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MARKETING MAGAZINE SINGAPORE EDITION

THE ART & SCIENCE OF CONNECTING WITH CONSUMERS

APRIL 2016

SINGAPORE

marketing-interactive.com

APRIL 2016

T H E T O

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ED’S LETTER ................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Rezwana Manjur, Deputy Editor rezwanam@marketing-interactive.com Editorial – International Matt Eaton, Editor (Hong Kong) matte@marketing-interactive.com Production and Design Shahrom Kamarulzaman, Regional Art Director shahrom@lighthousemedia.com.sg Fauzie Rasid, Senior Designer fauzier@lighthousemedia.com.sg Advertising Sales Johnathan Tiang, Sales Manager johnathant@marketing-interactive.com Ee Kai Li, Account Manager kailie@marketing-interactive.com Erica Loh, Account Manager erical@marketing-interactive.com Laura Lai, Account Manager laural@marketing-interactive.com Ong Yi Xuan, Advertising Sales Coordinator yixuano@marketing-interactive.com Advertising Sales - International Sara Wan, Senior Sales Manager (Hong Kong) saraw@marketing-interactive.com Event Production Hairol Salim, Regional Lead - Events and Training hairol@marketing-interactive.com Event Services Yeo Wei Qi, Regional Head of Events Services weiqi@marketing-interactive.com Circulation Executive Deborah Quek, Circulations Executive deborahq@marketing-interactive.com

In February this year, we ran the third edition of our Mob-Ex Awards, as most of you would have known. The awards, particularly these ones, were a bit more special for me personally. My sixyear-old niece, who just couldn’t fathom what a business event is and why I have to attend so many of them, was finally invited to catch a glimpse of it all. Awed as much as she was with the whole set up, she sat there giving her nod of approval to brands that were winning – not that she knew many of them, but when McDonald’s won an award her face lit up. “Good they won; they make awesome fries,” she remarked. In the moment, we laughed, of course, but what she said stayed with me for some time. It was a reminder of one critical thing: the ultimate test of all the marketing you do for your product is (a) the product/service itself, and (b) how you are delivering that product/ service to the customer. Depending on how you fare in those two areas, all the marketing you have done so far could either add up or simply fizzle out. Much has been said about the customer experience and the need to make it impeccable all along the customer journey, be it online or offline. The seamlessness and consistency of it all being the most important factor. None of that is less important, but the point of sale and the quality of your product are what will make or break your brand.

In this edition, we take an in-depth look at the customer experience, not from a theoretical point of view, but through reallife experiences of CMOs from brands such as McDonald’s, RBS, Rolls-Royce, Comedy Central, Mattel and so on. Quite literally, their troubles and tribulations when coming up with the right customer experience. In some cases it was product innovation and in others it was marketing innovation that helped solve the puzzle, but most agreed that the need for new experiences, coupled by the hyper-elevated customer expectation driven by mobile and IoT, is challenging for marketers. Today, consumers expect to be known by organisations and be delivered an experience that is consistent, continuous and compelling. Brad Rencher, the GM and EVP of Adobe Digital Marketing, says we are in the third wave of marketing which is centred around experiences, and marketers, he says, have historically been the nurturers of the customer experience. Read more in the following pages. Enjoy the edition.

Photography: Stefanus Elliot Lee – www.elliotly.com; Makeup & Hair: Michmakeover using Make Up For Ever & hair using Sebastian Professional – www.michmakeover.com

Editorial Rayana Pandey, Editor rayanap@marketing-interactive.com

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE EXPERIENCE

Finance Evelyn Wong, Regional Finance Director evelynw@lighthousemedia.com.sg Management Søren Beaulieu, Publisher sorenb@marketing-interactive.com Justin Randles, Group Managing Director jr@marketing-interactive.com Tony Kelly, Managing Director tk@marketing-interactive.com

Marketing is published 12 times per year by Lighthouse Independent Media Pte Ltd. Printed in Singapore on CTP process by Sun Rise Printing & Supplies Pte Ltd, 10 Admiralty Street, #06-20 North Link Building, Singapore 757695. Tel: (65) 6383 5290. MICA (P) 180/03/2009. For subscriptions, contact circulations at +65 6423 0329 or email subscriptions@marketing-interactive.com. COPYRIGHT & REPRINTS: All material printed in Marketing is protected under the copyright act. All rights reserved. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without the prior written consent of the publisher and copyright holder. Permission may be requested through the Singapore office. Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in Marketing are not necessarily the views of the publisher. Singapore: Lighthouse Independent Media Pte Ltd 100C Pasir Panjang Road, #05-01 See Hoy Chan Hub, Singapore 118519 198755 Tel: +65 6423 0329 Fax: +65 6423 0117 Hong Kong: Lighthouse Independent Media Ltd Unit A, 7/F, Wah Kit Commercial Building 302 Des Voeux Road Central, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong Tel: +852 2861 1882 Fax: +852 2861 1336 To subscribe to Marketing magazine, go to: www.marketing-interactive.com

Rayana Pandey Editor

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CONTENTS

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4 A MONTH IN NEWS A round up of a month of news from Singapore and the region.

15 CRISIS MANAGEMENT: YOU KNOW THE THREATS, BUT ARE YOU PREPARED FOR THEM? What is the role of board members during such times and how do they view a crisis? Rayana Pandey finds out.

20 WHY CLIENTS WILL NOT BE SPENDING MORE ON SOCIAL MEDIA IN 2016 Despite all the talk of social media being vital, half of the marketers in APAC say their 2016 social media budget will remain the same as 2015. Rezwana Manjur explains why.

22 RAKUTEN SHUTS DOWN: THE END OF E-COMMERCE AS WE KNOW IT? There is a fallacy that e-commerce is a cheaper way to reach more customers, but in truth e-commerce is surprisingly expensive to run. Rezwana Manjur explores. Today, it is all about creating the perfect experience for customers. But what are the key ingredients for doing it?

26 PROFILE: FINTAN KNIGHT, ROLLS-ROYCE’S GLOBAL DIRECTOR OF SALES AND MARKETING Fintan Knight speaks to Rezwana Manjur about putting marketing at the heart of product creation.

30 WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO CREATE A GREAT CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE? How does data and creativity merge in bringing a great customer experience to life? Rezwana Manjur explains.

40 ROUNDTABLE: HOW TO MAKE MARKETING PROCESSES LEANER Are marketing processes getting leaner? Rayana Pandey finds out.

44 PR AWARDS 2016 Read all about SG50 and Tate Anzur’s big wins at the PR Awards 2016.

SCAN TO SUBSCRIBE!

20 15

KEY TAKEAWAYS: >> Is your organisation crisis-ready? >> Why it is crucial for marketing departments to overlap with product teams. >> At the heart of all great customer service is personalisation. W W W .MA R KET ING - INT ERAC TIVE . COM

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NEWS

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WANT MORE BREAKING NEWS? SCAN THE CODE TO FIND OUT WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE INDUSTRY.

SMRT launches WINK+ SMRT Commercial launched WINK+, a loyalty app in Singapore that rewards commuters who ride and scan on WINK+ icons. Customers need to download the app, ride SMRT or scan WINK+ QR codes island-wide on SMRT Media OOH spaces and earn WINK+ points to redeem WINK+ rewards at participating WINK+ retailers and partners. WINK+ will work with advertisers and partners to track key metrics for their campaigns.

EVA gets social Leading Taiwanese international airline EVA Airways Corporation appointed social and mobile agency KRDS Singapore as its social media agency. The agency is tasked with handling the airline’s social media presence on Facebook for the Singapore market. The appointment comes following a pitch where KRDS Singapore was selected for its expertise in providing optimal social media strategies for aviation and tourism brands across the globe.

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Travelling together Travel technology company Amadeus appointed WE Communications as its regional PR agency of record. Karun Budhraja, vice-president of corporate marketing and communications at Amadeus Asia Pacific, said WE had mapped out an insights and impact-driven approach which resonated with the needs of the region. “With WE’s extensive network in the region, this partnership only reaffirms Amadeus’ commitment to the travel industry in Asia Pacific,” he said.

S.League’s SMRT move The S.League and SMRT Commercia inked a deal to promote Singapore’s only professional sports league. This collaboration brings Singapore football and its clubs closer to more than two million passengers across the SMRT transport network – in formats such as S.League concept trains and video content showing goals and highlights on its screens, among other things. Ahead of the curve Mindshare launched a programmatic buying unit called ULTRA for Unilever in ASEAN. ULTRA in Singapore will drive programmatic planning and buying for ASEAN. Mindshare and Unilever teams have been working together for the past few months to test and understand the available technology stacks and the right set of partners to power ULTRA.

A healthy partner The Health Promotion Board named Group M’s MEC Singapore as its media agency. The reappointment is from April onwards. Also vying for the account were Havas Media and OMD. The announcement comes after HPB appointed Publicis Singapore as its creative agency. The agency will provide media strategies, planning, buying and implementation services for integrated marketing and communication campaigns for HPB’s various health initiatives.

Disney gets animated outdoors Disney Studio Singapore launched a new campaign on Clear Channel’s play digital OOH for its latest animated film Zootopia. The campaign leverages on the dynamism of Clear Channel’s play digital screens by featuring the comical characters of Zootopia on an actual backdrop of the 10 carefully selected bus or taxi shelters in key areas of Singapore. The characters are brought to life when commuters look at the digital screens.

Joining the dots UK-based research company Join the Dots opened its first international office in Singapore, signalling its intention to develop and grow its international portfolio of clients. Join the Dots grew by 28% in 2015 and the new office in Singapore will allow the company to service its existing clients who have operations in the Far East, including GlaxoSmithKline, Unilever and Diageo.

New partnership Social data analytics firm Circus Social partnered with DataSift, a human data intelligence provider, to give access to aggregated and anonymous Facebook topic data for customers. Working with Facebook topic data allows companies to make business decisions in real-time, in a variety of applications, ranging from content discovery to product development and from audience affinity analysis to brand reputation management. Google acquires Pie Pie, a Singapore-based business messaging start-up, was acquired by internet giant Google. Caesar Sengupta, vice-president of the next billion users team at Google, confirmed the acquisition on Google’s Asia Pacific blog and said it was looking to hire more engineers. He added that this was part of Google building a new engineering team in Singapore – to get closer to the next billion users coming online from emerging markets.

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NEWS

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Reacting to reactions Recently, the social media world was abuzz with the new Facebook “reactions”. Embracing the new feature was Changi Airport which created a Facebook reaction post that garnered more than 3,000 reactions in less than 24 hours organically, and without media buy, according to a statement given by CAG. A quick check by Marketing also showed the majority of the responses on the new feature were largely positive. MOE appoints DDB Group The Ministry of Education appointed DDB Group as its agency of record for the next three years. MOE launched an integrated media campaign with the agency to encourage teaching as a career. The campaign, “It all begins with a teacher”, kicked off with a threeminute online and TV film that tells the story of a student and his teachers bravely challenging our social norms of success and failure.

General Mills picks agency General Mills Southeast Asia appointed GOVT Singapore as its creative agency for Betty Crocker. The agency has been tasked to produce the strategy, conceptualisation and execution of through-the-line work for Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand. Tim Chan, creative director for GOVT Singapore, said: “Following a decent first dance with Häagen-Dazs on their recent festive campaign, we’re thankful that General Mills has entrusted us with baking cakes now.”

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An Eye to the future Non-profit organisation Singapore Eye Bank appointed PR Communications as its public relations agency. The retainer contract includes the management of all Singapore Eye Bank’s media relations, advertising and digital engagement. PR Communications will provide strategic counsel to the Singapore Eye Bank’s portfolio until the end of 2016, and will be responsible for the planning and execution of campaigns to mark significant milestones for the organisation.

The party ends Heineken Singapore parted ways with iris Worldwide after seven years. Heineken and iris Singapore have worked together since 2009. The arrangement applies only in Singapore and iris’ relationship with Heineken in other parts of the world is unaffected. Craig Mapleston, managing director of iris Singapore, said the agency had made a “strategic decision not to continue as it looks forward to focusing on new opportunities”.

Pandora charms its customers Jewellery maker Pandora ran a campaign that showcased its charms on five strategically chosen bus/taxi shelters in the CBD and Orchard area. Clear Channel’s signature six-sheet panels were gutted for optimal effect, allowing the spotlight to be on the supersized Valentine’s Collection 2016 charms.

Courting a partnership The Oliver Group won the retainer for Courts’ retail business in Singapore and Malaysia. The appointment was effective from 16 March in Singapore and 1 April in Malaysia. The two will collaborate to cover strategy conceptualisation, creative and media fulfilment through a combination of both on and off-site resources to maximise contribution. The agency has been tasked with developing a long-term consumer value proposition for Courts.

New sights and sounds OOH company JCDecaux launched a new audio-enabled digital network at ION Orchard, broadcasting dynamic digital advertisements with the additional dimension of sound. Dior was the maiden advertiser on the enhanced digital network, promoting its Miss Dior fragrance. Situated at high traffic zones, JCDecaux’s two digital networks at ION Orchard – the ION Digital Fashion Network and ION Link Digital Network – were also recently enhanced with audio capabilities. A community affair Community hospital St Luke’s appointed Addiction Advertising for its rebranding campaign to provide creative strategy, counsel and direction to synergise its network of entities. St Luke’s has re-envisioned its mission, vision and values which aim to enrich lives in the communities and transform the landscape of community care. The rebranding exercise will see a contemporary creative direction being implemented across St Luke’s entities, aligning and uniting them.

Six Capital picks new agency Six Capital appointed Vocanic as its social marketing agency. The company is a Singaporebased FX business that launched a FinTech game called Tagg. It is an interesting proposition as a “game” that allows you to earn-as-you play. Six Capital and Vocanic implemented an Ang Bao giveaway launch campaign across Asia. The campaign uses content, paid social (using Twitter, Instagram and Facebook), social activation, employee advocacy and influencer marketing.

Leaner and cleaner Banyan Tree Hotels and Resorts is in the midst of a cost-cutting exercise to save millions as well as becoming leaner and more efficient. Globally, the resort will cut about 12% of its more than 1,400 workforce. In Singapore, the cuts have seen the exit of David Spooner, vicepresident of sales and marketing, CEO Abid Butt and Andrew Langston, vice-president of operations.

KidZania signs up Qatar Family edutainment brand KidZania signed on Qatar Airways as its latest industry partner. Qatar Airways’ facility will be the second KidZania City that the airline is partnering with. At the Palawan Kidz City at Palawan Beach where KidZania Singapore is housed, visitors are welcomed with the sight of a life-sized decommissioned Boeing 737 that measures over 25 metres long with a full wingspan of 28 metres.

