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THE ART & SCIENCE OF CONNECTING WITH CONSUMERS

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DECEMBER 2016/JANUARY 2017

marketing-interactive.com


編者的話

EDS LETTER

Editorial Carlos Bruinsma, Editor carlosb@marketing-interactive.com Inti Tam, Deputy Editor intit@marketing-interactive.com Angel Tang, Senior Reporter angelt@marketing-interactive.com Tracy Chan, Bilingual Sub Editor tracyc@marketing-interactive.com Advertising Sales - Hong Kong Sara Wan, Sales Director, Advertising & Sponsorships saraw@marketing-interactive.com Sherman Ho, Account Manager shermanh@marketing-interactive.com Ruby Lee, Account Manager rubyl@marketing-interactive.com Advertising Sales - International Søren Beaulieu, Publisher (Singapore) sorenb@marketing-interactive.com Production and Design Shahrom Kamarulzaman, Regional Art Director shahrom@lighthousemedia.com.sg Evisu Yip, Senior Designer evisuy@lighthousemedia.com.sg Samson Lam, Graphic Designer samsonl@lighthousemedia.com.sg Events Yeo Wei Qi, Regional Head of Events Services weiqi@lighthousemedia.com.sg Cathy Luk, Manager - Events Services cathyl@marketing-interactive.com Sarah Kee, Lead Producer sarahk@marketing-interactive.com Finance Evelyn Wong, Regional Finance Director evelynw@lighthousemedia.com.sg Management Tony Kelly, Managing Director tk@marketing-interactive.com Justin Randles, Group Managing Director jr@marketing-interactive.com

Lighthouse Independent Media Ltd. Printed in Hong Kong by Asia One Printing Ltd. For subscriptions, contact circulations at +852 2861 1882 or email subscriptions@marketing-interactive.com. COPYRIGHT & REPRINTS: All material printed in Marketing is protected under the copyright act. All rights reserved. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without the prior written consent of the publisher and copyright holder. Permission may be requested through the Hong Kong office. Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in Marketing are not necessarily the views of the publisher. Hong Kong: Lighthouse Independent Media Ltd, publisher of Marketing magazine 2/F, Connaught Harbourfront House, 35-36 Connaught Road West, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong Tel: +852 2861 1882 Fax: +852 2861 1336 Singapore: Lighthouse Independent Media Pte Ltd 100C Pasir Panjang Road, #05-01 See Hoy Chan Hub, Singapore 118519 Tel: +65 6423 0329 Fax: +65 6423 0117 To subscribe to Marketing magazine, go to: www. marketing-interactive.com

Let’s review some of the things that have happened this year. Microsoft stole Apple’s thunder with its new computers and aims to take back the PC market from its arch-rival. Apple, in general, seems to be struggling for ideas without Steve Jobs at its helm. A Clinton was running for president. Full House is back on TV (well, Netflix, but still). Britney Spears topped the music charts. Everyone played Pokémon. This all sounds eerily familiar, doesn’t it? It’s like we’re back in the 1990s, but with a little modern twist. Let’s take Pokémon Go as an example. It wasn’t a terribly interesting game, but seeing the colourful critters from my youth in HD on my phone filled me with the warm, fuzzy feeling of golden days gone by – and that’s a powerful feeling. I’m not the only one to take notice of the power of nostalgia. A lot of brands have been shifting their messages away from the “modern is best” mindset and towards a yearning for a time when things were “better”. And the interesting thing is, it’s working. Adobe’s most successful campaign this year featured “Bob Ross”; and Spotify grabbed Falkor and a very bearded, grown-up Atreyu from The NeverEnding Story as spokespersons. Even The Donald focused his campaign message on making America great again – a clear throwback to mythical days of yore that we’ve somehow lost. Perhaps as audiences, we’re drawn to messages that give us that sense of safety from our past because 2016 has been such an uncertain year politically, socially and economically. Or maybe we simply crave a distraction from the constant hustle and bustle of modern life and need a reminder of when times were simpler – whether in truth or in memory. In any case, as someone who spends many a Sunday reading old pulp novels, glorifies the music of yesteryear and still thinks wearing khakis is a perfectly acceptable fashion choice, it’s a welcome change – and strangely refreshing. Enjoy the read.

⟇ᔾᣞᑇ❁ዯጄፂᑧᶋ᏷῜ᛵᗇᅙẢ᱐⍋►ᗥ᲌ỉ ⤚埮梊勵噚懝垚㤫䠓樷榼虇᾵摂㊞ㄭ⑐㜄㏚ᾼ捜⫹ ↚⁉梊勵⾑⧃Ҹ军垚㤫ㄭ㜃汣ℕ䢚虇⃋῝⢷㸡㢘✻⾒ 㜾䠓⿅榧ᾚ虇桲⁴⌜㭚ㆬ⎉㜿Ὴ㊞Ҹ ⾛㑘捛䲅戇儝⢚俌伀ҷҿ㳰㮑䂎ⷚӀ捜慣梊嬥失 ⿤虃⬌▶虇捜慣Netflix虇⃕⁜䋅㞾梊嬥失⿤虄ҷBritney

Spears䠊ᾙ概㮑㬫欥ҷ⁉⁉抌⢷䔸PokémonҸ 憨ᾏ⎖刌弆ℕㄗ䌮㈘虇ᾜ㞾❝虚ⷀ≞㎠↠⡭⎿

90〃⁲虇╹㞾⪩―ᾏ灭䖍⁲䠓⋒亯Ҹ ⷀ⁴Pokémon Go䉉ℚҸ憨ᾜ㞾ᾏ↚棭⿇㢘弲 䠓懙㏁虇⃕䢚⎿㎠〃悤㟑⪶䍀䠓吁ヸ倌亪⶞乍棗虇 ⁴汧㾔㄀≞捜䖍⢷㏚㯮ᾙ虇⁳⁉↜㊮䰸ㅒ虇ㄆㄎ捜⡭ 㞣㝴䠓灒捠㟑⁲Ҹ憨㞾ᾏ䮽テ䉗䠓㊮孉Ҹ ㎠᾵棭⚾ᾏᾏ↚䛨㊞⎿㎆厙䠓⁉Ҹㄗ⪩♐䏛䠓ⴲ ≂宙ㇾ伢⾁ㄭӁ䃽㻐㞾㢏⬌ӂ䠓ㅒ㋚虇惘崙䉉㿃㷑㢃 ⬌䠓㞣㝴㟑⋘Ҹ㢘弲䠓㞾虇憨ᾏ㑪ㄗ⫞㛗Ҹ

Adobe ⁙〃㢏㎟␮䠓㔷ひ㻊⑤⿅ℕ伢⌇儝⢚ Rossӂ␸柲虖⁴╙Spotify屚ℕҿThe Never Ending StoryӀ䠓Falkor╙䖍⾁朆⪶㎟⁉ҷ 䂎棱沜ⳟ䠓 Atreyu㎟䉉⁲宏⁉Ҹ䚩厂憲䐈㢦㟽䠓䲅 戇╲埮! making America great again虇ㄗ㞝槾㞾 䛺ⵅӁBob

⢷⡭☂㞣㝴䠓悬䋛㝴ⳟҸ

2016〃㞾↚㛎㹊ҷ䫍㢒╙伢䅮⑤䡹ᾜⴘ䠓〃 ₌虇⃫䉉孏䣍虇㎠↠㎥冔⡯ⴲ≂宙ㇾ娺㞣㝴䠓ⴘ⋷㊮ ╦◇イ虇╗㎥冔㎠↠╹㞾㿃㢪㠺㟑ㄭ䋸⡑䠓䚮㻊ᾼ 㑌桱虇㎆佻ᾏᾚㄏ㝴悒䶰✽虃䊰履㞾䢮⵵戓㞾╹㞾宧 ㍅ᾼ虄䠓㟑⋘Ҹ 㳲⬑ᾏ‪伢⿇⢷◷㝴杀崏じ⊈⶞尹ҷ儝⒥㎆厙概 㮑ҷ䚩厂尜䉉䰎嗦⓰⌅⾒㞾㟑ⶩ䠓⁉ᾏ㮲虇憨㞾ᾏ↚ ⇋ㄦ㲲幭䠓崙⒥虇军ᾣ⎉⫖⢿⁳⁉䋴䋅ᾏ㜿Ҹ 屚亿杀⁙㢮桫尛Ҹ

SCAN TO SUBSCRIBE

Carlos Bruinsma Editor WWW.M A R K ET I N G - I N T ER A C T I V E.C O M

DE CE MB E R 2 016 / JANU ARY 2 017 MARK E TING HON G KON G 1


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DECEMBER 2016/JANUARY 2017 6  

The rising tide of in-house agencies.

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Taking a journey with your customers.

20  

Marketing Excellence Awards 2016.

42  

Content marketing is a ‘mindset’.

48  

Rewriting the Christmas story.

ひ◙⁲䖕㮰ゞ㜿㻹䃽

厖㼗幊冔▛姛

⾑⧃㔷ひⓢ弙⪶䓝2016

⋶ⵈ䍮摆㞾ᾏ䮽ㅒ㋚

捜⵺凥尤㛔‚

20

42

48

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Briefing What’s on? Mob-Ex Awards 2017 What: The Mob-Ex Awards 2017 is Hong Kong’s premier event celebrating mobile marketing excellence. Where: Hotel ICON, Hong Kong. When: 3 March 2017. MARKies Awards 2017 What: The MARKies Awards recognises the most innovative, creative and effective campaigns or projects spanning Hong Kong’s entire marketing services industry. Where: JW Marriott Hong Kong. When: 20 April 2017.

“If you are not marketing inside Zuckerberg’s world you might as well be marketing inside a trash can.” Ӂ⬑㤫⃯ᾜ⢷㣀⋚₾ 㧋䠓ᾥ䛛懁姛⾑⧃㔷 ひ虇⃯╾劌╹㞾⢷⤒ ⣍㨅婰懁姛㔷ひҸӂ Brian Halligan, co-founder and CEO of HubSpot. HubSpot 凾▗⭚␄⁉⌋姛㛎俌婐Brian Halligan

4 M A R K ET I N G H O N G K O N G D EC EMBER 201 6 / J ANUA R Y 201 7

60 seconds with

Karen Tam Assistant general manager, promotions and marketing Harbour City

First job in marketing? I started my career at Synergie Communications, a boutique ad agency which has since been acquired. Perks of your current job? Good question; there are a lot! This is my 24th year, so there have been so many special moments and perks that have kept me here. If we are going to discuss all the perks of my job, this will turn into 60 minutes with Karen Tam! Marketing professionals you admire? Facebook is a company I admire, even though it’s not an individual. It has really changed the way people connect, and it keeps evolving and refining its existing apps as well as acquiring new apps. It has brought the world together, and that’s what we as marketers all try to do. Why a career in marketing? To be honest, I didn’t really think about this career in school. I was fond of English literature, but I did not get into the university I wanted. A friend recommended studying communications instead, and so I did. I was fortunate enough to find a mentor who placed me in a three-month internship at a vibrant company, and that changed everything.

ᯧዯᐡᏕᲵᭆ⇚ጤᓆ៦ᅞ㎠⢷乍♐ひ◙⋻▇Synergy! Communications朚ⷤ‚㫼虇军封⋻▇䖍⾁娺㛅庋Ҹ ᯀᐞጤᓆ᲌ᑗᛵᑊ፵៦ᅞ⬌⛞槛虇㢘ㄗ⪩蘼憨㞾㎠⋴ 分䠓䲻24〃虇ᾏ䢃㢘ㄗ⪩䐈⎴䠓㟑⏊╙⬌埤⁳㎠䛨 ᾚҸ⬑㤫嬐宝履㎠⽴⃫䠓㏏㢘⬌埤虇憨ⶖ㢒崙㎟ᾏ↚ 60⎕斧䠓容⛞蘼 ᓇᚶ⋂ᛵᏕᲵᭆ⇚ዷ጗ᅩFacebook桥䋅ᾜ㞾ᾏ↚ ⁉虇⃕㞾ᾏⵅ㎠㲲幭䠓⋻▇Ҹⴒ䢮㳲㛈崙⁉↠䀬憩㝈 ゞ虇ᾜ㝆䠋ⷤ╙㕟ⓖ䖍㢘䠓㍘䚷䮚ゞ虇᾵㛅庋㜿䠓㍘ 䚷䮚ゞҸFacebook㐙ᾥ䛛憲俺⢷ᾏ弆虇憨ⷀ㞾㎠↠ ⃫䉉⾑⧃㔷ひ⁉♰➦寵╊⇩䠓‚Ҹ ᠥᒺᬙᗇᏕᲵᭆ⇚ጤᓆᅞ冐⵵尹虇㎠崏㢇䠓㟑↨㸡㢘 䢮㳲冒㋽懝䖍⢷䠓分㫼Ҹ㎠✫㳰咀⢚㜖ⴇ虇⃕㸡㢘冒 ⋴䖕㊂䠓⪶ⴇҸᾏ⃜㢚╚㔷圵㎠惘䉉ⅽ崏≂䖕虇㏏⁴ ㎠ⷀⅽ崏≂䖕―Ҹ㎠ㄗ〇懚⢿懖⎿ᾏ⃜⶝⾺虇⁥イ圵 ㎠懁⋴―ᾏⵅ⋔䂎㻊␪䠓⋻▇虇懁姛䉉㢮ᾘ↚㢗䠓⵵ 兡虇憨㛈崙―ᾏ⎖蘼

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DE CE MB E R 2 016 / JANU ARY 2 017 MARK E TING HON G KON G 7


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For several years, brands have been taking on tasks usually left to agencies, across advertising, digital, PR, print, video and so forth. Recently, a number of FMCG powerhouses and hotel chains have been greatly expanding their in-house marketing teams, and cutting back their agency rosters. As content has become the new weapon of choice for many advertisers in their battle for consumers’ hearts and minds, hotel chain Marriott established the Marriott Content Studio two years ago with the aim to develop, produce and distribute compelling and relevant content to inform, entertain and engage its consumers. Marriott’s first original short film Two Bellmen was launched in early 2015 and has had more

than five million YouTube views. A sequel came out in early 2016 and now a third instalment is set to debut in January 2017. Tony Chow, regional director of creative and content marketing for Asia Pacific at Marriott International, says brands are beginning to see the value of producing their own content inhouse. “We believe in the need to publish or perish given the target consumers we are after – nextgeneration travellers who are quick to ditch the pitch, and are more influenced by peers or influencers’ experiences,” he says. He adds that Marriott can no longer adopt the traditional advertising route to win the minds, hearts and wallets of its targeted customers.

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ᜬᑧᗔᅗ᝸ᵬ὚ጦᬻ፯ዯᐿᏻ᎚ᮿᢨ᱆ᛵ⇚ᓯᅘ∋ 䩋ҷ⋻杫ҷ⓿⏆ҷ㄀䏖䳘⽴⃫Ҹ㢏慠虇ᾏ‪ㅺ憮㼗幊♐ ⽷榼╙憲攥拡〦桕⢧㢃⪶␪㑢ⷤ⌅⋶扷⾑⧃㔷ひ⢧ 栙虇᾵⏙㾪凧䚷䠓ひ◙⁲䖕㜇䡽Ҹ 样嗦⋶ⵈ⾁㎟䉉寀⪩ひ◙⛕䎼╥㼗幊冔㳰ㅒ䠓 㜿㳵⟷虇憲攥拡〦桕⢧喻巹拡〦⢷⋸〃⏜㎟䱚␄㊞ ☛⋶ⵈ䍮摆⽴⃫ⴳMarriott Content Studio虇䡽䠓 㞾朚䠋ҷ媌⃫╙䠋⾒⌆◇イ␪䠓⋶ⵈ虇■槶ⴱ懁姛ⴲ ≂ҷ㕟K⮪㮑ҷ╙◇イ㼗幊冔Ҹ 喻巹拡〦䠓䲻ᾏ扷┮␄䥼䏖ҿTwo BellmenӀ㝋 2015〃⎬棱ᾥ虇᾵⢷YouTube撓ㄦ弔懝‣䠍喻㲰孏 䢚㲰㜇Ҹ倛桕⢷2016〃⎬㔷⎉虇军䲻ᾘ悾ⶖ㝋2017 〃1㢗䠊⧃Ҹ 喻巹⢚株桕⢧‭⪹Ⓩ␄㊞⋶ⵈ╙䍮摆俌䡲◷Ⅼ 啾姷䫉虇♐䏛朚⭚䢚⎿䛀⋶扷媌⃫卹㢘⋶ⵈ䠓⊈⇋Ҹ ⁥尹處Ӂ㎠↠䖍㟑䠓䡽㮨㼗幊冔㞾㜿ᾏ⁲㝔懙㊪

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“I do see the traditional advertising model is starting to break down, as the concept of content marketing is gaining traction.” Chow says the traditional agency model will find it harder and harder to stay relevant if its service offering is tactical and still in keeping with the conventional marketing model. “Today’s marketing is two-way communication and in real-time.” Technology has also engendered huge developments – and placed power in the hands of the consumers. Chow suggests brands and traditional agencies need to adapt, move with the changing times, and stay relevant. “Relevant, high quality and compelling content will become more significant for brands to connect on an emotional level.”

