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Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education Steven L. Beshear Governor

1024 Capital Center Drive, Suite 320 Frankfort, Kentucky 40601 Phone: 502-573-1555 Fax: 502-573-1535 http://www.cpe.ky.gov

Robert L. King President

August 29, 2013 Dear KIEC Attendees: It is with pleasure that I welcome you to the 2013 Kentucky Innovation and Entrepreneurship Conference, a conference open to everyone interested in research driven innovation. This year we commemorate eleven years of awards made under the Kentucky Innovation Act (KIA). Due in part to rising entrepreneurial interests and activity, the foundations developed by Kentucky Science and Technology, and the work of each of you, Kentucky’s entrepreneurial index continues to grow. It is important to not lose sight of the importance of the work you contribute to support state and local research and business initiatives. Your efforts have become even more urgent during these times of financial crisis. Nationwide, new job creation is attributed to small start-up companies. Each of you make these contributions through Kentucky’s small technology businesses. The Council on Postsecondary Education celebrates with you the achievements of scientific and technological development, training the next generation of innovators and entrepreneurs, and the creation of start-up companies. Taking what we learn from our laboratories to those with entrepreneurial talents, and from there to the people of the world is central to Kentucky’s Strategic Plan for student success, research and economic growth, and innovation. We have and will continue to grow Stronger by Research, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship. Congratulations. Kentucky’s KIA initiatives are not only benefitting Kentuckians but residents across the globe. The Council joins me in wishing you continued success. Sincerely,

Robert L. King President

KentuckyUnbridledSpirit.com

An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D


KCF  Kentucky Commercialization Fund   

KCF is open to scientists and engineers at accredited universities  and colleges in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  KCF supports  efforts to commercialize a technology, product, or process that  they have developed but not yet licensed. 

     

Announcement:  KCF‐015 Advance Notice  A new RFP (KCF‐015) will open September 5, 2013. Details  will be posted on http://ksef.kstc.com  Follow @KSEF_Team on  Twitter for details and  deadlines, including the  mandatory Pre‐Proposal  submission deadline.    If have questions or need help with KCF, contact Maria Labreveux, PhD, Program Director  R&D and Commercialization, mlabreveux@kstc.com (859.246.3251). 


TABLE OF CONTENTS KY CPE President Robert King Welcome Letter KSTC/KSEF Welcome and Overview KCF Announcement................................................................................................................................................ 4 Table of Contents.................................................................................................................................................... 5 KSEF Advisory Board............................................................................................................................................... 6 KSEF Managed Programs Impact............................................................................................................................ 7 Hotel Floor Plan...................................................................................................................................................... 8 Conference Agenda/Schedule................................................................................................................................ 9 IdeaFestival 2013.................................................................................................................................................. 10 Company Displays................................................................................................................................................ 12 Session Summaries............................................................................................................................................... 13 Kentucky Science and Engineering Team............................................................................................................. 17 Kentucky SBIR/STTR Matching Funds Program.................................................................................................... 19 Kentucky Science and Technology Teams............................................................................................................. 20 Speaker/Moderator Bios......................................................................22 Poster Presenters – Alphabetical List.....................................26 Poster Competition and Judging Worksheet.....................28 Poster Abstracts – By Focus Area......................................29 Conference Attendees.........................................................50 Governor’s School for Entrepreneurs........................................56 Notes..................................................................................................... 57

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 5


KSEF ADVISORY BOARD The KSEF Advisory Board is appointed by Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation Board of Directors and is composed of scientists, engineers, and administrators from academia and corporate sectors in Kentucky and other states.

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Dr. Dorothy H. Air Associate Senior Vice President for Entrepreneurial Affairs, University of Cincinnati

Dr. William M. Pierce Executive Vice President for Research, University of Louisville

Dr. Blaine Ferrell Vice President for Research, Western Kentucky University

Mr. Mark Roe Program Manager Phalanx, Raytheon Company

Mr. Paul Korkemaz Group Vice President, National Capital Region, Sabre Systems Incorporated

Mr. Ben M. Streepey Vice President and General Manager of Business Products, Lexmark International

Dr. Charles Kupchella President Emeritus, University of North Dakota

Dr. Joel Thierstein Provost and Vice President for Acadenic Affairs, Kentucky State University

Dr. Jonathan R. Mielenz Group Leader, Bioconversion Science and Technology, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Dr. James W. Tracy Vice President for Research, University of Kentucky

Dr. James Miller Professor Computer Sciences and Mathematics, Transylvania University

Ex-Officio Dr. Mahendra K. Jain KSTC Senior Vice President and  KSEF Executive Director Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


KSEF MANAGED PROGRAMS IMPACT

   KSEF  R&D  Excellence  Awards   KCF  –  Commercialization   SBIR/STTR  Phase  Zero/Double  Zero   KY  SBIR/STTR  Matching  

ROI   7:4  

Technological   Innovations   Patented  by  KSEF   Awardees  

KSEF   RDE  

KY  SBIR   Matching  

ROI   26:1  

KCF   Phase  Zero   Double  Zero  

ROI   12:1  

New  businesses   formed  by  KSEF   and  KCF  awardees  

Young  Investigator  Awards   Received  by  KSEF  Awardees,   14  NSF  Career  Awards,  and   one  DOD    

Peer  Reviewed   Manuscripts  and  Book   Chapters  Published   Young  Scientists  and   Engineers  Trained    by   Awardees.  

