a given level the fruit is cooled, reducing the rate of decay.

—04 DCA Live Project 2016: twenty20 encourages “Generation Z” teenagers to travel, explore, capture and collect the physical world. The device uses Zink technology to print augmented reality images. — 05 BuzzHub is an app for university students. Buzzhub eases the user’s process of finding side projects which best utilises their skillset. A prototype was created using Axure RP.


— 238

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 239

Tamara Moon —Details +44 (0) 7901 665 236 tamara.moon94@googlemail.com

01

04

05

03

Using traditional methods to make coconut oil in the home

02

— Experience '15 Infineon Technologies – Munich '15 Vodafone Milano - Milan — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '12 Bluecoats Lever’s Art Award

— 01 The functional Coconut Oil machine in use. — 02 The Coconut Oil maker combines the different processes of the traditional wet-mill method to create an efficient product for home use. — 03 This device produces coconut oil and creates useful by-products including coconut milk and flour.

—04 An injection moulded tool was fabricated in the workshops in order to produce a plastic pencil sharpener designed for mass manufacture. — 05 My ability and passion for working with machinery in the fabrication and metal workshops.


— 240

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 241

George Moone —Details +44 (0) 7825 742 098 georgemoone@live.co.uk linkedin.com/in/georgemoone

01

03

Improving prosthetic adoption following upper limb amputation 02

04

05

— Experience '15 Fast Food Systems – Product Designer '15 3D Systems – Design Engineer '13 Jaguar Land Rover – Material Engineer '13 Duncan Lynch Precision Engineering Ltd Machining Engineer

— 01 MyOrb is a fun, engaging training aid for upper limb amputees. Used before and after acquiring a prosthetic to reduce the adjustment period and improve proficiency in prosthetic control.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 James Dyson Foundation Bursary '15 e-NABLE Brand Redesign - 1st Place '14 Diageo Guinness Innovation Competition 1st Place '13 Jaguar Land Rover: New Life from Old 1st Place

— 02 Early muscular control training, following upper limb amputation, is critical to successful prosthetic adoption. However currently 75% of upper limb amputees are dissatisfied with the level of rehabilitation offered.

— 03 Controlled via a myoelectric muscle sensor armband, MyOrb offsets its centre of gravity causing it to lean and steer, creating a fun, multi- player, coaching experience in the home. —04 TAG is a smart rugby belt which uses contactless technology to encourage traditional playtime games to be played after school and be fair, safe and fun. DCA Live Project 2016 — 05 Reverse-engineered PS3 controller designed to exploit 3D-scanning and AM technologies.


— 242

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 243

Emma Morris —Details +44 (0) 7847 415 054 emmamorris101@gmail.com

01

04

05

03

Mechanical sewing machine for women in rural Africa

02

— Experience '13 Centurion Electronics PLC Product Design Placement '15 Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology Product Design Intern — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 A durable and compact sewing machine designed to address the lack of power provision. The machine is powered by a foot pedal enabling two hands to be free whilst sewing. — 02 The design incorporates task lights powered by a dynamo circuit and a collapsible foot pedal for storage. The flywheel is packed with dry sand and assembled at the destination.

— 03 Functional prototype demonstrating a modified hand crank sewing machine connected to the foot pedal by a bike brake cable. —04 A CAD model of an iron with an incorporated custom grip for arthritic users. Visuals generated using advanced surface modelling techniques and scan data within PTC Creo. — 05 Electro-mechanical can crusher device able to crush and dispense 5 cans consecutively run by an embedded electronics system of three.


— 244

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 245

Rosie Nevins —Details +44 (0) 7467 228 669 rosie.nevins@hotmail.com

01

04

05

03

— Experience '14 Kinneir Dufort Assistant Industrial Designer

Facilitating tactile play between parent and child when separated by distance 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Tactile and playful communication for 2-6 year olds, offering a more suitable way for parents digitally communicate with their children. — 02 The doll provides a platform for tactile experimentation. Vibration patterns form a tactile language that parent and child can learn and interpret to create meaningful interaction experiences. — 03 A light-up egg is a visual indicator for received messages; it also acts as a night-light, displaying the parent’s presence for extra comfort.

—04 Zemi transforms an indoor environment into one ideal for meditation through lighting, aroma and sound. The features have been influenced by traditional meditation techniques to provide an authentic, uplifting experience. — 05 A smart home assistant, with personality. Sisa allows for smart devices to be controlled seamlessly via voice command. Watch her evolve as she learns her owner’s personality and habits.


— 246

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Olivia Newall

01

—Details +44 (0) 7851 294 690 olivia_newall@hotmail.co.uk

Loughborough Design School

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 Unilever Junior Packaging Designer '13 Centurion Electronics PLC Industrial Design Intern '13 Paul Stott Design Ltd. Industrial Design Intern — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 247

— 01 The project involved electronics prototyping in order to deliver high accuracy motion sensing and corresponding levels of feedback. Functional prototyping facilitated the design of customisable features to encourage long-term wearability. — 02 A device to assist knee hypermobility sufferers with management of their condition. A connected wearable and app alert the user when hyperextension occurs, indicating its degree of severity.

— 03 With increased awareness and reminders, the user is encouraged to keep the joint within a healthy range of motion, aiding restabilisation. —04 A suite of connected gaming devices that mine data from wearable technology, utilising the user’s environment to create a seamless and interactive gaming experience. — 05 App designed as part of an integrated product and service to facilitate the learning of crafts for asylum seekers whilst unable to work.