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NEWS

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Putting meat back on the table Jack’s Place appointed digital creative agency Section as its marketing and creative partner. This is ahead of its revamp. Jack’s Place will embark on a year-long partnership with Section to reintroduce the restaurant as the definitive destination for steak lovers, and a great family dining spot. As it celebrated its 50th anniversary, Jack’s Place launched an integrated campaign, “Steak & Symphony” which rolled out in March. A reminder for the future Manulife Singapore launched a new brand campaign encouraging everyone in Singapore to be “Ready for life: both now and later”. This is the first major campaign launched for Manulife Singapore by Manulife Singapore’s SVP and chief marketing officer, Wendy Walker. The integrated campaign, developed with creative partner Tribal Worldwide Singapore, extends across multiple media channels, including print, out-of home, digital and social. A birthday bash Lazada Singapore celebrated its second anniversary with a marketing campaign than ran from 15 to 18 March. Lazada utilised various advertising channels for its birthday campaign from offline platforms to social media. Posters ran on MRT trains on the East-West and Northeast lines as well as on platforms of 20 MRT stations. Full-page print advertisements also ran in the TODAY newspaper with online advertising through Facebook, Instagram and on YouTube’s masthead.

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Raising awareness Wildlife Reserves Singapore launched a new campaign with the help of Possible Singapore to raise awareness about the illegal wildlife trade. Possible Singapore was tasked to motivate the public and empower them to change the fate of these animals. The agency decided to give the target audience a raw and unfettered look at the brutal behind-the-scenes state of the illegal trade across OOH mediums across the country.

Ringing in the changes The National Climate Change Secretariat (NCCS), under the Prime Minister’s Office, appointed Carbon Interactive as its social media agency for a year with an option to extend for another. The agency will assist NCCS in social management, content creation, engagement design, video production, social media monitoring, crisis communication, and application development. This is the third time Carbon has been appointed by NCCS.

Hot rewards JP Pepperdine Group launched a new “JP Pepperdine rewards programme”. JP Pepperdine Group is the parent company of Jack’s Place, Eatzi Gourmet and Restaurant Hoshigaoka. The new rewards programme entitles members with the rebate components more cost saving and convenience as it enables them to go card-less.They can also check their details through the JP Pepperdine Group of Restaurant’s website. There are also many other promotions for its loyal patrons.

Books in Medieval Europe were predominantly religious in nature, as the church was the primary source of education Secular examples of medieval writing included epic poetry such as Beowulf

The pens used by medieval scribes only allowed downward strokes due to how the nib was cut. This made writing a long process - and books very rare & precious

Gutenberg’s printing press heralded the decline of handwritten books when it first appeared in the 1440’s, as the press allowed books to be printed both quickly and cheaply

Insight Worth Sharing. www.kadence.com/share www.kadence.com/share US UK India Singapore Vietnam China

Indonesia

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NEWS

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Reaching out to New Zealand Dentsu Aegis Network acquired a majority share in Barnes, Catmur & Friends (BC&F) New Zealand. The acquisition is to establish the creative capability of Dentsu Aegis Network and strengthen the business in New Zealand. Takaki Hibino, CEO of Dentsu and Dentsu media APAC, said: “We now have a strong presence in New Zealand, expanding our network in the region and becoming the first Dentsu agency in New Zealand.”

Up for grabs IKEA is reviewing its media account globally, worth in excess of US$400 million. Currently the business is split across several agencies and networks. In Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand the business is held by Dentsu Aegis Network’s Vizeum. The agency was appointed after a review and the agency won the account from incumbents OMD in Singapore and PHD in Malaysia and Thailand. Apple battles FBI demands Apple is fiercely opposing the FBI’s demand to build a new version of its iPhone operating system, circumventing several important security features. Following the San Bernardino terror attack last December, Apple claims the authorities are pressuring the smartphone manufacturer to create a “back door” to the iPhone. In a letter to customers, Apple put what the demands could possibly mean for the personal data of customers.

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Google removes RHS ads The global roll-out of the removal of right hand side (RHS) ads in the search engine results page on Google, together with the addition of a fourth ad on the left hand side (LHS) above the search results page, will pose great challenges to advertisers who have been relying on their presence on Google to drive traffic and conversions.

Unilever appoints Alchemy Unilever Cambodia appointed Alchemy as Closeup’s digital agency in Cambodia. The new appointment came after a pitch against two other creative agencies in Cambodia. The agency is tasked to increase brand awareness and improve turnover for the brand. It is also responsible for its online strategic direction, growth and development. The Singapore headquartered agency also works with Unilever in Singapore.

Free sneakers Reebok used a smart digital outof-home ad, with a built-in speed camera and tracking technology, as an incentive to get people running in Sweden and win a new set of trainers. Those who ran past the speed monitor fast enough unlocked a clear plastic window box display to grab a brand new pair of Reebok ZPump 2.0 shoes.

HOW MUCH DOES THAT COST?

DISNEY DELIVERS OUTDOORS

Disney Studio Singapore launched a new campaign on Clear Channel’s play digital OOH for its latest animated fi lm Zootopia. The campaign leveraged on the dynamism of Clear Channel’s play digital screens by featuring the comical characters of Zootopia on an actual backdrop of 10 carefully selected bus or taxi shelters in key areas of Singapore. The characters were brought to life when commuters looked at these digital screens. It aimed to create hype around the animated fi lm,

drawing the attention of the masses, especially the Millennials, young adults and families with kids. The campaign ran on Clear Channel’s PlayGround network of 100 digital screens for three weeks, until 2 March 2016. The media agency behind the campaign was Dentsu while the creative agencies were Factory Communications and CNS Connections. The production costs for the campaign were about SG$3000, excluding media costs.

Inspiring SMEs FedEx Express worked with BBDO UK in the hope of inspiring SMEs in APAC to expand their businesses globally with a new set of films showing what was possible. Malcolm Sullivan, vice-president of brand communications and customer engagement for FedEx Express Asia Pacific, said: “Increasingly, SMEs in the Asia Pacific region are starting to recognise the huge business potential that they could unlock by going global.” Komli renews with Twitter Komli Media renewed its partnership agreement with Twitter for India until March 2017. Komli will continue to help Twitter expand its promoted products suite of advertising products and emphasise the company’s monetisation efforts. It will also be reaching out to the huge Indian mid-market segment, helping them target potential customers on Twitter thus, giving them high life time value per customer and eventual return on investment.

Paying tribute In collaboration with the Bruce Lee Foundation, Swiss watch brand Hublot held a special tribute exhibition for the kung fu superstar to celebrate the grand opening of its boutique at Beijing’s high-end shopping centre Shin Kong Place. The “Be Water, My Friend – Legend of Bruce Lee Memorial Exhibition” – under the theme of the actor’s philosophy – displayed his precious personal items and a variety of Hublot limited edition timepieces.

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NEWS

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AUDIT WATCH

ZBBZ GETS A NEW LOOK Cross-border e-commerce Walmart launched a crossborder e-commerce service “Walmart Global Shop”, available nationwide on its mobile app to serve customers with more quality and authentic products from overseas. By simply downloading the Walmart app, customers can now purchase imports and have the products delivered directly to their home from bonded area.

A cracking idea McDonald’s Hong Kong teamed up with DDB Group and OMD for an outdoor interactive campaign, turning the Causeway Bay Percival Street tram station into three giant bubble wrap walls. Noticing the fact that people are always busy with work and living a fast-paced life, the brand wanted to give them the opportunity to take a break and have some fun in the city centre.

Creating memories HDFC Life and Leo Burnett have created a new digital platform enabling customers to leave behind more than just money. The digital platform called #MemoriesForLife comes from the idea that often a lot is left unsaid as we strive to secure the future of loved ones. The digital platform was launched via an integrated campaign designed for both offline and online media.

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SPH’s Chinese magazine ZBBZ is undergoing a revamp and the new look will be unveiled in April. The magazine targets the bilingual and bicultural elite and high-net-worth individuals. It looks to put forth the “fi ner things in life”, said Woo Mun Ngan, supervising editor of ZBBZ. Advertisers of the magazine come from high-end fashion houses, luxury cars, hotels, watches, luxury homes and private bank sectors. With the revamp, advertisers can expect a new look and content. The masthead will be changed to ZBBZ using upper case instead of ZbBz. ZBBZ has also established a partnership with top-end hotels for distribution. The magazine is currently not audited. The revamp was spurred to better meet the needs of readers and help them better appreciate the things and people in life, said Woo. Currently there are four pillars

of content: In the know, in focus, in conversation, and in sight. In the know consists of the month’s talk of the town that includes the “should know and must know” – both in town and out of town. In focus is the cover story and feature of the month. In conversation consists of profiles stories and in sight covers areas such as travel and gourmet living.

Resuming operations Two years after closing its doors, FCB resumed operations in Hong Kong, interestingly enough, at its old location of Taikoo Place in Quarry Bay. Consisting of five people, the Hong Kong office is led by general manager Jocelyn Tse, who joined from Ogilvy & Mather Hong Kong where she was planning director. Before that, she was the associate planning director at TBWA Shanghai.

Assisting the elderly Uber brought its specialised feature uberASSIST to Hong Kong for the elderly, those with disabilities and others with mobility or accessibility needs. UberASSIST is a scheme developed with training for Uber driver-partners and input from a host of local NGOs.

Mullen takes a ride with Bajaj Bajaj Auto appointed Mullen Lintas as the creative agency for its popular Bajaj Avenger range of bikes. Mullen Lintas was given the mandate for integrated campaigns for Bajaj Avenger and will collaborate with group company LinTeractive to create a seamless brand experience across the entire eco system, including television, print, OOH, web and mobile.

New offering Eyeing China’s booming domain registration market, GoDaddy offered .cn to its customers and expanded its services to 11 Asia markets. GoDaddy has brought the total number of domain name extensions it offers to 421 by adding .cn to its line-up. “Having the ability to offer crossborder commerce with China is important, especially in the Asia region,” said Roger Chen, vicepresident of Asia for GoDaddy.

Tencent partners Omnicom Tencent Online Media Group established a partnership with Omnicom Media Group to collaborate on the development of new consumer data interpretation methodologies to maximise marketing ROI. The collaboration will create an infrastructure for holistic data mining and solutions that provides advertisers with deeper consumer insights to improve media planning and buying efficiency. Both companies will explore and develop data models for eight different industries. Adobe launches new app Adobe launched its latest offering aiming to simplify building and maintaining enterprise applications. It announced the Adobe experience manager mobile to simplify the process of building and managing visually appealing enterprise applications that are as easy to use as consumer apps. Brands such as Under Armour, Black Diamond, DuPont USA and Hartford Funds have been quick to adopt and use the tool.

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NEW WORK .................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1 Campaign The world’s smallest McDonald’s Brief McDonald’s launched the “The world’s smallest McDonald’s” campaign that drove excitement and traction for Nanoblock. It was a sneak preview of the McDonald’s Nanoblock collectibles, which were available to the public from 22 February, beginning with the limited edition of McDonald’s food icons x nanoblock collector’s kit. Client

McDonald’s Singapore

Creative

DDB Group Singapore

Media

OMD Singapore

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2 Campaign It all begins with a teacher Brief MOE launched an integrated media campaign as part of its new recruitment campaign to encourage teaching as a career. The campaign kicked off with a three-minute online and TV film that tells the story of a student and his teachers bravely challenging social norms of success and failure. The film will run on local television and selected cable channels until mid-March, and in selected Golden Village theatres until the end of March. Client

Ministry of Education, Singapore

Creative

DDB Group Singapore

Media

Maxus Singapore

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NEW WORK ................................................................................................................................................................................................................

3 Campaign Ah ma Brief By 2030, one in five Singaporeans will be above 65 years of age. Hence, the TVC campaign was created to promote the idea of “Home First” – a person-centred approach to care focused on keeping Singapore’s seniors safe in their homes; where placing them in a residential facility is explored only after all community care options have been considered. Client

Agency for Integrated Care

Creative

Addiction Advertising

Media

Addiction Advertising

3

4 Campaign You buy, they die Brief Wildlife Reserves Singapore launched a new campaign with the help of Possible Singapore to raise awareness about the illegal wildlife trade. The agency decided to give the target audience a raw and unfettered look at the brutal behind-the-scenes state of the illegal trade across OOH mediums across the country.

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Client

Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Creative

Possible Singapore

Media

ZenithOptimedia

SUBMISSIONS PLEASE SEND US YOUR BEST NEW WORK REGULARLY IN HIGH-RES JPEG OR PDF TO BE CONSIDERED FOR THESE PAGES. EMAIL RAYANAP@MARKETING-INTERACTIVE.COM

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OPINION: AD WATCH/WEB WATCH

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Theophilues Tan Associate creative director BBDO Singapore

AD WATCH HOT: Love of a Lifetime

NOT: OSIM uDIVA Classic

We are no strangers to Chinese New Year commercials that tug at the heartstrings. However, having seen the same commercials that follow the same formula year on year, emotionally touching spots now seem nothing more than just noise. This year, like the ang bao I received from a relative, one particularly stood out. Taking a simple approach of comparing the Pioneer Generation Package to a long-lasting relationship filled with care and affection, this beautiful commercial used the story of a couple to help deliver a simple premise that love knows no bounds. This spot totally broke free of the clutter across a few categories. Told in a non-linear fashion, there were many elements within this spot that got three million people to watch it. Aside from the music, it is watchable, the acting was believable, the message delivered was clear, and most importantly, there was lots of great looking popiah.

Massage chairs have been a constant fixture in our lives, and furnish the lives of the target audience with a variety of products that meet their needs for a massage without having to leave their living room. Now, while OSIM offers great massage products that do just that, this spot hardly left me relaxed. While it’s perfectly fair to keep the main focus of the ad around the new offering, it could have been done in a variety of ways. Instead, all I could focus on were the awkward family members crowding around their grandfather. The dialogue for the main hero of the ad wasn’t delivered in the most natural way, and getting him to utter a few colloquial terms didn’t do him any favours. Overall, by the end of the ad, the message it tried to communicate around “great value, multiple lifestyle enjoyments” throughout the commercial was distracted and lost among the family’s fake laughter.

Jeffrey Lim General manager Carbon Interactive Singapore

WEB WATCH HOT: Income.com.sg

NOT: www.Msig.com.sg

With all the wrong attention Income was getting from the media recently, I was pleasantly surprised to find its website team has transformed this important touchpoint. The website has incorporated many of the current best web practices and design trends – the use of relevant hero images, nice responsive designs, a less-is-more approach and easy to understand icons/call-to-action buttons. The navigation has been well thought through with options for users to be task-based or audience-centric. The copy is short, succinct, and when required, provides more information. Lastly, the ability to stamp a strong brand identity while marrying heavy content with in-trend web design and development makes this a tick for me.

On the contrary, Income’s competitor – MSIG – could have paid more attention to its web asset and presence. It’s alarming to see big companies like them still ignoring the hygiene factor of having a mobile-friendly website, particularly in a country where mobile penetration is one of the highest in the world. Not to mention, they are still using flash web banners! Landing on their page creates confusion to the user, who does not know where and how to begin. Information is all over the place – specific product/service pages do not provide users with important content to help them make decisions. From the design, content, layout, technology to branding, the website leaves much to be desired. It left me wondering how they convert sales when they can’t even compel and connect with their target audience.

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UNI 160317 MKT MAG Print Ad APOS 210mm x 280mm FA.pdf

C

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CM

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CMY

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5:53 pm


DIRECT MAIL CASE STUDY

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CPF HATCHES A NEW PLAN The CPF Board wanted to seed appreciation of its new CPF system and here’s how it did it.