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That’s why, he says, some brands are their own publishers today because in this way they can communicate directly with customers. Chow says clients, who are still in the early stages, will leverage the agency support model, but this will still need concentrated management to ensure the content is relatable and authentic – and agencies who fall short of really telling compelling stories on behalf of their brands risk becoming irrelevant. In this sense, brands will need to move fast to build the in-house resources and capabilities required to be a publisher, manage their content and be a storyteller, he says. “Brands need to jump in the driving seat when content marketing is concerned.” However, building a content team in-house can be challenging – finding the right people is a challenge and the investment costs are high, he admits. The “in-house agencies trend” doesn’t stop here, however, especially in the FMCG industry. In May, PepsiCo strengthened its media and content creation division with the opening of its own in-house studio in New York. Dubbed the “Creators League”, the 4,000-square foot content studio aims to pump out branded content while also pursuing distribution deals with film studios, online publishers and other outlets for brand-agnostic content. The future of the traditional agency model has been the subject of much debate in recent years. PepsiCo president Brad Jakeman, who launched the in-house hub, constantly urges brands and agencies to “evolve” their relationship. He recently conceded the traditional model is “going to break if we don’t really think about how to innovate”. In a recent report in July, Jakeman mentioned that “instead of five pieces of content

⬌冔虇⁥↠僉῞冟ㆶ虇军ᾣ㢃ⵈ㞢╦㢚悸㎥⌆佁仰五 ⁉㄀榎虇⡯㳳㎠↠嬐ᾜ䠋⾒⋶ⵈ虇嬐ᾜⷀ娺㽧㷿Ҹӂ ⁥婫⋔㒖虇喻巹ᾜ劌⌜㔰䚷≂伀䠓ひ◙彾佩ℕ 庞╥䡽㮨ⴱ㏅䠓㳰ㅒ╙䚮㊞Ҹ Ӂ样嗦⋶ⵈ䍮摆䠓㬑ㆄ㝴䡙㟽╙虇㎠䢚⎿≂伀ひ ◙㮰ゞ朚⭚㸡嗌Ҹӂ ◷Ⅼ啾姷䫉虇⬑㤫≂伀ひ◙⁲䖕╹㞾㕟K㎿姢 ⷳ棱䠓㢜⑨虇㹎䚷厙㢘䠓䍮摆㮰ゞ虇≂伀ひ◙⁲䖕㮰 ゞⶖ㢃桲⁴Ⅼ㒐⌅䢇杫ㆶҸ Ӂ䖍⁙䠓⾑⧃㔷ひ㞾桨■䀬憩虇᾵岪㷑│㟑⶜ 尀Ҹӂ 䭠㐏⿅ℕ⽷⪶䠓䠋ⷤ㯮㢒虇᾵仵‗㼗幊冔㢃⪩ 䠓㲙␪Ҹ◷Ⅼ啾ら峿虇♐䏛╙≂伀ひ◙⁲䖕梏嬐厖㟑 ᾵懁╙Ⅼ㒐䢇杫Ҹ Ӂㇾㇾ䢇杫ҷ汧幹亯╙⌆◇イ␪䠓⋶ⵈ虇⶜㝋♐ 䏛ら䱚㉔㊮凾俺崙ㄦ㢃␯捜嬐Ҹӂ ⡯㳳虇⁥姷䫉ᾏ‪♐䏛䖍⾁卹姛崙䉉⋶ⵈ䠋⾒ ⛕虇坘㳳厖ⴱ㏅䢃㔴䀬憩Ҹ ◷Ⅼ啾姷䫉虇⁜埤㝋㝸㢮䠋ⷤ栝㵄䠓ⴱ㏅虇ⶖ㢒 㔰䚷ひ◙⁲䖕㚾㖃㮰ゞ虇⃕憨㮲⁜梏嬐桕ᾼ䴰䖕虇⁴ 䩉Ⅼ⋶ⵈ㞾╾棯╙䢮⵵虇军䊰㹤䉉♐䏛岪慿䢮㳲⁳⁉ ⅰ㢜䠓㛔‚䠓⁲䖕虇ⶖ嬐⌡嗦娺㽧㷿䠓樷根Ҹ ���㳳⁥姷䫉虇♐䏛梏嬐慔憮⡭㍘虇ら䱚⋶ⵈ䠋⾒ ⛕㏏梏䠓⋶扷幖䀟☛劌␪ҷ䴰䖕⁥↠䠓⋶ⵈҷ᾵㎟䉉 ᾏ↚岪㛔‚䠓⁉Ҹ Ӂ懁姛⋶ⵈ䍮摆㟑虇♐䏛梏嬐㎟䉉㔛叄㏚Ҹӂ 䋅军⁥㐎尜虇⢷⋶扷ら䱚⋶ⵈ⢧栙╾劌⎴⌆㒠㎿虇 ⡯䉉⶚㐍▗懸䠓⁉戇㞾ᾏ↚㒠㎿虇军ᾣ㐤幖㎟㢻ㄗ汧Ҹ 䋅军虇⋶扷ひ◙⁲䖕䠓強⑱᾵ᾜ㳱㝋㳳虇ⶳ⌅⢷ ㅺ憮㼗幊♐姛㫼Ҹ ⁙〃‣㢗虇䠍‚⋻▇␯テ⌅Ⱑ汣╙⋶ⵈ␄⃫扷 朏虇⢷亟亓朚宼―⋶扷⽴⃫ⴳҸ 憨↚ ⃣ ⢿⡪ⓒ 。㝈 ◝ 䠓⋶ⵈ⽴⃫ ⴳ 䯀 䉉 Creators League虇㝷⢷媌⃫♐䏛⋶ⵈ虇▛㟑‵厖梊 ㄀媌䏖⛕ҷ佁ᾙ⎉䏗⛕╙⌅⁥♐䏛⋶ⵈ䠋⾒⛕▗⃫ 㔷ひ₊⃤♐䏛䠓⋶ⵈҸ ≂伀ひ◙⁲䖕䠓⏜㟾慠〃㎟䉉䍀朏䠓䎼履尀 槛Ҹ㎟䱚Creators League䠓䠍‚⋻▇檁㜨桕⢧⋷ 䖒俌婐Brad Jakeman虇ⷀ㞾ᾏ■ᾜ㝆㛵⅒♐䏛╙ ひ◙⁲䖕Ӂ懁⒥ӂ⋸冔䠓杫⅑Ҹ ⁥㢏慠姷䫉虇≂伀⁲䖕㮰ゞ㞾Ӂ⬑㤫㎠↠ᾜ尜䢮 冒㋽⬑⃤␄㜿虇ⷀ㢒⺸䃿ӂҸ

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a year, a brand like Pepsi needs about 5,000 pieces of content a year”. He believes agencies often struggle to work consistently at this kind of speed in a way that is both affordable and sustainable. Unilever is also jumping on this trend. In October, the consumer goods giant was reportedly planning to launch two units dedicated to branded content in a bid to overcome ad blocking and change consumer search behaviour. Under the new project, it will create “U-Studio” and “U-Entertainment” – the former will concentrate on “needs content”, which includes how-to videos, reviews and usergenerated content; while the latter will develop “passions content”, including games, TV series and music created with partners in the entertainment industry. On the agency front, many are aware of this trend and point out it’s not new in the market or even surprising.

Tan says she is still very confident about the future of the traditional agency model; as long as agencies continue to cook up ideas that can change both markets and culture, it will look bright for the business. “Ultimately, it means we need to retain our high-ground on strategic thinking, creativity, and integration – thereby allowing us to develop work that people really talk about.” Echoing Chow’s earlier opinion, Catarina Lio, chief operating officer of Ogilvy & Mather Hong Kong, doubts if brands have the right environment to build and sustain the talent for their in-house teams. “Trends always change – the talent you have today may not be the right fit two years down the road. Who will make the right decision to evolve or adapt? Who will help to train the talent?” When it comes to the modern communication environment, things move from print to digital, from normal search to voice

Brad Jakeman⢷ᾒ㢗䠋⾒䠓⧀懢㕟╙虇Ӂ≞䠍 ‚憨㮲䠓♐䏛㵞〃梏嬐䠓ᾜ╹㞾‣䵖⋶ⵈ虇军㞾㵞 〃⪶亓‣ⓒ䵖⋶ⵈӂҸ ⁥尜䉉虇ひ◙⁲䖕ㄏㄏ桲⁴㔰䚷⊈撱䢇⴫军ᾣ ╾㒐倛䠓㝈ゞ虇Ⅼ㒐⁴憨䮽憮〵䠓⽴⃫Ҹ 凾▗⎸啾‵㐤怺憨↚䃽㻐Ҹ⁙〃ⓐ㢗虇封㼗幊♐ ⽷榼㙩⧀宗␒㎟䱚⋸↚⶗㹷㝋♐䏛⋶ⵈ䠓扷朏虇⁴ ㍘⶜ひ◙㚣㎹╙㼗幊冔㖫⶚姛䉉惘崙Ҹ 㜿 宗 ␒ ⶖ ら 䱚 ⋸ ↚ 扷 朏處Ӂ U - S t u d i oӂ╙ ӁU-Entertainmentӂ虇⏜冔ⶖ桕ᾼ⢷Ӂ梏㷑⋶ⵈӂ虇 ⌅ᾼ⒔㑻㄀䏖媌⃫㒖ⓦҷ寤履╙䚷㏅䚮㎟⋶ⵈ虖军ㄛ 冔ⶖ朚䠋Ӂ㉔㊮⋶ⵈӂ虇⒔㑻懙㏁ҷ梊嬥␖ҷ⁴╙厖⮪ 㮑姛㫼▗⃫媌⃫䠓概㮑Ҹ ⢷ひ◙⁲䖕㝈棱虇寀⪩⁉抌䛨㊞⎿憨↚強⑱虇᾵ 㒖憨⢷⾑⧃ᾙ᾵ᾜ㞾㜿洽㎥⁳⁉毩宬䠓‚Ҹ ‚⵵ᾙ虇⁥↠⣵㐎虇ㅔ榗⢷㢜⑨⃫⎉㛈崙虇⁴懸 ㍘Ⱑ汣䠓䂣崙╙㜇䩋⒥䠓テ⪶㄀榎Ҹ BBDO⪶ᾼ啾Ⓩ欥⾼⦆姛ⴧ栂ⳟ䃣姷䫉虇ᾏ‪ⴱ ㏅䠓䩉ⶖ扷₌⾑⧃㔷ひ⽴⃫惘䛀⋶扷帯帻Ҹ ⬈孲捚㒖┮⡯ㄗ䶰✽處ㅺ㔆ҷ幹亯⬌ҷ军ᾣ⌆㎟ 㢻㛗䡙Ҹ Ӂ⢷㵞↚ⴱ㏅䠓㵞榔㔷ひ㻊⑤ᾼ虇抌㢘䰉朢⶗

In fact, they admit there is certainly a need to evolve in terms of capability to adjust to the evolution of the media and the strong role of digital. Tze Kiat Tan, CEO of BBDO Greater China, says it’s true that some clients are taking some elements of the marketing service in-house. She explains the reason for this is simple: fast, good and cost-efficient. “In every campaign for every client, there is room for precisely this kind of (cost-effective) content – most of which comes from small outfits or indeed in-house studios.” However, she says, very often brands come to famous agencies such as BBDO looking for more than just a “good” production. “They usually come to us to provide higher value services – strategy, big ideas and integration expertise. They don’t want to merely have ‘good’ stuff from BBDO. They expect ‘great’ stuff.”

search, as every day is changing, and she believes “agencies need to rebuild the model to create trends in order to build trends”. She says moving ahead, she still believes that agencies have the advantage because they understand the depth and breadth of market trends – across many industries, not just one. “This also means we have a quicker learning curve because we are exposed to more channels and more industries. We may hit the wall, but I believe we learn faster this way.” For the relationship between the agency and the client in the future, she says the key is to mix the best talent to form the right team to best partner its clients. The most appropriate model is greater transparency with its clients. “The modern way is about listening and learning from consumer insights to co-create a content/brand experience that keeps consumers coming back.”

朏ⵈ亜憨槭虃⌆㎟㢻㛗䡙䠓虄⋶ⵈ虇⌅ᾼ⪶扷⎕ℕ 卹⶞⤚ひ◙⁲䖕㎥⋶扷⽴⃫ⴳҸӂ 䋅军⬈ 姷䫉虇ㄗ⪩㟑 ↨♐䏛 ⶚㐍≞ BBDO憨 㮲 䠓 嗦▜ひ ◙ ⁲ 䖕虇䉉䠓 ᾜ≔≔ 㞾 ᾏ ↚Ӂ⬌ӂ䠓 ⃫♐Ҹ Ӂ⁥↠憩⿇嬐㷑㎠↠㕟K㢃汧⊈⇋䠓㢜⑨ʟʟ 䳥䛴ҷ⪶㬑ㆄ╙伫▗⶗㫼䥴峧Ҹ⁥↠㢮㢪ㄭBBDOㄦ ⎿䠓ᾜ╹㞾Ӄ⬌ӄ䠓㤀嬎虇军㞾Ӄ⎉吁ӄ䠓㤀嬎Ҹӂ 栂ⳟ䃣姷䫉虇⬈⶜≂伀ひ◙⁲䖕㮰ゞ䠓㢹ℕ⁜ 䋅棭⿇㢘ⅰㅒ虇╹嬐ひ◙⁲䖕劌個倛㭚ㆬ㛈崙⾑⧃ ╙㜖⒥䠓㬑ㆄ虇⌅㫼⑨⏜㟾ⶖ㢒ᾏ䏖⋘㞝Ҹ Ӂ㢏 仑虇憨㊞☂嗦㎠↠嬐 Ⅼ 㒐㎠↠⢷ 䳥䛴ㆬ 似ҷ␄㊞╙㜃▗㝈棱䠓⊹⑱⢿⃜虇ㄭ军ℎ㎠↠劌⪯ ㏢憯⎉姦䥴⾆凭䠓⃫♐Ҹӂ ⫶儝欨㾾欥⾼䍮懚ⴧづ䯝䖵⡭㍘◷Ⅼ啾Ὶ⏜䠓 履灭虇幹䜠♐䏛㞾▵㢘懸䜅䠓䘿⨒ℕら䱚╙䛨⃞⌅ ⋶扷⢧栙䠓⁉㏜Ҹ Ӂ䃽㻐 伢⿇⢷ 崙虇⃯⁙⪸ 㙐 㢘䠓⁉㏜ ㎥ ⢷⋸ 〃ㄛ崙ㄦ懝㟑Ҹ尿劌ⷀ㛈崙㎥懸㍘虇⃫⎉㳲䩉䠓㸉 ⴩虚尿劌⿺ㅨ⦈客⁉㏜虚ӂ 屖╙䖍⁙䠓≂宙䘿⨒虇ᾏ⎖ㄭ⓿⏆⎿㜇䩋ҷㄭ

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Caspar Schlickum CEO of Wunderman APAC, thinks the always-on real-time marketing ecosystem is challenging brands to rethink how they approach the way they engage with their customers. And it also challenges agencies to rethink what they do for their clients. “Agencies that will survive are those that are fast and nimble, who are driven by great creative and inspiring content, and who can collaborate with their clients to find inspiration in data.” But to say that clients can just in-house all of this is missing the point, he adds. “Clients benefit from the diversity of ideas and thinking that their agencies bring. They benefit from having people working on their business who are exposed to a very broad set of challenges and ideas, not all of them related to the client’s brand.” With so many tools, so many channels and so many platforms today, he says the agency can be a valuable window into not just ideas, “but capability and understanding”. Looking into the future, he says he is firmly in the “it’s evolving” camp when it comes to the client/agency relationship. By embedding some or all of their agency team and capabilities in their own marketing departments, that sort of partnership creates the kind of collaboration that delivers the best of both worlds. Rather than traditional marketing campaigns, social media has become an important means to engage with customers

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daily. Xiaofeng Wang, senior analyst at Forrester, says marketers can take the day-to-day creation of content internally, for example, with owned media such as branded pages or branded social media accounts. However, marketers can’t do everything internally. “They still need external support in digital strategy to accelerate digital transformation and deliver business outcomes; creative strategy is among the areas that marketers need the most external support.” She points out marketers need creative strategies to improve the return on their digital marketing investments. “Creative strategies include guidance on how the audience will interact with the brand and what the brand can do or say to engage them,” she says. “Content marketing, creating relevant ideas, defining customer segments, and customer journey mapping are critical to developing an effective creative strategy where the ultimate goal is to deliver business outcomes.” On the other hand, Wang suggests that agencies could transform from implementation to a business-outcome delivery, more like consultancies that offer both strategies and deliver business results. She adds that, for instance, digital agencies nowadays are competing with digital service providers such as Accenture Interactive and Deloitte Digital, blurring the lines even further and greatly complicating the future of the status quo.

㳲⿇㖫亱⎿尭概㖫亱虇㵞ᾏ⪸抌⢷崙⒥虇⬈尜䉉ひ ◙⁲䖕梏嬐䧃厙䱚㜿Ҹ ⷤ㢪㢹ℕ虇⬈⁜䋅尜䉉ひ◙⁲䖕㙐㢘⊹⑱虇⡯ 䉉⁥↠㾀⋴军ひ㹪⢿―孲寀⪩姛㫼䠓䘿⨒虇军棭✽ ᾏ姛㫼䠓⾑⧃強⑱Ҹ Ӂ棱卷㢃⪩䠓㾯懢╙㢃⪩䠓姛㫼虇㊞☂嗦㎠↠ 嬐ⴇ兡ㄦ㢃ㅺҸ㎠↠╾劌㢒䨿⩐虇⃕㎠䢇ⅰ憨㮲㢒 ℎ㎠↠ⴇ兡ㄦ㢃ㅺҸӂ 厂 㝋 㢹 ℕひ ◙⁲ 䖕 厖 ⴱ㏅Ὶ朢䠓杫⅑虇⬈ 姷 䫉杫攄⢷㝋ⶖ㢏⊹䭏䠓⁉㏜仓㎟▗懸䠓⢧栙虇㎟ 䉉ⴱ㏅㢏⬌䠓▗⃫⪴⃃虇㢃嬐■ⴱ㏅Ⅼ㒐㢃汧䠓 憞㞝〵Ҹ Ӂ䖍⁲䠓㝈ゞ㞾凕刌㼗幊冔㺭㈘᾵ㄭᾼⴇ兡虇 ⌀▛␄憯⋶ⵈ虊♐䏛汣毦虇◇イ㼗幊冔ᾜ㝆⡭榼Ҹӂ ⇘朏‭⪹Ⓩ俌婐㣝ㆬ㥞尜䉉虇㷇懯⢷佩䠓⵵㟑 ⾑⧃㔷ひ䚮㋚亊伀虇㳲㒠㎿♐䏛捜㜿ㆬ冒⁥↠厖ⴱ ㏅‡⑤䠓㝈ゞҸ 憨㮲▛㟑‵㒠㎿ひ◙⁲䖕虇捜㜿ㆬ冒⁥↠⎿〤 劌䉉ⴱ㏅⇩䚩灋Ҹ Ӂひ◙⁲䖕䠓╜㍘ㅔ榗慔憮╙棗㻊虇⁴⎉吁䠓 ␄㊞╙⌆⛮䠋ㆶ䠓⋶ⵈ⃫Ὴ⶝虇᾵厖ⴱ㏅▗⃫ㄭ㜇 㙩ᾼ⶚㐍棗㊮虇憨㮲㏜劌䚮⳧Ҹӂ ⃕⁥婫 ⋔ 姷䫉虇ⴱ㏅ᾜ ╾劌 ⶖᾏ ⎖″䛀⋶扷 帯帻Ҹ Ӂひ◙⁲䖕㏏⿅ℕ䠓⪩⋒⒥㬑ㆄ╙㊂㹤虇▛㟑 ⁲䖕⋻▇㔴宇懝㢹ㅔ厖ⴱ㏅䢇杫䠓‚㉔虇⁳ⴱ㏅ㄭ ᾼ╦䡙Ҹӂ 䖍⁙㢘戲灋⪩⽴⌆ҷ㾯懢╙。╿虇⁥姷䫉⌅ひ ◙⁲䖕⋻▇ⶖ㢒㞾ᾏ↚㢘⊈⇋䠓㾯懢虇㕟K䠓ᾜ╹ 㞾㬑ㆄ虇Ӂ军㞾劌␪╙䖕孲ӂҸ ⷤ㢪㢹ℕ虇⶜㝋ⴱ㏅虊ひ◙⁲䖕䠓杫⅑虇⁥姷 䫉㢒⦔⴩䱨⢷Ӂᾜ㝆䂣崙ӂ䠓柲䍮Ҹ憞懝ⶖ扷⎕㎥ ㏏㢘ひ◙⁲䖕䠓⢧栙╙㢜⑨亜⋴卹⾀䠓⾑⧃㔷ひ 扷朏虇憨䮽▗⃫䉉⋸↚ᾥ䛛⿅ℕ桨庞䠓⷏棱Ҹ 柳≂伀䠓⾑⧃㔷ひ㻊⑤⪥虇䫍″Ⱑ汣‵⾁㎟䉉 㝴⿇凾俺㼗幊冔䠓捜嬐㾯懢ҸForrester 汧亩⎕㤟 ⾺䔚㡘⹿姷䫉虇⾑⧃㔷ひ⁉♰╾ⶖ㝴⿇⋶ⵈ␄⃫″ 䛀⋶扷⢧栙帯帻虇ℚ⬑♐䏛佁榐㎥♐䏛䫍″⿂埮䳘 卹㢘Ⱑ汣ᾙ䠓⋶ⵈҸ 䋅军虇⾑⧃㔷ひ⁉♰ᾜ劌ⶖᾏ⎖″䛀⋶扷⢧栙 帯帻Ҹ Ӂ⁥↠⢷㜇䩋䳥䛴ᾙ⁜梏嬐⪥扷㚾㒐虇⁴␯ㅺ 㜇䩋⒥惘⤚╙⵵䖍㫼⑨㎟㤫Ҹ␄㊞䳥䛴㞾⾑⧃㔷ひ ⁉♰㢏梏嬐⪥扷㚾㖃䠓䵓䜖ῚᾏҸӂ ⬈㒖⎉虇⾑⧃㔷ひ⁉♰梏嬐␄㊞䳥䛴ℕ㕟汧⌅ 㜇䩋⾑⧃㔷ひ䠓㐤幖⡭⧀Ҹ ⬈尹處Ӂ␄㊞䳥䛴⒔㑻㢘杫╦䣍ⶖ⬑⃤厖♐䏛 ‡⑤ҷ⁴╙♐䏛╾⁴⇩䚩灋㎥尹䚩灋ℕ凾俺╦䣍䠓 㒖イҸӂ Ӂ⋶ⵈ䍮摆ҷ␄⃫䢇杫㬑ㆄҷ⴩儸ⴱ㏅槭⤚╙ 俹媌ⴱ㏅㝔䮚⶜㝋⏅⴩㢘㛗䠓␄㊞䳥䛴厂杫捜嬐虇 军㢏仑䠓䡽㮨㞾⵵䖍㫼⑨㎟㤫Ҹӂ ╵ᾏ㝈棱虇䔚㡘⹿ら峿虇ひ◙⁲䖕䠓孡吁╾ㄭ 帯帻⦆姛惘崙䉉帯帻懣㎟㫼⑨㎟㤫虇⁴槭⃋屽寱 槶⛞䠓怺₌㕟K䳥䛴╙⿺␸⵵䖍㫼⑨㎟㤫Ҹ⬈婫 ⋔㒖虇ℚ⬑䖍㟑䠓㜇䩋ひ◙⁲䖕㳲厖 Accenture! Interactive╙Deloitte Digital䳘㜇䩋㢜⑨K㍘⛕ ‡䢇䲅䎼虇ℎ⋸冔Ὶ朢䠓䛛佩崙ㄦ㢃㮰乙虇‵⁳㢹 ℕ䠓㉔㹐崙ㄦ㢃媖桫Ҹ