05 03

Improving postural alignment via the knee for hypermobility sufferers 02

04


— 248

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 249

Raymond Ng —Details +44 (0) 7763 062 772 raymondngdesign@gmail.com

05 01

04

06

03 — Experience '14 Philex Electronic – Product Designer '14 Freelance Designer

Re-imagining viewing experiences in small environments 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Apps and mobile content increasingly drive media consumption, habitualising non-social behavior and attachment to portable screens.

—04 Modular product suite enabling finer control of heat, pressure and filtration settings to manage how water affects the skin for eczema sufferers.

— 02 The product aims to shift media and video content viewership from small devices to large expansive experiences; challenging the status quo of modern culture, socialising and entertainment.

— 05 Reverse engineered computer mouse modelled using complex surface geometry to achieve G2 continuity where possible.

— 03 Portable, variable throw projection enables use in a range of locations, whether working at a desk or enjoying a film night with friends.

— 06 Football boot optimized for consumer customization via additive manufacturing. Interchangeable soleplates and custom uppers to suit performance and comfort preferences.


— 250

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 251

Jonathan Oakes —Details +44 (0) 7983 614 056 jonathanoakes@hotmail.com

01

04

05

03

A fast and safe way of identifying allergens within food

02

— Experience '14 Kerry Foods Packaging Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Juvo, is a fast, reliable and safe way for food allergy sufferers to identify allergens within the food they eat. — 02 Near infrared spectroscopy enables Juvo to identify harmful allergens in seconds, whether on the move or in the home. — 03 Analysis of a meal is performed in a non-contact manner, as multiple ingredients are scanned simultaneously in one swift motion.

—04 Socius is a living aid that improves how people with dementia interpret the environment around them, by optimising their ability to see and understand objects. — 05 Thermometers beneath the screen alert the user to potential risks such as a hot drink, whilst colour sensors automatically adjust the screen to create contrast between the device and objects placed on it.


— 252

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 253

Ayesha Parmar —Details +44 (0) 7557 943 101 ayeshapriya@btinternet.com

01

04

05

03

Reducing the risk of rape for women in rural India

02

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 Redd Europe Ltd – Junior Creative Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Every 20 seconds a woman is raped in India. Women in rural India are forced to defecate in open fields where they are vulnerable to male predators. — 02 Sahi is a low cost, sustainable sanitation solution to help women and girls lead safer lives. — 03 The design is a sanitation solution for rural India, independent of the sewage system. Sahi allows women to dispose of waste safely during the day.

—04 Vitalise is a product range to enhance a healthy cooking experience through wearable technology and smart devices. The range aims to create a valuable home experience for generation Z. — 05 Why don’t we only own one pair of shoes? – A research dissertation investigating footwear and emotion.


— 254

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

Jack Pearson

— Experience '15 NPF Bassetts Pole - Graphic Designer '14 New Dawn Innovations (VQ, Lava, Lenco) - Product Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 Superyacht UK Young Designer Finalist '15 Design the Future University of Twente (2 ECTS)

—Details +44 (0) 7849 233 234 pearsonj.uk@gmail.com jackpearson.uk

— 255

— 01 Focus is a modular camera designed with interchangeable components building on the growth of home 3D printing to allow the user to modify the camera for their specific requirements

— 03 The rechargeable hand-held device uses ultrasound to detach the ice layer from the glass, increasing the efficiency of the task and allowing for a clear view while driving.

— 02 A selection of projects undertaken on industrial placement at New Dawn Innovations (VQ, Lava, Lenco) including graphic, product and promotional design work for the consumer electronics brand VQ. Image used with permission.

— 04 Syncing with the owner’s phone alerts through NFC, the device automatically senses and de-ices the windscreen of the car so it is ready when needed.

01

04

Improving the efficiency of de-icing car windows using ultrasonic technology 02

03


— 256

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 257

Henry Prout —Details +44 (0) 7823 533 778 henry@prout.co

01

03

Reducing the risk of hypothermia in maritime emergencies 02

04

— Experience '15 Depuy Synthes - Industrial Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 James Dyson Foundation Bursary

05

— 01 A buoyancy device to significantly extend survival times of users exposed to the secondary risk of severe hypothermia from long term cold water immersion. — 02 The ergonomic, lightweight wearable product raises the sailor out of the water and provides its own active heating system — 03 The device activates automatically when immersed but also features manual triggers.

—04 Reverse engineered electric shaver redesigned for additive manufacture to reduce the number parts and streamline assembly. Modelled in PTC Creo 3.0 using class-A surfacing and rendered in in Keyshot 5. — 05 A “Smart Scale” as part of a suite of interactive kitchenware products which help to enhance the user’s cooking experience through the Internet of Things.


— 258

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 259

Priya Rai —Details +44 (0) 7808 794 312 priya.k.rai@outlook.com

01

04

05

03

— Experience '15 Valley CPI – Creative Designer

Encouraging everyday consumption of breakfast

02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Skipping breakfast on a regular basis can lead to major health issues, yet this vital meal is not always prioritised within the morning routine. — 02 The product uses ultrasonic diffusion in order to emit invigorating scents prior to the users alarm sounding. The aroma acts as a reminder to the user to consume breakfast. — 03 Every aspect of the design has been developed and prototyped, with user testing and evaluation ensuring the functionality meets all user needs.