The mnemonic device of an egg was adopted as it represents a retirement nest egg – something that everyone is able to relate to. The egg is also a symbol of hope and new life that needs to be nurtured in order for it to grow. The imagery did not end there. The different spreads of the DM explained the composition of CPF accounts and the various schemes with the help of other egg-related visuals such as a nest, a birdhouse and an egg timer. The nest egg theme was also applied consistently across other platforms such as EDMs, the CPF starter mobile app, and letters as part of an ongoing engagement roadmap with new CPF members.

THE MAIL Objective To connect with new CPF members who have just started working and to foster an appreciation for how CPF schemes help them at key stages of their lives.

Target audience Mainly young working adults who have just joined the workforce in full-time employment.

Results

Connecting with new members: CPF’s direct mailer was called “Your journey starts here”.

The CPF Board (CPFB) introduced its new members programme to connect with new CPF members who have just started working. The objective was to establish a relationship with them at an early stage and to foster an appreciation of how CPF schemes will help

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them at key stages of their lives as well as the value and importance of saving early for retirement. This gave birth to the charming CPF direct mailer featuring an egg, entitled “Your journey starts here”.

It has and continues to enthuse recipients to know more about the CPF system by simplifying CPF schemes in an endearing and easy to understand manner, aided by charming visuals and graphics.

Ng Khee Jin Founder/creative director Wild Advertising & Marketing

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NEWS ANALYSIS

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CRISIS MANAGEMENT: YOU KNOW THE THREATS, BUT ARE YOU PREPARED FOR THEM? What is the role of board members during a time of crisis and how do they view a crisis? Rayana Pandey finds out. Crisis management is not an easy task. Identifying or knowing how to tackle it is one thing, predicting and being prepared for it is totally different. What is the role of board members during such times and how do they view a crisis? A Deloitte survey has found that board members worldwide have confidence in their organisations’ ability to deal with crisis situations (76%), but are less confident that they, and their organisations, are prepared for them. Fewer than half (49%) of the board members surveyed say their organisations have the capabilities or processes in place required to handle a crisis with the best possible outcome, according to the Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (Deloitte Global) survey report, “A crisis of confidence”. “Most businesses will face a crisis at some point; it’s a matter of when, not if,” said Peter Dent, leader of Deloitte’s global centre for crisis management. “Board members should discuss with management to ensure there is a sound and common understanding of the risks that can leave an organisation vulnerable to crisis. It’s equally important to deepen that understanding by strengthening the systems used to detect and prevent adverse events from occurring in the first place.” More findings from the survey revealed that damage to corporate reputation (73%) was ranked the top area of vulnerability, followed closely by cybercrime (70%). Almost 66% named supply chain issues, regulatory action and natural disasters as vulnerabilities as well. When asked about specific crisis areas, board members were more likely to acknowledge their vulnerability, than they were to say they had a plan to address it. While 73% named reputation as a vulnerability, only 39% said they had a plan for it. Board members aren’t engaging with management: Fewer than half (49%) say they have engaged with management to understand

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A plan in place: Is your board ready to deal with a crisis?

what has been done to support crisis preparedness. Only half say board members and management have specific discussions about crisis prevention. No quick fixes: Fewer than one-third (30%) of board members whose organisations had been hit by crises, said their reputations had recovered in less than a year. Around 16% said it took four years or more. Financial and operational crises had similar long recovery times. “It’s clear that crisis awareness, preparation and resilience needs to be a more prominent topic in the boardroom. While the approach may differ depending on the company, no board should underestimate the challenge of crisis preparedness,” Dent said. “In an era when risks can turn into reality in the blink of an eye, it is important for boards to re-look at the business assumptions which have served the companies well (thus far). “It is through constantly challenging traditional wisdom and stress-testing the business strategy that companies can hope

to keep ‘black swan’ type of crises at bay,” said David Chew, Deloitte’s co-leader of the Singapore centre for corporate governance. “Boards need to inquire about the organisation’s cyber risk strategy, what information the organisation is exposed to with third party partners, and the cyber resiliency of the organisation’s ecosystem.” Thio Tse Gan, the Southeast Asia leader for Deloitte’s Asia Pacific centre for regulatory strategy, added: “With the widespread use of technologies in today’s environment, the board has a key role to play in ensuring that management is building a cyber-savvy organisation.” The global survey conducted by Forbes Insights on behalf of Deloitte was undertaken to assess the state of crisis readiness in large organisations. More than 300 board members from companies representing every major industry and geographic region responded to the survey.

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30/3/2016 6:26:53 PM


NEWS ANALYSIS

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WHAT KIND OF A CMO ARE YOU? CMOs – are you a torchbearer or a market follower? Rezwana Manjur writes.

Which direction are you heading in?

Two-thirds of global chief marketing officers (CMOs) say the single greatest business challenge they currently face is industry convergence. In the face of this challenge, where disruptive technologies are breaking down barriers to entry that once existed between distinct industries, two kinds of CMOs have emerged – the “torchbearers” and the “market followers”. The differences between the two groups are distinct. The torchbearers, as IBM’s “Redefining Markets” study claims, are those who come from enterprises with strong financial track records and equally strong reputations. Meanwhile, the market followers are those who come from businesses that are less

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successful financially and have lower market profiles. Comparing the two groups reveals pronounced variations in the way torchbearer CMOs and market follower CMOs behave. Creative disruption Torchbearer CMOs are actively embracing “creative destruction” and enriching the arc of engagement with customers. Much like the market follower CMO, they too are striving to make their organisations more digitally literate. The only difference is they are far better prepared to manage the data explosion and an increasingly complex marketing mandate. The torchbearer CMOs feel they have made far greater progress when it comes to managing the data explosion – 47% versus 27% of market followers.

Strategic choices There are also significant differences in the strategies pursued by torchbearer CMOS and market follower CMOs. Torchbearer CMOs are more likely to be reviewing the way they go to market. Two-thirds of them are also exploring new revenue models, such as licensing and subscriptions, compared with just 50% of all market follower CMOs. Torchbearer CMOs are also more likely to be experimenting with – or already using – more collaborative business models, such as open and platform variants. They realise that participating in an ecosystem enables all the members to extend their reach and range, and produce more value collectively than they can individually. Moreover, whether they’re developing new

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NEWS ANALYSIS

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Data doyens: Torchbearer CMOs are much more confident of their ability to deal with the data explosion

Figure 5 Lead role: Torchbearer CMOs are much more determined to reach the market first

Versatile virtuosos: Torchbearer CMOs are more confident about coping with an increasingly complex marketing mandate

54%

79% 46%

39%

36%

72% more

18%

47% 27%

69% 49%

74%

41%

more

Focus on reaching the market first Torchbearer CMOs

2013 Market Follower CMOs

more

2015

All CMOs

2013

All CMOs

Torchbearer CMOs

Figure 9

Class act: Torchbearer CMOs are focusing more heavily on collaborative business models

Joint enterprise: Torchbearer CMOs are better at listening to customers and applying their input to co-create new offerings

77% 62%

60% 42%

43%

more

more

61% 51%

66% 50%

20%

32%

more

Open Torchbearer CMOs

Torchbearer CMOs Market Follower CMOs

Market Follower CMOs

24%

2015

more

Platform Market Follower CMOs

Use of customer feedback to explore new trends

Focus on customer collaboration and co-creation

Source: IBM Redefining Markets Study Insights from the Global C-suite Study – the CMO perspective.

business models or new offerings, Torchbearer CMOs are far more focused on reaching the market first. Torchbearer CMOs know there are compelling reasons to make the effort. “First movers have always enjoyed certain advantages, such as the buzz they generate and the ability to charge premium prices,” said the study. Customer love Torchbearer CMOs are also more focused on mapping out the customer journey – 82%, compared with 65% of market follower CMOs. As the emphasis on the total integrated customer relationship continues to intensify, CMOs are responding accordingly. Nearly two-thirds of our respondents regard developing deeper, richer customer experiences as their top marketing priority. Today the CMO is the custodian of the customer experience, and hence, expect to interact with customers on an even more individual and digital basis than they did just three years ago. Torchbearer CMOs are working harder to

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understand the customer’s journey through the enterprise. Mapping the entire path, as well as the technologies, people and processes involved, enables marketers to pinpoint any weaknesses and rectify them. Torchbearer CMOs are better at using customer feedback to explore new trends and collaborating with customers to cocreate new products and services. While it is evident that today plotting the customer journey is now harder because of the non-linear nature, Torchbearer CMOs’ focus on delivering holistic, multi-faceted customer journeys is also reflected in their enthusiasm for physical and digital opportunities to engage customers. Evolution from market follower to torchbearer So how do you go from a market follower to a torchbearer? Well, first and foremost, all CMOs need to prepare for a future in which disruption is pervasive. This is a future in which technological advances are increasingly blurring the distinctions between different industries.

CMOs need to infuse digital DNA into the team and grow the digital expertise that’s essential to create differentiated experiences for their customers. They need to rethink processes and view the organisation through the lens of the customer experience. CMOs need to also form ecosystems and devote more energy and resources to developing unique products, services and experiences that truly better the lives of customers – and simultaneously make sure they are first to market. They also need to challenge people in every function to demolish internal organisational silos and provide a consistent and authentic face to the customer. “Set up digital ‘boot camps’ to train your existing staff, and fill critical skill gaps with a mix of new hires and talent from partners in your ecosystem. And don’t forget to tap customers as a great source of expertise. Incorporate customer feedback and invite customers to participate as co-creators and innovators,” said the study.

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NEWS ANALYSIS

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BEWARE THE PERILS OF SOCIAL MEDIA AND CELEBRITIES Should paid content on social media be labelled more clearly? Rezwana Manjur asks.

Being responsible: Can celebrities and brands afford to be careless in an era where re social media is unforgiving?

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NEWS ANALYSIS

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Recently, local Mediacorp actress Rebecca Lim announced her retirement on Instagram and asked fans to be happy for her. Little did her fans know, it was just a publicity stunt. The 29-year-old actress made the announcement on Instagram which was then covered by several local media outlets, and support from fans poured in. Then, in a surprising turn of events, the blossoming actress released a video explaining the whole incident. In the video, she said: “Nope I am not leaving my job. I love it too much. I have, however, signed a retirement plan with NTUC Income. And it is a relief to know that I am saving a little each day for my future.” What is not a relief for the young actress, however, is that her fans were left a little dumbfounded and somewhat unhappy. After just three days, the video had more than 800 shares and more than 2000 likes. One fan said: “This was a disgusting marketing ploy. Did NTUC Income think it up or did you?” Another fan also commented that it was the “best way” the actress could kill the trust of viewers. “You turned people’s genuine concerns into a laughing stock. Totally ridiculous. I hope NTUC pays you well for it. Because it has backfired real-time for you, but created an awareness (be it good or bad) in NTUC products. It is disappointing to see this from you.” According to an article in The Straits Times, Lim has soon after apologised for the misunderstanding in a media conference call, but insisted she would not have changed how the stunt was executed. Meanwhile, NTUC Income also said in a Facebook post: “We did not set out to mislead through Rebecca’s ‘retiring’ announcement. Instead, we hoped to draw attention to the importance of securing one’s financial future. We are glad that Rebecca has begun that journey, and hope her personal story will inspire young Singaporeans to embark on their retirement planning.” Edwin Yeo, general manager of SPRG Singapore, was of the view that the stunt, while creating talk-ability, did not hit the spot as talk of Lim’s retirement overshadowed the actual messaging. “I don’t think the overall stunt worked in NTUC Income’s favour. The idea was potentially a good one seeing how Lim is a well-known young artist who can discuss retirement plans. But the PR agency behind the stunt should have conducted a scenario planning before the announcement to anticipate the reactions,”

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he said. Seeing the current spiral of events, he was of the view that proper planning was not undertaken. Should paid content on social media be labelled more clearly? However, two weeks later the actress once again apologised on Facebook. She wrote: “Recently, I’ve been reminded that being an artiste comes with great responsibilities. I know I have upset many of you, including those dearest to me. Please accept my humblest apologies. I’ve taken to heart many lessons, and hope that you will be patient with me as I continue to learn and grow.” A quick check by Marketing showed that fans have since been generally supportive. While on more traditional mediums such as print and TV the lines between content and advertisements are more defined, the world of social media still has shades of grey. We asked industry folks if the local market has reached a point of maturity where content or marketing stunts on social media by brands should be clearly marked as “social advertorials”.

media is clearly distinguished with an explicit disclosure. “Even with disclosures, brands can achieve their marketing goals as long as the celebrity has the right kind of reach and if the idea is creatively executed,” he said. Ryan Lim, founder of QED Consulting, agreed with Mazumdar saying in markets such as UK content marketing is now clearly marked as paid. This practice has unfortunately not yet been adopted in our local markets. Consumers need to be given the choice to decide if they wish to connect with a piece of content. Marketing stunts, as they are, do not play very well with consumers today as they simply leave them feeling duped. “Just because a piece of content is marked advertorial or paid, it doesn’t mean that it won’t be creative. It just pushes the agencies to work harder and think of more engaging content,” he said. Last year after the Singtel-Gushcloud saga, where news broke that Singtel had mandated its agency to bad mouth competitors on social media, The Advertising Standards Authority of Singapore called for public input for its

“Brands and their celebrity influencers need to be more responsible on social media as the audience on these channels are sharp and vocal. Every silly gimmick will be scrutinised and criticised.” Prantik Mazumdar — managing partner of Happy Marketer

Prantik Mazumdar, managing partner of Happy Marketer, is of the view that they should be. He said it was quite unfortunate that a brand of NTUC Income’s stature had to resort to “sly tactics to garner attention on social media”. “Brands and their celebrity influencers need to be more responsible on social media as the audience on these channels are sharp and vocal. Every silly gimmick will be scrutinised and criticised,” he said, adding: it would definitely impact the subtlety and “realism” of the message, but that’s a cost of responsible/ transparent influencer engagement. He added that when engaging celebrities to advertise, it would be advisable for brands to mark those pieces of content as a sponsored message or advertorial for the sake of transparency and social responsibility. In more mature markets, brands such as Johnson & Johnson and P&G already have internal policies which demand that every celebrity endorsed message on social

consultation on the draft, “Digital and Social Media Advertising Guidelines”. According to the guidelines, marketers are required to make sponsored messages distinguishable from personal opinions and editorial content in their posts and disclose any commercial relationships. In addition, the guidelines require marketers to develop community guidelines, be transparent about fees and the purchase process, and ensure that digital marketing communications addressed to children are suitable for them. The guidelines also state that regardless of content, paid advertising should be clearly distinguished and the disclosure for paid native advertising should be marked clearly and prominently. The guidelines draw reference from similar advertising codes of conduct that are already established in countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom, as well as some of those set by social media channels.

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30/3/2016 5:37:46 PM


NEWS ANALYSIS

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WHY CLIENTS WILL NOT BE SPENDING MORE ON SOCIAL MEDIA IN 2016 Despite all the talk of social media being vital, half of the marketers in APAC say their 2016 social media budget will remain the same as 2015. Here’s why. Rezwana Manjur writes.

Pushing the right button: It’s important to find the right social media platform for a successful marketing campaign.