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Yahoo unveils winners of the Big Idea Chair Awards 2016 桔埝⋻⃗ӁYahoo Big Idea Chair佁ᾙ␄㊞ひ◙ ⪶䓝2016ӂㄦ䓝▜✽

Yahoo Hong Kong announced the winners of the “Yahoo Big Idea Chair Awards 2016”. Marking the eighth consecutive year of the Yahoo BIC Awards this year, the event recognises the extraordinary efforts of marketers on the Yahoo network with their integration of creativity, innovation and imagination. Twenty-one awards overall, consisting of 15 Hong Kong categories and six North Asia categories, were honoured at the ceremony at JW Marriott Hong Kong. CLP Power Hong Kong Limited took home a number of grand awards, including

the Yahoo Big Idea Chair Award for Hong Kong, while Bayer HealthCare Limited and AXA Hong Kong took scored multiple merit awards in different categories this year. Media Agency of the Year for Search was awarded to Zenith, while Mindshare bagged the Media Agency of the Year for Display. Advertising Agency of the Year was won by Metta Communications. Commenting on the win, Quince Chong, Chief Corporate Development Officer, CLP Power Hong Kong Limited, said, “We are truly honoured to receive the Yahoo Big Idea Chair Award, the Best Branding Campaign

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雅虎香港宣䆋「Yahoo Big Idea Chair 網上創 ㊞ひ◙⪶䓝 2016ӂ䠓ㄦ䓝▜✽Ҹ⁙〃成⋴䲻⋺ⷕ虇 ӁYahoo Big Idea Chair Awards佁ᾙ␄㊞ひ◙⪶ 䓝ӂ䐈㊞姷㕩⢷桔埝佁仰ᾙ⶜␄㊞ҷ␄㜿╙㊂≞␪ 㝈棱⃫⎉ⓢ弙帱䔊䠓⾑⧃㔷ひ⁉♰Ҹ榡䓝䬽⇖欨㾾 JW喻巹拡〦厘姛虇㢒ᾙ⌀榡䠋21↚䓝榔虇⒔㑻15榔 欨㾾Ⓩ䓝榔⁴╙⋼榔⒦‭Ⓩ䓝榔Ҹ ᾼ 啾 梊 ␪ 㢘 柟 ⋻ ▇ 庞 ㄦ ⪩ 榔 ⪶ 䓝虇⒔ 㑻 ӁYahoo Big Idea Chairӂ欨㾾Ⓩ厂⶙⪶䓝虇军㑫 凂挺坴Ⅼ⇴㢘柟⋻▇╙ⴘ䡪欨㾾‵⎕⎴㝋⁙〃䔁ㄦ ⪩↚䓝榔Ҹ ⢷ ひ ◙ ⋻▇ 䓝 㝈 棱虇䢮 ␪㟑虃 Ze nith虄庞 ㄦ 㢏 ℂ ‡ ⑤ ひ ◙ ⋻▇ʞ㖫 ⶚虖≂ 䱚 欨 㾾 㢘 柟 ⋻▇ 虃Mindshare虄⫹ㄦ㢏ℂ‡⑤ひ◙⋻▇ʞ⢥≞虖军

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and Best Content Marketing Campaign awards in recognition of our successful ‘Power Your Love Programme’ this year. Through the collaboration with Yahoo and its Better Me eMagazine campaign, we are able to spread green messages with positive energy to our customers, which helps encourage a greener lifestyle and energy saving behaviour in the younger generation.” Winning brands and agencies gathered together at the awards ceremony to celebrate their digital marketing successes complete with local musical performances.

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The ceremony was attended by over 260 guests and renowned marketers. “This year we saw a surge in award submissions, breaking last year’s record, with all of the entries demonstrating digital creativity. We look forward to working closely with more creative talent and developing more outstanding digital campaigns in the future,” Rico Chan, Vice President & General Manager, Yahoo Hong Kong & INSEA Sales said. Originating from Yahoo! Inc., the Yahoo Big Idea Chair was launched in Hong Kong in 2009.

ⵕ懣儝㾰≂㘼㢘柟⋻▇虃Metta Communications虄 ⑖⫹㢏ℂ␄㊞ひ◙⋻▇㴙㬽Ҹ ⶜ 㝋庞ㄦ⪶ 䓝虇ᾼ啾梊␪ₐ 㫼䠋 ⷤ 俌婐唙 ⇘ 哄姷䫉處Ӂ㎠↠ㄗ汧厗ᾼ梊Ӄ⋷⥝懝梊ӄ宗␒䔁榡 ӃYahoo Big Idea Chair佁ᾙ␄㊞ひ◙⪶䓝ӄ厂⶙⪶ 䓝虇⁴╙㢏ℂ♐䏛㔷ひ㻊⑤䓝☛㢏ℂ⋶ⵈ姛摆⪶䓝Ҹ 憞懝厖桔埝䠓▗⃫虇拜▗⌅Ӄ⬌桕㋲ӄ佁ᾙ桫尛虇Ӄ ⋷⥝懝梊ӄ宗␒㢘㛗ⴲ㕩䘿Ⅼ宙ㇾ虇䉉ⴱ㏅㹷⋴㳲劌 捞虇᾵ᾣ㢘␸炢⒄〃悤ᾏ⁲⵵徟㢃䘿Ⅼ䠓䚮㻊㝈ゞ虇 ⦈檙䵏亓劌䀟䠓兡㋲Ҹӂ 弔懝260⃜嗦▜➘幢☛⾑⧃㔷ひ⁉♰⎉⾼榡䓝 䬽虇厖▓⪶ㄦ䓝♐䏛☛ひ◙⋻▇㌅䫬⌅㜇䩋姛摆ₐ␒ 䠓㎟␮虇᾵⌀▛㲲幭㢻⢿概㮑姷䂣Ҹ 桔埝欨㾾俌伢䖕╙㤀ⓦ‭⓿〵㫼⑨⏾俌婐栂⛮ 䁣姷䫉處Ӂ⁙〃虇㎠↠嬚⎿╒庌⃫♐䠓㜇䡽⪶⿔ᾙⓖ虇 ᾵㏢䧃╊〃亏撓虇⃫♐㢃䡰槾㜇䩋␄㊞Ҹ㎠↠㢮ㄔ厖 㢃⪩␄㊞⁉㏜㚫㏚▗⃫虇㔱亱㢹ℕ㢃⪩䠋ⷤⓢ弙㜇䩋 姛摆ₐ␒䠓㯮㢒Ҹӂ ӁYahoo Big Idea Chair佁ᾙ␄㊞ひ◙⪶䓝ӂ䀟 卹桔埝⋻▇虇欨㾾㝋2009〃朚⭚厘愵欥ⷕ榡䓝䬽Ҹ

DE CE MB E R 2 016 / JANU ARY 2 017 MARK E TING HON G KON G 1 3


觀點

OPINION

Kam Fatt Chen Strategic planning director The Gate Worldwide Hong Kong

AD WATCH 廣告點評

HOT: Doritos No Choice

NOT: Seat Mii by Cosmopolitan

During the US presidential race, Doritos introduced an election-themed promotion with a purpose – to encourage young Americans to register as voters. At Doritos’ vending machines, you would only get blandly packaged Doritos “No Choice” inedible chips if you hadn’t registered to vote. Once you had registered, you had a choice of two new Doritos flavours. The message – if you don’t vote, you don’t get a choice. Getting a piece of the national conversation? It’s a no-brainer really.

As we celebrate gender equality and the removal of female stereotypes, this marketing effort is a huge reset button. Proclaimed to be a car designed by women for women, which featured “exclusive design and thoughtful feminine touches”, “eyeliner headlights”, shimmery “jewel wheels” and “ease of parking” – with enough room for “impromptu karaoke performances, last-minute wardrobe changes, dramatic gossip sessions and emergency lunch-hour kips”. Cringeworthy. As expressed by many netizens, this does not work for Mii.

⟰;Doritos No Choice 儝⢚俌伀⪶戇㢮朢虇Doritos㔷⎉ᾏ↚⁴戇厘䉉Ὴ槛䠓⅒摆㻊⑤虇䡽䠓㞾炢⒄儝 ⢚䠓〃悤⁉䠊宧㎟䉉戇㶠Ҹ⢷Doritos䠓卹⑤常帷㯮ᾙ虇姷䫉⬑㤫⃯ⶩ㢹䠊宧㎟ 䉉戇㶠虇ⷀ╹劌䔁ㄦ␒ᾏ⒔婬ҷᾜ╾橮䚷䠓DoritosӁNo Choiceӂ旄䏖圾䏖Ҹ ᾏ㝵⃯⾁䠊宧虇ⷀ╾⁴戇㙖⋸䮽㜿䠓Doritos╲☂Ҹ≂懭䠓宙ㇾㄗ㾔㫩處⬑㤫⃯ ᾜ㐤䫷虇⃯ⷀ㸡㢘戇㙖Ҹ㊂䠋姷卹⾀䠓刁概虚ᾜ䚷⪩㊂▶Ҹ

⇜;Seat Mii by Cosmopolitan 䜅㎠↠㌅䫬ㆶ⎴。䳘╙㼗柳⬂ㆶ㳶嬥㟑虇憨槭⾑⧃㔷ひ㏚㹤䶰䢃㞾↚⪶↡憏Ҹ 刁䯀⶗䉉⬂ㆶ军宼宗䠓㸌恙虇⁴Ӂ䣋佩ヱ恙榼䍗ӂҷ朒‽䠓Ӂⶅ䦂恙悹ӂҷӁ㹙恙 ⵈ㞢ӂҷ㢘彂⪯䠓䰉朢Ӂ│厗⛀⓰㑘OKҷ㢏ㄛᾏ⎕斧㕪婬ҷ朚⋺⓵㢒╙ⓗ朢⶞䣰 ⋔梊ӂ䉉干灭虇⵵⢷⪹⁳⁉ⷆⶻҸ㳲⬑寀⪩佁╚㏏尹虇Mii憨ᾏ㑪ᾜ䴰䚷Ҹ

MOBILE CHOICE 流動熱潮 Presented by

Tomy C.C.Choi Principal consultant cccdi ltd.

Panorella Panoramic 360° Umbrella Since Ricoh launched the first 360-degree camera, major electronics manufacturers have been eager to launch their own panoramic cameras, making panoramic technology popular. Panorella now provides a new service to connect panoramic technology with our daily lives. Users can upload their own 360-degree photos and easily print them onto the roof of an umbrella to make a custom umbrella with 360-degree view overhead. 卹Ricoh㔷⎉䲻ᾏ扷360±⋷㟾䢇㯮Ὶㄛ虇▓⪶梊ⳟ䚮䚱⛕⣖亪亪⋗ㄛ㔷⎉▓ 卹ⵅ䠓⋷㟾䢇㯮虇⁳⋷㟾㐏姢ㄦ⁴㟽╙⒥Ҹ军Panorellaℎ㳳榔360±⋷㟾㐏姢 㢃㔴慠㎠↠䠓㝴⿇䚮㻊虇㐙⋷㟾䢇㯮㑜㚬䠓360±⋷㟾㄀≞│㟑ᾙ悘虇㏢⓿⢷ ∧⋶虇␄らⷻ㝋卹⾀䠓360±⋷㟾䋶䏖∧Ҹ

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KDDI Hello, New World! Aerial filming, mobile 360° panorama and VR have become a trend in recent years. KDDI’s latest campaign has ridden the digital wave by shooting different aerial videos of various places worldwide. Starting from the plain before Mount Fuji, audiences can use their mobile phone to control a drone to fly across different parts of the world to enjoy the 360 scenery. KDDI creates a holistic user experience across its website, mobile app and the interactive installation Warp Cube where users can find themselves in an immersive virtual environment and fly all over the world with the drone. 厹㑜ҷMobile 360±⋷㟾ҷVR㎟䉉慠〃䠓䃽㻐䔸㊞ҸKDDI⢷憨㲰㔷ひ㻊⑤⎸ 䚷憨↚㜇䩋䍀䃽虇⢷▓⢿⁴厹㑜㑜㚬ᾜ▛䠓嬥槊虇䔸ⵅ╾⁴⎸䚷卹⾀㏚㯮䜅 㔶⏅⟷虇⋗䛀ⵛ⩺⸀⏜。┮⎉䠋虇㔶⏅䊰⁉㯮橪⎿ᾥ䛛ᾜ▛⢿灭㲲幭360令 㟾Ҹ㜃↚㻊⑤㍘䚷ㄭ佁榐⎿‡僽婬僽⎿㏚㯮 Apps帺ㅈ⭚仑虇ⶳ⌅⢷‡僽婬 僽Warp Cubeᾼ虇ヱ⇩埪㙻⵵㟾虇⁳䔸ⵅⴛ⋷僽怺⢷䊰⁉㯮ᾙҸ

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編輯飯局

OUT TO LUNCH

Agnes Wan, the marketing director for APAC at Gemalto, a global digital security firm headquartered in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, is obviously highly passionate about her job and the work at large. Having found herself in an executive position at the tender age of 26, her entry into the wonderful world of marketing isn’t exactly your run-of-the-mill career story. Wan is a bit of a globetrotter, and as a result, she ended up studying translation at university, even though she previously specialised in science. How, then, did she end up in marketing? “Double C, as I always say: curiosity and courage. You get curious about the rest of the world, you want to explore, see new things and meet new people. I did not actually intend to find a marketing job,” she recalls. “I just sent out my CV to a few companies that I liked, and ended up getting an offer from a technology company that offered me overseas training, and I thought: ‘Wow, that sounds amazing!’” She moved away from the fragrant harbour and found herself working in places such as Beijing and Singapore. Over the next few years, Wan quickly established herself as a talented and driven young marketer and ended up as a marketing director before she had even turned 30. She finally left the role to focus on her other passions – such as being a full-time mum and spending time with her family – but it wasn’t long before the old itch returned. In 2013, she rejoined

the industry in her current role as marketing director for Gemalto, but found the transition easier than expected. “It was challenging, but much more exciting than you would imagine,” she said with a smile. “There are actually a few similarities between being a leader and being a parent – for example, you need lots of energy for both roles! Moreover, you need to be patient and persistent. Learn from your failures, move on and never give up.” Wan explained that family support was crucial in re-entering the workplace, and this support helped her maintain her confidence and energy levels at first. Especially joining a company experiencing declining growth at the time, Wan had a monster of a job ahead of her – which she tackled head-on. Within a few short years, the company started seeing 150% YOY growth. “You have to embrace the changes in the industry, but also in your company,” she said. “When things aren’t working out – change. But even if things are working, you still have to make changes to make things even better. So I introduced a lot of changes, and we started to see a lot of creativity.” In addition to all of that – if that wasn’t enough – she’s an avid hiker, having completed the Oxfam Trailwalker challenge three times, casual runner and a marketing director to boot. “Passion is always the key to success,” she told me as dessert was served, and that statement describes her perfectly.