—04 Stori is an interactive toy which prompts story telling for children in order to encourage face-to-face interaction, and improve cognitive development and communication skills. — 05 The docking station establishes a WIFI connection which allows the child to communicate through asymmetric encryption technology providing audio responses.


— 260

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 261

Oliver Ramirez —Details +44 (0) 7702 472 339 oliverhramirez@gmail.com

01

04

05

03

Poseable creative task light with smart lighting features and dynamic control 02

— Experience '15 En Route – Graphics & Packaging Designer '14 En Route – Graphics & Packaging Designer '13 Gulf News – Creative Assistant '12 RWJ Consultants Primary Research Assistant — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Custom designed PCB with IoT-enabled functionality provides intuitive web or app-based control. — 02 Poseable task light with a balanced arm mechanism, user customizable/ saveable lighting profiles, and internet location data adjust the light according to the time of day. — 03 Companion app allows customization of light properties such as colour, brightness and intensity.

—04 Hub and armbands that translate the electrical impulses in your forearm muscles into accurate hand movements and gestures for use in a home VR setup. — 05 An ergonomic and active tremor reducing paint brush to be used by Parkinsons sufferers going to Art Therapy sessions.


— 262

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 263

Sarah Reed —Details +44 (0) 7771 962 715 info@sarahjaynereed.com sarahjaynereed.com 05 01

04

06

03 — Experience '15 Unique Secure - Product Designer

Female specific self-inflating life jacket 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Accessories designed to integrate within life jacket, aiding the recovery of the user in an emergency situation. — 02 Life jacket designed specifically for the female form, improving the user experience and thus encouraging its use in required situations. — 03 Life jacket in its deployed (inflated) state. Project sponsored by International Safety Products Limited. All images used with permission.

—04 Suite of three products utilizing data mined from wearable technology: heated yoga mat controlled by user’s body temperature and aroma speaker by user’s heart rate. — 05 Self-pouring water reservoir; pours an appropriate amount of water post exercise based on data from a sweat monitor. — 06 ’in take’: insulin applicator designed for 16-25 year olds; enables the inhalation of insulin in powder form rather than injecting to injecting.


— 264

2016

Loughborough Design School

A global reputation for research, teaching, and enterprise.

— 265


— 266

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 267

Hannah Revie —Details +44 (0) 7813 492 590 hannahrevie@gmail.com

01 05

04 03

Poolside performance analysis

02

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '14 V2 Studios / V2 Toys / Vitamin - Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 A poolside system providing water polo teams with performance analysis data. Paired with an app, individual and team data can be viewed in real-time.

—04 A suite of products to capture emotional and biometric data to create personalised recipes and tailored shopping lists, improving the user’s psychological and physiological wellbeing.

— 02 Individual and team fitness is tracked by monitoring heart rate, distance and speed.

— 05 A 3D scanner to aid inexperienced makers. Using the thermo-polymer and touchscreen interface, users can mould their designs, assign materials, and track their projects.

— 03 Low energy Bluetooth allows positional tracking throughout training and gameplay; information is transmitted to poolside and overlaid with footage for real-time analysis.


— 268

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 269

Megan Richmond

—Details +44 7970 743 238 megrichmond@live.co.uk

01

03

A sculptural installation to visually document wellbeing progress 02

04

— Experience '15 Cath Kidston Store Design & Visual Merchandising '14 Turn Key - Creative Marketing — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 Nominated for Student Placement Award

05

— 01 A tactile journal to encourage wellbeing activities, as proposed by the charity ‘Action for Happiness’. By mapping successes, users create visual representations of their progress. — 02 Layers of information on twelve wall-mounted panels encourage continual user interaction within the home environment. —03 Coloured pieces of yarn represent days and are secured by pegs, semantically identifying related activities while remaining ambiguous to non-users.

— 04 Abili-TEA offers a pleasurable tea-making experience to stimulate safe drinking practice for Dysphagia sufferers. Liquid modification and a variety of lid attachments aid in the users independent swallowing development. — 05 SMILE TILE encourages ‘Generation Z’ to actively engage with their surroundings. Competitive collection and distribution of personalised tiles symbolise places they have explored and people they have crossed paths with.


— 270

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 271

Michael Rizzo —Details +44 (0) 7428 564 529 mike-rizzo@live.co.uk

01

03

Encouraging proactive diabetes management via a discreet, wearable device

02

04

— Experience '15 Troax Lee Manufacturing Ltd Design Engineer Coordinator — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 Using emerging, near-infrared technology, real-time readings of blood glucose are monitored continuously, offering a truly non-invasive solution. — 02 The device features the ability to record carbohydrate intake which is factored into the suggested insulin dosage, reducing human error.

— 03 A visual simulation was developed to evaluate effectiveness based on user interaction with automated functionality. —04 Reverse engineered CAD model of a Nerf blaster, modified and optimized for additive manufacturing, utilizing advanced surface modelling techniques to achieve G2 continuity. — 05 Electromechanical can crusher designed and fabricated as a team to store, crush and eject five 330ml or 440ml cans.


— 272

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 273

James Robertson

05

—Details +44 (0) 7541 832 031 james@jrobertsondesign.com jrobertsondesign.com

01

06

04 03

Encouraging engagement with interactive electronics 02

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 Fiveorsix – Junior Designer '13 AEHL Homeware, Hong Kong Freelance Designer

— 01 Ike: An all-in-one circuit construction kit to create project based circuits, accompanied by a booklet of examples to expand a student’s knowledge prior to higher education learning.