Kentucky  Science  and  Engineering  Founda3on,  an  ini3a3ve  of     Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 7


HOTEL FLOOR PLAN

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Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


CONFERENCE AGENDA / SCHEDULE KIEC 2013 General Sessions ► 7AM - 2PM

7:00-­‐8:15  AM   Pre-­‐Assembly     Area  

Registration  and  Light  Continental  Breakfast  

7:00-­‐8:15  AM   Ballrooms  D  –  H    

8:30-­‐9:15  AM   Ballrooms  A-­‐C    

Poster/Composition  Board  Setup  

Conference  Welcome  Remarks   –  Kris  Kimel,  KSTC     –  Linda  Linville,  CPE   –  Mahendra  Jain,  KSEF   Session  1:  “The  Role  of  Collaboration  in   Advancing  Local  and  Regional  Economies”     –  Anthony  Boccanfuso,  UIDP  

10:00-­‐10:45  AM   Ballrooms  D-­‐H    

Poster  Session:  ODD  Numbers      

11:00-­‐11:15  AM   Ballrooms  A-­‐C    

Session  2:  “At  the  Interface  of  Advanced   Materials  and  Plant  Biotechnology”     –  Barbara  Knutson  ,  University  of  Kentucky  

11:15-­‐11:30  AM   Ballrooms  A-­‐C    

Session  3:  "Directed  Self-­‐assembly  of   Nanostructures  to  Develop  Tools  and  Devices   to  interface  Biomaterial-­‐to-­‐Electronic"     –  Mehdi  Yazdanpanah,  NaugaNeedles  

11:30-­‐11:45  AM   Ballrooms  A-­‐C    

Session  4:  “Peaklet  Analysis:  Software  for   Spectrum  Analysis"  –  Bruce  Kessler,  Western   KY  University  

11:45-­‐12:00  AM   Ballrooms  A-­‐C    

Session  5:  "Metal  Organic  Frameworks  as   catalysts  in  the  conversion  of  CO2  to  cyclic   carbonates"    –  Moises  Carreon,  University  of   Louisville  

Noon-­‐1:00  PM   Bluegrass   Pavilion  

1:00-­‐1:45  PM   Ballrooms    D-­‐H    

2:00-­‐2:45  PM   Session  6A:   Ballroom  A   Session  6B:     Ballroom  B   Session  6C:   Ballroom  C  

  2:45  –  3:30  PM   Session  7A:   Ballroom  A  

9:15-­‐10:00  AM   Ballrooms  A-­‐C    

KIEC 2013 Concurrent Sessions ► 2 PM - 5PM

Lunch  and  More         Poster  Session:  EVEN  Numbers      

Session  7B:   Ballroom  B   Session  7C:   Ballroom  C  

  3:30-­‐3:45  PM   Exhibit  Area  

Ballrooms  D-­‐H  

 

“NIH  Grants  Peer  Review  Process:  An   Update”  –  Atul  Sahai,  NIH   “Hope  is  Not  a  Plan”  –  Keith  Micoli,  NYU   Langone  Medical  Center   “NSF  Innovation  Programs:”   –  Jesus  Soriano,  NSF  

“Air  Force  SBIR/STTR:  From  Conception   to  Commercialization”– Leah  Bryant,  DoD   Air  Force  SBIR  Contractor   “Short  Workshop:  Career  Counseling  and   Job  Search  Strategies  ”  –  Keith  Micoli,   NYU  Langone  Medical  Center   “NSF  SBIR”     –  Jesus  Soriano,  NSF  

Grad  Student/PostDoc  Poster   Competition  Awards  and  Coffee/Dessert   Break  

3:45-­‐4:15  PM   Exhibit  Area  

Ballrooms  D-­‐H  

  3:45-­‐4:45  PM   Session  8A:   Ballroom  A  

Session  8B:   Ballroom  B  

“Career  Networking,  Meet  and  Greet,   and  Workshop  Lessons  Put  Into  Practice”   –  Keith  Micoli,  NYU  Langone  Medical   Center    

  “Entrepreneurial  Leave  and  Conflicts  of   Interests  in  Research”  – Debbie  Davis,   University  of  Kentucky,  and  Allison   Ratterman,  University  of  Louisville    “Small  Business  Accounting  for   SBIR/STTR  Award  recipients”  –  Chuck   Woods  and  Rebecca  Daigrepont,  OPM   Financial  LLC  

  4:45-­‐5:00  PM   Ballrooms  D-­‐H  

Poster  Removal  

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 9


www.ideafestival.com

Daphne Miller California practicing physician, Author of Farmacology: What Innovative Family Farming Can Teach Us About Health and Healing

Jason Pontin Editor in chief, publisher, MIT Technology Review

Rafe Sagarin Marine ecologist & congressional advisor, author of Octopus: How Secrets From Nature Can Help Us Fight Terrorist Attacks, Natural Disasters & Disease

Beth Comstock GE’s first female Chief Marketing Officer, leads GE’s growth and market innovative initiatives

Kim Xu Part of the Google Glass Team, she explores the intersection of mobile computing and assistive technology

Lance Hosey Chief Sustainability Officer of RTKL, author of The Shape of Green: Aesthetics, Ecology and Design

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer Electronic artist, develops interactive installations

Maria Konnikova Writer for Scientific American, author of NYT best seller: Mastermind: How to Think like Sherlock Holmes

Dr. Tererai Trent Zimbabwean-born Founder of Tinogona, global activist and advocate for education, particularly for young girls

Ron Finley Artist, designer and guerilla gardener, Thrivals 6.0

Roger Newton Entrepreneur, CEO of Esperion Therapeutics, Inc., co-discovered the game-changing drug Lipitor®

Ariel Waldman Hackerspace exploration entrepreneur, founder of Spacehack.org and global advocate for citizen science

And Many More…

Cullen Murphy Editor at Large at Vanity Fair, author of Rome: the Fall of an Empire and the Fate of America

These global thought leaders and innovators will be coming to LOUISVILLE in 2013.