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ጵ᫤ᴙᯀᠥGemaltoᗉ፠᪸ᏕᲵᭆ⇚ⓘ⃕ᅗ⁝ᚑጤ ⃫☛‚㫼虇⬈抌⋔䂎䍀尯Ҹ封⋻▇㞾ᾏⵅ⋷䖒㜇䩋Ⅼ ⴘ⋻▇虇俌扷⃜㝋唆垼柎⭕㜾䐈ῈҸ ⬈㝸⢷26㴁㟑ㄭ‚姛㛎分⃜虇從彂乍ヸ䠓⾑⧃㔷 ひᾥ䛛虇⃕⬈䠓㛔‚┊㞾棭ᾏ去䠓分⧃䚮㼾㛔‚Ҹ ⷈ⯘㠉✫㳰懙㴆ᾥ䛛Ҹ⬈ᾼⴇ㟑崏䖕䭠虇⢷⪶ⴇ 㟑┊㸉⴩Ὴⅽ冊峾Ҹ戲灋虇⬈㢏仑㞾⬑⃤㐤怺⾑⧃㔷 ひ姛㫼虚 ⬈㍅慿處Ӂⷀ㞾㎠⿇尹䠓⋸↚ӃCӄ虇Ӄcuriosity虃 ⬌⫖ㅒ虄ӄ☛Ӄcourage虃⑖㶲虄ӄҸ䜅㟑䠓㎠⶜ᾥ䛛⪶ ⢿⋔䂎⬌⫖虇㊂╊㔱亱ᾥ䛛ҷ䠋㔧㜿‚䏸╙尜峧㜿㢚 ╚虇⵵株ᾙ㎠᾵㸡㢘⏊㊞⶚㐍⾑⧃㔷ひ⽴⃫Ҹӂ Ӂ㎠╹㞾ⶖⷴ㴆ⵓ仵」ⵅ㎠ㅒ⊏䠓⋻▇虇㢏ㄛ㢘 ᾏⵅ䭠㐏⋻▇╥撓―㎠虇᾵㕟K㼆⪥⦈客虇㎠䜅㟑ㅒ ㊂處Ӄ♖虇刌弆ℕᾜ撾✣蘼ӄӂⷀ憨㮲虇⬈桱朚―欨㾾虇 ⏜ㄏ⒦※╙㜿␯⣰䳘⪶⥝⾑⽴⃫Ҹ⢷㔴ᾚℕ䠓」〃 朢虇ⷈ⯘㠉慔憮娺刾⴩☛尜▛䉉ᾏ▜㢘㏜啾╙㢘泓␪ 䠓〃悤⾑⧃㔷ひ⁉♰虇䚩厂⢷41㴁⏜㟘ⓖ㎟䉉⾑⧃㔷 ひ俌䡲Ҹ ⃕⬈㢏仑桱朚―分⧃虇㐙⬈䠓䍀尯桕ᾼ⎿╵ᾏ↚ 㜿䠓孡吁虇憌㷑╵ᾏ䮽䚮㻊虇ⷀ㞾㎟䉉ᾏ⃜⋷分ⱌⱌ虇 呀㢃⪩䠓㟑朢厖ⵅ⁉⌀埤Ҹ⃕ᾜ῔虇⬈╗㐏䟱Ҹ2013 〃虇⬈捜慣⾑⧃㔷ひ姛㫼虇⎉₊䖍㟑䠓Gemalto⾑⧃ 㔷ひ俌䡲虇㸡㊂⎿䜅ᾼ䠓惘崙㵣㊂≞ᾼℕㄦⵈ㞢Ҹ ⬈䲠尹處Ӂ憨↚惘崙㬄⌆㒠㎿ㆶ虇⃕㵣㎠㊂≞ᾼℕ ㄦ㢃⁳⁉䅏⑤☛厗⫽Ҹӂ Ӂ‚⵵ᾙ虇⃫䉉ᾏ↚榧⶝☛䜅䏅㵜Ὶ朢㢘‪⌀憩 灭虇ℚ⬑⋸↚孡吁抌梏嬐⪶捞勵␪☛汣␪蘼㳳⪥虇ㅔ榗 嬐㢘ⓐ彂䠓冟ㅒ╙ᾜ㝆䠓⦔㒐Ҹㄭ⫀㛦ᾼⴇ兡虇個倛 ⏜懁虇㷇ᾜ㛍㩓Ҹӂ ⷈ⯘㠉孲捚㒖虇ⵅ⁉䠓㚾㒐㞾⬈捜慣分⧃䠓杫 攄Ҹⶳ⌅㞾⬈⏪⏪␯⋴憨ⵅ⋻▇㟑㳲伢㴆㫼⑨⨭朆ᾚ 彛虇ⵅ⁉䠓㚾㒐㢘␸⬈ら䱚ⅰㅒ虇⬌崢⬈㢘彂⪯䠓劌 捞厖桲槛㖞沴Ҹ⢷䥼䥼」〃⋶虇㫼⑨朚⭚撓ㄦ150% 䠓▛㵣⨭朆Ҹ Ӂ嬐㔴╦姛㫼䠓崙⒥虇㢃梏嬐嬐㔴╦☛㙐㑀⋻▇ 䠓崙⒥Ҹӂ⬈尹處Ӂ䜅懖ᾙ憕⨒虇ⷀ嬐㛈崙Ҹ⃕│ℎᾏ ⾕樷榕虇㎠↠⁜䋅梏嬐⃫⎉㛈崙虇㛈崙㏜劌⁳‚㉔崙 ㄦ㢃⬌Ҹ⡯㳳㎠㕟⎉懝ㄗ⪩㛈棸虇ᾏ彾ᾙ䢚⎿ㄗ⪩䠓 ␄㊞ᾜ㝆㿶䖍Ҹӂ刌懝―⁴ᾙ䠓䮽䮽‚忮虇呴⃯⁜㊞䓅 㢹䡰虇⬈΅㞾ᾏ▜姛⸀㊪⬌冔虇⾁伢ᾘ㲰㎟␮ⴛ㎟㮑 㝌㵔姛冔ᾏ䠍丂㒠㎿虇㢃▛㟑㞾ᾏ▜㫼檧彠㏚虇ᾏ↚ ㊪彠䠓⾑⧃俌䡲Ҹ 䜅䚫♐ᾙ㧛㟑虇⬈◙寃㎠處Ӂ䍀尯㞾㎟␮䠓杫 攄Ҹӂ䚷憨╴尀ℕヱⵈ⬈㢏䉉幋⎖ᾜ懝Ҹ

Guest: Agnes Wan, marketing director, APAC, at Gemalto. Venue: Liberty Exchange Main: Liberty burger and salmon. Service: Personal and professional.

⅓ហᅨGemalto‭⪹Ⓩ⾑⧃㔷ひ俌䡲Agnes Wan ᑊ╞ᅨLiberty Exchange. ᭆፃᷠᑨᅨLiberty䂱⦰╙ᾘ㜖泩 ᚞᪱ᅨ幋ㅒ⶗㫼

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MARKETING EVENTS

Think back on your last railway experience. When you stared at the map, did you try to locate yourself? Or did you check how far you were from the location, to figure out what was ahead of you in the journey? Angel Tang reports from the SAS customer intelligence 360 insights conference. ⡭㊂ᾏᾚ朲ᾚῧ⣟旄彾䠓伢毦Ҹ䜅 ⃯䡾嗦⢿⢥㟑虇╾㢘寵⢥㐍⎉卹⾀ 䠓⃜僽虇㎥冔㥴䢚彬桱䡽䠓⢿㢘⪩ 懯虇⁴―孲㝔䮚⏜㝈㢒懖⎿䚩灋虚 Angel Tang⢷SASⴱ㏅㺭㈘360 ⧀⶝Ҹ

Date: 26 October 2016 Venue: The Mira Hong Kong Sponsor:

Like a railway map, marketing pundits say identifying the customer journey allows brands to locate, navigate and understand how people experience a product or service. Find the right touch-point, adopt the right strategy, and achieve loyal customers. At a recent half-day Insights conference, sponsored by SAS – “Shaping the future of the customer journey” – Marcus Lui, head of customer experience and design at Asia Miles, used a railway map as a metaphor of the customer journey to point out the essential steps a brand should take to understand customers’ points of view. “The journey map should not be a great mystery,” he said. “It is not a static document, and needs to expand continuously with customer insights. The question is: how do we actually capture these moments of truth?” The first step, he answered, was always to locate, which means to empathise. “Put yourself in the customers’ shoes, capture the customer experiences, and identify their pain points.” For example, while customers often found it difficult to buy concert tickets, the brand did a title sponsorship for the Hacken Lee and Joey Yung concert, and extended the concert experience by giving customers additional backstage passes for photo opportunities. “We have to extend beyond adding our logo to the concert,” he said. Similarly, Tony Chow, regional director of creative+content marketing for APAC at Marriott International, said it all started with

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Ꮹᑙ✷῅ᑊ‽ዯ∐ᅗᏕᲵᭆ⇚᫵ᤲⅉᱜ῜ᵗ♈ហ፮ 䠓㝔䮚虇♐䏛卹䋅劌㐍⎿卹⾀䠓⴩⃜虇―孲⁉↠⬑⃤ 汣毦ᾏ₅䚱♐㎥ᾏ榔㢜⑨Ҹ㐍⎉㳲䩉䠓㔴宇灭虇㔰╥ 㳲䩉䠓䳥䛴虇ⷀ劌庞ㄦㅯ⵵䠓ⴱ㏅Ҹ ⢷ 慠㢮䛀 SAS 庙␸䠓Ӂ⧠ 憯 㢹 ℕⴱ㏅Ὶ 㝔ӂ ⓙ⪸䦣宝㢒ᾙ虇‭㻁喻捛憩ⴱ㏅汣毦╙宼宗Ὴ䴰 Marcus Lui⁴旄彾⢿⢥ℕ㵣❊ⴱ㏅㝔䮚虇᾵㒖⎉♐ 䏛―孲ⴱ㏅孏灭㟑㍘㔰╥䠓⦉㢻㳴毮Ҹ Ӂ㝔䮚⢿⢥ᾜ㍘㞾ᾏ↚⪶岝⢧ҸӂLui 尹處Ӂⴒ ᾵棭ᾏ₌棫㋚㜖₅虇梏嬐憞懝ⴱ㏅㺭㈘ⶖ⌅ᾜ㝆㚃 ⪶Ҹ⛞槛㞾處㎠↠⵵株ᾙ⬑⃤㓤㓘憨‪杫攄㟑⏊虚ӂ ⁥⡭䳣㒖虇䲻ᾏ㳴㞾㐍⎉ⴱ㏅䠓⃜僽虇憨㊞☂嗦 嬐宼怺埤⢿ҸӁⶖ卹⾀⁲⋴ⴱ㏅䠓埤⨒虇㓤㓘ⴱ㏅汣 毦虇᾵㐍⎉⁥↠䠓䝪灭Ҹӂ ℚ⬑虇ⴱ㏅伢⿇桲⁴庋幆䂣⛀㢒朏䫷虇⃕封♐䏛 ㎟䉉㣝⋚⑳╙ⵈ䫥⋡䠓䂣⛀㢒⌯▜庙␸⛕虇᾵䉉ⴱ ㏅㕟K槜⪥䠓ㄛ╿憩姛峘虇㕟ⓖ䂣⛀㢒汣毦Ҹ Lui尹處Ӂ㎠↠㏏⇩䠓虇ᾜ≔㞾⢷䂣⛀㢒␯ᾙ♐䏛 ▜⳦Ҹӂ ▛㮲⢿虇喻巹⢚株‭⪹Ⓩ␄㊞╙⋶ⵈ䍮摆俌䡲 ◷Ⅼ啾姷䫉虇ᾏ⎖抌ㄭ䫍″凕刌朚⭚ҸӁ䖍⁙⪩↚ⷞ ⿤╙。╿ᾙ⋔㜴嗦ᾜ▛䠓䫍″Ⱑ汣刁概虇♐䏛ᾜ嬐 ㏢㝆憨‪⶜尀虇᾵朚⭚凕刌⌅ⴱ㏅䠓刁概虇⁴ⅎ㢃␯ ―孲⁥↠䠓✫⬌╙梏㷑Ҹӂ ᾚᾏ㳴虇ⷀ㞾憩懝│㟑╙慔憮䠓╜㍘ℕ䂎彂ⴱ ㏅䠓梏㷑Ҹ ◷Ⅼ啾姷䫉虇⁥䠓⢧栙㢘ᾘ⪶䡽㮨處ⶖ䢮⵵䠓ⴱ ㏅汣毦崙㎟ⴲ≂㯮㢒ҷ䲻ᾏ㟑朢㍘⶜─㯮㉔㹐ҷ᾵╒ 厖㻐姛㜖⒥䍀朏尀槛ℕ◇イⴱ㏅䠓㹷㊞Ҹ ⡭槶ᾒ㢗⎬虇䜅㟑Pokémon Go⾼㔁欨㾾虇喻巹 䬽幭䓝⒄宗␒厖Expedia▗⃫虇庙␸⶞乍棗懣⁉Nick Johnson⏜ㄏ欨㾾╙⌅⁥⋸↚⢿Ⓩ⋜幊㝔姛虇᾵⿺␸ ⁥ⴛ㎟㓤㓘㏏㢘⶞乍棗Ҹ Johnson⢷⌅Snapchat☛Twitter⿂㏅ᾙ宧撓⁥ 䠓㝔䮚虇⁥䠓伢㴆䔁ҿⓦ啾㝸⧀Ӏҷҿ垚㤫㝴⧀Ӏ╙

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MARKETING EVENTS

social listening. “With all of today’s social clutter across multiple screens and platforms, brands need to stop interrupting and start listening to their customers to better understand their preferences and needs.” The next step is to fulfil customers’ needs with instant gratification and quick responses. Chow said he highlighted three goals for his team: to amplify authentic guest experiences as recommendations; to be the first to respond to crisis situations; and to participate in hot topics in pop culture to catch a customer’s attention. A look back to early July, when Pokémon Go caught on in Hong Kong, Marriott Rewards employed the tactic by partnering with Expedia to sponsor Pokémaster Nick Johnson with free trips to the city and two other regions, and helped him complete his Pokémon collection. While Johnson documented his journey on his Snapchat and Twitter account, his experience was picked up by local news sources such as the South China Morning Post, Apple Daily and RocketNews24. In Asia Pacific, a total of 52 articles resulted in an estimated 8.8 million total PR impressions – all with no ad spend. “We use what’s trendy on social media to inspire new and original content with partners and brands,” Chow said. “Eventually, it did help us to increase brand loyalty and drive sales.” However, he warned that brands have to stay connected with customers by creating resonance; one key differentiator was to check if people were spending time on the content. “If they know it is branded content, and still

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stay on it, some values or messages must have resonated with them.” Irene Xu, practice lead for customer intelligence at SAS Asia Pacific, added a thorough data analysis could help identify relevant content. “Did they stop midway on the journey?” she asked. “If yes, where did they stop? From offline to online, cite a 360-degree customer profile, identify their paths and do a thorough analysis. Look deeper into the channels they prefer, and consolidate them with the customers’ histories, including transactions, events and feedback for the right solutions and products.” Technically, she advised brands to know what they want upfront, then integrate data into a digital customer data model. “You can track click streams, and identify the same customer even when he or she logs into different geolocations and IDs. Establishing a customer context helps brands understand what ‘relevant’ means for them,” she said. Alexander Roth, CEO at foodpanda Hong Kong, finds it crucial to use data analytics to keep track of an ever-changing customer journey. “We are staying really responsive, putting marketing budgets into tracking customer behaviours,” he said. “Are we meeting the convergence rate? If not, why is it levelling off? All this data helps map out a distinctive customer journey.” It is all about an open mindset, he said. “The world is constantly changing, that is why brands appear and disappear so quickly. If there’s no constant evaluation on the marketing strategy, the company is doomed to fail.”

ҿRocketNews24Ӏ䳘㢻⢿㜿凭Ⱑ汣ひ㹪⧀⶝Ҹ⢷㸡 㢘₊⃤ひ◙㚾⎉ᾚ虇‭⪹Ⓩ⌀㢘52䵖㢘杫封‚₅䠓 ⧀⶝虇撓ㄦ䠓⋻杫⓿巰䔖⌀8,800喻Ҹ Ӂ㎠↠厖▗⃫⪴⃃╙♐䏛虇⌀▛懚䚷䫍″Ⱑ汣䠓 䍀䃽ℕ⛮䠋㜿䠓┮␄⋶ⵈҸӂ◷Ⅼ啾尹處Ӂ憨㮲㢏仑 㢘␸㎠↠㕟汧♐䏛ㅯ尯〵╙⏉䅏摆⚽Ҹӂ 䋅军虇⁥㕟挡♐䏛ㅔ榗憩懝␄憯⌀溃厖ⴱ㏅Ⅼ 㒐凾俺虇军杫攄㒖㮨Ὶᾏ虇㞾䛨㊞⪶䣍槧㊞呀⪩ⶠ㟑 朢杀孌ҸӁ⬑㤫⁥↠䥴懢憨㞾ᾏ䵖♐䏛庙␸⋶ⵈ虇᾵ ⁜䋅個倛杀孌虇姷䫉䜅ᾼᾏ⴩㢘ᾏ‪⊈⇋孏㎥宙ㇾ 厖⁥↠䚱䚮⌀溃Ҹӂ SAS‭⪹Ⓩⴱ㏅㺭㈘㫼⑨Ὴ䴰Irene Xu婫⋔㒖虇 ᾏ⫦⋷棱䠓㜇㙩⎕㤟㢘␸峧⎴䢇杫䠓⋶ⵈҸ Ӂ⁥↠㞾▵⢷㝔䮚ᾼ憣⇫ᾚℕ虚ӂ⬈⛞處Ӂ㞾䠓 尀虇⁥↠⇫⢷♹婰虚ㄭ桱佩⎿⢷佩虇イ䚷360〵䠓ⴱ ㏅幖㜨虇峧⎴⁥↠䠓彾ㄠ虇᾵懁姛ㅈ〤䠓⎕㤟Ҹ㾀⋴ ―孲⁥↠✫㳰䠓㾯懢虇᾵ⶖ⌅仟▗ⴱ㏅䠓䆞孌宧撓虇 ⒔㑻″㞢ҷ㻊⑤☛╜櫚虇⁴㔷⎉㳲䩉䠓孲㸉㝈㧗╙䚱 ♐Ҹӂ ㄭ㐏姢ᾙ ℕ尹虇Xuら峿♐䏛欥⋗嬐 䥴懢卹⾀ ㊂ 嬐 䚩 灋虇䋅 ㄛ ⶖ 㜇 㙩 仟 ▗ 厂 㜇䩋 ⴱ㏅㜇 㙩 㮰 ⤚Ҹ⬈尹處Ӂ│ℎⴱ㏅⁴ᾜ▛䠓⢿䖕⃜僽╙怺₌䠊 撓虇⃯抌╾⁴憌忳灭㙙㻐虇᾵峧⎴䢇▛䠓ⴱ㏅Ҹら 䱚ᾏ↚ⴱ㏅剛㟾虇㢘␸♐䏛―孲⬑⃤厖 ⴱ㏅Ⅼ㒐 ㇾㇾ䢇杫Ҹӂ foodpanda欨㾾Ⓩ姛㛎俌婐Alexander Roth䠋 䖍虇懚䚷㜇㙩⎕㤟ℕ彮忳ᾜ㝆崙⒥䠓ⴱ㏅㝔䮚㞾厂 杫捜嬐ҸӁ㎠↠䠓╜㍘棭⿇慔憮虇᾵㐤㛍⾑⧃㔷ひ幖 捠ℕ憌忳ⴱ㏅姛䉉Ҹӂ⁥孲捚尹處Ӂ㎠↠㞾▵䲵▗㛅 㜑憮〵虚⬑㤫ᾜ㞾虇䉉䚩灋㢒◗䖍。䯸䑏㋚虚㏏㢘憨 ‪㜇㙩㢘␸㝋俹媌ᾏ↚䓷䐈䠓ⴱ㏅㝔䮚Ҹӂ Roth姷䫉虇ᾏ⎖⢷㝋Ⅼ㒐朚㛍䠓ㅒ㋚ҸӁᾥ䛛ᾜ 㝆崙⒥虇憨ⷀ㞾♐䏛⬑㳳慔憮⎉䖍☛㼗⫀䠓┮⡯Ҹ⬑ 㤫㸡㢘⶜⾑⧃㔷ひ䳥䛴懁姛㒐倛䠓寤₿虇⋻▇㹷⴩ 㢒⫀㛦Ҹӂ

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Marketing has changed its face over recent years: digital and social media are driving it to new heights. With so many different communication channels out there, there’s no argument that many companies are faced with a monumental challenge: translating product or service information into marketing messages effectively to create a meaningful dialogue with customers that will make them stand out from competitors. The Marketing Excellence Awards are far

more than simply acknowledging the great campaigns of this year. It’s about celebrating those that pushed the envelope just a little bit further. It’s about rewarding and recognising the truly exceptional. And being truly exceptional among so many unique, talented and tireless companies and individuals is no easy feat. Congratulations to all the finalists and a huge thank you to our sponsors and the industry for supporting this initiative.