—04 Tint: a holographic projector to encourage Generation Z to unplug themselves from what’s virtual, and explore the physical through interactive stories

— Awards '16 Diploma of Professional Studies '13 Diageo Experience Competition Finalist '12 Alex Watson Design Award

— 02 Current products do not enable the understanding of the fundamentals of circuitry.

— 05 Buzzhub: A digital platform in which students, can initiate and manage short term collaborative business projects.

— 03 Ike encourages students to take a more practical approach to learning electronics, whilst aiding the teacher to convey circuit theory by eliminating circuit translation confusion.

— 06 Dissertation investigating how user experience design and technology can enhance the end-to-end journey of road users in rural areas.


— 274

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 275

Michael Rudak —Details +44 (0) 7891 980 976 michaelenzorudak@gmail.com

01

03

A build-ityourself alarm clock designed to teach users transferable repair skills 02

04

— Experience '13 Abdoolally Ebrahim Housewares Freelance Designer '14 Ape – Design Thinker — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 We live in a Throwaway Society where few people know how to repair their own items anymore. Reperio is aimed at consumers with very limited experience in this area. — 02 Reperio is designed to look like an ‘off-the-shelf’ product the user would be proud to showcase, eliminating the stereotype that build-it-yourself kits need to look DIY.

— 03 Detailed but intuitive instructions are provided to teach users about materials, joining methods, electronics, repair, disassembly and disposal. —04 Compact amplifier for buskers; takes advantage of additive manufacturing technologies enabling users to print equipment bespoke holsters to attach to the back panel. — 05 Injection mould tool designed for a constructible, promotional children’s mouse.


— 276

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 277

Josef Rusiecki —Details +44 7860 647 372 josefrusiecki@gmail.com

01

03

Facilitating the domestic production of fresh coffee grounds 02

04

— Experience '15 5or6 - Junior Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '13 Diageo Innovation Finalist

05

— 01 Aria enables the effective roasting, storing and grinding of coffee beans in the home, facilitating production of the freshest coffee attainable. — 02 Materials are specifically selected to encourage the gradual staining of surfaces. Combined with tactile interaction, the product nurtures a more sustainable product-user interaction. — 03 Functional prototype to demonstrate the fluidbed roaster, incorporating electronic controls and key components suggested in the roaster.

—04 Buzz Hub provides a platform in which students, supported by their Universities Enterprise Centre, can initiate and manage short term business projects which collaboratively utilise the skills of fellow students. — 05 BeThink is a system of connected devices designed to aid sufferers of mild dementia. BeThink enables users to correctly medicate and organise schedules, alongside communicate with family and medical support.


— 278

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

Mizuki Sasaki

— Experience '14 The Walt Disney Company DCP Softlines Intern for Emerging Markets — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 279

— 01 Dream Inside is a scanner and storybook printer to encourage children of Generation X to let their imagination run wild and create their own stories from scratch. — 02 Tableware items designed whilst on industrial placement, included into the Mickey Breakfast collection for a Disney Lifestyle event held at Somerset House, 2015. Image © Disney

—Details +44 (0) 7956 218 468 mizuki.sasaki@hotmail.com

— 03 A grocery trolley to fit the “often but little” shopping trend and suited to meet the needs of female city workers. — 04 The trolley includes a separate compartment in which users can store their work or travel shoes, thus preventing the groceries from becoming contaminated.

01

04

A modernised shopping trolley for the female city dweller 02

03


— 280

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 281

Kai Saunders —Details +44 (0) 7936 350 864 kaisaunders.designer@gmail.com

01

03

From Grain to Glass exploring what’s possible in home brewing as a craft 02

04

05

— Experience '15 DCA Design International Industrial Designer '14 Starburst Creative Freelance Illustrator

— 01 The current food and drink revolution brought on by localism, natural ingredients and artisanal methods, has been reinventing beer and the processes used to make it.

—03 Encompassing traditional all-grain brewing techniques found in large breweries, consumers are able to brew a wide variety of beer types, creating new opportunities for experimentation with flavour.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '14 Loughborough Design School Prize for Academic Excellence

— 02 Beers, and the consumers who drink them, are moving away from past stereotypes. The rapid expansion of the craft beer market has also seen the emergence of a new creativity amongst home brewers.

— 04 An in-home, centre-piece experience where the design celebrates the experimental nature of the craft and draws its inspiration from both historical and cultural influences. — 05 A selection of development sketches exploring form, colour, material and finish.


— 282

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 283

Louise Scott —Details +44 (0) 7975 841 677 louisescott.5@gmail.com

01

04

05

03

Improving the start-up and maintenance of beginner aquariums 02

— Experience '14 DIAM International - Development Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Poor water quality during early stages is the most common cause of death for fish in small domestic aquariums, with insufficient cycling resulting in high levels of ammonia. — 02 Improving the reliability and frequency of water tests and changes, optical sensors continually monitor ammonia levels in the tank indicating to the user when intervention is required. Precalculated water changes can be adopted saving time and reducing mess when in operation.

— 03 Electronic prototyping of the feedback system demonstrating control over lighting, heating, water changes and testing. —04 Dandle smart pet is a preparatory life skills teaching aid for children, encouraging parents and carers to prepare children for dealing with injuries and problems when playing outdoors unsupervised. — 05 Quick sketch ideation exploring physical form for a hand-held gardening plot planning device.