Louisville, KY

September 24–27, 2013


9/22‐9am‐7:30pm

Headliners Music Hall 8pm‐9:30pm

Louisville Music Louisville Music  Awards

The Green Building 1pm‐4:30pm

IF Music

Velocity Indiana 9am‐12pm

Start Up Weekend IF Lean Startup  9/20‐5:30pm‐10:30pm Workshop 9/21‐9am‐10:30pm

Mellwood Arts Center 8:15am‐4pm

IF Local Food

Mon. Sep 23

MeX 9am‐3:30pm

IF Labs Bomhard

Bomhard

5pm‐10pm

1pm‐5pm p p

Hasan Davis*

Bomhard

Daphne Miller*

Bomhard

Bomhard

Tererai Trent*

Bomhard

Beth Comstock* Oliver Burkeman*

Louisville  Metro Govt.  2nd Annual  Ariel Waldman* Cullen Murphy* Bomhard Mayor’s Day  Bomhard of Celebration Whitney Hall

9am‐2pm

Rafael  Lazano‐Hemmer* Bomhard IF Kids

Todd Hall

IF Mash‐Up*

Fri. Sep 27

Art @ the Edge* Roger Newton* Bomhard

Bomhard

Lance Hosey*

Todd Hall

IF Mash‐Up* Kevin Smokler

Thu. Sep 26

Market Street 12pm‐6pm

Louisville Mini  Louisville Mini Maker Faire®

Market Street 12pm‐11pm

Nulu Fest

Speed Local 9 9am‐12:30pm 12 30

IF Art: The  Boom is Over

Bomhard 8am‐6pm

Churchill Downs 5:45‐8pm

8:30pm‐11pm

Spleling Be

Taste of Innovation*

Bomhard

Retazos*

5:30pm‐7:30pm p p

21c

IF Speakers  Reception*

Bomhard

Mother Falcon*

Kentucky Center 6pm‐8pm

IF GSA  Reception

Visit ideafestival.com for ticket/registration information for events not included in the Festival Pass.

Sat. Sep 28 IF Gov  Scholars  Alumni (GSA)

Bomhard WFPK  Big Challenges,  g g Purpose‐Driven Purpose Driven Brand Brand* Brooks Simpson* Waterfront  Big Ideas…* Bomhard Bomhard Wednesday Bomhard

Bomhard

Rafe Sagarin*

Bomhard

Chris Bliss*

Bomhard

Innocence*

Bomhard

Alex Stone*

Maria Konnikova*

Wed. Sep 25

**Festival Festival Passes provided to IF Sponsors also include complimentary admission to Thrivals  Passes provided to IF Sponsors also include complimentary admission to Thrivals

Ice House 5:30pm‐7:30pm

IF Startup‐ PALOOZA

Finley  G d Garden Dig

Todd Hall 4pm‐6pm

Village  p / Capital/ VentureWell  Pitch Event

Ali Center 9am‐5pm

IF Water

Bomhard 8:30am‐3pm

Tue.  Sep 24 Thrivals  6.0**

*EVENTS EVENTS IN BOLD INCLUDED IN FESTIVAL PASS IN BOLD INCLUDED IN FESTIVAL PASS

8 00 9:30 PM 8:00 ‐ 9 30 PM

6:00 ‐ 7:30 PM

4:30 ‐ 5:30 PM

3:00 ‐ 4:00 PM

1:30 ‐ 2:30 PM

12:00 PM‐ 1:00  PM

10:30 ‐ 11:30AM

9:00 – 10:00 AM

7.45 ‐ 8:45 AM

Fri. 9/20 ‐ Sun. 9/22

Agenda for 2013 IdeaFestival® and Affiliate Events


COMPANY DISPLAYS

Office of Entrepreneurship

Four Tigers

Invenio Therapeutics Inc 12

Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


SESSION SUMMARIES GENERAL SESSIONS Session 1: “The Role of Collaboration in Advancing Local and Regional Economies” – Anthony Boccanfuso Throughout the Nation, regional and local communities are seeking effective strategies for maximizing the quality of life of it citizenry. One commonly held value is that a healthy innovation ecosystem bolsters the number of high-paying jobs in a community; a clear catalyst for these efforts are effective collaborations between the various organizations (non-profit, public, private) as well as the engaged individuals (innovators, entrepreneurs, academicians, financiers, and government representatives) that have a vested interest in the well-being of the community. This presentation will discuss this topic, and some contemporary strategies being used to enhance collaborations and improve the lives of people in the region.

Session 2: “At the Interface of Advanced Materials and Plant Biotechnology” – Barbara Knutson Efforts to produce chemicals and fuels through the conversion of cellulosic biomass are receiving significant attention, with a goal of reducing the dependence on petroleum-based products. The depolymerization of lignocellulose to soluble sugars provides an important feedstock for subsequent fermentation or catalysis to desired products. The development of advanced ceramic adsorbents for soluble sugar separations and the adaptation of materials-based thin film analysis approaches to quantify enzymatic conversion pathways are being pursued to enhance the production of soluble sugar feedstocks. The thin film analysis approaches complement ongoing efforts to understand the effect of pretreatment, feedstock, and plant modification on depolymerization kinetics. Separation using the tailored ceramic adsorbents is being extended to potentially high-value therapeutics derived from plants, products of recent advances in plant biotechnology. The current technologies to separate these bioactive compounds derived from plants (for identification and production) lag the novel methods which can be used to produce them, and therefore limit their commercial production.