While we know social media is one of the most important mediums of communication today, a recent study by Forrester states that half of the marketers in APAC surveyed say their 2016 social media budget will be the same as 2015. Only a quarter of those interviewed will increase their spend by less than 10%. “This cautious investment appetite in social marketing reflects the growing maturity of markets such as Singapore and Australia,

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where user growth and usage has stabilised, whereas marketers in developing markets continue to invest to increase their reach,” said Clement Teo, senior analyst at Forrester. For instance, India’s social media advertising spending will grow from 2015 to 2020 at a CAGR that is double Australia’s. On a scale of one (very dissatisfied) to five (very satisfied), respondents’ satisfaction with the tactics they deploy on social networks received an average score of 3.43. This

suggests that while they believe they’re using the right platforms, they feel that tactics such as maintaining a branded profile on social sites such as Facebook or LinkedIn are not up to scratch. East versus west: What’s your social media preference? Marketers in Australia, India, Indonesia and Singapore are adopting mainstream Western social platforms such as Facebook and Twitter

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NEWS ANALYSIS

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more than prominent Asian social platforms such as WeChat and Line, said the Forrester study.

Tencent Weibo Undervalued

Essential

4.35

4.20

WeChat We maintain our own branded discussion forum or community

4.05

Satisfaction

Here’s a list of the platforms that marketers currently use: • Facebook – 100% • Twitter – 81 % • LinkedIn – 78% • YouTube – 66% • Instagram – 59% • Google Plus – 25% • WeChat – 19% • Tencent Weibo – 13% • Line – 13% • Snapchat – 9% • Pinterest – 6% • Tumblr – 6%

Tumblr 4.50

Pinterest We pay key opinion 3.90 leaders to post ratings, reviews, and comments on other social sites 3.75 We sponsor or advertise on other discussion forums 3.60 or communities

Instagram YouTube

Facebook We maintain our own branded blog

Essential: High adoption and satisfaction. Social tactics and platforms such as using social sites like Facebook and LinkedIn and sponsoring or advertising on those platforms are marketers’ ideal choices.

Undervalued: Low adoption, but high satisfaction. Although social tactics and platforms such as WeChat, Pinterest and Tumblr create significant business value for marketers, not many use them.

Overvalued: High adoption, but low satisfaction. While social tactics and platforms such as Twitter are widely used, they fall short of marketers’ expectations.

Optional: Low adoption and satisfaction. Very few marketers use social tactics and platforms such as Snapchat and Line. Marketers are either just starting

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LinkedIn Twitter

We allow customers to post ratings, reviews, and comments on our own websites

Line 3.45

However, while marketers might expect the most popular social tactics to be the ones they are most satisfied with, survey results show that some less popular tactics rank higher in satisfaction than the highly popular ones. Conversely, some less popular social platforms fared better in satisfaction than their more popular counterparts. The study suggests this is because marketers who flock to the most popular sites with the widest reach find they are also beholden to the site owners’ whims and have little choice, but to play by their rules. For example, Facebook’s recent changes to what users see in their news feed affected social marketing tactics such as advertising, which had an impact on marketers looking to improve their reach. Forrester categorises the social tactics and platforms that marketers use in Asia Pacific into four groups.

We sponsor or advertise on social sites like Facebook or LinkedIn

Snapchat

We sponsor or advertise on other blogs

3.30

3.15 Optional

We ask customers to post ratings, reviews, and comments on other social sites

We maintain our own branded profile on social sites like Facebook or LinkedIn

We use social monitoring or social listening tools

Overvalued

Google Plus 3.00 0.0

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.5

0.4

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

1.0

Adoption Base: 32 social marketers in Australia, India, Indonesia, and Singapore

Source: Forrester’s Q4 2015 Asia Pacic Social Marketing Online Survey

to experiment with these tactics or have already become disillusioned with them. Look at the chart above to see where each of the social media platforms fall under. Social handicaps While social marketing is maturing in Asia Pacific, marketers still face challenges in these areas: • Achieving a positive ROI More than half of marketers indicated that achieving a positive social marketing ROI was their biggest challenge. While some social tools, such as viral videos, can be effective at increasing awareness, they are typically more expensive than other social media tools. They’re also more difficult to scale than traditional media buying campaigns. And unlike ad buys, these tools come with no audience guarantees, making it difficult to set expectations and ultimately deliver ROI. • Measuring campaign performance Nearly 53% of marketers found measuring campaign performance a challenge. While 62% track click-throughs and 52% monitor site traffic, only 38% track the number of leads and 14% track sales numbers as metrics. This

means that marketers are not aligning campaign performance to the right set of social metrics. •

Determining the best social strategies and tactics Nearly half of the marketers Forrester surveyed struggle to find the best social strategies and tactics for social marketing. Why? Because social media development and consumer behaviours are changing quickly in AP and marketers are struggling to constantly learn new ideas, tools and innovations to keep up with their customers on social media. •

Integrating a social channel strategy with other marketing channels One-third use social marketing as a discrete channel, meaning that companies’ different campaigns don’t integrate well across marketing channels. Marketers need to find ways for social media to support their marketing programme rather than vice versa, as it affects how companies win, serve and retain customers throughout the customer journey. Forrester’s Q4 2015 Asia Pacific social marketing online survey was fielded in November and December 2015 to social marketers in Australia, India, Indonesia and Singapore.

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NEWS ANALYSIS

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RAKUTEN SHUTS DOWN: THE END OF E-COMMERCE AS WE KNOW IT? There is a fallacy that e-commerce is a cheaper way to reach more customers, but in truth e-commerce is surprisingly expensive to run. Rezwana Manjur writes.

Not all doom and gloom: Despite Rakuten’s recent decision, many think the future of e-commerce in Southeast Asia continues to look bright.

Rakuten shocked the retail world when it recently decided to shut down its e-commerce sites and offices in Malaysia, Singapore and

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Indonesia. But in a conversation with Marketing, a spokesperson from Rakuten explained this was in line with its “2020 vision and global

strategy for its transformation of e-commerce”. “In Southeast Asia, as the market itself changes and adapts, we are looking towards C2C and

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NEWS ANALYSIS

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“The large players have moved quickly in terms of acquisition and advertising. Serious players need to work on getting scale quickly and focus needs to be razor sharp executions on all fronts from merchandising, acquisition, marketing to data.” Rajeev Bala, co-founder and CEO of Predator Digital Holdings

mobile business models for e-commerce and other businesses,” read an added statement given to A+M.

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While e-commerce continues to grow in the region, today consumers are flooded with options as to which online marketplace service to use. Most of these players offer similar deals with very little areas of difference from competitors. So is this just a natural consolidation of e-commerce as we know it? Linda Locke, previously a marketing consultant at Club21, certainly deems it to be. She says today that too many e-commerce retailers think “build it and they will come” when they should be saying “make it special and they will come”. There is a fallacy that e-commerce is a cheaper way to reach more customers, but in truth e-commerce is surprisingly expensive to run. She added that going forward, more players will look to exceptional customer service and an omni-channel presence, as well as omnimedia, to remain top-of-mind and to be seen as exciting. “A unique and differentiated product is still a must have and is far too underestimated. There also needs to be clever tie-ups to stimulate traffic and desire,” Locke said. Added Prantik Mazumdar, managing partner of Happy Marketer: “It is alarming and unfortunate that Rakuten is shutting its B2B2C e-commerce operations in the region.” However, in the long-term, this might be a good move. This is an early indication that a market correction is in the reckoning. Moreover, there is talk in the market and media about the over valuations of companies in the tech and e-commerce space. Given the availability of “easy money”, many companies are now pushed to focus purely on exponential customer acquisition growth at the cost of profitability – which is not sustainable. As the Federal Reserve increases its rates, growth slows down in China, and tech companies such as LinkedIn see their stock prices slashed, there will be more uncertainty among investors.

They might soon be pulling back from subsequent rounds of investments, forcing many more ventures without profitable business models to scale down. This is a cyclical nature of the market and it was bound to happen sooner or later. Rakuten won’t be the last e-commerce player to shut or scale down operations in the region. Moving into the next phase Neeraj Gulati, former managing director of Ingenuity at IPG Mediabrands Malaysia, said this was just the evolution of the digital business model. The e-commerce model evolved around taking an offline product and selling it online, thereby making discovery and transactions easier and faster. “Somehow it became synonymous with discounting for the customers and a race for transaction numbers (valuation) for the companies,” he said. Like Mazumdar, he added these are signs of the next revolution in the commerce space where shopping will take a more contextual face. In the near future, data from chat apps such as Viber and WhatsApp will blend seamlessly into services and products for sales. “The new face of e-commerce is not just taking offline products and selling them online, but using the data from the online space and customising the products and services for the user and making it relevant to that moment. It will become ‘data-commerce’,” he said. Rajeev Bala, co-founder and CEO of Predator Digital Holdings, added that smaller players would quickly see themselves squeezed out. He explained Rakuten had been a fringe player to date. Quoting statistics from analytics site SimilarWeb, he added Rakuten’s Indonesia site barely managed 300,000 visits in August 2015, compared with 48 million for Lazada Indonesia – spelling out a crushing difference between the two. Nonetheless, the future of e-commerce as an industry in Southeast Asia continues to look bright, with significant room for growth. Moreover, the rapid adoption of mobile will also catapult the trend. “The large players have moved quickly in terms of acquisition and advertising. Serious players need to work on getting scale quickly and focus needs to be razor sharp executions on all fronts from merchandising, acquisition, marketing to data,” Bala said. “Going forward, there will be a few niche players, but this is a game where scale is probably the only differentiation factor over time.”

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NEWS ANALYSIS

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HOW CPG BRANDS CAN SEIZE E-COMMERCE GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES Accenture estimates the consumer goods and services industry will grow by as much as US$700 billion globally by 2020. Rayana Pandey explores. Consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies must fully embrace digital commerce or risk losing out to newer industry players in the battle for an estimated US$340 billion worth of market growth in Asia Pacific, according to Accenture. In a new report, “The future is now: understanding the new Asian consumer”,

Accenture estimates the consumer goods and services industry will grow by as much as US$700 billion globally by 2020, with nearly 50%, or US$340 billion, of this growth coming from Asia – specifically China, Indonesia, India, Singapore and Thailand. China alone is expected to account for about US$200 billion or 60% of the growth in Asia.

How to reach the Singaporean consumer

“If CPG companies don’t take action now, they risk losing out on the new generation of consumers. These companies must couple traditional models with new ones where consumer engagement is digital and one2one, social influence is perceived to be the trustworthy source and shopping is one click away,” said Fabio Vacirca, senior managing

CURRENT REALITY IN MUCH OF APAC:

Basic online shopping: product-focused It’s the micro moments: Deliver unique experiences that delight and enable loyalty, seamlessly, NOW.

Enable the purchasing decision: Deliver the best products to consumers – before they’ve even asked for them.

Be omnichannel: Stay connected and on, always.

 For a developing e-market, motivations for online shopping are hinged on “getting the basics right”; the product aspects need to be heightened in order to create a more compelling offer  … while the fulfilment aspects need to be worked out to minimise risks and disappointment.

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Going beyond the basics: creating an enhanced shopping experience is necessary to increase market share.  First, recreate the role of shopping as a social lubricant in the digital world. • In highly globalised markets, expectations of online offerings can be raised by the ease of access to foreign luxuries in the local retail market  … next, enhance the in-store experience by bringing convenience, sensorials and by spoiling the shoppers. • Also leverage online channels to consolidate expert advice, helping shoppers to make more informed decisions.  Finally, up the ante on online deals and promotions by constantly innovating to reward shoppers with the absolute thrill of getting the best bargains.

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NEWS ANALYSIS

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director in Accenture’s products operating group in Asia Pacific. “The entire sales and marketing ecosystem is changing dramatically on the back of the new generation of consumers and pervasive digital technologies. In Asian markets the change is faster and in many cases it means leapfrogging the traditional models.” The report estimates that retail sales across Asia Pacific’s booming consumer markets are on course to top US$10 trillion by 2018, with about one-quarter of that amount coming from digital commerce. In addition, using knowledge of consumer preferences and their evolving demands, leading disruptors in the market such as Alibaba have been adapting by reinventing and tailoring offerings to redefine the value chain and make the consumer their focal point. The report identifies a number of steps that established CPG companies can take to seize growth opportunities and counter the threat of the new players: • Partnering with e-commerce platforms to reach new consumers/markets. • Maximise value from cross-border e-commerce. • Investing in brand building, with integrated marketing initiatives spanning online/offline. • Adopting a “mobile first” approach. • Integrating e-commerce initiatives with social platforms to engage consumers and build trust. • Investigating opportunities for product

TOMORROW:

Smart lifestyle: integration-focused For Singapore, the future could lie in innovating toward a “sans hassle” experience; eliminating all the “unwanted” steps and compacting the process of shopping and taking care of their needs.

testing and product development through crowd-sourcing. Leveraging insights from big data to enhance and fine-tune customer interactions across multiple touch-points.

The digital commerce opportunity for CPG companies Despite the market seeing some digital transformation by CPG companies, it is still not enough for many consumers. Accenture’s research shows consumers are not satisfied with their purchase journeys. Today’s top “ask”, according to the report, is for a single platform where they can enjoy unique experiences that delight and enable their impulse decisions, receive tailored product recommendations that meet their desires immediately and where they are always connected to their favourite brands. This represents an outstanding opportunity for traditional CPG companies to capture the next wave of growth. By focusing on providing stronger digital commerce they can bridge existing gaps in consumers’ purchase journeys and provide the seamless shopping experiences they’re looking for. “Technology will continue to evolve and influence how consumers shop in the future,” Vacirca said. “By better using digital technologies, CPG companies can engage with consumers on a real-time basis, allowing the companies to provide the maximum value

 A personal “life” assistant for advanced e-commerce shoppers that enhances the fun of shopping and the mastery of life skills, while relieving the burden of chores and inconvenience.  Path to purchase phases easily triggered, accessed and completed from wherever and whenever at the most relevant life moments.

within the minimum time. This will, in turn, create opportunities for CPG companies to control the consumer buying experience of tomorrow.” The research was launched at the Accenture Internet of Things (IoT) centre of excellence in Singapore. The centre brings market expertise, industry leading practices, leading-edge technologies and consumer research together to create an experience that empowers businesses to think differently about the future – from digital transformation and corporate strategy to IT, sales and marketing reinvention. “The next generation of digital commerce is here, and consumer empowerment enabled by smarter technologies will change how we shop and make purchases,” Vacirca said. “From the virtual reality room to its nextgeneration experience space, the Accenture IoT centre of excellence in Singapore helps businesses take advantage of the unprecedented opportunities that exist in the rapidly evolving digital marketplace.” Accenture carried out a range of qualitative and quantitative research for this report. It included the creation of “online consumer communities” across China, Indonesia and Singapore to better understand e-commerce preferences, pain-points and motivations in relation to consumer goods and services purchases. The communities were active from December 2015 to January 2016. In addition, Accenture hosted interviews with a sample of senior-level executives with a strong exposure to the CPG industry and desk research was used to complement this.

 The experience needs to be fully integrated and anticipatory to improve the fast-paced lifestyles of consumers to move the frontier of digital commerce.

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What does smart shopping mean to consumers in Singapore? Efficiency is at the heart of the Singaporean shopper. They love simple, streamlined procedures. They want quick results with the best outcome and minimal waste of resources – in terms of money or product. They seek hassle-free solutions that help them reach their desired outcomes with the fewest steps and least resources possible.