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ᏕᲵᭆ⇚ᒭỔᜬᑧ὚ጦᕓ➦ᣃ⅒ᅗ∋≜፛᛻ᐐ᳂➳ 䠓㟽╙㳲ⶖ⌅㔷■㜿汧⹿Ҹ䖍㟑㢘憨灋⪩ᾜ▛䠓䀬 憩㾯懢虇寀⪩⋻▇䊰䜠棱卷⽷⪶䠓㒠㎿Ҹ劌⪯㢘㛗 ⢿ⶖ䚱♐㎥㢜⑨幖宙惘⒥䉉⾑⧃㔷ひ宙ㇾ虇᾵厖ⴱ ㏅懁姛㢘㊞儸䠓⶜尀虇ⶖℎ⌅ㄭ呇呇䲅䎼⶜㏚Ὶᾼ 劺䯝军⎉Ҹ ⾑⧃㔷ひⓢ弙⪶䓝ᾜ≔✽䉉―姷㕩⁙〃䠓⎉吁 㔷ひ榔䡽虇㢃⢷㝋㌅䫬姛㫼䠓懁㳴虇■䢮㳲䠓⊹䭏 冔仵‗䓝⒄╙尜╾Ҹ 嬐⢷䣍⪩䓷䐈ҷ㢘㏜啾╙ⳫⳫᾜ↵䠓ₐ㫼厖↚ ⁉Ὶᾼ䰐⢜军⎉㞾ᾏ₅ᾜⵈ㞢䠓⩾厘Ҹㇼ✫㏏㢘⋴ ⢜冔虇᾵棭⿇㊮岬㎠↠䠓庙␸⛕╙㜃↚姛㫼⶜憨↚ 榡䓝䬽䠓㚾㒐Ҹ

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Ivan Choi

Neil Lewis

Chief marketing officer AIA Pension and Trustee Company

Head of country marketing – Asia Marks & Spencer Asia Pacific

Henry Yim Group managing director Amoy Food

Tony Chow Director, creative and content marketing, APAC Marriott International

Bonnie Chow

David Leung

Head of marketing, branding support services City Super

Head of branding, research and development Maxim’s Caterers

Inness Chu

Tin-tin Siapno

Digital marketing and social media manager CLP Power Hong Kong

Head of marketing communications Nestlé Hong Kong

Andrew Hui

Vicky Lau

Head of marketing, Hong Kong and Macau Coffee Concepts Hong Kong

Head of corporate affairs Ngong Ping 360

Garry Bissett

Perry Chung

Director of marketing Dining Concepts

Marketing director Ocean Park

Mary Tse Regional marketing director, business region, Asia Pacific Fiskars Asia Pacific

Carman Cheung Marketing director Procter & Gamble Hong Kong

Sharon Koo

Simois Ng

Head of marketing, Asia ghd Hong Kong

Head of marketing communications Sony Corporation Hong Kong

Winny So

Kevin Cheung

Head of marketing, commercial banking HSBC

General manager Sunglass Hut Hong Kong and Macau

Janice Leung Director of marketing and communications, Asia Pacific John Hardy

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Emma Leung Head of communications WWF-Hong Kong

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EXCELLENCE IN

PARTNERSHIP SILVER Samsung Electronics H.K. Company Campaign Samsung Galaxy A Pink – The Korean Craze Brand Samsung Agency Starcom

GOLD

BRONZE Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong)

HKT Campaign HKT Hong Kong ePrix Title Sponsorship Agencies Bones, Feed HK, ADB

Campaign Why Banking Can Be an Obsession Brand Standard Chartered Agency TBWA\Hong Kong

EXCELLENCE IN

BRANDED CONTENT SILVER Swire Resources Campaign Columbia Raining Man Brand Columbia Sportswear Agency The Bridge Agency

GOLD

BRONZE

Unilever Hong Kong

Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong)

Campaign Bring Back the Taste of Home in the Memories of Family Love Brand Knorr Agency Vizeum Hong Kong

Campaign Standard Chartered Asia Miles MasterCard Launch Brand Standard Chartered Asia Miles MasterCard Agencies CMRS Digital Solutions, PHD Hong Kong

EXCELLENCE IN

CONTENT MARKETING

GOLD

SILVER

BRONZE

BRONZE

Nestlé Hong Kong

Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong)

Mastercard Worldwide

Watsons Water

Campaign From Regular to Red Carpet Brand Mastercard Agency Digital Arts Network Hong Kong

Campaign Find your previous life Agency PRIZM

Campaign NESCAFÉ Premium White Coffee Brand NESCAFÉ Agency Zenith

Campaign Standard Chartered Asia Miles MasterCard Launch Brand Standard Chartered Asia Miles MasterCard Agencies CMRS Digital Solutions, PHD Hong Kong

2 2 M A R K ET I N G H O N G K O N G D EC EMBER 201 6 / J ANUA R Y 201 7

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BRANDED CONTENT

᛾ᙱ᩷ᕧᲐỉᅘ↊ᐧᅘᎵ៑✟ᶋ᤺፛᱖ឯᛵᐩᐹᮿ ㆄ虇欨㾾欥⷗ᾏ㒖䠓梊宙㢜⑨K㍘⛕欨㾾梊宙⁙ 〃㎟䉉⋷䖒欥榔梊⑤㝈䮚ゞ撵㮨庌 Formula E 䠓 ⌯▜庙␸⛕虇᾵㎟␮⫹ㄦ▗⃫⪴⃃ⓢ弙⪶䓝仓⎴ 䠓⌯恜Ҹ ῜䢚弆ℕ虇ⴲ≂䵏亓劌䀟ҷ⮪㮑ҷ䘿⨒Ⅼ崆䠓 梊⑤恙庌‚虇彮梊宙姛㫼⪶䢇憤〼Ҹ䋅军虇欨㾾梊 宙䠓䴰䖕ⷳ尜䉉虇梊⑤恙ⶖ㢒㎟䉉㢹ℕ䠓Ὴ嬐″憩 懚惇⽴⌆Ҹ 军憞懝㞾㲰⋸ⵅ⋻▇䠓▗⃫虇峘㞝仟▗⋸冔▓ 卹䠓⊹⑱‡婫虇╾䉉⁉↠⿅ℕ桨庞⷏棱Ҹ

Sharing a common belief in pursuing innovation, leadership, sustainability and speed, HKT— Hong Kong’s premier telecommunications service provider—became title sponsor of Formula E, the world’s first fully-electric racing series this year; and the successful partnership snatched Gold in the Excellence in Partnership category. At first glance, the electric car racing event which promotes energy, entertainment, environment, has very little to do with telecommunications. However, HKT’s management is convinced that electric vehicles are the future of transportation. The two companies wanted to demonstrate that the separate strengths of each of these two players complement each other, resulting in a winwin situation for everyone. Excellence in partnership This type of partnership looks to amplify the strengths of differences and together strengthens and enhances both partners’ virtues. HKT does not only provide a wide range of telecommunications services but also commits to promoting social and environmental sustainability development. It also fuels excitement and builds new businesses, delivering strong business returns from sponsorship.

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External partnerships Being a winner of Excellence in Partnership, HKT has developed over 10 other business partnerships with Formula E partners; shopping malls, luxury brands, car brands, race teams, events, and chambers of commerce. For instance, to develop more B2B opportunities, HKT loyalty platform ‘The Club’ partnered with Tag Heuer. Additionally, HKT has been involved in a number of B2C opportunities, such as getting the boxing events DEF Championship as one of the supporting event partners. Internal Partnerships 13 brands under the HKT umbrella were deeply involved in making the HKT ePrix a successful event. These brands include The Club, 1010, CSL, eye, netvigator, now TV, Viu TV, Smart Charge, Smart Living, HKT Premier, Tap & Go Card, PCCW Global, and HKT Enterprise Cloud. This provided different units the opportunity to develop unique tactical offers, such as retail exposure, priority ticket offers, package bundling, and VIP Guests invitation according to the different entitlements.

ᗵḏ⁇ᒸᑁᓆ⚆ᝓ 㞾㲰▗⃫㝷⢷䰐⎉⋸冔䠓⊹⑱虇‡䢇仟▗⌀▛␯テ 桨㝈䠓ₐ㫼懢ㅆҸ 欨㾾梊宙ᾜ≔㕟K⪩⋒⒥䠓梊宙㢜⑨虇㢃厃␪ ⴲ㕩䫍㢒╙䘿⨒䠓╾㒐倛䠋ⷤҸ封⋻▇㢃㎟␮イ弆 ⋷⥝杫㹷╙ら䱚㜿㫼⑨虇憩懝庙␸⵵䖍テ⪶䠓㫼⑨ ⡭⧀Ҹ Ꮚᱡ⁇ᒸᑁᓆ⚆ᝓ ⃫䉉▗⃫⪴⃃ⓢ弙⪶䓝仓⎴䠓⊹⑬冔虇欨㾾梊宙 厖Formula E⾁⢷弔懝ⓐ榔⌅⁥㫼⑨䵓䜖ᾙ虇⒔㑻 ⛕⧃ҷ⫱℗♐䏛ҷ㸌恙♐䏛ҷ㵣庌⢧栙ҷ㻊⑤╙ ⛕㢒虇ら䱚▗⃫⪴⃃杫⅑Ҹ ℚ⬑虇䉉㑢ⷤ㢃⪩B2B㯮㢒虇欨㾾梊宙䠓ⴱ㏅ 。╿The Club厖Tag Heuer懣㎟▗⃫Ҹ㳳⪥虇欨 㾾梊宙‵䯜㬄╒厖寀⪩B2C㻊⑤虇ℚ⬑䎼╥㎟䉉㒂 㙙㵣庌DEF Championship䠓㚾㒐▗⃫⪴⃃ῚᾏҸ ፇᱡ⁇ᒸᑁᓆ⚆ᝓ 欨㾾梊宙㝦ᾚ䠓 13 ↚♐䏛▛㟑㾀⋴╒厖虇ℎ欨 㾾梊宙梊⑤㝈䮚ゞ撵㮨庌╥ㄦ⢢䂎㎟␮Ҹ憨‪ ♐䏛⒔㑻T h e C l u bҷ 1010ҷ C S Lҷ eyeҷ佁ᾙ 姛ҷ now TVҷViu TVҷ Smart ChargeҷSmart LivingҷHKT PremierҷTap&Go CardҷPCCW Global╙HKT Enterprise CloudҸ㞾㲰▗⃫䉉ᾜ ▛✽⃜㕟K㯮懖虇㧈㙩ᾜ▛䠓㫼⑨ㆶ幹㑢ⷤ䓷䐈䠓 ㎿姢㢜⑨虇ℚ⬑梅⚽㡬⋘ҷ⊹⋗朏⏇⊹㉯ҷ㓕伐ゞ 㢜⑨⫦檟╙VIP戏屚Ҹ

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EXCELLENCE IN

LOYALTY MARKETING SILVER Philips Electronics Hong Kong Campaign Philips Mini Rice Cooker Digital Activation Campaign Brand Philips Electronics Agency PacificLink iMedia – Part of Accenture Interactive

GOLD

BRONZE

Jardine Restaurant Group

SOGO Hong Kong

Campaign Mini Plate Mega Treat Brand Pizza Hut Agency UM Rally

Campaign SOGO Rewards Mobile App Agency Pixo Punch – Part of Accenture Interactive

EXCELLENCE IN

CUSTOM PUBLICATION SILVER Visa Hong Kong Campaign The Most Preferred Card for Overseas Payment – Visa Card Brand Visa Agency Starcom

GOLD

BRONZE

Nan Fung Group

Hong Kong Tourism Board

Campaign Ori – Property Marketing Launch Campaign Brand Ori Agency Cre8PLUS

Campaign HKTB Annual Report 2014/15 – New Thinking · New Possibilities. From Product to Experience

EXCELLENCE IN

CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT SILVER PANDORA Jewelry Asia-Pacific Campaign Hear My Love Brand PANDORA Agency Maxus Hong Kong

GOLD

BRONZE

AIA International

adidas Hong Kong

Campaign AIA Vitality Weekly Challenge Brand AIA Hong Kong

2 4 M A R K ET I N G H O N G K O NG D EC EMBER 201 6 / J A NUARY 201 7

Campaign Boost Battle Run Hong Kong Brand adidas Agency PacificLink iMedia – Part of Accenture Interactive

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EXCELLENCE IN

RELAUNCH MARKETING SILVER Link Asset Management Campaign Link’s Temple Mall Relaunch

GOLD

BRONZE

Nestlé Hong Kong

Cerebos Hong Kong

Campaign NESCAFÉ Premium White Coffee Brand NESCAFÉ Agency Zenith

Campaign Brand’s BEC 2016 Digital Campaign Brand Brand’s Essence of Chicken Agency Pixo Punch – Part of Accenture Interactive

EXCELLENCE IN

DESIGN SILVER The Peninsula Group Campaign The Peninsula Boutique Online Store Brand The Peninsula Boutique Agency monimedia

GOLD

BRONZE

AIDS Concern

MTR Corporation

Campaign Kuk Fa Cha Agency Havas Hong Kong

Campaign Art In Station Agency CMRS Digital Solutions

EXCELLENCE IN

DIGITAL MARKETING SILVER Nestlé Hong Kong Campaign NESCAFÉ Premium White Coffee Brand NESCAFÉ Agency Zenith

GOLD

BRONZE

Audi Hong Kong

Manulife International

Campaign Audi R8 NeuroRacer Agency Isobar Hong Kong

Campaign ManulifeMOVE Brand Manulife Agencies PHD Hong Kong, mcgarrybowen Hong Kong

2 6 M A R K ET I N G H O N G K O NG D EC EMBER 201 6 / J A NUARY 201 7

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WWW.M A R K ET I N G - I N T ER A C T I V E.C O M

DE CE MB E R 2 016 / JANU ARY 2 017 MARK E TING HON G KON G 2 7


EXCELLENCE IN

EVENT MARKETING

GOLD

GOLD

SILVER

BRONZE

Harbour City

Sun Hung Kai Real Estate Agency

Mercedes-Benz Hong Kong

Art Central

Campaign “We’re all Smurfs!” Art Exhibition @ Harbour City

Campaign Pika Fever Brand Mikiki Agency Wasabi Creation

Campaign E-Class HK Launch Brand Mercedes-Benz Agency Pico International (HK)

Campaign Art Central: Bringing Back Hong Kong’s Contemporary Art Fair with a Distinctly Asian Edge Brand Art Central 2016 Agency Sinclair Communications

EXCELLENCE IN

EXPERIENTIAL MARKETING SILVER Nike Hong Kong Campaign We Are Jordan Flight Tour Brand Jordan Agency Mindshare Hong Kong

GOLD

BRONZE

Manulife International

UNIQLO Hong Kong

Campaign ManulifeMOVE Pokémon Go Brand Manulife Agency mcgarrybowen Hong Kong

Campaign UNIQLO 10th Anniversary Pop-Up Store Brand UNIQLO Agency Dentsu Hong Kong

EXCELLENCE IN

FINANCIAL ADVERTISING SILVER Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong) Campaign Why Banking Can Be an Obsession Brand Standard Chartered Agency TBWA\Hong Kong

GOLD

BRONZE

Manulife International

AIA International

Campaign ManulifeMOVE Brand Manulife Agencies mcgarrybowen Hong Kong, Dentsu Hong Kong

2 8 M AR K ET I N G H O N G K O N G D EC EMBER 201 6 / J A NUARY 201 7

Campaign Love is in Every Moment Brand AIA Hong Kong Agency Uth Creative Group

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EXCELLENCE IN

GAMING SILVER RB Hong Kong Campaign Health Academy Brand Dettol Agency Havas Hong Kong

GOLD

BRONZE Festival Walk

The Dairy Farm Company – Wellcome

Campaign “Secret Code Gift Surprises” at Festival Walk Agency ET Promotions

Campaign Wellcome Voice-over Recording Tour Brand Wellcome Agencies Grey Advertising Hong Kong, UM

EXCELLENCE IN

INNOVATION

GOLD

SILVER

SILVER

BRONZE

Shiseido Hong Kong

The Dairy Farm Company – Wellcome

UNIQLO Hong Kong

Hutchison Telecom

Campaign UNIQLO 10th Anniversary Pop-Up Store Brand UNIQLO Agency Dentsu Hong Kong

Campaign Making Better Brand 3HK Agencies PHD Hong Kong, Metta Communications

Campaign Meet Your First Red Brand Shiseido Agency Curious Few Company

Campaign Wellcome Voice-over Recording Tour Brand Wellcome Agencies Grey Advertising Hong Kong, UM

EXCELLENCE IN

INTEGRATED MARKETING SILVER DBS Bank (Hong Kong) Campaign New Chapter Retirement Planning Brand DBS Wealth Management Agency Havas Hong Kong

GOLD

BRONZE

AIA International

McDonald’s Restaurants (Hong Kong)

Campaign AIA Vitality Weekly Challenge Brand AIA Hong Kong Agency Uth Creative Group

WWW.M A R K ET I N G - I N T ER A C T I V E.C O M

Campaign McDonald’s Turn Back the Time Brand McDonald’s Agency DDB Group Hong Kong

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EXCELLENCE IN

LAUNCH MARKETING SILVER Shiseido Hong Kong Campaign Meet Your First Red Brand Shiseido Agency Curious Few Company

GOLD

BRONZE

Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong)

HSBC

Campaign Why Banking Can Be an Obsession Brand Standard Chartered Agency TBWA\Hong Kong

Campaign Seize the Moment: HSBC X Apple Pay launch Brand HSBC Credit Card Agencies Mindshare Hong Kong, J. Walter Thompson Hong Kong

EXCELLENCE IN

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY SILVER CLP Power Hong Kong Campaign Power Your Love Programme Agency Zenith

GOLD Unilever Hong Kong Campaign Bring Back the Taste of Home in the Memories of Family Love Brand Knorr Agency Vizeum Hong Kong

BRONZE AIA Pension and Trustee Company Campaign Let’s Work Together Brand AIA MPF Agency Hungry Digital

EXCELLENCE IN

LUXURY MARKETING SILVER Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts Campaign World of Christmas Warmth Brand Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts Agency Ogilvy & Mather Hong Kong

GOLD

BRONZE

Shiseido Hong Kong

PANDORA Jewelry Asia-Pacific

Campaign Meet Your First Red Brand Shiseido Agency Curious Few Company

Campaign PANDORA X’mas Campaign Brand PANDORA Agencies PacificLink iMedia – Part of Accenture Interactive, Maxus Hong Kong

30 M A R K ET I N G H O N G K O N G D EC EMBER 201 6 / J A NUARY 201 7

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EXCELLENCE IN

MARKETING – NGO SILVER AIDS Concern Campaign Text from your ex Agency TBWA\Hong Kong

GOLD AIDS Concern Campaign Kuk Fa Cha Agency Havas Hong Kong

BRONZE SPCA Campaign SPCA The Truth Restaurant Agency Razorfish Hong Kong Company

EXCELLENCE IN

MASS EVENT SILVER Festival Walk Campaign BATMAN v SUPERMAN: Dawn Of Justice x Festival Walk Agency ET Promotions

GOLD Eagle Property Management (CP) Campaign Share your #HappyMEOWment Agency Langham Place

BRONZE AIA International Campaign The AIA Great European Carnival Brand AIA Hong Kong Agency The Great European Carnival (TGEC)

EXCELLENCE IN

MEDIA STRATEGY SILVER Manulife International Campaign ManulifeMOVE Brand Manulife Agencies PHD Hong Kong, mcgarrybowen Hong Kong

GOLD

BRONZE

AIA International

Ctrip International Travel (Hong Kong)

Campaign Love is in Every Moment Brand AIA Hong Kong

WWW.M A R K ET I N G - I N T ER A C T I V E.C O M

Campaign Ctrip Branding Campaign 2016 Brand Ctrip.com.hk Agency MEC Hong Kong

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EXCELLENCE IN

MOBILE MARKETING SILVER Maxim’s Caterers Campaign Mooncake Attack! Brand Maxim’s Snowy Mooncake Agency Maxus Hong Kong

GOLD

BRONZE

DBS Bank (Hong Kong)

SPCA

Campaign DBS Omni Contextual Marketing Brand DBS Credit Cards

Campaign SPCA The Truth Restaurant Agency Razorfish Hong Kong Company

EXCELLENCE IN

ONLINE VIDEO SILVER AIA International Campaign Love is in Every Moment Brand AIA Hong Kong Agency Uth Creative Group