Session 3: “Directed Self-Assembly Of Nanostructures To Develop Tools And Devices To Interface Biomaterialto-Electronic” – Mehdi Yazdanpanah Liquid gallium (Ga) spontaneously alloys with silver (Ag) thin films at near or even below room temperature resulting in rapid self-assembly of Ag2Ga nanoneedles. The Ag2Ga nanoneedles orient nearly vertical to the interface which suggests that an individual nanoneedle can be directed to grow in a desired direction by drawing a silver-coated surface from the Ga droplet. Very flexible and rugged Ag2Ga nanoneedles of constant diameter can be securely grown onto selected location at room temperature. These nanoneedles are electrically conductive and have stiffness well matched to viscoelastic properties of complex fluids and biological materials. We are currently in the process developing instrumentation for batch fabrication of these nanoneedles at the wafer scale. Using our platform technology, we have developed tools and devices for various R&D groups in industries and research institutes (e.g. probes for high resolution imaging and nano-device manipulation used by semiconductor industry). Also, we are in the process of developing a detection mechanism for capturing low dose of Circulating Tumor Cell (CTC) in human blood. In this presentation, an overview of NaugaNeedles platform technology will be presented and some of the current and future application of the technology will be reviewed.

Session 4: “Peaklet Analysis: Software for Spectrum Analysis” – Bruce Kessler This presentation will introduce software that has grown out of research with the Applied Physics Institute at WKU, called Peaklet Analysis, developed in partnership with HitCents, Inc., that provides a fast, accurate, and objective analysis of spectrum data for the purpose of identifying elements and substances indicative of high counts at specific locations in the spectrum. The algorithm used by the software, which was granted a patent in April 2013, uses a relatively new mathematical tool called wavelets (specifically multiwavelets) to determine the baseline in spectra, and then provide accurate counts under peaks for which the user is searching. This presentation provides a background to the development and science of the software, and a demonstration of the software with several data sets illustrating its capabilities.

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 13


SESSION SUMMARIES

Session 5: “Metal Organic Frameworks as Catalysts in the Conversion of CO2 to Cyclic Carbonates” – Moisés Carreón The effective utilization of CO2 as a renewable raw material for the production of useful chemicals is an area of great interest. In particular, the catalytic conversion of CO2 into cyclic carbonates, which are useful chemical intermediates employed for the production of plastics and organic solvents, represents an attractive route for the efficient use of carbon dioxide. The development of superior performance catalysts requires novel materials with fundamentally different structural, compositional, adsorption and transport properties than those of conventional zeolite, metal oxides or metal phases. In this respect, metal organic frameworks have emerged as a novel type of crystalline porous materials which combine highly desirable properties, such as uniform micropores, high surface areas, flexible chemistries, and exceptional thermal and chemical stability, making them ideal candidates for catalytic applications. In this presentation, representative examples demonstrating the catalytic ability of these porous materials for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates are presented. The fundamental structure/ catalytic relationships of these porous phases in the conversion of CO2 into cyclic carbonates are discussed.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS Session 6A: “NIH Grants Peer Review Process – An Update” – Atul Sahai This presentation will provide information about the overall peer review process for a NIH grant application. This presentation will give an overview of the NIH grant application review process at the Center for Scientific Review at NIH. Dr. Sahai will discuss the overall goal and the structure of the NIH and the Center for Scientific Review (CSR). Dr. Sahai will cover the following areas: • Where does the application go after its submission? • How does the applicant find the right review group/ study section before submitting the application? • How the applications get assigned to a study 14

section or a Special Emphasis Panel for review? • How do we select the reviewers? • What are the review criteria and how are the applications scored? • A brief description of NIH New Investigators, small business, and early career reviewer program with updates • What are the do’s and don’ts when preparing a NIH grant application?

Session 6B: “Hope Is Not a Plan: How To Take Charge of Your Own Career Development” – Keith Micoli Many young scientists are looking at the difficult job market and increasingly competitive funding environment with great anxiety and wondering whether their current career aspirations are still possible. Despite this anxiety, few are proactive enough to look rationally at the career path they are on and make adjustments to that path based on their own interests and desires. This session is intended to introduce young scientists to a career planning process that focuses less on technical skills and which jobs are currently “hot”, and more on personal and professional values. This is a hands-on workshop in which participants will work to determine what their values are, set long term career goals, and develop an individual work plan to better position themselves for their next step. By creating a written development plan, participants will be better able to take charge of their own training, ask for assistance from the right people, and be able to recognize opportunities when they arise. Although not required, this session is a natural introduction to the session “Career Transitions and Job Searches”.

Session 6C: “NSF Innovation Partnerships” – Jesús Soriano IIP seeks to successfully invest in science and engineering research across all disciplines that have the potential for high impact in meeting national and societal needs. This session will present a set of cohesive programs offered by the NSF’s Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships (IIP) of the Directorate for Engineering (ENG) that contribute to the goal of innovation. These include: Partnerships for Innovation: Building Innovation Capacity (PFI: BIC), Partnerships for Innovation: Accelerating Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


SESSION SUMMARIES

Innovation Research (PFI: AIR), Innovation Corps (I-Corps), the Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer Research (SBIR/STTR), the Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI), and Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/ UCRC). Taken together, these programs provide serial momentum that promotes the common goal of innovation.