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PROFILE

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FINTAN KNIGHT, GLOBAL DIRECTOR OF SALES LES AND MARKETING AT ROLLS-ROYCE, SHARES ES WITH REZWANA MANJUR WHY HAVING A STRONG MARKETING CONCEPT BEFORE HEADING INTO ENGINEERING IS WINNING HALF THE BATTLE.

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PROFILE

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The turn of the 20th century brought together two distinct individuals from two very different walks of life. On 4 May 1904, the affluent and daring Charles Stewart Rolls met the hardworking and experimental Henry Royce in Manchester as Royce drove his first 10hp motor car into town. Legend has it that within minutes of seeing Royce’s twin-cylinder 10hp, the already established daredevil motorist Rolls knew he had found what he was looking for in an engine. He agreed on the spot to sell as many motor cars as Royce could build, thus leading to the birth of today’s ultra-luxurious automobile brand. While critics say the brand, now 112 years old, is not big on innovation, its global director of sales and marketing Fintan Knight believes otherwise. Rolls was an experimenter, Royce an inventor and Eleanor Velasco Thornton was the glamorous muse that now sits at the front of every car. “We are an ideas company and these traits are very much at the heart of the innovation economy and in modern day luxury,” Knight says. However, although contemporary and timeless, Rolls-Royce needed to bring forth its narrative across all its communications. “We allowed our narrative to become dusty over the years, but in last three years we are modernising the brand and the story of Henry, Charles and Eleanor. We have always been sexy, cool and luxurious and going forward with our ad executions we will look to showcase these attributes more,” Knight says. The choice to put forth these attributes also comes as the brand sees

the average age of customers dropping from 53 to 45. While once, the archetype Rolls-Royce customer used to be a captain of industry who sat in boardrooms, now that trend has changed to include more innovators or entertainment entrepreneurs to alpha females. “We were being let down in the past. Even just five years ago people would say this is my father’s car or my grandfather’s car,” he says, adding that it was a shame because of the enthusiasm and technology that goes into building the vehicles. But innovation for the brand is not simply about creating a new cool gadget or adding on a feature. Instead, it’s in the engineering of the product. While marketers are often told to find ways to market a product after it has been created, for Rolls-Royce, it is the reverse. “We start with a strong marketing concept and idea of what a Rolls-Royce vehicle should be and represent before heading into engineering,” he says. “It would be very easy to talk about gear box and engine and brakes, but we need to start with a solid concept and everything else fits very logically.” The convergence of digital and luxury To keep up with its younger audiences, the brand has also now become immensely active on social media – and it has paid off. Content and access are also vital when you want to play in these areas. In 2015, the company’s combined social media community grew by

“IT WOULD BE VERY EASY TO TALK ABOUT GEAR BOX AND ENGINE AND BRAKES, BUT WE NEED TO START WITH A SOLID CONCEPT AND EVERYTHING ELSE FITS VERY LOGICALLY.”

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PROFILE

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“ DIGITAL TECH IS A GREAT WAY TO INSPIRE AND ENTERTAIN CLIENTS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS WITH IDEAS. LUXURY BRANDS SHOULD NOT BE AFRAID OF DIGITAL.” 125% YOY to 6,312,005. The bulk of this growth came from Instagram which registered a 740% YOY growth to 798,767 followers by year end. In February 2016, Rolls-Royce crossed the one million mark. All this was relatively quick given the brand had taken up social media at the tail end of 2011. “It is a shame to keep our brand and character and ambition a secret. Digital tech is a great way to inspire and entertain clients and future prospects with ideas. Luxury brands should not be afraid of digital,” he says. However, what marketers must remember is to have all of these initiatives culminate into real experiences for the clients – while keeping to its exclusivity and intimacy. “Many clients enjoy the recognition they gain from those who regard their purchases as an intelligent choice. We’re a brand that people love to associate themselves with. So digital is not a replacement for our luxury lifestyle, but an enhancement of the luxury experience,” he says. And no doubt when it comes to both wealth and digital, Asia Pacific is fast moving into a leadership position. “The APAC region is fast developing into a powerhouse and the wealth generated here is having a great influence in the west and Europe and America and we can feel it happening.” Knight’s role sees him lead 230 people globally. Half of them sit in the headquarters in the UK and the rest in regional positions. A large part of wearing the global marketing and sales es hat sees him travelling extensively. But for Knight, APAC is a region he feelss comfortable with having

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lived in Singapore for two years in the late 1990s working with German carmaker Audi. “Singapore is our regional headquarters and to me, it is the Switzerland of Asia Pacific.” With 13 direct reports under him, he is very conscious of managing his time and while he tries to divide his time up reasonably equally between the sales, marketing and ownership services team, the innovation side of things steal his attention a lot of the time. “Rolls-Royce also has a number of innovative projects where I end up spending more time than I should, but there are more than eight hours in a day so I make sure to find time for all,” he adds smiling. To be a successful marketer of a brand of the future, adds Knight, one needs to find a connection between his/her own personal mission in life and the company’s mission. Unfortunately, much of the marketing in the automotive industry, says Knight, is mediocre. “I don’t think the automotive industry is much better than average when it comes to marketing.” The industry, he says, is uniformly run by either engineers or finance folks who are fascinated by the hardware. “Hardware is constantly put up front and centre in the industry, sometimes quite rightly, but the industry is still a little bit dumb about the rest such as packaging and selling a dream,” he says. “In the future I believe auto marketing will become a lot more multidimensional and experiential over time. The digital world will help that; it will be a major transformation, as brandss begin begin to speak to clients directly.”

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MARKETING FEATURE: CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE ................................................................................................................................................................................................................

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The real currency of marketing now is the customer experience. And that’s what marketing decision-makers from McDonald’s, Comedy Central and RBS stressed at the Adobe Digital Summit, held at the Venetian in Las Vegas in front of more than 10,000 professionals. Digital is a reality, but how brands create an exceptional customer experience in the digital as well as the physical realm will be critical to their success. Digital marketing is in its third enterprise wave, explained Brad Rencher, GM and EVP of Adobe Digital Marketing. The first wave started as early as the 1960s when companies were forced to digitise their back offices. This was followed by the front office with CRM and sales. The third phase is all about the experience. “This has never been more important than now as we move into the experience economy,” he said, adding that marketers have historically been the nurturers of the customer experience. The need for new experiences, coupled with the hyper-elevated customer expectation driven by mobile and IoT, is undoubtedly challenging for marketers. Today consumers expect to be known by organisations and be delivered an experience that is consistent, continuous and compelling.

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“This wave is about bringing people together and things they love and then getting out of the way. For marketers, it is now about doing our job so well that customers don’t know we exist,” he said. Enterprises as a whole need to become experience-obsessed. Those who fail to do so will be called out publicly and loudly. Quoting Moore’s Law, he added the digital experience and enhancement doubles every 18 months, and as such, consumers would also now expect an exponential improvement in their interaction with brands every 18 months. Shantanu Narayen, CEO of Adobe, said all digital experiences need to be seamlessly provocative, personal and predictive in the experience era and they need to move into the physical world in industries such as retail, hospitality and automotive. As augmented and virtual reality blur the lines between physical and digital, possibilities for brands have exploded. Design and aesthetics, therefore, have never been more important and complex than now. “While digital experiences are on everybody’s mind, what is a challenge is making these imaginations into reality,” he said adding that Adobe believes a great experience starts with great content.

Beautiful design and eye-catching imagery have always had the power to move and educate and to inspire people to action and to build a great brand. Good content has the power to inspire. Getting content to the right person at the right place and time needs data. “Robots will never do great marketing and human intuition can never be replaced, but we need to harness the power of computing. Man plus machine to work faster and smarter to make things happen,” he said. Also taking the stage was Deborah Wahl, SVP and CMO of McDonald’s USA. Picking up from Rencher’s statement on the expectations of consumers improving every 18 months, she added that McDonald’s has been making significant strides to improve its services. Currently, using Adobe Experience Manager, the fast-food giant decided to take a closer look at the data it found in its local stores’ Wi-Fi systems to create a more localised experience. “It has been 18 months since we started investing from mass discussion to mass personalisation. We are off to a good start, but we have a long way to go,” she said. Recent in fully embracing digital is one of the oldest English banks, RBS, whose client list includes the likes of the queen of England. Giles

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MCDONALD’S CMO: WHY DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION IS NOT AN EASY TASK McDonald’s USA is on a journey of complete digital transformation, but the journey is by no means an easy one, admits SVP and CMO Deborah Wahl. Just 18 months ago, the company, which services 26 million customers daily in the US alone, had zero digital interaction with customers. In fact, the fast-food giant didn’t even own an app for the US market. “Back then, the predominant way to order was over the counter,” she said. That’s when McDonald’s decided to double down on its transformation. The transformation for the company meant changing everything – from food options, the service experience, brand perception and value to digital. While the first bite was into the food department, change for the company meant a complete overhaul. “We are off to a good start, but we have a lot of things to do. There are so many different things to approach, including digital. That’s where we made a commitment to move from mass discussion to mass personalisation.” Today, it has two million opportunities a month to respond directly to customers, and using Adobe’s marketing tools, the company is at a 10% response rate. The fast-food giant has also seen more than 10 million downloads over the past three months and also measures response time tightly. Another challenge for the brand was blending physical with digital. "The core tenets of McDonald’s is quality, service and convenience. The question for us, then, is how do we take those tenets into the virtual world as well. Our aim is to blend the digital and physical realm seamlessly so that our brand experience remains consistent.” Coupled with its large global footprint, change isn’t easy. In digital there are a lot of shiny toys. What then does a company such as McDonald’s do? It steps back to “focus on timing and balance” in integrating new services or digital tools. While moving into mobile payments early on in the game proved beneficial for the company, it ensures it takes calculated risks when jumping on the latest gadgets and tools available in market. It also has a mention on social media every 1.5 seconds. This makes it almost imperative for McDonald’s to be part of those conversations and engage customers. The most important thing is having discipline, she says. “For us, it is about what we can do first and where our biggest customer need is and solving that. That takes discipline because in marketing you love new ideas and always want to do something exciting,” she adds. While McDonald’s does from time to time delve into innovative products such as its Virtual Happy Meal box at SxSW or working with car brand Ford for future drive-through initiatives to save consumers time, it is peeling back and now looking at day to day issues. One such area where Adobe is assisting McDonald’s in is by using the Adobe Experience tool to see what consumers are saying about the brand on its Wi-Fi network. One market which this has been used in was Texas. From this, McDonald’s was also able to find that Texans really preferred local messaging and by tweaking its promotional offers the company saw a 350% increase in click-through. There is so much incremental power in those little things versus the big thrilling new ideas. “Our tasks and teams are really focused on that day to day optimisation and areas that build the business,” she said. Adobe paid for the journalist’s trip to Adobe Summit 2016, held in Las Vegas.

Richardson, head of analytics at RBS, explains that just a few years ago, the company would simply invest in digital without knowing how it was helping its strategic investment. “We were terrible at digital … and 80% of whatever you do online probably doesn’t work,” he admits. “What we needed to become was

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‘superstar DJs’ of digital, constantly pushing out content and monitoring it to see if it was working. Being agile to be able to optimise and constantly revising content was key,” he said. Much like the superstar DJs, who would take control of the technology in-house, RBS’ digital team started building capabilities internally. The first step was dividing the digital

team into journey managers who mapped the customer experience from marketing to research and application. It then decided to tag these customers to see if they followed through with the entire journey. With all the data collected, the company decided to democratise the data and see what consumers were best responding to. “The solution for us was to test, learn and collaborate,” he said. Finally, RBS had to optimise the data it had collected. For that, the brand decided to create “producer roles” and these producers were tasked to work within the Adobe marketing cloud to create the customer profiles and journeys from start to finish. At the end of the day, data is the biggest disrupter within a business and marketers need to be fearless, he added. Comedy Central was another client who found that to connect with its main target audience – 18 to 34-year-olds – embracing digital was a must. With Jon Stewart also leaving The Daily Show after 15 years in February, the network found itself in need of a new identity. Walter Levitt, CMO of Comedy Central, said: “Our research showed that comedy was a way for 18 to 34-year-old men to build their personal brand by sharing content. So after 25 years, we needed to reinvent ourselves and find out what this new era meant for us. We needed to be the social platform wherever Millennials were consuming our content.” “We could no longer just be a TV network. We need to be the favourite comedy brand. As a marketer, it was the scariest and coolest opportunity.” When the announcement of Trevor Noah was made to replace Stewart, the company’s data analysis showed the public was immensely interested in Noah, not only as the new host of The Daily Show, but also on his personal life and aspects not at all related to Comedy Central. To pick up on this new buzz, the channel decided to create a series of hilarious YouTube videos starring Noah. He was on screen explaining personal issues such as who his girlfriend was or general facts about himself in a hilarious manner – building up anticipation of a brand new The Daily Show. In this way the channel was able to effectively marry its data with creativity “Creativity is at the core for us at Comedy Central. When our creators make their content they try to come up with the funniest stuff. From a marketing point of view, our connection and use of data has grown exponentially and we don’t start a campaign without data,” he added.

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BOLD AND BEAUTIFULLY CREATIVE: DON’T LET DATA PARALYSE YOU George Clooney, Abby Wambach, Cirque du Soleil and Mattel on what the collision of digital and physical mean for their businesses. Rezwana Manjur writes. At the heart of digital marketing is creativity and boldness, said John Mellor, EVP and general manager of digital media at Adobe Systems, on day two of the Adobe Summit 2016. Without an emotional connection with consumers, data is absolutely meaningless. While data can amplify or direct a sense of storytelling, ultimately a human approach is what counts. As much as our jobs require more and more data, it is still just a piece of the puzzle. Data alone is useless unless we can wrap

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content around it. It can be sterile and it is not emotional. Stories evoke emotions and emotions drive change. But changing mere numbers to tell a story at scale is not easy. Despite having cutting-edge technology to spot trends and topics, data can still be hugely overwhelming for many. In fact, a quick survey of the 10,000 attendees of the summit showed that 27% still felt that they were rookies with digital marketing skills and only 30% felt they were great at it. About 43% of people felt they had some

skills and their organisations were slow and steady when it came to adopting new digital technology. So how do you refrain from getting dataparalysis? No matter where your digital capabilities are, you just get down to business and get personal with the customer, Mellor said. Getting to know them in an intimate manner changes awareness to experience and leads to an emotional connection. All that ultimately depends on how ready you are to be creative and personal in creating an experience.