GOLD

BRONZE

Nestlé Hong Kong

Unilever Hong Kong

Campaign NESCAFÉ Premium White Coffee Brand NESCAFÉ Agency Zenith

Campaign Bring Back the Taste of Home in the Memories of Family Love Brand Knorr Agency Vizeum Hong Kong

EXCELLENCE IN

OUT-OF-HOME MARKETING SILVER Ocean Park Corporation Campaign Enjoy the best summer water party with SpongeBob Agency Dentsu Media HK

GOLD

BRONZE

FWD Life Insurance Company (Bermuda)

Hong Kong Disneyland Resort

Campaign FWD Branding 2.0 Campaign Brand FWD Hong Kong Agencies Saatchi & Saatchi Hong Kong, PHD Hong Kong

32 M A R K ET I N G H O N G K O N G D EC EMBER 201 6 / J ANUA R Y 201 7

Campaign Star Wars: Tomorrowland Takeover Brand Hong Kong Disneyland Agencies Mindshare Hong Kong, ANON

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EXCELLENCE IN

ADVERTISING SILVER Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong) Campaign Why Banking Can Be an Obsession Brand Standard Chartered Agency TBWA\Hong Kong

GOLD Nestlé Hong Kong Campaign NESCAFÉ Premium White Coffee Brand NESCAFÉ Agency Zenith

BRONZE Nan Fung Group Campaign Ori – Property Marketing Launch Campaign Brand Ori Agency Cre8PLUS

EXCELLENCE IN

PRINT ADVERTISING SILVER DBS Bank (Hong Kong) Campaign There is Something New Under the Sun Brand DBS Credit Cards Agency Havas Hong Kong

GOLD

BRONZE

Hong Kong Disneyland Resort

Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong)

Campaign Star Wars: Tomorrowland Takeover Brand Hong Kong Disneyland Agencies Mindshare Hong Kong, ANON

Campaign Why Banking Can Be an Obsession Brand Standard Chartered Agency TBWA\Hong Kong

EXCELLENCE IN

PROGRAMMATIC SILVER Verizon Enterprise Campaign Establish an expert “Digital Transformation” position Agency Current Asia

GOLD

BRONZE

Hong Kong International Theme Parks

Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong)

Campaign Reinventing Digital Media Buy Through the Use of Data & Programmatic Brand Hong Kong Disneyland Agency MEC Hong Kong

WWW.M A R K ET I N G - I N T ER A C T I V E.C O M

Campaign Full Funnel Programmatic Strategy Converting Awareness To Applications Brand Asia Miles MasterCard Agency iProspect Hong Kong

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EXCELLENCE IN

PROPERTY MARKETING SILVER Midland Realty Campaign Super Home Tour

GOLD

BRONZE

Swire Properties

D · PARK (Member of New World Group)

Campaign Tong Chong Street Market Brand Taikoo Place Agency ANON

Campaign Birth of The World’s 1st Multiple Intelligence Kids Mall Brand D · PARK Agency Strategic Public Relations Group

EXCELLENCE IN

PUBLIC RELATIONS SILVER DBS Bank (Hong Kong) Campaign Live more, bank less Brand DBS Bank Agencies FLIP Social, MEC Hong Kong

GOLD

BRONZE

AIA International

Lee Tung Avenue Management Company

Campaign AIA’s Timeless PR Strategy Brand AIA Hong Kong Agency Bentley Communications

Campaign Launch of Lee Tung Avenue Brand Lee Tung Avenue Agency Strategic Public Relations Group

EXCELLENCE IN

DATA-DRIVEN MARKETING SILVER Kao (Hong Kong) Campaign The Always On Social CRM Solution Brand Sofina Agency Fimmick CRM

GOLD PCCW Media Campaign VIU App Launch Brand VIU App Agency Maxus Hong Kong

34 M AR K ET I N G H O N G K O NG D EC EMBER 201 6 / J A NUARY 201 7

BRONZE Hong Kong International Theme Parks Campaign Reinventing Digital Media Buy Through the Use of Data & Programmatic Brand Hong Kong Disneyland Agency MEC Hong Kong

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EXCELLENCE IN

RETAIL MARKETING SILVER Jardine Restaurant Group Campaign Mini Plate Mega Treat Brand Pizza Hut Agency UM Rally

GOLD The Dairy Farm Company Campaign 7-Eleven x Le Creuset Cutlery Collection Brand 7-Eleven Hong Kong Agency Maxus Hong Kong

BRONZE HSBC Campaign Seize the Moment: HSBC X Apple Pay launch Brand HSBC Credit Card Agencies Mindshare Hong Kong, J. Walter Thompson Hong Kong

EXCELLENCE IN

SEARCH MARKETING SILVER Allianz Global Investors Campaign Step forward with us Agencies Webs s’up Production Company, Carat Media Services Hong Kong

GOLD Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong) Campaign Going the Extra “Mile” with SCB Agency iProspect Hong Kong

BRONZE Hang Seng Bank Campaign Segmenting Travellers through Search Brand Travelsure (Travel Insurance) Agency Maxus Hong Kong

EXCELLENCE IN

SOCIAL MEDIA SILVER Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong) Campaign Standard Chartered Asia Miles MasterCard Launch Brand Standard Chartered Asia Miles MasterCard Agencies CMRS Digital Solutions, PHD Hong Kong

GOLD

BRONZE

Nestlé Hong Kong

Unilever Hong Kong

Campaign NESCAFÉ Premium White Coffee Brand NESCAFÉ Agency Zenith

Campaign Bring Back the Taste of Home in the Memories of Family Love Brand Knorr Agency Vizeum Hong Kong

WWW.M A R K ET I N G - I N T ER A C T I V E.C O M

DE CE MB E R 2 016 / JANU ARY 2 017 MARK E TING HON G KON G 35


EXCELLENCE IN

TARGETED EVENT SILVER Swire Properties Campaign PROJECT AFTER 6: Executive Chef Brand Taikoo Place Agency ANON

GOLD

BRONZE

Manulife International

Samsung Electronics H.K. Company

Campaign ManulifeMOVE Pokémon Go Brand Manulife Agency mcgarrybowen Hong Kong

Campaign Samsung Solve for Tomorrow 2015 Agency Guru Online

EXCELLENCE IN

TRAVEL AND HOSPITALITY MARKETING SILVER Hotel Jen Campaign We Are One Brand Shangri-La Hotels Agency DigitasLBi

GOLD

BRONZE

Hong Kong Tourism Board

South Australian Tourism Commission

Campaign Hong Kong Tourism Board: I Never Knew Agency Razorfish Hong Kong Company

Campaign Inspiring Family Travel to South Australia Agency Sinclair Communications

EXCELLENCE IN

TV ADVERTISING SILVER Ocean Park Corporation Campaign Ocean Park Summer Splash 2016 Agency Metta Communications

GOLD

BRONZE

Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong)

DBS Bank (Hong Kong)

Campaign Why Banking Can Be an Obsession Brand Standard Chartered Agency TBWA\Hong Kong

36 M AR K ET I N G H O N G K O NG D EC EMBER 201 6 / J A NUARY 201 7

Campaign Look Sang Song Brand Compass Visa Agency Havas Hong Kong

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EXCELLENCE IN

USE OF APPS SILVER Airport Authority Hong Kong Campaign HKG My Flight Brand Hong Kong International Airport Agency Mtel

GOLD

BRONZE DBS Bank (Hong Kong)

M+, The West Kowloon Cultural District Authority

Campaign DBS Omni – The Prefect Companion for DBS Credit Cards Brand DBS Credit Cards Agencies Havas Hong Kong, CMRS Digital Solutions, ESDLife

Campaign M+ Sigg Collection Exhibition

EXCELLENCE IN

USE OF TECHNOLOGY

GOLD

SILVER

BRONZE

BRONZE

Manulife International

Estée Lauder (HK)

Carlsberg Hong Kong

Wyeth Nutrition

Campaign ManulifeMOVE Brand Manulife Agencies PHD Hong Kong, mcgarrybowen Hong Kong

Campaign ANR Hologram Video Campaign Brand Estée Lauder Agency PacificLink iMedia – Part of Accenture Interactive

Campaign Carlsberg x IZZUE Fitting Room Campaign Brand Carlsberg Agency Pixels

Campaign Inspired by Nature Brand Illuma Agency OMD Hong Kong

WWW.M A R K ET I N G - I N T ER A C T I V E.C O M

DE CE MB E R 2 016 / JANU ARY 2 017 MARK E TING HON G KON G 37


At the Marketing Excellence Awards 2016, Standard Chartered Bank Hong Kong walked away with 11 awards and comfortably took home the coveted title of Marketer of the Year. The bank stole the show solely for its latest stellar product – the Standard Chartered Bank Asia Miles MasterCard. Standard Chartered’s trophy tally included three gold for Excellence in Launch Marketing, Excellence in Search Marketing and Excellence in TV Advertising; four silver for Excellence in Content Marketing, Excellence in Advertising, Excellence in Financial Advertising and Excellence in Social Media; and four bronze for Excellence in Partnership, Excellence in Print Advertising, Excellence in Branded Content and Excellence in Programmatic. Taking reference from the trope that Hongkongers can get a bit obsessive about redeeming things, the core idea of “Banking can be an obsession” was born to highlight the fact the credit card rewards its customers miles for a range of banking services. The bank harnessed a multi-platform strategy, including TVC, OOH, print, online and social media to drive awareness and engagement, ultimately leading to conversion. To extend the reach and engagement of the campaign, the bank enlisted celebrity Sammi Cheng and did the unthinkable by

partnering with 100Most, a social content provider famous for its satirical parodies. It was a parody on one of Cheng’s classic songs. She played a bank manager in the online video who explained the card’s benefi ts through rewritten lyrics. This whimsical approach mirrored the TVC, while staying true to 100Most’s style of humour. Within the fi rst 24 hours, the video had a million views, more than 40,000 likes and 15,000 shares. Standard Chartered also employed Facebook Live to broadcast its press event, giving a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the curious campaign. The bank also extended its campaign to outdoor to create impact via massive billboards to reinforce how its Priority Banking customers earn benefi ts through a range of banking services. As a result of these efforts, 93% of the full year card application target was achieved in only fi ve months. In what was the closest race yet for the overall award, Standard Chartered Bank Hong Kong had Nestlé Hong Kong nipping at its heels, which secured fi ve gold awards and one silver award, but was slightly outpaced by Standard Chartered in a very tight points system.

38 M A R K ET I N G H O N G K O N G D EC EMBER 201 6 / J A NUARY 201 7

ᑋᆋᏕᲵᭆ⇚ᗵḏጙ∿2016ᆌጆᅗᵊᏞⅰᒭᣍᵁᐩ⛦ ㄦ11↚䓝榔虇悤沕⫹╥Ӂ〃〵㢏ℂ⾑⧃㔷ひ㯮㭚ӂ䠓 㴙㬽Ҹ 封搏姛㌠坘⌅㢏㜿䠓䠖䏛䚱♐ʟʟ㾲㏢‭㻁喻 捛憩喻‚懣⓰虇㎟䉉⋷⧃⪶庞ⵅҸ㾲㏢搏姛庞ㄦ䠓䓝 榔⒔㑻㜿䚱♐䠋⾒ⓢ弙⪶䓝ҷ㖫⶚䍮摆ⓢ弙⪶䓝╙ 梊嬥ひ◙ⓢ弙⪶䓝ᾘ↚仓⎴䠓捠䓝虖⋶ⵈ䍮摆ⓢ弙 ⪶䓝ҷひ◙ⓢ弙⪶䓝ҷ捠夜ひ◙ⓢ弙⪶䓝╙䫍″Ⱑ 汣ⓢ弙⪶䓝⡪↚仓⎴䠓搏䓝虖⁴╙▗⃫⪴⃃ⓢ弙⪶ 䓝ҷ。棱ひ◙ⓢ弙⪶䓝ҷ♐䏛⋶ⵈⓢ弙⪶䓝╙䮚〞 ⒥ひ◙ⓢ弙⪶䓝⡪↚仓⎴䠓搔䓝Ҹ ―孲欨㾾⁉⶜䬽♐㕪榧䠓❫⬌虇⡯军尤䚮Ӂ搏姛 㢜⑨╾⁴㞾ᾏ䮽❫⬌ӂ䠓䖕ㆄ虇㔷ひ封ⅰ䚷⓰╾憞懝 ᾏ亊⎦䠓搏姛㢜⑨■ⴱ㏅憐店捛㜇Ҹ 封搏姛懚䚷⪩。╿䳥䛴虇⒔㑻梊嬥ひ◙ҷ㏅⪥ひ ◙ҷ。棱ひ◙ҷ佁ᾙひ◙ҷ䫍″Ⱑ汣ひ◙ℕ㕟ⓖ䥴▜ 〵╙╦䣍╒厖虇㢏仑⏉䅏㼗幊Ҹ 䉉㚃⪶㔷ひ㻊⑤䠓嬕噚棱╙╒厖〵虇㾲㏢搏姛 戏屚⪸▝押䭏㜖␸柲虇᾵厖⁴岆⏉ゞ㉰㖭䫍″⋶ⵈ 军凭▜䠓ҿ100㵪Ӏ▗⃫Ҹ 押䭏㜖⢷佁ᾙひ◙䏖ᾼ㏽䂣搏姛伢䖕虇᾵憞懝 峫ᾙ㜿寭䠓伢⌇⃫♐ҿᾜ嬐毩⑤㊪㉔Ӏ⛀⎉ⅰ䚷⓰ 䠓⊹⑱Ҹ憨䮽䛿㊂⪸朚䠓ⴲ≂㝈ゞ㝱㢘梊嬥ひ◙䠓 䐈吁虇▛㟑Ⅼ㒐ҿ100㵪Ӏ䠓「灧樷㧋Ҹ ⢷ 24⶞㟑⋶虇封㄀䏖撓ㄦ211喻㲰孏䢚㲰㜇ҷ弔 懝40,000↚崩⬌╙15,000㲰⎕›Ҹ 㾲㏢搏姛㢃懚䚷Facebook Liveℕひ㘼⌅㜿凭 㻊⑤虇崢孏䣍ᾏ䤈憨↚㜿⫖㻊⑤䠓⿤ㄛ呀份Ҹ 封搏姛‵ⶖ⌅㔷ひ㻊⑤㚃ⷤ厂㏅⪥虇憩懝⪶嬞 㮰䠓㏅⪥ひ◙媌憯憃榎虇⁴炢⒄⌅Ӂ⊹⋗䖕帰ӂⴱ㏅ 憩懝ᾏ亊⎦搏姛㢜⑨䔁╥⊹㉯Ҹ 伢懝憨‪␹␪虇㾲㏢搏姛⢷䥼䥼‣↚㢗⋶⵵䖍 93%䠓⋷〃ⅰ䚷⓰䛂屚䡽㮨Ҹ 䜅㟩䠓Ӂ〃〵㢏ℂ⾑⧃㔷ひ㯮㭚ӂ⪶䓝䲅䎼䅏 䉗虇桏⽱欨㾾⌀庞ㄦ‣捠ᾏ搏虇厖㾲㏢搏姛欨㾾╽⠈ 欻榼虇⃕㾲㏢搏姛㢏仑⁴‪ㄽ灭㜇⑬⎉Ҹ

WWW. MARK E TING-IN TE RAC TI VE . C OM


BRANDED CONTENT

To differentiate itself in the market, jewellery retailer MaBelle introduced “Professional Ear Piercing Experience” in 2012, providing a different kind of piercing experience for its clients. There are different types of ear piercing options available in the market, but professionalism, safety and hygiene of the service are far more important than the price. Improper sterilisation procedures and unclean piercing equipment can easily lead to many problems such as inflammation as well as getting infected with Hepatitis B and other bacteria. Poor piercing aftercare can also result in allergies, inflammation, swelling or lumps. Therefore, a hygienic and reliable piercing service provider is all customers need. MaBelle has always been committed to Ear-Piercing Aesthetics; all shops are stationed with licensed and well-trained ear piercing consultants to provide all-round, personalised piercing service according to each individual’s ear shape requirements. It also helps customers create perfect piercings to provide the best look in fashion diamond earrings. Committed to offering “safe, hygienic and convenient” professional piercing service, the brand now provides the service at more than 70 stores in Hong Kong and Mainland China. Each qualified ear piercing consultant is rigorously trained and certified to ISO9001. All the starter earrings MaBelle uses are made of medical-grade stainless steel and titanium. The

titanium used meets the European Union (EU) nickel-free standards and the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) disinfection standards to prevent bacterial growth and reduce the risk of irritants. Social media plays an essential role in the marketing strategy, but each channel has its own audience reach, and MaBelle develops its strategy accordingly. By getting more than a hundred influencers involved with its promotion, ear piercing has now attracted much attention from the young audience. Other than social media and online promotion, the brand has been providing a personalised platform with the mobile app, fanshare, to share more information on ear piercing services to its customers. Is it expensive to get an ear piercing at MaBelle? One of the brand’s advantages is the close relationship it has built with the customers. Considering the need for consumers to buy luxury products as well as enjoy professional services, MaBelle links the two with a consumercentered approach. Customers may get an ear piercing coupon upon purchase of any diamond jewellery item or gift voucher of HK$600 or above at any MaBelle shops. To deepening customer relationships, MaBelle will provide six free aftercare services within three months after the piercing to closely assess the healing progress of the piercing, and to provide guidance on how to prevent the piercing holes from infection.