Session 7A: “Air Force SBIR/STTR: From Conception to Commercialization” – Leah Bryant This presentation describes the Air Force SBIR/STTR program goals and objectives and its three-phased approach to commercializing innovative technologies.

Session 7B: “Short Workshop - Career Counseling and Job Search Strategies” – Keith Micoli Today’s graduate students and PostDocs face unique challenges in a job market that is both more competitive and diverse than ever before. More and more young scientists are looking beyond academia with a mixture of fear and longing, with little knowledge or guidance on how to break into new careers. Although they recognize that most non-academic jobs require a resume, few understand the difference between this and a CV, and fewer still take the time needed to craft a truly effective resume. This workshop will demonstrate what employers are really looking for in an applicant, how to read a job ad strategically, and how to create a resume that is compelling and specific for the job you are applying for. Most scientists focus exclusively on the technical skills they have worked so hard to achieve, and these skills are critical to a successful application. But the hard skills are only a part of a great application, and to set yourself apart from the crowd, you will need to demonstrate that you possess the soft skills needed to be a great employee. This workshop will help you identify what those skills are, how to bring them to light in your resume, and how to develop them if necessary. By knowing what employers want, how the application process works, and what your true strengths are, you can develop a resume that truly shines and give yourself the best possible chance of being successful.

Session 7C: “Conversations on NSF’s SBIR/STTR Program” – Jesús Soriano NSF SBIR/STTR programs incentivize and enable startups and small business to undertake R&D with high technical risk and high commercial reward. During this session, Dr. Jesus Soriano, will deliver an introduction on the mission and vision of NSF’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program followed by a conversation with session participants on their experiences and comments related to the program.

Session 8A: “The Entrepreneurial Faculty: Balancing Academic and Entrepreneur Roles”–Debbie Davis and Allison Ratterman For decades academia and industry have been forging partnerships for each side’s mutual benefit, but, to the untrained public eye may seem riddled with bias and problems. With a mission that includes a focus on research and economic development, a university does carry out research projects that could lead to financial benefits for the institution or for institutional officials. Projects can be internally funded or funded through agreements that may be mutually beneficial to the university and a corporate entity. Such agreements can include, but not be limited to, receiving royalties from or holding an equity interest in a company. Determining what situations are manageable frequently falls to the institution, but the faculty-entrepreneur can learn to navigate these turbulent waters. In this session, we will explore some of the conflicts of interest that arise, discuss common pitfalls and investigate approaches to mitigate conflicts in research/entrepreneurial situations.

Session 8B: “Small Business Accounting for SBIR-STTR Award Recipients” – Chuck Woods and Rebecca Daigrepont While developing a budget is important when submitting a grant proposal, it is more imperative to properly manage the budget upon receiving a government SBIR/STTR

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 15


SESSION SUMMARIES

grant or a contract. Understanding the direct cost, indirect cost, and managing subcontracts are necessary to have an accounting system that can be tailored to specific needs. One can start with QuickBooks, but security and growth of business depends upon having appropriate procedures in place to avoid any fraudulent activity and to comply with government reporting requirements including annual financial reports. Keeping in view the increasing number of federal and state audits, the session will focus on having a professional accounting system and certified professional to reconcile the accounts for any audit challenge, to allow businesses to remain focused on the business and their growth.

INTERACTIVE DISCUSSION The Lean Launch Pad and Founders Lab Experience – Wes Brooks KSTC’s Kentucky Enterprise Fund team has developed a business accelerator program aimed at assisting very early startups. Based on the business model proposed by Steve Blank (the Lean Launch Pad), the company learns how to quickly test and modify its approach to customer and product development. The Lean Startup process emphasizes early interaction with customers and other stakeholders as a way to reduce the risk inherent in all new businesses. The Lean Startup approach has rapidly gained adherents in both commercial and academic settings and is used in business schools and business accelerator programs around the country. Wes will deliver a brief presentation over lunch on how you could apply this business model to your newly developed technology. To join Wes, sign up at the registration desk.

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Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


KENTUCKY SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING TEAM Mahendra K. Jain, PhD Upon joining KSTC in February 2001, Mahendra brought 30 years of teaching, research, and management experience to the creation and management of KSEF and making R&D investments in novel ideas for innovation and commercialization. He is helping to forge partnerships between academic, industrial, and state institutions in building and expanding Kentucky’s scientific and engineering capacity to attract external research funds from all sources. In addition, Mahendra has proactively pursued the growth of the Federal SBIR and STTR Programs in the state through outreach and state-funded assistance programs. He currently provides direction to the Kentucky Science and Engineering Foundation, Kentucky Commercialization Fund, and the Kentucky SBIR/STTR Matching Funds Program. Before joining KSTC, Mahendra worked at several universities in the USA, Europe, and India as well as at MBI International, a biotechnology R&D organization in Lansing, Michigan. He has been a consultant to the United Nations Development Program, Food and Agriculture Organization, and the Organization of American States. For his outstanding contributions in microbiology, Mahendra received the 1997 G.B. Manjrekar Award from the Association of Microbiologists of India (AMI) and an American Society for Microbiology International Professor Award in 2006. He also received a National Tibbetts Award in 2006 for exemplifying the Federal SBIR/STTR Programs at both the state and national levels. Mahendra is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology (AAM Fellow), a fellow of AMI (FAMI), and a member of the Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC). Mahendra received and managed research grants and contracts in several million dollars from federal, state, and industrial sources. He received his PhD in Microbiology in 1972 from IARI, New Delhi, and is the author of ten USA patents, one Canadian patent, and over 120 research papers, articles, and book chapters.