— 284

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 285

Alexander Shayle

—Details +44 (0) 7540 940 580 alexandershayle@gmail.com behance.net/alexandershayle

01

03

Creating comfortable micro space living by addressing the home environment 02

04

— Experience '15 Studio Make Believe – Junior Designer '14 Ted Baker – Intern '14 Pipsqueak Developments – Intern '14 Studio Make Believe – Junior Designer

05

— 01 Concept development for the air purifier and pod. — 02 The air purifier quickly removes indoor air pollution to create a healthy home environment, and also charges and stores the removable pod. —03 The pod houses a colour changing light system and a removable speaker, allowing the user to create a holistic home environment.

— 04 Concept sketches and foam models for a knife skill training system that uses augmented reality and built in sensors such as MEMS gyroscopes to teach aspiring cooks at home. — 05 Final renders for the Praxis knife skill training system showing the modular knife, pressure sensitive smart chopping board and knife blade storage block.


— 286

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 287

Freddie Silvester —Details +44 (0) 7763 862 888 a.f.silvester@hotmail.com

05 01

06

04 03

Automated cooking system for busy individuals 02

— Experience '14 Calomax – Design Assistant (Intern) '14 Lockheed Martin – Systems Engineer (Summer Intern)

— 01 User testing was conducted to refine the design using a dimensionally correct rig, in which the cooking process could be simulated.

—04 A universal can crushing device, capable of generating forces up to 2000N. Powered by a 12V DC motor, and programmed in C.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 02 A cooking product which allows users to boil and fry food without human interaction, allowing them to complete other tasks. The device also features a sauce dispenser for maximum variety.

— 05 An augmented reality projector, to encourage Generation Z to re-engage with the outside by enabling real world data to be manipulated like digital content.

— 03 Electronic prototype, built and programmed in Arduino, was used to evaluate the user process.

— 06 A redesign of the Glade air freshener with a reduced carbon footprint through the use of recycled plastics.


— 288

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

Forrest Skerman-Stevenson

—Details +44 (0) 7722 623 362 forrest.skermanstevenson@gmail.com behance.net/Forrest_

01

03

04

— Experience '16 Isolana London - Founder '15 Pavegen Systems Ltd - Industrial Designer '12 Wieden and Kennedy - Creative

Modular power supply for refugee camps 02

— 289

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 A low cost solution to providing off grid power in refugee camps. Featuring an adjustable solar module, motion sensitive alarm set-up and a compact, durable design. — 02 A plug-and-play power ouput, utilising modules including street lighting and phone charging, provides adaptation to a camp’s changing needs. —03 A quick release mobility system enables fast deployment at required locations. Modular parts facilitate easier transportation and repair.

— 04 Knee osteoarthritis support using interchangeable modules to apply assistive heat, vibration and cooling treatment, reducing pain whilst exercising and encouraging a more active lifestyle.

— 05 Extreme terrain cooking device enabling skiers to enjoy a nutritious hot meal whilst embarking on backcountry expeditions.


— 290

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 291

Adam Spencer —Details +44 (0) 7758 549 007 adamlspencer22@gmail.com

01

03

Thermal and massage therapy for rheumatoid arthritis sufferers

02

04

05

— Experience '14 New Dawn Innovations (View Quest, Lava, Lenco UK) Product Designer

— 01 Sleek and minimalistic styling create a discreet desirable solution that avoids the stigma often associated with the design of disability devices.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 02 Electronic heaters and vibrating motors within padded memory foam provide thermal and massage therapy to alleviate the painful symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. —03 An intuitive visual interface enables quick setup and convenient selection of heat zones, temperature and variable massage settings.

— 04 An innovative redesign to supply COPD sufferers with oxygen therapy and improve their independence. Oxygen technology integrated within a motorised storage unit that maintains proximity with users via infrared scanning. — 05 A handheld console for car diagnostics and maintenance. Pre-installed data from registered car manufacturers enables mechanics to swiftly detect faults and complete vehicle repairs.


— 292

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 293

Ben Sully —Details +44 (0) 7542 572 789 bensully-design@live.com bensully-design.co.uk

01

03

Giving a voice to those who cannot speak

02

04

— Experience '14 Howdens Joinery – Design Assistant — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 An electronic prototype was produced to prove that the device can be created and to also test the accuracy of detection.

—04 Live Project: Scented Candle 3D Printer enabling customisation and personalisation within the home.

— 02 Ergonomic prototypes were created to test on various volunteers to determine any initial issues that required further development.

— 05 Design for Manufacturing: Megabloks Mouse Plastic injection molding tool design for a promotional product.

— 03 Aimed at people with communication difficulties, this device allows communication via the detection and interpretation of muscle movements in the throat.


— 294

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 295

Alex Tarquini —Details +44 (0) 7928 423 223 alextarquini@msn.com

01

03

Improving the user experience of long term oxygen therapy

02

04

— Experience '14 Realise Design – Product Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 Respo is a removable regulator for oxygen cylinders, which is controllable via the patient’s mobile device and aims to remove the unsafe use of current products. — 02 Respo challenges the stigma attached to longterm oxygen therapy with aesthetics that are more appropriate to a home environment. — 03 An integrated app allows health professionals to monitor the patient and set goals for recovery, as well as advising in ambulatory situations.