40 M A R K ET I N G H O N G K O NG D EC EMBER 201 6 / J A NUARY 201 7

᧋⚮ ᫋᪼ MaBelleᒢ 2012 ᑧᩪᭆᎤᆋ᫵Ổᡤᒜ 㜿汣毦ӂ虇崢㵞⃜槶ⴱⴘㅒ⢿›╦厖⎴ᾜ▛䠓䰎 凂汣毦虇⑨㷑⢷⾑⧃ᾙ劺䯝军⎉Ҹ ⣙朢䠓䰎凂㢜⑨㢘。㢘幃虇⃕㢜⑨䠓⶗㫼ҷⴘ ⋷ҷ姪䚮䮚〵懯㵣⊈撱捜嬐Ҹ槶ⴱ戇㙖姪䚮☛ⴘ⋷ 䮚〵汧䠓〦厥䰎凂虇㼗㵡䮚〞☛⟷⌆ᾜ⪯䃣㽷䠓尀虇 㢒ⵈ㞢⁳凂ⳣ䠋䈝Ὶ檧虇‵㢘╾劌㊮㥢Ῠ⤚刬䈝䳘 亿啛Ҹ⬑槶ⴱ崆䖕ᾜ䜅虇㢘㯮㢒⶝厃㛞㊮ҷ䠋䈝ҷ勺 勈㎥䚮刘両䳘㉔㹐Ҹ MaBelleᾏ䢃厃␪㔷⺖儝凂㬑ㆄ虇㏏㢘〦摹㕟K 䠓䰎凂㢜⑨䛀伢懝⶗㫼客侃䠓䰎凂槶⛞帯帻虇㵞⃜ ▗幖㧋䠓䰎凂槶⛞⣖㔴╦⡃㧋䠓⦈客虇榧㢘⶗㫼峘 㢇虇㢒㧈㙩↚⁉凂ヱ梏嬐虇⋷㝈⃜䉉槶ⴱ㏢憯⶗ⷻ 䠓儝瀦凂ⳣ虇⁴乍䀥䠓凂ⳣℕ⃸㏃㟑ⶩ凂䘿昌檍虇 㢃㐎岍㵞⃜槶ⴱ⣖╾›╦Ӂⴘ⋷ҷ姪䚮ҷ㝈ⅎӂ䠓⶗ 㫼䰎凂㢜⑨Ҹ㟑厂⁙㝴虇欨㾾╙⢚⋶⾁㢘弔懝70ⵅ MaBelle〦摹㕟K⶗㫼䰎凂㢜⑨Ҹ MaBelle䠓䰎凂㢜⑨㢃䔁ISO9001⢚株幹捞尜 ╾㮨䀥虇䰎凂ℎ䚷䠓凂䘿⣖⁴挺ⴇ䳘亩䠓㏚姢撋╙ 掵䉉䏸㜨虇掵捠ⷻ㢃㞾䲵▗㳟䡮)European Union-! EU *䊰敂㮨䀥╙儝⢚橮♐╙坴䏸䴰䖕⷏䠓㼗㵡㮨 䀥Ҹ劌㢘㛗榟柁亿啛虇⁳䠽匩ᾜ㞢㛞㊮Ҹ 䫍 ″ Ⱑ汣⢷摆⚽䳥䛴ᾼ䠋㕽捜 嬐⃫䚷虇⃕䛀 㝋㵞↚㾯懢抌㢘⌅䓷䐈䠓╦䣍虇⡯㳳封⋻▇㢒⡯ ㍘ᾜ▛㾯懢㔰╥䢇㍘䠓䳥䛴Ҹ憞懝佁仰五⁉ⴲ≂虇 ℎ䰎凂㢜⑨㢃ⵈ㞢◇イ〃悤ⴱ儳䠓㹷㊞Ҹ柳―䫍″ Ⱑ汣╙佩ᾙ㔷ひ⁴⪥虇♐䏛㢃憞懝㏚㯮㍘䚷䮚ゞ fanShare虇䉉ⴱ㏅㕟K↚⁉⒥䠓。╿虇䔁╥䰎凂㢜⑨ ╙幖宙Ҹ MaBelleᡤᒜᚗḊṳᅞ

厖槶ⴱら䱚㢃余ⵕ䠓杫⅑虇㞾♐䏛䠓ᾏ⪶⊹⑱Ҹ冒 ㋽⎿㼗幊冔⶜㝋庋幆⫱℗♐厖›䚷⶗㫼㢜⑨䠓梏 㷑虇封♐䏛⾁ⶖ⌅凾俺弆ℕ虇㔰╥⁴槶ⴱ䉉ᾼㅒ䠓 㝈ゞ虇崢槶ⴱ㝋⌅〦厥戇庋₊⃤昌檍帷♐㎥庋幆棱 ⇋ HK$600㎥⁴ᾙ䠓䬽⏇虇⣖╾䔁ㄦӁ⶗㫼䰎凂㜿 汣毦ӂ㢜⑨Ῠ㲰ҸMaBelle㢃㕟K䰎凂ㄛ崆䖕㒖⶝㢜 ⑨虇㝋ᾘ↚㢗⋶㕟K⋼㲰䠓⋜幊䰎凂ㄛ崆䖕㢜⑨虇汣 幋彮懁凂㺭㎟ヱ䠓懁〵᾵ⓣ␸Ⅼ㒐凂㺭⇴うҸ

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Content marketing has become a staple in the marketing diet, but it seems to be awash with jargon and misconceptions. Some of the best minds, savviest brands and top marketing experts came together to challenge these misconceptions, take a good look at what good content is, as well as how it should be used in marketing. Angel Tang writes. ⋶ⵈ䍮摆⾁㎟䉉⾑⧃㔷ひ仓▗䠓ㅔ∨⋒亯虇㉮姛⋶⃋῝⁜⋔㜴 ⪶捞姢尭╙尳孲Ҹᾏ䣍姛㫼乍咀ҷ㢏乍㞝䠓♐䏛╙⾑⧃㔷ひ⶗ⵅ 凩欥ᾏ⦑虇ᾏ▛孲㑕憨‪尳孲虇᾵㔱宝⃤岑⬌䠓⋶ⵈ虇⁴╙⬑⃤ ⶖ憨‪乍ヸ⋶ⵈ㍘䚷⢷⾑⧃㔷ひῚᾙҸAngel Tang⧀⶝Ҹ

“Content marketing is not new,” said Eric Leong, vice-president of brand marketing and communications at Dream Cruises, at the start of this year’s Content 360 conference in Hong Kong. “It is as old as advertising itself.” As he further explained, brands have been studying the art of storytelling ever since the advertising era began. In this sense, content marketing is a return to the basic emphasis on storytelling: it arises from the need to engage consumers with the brand’s own voice. “It is not a strategy, programme, execution, etcetera,” he said. “Content marketing is a mindset.” In a world fi lled with distractions, basic “golden” rules that have applied to storytelling since the beginning of time need to be reapplied to the content we create, he explained. To test your relevance, he advised, was to look at the content and ask: “Is it interesting, beautiful or funny?” 42 M A R K ET I N G H O N G K O NG D EC EMBER 201 6 / J A NUARY 201 7

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Rule No.1: What interests people is what counts – so listen to them While telecom may not be the most fascinating topic to non-techies, HKT’s strategy is to stay connected with its end-users by highlighting its relevance to various aspects of their daily lives. HKT’s strategic partnership and business development vice-president Michelle Chan said one of the ways to accomplish this was to partner with exciting events. A recent event it participated in was the FIA Formula E Championship in Hong Kong in October 2016 for which the telecommunications company was named title sponsor. “We can showcase the beauty and relevance of telecommunications by letting people know that HKT is providing an advanced telecommunications network, technology and services during this exciting event,” Chan said. Jetour takes a slightly different approach, its marketing director Jenny Leung explained. The travel agency focuses on solutions of several travelling pain-points, one of which is WWW.M A R K ET I N G - I N T ER A C T I V E.C O M

travellers’ increasing desire to take professional pictures on their journeys. “We get an understanding of their painpoints through our front-line staff, who speak directly to our customers,” she said. “We invite professional photographers to give classes, and hold tailored photo tours for the enthusiastic photographers, for example.” Similarly, Michael McComb, brand director of brand and corporate affairs at Prudential Corporation Asia, found the company’s front-line sales agents to be its greatest social-listening asset in recognising consumers’ pain-points. “Sales agents are the ones who communicate with the customers, many even have personal connections with the customers,” he said. “They are important channels to collect customer needs as well as sharing our content.” But if you are still unable to identify the points to be highlighted in your content, there is one question you could ask your brand, suggested Tin-tin Siapno, head of marketing

「內容營銷並非新鮮事Ҹ」星夢郵輪品 推廣及傳 宙⏾俌婐㨐似㞝⢷⁙〃䠓欨㾾Ӂ⋶ⵈ360ӂ⪶㢒ᾙ孲 捚ҸӁⴒ彮ひ◙㢻怺ᾏ㮲╳冐Ҹӂ ⁥懁ᾏ㳴孲捚虇卹ひ◙㟑⁲朚⭚虇♐䏛ᾏ䢃⢷昌 䦣㛧‚䠓坬姢Ҹ⡯㳳虇⋶ⵈ䍮摆│♐䏛憞懝卹⾀䠓刁 概ℕ◇イ㼗幊冔虇ⶖ䊵灭捜㜿㛍⡭岪㛔‚ῚᾙҸ Ӂ憨ᾜ㞾ᾏ䮽䳥䛴ҷ宗␒㎥⦆姛㝈ゞ䳘䳘虇⋶ⵈ 䍮摆㞾ᾏ䮽ㅒ㋚Ҹӂ ⁥孲捚㒖虇⢷ᾏ↚ⵈ㞢崢⁉⎕ㅒ䠓ᾥ䛛虇⶜㝋岪 㛔‚䠓⦉㢻Ӂ灒捠⴩ㄚӂ虇ᾏ朚⭚ⷀ梏嬐捜㜿㍘䚷⢷ ␄憯䠓⋶ⵈᾙҸ ㊂䥴懢⃯䠓⋶ⵈ㞾▵厖㼗幊冔ㇾㇾ䢇杫虚⁥ら峿 ⋗䢚懝⋶ⵈ虇⌜⛞卹⾀處Ӂ憨㞾▵◇イҷ⑤⁉㎥㢘弲虚ӂ ᘷិ1ᅝᰅ❯ጙᯖ⁝ᠻ↚Ầ⏏⋎ ⊧䴰⶜㝋棭䭠㐏憆ℕ尹虇梊宙㢹ㅔ㞾㢏◇イ⁥↠䠓Ὴ 槛虇⃕欨㾾梊宙䠓䳥䛴テ屎厖㝴⿇䚮㻊▓㝈棱䢇杫虇 厖ⴱ㏅Ⅼ㒐凾俺Ҹ 嬐⇩⎿憨ᾏ灭虇欨㾾梊宙䳥䛴▗⃫╙㫼⑨㑢ⷤ⏾ 俌婐栂㛞ㆬ姷䫉虇欨㾾梊宙㔰╥䠓⌅ᾼᾏ↚㝈㹤ⷀ㞾 厖乍ヸ䠓⪶⤚㻊⑤▗⃫Ҹ 封⋻▇㢏慠╒厖䠓㻊⑤虇㞾2016〃10㢗⢷欨㾾 厘姛䠓⢚株㸌凾梊⑤㝈䮚ゞ庌恙撵㮨庌虇欨㾾梊宙㞾 封庌‚䠓⌯▜庙␸⛕Ҹ 栂㛞ㆬ尹處Ӂ㎠↠崢⾑㶠䥴懢虇欨㾾梊宙䉉憨榔 乍ヸ䠓㻊⑤㕟K⋗懁䠓梊宙佁仰ҷ㐏姢☛㢜⑨虇ㄭ军 ⷤ䫉梊宙姛㫼厖⪶䣍ㇾㇾ䢇杫Ҹӂ 㔆㝔⇖㢮㔰╥䮜䉉ᾜ▛䠓䳥䛴Ҹ⌅⾑⧃㔷ひ扷俌 䡲㨐䃣啾孲捚㒖虇封㝔姛䫍⶗㹷㝋孲㸉ᾜ▛䠓㝔姛䝪 灭虇⌅ᾼῚᾏ㞾㝔姛⁉⩺㊗ℕ㊗⾛㢪⢷㝔䮚ᾼ㑜㚬⎉ ⶗㫼䠓䋶䏖Ҹ ⬈尹處Ӂ㎠↠ⴘ㔡⏜佩♰⽴䢃㔴厖ⴱ㏅䀬憩虇―孲 ⁥↠䠓䋸㊀Ҹӂ

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communications at Nestlé Hong Kong. “Imagine the world without your brand. Will the world still exist, and can your consumers survive without it?” And if you answered “yes”, there is an urgent need to give your brand a purpose, to add value to your brand through content. In Nestlé’s case, said Siapno, consumers were always looking for new ways to consume its products. “What they really want from me is recipes, and we spoonfeed our consumers recipes at every touchpoint. It may be the QR code they see on our packages, at the supermarket, or on the digital media popping up when they go home.” In an example of beautiful content, PANDORA Asia took an emotional approach to Mother’s Day – giving screen-time to the touching relationship between mother and child. In the advertisement, children were blindfolded and asked to identify their own mothers from a line of women by touch alone, to convey the message that each woman is special in their own way. Each child successfully recognised their own mother without taking the blindfold off. Isabella Mann, vice-president of marketing at PANDORA Asia, said it wasn’t about jewellery being the hero in the advert, but instead the spotlight was on the customer’s own bond with their mothers or children. “Let the customers be the hero, and get them to create and share content for you.” One thing to add in the content – besides being interesting, beautiful, or hilarious – Nestlé’s Siapno reminded the audience, was a call to action at the end. “Now that they are engaged, what are they supposed to do with the content? As simple as ‘Like, share and purchase’, the word has its power.”

Rule No.2: Put yourself into the customers shoes and be true to them Siapno recalled an almost failed calltoaction attempt by her staff: as the team put up a QR code for its materials to recommend consumers to scan for more information, she realised the QR code was too small to be noticed. “QR codes are supposed to be accessible, so consumers can scan the code conveniently; in this case, it failed to serve the purpose, and we decided to change the materials. This is a classic example of how brands are too focused on jumping on trends and neglecting a sense of the human touch, she said. Chris Reed, global chief executive officer and founder at Black Marketing, added it was crucial to make content authentic and organic. “If you force everyone to agree, the content is just a boring industrial product. It is usually the negative comments and controversies that propel a conversation; it is the haters that can make your brand go viral.” There is nothing to fear about the uncontrollable on social media either, Reed reassured, as controversies can be an opportunity to educate customers. “Don’t just stick to one metric – it is not always black and white, but it is about how customers are giving you feedback.” MOViE MOViE’s general manager Joycelyn Choi said letting KOLs be authentic was equally important for effective content marketing. “Treat KOLs as your partners, but not your employees,” she said. “If they contribute to it as a job, the content feels fake, and no one would read it. Instead, build a relationship with the KOLs and let them have fun with your brand.” Grana’s social and content director Suhani Jain said the brand was paying more attention to a particular type of influencers which it had been ignoring: the ones who give very honest views and comments. “They may do direct comparisons between our products and that of our competitors or point out all the pros and cons of our garments. But they are actually converting way more traffic than the highpaid influencers because they let consumers see the garments on themselves, and not on stylish models,” she said. The brand’s strategy with KOLs is to walk them through the brand’s mission and the stories behind it. Initially, the brand will do facetoface meetings with new KOLs to build a brand concept by letting them meet the faces behind the brand. Then they will work together to drive engagement levels on social media. The brand will then share a promotion code with KOLs to encourage them into more purchases.

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Ӂℚ⬑虇㎠↠戏屚⶗㫼㚬㄀⾺朚䕼㔗屁虇▛㟑䉉 㢘䍀尯䠓㚬㄀⾺厘愵〵怺宑憯䠓㚬㄀Ὶ㝔Ҹӂ ▛㮲⢿虇咀⢚Ⅼ尯桕⢧‭㻁Ⓩ♐䏛╙⋻▇‚⑨♐ 䏛俌䡲Michael McComb尜䉉虇封⋻▇䠓⏜佩摆⚽⁲ 䖕⁉♰虇㞾峧⎴㼗幊冔䝪灭䠓㢏⪶幖䚱Ҹ ⁥尹處Ӂ摆⚽⁲䖕㞾厖ⴱ㏅䀬憩䠓⁉虇䜅ᾼ㢘寀⪩ ⁉䚩厂厖ⴱ㏅㢘↚⁉凾俺Ҹӂ Ӂ⁥↠㞾㛅桕ⴱ㏅梏㷑㊞嬚╙⎕›㎠↠⋶ⵈ䠓捜 嬐㾯懢Ҹӂ 呴㤫⃯䊰㹤䩉⴩⋶ⵈ捜灭虇桏⽱欨㾾⾑⧃䍮摆≂ 㘼Ὴ䴰Tin-tin Siapnoら峿⃯㕟⎉ᾏ↚⛞槛Ҹ Ӂ㊂≞ᾏᾚᾏ↚㸡㢘⃯♐䏛䠓ᾥ䛛Ҹᾥ䛛㞾▵⁜䋅 ⳧⢷虚⃯䠓㼗幊冔劌▵⢷㸡㢘ⴒ䠓㉔㹐ᾚ䚮⳧虚ӂ ⬑㤫⃯⡭䳣Ӂ㞾ӂ䠓尀虇姷䫉㢘慺⎖梏嬐䉉♐䏛 幵‗⳧⢷䡽䠓虇䚷⋶ⵈ䉉♐䏛⨭⇋Ҹⷀ桏⽱䠓㉔㹐军 宏虇Siapno姷䫉㼗幊冔俌㞾⢷⶚���㜿㝈ゞℕ㼗幊⌅䚱 ♐Ҹ Ӂ⁥↠䢮㳲㊂嬐䠓⌅⵵㞾橮峫Ҹ㎠↠⢷㵞ᾏ↚㔴 宇灭ᾙ㕟K橮峫虇憨╾劌㞾⓿⢷㎠↠⒔婬ᾙ䠓QR䩋ҷ ⢷弔亩⾑⧃⋶ҷ╗㎥冔⁥↠⡭ⵅ䢚⎿䠓プ⎉ゞひ◙Ҹӂ 嬐㜇⑤⁉⋶ⵈ䠓ℚⳟ虇ⷀ㞾Pandora‭㻁㔷⎉䠓 㵜嬹䵏䰸ㅒひ◙虇㳛榛㵜嬹厖⳸ⳟῚ朢䠓㊮⁉杫⅑Ҹ ⢷ひ◙ᾼ虇⳸ⳟ↠嘨ᾙ䣋䣪虇✽棯宇㘇⢷⁉儳 ᾼ㐍⎉卹⾀䠓㵜嬹虇⁴≂懭⎉㵞↚⬂⁉抌㞾䓷ᾏ䊰 ‛䠓宙ㇾҸ㢏仑虇㵞↚⳸ⳟ抌劌嘨嗦䣋䣪㎟␮尜⎉ 㵜嬹Ҹ Pandora‭㻁Ⓩ⾑⧃扷⏾俌婐Isabella Mann 姷䫉虇ひ◙ᾼ䠓䊵灭᾵棭䕯ⶅ虇╜军嗌⢷ⴱ㏅厖㵜 嬹㎥⳸ⳟ䠓杫⅑Ҹ Ӂ崢ⴱ㏅㎟䉉咀桓虇炢⒄⁥↠䉉⃯␄憯╙⎕› ⋶ⵈҸӂ 桏⽱䠓Siapno㕟挡厖㢒冔虇柳―㢘弲ҷ⑤⁉㎥「 灧虇⋶ⵈ戓㢘ᾏ↚捜嬐⋒亯虇ⷀ㞾㢏仑劌⪯炢⒄㼗幊冔 姛⑤Ҹ Ӂ䖍⢷凾俺⎿⁥↠―虇⁥↠㍘封⶜⋶ⵈ⃫⎉䚩灋 ╜㍘虚䶰✽⬑Ӄ崩⬌ҷ⎕›╙庋幆ӄ虇憨‪㜖⳦㢘ᾏ ⴩␪捞Ҹӂ ᘷិ2ᅝᨄᑋ❁ហᛵᐉᲵᅗᗄᢢ᧣⁘ Siapno㍅弆⌅♰⽴㢘㲰」῝㢹劌炢⒄姛⑤䠓伢毦Ҹ ⌅⢧栙⢷⒔婬㣟㜨ᾙ⓿ᾙQR䩋虇⁴炢⒄㼗幊冔㔒䤓 䔁╥㢃⪩幖宙虇⃕⬈㊞峧⎿QR䩋⪹⶞虇桲⁴愷尜Ҹ ӁQR䩋㢻㍘㝈ⅎ㼗幊冔㔒䤓㥴䢚虇⃕ᾙ慿㉔㹐 ⇩ᾜ⎿憨ᾏ灭虇⡯㳳㎠↠㢃㕪―⒔婬㣟㜨Ҹӂ ⬈姷䫉虇憨㞾♐䏛⪹⶗㹷憌弤䃽㻐虇ㄭ军ㆌ䛴⁉ ㆶ⒥䠓⌇⤚ℚⳟҸ Black Marketing⋷䖒姛㛎俌婐⌋⭚␄⁉Chris Reed婫⋔㒖虇⋶ⵈ幃῝䢮⵵╙卹䋅Ҹ Ӂ⬑㤫⃯テ慺⪶䣍▛㊞虇憨䵖⋶ⵈ╹㞾ᾏ↚䊰凙 䠓⽴㫼䚱♐Ҹテ慺⶜尀ㄏㄏ㢒⿅ℕ帯棱䠓寤履╙䎼 峿虇㌝ㇷ冔╾⁴⁳⃯䠓♐䏛㎟䉉䣍䥱Ὶ䠓Ҹӂ Reed⌜㲰テ屎虇䫍″Ⱑ汣ᾙᾜ╾㔶⏅䠓惎履㸡 䚩灋╾ㆤ虇⡯䉉惎履‵╾⁴㞾ᾏ↚㛨剁槶ⴱ䠓㯮㢒Ҹ Ӂᾜ嬐╹⦔㒐ᾏ↚㒖㮨虇‚㉔᾵棭㷇懯棭灠│ 䠌虇ᾏ⎖⢷㝋槶ⴱ⬑⃤■⃯╜櫚Ҹӂ MOViE MOViE䵏䡽俌䡲嚰棓⋡姷䫉虇⁳杫攄㊞ 嬚榧娥虃KOL虄Ⅼ㒐䢮⵵╾棯虇⶜㢘㛗䠓⋶ⵈ䍮摆▛ 㮲捜嬐Ҹ ⬈尹處Ӂ㐙KOL嬥⃫⃯䠓▗⃫⪴⃃虇军ᾜ㞾⃯䠓 ♰⽴Ҹӂ