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Make the first move Getting personal isn’t always about getting the consumer to open up. Sometimes, it is about opening up first. One example of a company which was ready to do so was Cirque du Soleil, which Mellor termed as “possibly one of the most creative and experience-led companies of all time”. Creating an extravagant experience has always been at the heart of the company, but with the strips in Las Vegas getting more and more crowded and shows constantly drumming up noise for footfall, Cirque du Soleil felt that it would benefit more by turning the volume down. The brand decided to get more intimate with its consumers. “Our product doesn’t translate [visually] onto other mediums easily,” said Alma Derricks, CMO of the company.

the role of a “packaging company”. To tackle this change, Mattel started to really listen to what consumers were saying. It listened into conversations between children, mothers and society as a whole. Eventually, the brand realised it had to add more diversity. This began with changing Barbie’s skin and hair colour. Slowly, Barbie’s stiff heeled foot was changed into one which was flexible allowing for more permutations and combinations to the dolls’ styles. It also launched various body types such as plus size Barbie and petite Barbie. Dickson added while it might seem daunting for companies set in their ways to make a change, sometimes big meaningful change doesn’t necessarily mean taking crazy risks. Sometimes, like for Barbie, these changes are somewhat easy to implement and make the

infiltrated the world of Hollywood. For example, when casting a new face, metrics such as a social media following and so on come into play. Casting directors and playwrights often face the pressure of hiring an actress with a bigger following as compared to a more talented one. As a young talent this can help you, but it can also cloud your judgment. Clooney added: “If those with the most Twitter followers were the biggest stars then Kim Kardashian would be Meryl Streep. I’m not knocking Kim Kardashian, but she has a large Twitter following.” While all for advancement, Clooney however, is not the biggest fan of being on social media himself. He once even said: “I think anyone who is famous and is on Twitter is a moron.”While he stood by the statement, Clooney explained that in the offline world,

“If those with the most Twitter followers were the biggest stars then Kim Kardashian would be Meryl Streep. I’m not knocking Kim Kardashian, but she has a large Twitter following.”

One way the show decided to get more intimate with its consumers was by inviting them back stage to get to know its designers and musicians and telling their stories as well. Recently, Cirque du Soleil launched its first ever half-day master class to teach dancing to the public. Derricks added the plan for Cirque du Soleil was to grow this into regular master classes to invite more of the public to get closer to the brand. “It is a completely different way of engaging our customers from the past.” Listening to change Meanwhile for Mattel, listening to its customers allowed the brand to win back the love of consumers. The brand recently went through revolutionary changes with its iconic Barbie dolls. Barbie had long lost her charms with a very dated look, admitted Richard Dickson, COO of Mattel. “Fear of messing up the most popular toy ever led to our silence and inaction.” He added the company was fast taking

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product contemporary and relatable. “We knew Barbie had a purpose, but what was critical was making those ideas relevant today.” Seeing real change Media is another industry which has been heavily impacted by digital. Hollywood star George Clooney, who came on stage on the second day, shared that digital technology is helping filmmaking from remote parts of the world such as Pakistan and Iran. One simply has to look at the content made for the likes of Netflix to see the quality of storytelling has improved. Moreover with TV no longer being the only dominating medium, the work out there available for young actors has increased exponentially. “I think it is great for our industry and opens up a million different avenues of how to make and work in entertainment,” he said. As with all things good, Clooney admitted there are some negative aspects that have

celebrities have greater control over their narratives, but online a small mistake can easily be amplified, adding that the speed of response on social media and responses “can kill you”. American soccer star Abby Wambach, who is a tough advocate for equality, also added that armed with data, it is easier to bring hard evidence to the table and address issues such as the pay gap in the sporting world, which is still largely dominated by men. Despite having a larger viewership compared with the 2014 FIFA World Cup, last year the winning team of the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup only took home US$2 million in prize money compared with Germany in 2014 bringing home US$35 million. With data in hand, she added, there is more ways to fight to change the world. On measuring success, she added: “Process is so much more important than the outcome. “So I am personally not so focused all the time on the outcome and I believe if you put it out there, you will get back what you give.”

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WHAT LEGACY BRANDS CAN LEARN FROM BARBIE’S REVIVAL Richard Dickson, COO of Mattel, shares Barbie’s story at the 2016 Adobe Digital Marketing Summit. Rezwana Manjur reports. If you are a legacy brand, how do you stay relevant at a time “cool” is just a thing of the moment? That is the challenge many legacy brands face and one, most recently, faced by long-time toymaker Mattel. Started in 1945, the brand’s founders initially thought of the business not just as a toy company, but as the image of the great American dream. The company was started in a humble garage in post-war California, the birthplace of many of today’s leading brands such as HP, Apple and even the classic band The Beach Boys. Creativity was in its genes. “Mattel was design-led before anybody ever knew what it even meant. The big idea to come out of the garage in California wasn’t making toys, but rather it was about a mindset and a conviction that taking bold risks on insightful, thoughtful and innovative ideas would delight children, and as a result, build business,” said Richard Dickson, COO of Mattel

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at the 2016 Adobe Digital Marketing Summit. With this vision in mind, the company launched the beloved Barbie doll in 1959. Not long after, Mattel went ahead to create the ideal car – Hot Wheels. Seeing the success of these toys, the company then added many other brands to its portfolio such as Polly Pocket, Bob the Builder and Thomas the Tank. In its early days, Mattel was leading the pack in out-of-the-box thinking. In marketing as well, Mattel took on a daring stance. At a time where advertising was largely in newspapers, Mattel looked beyond this format and ventured into television. It soon became one of the first consistent national advertisers more than 60 years ago. “Our founders didn’t know if TV would work, but they believed in the power of this new medium. Our founders engaged children with brands long before anybody actually talked about a content strategy.” In fact, the founders of Mattel, Harold

Matson, Elliot Handler and Ruth Handler, were so forward thinking that in 1955 Mattel formed a partnership with Walt Disney, who was a fellow Californian entrepreneur, to sponsor the Mickey Mouse Club TV series. While this mindset of working with likeminded creative entrepreneurs is still pretty much a part of its DNA, over the course of time, growth for the business plateaued. “At some point we stopped looking to the future as we had before. We became near sighted, failing to recognise how fast our business was changing.” As time passed and the speed of change and competition kept growing, the simple act of playing had evolved from an activity of entertainment to one of education and purpose. The business was changing simply because the term “play” was changing with toys, games, media and content all seamlessly converging in children’s minds. The company faced competition from

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not only other toy companies, but also media and technology brands. Companies were essentially competing for the consumers’ time and eyeballs, and the new and daring 30-second TV spots Mattel was proud of, became “traditional”. In a world where everyone was looking to omni-channel strategies, Mattel was lost. Its performance was suffering. Mattel had devolved from an innovative goods company to a packaged goods company, said Dickson. “We repeated what worked instead of fearing the status quo. We mistook acting creative as being creating and our ideas lacked purpose.” Everyone from the media to consumers noticed. The company was now cornered into thinking of a new way forward and finding a way to pull out of its gloom and back on its initial path to glory.

was the only way out”. Barbie had to, overnight, engage and reengage the everyday consciousness of girls and mums in record speed. For Barbie to succeed, girls had to love her again. Getting some love for Barbie Mattel developed a very ambitious strategic plan for the Barbie brand. It began with a big, yet meaningful change, which was relatively easy to execute. The Barbie brand introduced a diversity revolution with more than 20 different skin tones, hair colours and textures, facial features and styles – a far cry from the dated model. The dolls were made to reflect the complex world girls live in and see today. Barbie was even given a flexible foot to further contemporise the brand, while giving it a whole new fashion sense for girls to play with.

agenda of making the biggest change for Barbie head-on and to do so thoughtfully. Carefully, the brand delved into more extensive research, data and real-life conversations with both children and mothers which led to the creation of a whole new range of Barbies with numerous body shapes and sizes. Barbies were now curvy, petite, tall and many other sizes, along with the original doll. The cultural significance of this warranted a TIME magazine cover story, and for the first time, Barbie became a trending topic. Celebrities everywhere showered the brand with praise and support of the move and were conversing on Barbie’s new look. “This was content money just couldn’t buy.” Going forward Learning from Barbie’s success, Mattel was sure that being a leader in a fast-moving ever-

“At some point we stopped looking to the future as we had before. We became near sighted, failing to recognise how fast our business was changing.”

“I believe the most valuable form of invention is the reinvention. We needed to question everything we were doing, embrace uncertainty and relentlessly experiment.” The reinvention of Barbie With so many toy brands under its belt, Mattel decided that Barbie was in the greatest need of a revamp. For Mattel there was no greater challenge as Barbie had long lost her sparkle, despite at one point being one of the most valuable kid brands in the world. Quarter after quarter the brand saw a decline in sales, and it was devastating to see Barbie losing its purpose. This lack of purpose led to Barbie’s initial empowerment messages being diluted to becoming too broad and unfocused. Not knowing what Barbie stood for – or didn’t – made brand decision-making hard and inconsistent. “We needed to reboot Barbie without losing what made her great in the first place. The critical challenge was making what Barbie stood for relevant to girls today, 57 years later.” The brand began by listening to consumers – children, mothers and society. It eavesdropped intently into what everyone was saying about Barbie because “rapid relevance

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She was also given a voice and the ability to talk with the “Hello Barbie” series and was featured on TIME magazine as the new-age artificial intelligence. “We had created brand content by product innovation.” In a bid to engage mums, and reframe the image of the brand in the eyes of mums, Mattel also launched a campaign which showed girls had the power to dream and create their own futures and it all started at a young age when they played with their babies. The biggest change for Barbie The impact of the ad gave Mattel the confidence to take on its boldest step yet: change the fundamental appearance of the most iconic product. Barbie’s figure has long been the centre of attention and dispute by many in the modern era. Mattel, on the matter, has largely remained silent, which Dickson said was often perceived as resistance. The reality is that Mattel understood, but the fear of making a mistake of messing up the most popular toy ever led to silence and inaction. Now armed with a new-found confidence, Mattel was ready to take its new

changing industry required innovation. This led to the creation of “The Toy Box” – an all-new innovations engine within Mattel. The Toy Box was an open-to-all suggestion box – in the belief that the greatest idea can come from anyone at any time. With the Toy Box, Mattel hopes to encourage entrepreneurial thinking and structure among its employees, all the while putting design and creativity at the heart of innovation. With this new structure in place, Mattel is now also revisiting many of its legacy brands and products and taking a creative and innovative approach. “We are applying, with prescription as an individualised formula, to accelerate every brand and create a new culture at Mattel.” A culture which strongly emphasises on creative sharing, global ideation and speed. He added for legacy companies such as Mattel, products need to constantly be innovated and re-innovated to continue being relevant. To move your brand forward, you have to find out what made you special in the first place. Ask yourself: “What was your secret sauce?” Adobe paid for the journalist’s trip to Adobe Summit 2016, held in Las Vegas.

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BRANDED CONTENT

DELIVERING DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION – SINGAPORE POST LEADS BY EXAMPLE IT’S 2016. Four more years and it’ll be two whole decades since Y2K. Twenty years is a long time in today’s fast moving digital age. We’ve made massive strides in technology during this time and this has dramatically changed the way we do many things.

Bernard Leong Head of digital services, Singapore Post

One of the most engulfing change factors is digitisation. Slowly, but surely, we’re moving from the physical to the digital. When was the last time you printed an entire photo album? When did you last receive a hand-written letter?

“In the next couple of years, I think it’s more than just about automation. It’s going to be about how artificial intelligence will seep into your life. The next industrial age is probably more about smart and than about automation. And that is going to be the challenge.

It used to be that we would get excited about receiving an email and treat regular snail mail with nonchalance. Nowadays, the situation is reversed: Finding a letter in the mailbox is one of life’s most delightful little surprises. Well, perhaps not bills and official correspondences – though even these are being digitised. So, in today’s digital age, in which messages are delivered instantaneously through a cloud of 1s and 0s, is the post office still relevant? A big “yes”, says SingPost, and then some. At a digital transformation seminar for CEOs, directors, general managers, and other business leaders, SingPost’s chief commercial officer Grace Ho recounted SingPost’s journey to secure its future in a digitised world.

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The interesting thing about bringing artificial intelligence into automation is that it’s going to allow us to create much more complex workflow processes. For anyone thinking about the journey of digital transformation, just think big, act small, learn quickly, fail fast and do whatever’s in the best long-term interest of your organisation.”

The rise of the internet marked the fall of mail. But that did not faze the 197-year-old company. Technology may have created the challenge. But it also provided opportunities.

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Ho said: “We have created not just a modern-day service for customers, but also a trusted ecosystem where other vendors and organisations can operate more efficiently.” Who said the old guard can’t handle modernisation? They may even show the way. Bernard Leong, SingPost’s head of digital services, had these words of wisdom: “For anyone thinking about the journey of digital transformation, just think big, act small, learn quickly, fail fast and do whatever’s in the best long-term interest of your organisation.” Citing examples and case studies from both SingPost’s transformation experience and that of its customers, he said the major challenges in digitisation lie in the security and cost of transformation, and the adaptability of customers and staff.

Lazarus Goh Head of IT, RHB Singapore “There are many traditional jobs that can be replaced by technology. It’s happening now, especially in banks. Once you are able to build systems to replace conventional jobs, that’s where productivity gains will come in. Technology is empowerment. It increases productivity. Tomorrow’s world is all about services coming straight to you, via a phone, customised to your needs. With technology, every single potential customer has mobility, and you can customise services specific to their requirements, and by the masses.”

A lively discussion panel comprising Dr Leong, Lazarus Goh, head of IT from RHB Singapore, and Marc Brown, DocuSign’s director of services for the Asia Pacific region, looked at the next step of the digital business evolution.

Marc Brown Director of services, Asia Pacific region, DocuSign “As you’re just beginning your digital journey, you should be looking at bite-size pieces where you can take your first step, instead of thinking of, “How do I transform my entire organisation?” We’re all getting used to social media with the trust that’s being developed among friends. The same thing is happening overall in technology. You are building trust, whether signing with a company or just interacting with each other digitally, and becoming closer through those electronic relationships that you’re building.”

Brown shared how DocuSign, which has never had a security breach since its founding more than 13 years ago, is revolutionising digital signatures and personal data security even as these are being targeted by hackers.

The 17 March 2016 seminar was organised by SingPost and sponsored by DocuSign. Participants said they found the event educational and fruitful. ABOUT SINGAPORE POST For over 150 years, Singapore Post (SingPost), as the country’s postal service provider, has been delivering trusted and reliable services to homes and businesses in Singapore. Today, SingPost is pioneering and leading in eCommerce logistics as well as providing innovative mail and logistics solutions in Singapore, US, China and the rest of Asia Pacific, with operations in more than 15 countries. Building on its trusted communications through domestic and international postal services, SingPost is taking the lead in endto-end integrated and digital mail solutions. The suite of SingPost e-commerce logistics solutions includes front end web management, warehousing and fulfilment, last mile delivery and international freight forwarding.

Brought to you by:

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EVENTS

ARE MARKETING PROCESSES GETTING LEANER? Marketers today often ďŹ nd themselves justifying the ROI for every dollar spent on marketing and if ROI is positive, the job is perceived as well done.