—04 Amba is a firefighters helmet with haptic feedback pads that vibrate according to the proximity of sound in the external environment, optimising firefighters awareness when in scenarios of poor visibility. — 05 Quill is an art tool for arthritic users that can be customised to the ergonomics of the individual, foreseeing the possible benefits of additive manufacturing within the home.


— 296

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 297

Callum Tongue —Details +44 (0) 7896 764 496 callum_tongue@hotmail.com

01

03

04

Assisting wheelchair users with the care of young children around the home 02

— Experience '14 RGK Wheelchairs - CAD Engineer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 Optional deployable support wheel which can be folded away when not in use. — 02 The device allows the user to position the child in a more upright position, reducing the footprint of the product for easier movement around the home. —03 The chair provides four unique adjustments to the position of the upper section holding the child: height, angle, and the dual-axis rotation feature.

— 04 A device for beach goers that allows a cool-box to become a cooking platform for small meals, with storage for utensils and litter. — 05 A family of kitchen appliances that utilizes the user’s shopping list to plan tailored meals, check food and help the user prepare & cook meals with a holographic tutor.


— 298

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 299

Isabella Trani

A low energy, low cost personal air cooler

—Details +44 (0) 7907 073 447

isabella.trani21@gmail.com behance.net/isabellatrani

01

05

06

02

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 Acuregen – Freelance Designer '15 Illumination – 3D Design Intern '15 Honey Creative – Graphic Design Intern '14 Cocoa Branding – Graphic Design Intern — Awards '15 Seymour Powell Live Projects Runner up

03

04

— 01 Tao creates time for mindfulness within the user’s busy lifestyle. The suite of products utilises EEG waves and electromagnetic levitation. — 02 Voice translates sign language into spoken word to help deaf individuals speak in the office. Utilising motion trackers and flex sensors, it programs a word from a specific movement. — 03 Concept development for Tao.

—04 Tao comprises a meditation trainer, a kettle and a toothbrush, which turn and stay on by focusing the mind, until the ball spins / levitates — 05 An air cooler aimed at the emerging middle class of India, utilising the material properties of terracotta, aluminium and ice to produce a sustainable, completely repairable device. — 06 The air cooler tilts within the base to provide adjustment to air flow.


— 300

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 301

Sam Troop —Details +44 (0) 7545 870 918 samtroop7@googlemail.com

01

03

Incorporating flameless ignition to eliminate fire risks in woodland environments 02

04

05

— Experience '15 Walgreen Boots Alliance Packaging Technologist (Open Innovation Team)

— 01 The Eco-Grill is intended to help people and communities in rural areas to flourish. Short listed for submission to RSA Student awards.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 02 The design offers a sustainable solution to the outdoor cooking market, creating a use for locally produced charcoal as well as allowing tourists to explore more of the local environment. —03 Experience prototyping was undertaken to explore user interactions and product styling to further develop the concept.

— 04 Optimised for additive manufacturing, this design was reverse engineered from an existing product and constructed with advanced surface modelling that utilised scanned 3D data in PTC Creo (CAD). — 05 A product designed to entice children away from technology in the home. Increased activity and social interactions are rewarded with 3D printed characters, bringing playtime back to the physical world.


— 302

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 303

James Trott —Details jamestrottdesign@gmail.com

01

04

05

03

Reducing home wastage through a new fruit storage and delivery system. 02

— 01 An exploded view of the home storage solution. — 02 A home storage and delivery product for fruit aimed at decreasing spoilage and reducing household waste. — 03 The home storage solution with conceptual developed packaging and branding.

—04 An interactive chopping board for students that weighs ingredients, displays recipes and allows them to be shared between users. — 05 A redesign of a computer mouse for additive manufacturing created using CAD skills developed in the final year.


— 304

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 305

Chris Tunbridge

—Details +44 (0) 7807 831 922 c.tunbridge@live.co.uk

01

03

Using electromyography to reduce noncompliance in hand injury patients 02

04

— Experience '14 Walgreens Boots Alliance Packaging Technologist — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

05

— 01 A combination of electromyography and tilt sensors are used to determine whether the patient is adhering to the exercise and elevation programs of their rehabilitation. — 02 Aesthetic prototype showing the combination of simple design and magnetic strap which provides easy attachment onto all sizes of arm. — 03 Functional prototype showing working elements of the design. Targeting different areas of the forearm allows monitoring of various injuries.

—04 Smartphone app using gamification techniques to encourage university students to save energy. Creates healthy competition between housemates by implementing a weekly forfeit system. — 05 Electro-mechanical can crusher capable of crushing either 330ml or 440ml cans. Utilises a crank and slider mechanism, a DC motor, and integrated electronic control system.


— 306

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 307

Scott Virgo —Details +44 (0) 7805 388 337 scottvirgogp@googlemail.com scottvirgodesign.com

01

03

04

Emergency buoyancy lifeline for surfers

02

— Experience '15 eg technology – Design Engineer '15 Ariel Motors – Design & Manufacture Intern '13 Aardman Animations 3D Visual and Manufacture Intern '12 Brightworks Consultancy Design Engineer Intern — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 James Dyson Foundation Bursary '12 Eliahou Dangoor Scholarship '12—'16 Ford Motors Scholarship

05

— 01 Rapid prototyping techniques were utilised to tightly package the components required to provide lighting, flotation and location signal. — 02 A slimline, neoprene harness houses the flotation bladder, while emergency location and inflation components are protected in the hard shell worn on the surfer’s back. —03 Fully functional prototype, created and tested in compliance with British Standards. In-context buoyancy tests led to improved flotation design.