WWW. MARK E TING-IN TE RAC TI VE . C OM


Ӂ⬑㤫⁥↠嬥Ὶ䉉ᾏ₌⽴⃫虇⁥↠㏏媌⃫䠓⋶ⵈ 㢒⿅仵⁉埪⇖䠓㊮孉虇㸡㢘⁉㢒杀孌Ҹ䢇╜虇厖KOL ら䱚杫⅑虇崢⁥↠ㄭ⃯䠓♐䏛ㄦ⎿㮑弲Ҹӂ GRANA 䫍″Ⱑ汣╙⋶ⵈ俌䡲Suhani Jain 姷 䫉虇封♐䏛ⶖ㢃⪩䠓㹷㊞␪惘■䐈⴩槭⤚䠓㊞嬚榧 娥虇⁥↠⁴ㄏᾏ䢃娺ㆌ䛴虇⃕⁥↠㢒仵‗棭⿇尯⵵ 䠓寤履╙㊞嬚Ҹ ⬈尹處Ӂ⁥↠╾劌㞾䢃㔴㵣悒㎠↠䠓䚱♐厖䲅䎼 ⶜㏚䠓䚱♐虇㎥㒖⎉㎠↠㢜婬䠓㏏㢘⎸゙Ҹ‚⵵ᾙ虇 ⁥↠㵣汧圹䠓佁仰五⁉◇イ㢃⪩䠓䆞孌捞虇⡯䉉⁥ ↠㢒嬹怺■㼗幊冔䫉䵓㢜婬虇军ᾜ㞾䚷㟑婬㮰⤚ℕ ⇩䫉䵓Ҹӂ 封♐䏛䠓䳥䛴㞾厖KOL⎕›♐䏛䠓ℎ☌╙剛ㄛ 䠓㛔‚Ҹ⏪朚⭚䠓㟑↨虇♐䏛㢒厖㜿䠓KOL懁姛棱⶜ 棱䠓㢒峿虇崢⁥↠尜峧♐䏛䠓⿤ㄛ␮卲虇ㄭ军ら䱚ᾏ ↚♐䏛㬑ㆄҸ䋅ㄛ虇⁥↠㢒▗⃫㕟汧䫍″Ⱑ汣ᾙ䠓 ╒厖〵Ҹ♐䏛Ὶㄛ㢒厖KOL⎕›ᾏ↚⅒摆⁲䩋虇炢⒄ ⁥↠㢃⪩㼗幊Ҹ

Rule No.3: “Millennials” is a mindset When brands have equipped themselves with attentiongrabbing authentic content, it then comes down to the right timing to release that content. “How do you break through all the noise and hit the consumers at that one second when they are ready to listen?” asked Amadou Doumbia, Ovolo Group’s PR and communication manager. To identify moments on a customer’s journey, which includes the time when a consumer “wants to get away”, the time they make a plan, the time they do the bookings, or when all plans are done and the consumer is waiting to explore, the team provides different content to meet their needs at different periods. Furthermore, he advised brands to identify moments anytime, anywhere, with a “millennialslike mindset”. “Stay mobile, constantly look for a way of life, be techsavvy. Millennials do not essentially need to be a specific group of people. ‘Millennials’ is a mindset,” he said. Bonnie Chow, head of marketing, corporate, City Super Group, agreed that realtime demand is no longer a characteristic of young generations, but a general consumer trend. Quoting figures from the “Global Consumer Executive Top of Mind Survey 2016”, released by KPMG and the CGF, Chow recognised that 77% of consumers look for detailed and WWW.M A R K ET I N G - I N T ER A C T I V E.C O M

transparent product information, and 76% of consumers demand to shop online for the best value. “We have to stay innovative and constantly create new marketing content with product information,” she said. “The old thinkings are not working anymore.” While more than 50% of Morning Star Travel’s customers are aged 40 and above, Wilson Yeung, director of marketing at Morning Star Travel, said the challenges are to transform the old marketing methods, and translate content into the right languages as well as share it at the right moment. Several tactics he learned from a series of trialanderror on social media included an imagefirst approach, listing of products to generate clicks, to avoid word messages or images with logos, etc. “We tried many times in order to learn these truths,” he said. Stepping into the new era of social, marketing campaigns may fail fast, but all you need is to be as open as millennials are to new technologies and approaches, and learn faster. Nestlé’s Siapno pointed out that marketers are relying so much on data nowadays, that they dare not initiate a campaign or the next action without enough research support. “There is one thing that we have to remember all the time,” she said. “We are marketers, and we should never lose our guts.”

ᘷិ3ᅝᆋጓⓀᎌ᎚ᆌ៦ዯ⃣፬ 䜅♐䏛㙐㢘⌆◇イ␪ҷ䢮⵵䠓⋶ⵈ虇⏸ᾚ䠓ⷀ㞾䠋⾒ ⋶ⵈ䠓懸䜅㟑㯮Ҹ Ovolo桕⢧⋻杫╙≂宙伢䖕Amadou Doumbia ⛞處Ӂ⃯⬑⃤䰐䧃㏏㢘刁概虇᾵⢷㼗幊冔䀥∨⬌凕刌 䠓ᾏ䤻朢㙙ᾼ䡽㮨虚ӂ 䉉峧⎴槶ⴱ㝔䮚䠓ᾜ▛㟑⏊虇⒔㑻㼗幊冔⃤㟑 ㊂⎉懙ҷ⃤㟑⏅⴩宗␒ҷ⃤㟑懁姛榟宑ҷ㎥冔㏏㢘宗 ␒⃤㟑ⴛ㎟⁴╙㼗幊冔㳲䀥∨㔱⶚虇封⢧栙␄⃫ᾜ ▛䠓⋶ⵈ⁴䂎彂ᾜ▛㟑㢮䠓梏㷑Ҹ 㳳⪥虇⁥ら峿♐䏛样㟑样⢿䚷Ӂⓒ䬶ᾥ⁲䠓ㅒ ㋚ӂℕ峧⎴㟑⏊Ҹ ⁥尹處Ӂ㏚㯮⢷佩ҷᾜ㝆⶚㐍䚮㻊㝈ゞҷ乍憩䭠 㐏虇Ӄⓒ䬶ᾥ⁲ӄᾜᾏ⴩㞾㒖ᾏ↚䐈⴩䠓儳仓虇军㞾 ᾏ䮽ㅒ㋚Ҹӂ City Super 桕⢧⾎⧃俌䡲◷寯ㇸ▛㊞㒖虇⵵㟑 梏㷑ᾜ⌜㞾〃悤ᾏ⁲䠓䐈ㅄ虇军㞾㟽懜䠓㼗幊冔強 ⑱Ҹ イ䚷䛱欻⮐厖CGF䠋⾒䠓ҿGlobal Consumer Executive Top of Mind Survey 2016Ӏ屎㥴㜇㙩虇 ◷寯ㇸ㒖 77%䠓㼗幊冔⶚㐍専亿╙憞㞝䠓䚱♐幖 宙虇军76%䠓㼗幊冔⢷佁ᾙ庋䏸⁴䔁ㄦ㢏ℂ⊈⇋Ҹ ⬈尹處Ӂ㎠↠ㅔ榗Ⅼ㒐␄㜿虇ᾜ㝆␄憯㜿䠓⾑⧃ 㔷ひ⋶ⵈ厖䚱♐幖宙Ҹӂ Ӂ厙㢘䠓ㆬ似㮰ゞ⾁ᾜ⌜⫞㛗Ҹӂ 㞮㟷㝔懙⾑⧃扷俌䡲㫙㒾戵姷䫉虇弔懝50%䠓 㞮㟷㝔懙ⴱ㏅〃烰⢷40㴁㎥⁴ᾙ虇⡯㳳㝔姛䫍ㅔ榗 㛈崙厙㢘䠓⾑⧃㔷ひ㝈ゞ虇᾵ⶖ⋶ⵈ冊峾㎟▗懸䠓 尭宏虇⁴╙⢷▗懸䠓㟑朢ⶖ⋶ⵈ⎕›⎉╊Ҹ ⁥ㄭ䫍″Ⱑ汣ᾙ䠓▓䮽➦寵厖⫀㛦ᾼⴇ⎿」䮽 䳥䛴虇⒔㑻⢥≞⊹⋗㝈ゞҷ⎦⎉䚱♐⁴◇イ灭㙙ҷ戎 ⋜ℎ䚷㜖⳦宙ㇾ㎥⿅㢘㮨尛䠓⢥䏖䳘䳘Ҹ ⁥尹處Ӂ㎠↠伢懝⪩㲰➦寵㏜ⴇ⎿憨‪䢮䖕Ҹӂ 從⋴䫍″Ⱑ汣㜿㟑⁲虇⾑⧃㔷ひ㻊⑤╾劌ㄗㅺ ⅎ⫀㛦虇⃕ㅔ榗≞ⓒ䬶ᾥ⁲ᾏ㮲虇⶜㜿䠓㐏姢╙㝈ゞ Ⅼ㒐朚㛍䠓ㅒ㋚虇᾵㢃ㅺ⢿ⴇ兡Ҹ 桏⽱䠓Siapno 㒖⎉虇⾑⧃㔷ひ⁉♰䖍㟑棭⿇ℬ 広㜇㙩虇⡯㳳ᾜ㛱⢷㸡㢘彂⪯䠓䦣䰅㚾㒐ᾚ虇ⷤ朚㻊 ⑤㎥ᾚᾏ㳴姛⑤Ҹ Ӂ㢘ᾏ灭㎠↠ㅔ榗㟑⏊宧⃞Ҹӂ⬈尹處Ӂ㎠↠㞾⾑ ⧃㔷ひ⁉♰虇ᾜ劌✹⫀⑖㶲Ҹӂ

DE CE MB E R 2 016 / JANU ARY 2 017 MARK E TING HON G KON G 45


職埸

CAREERS

JOB SHUFFLE ⁉‚崙⑤ DJI’s Adam Najberg, former global director of communications, has joined Alibaba as head of digital communications based in Hong Kong. The 46-year-old is a seasoned journalist and author who has served many news organisations for the past 25 years, including The Washington Post, The Associated Press, ICRT and more recently The Wall Street Journal. ⏜⪶䜕␄㜿䭠㐏㢘柟⋻▇⋷䖒≂㘼俌䡲 Adam Najberg␯⋴柎捛⾃⾃虇㙣₊欨㾾㜇䩋≂宙 俌䡲Ҹ46㴁䠓Najberg㞾ᾏ⃜伢毦巟ⵛ䠓宧冔╙⃫ ⵅ虇⢷懝╊25 〃㢍㛗␪⪩ⵅ㜿凭㯮㭚虇⒔㑻ҿ啾䡪 榢抄⧀Ӏҷ儝凾䫍ҷ╿⒦⢚株䫍Ⓩひ㘼梊╿╙㢏慠䠓 ҿ啾䏍姦㝴⧀ӀҸ

SCMP GROUP APPOINTS NEW CEO

Michael Li, Tony Cheung and Justin Foo have joined Mirum Hong Kong as the agency bolsters its senior management team. Li (left) was hired as the agency’s project director; Foo (right) was appointed as Mirum’s strategic business director, while Cheung has taken up the role of business account director. Michael LiҷTony Cheung ╙Justin Foo ␯⋴Mirum Hong Kong虇㎟䉉汧亩䴰䖕⢧栙㎟ ♰ҸLi虃⽵虄䔁₊☌䉉榔䡽俌䡲ҷFoo虃▂虄䔁₊☌ 䉉䳥䛴㫼⑨俌䡲ҷ军Cheung ⏖㙣₊㫼⑨ⴱ㏅俌䡲 ᾏ分Ҹ

ⓦ啾㝸⧀桕⢧₊☌ 㜿姛㛎俌婐 South China Morning Post Publishers appointed Gar y Liu as the incoming chief executive officer, succeeding Robin Hu, effective 3 January 2017. He joins SCMP from his recent CEO position at Digg, a New York-based online content aggregator. Before joining Digg, he was head of labs at Spotify from November 2013 to February 2015. Liu, 33, is a California native who has lived in New York for nearly two decades, after having grown up in Taiwan and New Zealand. ⓦ啾㝸⧀⎉䏗㢘柟⋻▇⭣₊␘╾䗭㔴㢎剰⁴㟷⎉ ₊姛㛎 俌婐虇₊☌ⶖ㝋 2017〃 1㢗 3㝴䚮㛗Ҹ␯⋴ ҿⓦ啾㝸⧀Ӏ⏜虇⁥⢷亟亓䠓‡凾佁⋶ⵈⒾ凩⋻▇ Digg 㙣₊姛㛎俌婐Ҹ␯⋴Digg ⏜虇⁥㝋2013 〃11 㢗厂2015 〃 2㢗㢮朢㙣₊ Spotify 䠓㐏姢䠋ⷤ䦣䰅 ⴳῊ䴰Ҹ33㴁䠓␘╾䗭䚮㝋儝⢚␯⽭虇⢷╿䇲╙亟 嬎垼朆⪶虇⢷亟亓䚮㻊ⶖ慠‛ⓐ〃Ҹ

Burson-Marsteller appointed Noëlle Gahan as managing director. Based in Hong Kong, she is tasked with supporting the global Huawei business across its corporate, carrier, enterprise and consumer business groups. She has 25 years of marketing experience across APAC, mainly in China and Hong Kong. She has held senior-house roles responsible for strategic planning, product marketing, marketing communications and building partnerships in technology multinationals, including Cisco, Tektronix and Hewlett-Packard. ⓩ桔⋻杫₊☌ Noëlle Gahan 䉉欨㾾Ⓩ嗲‚俌 伢䖕虇帯帻㚾㒐啾䉉⢷⋷䖒䠓桕⢧ҷ懚䍮⛕佁仰ҷ ₐ㫼╙㼗幊冔㫼⑨Ҹ⬈⢷‭⪹Ⓩ㙐㢘 25 〃䠓⾑⧃ 㔷ひ伢毦虇Ὴ嬐㞾ᾼ⢚Ⓩ╙欨㾾ⓏҸ㢍㙣₊䳥䛴ҷ 䚱♐㔷ひҷ⾑⧃䀬憩䳘榧⥮䠓汧䴰虇⬈䠓ⴱ㏅⒔㑻 CiscoҷTektronix ╙㉯㟽䳘彷⢚䭠㐏⋻▇Ҹ

Steven Taylor, chief marketing officer of Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts, has left the company. During his two-year stint, he oversaw all functions across Shangri-La’s sales and marketing division, including revenue management, sales, digital marketing, brand communications, loyalty and partner marketing, customer insights and relationship management, reservations and distribution and corporate communications. 欨㧋捛㑘拡〦桕⢧欥⾼⾑⧃ⴧSteven Taylor 桱 分Ҹ⢷⁥₊分䠓⋸〃朢虇Taylor 帯帻䴰䖕桕⢧摆⚽ ╙⾑⧃㔷ひ 扷朏䠓ᾏ⎖分 ⑨虇⒔㑻⎸䃳䴰䖕ҷ摆 ⚽ҷ梊ⳟ䍮摆ҷ♐䏛≂㘼ҷㅯ尯ⴱ㏅厖▗⃫⪴⃃䍮 摆ҷⴱ㏅⎕㤟╙杫⅑䴰䖕ҷ榟宑╙⎕摆ҷ⁴╙桕⢧ ⋻杫Ҹ

ON THE MOVE? LET US KNOW! INTIT@MARKETING-INTERACTIVE.COM

46 M AR K ET I N G H O N G K O N G D EC EMBER 201 6 / J A NUARY 201 7

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結語

LAST WORD

Clients need to make Christmas work. Consumer habits of gifting must be maximised and it seems as though retailers may have a glimmer of hope to be optimistic this year. Why is the trend still to panic purchase as the festivities near? We’ve all been there. The forgotten present which gets bought on Christmas Eve. With limited options and time, we throw more money at the situation and often end up spending over budget. Similarly, it transpires that during the season, the occasional lifestyle brand forgets about PR. Indeed, the PR panic purchase may come at a heftier price tag; it can also come with a diminished product. By its very nature, PR relies on other parties to help tell a brand’s Christmas story. Oddly enough this does not happen in December, even online media has deadlines! The main Christmas message should be wrapped up and ready for dissemination ideally by September. For those that forget to favour PR, we can pull off a Christmas miracle, but client expectations need to be managed. At such a competitive time of year, clients want to see a return on investment, which bluntly put, means an uplift in Christmas sales. Now is the time that brand exposure has to have a clear call to action to drive consumers to the point of purchase. Although PR can help to influence the customer’s decision process, it cannot drive sales all on its own. This is why it should not be an afterthought. An integrated approach to marketing is required to ensure a successful Christmas campaign, with PR playing a major role in its nativity. Activating not only your PR agency’s network of media, influencers, socialites and celebrities

is important, but CRM (customer relationship management) should also be linked with PR so that clients can double-up on their investment; attracting immediate sales coupled with widespread exposure for the brand. Similarly, make any and all marketing investments count; do not limit a big event only to VIPs when you can use PR to trend the event on social media. Quality over quantity is the old adage that PR comes back to time and again; and it applies here, especially when putting last minute PR plans into practice. With so many festive activities targeting the same audience, be smart and think about the brand’s demographics. Yes, an online KOL with hundreds of thousands of followers will help with your KPIs. However, will it improve on someone with a significantly smaller following that genuinely cares about your brand? Each and every brand’s campaign is different, but here are some guiding principles that can be put into play when it comes to Christmas 2017 to make sure PR is well and truly on the wish list. 1. Sign off and agree on your Christmas plan by 1 August. Ensure that PR is maximising your full marketing potential. 2. Determine your target audience and the appropriate communication methods. 3. Strategise timelines and deadlines – do not send everything out to everyone at the same time, you might miss opportunities. 4. Action your media relations plan. 5. Media follow-up – be proactive. 6. Begin your social media activation and KOL engagement. 7. Collate coverage and review campaign.

Laura Derry Southwood

managing director, Prime, a member of the Council of Public Relations Firms of Hong Kong

48 M A R K ET I N G H O N G K O NG D EC EMBER 201 6 / J ANUA R Y 201 7

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Marketing magazine Hong Kong - December 2016 / January 2017