Maria Labreveux, PhD Maria Labreveux joined KSTC in February 2007 and is the Program Director for the Kentucky Science and Engineering Foundation (KSEF). Maria manages the KSEF Research and Development (RDE) and the Kentucky Commercialization Fund (KCF) programs, for which KSTC receives funding from the Commonwealth of Kentucky through a contract with the Council on Post-Secondary Education (CPE). Maria brings research and grants management experiences from the Delaware State University (DSU) where she worked as an Assistant Professor before moving to Kentucky. Maria secured over $2 million in a 2.5-year period at DSU for her research and teaching from federal and state agencies such as the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), National Resources Conservation Services (USDA-NRCS), the Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Services (CSREES), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the University of Delaware. Maria is an active member of the Early Career Professional Division of the Agronomy and Crop Science Societies of America, and a contributor to the society’s monthly newsletter. Maria received her PhD in Agronomy-Plant Science from The Pennsylvania State University, and her MS and Ag Engineering degrees in Argentina. Debbie Rempfer Debbie Rempfer joined KSTC in August 2006 and is the Executive Assistant for the Kentucky Science and Engineering Foundation (KSEF). She supports the KSEF Executive Director and provides administrative assistance for KSEF, the Research and Development Excellence Program (RDE), the Kentucky Commercialization Fund (KCF), the Kentucky SBIR/STTR Phase Zero and Phase Double Zero Program (PZ/DZ), and the Kentucky SBIR/STTR Proposal Preparation Workshops and Conferences organized by KSEF and KSTC. Debbie’s business experience includes executive support, publications and print media, business and medical office

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 17


management, personnel, benefits, and finance and policy administration. Her professional background includes working at Artemetrx, CHA Health, and the Center for Psychological Health before joining KSTC. In addition, she is a published author (David C. Cook Publishing Company), and worked as an editor and writer for Bristol Books. Debbie received her Bachelor’s degree from Asbury University. Ken Ronald Ken Ronald joined KSTC in February 2007 and is the Program Manager for the Kentucky SBIR/ STTR Matching Funds Program. Ken brings experience from the Virginia/Washington DC area where he was a support contractor for the Marine Corps. Ken worked as a captain for six years flying for Colgan Air Inc, a US Air Express carrier. His previous work included 15 years with the Air Force at WPAFB in the Manufacturing Technology Directorate, Nonmetals Branch, supporting composite structures processing and design programs. He supported C-17, Global Hawk, F-22, and JSF manufacturing issues. While working for the Air Force, Ken managed many Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Historically Black College and University (HBCU) contracts. Ken received his Bachelor’s degree from the University of Florida.

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Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


Only Kentucky matches $- for -$ SBIR-STTR Phase 1 + Phase 2 awards Kentucky will match, dollar-for-dollar, both Phase 1 and Phase 2 federal SBIR and STTR awards to our hightech small businesses – no other state has a program designed to do just that. If you are looking for a place to grow, locate or start a high-tech company, Kentucky’s SBIR-STTR Matching Funds program is just one of many reasons to give us a call. We regularly accept applications from companies in Kentucky (or willing to relocate to Kentucky) for state funds to match federal Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants. Phase 1 awards are matched up to $150,000 and Phase 2 awards up to $500,000 per year. No third-party match is required.

Kentucky offers a wide range of support for hightech small businesses, including grants, tax incentives, and other forms of early-stage funding. Our statewide network of Innovation and Commercialization Centers can offer business management and entrepreneurial training, while helping find financing. The Cabinet for Economic Development can make growing a business in Kentucky fast and easy. Our low cost of living, low-stress commutes, and high quality of life amid unrivaled natural beauty are why Kentucky communities are rated among the best places to start a business and raise a family. For more information about our SBIR-STTR Matching Funds and other business support programs, visit www.ThinkKentucky.com/dci/dcifunding.aspx.

Cabinet for Economic Development For more information about the SBIR-STTR program in Kentucky, call (859) 233-3502 Ext. 252 or visit www.ThinkKentucky.com/dci/dcifunding.aspx

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KENTUCKY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION TEAMS

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Kentucky Science and Engineering Foundation (KSEF): Created under the Kentucky Innovation Act of 2000, KSEF invests in research and development activity to promote innovation, new product development and commercialization, and build a pipeline of new ideas and technologies to add value to the scientific economic growth in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Website: ksef.kstc.com

oriented small businesses to advance their innovative concepts, translate them into products or technologies for commercialization, and profit from it through SBIR/STTR. Website: kysbir.com

Kentucky Space designs and develops R&D, educational and entrepreneurial space platforms. Website: kentuckyspace.com

EDUCATION

Exomedicine Institute explores and advances medical solutions in the microgravity environment of space. Website: exomedicine.com

Kentucky EPSCoR: Kentucky’s Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, known as KY EPSCoR, exists to stimulate sustainable improvements in the Commonwealth’s R&D capacity, and to advance science and engineering capabilities for discovery, innovation and knowledge-based prosperity. Website: kyepscor.org

Kentucky SBIR/STTR Resource Center: Managed by the KSEF Team, the Kentucky SBIR/STTR Resource Center helps Kentucky innovators, entrepreneurs, and technology20