— 04 Scio is a conceptual system, designed to encourage type 2 diabetics to undertake physical exercise in a safe and unrestricted manner, whilst closely monitoring blood glucose levels. — 05 A system of products to support sufferers of dementia and reduce the burden of home care- giving. An automated medication dosing-wheel alongside a wristband to offer dose reminders and wandering alerts.


— 308

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 309

Emma Louise Walder

—Details +44 (0) 7896 368 475 emmalouisewalder@gmail.com

04

Quality coffee for social situations

01

03

— Experience '16 EarlyBird – Product Designer '15 Pavegen Systems – Design Engineer '13 Mantra Events – Design Director — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

02

— 01 Sketch ideation for a brief set by D2M, exploring the idea of a consumer product that actively encourages integration of user-fabricated elements. — 02 Final design for the D2M brief: Having the ability to design personal hair styling devices whilst maintaining quality and maximising the customisation opportunities.

— 03 A stylistic machine designed to fit within a social environment and provide the user with a unique coffee brewing experience. — 04 The product has the ability to dispense four coffees simultaneously with minimal effort.


— 310

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 311

Adam Wallace —Details +44 (0) 7528 695 000 adamwallacedesign@gmail.com instagram.com/adam_wallace94

01

03

Improving cardiovascular disease diagnostics in emergency situations 02

04

05

— Experience '16 Design School Show Team '15 NPW – Junior Product Designer '15 Hundred Million Ltd – Freelance Designer '14 NPW – Design Intern '15 TDA Creative – Design Intern

— 01 Imprint is a two product system that supports Paramedics in making more informed and quicker diagnoses in emergency situations in order to diminish diagnostic errors related to cardiovascular diseases.

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '16 James Dyson Foundation Bursary '16 O2 UX Shortlist '14 Diageo Live Design Competition Finalist

— 02 Cardiovascular diseases are the 2nd biggest killer in the UK. Current use of diagnostic products is awkward and cumbersome, hindering a paramedic’s ability to work as effectively as they could.

— 03 Utilising an opto-physiological sensor and automatic Bluetooth connection, Imprint creates a more efficient experience for paramedics, leading to superior treatment of casualties. —04 Critter Capture, an educational smart magnifying glass, encourages Gen Z to unplug from the virtual world, and be active outdoors exploring. — 05 BuzzHub is a student app, encouraging entrepreneurship, used to initiate and manage short-term collaborative projects.


— 312

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 313

Sam Walrond —Details +44 (0) 8716 884 834 sam.walrond@hotmail.com

01

04

05

03

A hydroponic air purifier for inner city residents

02

— Experience '14 Numatic International Ltd - Junior Product Design Engineer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 Deadly toxin levels in the atmosphere are rising in some major cities, this is becoming more and more of an issue, especially to those who live in these areas. — 02 This product creates clean air for the user’s home whilst providing a platform for plants to thrive, taking toxins from the air and feeding them to the plants. — 03 All necessary nutrients and the correct environment for growth are provided, just add water!

—04 Automated electromechanical can crusher, designed and manufactured in a group and assembeled for final testing. — 05 Processes included welding, milling and turning. The project also required the design and manufacture of a PCB, as well as coding in C using MPLAB.


— 314

BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 315

Liam Ward —Details +44 (0) 7891 394 561 l-ward@live.com issuu.com/liamwarddesign

01

04

05

03

Reducing driver inattention amongst drivers aged 18-23 years old 02

— Experience '14 Pavegen Systems Design Engineer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 The device alerts inattentive drivers through multimodal feedback, helping to identify blind spot, lane departure and speeding hazards.

— 03 Every year millions of people die in road traffic. collisions; in developed countries it is thought that up to 80% of collisions are caused by inattention.

— 02 The system is formed of two components - one mounted on the dashboard providing visual feedback, and the other beneath the driver’s head restraint providing audio and haptic feedback.

—04 ’Vex’ is a cup designed to prevent spiking of drinks in bars and clubs. It only allows liquid to be added when placed on the correct filling mechanism at the bar. — 05 The lid is raised partially when tipped to allow the user to drink, and fully raised when placed on the correct extrusion at the bar to fill the cup.


— 316

BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 317

George Wardell —Details +44 (0) 7923 576 169 george.e.wardell@gmail.com behance.net/george-wardell

01

04

05

03

— Experience '15 Kokoon – Product Designer '14 Ape – Design and Innovation Consultant

Controlling your sleep environment from the bedside 02

— 01 Our bedroom environment provides one of the biggest factors which can impact on quality of sleep. This multifunctional device allows you to fully control your sleeping environment.

—04 For the budding young filmmaker or a child’s very first camera. The film camera grows with the child as they develop skills, adapting the camera to meet their abilities.

— 02 Noise, temperature and air quality are controlled through the device, allowing users to feel comfortable, regardless of their environment.

— 05 A wearable device which helps new and in- experienced climbers stay safe on the rock face, as well as helping experienced climbers to improve their technique.

— 03 The device, and its mobile app, provide a userfriendly experience of cognitive behaviour therapy.