But what does it take to bring ROI to the level it should be? The changing digital and media landscape warrants that marketers truly understand the media consumption patterns

and the complete journey of their customers. There is a pressure to know more and to do more, but with lesser or tighter budgets. It is therefore important that marketers are agile about viewing each campaign and marketing

Date: Thursday 25 February 2016

Venue: FLUTES@ National Museum

Sponsor:

For more details, visit www.salesforce.com/ap/ 4 0 MARKETING A P RIL 201 6

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activity as a solid step towards customer acquisition and customer satisfaction. While technology brings with itself a promise to create more efficiency across the board, what are the practical challenges marketers face when making their marketing processes lean? To answer this question and more, Marketing organised a luncheon with senior marketing decision-makers who shared tips and views on how marketing processes could be “lean” and drive customer experience and cost-effectiveness at the same time. While the concept of lean marketing is nothing new or different from other lean initiatives that businesses have seen since the 1980s, it carries a huge implication for marketers, said Canon’s Alok Bharadwaj who believes that marketing now requires a whole new outlook with real-time engagement at the heart of all initiatives. For Vivek Kumar, director and executive leader of the National Trades Union Congress, lean marketing is about getting sharp about what brands are trying to achieve. It is therefore important for brands to identify customers that drive the bulk of their sales, understand their journey and engage them deeper. Other guests at the round table agreed to the point, adding that technology, while being a great enabler, should not undermine the human touch. Andrew Cefai, senior director of regional marketing for APAC at Hilton International Singapore, said it was important that marketers did not switch off their judgment – based on experience and business knowledge – as a result of relying too much on technology. “It is important that direction is set from the top, that there is the expectation that you would test something to the point of failure,” he said. “Failure is expected, failure is considered essential within defined perimeters of course. If you don’t set that direction there is a real danger that you will go overboard with optimisation, and as a result, the audience you are going after will shrink more and more.” Mark Fong, senior vice-president and head of branding and strategic marketing at City Developments, said technology was just a tool in the tool box. The overpromise of technology is one of the reasons for bloated marketing, as opposed to “fat-free marketing”, which is his definition of lean marketing. “I believe that in every industry, their pipeline is different. So, what we need to do is get to the W W W .MA R KET ING - INT ERAC TIVE . COM

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point in how you can get the maximum impact with minimum means,” he said. “So fat-free marketing is where you question every media selection, every channel. You have got to be aware of the 360 of the world, but you don’t have to focus on all of them. You need to find two or three channels that gives the greatest impact and I think that is the approach to making the marketing function as efficient as possible.” Donna Canestra, head of marketing communications and knowledge management at Marsh Singapore, added that in her company marketing was expected to look at the funnel daily and results were measured in terms of conversion. “All of our campaigns are much focused. Our strategy towards our clients has become a lot more targeted so at the moment we’re running more targeted value proposition campaigns – it’s all about the customer experience now.” Data and personalisation A large part of the conversation over lunch centred on data and personalisation issues

where guests discussed their challenges of combining data that currently sits in silos within organisations. While there was complete agreement that combining all sources of data was critical to attaining that single view of the customer, Swatantra Kumar, enterprise account manager at Salesforce Marketing Cloud, said a common challenge brands faced was to truly understand the customer journey across channels – online as well as offline. “The customer doesn’t care what the interaction is, they want to have an integrated experience with marketing content relevant to them. Companies need to catch up and look AP RI L 2 01 6 M ARKE TI N G 41

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to any touch point being delivered in a highly consistent way that meets the customer where they are in their relationship with your brand.” he said.

Olivia Reeves, account executive at Salesforce Marketing Cloud, added that data and its usefulness was not just a marketing conversation today. Across businesses there

CLOSING THOUGHTS Given all the changes happening, what do you think brands will be focussing on to make marketing processes more effective? “Everything needs to be started from the ground-up, everything has to be interrogated to make sure we are not going through the legacy motion. We have to identify best practices and extend that to the vendor landscape as well.” • Mark Fong, senior vice-president, head of branding and strategic marketing, City Developments “For us, we will continue doing 70% of our marketing ourselves. For the rest of the initiatives we evaluate on a case by case basis and bring in experts or outsource it depending on the need.” • Joachim Holte, chief marketing officer, Wego “We’re doing a lot more on video, so we’ve hired new resources in-house, but we still would use vendor partners when we have capacity issues in key areas. We’re expanding around digital capabilities in-house.” • Donna Canestra, head of marketing communications and knowledge management, Marsh Singapore “No one size fits all, but if you have large budgets to manage across multiple geographies, you need a very strong internal function and, of course, you’re always looking for further opportunities to automate.” • Andrew Cefai, senior director of regional marketing, APAC, Hilton International Singapore “We will continue to learn about guest behaviour by implementing robust systems to collect feedback from various sources and break them down to figure which are the business’ top priority.” • Marlene Teo, director of marketing communications, Carlton Hotel Singapore “Business will have to get smarter in balancing internal and external resources. As we move towards more real-time customer engagement, they will have to be clear on what resources should sit in-house and those that should be moved to an external partner.” • Deborah Goldingham, head of marketing SEA, MasterCard International Singapore “We spend a lot of time doing a lot of campaigns, and testing is important for us. We spend a lot of time testing and optimising campaigns, whether offline or online.” • Steven Wong, head of marketing and communications, Singapore Press Holdings “Some challenges will remain – questions around digital and ROI, where is the money being invested and so on. Companies will continue to invest in data and analytics to get a 360 view of the customer in order to be more efficient in their marketing and become more and more personalised in their messaging.” • Swatantra Kumar, enterprise account manager, Salesforce Marketing Cloud “Media and digital advertising are starting to come into the conversation a lot more. How can brands now get more targeted across not just social, but also digital with the likes of Google and Facebook playing a more important role, is something clients are thinking about. On top of that, mobile and its applications will continue to drive conversations around engagement and personalisation.” • Olivia Reeves, account executive, Salesforce Marketing Cloud

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is growing awareness of how to manage and analyse data to bring a seamless experience to customers. “It is imperative for marketers to understand what is happening on the sales as well as the customer service side to be able to target the audience smartly. Customers today expect that brands should know exactly where they are and what they want,” she said. NTUC’s Kumar mentioned how they use Salesforce to overlay social data over traditional CRM data to get a full view of the customer, but also added that with the PDPA kicking in, marketers have to be cautious in their approach to data. “The tightening privacy laws across all markets has forced marketers to move out of the ivory tower and to interact with customers at the point of sales. The tough thing about data is to get those at the front desk to loop back data because they are strapped for time. As marketers, we need to pick those cues,” he said. WWW. M ARKE TI N G- I N TE RAC TI VE . C OM

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“Marketing Cloud helps us identify when and where our customers want to engage with our brands.” CHRISTOPHE EYMERY HEAD OF DIGITAL, AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND

READY TO BECOME A CUSTOMER COMPANY? Call us toll free on +65 63025700 or visit us at www.saleforce.com/ap

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Marketing magazine’s regional PR Awards saw major corporations recognised for the top PR campaigns in Southeast Asia. Among a 400-strong crowd, SG50 and Tate Anzur bagged top glory at our third annual PR Awards 2016. Here is the list of the judges and winners for the big night.

JUDGING PANEL Darshini M. Nathan, head of corporate communications, AIA Malaysia Crystal Seah, senior vice-president and head of group communications, Ascendas-Singbridge Cheryl Lim, head of branding and communications, AXA Singapore Puspa Marina Omar, senior vice-president and head of strategic communications, Bank Simpanan Nasional Lynn Ong, head of communications, Asia Pacific, crop science, Bayer Jane Chang, head of marketing communications, Chan Brothers Travel Harikumar Rajasekharan, vice-president of communications, CSR and public affairs – APAC, Deutsche Bank Alicia Seah, director of marketing communications, Dynasty Travel International Judy Yap, head of brand and communications, Eastspring Investments Frazer Neo Macken, vice-president of communications, APAC, Electrolux Asia Pacific Donna V. Ferro, head of marketing communications and PR, Epson Philippines Corporation Joanna Ong, vice-president of corporate communications, Asia Pacific, Hilton Worldwide Choong Fong-Ling, communications director, Johnson Controls Holdings Shweta Shukla, director of communications and government affairs – Asia Pacific, Kimberly-Clark Lisa Williamson, vice-president of communications, Marina Bay Sands Janice Azupardo, regional vice-president of branding and communications, Meritus Hotels & Resorts Yvonne Koh, director, head of communications, APAC, PayPal Singapore Noor Yang Azwar Kamarudin, director of corporate affairs, health and value (Malaysia/Brunei), Pfizer Chan Hse May, head of communications, APAC, Skyscanner Patrick Nathan, vice-president, corporate information and communications, SMRT Audrey Mok, general manager and head of corporate communications, Sony Electronics Asia Pacific Divya Anand, global communications director, Tata Communications Maranda Barnes, director of corporate communications and business development and co-founder, TWG Tea Company Duangmanee (Apple) Yantawattana, director of public relations and marketing communications, W Bangkok 4 4 MARKETING A P RIL 201 6

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SG50, TATE ANZUR CROWNED OVERALL WINNERS AT PR AWARDS 2016

Tate Anzur retained its title as the top PR agency at Marketing magazine’s PR Awards 2016 after being named “PR Awards Champion – Agency” for the second time in the awards’ three-year history. Meanwhile, SG50 took home the top brand title, narrowly beating Changi Airport Group (Singapore) in a closely fought competition. Tate Anzur took home three gold, two silver and two bronze awards for campaigns that included SG50’s “SG Heart Map” and National Museum of Singapore’s “Singapore Night Festival”. The agency’s road to overall victory wasn’t an easy one though, with previous champion

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Golin Singapore putting up a good close fight, winning eight trophies that included a gold for the campaign “Create Your Taste”. Meanwhile, overall brand champion SG50 won big, riding high on the hype surrounding Singapore’s 50th year of independence celebrations. Its “SG Heart Map” campaign swept three gold awards. Runner-up Changi Airport Group (Singapore) clinched two gold and two silver awards, missing the overall title by a deficit of one gold award. Other winners at this year’s awards included A+E Networks Asia, Jetstar Asia, LEGO Singapore, PETRONAS, Unilever,

among others. A total of 92 trophies were handed out. Entries were judged under intense scrutiny by a jury that consisted of senior PR and communications professionals from brands in the region that included AIA Malaysia, Electrolux Asia Pacific, Epson Philippines, Kimberly-Clark, W Bangkok and more. Nearly 400 PR practitioners from both agencies and brands across Southeast Asia were present at the Shangri-la Hotel Singapore. The PR Awards 2016 was supported by partners Peroni Nastro Azzurro, Cellarmasters Wine and Graphiss Productions.

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BEST B2B PR CAMPAIGN

BEST CONSUMER PR CAMPAIGN

GOLD Client: Scoot Brand: Scoot Campaign: Scoot Inspiring Spirit Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi

GOLD Client: Jetstar Asia Brand: NIL Campaign: Love is in the Zodiac Pair Agency: AKA Asia

SILVER Client: Panasonic Brand: NIL Campaign: Factory Fresh Veggies Agency: Golin Singapore

SILVER Client: Unilever Philippines Brand: Closeup Philippines Campaign: Closeup Forever Summer 2015 Agency: One Digital Media Group

BRONZE Client: CenturyLink Asia Pacific Brand: NIL Campaign: Leaving Footprints in the Cloud Agency: The Hoffman Agency Asia Pacific

BRONZE Client: EVA Air Brand: NIL Campaign: EVA Air Hello Kitty Jet Launch Agency: Asia PR Werkz

BEST CRISIS MANAGEMENT

BEST CSR COMMUNICATIONS

GOLD Client: Jollibee Foods Corporation Brand: Chowking Campaign: From Brand Boycott to Brand Love Agency: NuWorks Interactive Labs, Inc

GOLD Client: Unilever Philippines Brand: Domex Campaign: WORLD TOILET DAY 2015: How Unilever Philippines advocated proper toilet sanitation to eliminate disease Agency: Stratworks

SILVER

SILVER

Client: Scoot Brand: Scoot Campaign: Scoot Inspiring Spirit Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi

Client: Coca-Cola Brand: NIL Campaign: The Happiness Cycle Agency: Adhesive PR

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: Compass Group Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: Crisis Management of Halal Food Incident Agency: Hill+Knowlton Strategies

Client: Unilever Singapore Brand: Ben & Jerry’s Campaign: Diverse-City Trails Powered By Ben & Jerry’s Agency: Golin Singapore

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BEST DIGITAL COMMUNICATION STRATEGY

BEST EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT/INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS

GOLD Client: SG50 Brand: NIL Campaign: SG Heart Map Agency: Tate Anzur

GOLD Client: SAP APJ Brand: NIL Campaign: Our Simple Agencies: BlueCurrent Group, FleishmanHillard Singapore

SILVER

SILVER

Client: Unilever Brand: Lux Campaign: A Fine Fragrance Disruption in the Philippines – The Launch of Lux Agencies: Golin, Bridges PR, 1DMG

Client: Universal McCann Brand: NIL Campaign: #1intheworld Agency: NIL

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: KASKUS Brand: NIL Campaign: KASKUS Cendolin Indonesia Agency: NIL

Client: K & N Kenanga Holdings Brand: NIL Campaign: Back to School Donation Drive & Aid for Employees and/or Immediate Families Affected by Recent Flood Agency: NIL

BEST ENGAGEMENT FOR A TARGETED COMMUNITY

BEST EVENT-LED PR CAMPAIGN

GOLD Client: Qatar Airways Brand: Qatar Airways A380 Campaign: Landed A380 in Thailand Agency: Dentsu Media Thailand

GOLD Client: Audi Singapore Brand: Audi Campaign: Audi Presents “A Drive Back in Time” Agency: Publicis Singapore

SILVER

SILVER

Client: DBS Brand: NIL Campaign: LinkedIn Showcase Page for Working Capital Advisory Agency: Text100 Singapore

Client: adidas Brand: adidas Bodycare – Coty Inc. Campaign: The Running Man with a Cause Agency: Vibes Communications (Malaysia)

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: IKEA Brand: NIL Campaign: IKEA Young Designer Award Agency: Huntington Communications

Client: Singapore International Film Festival Brand: NIL Campaign: 26th Singapore International Film Festival Agency: Tate Anzur

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BEST GOVERNMENT SECTOR PR CAMPAIGN

BEST INSIGHTS-DRIVEN PR CAMPAIGN

GOLD

GOLD

Client: SMRT Corporation Limited Brand: NIL Campaign: SMRT Rail Transformation Campaign Agency: NIL

Client: Microsoft Asia Pacific Brand: NIL Campaign: Enabling the New World of Work in Asia Agency: IN.FOM

SILVER

SILVER

Client: National Museum of Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: Singapore Night Festival Agency: Tate Anzur

Client: McDonald’s Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: Create Your Taste Agency: Golin Singapore

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: National Gallery Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: National Gallery Singapore Launch Agency: Burson-Marsteller (SEA)

Client: K & N Kenanga Holdings Berhad Brand: NIL Campaign: KenTrade Trading Challenge II Agency: NIL

BEST INVESTOR RELATIONS CAMPAIGN

BEST MEDIA RELATIONS CAMPAIGN

GOLD Client: Riverstone Holdings Limited (Riverstone) Brand: NIL Campaign: Riverstone IR programme – Unlocking intrinsic corporate value Agency: Financial PR

GOLD Client: A+E Networks Asia Brand: Lifetime Campaign: MasterChef Asia 2015 Agency: Strategic Public Relations Group, Singapore

SILVER

SILVER

Client: China Aviation Oil (Singapore) Corporation Brand: NIL Campaign: CAO – Soaring Above All Odds Agencies: Citigate Dewe Rogerson, i.MAGE