AdvanceKentucky helps students reach new heights in rigorous academic achievement. AdvanceKentucky’s mission is to work with local, state and national partners to dramatically expand access to and participation and success in rigorous college-level work in high school, particularly among student populations traditionally underrepresented in these courses. AdvanceKentucky is an initiative of KSTC in partnership with NMSI, Participating School, Kentucky Department of Education, Berea College, Council on Postsecondary Education, Lockheed Martin, Exxon Mobil, Appalachian Regional Commission, and the U.S. DoEd AP Incentive Program. Website: advancekentucky.com

Governor’s School for Entrepreneur: The Governor’s School for Entrepreneurs (GSE), building on the Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


KENTUCKY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION TEAMS

successful Governor’s Scholars and Governor’s School for the Arts programs, brings together high school students, teachers, colleges, universities, entrepreneurs, scientists, engineers and product designers in an annual immersive high-energy summer experience.

Website: gse.kstc.com ]Laying the Foundation is dedicated to enhancing rigorous instruction through training for middle and high school teachers.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Startups@KSTC: Startups@KSTC provides seed and early stage funding and other resources to Kentuckybased companies. Our goal is to build successful technology-related companies in Kentucky. Website: startups.kstc.com

Kentucky Innovation Network: The Kentucky Innovation Network was established in 2001 and expanded in 2012. It is managed in partnership by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development, the Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation and a number of regional/ local partner organizations. It is a statewide network of experienced business mentors focused entirely on the

development of innovation-driven, technology based companies in Kentucky. Kentucky's Innovation Network consists of twelve offices, spread geographically around the state, that are staffed by experienced and educated business leaders. These Innovation Network Offices possess the depth and breadth of knowledge needed to help technology companies through preliminary business Assessment, Business development and ultimately Capitalization (the ABCs of business development). Website: kyinnovation.com

Space Tango, the nation’s first business accelerator specifically for space enterprises and entrepreneurs, is an early-stage venture fund, business accelerator and community of entrepreneurs for space-driven start-ups, with the goal of helping new and growing businesses develop innovations, novel applications and diverse markets. Selected companies have access to a full team of advisors (scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, sales and marketing professionals, investors, etc.) and facilities. Assets include the Exomedicine Institute, technical and ground operations centers at Morehead State University Space Science Center (21 meter tracking station) and the University of Kentucky Space Systems Lab, offices at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley (Mountain View, California), as well as connections at other space organizations and companies. In the initial round Space Tango will invest in up-to six companies from across the U.S. These companies will participate in an intensive twelve week on-site program, centered in Lexington, Kentucky, that will provide a complete constellation of services, information, customized team of mentors and networks necessary to successfully start and grow a space-driven business. Companies will be selected primarily on the basis of the idea, science, technology, market fit, customer understanding, management team and readiness level. Website: spacetango.com

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 21


SPEAKER/MODERATOR BIOS Anthony Boccanfuso Executive Director The National Academies of Science University-Industry Demonstration Partnership (UIDP) Dr. Boccanfuso has served as the National Academies’ University-Industry Demonstration Partnership Executive Director since 2007. He is a leading expert on high value, high return university-industry partnerships who works with other thought leaders from the academic and corporate communities to advance these collaborations and promote the Nation’s economic competitiveness. In his current role, he spearheads the development of a series of initiatives to catalyze partnerships and reduce barriers to University-Industry collaborations. In recognition of his experience and insights in this arena, Tony is regularly sought after as a speaker (both domestically and internationally) and has published several reference sources. He also serves as a consultant for government agencies, non-profit organizations and private firms and is Vice-Chair of the MedStar Health Research Institute. Tony holds a Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry from the University of South Carolina and earned his B.S. in Chemistry and Political Science from Furman University

Moisés A. Carreon Associate Professor University of Louisville Moises A. Carreon was born in Morelia, Mexico in 1974. He received his BS and MS degrees in Chemical Engineering, and Materials Science and Engineering at Universidad Michoacana in 1996, and 1999 respectively. He obtained his PhD degree in the Department of Chemical & Materials Engineering at the University of Cincinnati in 2003. From 2004-2005 he worked as a postdoctoral fellow in the Chemistry Department at University of Toronto. From 2006-2007 he worked as a Research Associate in the Chemical & Biological Engineering Department at University of Colorado-Boulder. In 2007, Moises joined the Chemical Engineering Department at University of Louisville as Assistant Professor. Currently, he is Associate Professor in Chemical Engineering Department at University of Louisville. His research centers on the rational design of porous crystals, including zeolites, oxides, and metal organic frameworks for molecular gas separations, heterogeneous catalysis and natural gas storage. Moises has co-authored more than 40 peer-reviewed publications, and is the recipient of the 2009 ACS-PRF Doctoral New Investigator award, 2011 NSF-CAREER award, and 2013 AICHE separations division Kunesh award.

Wes Brooks Fund Associate Kentucky Science and Technology Wes Brooks is a recent graduate of the University of Kentucky where he received his bachelors in Materials Engineering. During his time at UK, Wes tarted multiple small ventures and ran the university’s entrepreneurship club for over two years. Wes is the youngest alumni to date of the NSF I-CORPS program where he served as the entrepreneurial lead of the University of Kentucky team. He currently serves on two boards, the Young Professional Board of BEAM (the Bluegrass Economic Advancement Movement)and iNET, UK’s campuswide entrepreneurship certificate program. Wes joined the KSTC staff in 2013. Today he applies his entrepreneurial knowledge and background as a fund associate at KSTC.