— 318

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 319

Katie Ware-Lane

—Details +44 (0) 7833 972 647 katiewarelane@hotmail.com

01

03

Panic attack management through support and training

02

04

— Experience '15 CORD Worldwide Industrial and Graphic Designer '15 Cutting Edge Group Freelance Graphic Designer '14 Codex Capital – Graphic Designer — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies '13 UX Design Shortlisted for O2

05

— 01 A device to alleviate the symptoms of panic attacks, through brain training and focus management. — 02 At elevated anxiety levels, the device employs gentle haptic vibrations based on the user response requirement to the anxiety sensed. —03 An app connected to the band avoids phone usage, connecting to a projector which the user can interact with to help develop skills to over-come panic attacks.

— 04 Refillable spray bottles used by Alzheimer’s sufferers, to avoid misuse of products, without the need for a carer creating independency for the user within the kitchen or bathroom. — 05 The head of the bottle rotates to switch between three modes: spray, squirt and pour, pre set by the carer dependent on what liquid the bottle contains.


— 320

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 321

Daniel Watt —Details +44 (0) 7910 310 374 danwatt789@hotmail.com linkedin.com/in/dwatt

01

04

05

03

— Experience '15 Mansfields Design

Discreet breastfeeding support device to help new mothers 02

— Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 A wearable device that provides discreet breastfeeding support to new mothers in the first months after giving birth. — 02 Ergonomically designed to provide comfortable support for the mother’s arm and the baby’s body, while establishing the correct feeding position. — 03 The device’s sympathetic, low profile design allows discreet feeding in public places and seeks to avoid the negative stigma sometimes associated with feeding in public.

—04 Suburbia App – Incorporating gamification to create positive behavioral change and reduce household bills. The user completes tasks in order to gain rewards, competing against other households in the community. — 05 A new handheld device that enables individuals to enhance long-term cardiovascular conditions, by tracking and improving their heart rate variability using biofeedback therapy techniques.


— 322

BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 323

Shaun Wellens

05

—Details +44 (0) 7703 793 910 shaunwellens@icloud.com shaunwellens.com

01

03

Encouraging the consumption of healthy and nutritious breakfasts 02

04

— Experience '14 Wonder Vision – Junior Visualiser — Awards '16 Diploma in Professional Studies

— 01 By engineering a number of components into one compact form, Iris enables health and fitness enthusiasts to prepare and consume a nutritious breakfast, every day.

— 04 Modelled in 3DS Max and rendered using Vray, Lacerta is a high-end suite of gaming peripherals inspired by current and future technologies, comprising of three products.

— 02 As a high-end product, Iris displays simple and somewhat rugged aesthetics, exhibiting a selection of high quality materials and finishes.

— 05 The Yeti ski goggles were modelled in Creo as part of a CAD project in which the product was to be reverse engineered in order to create a custom fit.

—03 Iris boasts intuitive controls and features: a simple twist initiates powerful blending or the release of ingredients stored in a separate compartment.


— 324

BSc (Hons) Product Design & Technology

2016

Loughborough Design School

— 325

Harry Wilkinson

—Details +44 (0) 7896 914 208 info.harrywilkinson@gmail.com

01

03

Reducing time and cost of mortar application

02

04

— Experience '15 HA-BE Gehäusebau GmbH Quality Controller '14 Compact Engineering Design Engineer

05

— 01 Visual prototype used for demonstrating and observing user interactions, whilst receiving feedback regarding product aesthetics. — 02 The device mixes and extrudes a bead of mortar, overtaking the speed of conventional handpointing whilst challenging waste-reduction. — 03 Functional mechanical prototype providing full electronic control over mix and extrusion parameters, allowing calibration of interface and automated systems.

—04 These renderings propose the outcome of a new method of creating custom masks for constantpressure sleep apnoea pumps and other respiratory aids, using a 3D scanner and printer. — 05 Produced by additive manufacture in the home or medical field, the custom contour maintains a near perfect fit.


— 326

2016

Design School Show Team

118

Isabella Trani 310

210

Adam Wallace 218

Thanks

298

Ollie Godwin 212

Mitchell Leigh

142

Hannah Lewis

Georgia Humphrey

220

Elspeth MacLeod

230

Amil Malik 012

Loughborough Design School

Hannah McDermid

We would like to say a massive thank you to everyone who made this book and event possible. This extends from the volunteer student team, through to staff and the design agency who kept us on the right track. We are immensely proud of what the 2016 cohort have produced and wish the students the best of luck for their future careers.

— 327

— Editors David Bramley Dr Abby Patterson Karen Roxborough Dr Matt Sinclair Loughborough Design School Loughborough University Leicesterhsire LE11 3TU +44(0)1509 226 900 dsoffice@lboro.ac.uk

— Design Moving Studio movingstudio.co.uk

— Publication Spec Cover UPM Fine Offset, 300gsm

236

Internals UPM Fine Offset, 120gsm Novatech Matte Coated, 115gsm Zoë Browning

Shailen Mistry

246

Binding PUR Bound 252

258 Print Process Offset Lithographic 4 Colour Process

Olivia Newall

Ayesha Parmar 266

Priya Rai

— Typography

272 @lborodesign loughborough_design_school Hannah Revie

James Robertson

blog.lboro.ac.uk/design-school-show

Copy & Headings Akkurat Light, Regular and Bold Tiempos Headline Medium


Loughborough Design School Loughborough University Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK

Loughborough Design School 2016  
Loughborough Design School 2016