Client: Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: NO BOTS ABOUT IT NADINE IS A HIT FOR NTU SINGAPORE Agency: NIL

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: Jumbo Group Limited Brand: NIL Campaign: Winning Recipe for a Chilli-Hot IPO Agencies: Citigate Dewe Rogerson, i.MAGE

Client: Orchard Road Business Association Brand: Pedestrian Night Campaign: Creating buy-in for Pedestrian Night Agency: Ninemer Public Relations

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BEST PR CAMPAIGN – CONSUMER

BEST PR CAMPAIGN – FOOD AND BEVERAGE

GOLD Client: LEGO Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: LEGO SG50: Rebuild Your Memories Agency: iris Singapore

GOLD Client: McDonald’s Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: Create Your Taste Agency: Golin Singapore

SILVER

SILVER

Client: Kao Singapore Brand: Biore Campaign: Biore: Growing with you Agency: Ninemer Public Relations

Client: Panasonic Brand: Veggie Life Campaign: Factory Fresh Veggies – Launch of Veggie Life Agency: Golin Singapore

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: Unilever Singapore Brand: Cornetto Campaign: Cornetto Shake it Off Battle Agency: Golin Singapore

Client: CÉ LA VI Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: CÉ LA VI Singapore Sky High Brunch Agency: DeVries Global

BEST PR CAMPAIGN – LIFESTYLE

BEST PR CAMPAIGN – LUXURY

GOLD Client: EVA Air Brand: NIL Campaign: EVA Air Hello Kitty Jet Launch Agency: Asia PR Werkz

GOLD Client: Procter & Gamble Brand: SK-II Campaign: SK-II #changedestiny Indonesia Agency: Proximity Indonesia

SILVER

SILVER

Client: Blackmores Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: The Wellness Tribes Campaign Agency: Edelman Public Relations Worldwide

Client: William Grant & Sons Brand: Glenfiddich Campaign: Valley of the Deer Agencies: Ketchum, Text100 Malaysia, GOODSTUPH

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: Heritage R Brand: NIL Campaign: 45r Agency: Touch PR & Events

Client: RAM PACIFIC Brand: RIMOWA Campaign: RIMOWA X ART Agency: Vibes Communications

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BEST PR CAMPAIGN – PUBLIC SERVICES

BEST PR CAMPAIGN BY AN IN-HOUSE COMMUNICATIONS TEAM

GOLD Client: Sport Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: One Team Singapore Agency: Weber Shandwick

GOLD

SILVER

SILVER

Client: Centre For Fathering Brand: NIL Campaign: Raising the Profile of the Centre for Fathering Agency: Huntington Communications

Client: SMRT Corporation Limited Brand: NIL Campaign: SMRT We’re Working On It Campaign Agency: NIL

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: SMRT Corporation Limited Brand: NIL Campaign: SMRT Rail Transformation Campaign Agency: NIL

Client: Wildlife Reserves Singapore Brand: Singapore Zoo Campaign: Koalamania at Singapore Zoo Agency: NIL

BEST PR IDEA

Client: Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Brand: NIL Campaign: Star Wars at Changi Agency: NIL

BEST PR-LED INTEGRATED COMMUNICATIONS

GOLD Client: SG50 Brand: NIL Campaign: SG Heart Map Agency: Tate Anzur

GOLD Client: Scoot Brand: Scoot Campaign: Scoot Inspiring Spirit Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi

SILVER

SILVER

Client: Jetstar Asia Brand: NIL Campaign: December Baby Agency: AKA Asia

Client: Chuan Pictures Brand: NIL Campaign: 7 Letters Agency: Tate Anzur

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: Chuan Pictures Brand: NIL Campaign: 7 Letters Agency: Tate Anzur

Client: LEGO Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: LEGO SG50: Rebuild Your Memories Agency: iris Singapore

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BEST PRODUCT LAUNCH PR CAMPAIGN

BEST PRODUCT RE-LAUNCH PR CAMPAIGN

Client: SHARP Brand: SHARP Campaign: Stay SHARP In The Haze Agency: Cohn & Wolfe Singapore

GOLD Client: GrabTaxi Brand: NIL Campaign: Introducing GrabCar to Singapore Agency: Ruder Finn Asia

SILVER

SILVER

Client: Bugaboo Brand: NIL Campaign: Bugaboo + Van Gogh Agency: AKA Asia

Client: NTUC Club Brand: D’Resort Campaign: Launch of D’Resort Agency: Asia PR Werkz

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: RAM PACIFIC Brand: RIMOWA Campaign: RIMOWA Bossa Nova Agency: Vibes Communications

Client: Science Centre Singapore Brand: Snow City Campaign: Snow City Re-launch: Arctic Avengers Agency: Golin Singapore

GOLD

BEST SPORTS PR CAMPAIGN

BEST USE OF BLOGGERS

GOLD Client: Sport Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: 28th SEA Games Agency: Weber Shandwick

GOLD Client: Unilever Brand: Closeup Campaign: Closeup Cupid Games Agency: salt communications

SILVER

SILVER

Client: Sport Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: 8th ASEAN Para Games Agency: Weber Shandwick

Client: Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Brand: NIL Campaign: #ChangiBarepackers – Do you dare to travel bare? Agency: Ketchum Singapore

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: Unilever Indonesia Brand: CLEAR Campaign: CLEAR Ayo! Indonesia Bisa Academy 2015 Agency: Pulse Communications

Client: Cebu Pacific Air Brand: NIL Campaign: The #CEBjuanderers Challenge Agency: Ketchum Singapore

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BEST USE OF BROADCAST/VIDEO

BEST USE OF CONTENT

GOLD Client: Petroliam Nasional Berhad Brand: PETRONAS Campaign: Akrab – Merdeka & Malaysia Day 2015 Agency: Leo Burnett/ARC Worldwide

GOLD Client: LEGO Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: LEGO SG50: Rebuild Your Memories Agency: iris Singapore

SILVER

SILVER

Client: Stayz Brand: NIL Campaign: Stayz Dogumentary Agency: Adhesive PR

Client: Petroliam Nasional Berhad Brand: PETRONAS Campaign: #tanahairku Agency: dnaCOMM

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: Unilever Philippines Brand: Lady’s Choice Campaign: Lady’s Choice Reunion Surprise Agency: Ogilvy & Mather Philippines

Client: Jetstar Asia Brand: NIL Campaign: December Baby Agency: AKA Asia

BEST USE OF INFLUENCERS

BEST USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA

GOLD Client: SG50 Brand: NIL Campaign: SG Heart Map Agency: Tate Anzur

GOLD Client: BSN Brand: NIL Campaign: Kucing Happy Agency: Fishermen Integrated

SILVER

SILVER

Client: Universal McCann Brand: NIL Campaign: #1intheworld Agency: NIL

Client: Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Brand: NIL Campaign: Star Wars at Changi Agency: NIL

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: Unilever Brand: Lux Campaign: A Fine Fragrance Disruption in the Philippines – The Launch of Lux Agencies: Golin, Bridges PR, 1DMG

Client: LEGOLAND Malaysia Resort Brand: NIL Campaign: LEGOLAND Malaysia Holiday Extravaganza 2015 Agency: The Hoffman Agency Asia Pacific

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BEST USE OF TECHNOLOGY

MOST CREATIVE PR STUNT

GOLD Client: William Grant & Sons Brand: Glenfiddich Campaign: Valley of the Deer Agencies: Ketchum, Text100 Malaysia, GOODSTUPH

GOLD Client: Changi Airport Group (Singapore) Brand: NIL Campaign: Star Wars at Changi Agency: NIL

SILVER

SILVER

Client: Singapore Kindness Movement Brand: NIL Campaign: ImagiNation Agency: Strategic Public Relations Group, Singapore

Client: Stayz Brand: NIL Campaign: Stayz Christmas Shopping Sleepover Agency: Adhesive PR

BRONZE

BRONZE

Client: Science Centre Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: E3: E-mmersive Experiential Environments Agency: Golin Singapore

Client: Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Brand: NIL Campaign: NO BOTS ABOUT IT NADINE IS A HIT FOR NTU SINGAPORE Agency: NIL

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CAREERS

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CAREER PATH

JOB SHUFFLE

Cheryl Lim Head of branding and communications, AXA Singapore

First job?

My first job lasted four days at Publicis. First job in advertising/ marketing?

DBS, doing product development. It proved to be a good springboard for a newbie as I was also exposed to product marketing, along with pricing and processes. It gave me the foundation of marketing and understanding the customer experience. Best job?

I wouldn’t say there was a “best” job as each one I had was different. The demands and scope of work for each job varied, and I definitely took away different skills and experience for each job. Perks of your current job?

A better understanding of the world of insurance and financial planning. Plus, staff discounted insurance! Worst job?

None really, just like how there’s no “best” job. Every job is different. Marketing professionals you admire?

My former DBS marketing head Melvin Lim who first believed in me. He has the ability to bounce back from adversity and make the best of any given situation. Best career advice you’ve been given?

“Giving up doesn’t mean you are a quitter. It just means whatever you are fighting for is no longer worth the fight.” Indeed. Sometimes, we are too hard on ourselves for giving up. Why a career in marketing?

Leveraging from my (very few) strengths and passion, marketing came naturally to me. I love that marketing is both a science and arts. How do you wind down?

With the wind in my face, glass in my hand and music to my ears.

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Discovery Communications named Atsushi Saito as VP of advertiser partnerships for Eurosport in Asia Pacific. He reports to Jonathan Davies, SVP and managing director for advertiser partnerships. In his new capacity, he is tasked to maximise Eurosport’s ad sales efforts in Asia Pacific by providing innovative and bespoke solutions for clients and developing meaningful partnerships. Marketing and tech agency DigitasLBi is strengthening its Singapore office with new senior hires. The agency appointed Knox Balbastro as regional associate creative director, Lauren Ahearn as business director and Lawrence Lee as strategy lead. The hires follow a series of recent client wins for DigitasLBi Singapore; including UOB, Pernod Ricard and Unilever. Aviva hired Jon Yongfook as head of digital product and design for Aviva’s digital garage in Singapore. His team will be responsible for the customer experience of the company’s digital products that span across web, mobile and more. He will lead the team in applying agile methodologies, design thinking, rapid prototyping and customer insights for the development of digital products and experiences that meet the expectations of its customers and are delightful to use. Banyan Tree Hotels and Resorts is in the midst of a costcutting exercise which has seen the exit of David

Spooner, vice-president of sales and marketing. A spokesperson from Banyan Tree confirmed the news to Marketing and also said the position of sales and marketing had been replaced with a VP of sales, but declined to name the new sales lead and clarified that a separate marketing function remains. Don Anderson left We Are Social six months after being named regional managing director. No replacement has been named and his responsibilities have been split between regional managing director Simon Kemp and newly appointed GM Sophina Smith. Smith was previously the client service director and told Marketing, Anderson left for personal reasons. Dog Digital hired Shannon Quek as its business development director for Asia. He will report directly to David Hamilton, global commercial director of Dog Digital. In his new role, he will be responsible for developing senior client relationships for new business across Asia and managing all major client portfolios across the agency’s key suite of services, including strategic consultancy, multi-disciplinary marketing, content creation, and digital design and development solutions. Maxus Asia Pacific appointed Nathan Cook as head of trading, replacing Simon Porter who moved to the Maxus global team as deputy global trading director. In

his new role, Cook will be working closely with Nick Binns, CIO of GroupM APAC, and will lead the trading and investment product for clients across the APAC market, supported by regional trading director, Anita Munro and associate trading director, Scotty Ho. Miguel Bernas joined Mediacorp as VP of digital marketing, reporting to Mediacorp’s chief digital officer Shane Mitchell. He will play a key role in the digital transformation of the company’s marketing practices, and adoption of digital marketing and audience development best practices across all business units. He will look at growing audiences across the various media properties and support revenue through digital marketing activities. LEGO appointed Rohan Mathur as its senior marketing manager. He joined earlier this month and is now leading a team of four brand marketers and trade marketers in a business delivery role. He is tasked to grow the LEGO business across all key franchises. He was with P&G as brand manager and digital/e-commerce leader for Asia Pacific for fabric care, a role he held for more than two years and in total, was with P&G for over eight years. Netflix hired Belle Baldoza as its new consumer PR manager for APAC. She is tasked to drive awareness around the Netflix brand through lifestyle PR campaigns, as well as media and influencer relations. She will be working with Netflix’s PR agency, MSLGROUP, and reporting to the global consumer PR team at Netflix.

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LAST WORD

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A VERY HONEST AGENCY WEBSITE – IF IT EXISTED It doesn’t get better than this.

A good dose of humour: Zulu Alpha Kilo has hit the mark with its latest parody spot on agency websites.

Zulu Alpha Kilo has done it again with its latest parody spot on agency websites. The site pokes fun at the “sameness” of every agency’s website. It features Zulu’s fictional co-founders Frank Zulu, chief executive and executive officer; Marcus Alpha, ultra chief creative director officer; and Katherine Kilo, VP of strategic and strategy officer in charge of everything. “Every agency website essentially says the same thing. So we decided to poke a little fun at the sameness of the industry with our Mocku-site,” said Zak Mroueh, chief creative officer and founder. Highlights include the agency’s culture (including daily nap times) and news of Zulu’s latest coup – landing the Glen’s Pet supply store account.

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Proprietary strategic methodologies are skewered on the site. Zulu’s fictional “revolutionary” strategic process called Holist-i-think includes how to “focus group test the best sandwich bread for catered meetings”. The site also features Zulu’s revolutionary creative approach to B2B – using stock handshake photos. The new site replaces the “real” Zulu Alpha Kilo’s simplistic original website that contained no address, phone number or information about senior management. The agency is using the new site as a chance to create entertaining content, albeit fictional. All production was handled through Zulu’s content creation division zulubot.

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EXPLORING THE OFFLINE SIDE OF SHOPPER Who said the physical retail space is dead? Many brick and mortar retailers are reinventing themselves. Coupled this with the increase in mobile and social engagement, and the advancement in shopper technology, the onus is now on brands to make the shopping experience and transaction between both online and offline as seamless as possible.

EARLY BIRD RATES before 15 April

Join us at Marketing magazine’s fourth edition of the popular Shopper Marketing conference, where will look at the future of the retail space, and explore how brands and retailers can effortlessly tap into the opportunities present in the digital, mobile and physical commerce ecosystems that are both dynamic, omnipresent and constantly evolving.

For agenda and registration enquiries, contact EMILIA NATHASHA, +65 6423 0329, emilian@marketing-interactive.com

Sponsors and Partners

www.marketing-interactive.com/shopper-marketing/sg/

Client-side marketers SGD790

Marketing solutions providers SGD1,490

For sponsorship and advertising opportunities, contact JOHNATHAN TIANG, +65 6423 0329, johnathant@marketing-interactive.com


WHERE WILL YOU PUT YOURS?

25 MAY 2016 / SHANGRI-LA HOTEL SINGAPORE

BOOK YOUR TABLES NOW! www.aotyawards.com/sg/ Call +65 6423 0329 and look for Bernadine Reyla for tables booking or Johnathan Tiang for sponsorship opportunities.

SPONSORS AND PARTNERS


Marketing Magazine SG - Apr 2016