Deborah K. Davis Associate Vice President for Research and Director, Office of Sponsored Projects Administration University of Kentucky Deborah K. Davis has been involved in research administration for over 30 years. In her current position, she heads the office responsible for submitting proposals to external funding agencies and administering all sponsored project awards to the University of Kentucky. The office also administers the research-related financial conflict of interest policy. Deborah is a member of the National Council of University Research Administrators, is the university’s administrative representative to the Federal Demonstration Partnership (FDP) and regularly participates in meetings of the Council on Governmental Relations. She served on the FDP American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Committee and has made numerous

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Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


SPEAKER / MODERATOR BIOS presentations on research administration topics, including participation in workshops sponsored by a grant from the National Institute of General Medicine Sciences. Deborah holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Kentucky. Pamela Feldhoff Professor, Associate Vice President for Research & Innovation (EVPRI) and Vice Chair of Faculty Senate Her research interests span structure, function and metabolism of proteins and glycoproteins in plasma, tissues and cultured cells; affinity-biofunctional membrane biotechnology; multi-drug resistance in cancer with emphasis on DNA topoisomerase II utilizing human and animal cell lines; regulation of complement in cell culture and a rat neonatal animal model; and most recently biochemical, behavioral and evolutionary studies of salamander pheromones. One of her responsibilities in the EVPRI Office is institutional oversight of the Postdoctoral Training Program. Bruce Kessler Professor, Head Department of Mathematics Odgen College, Western Kentucky University Bruce Kessler is the Head of and professor in the Mathematics Department at WKU, and was formerly the Associate Dean of Ogden College at WKU. His research interests include applied wavelet analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical curricula development for elementary school students. He just recently earned a patent on the science behind the software Peaklet Analysis (www. peakletanalysis.com), and has a series of mathematics-based comic books Operation Comics (www.operationcomics.com) for students in grades 4 through 6. Barbara L. Knutson Professor University of Kentucky Barbara Knutson is a Professor in the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering at

the University of Kentucky. She completed her B.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and post-doctoral studies at Princeton University. Barbara is an Associate Faculty of the Center of Membrane Sciences and a faculty affiliate of UK’s Advanced Science and Technology and Commercialization Center (ASTeCC). Barbara’s research is in the field of applied thermodynamics and molecular self assembly, with emphasis on biotechnology and bioseparations applications. Her current research efforts are directed at the development of advanced materials and bioprocessing technologies for the production of plant-derived biochemicals and therapeutics. Keith Micoli PostDoctoral Program Director New York University Langone Medical Security Center Keith Micoli is the Postdoctoral Program Director at New York University School of Medicine. He received a BA from New College of Florida in 1993, and a Ph.D. from University of Alabama at Birmingham in 2001. His dissertation project studied HIV/ AIDS pathogenesis and focused on the role of HIV-1 gp41 cytoplasmic tail in apoptotic cell death. During his tenure at UAB, he was also a research associate and Instructor in the Department of Pathology, and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology at Samford University. Keith’s interest in postdoctoral training at a national level was developed by volunteering with the National Postdoctoral Association, a grassroots organization founded in 2003. He served on the NPA Board of Directors for four years and was Board Chairman from 2004-2006. During this time, the NPA transitioned from a special project of AAAS into an independent 501(c) non-profit corporation. During his tenure as Chair, the NPA successfully worked with the NIH to start the K99/R00 grant mechanism, and helped the NIH and NSF develop a unified definition of a postdoc. He left academic research to pursue a full-time position with New York University School of Medicine as Postdoctoral Program Manager in 2008. Since that time, the program has developed numerous formal programs to foster postdoc training, including a grantwriting course, lab management series, a course in pedagogy, and professional development groups focused on biotech and consulting careers. He has expanded his role to include career development programs for graduate students, and organized a popular career discussion series

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 23


SPEAKER/MODERATOR BIOS that brings in PhDs who have chosen a wide variety of careers to come and discuss what the transition was like and how people can position themselves to be competitive when opportunities present themselves. His biggest achievement has been the organization of What Can You Be with a PhD?, a career symposium that brings together over 1000 graduate students and postdocs from NYC for two days of talks and workshops. This program featured over 100 speakers in 2011, and covered 15 different career options and numerous career development workshops, and will be offered again in November 2013. His passion is encouraging postdocs and graduate students to take responsibility for their own success, and providing the resources they need to develop their own careers. Allison Griffin Ratterman Director, Research Integrity Program University of Louisville Allison G Ratterman, Ph.D., joined the Research Integrity Program at the University of Louisville in November 2001, after completing doctoral studies in Biological Engineering at the University of Georgia. Dr. Ratterman’s primary focus is the development of training and resources in the area of the Responsible Conduct of Research and she coordinates the implementation of this effort with departments and units within the University, with the objective of ensuring that the responsible conduct of research is maintained at a high priority level in all aspects of research activities. As part of this endeavor, Dr. Ratterman coordinates the university’s program for conflicts of interest in research and the administrative processes associated with allegations of research misconduct. Dr. Ratterman has special interest in identifying opportunities to make research training and research compliance processes more efficient and relevant. Atul Sahai Scientific Review Officer Center for Scientific Review National Institutes of Health Dr. Sahai serves as a Scientific Review Officer (SRO) at the Center for Scientific Review (CSR) at NIH. He is currently responsible for organizing the 24

review of Pathobiology of Kidney Disease study section and Special Emphasis Panel (SEP) reviews of applications in renal, digestive, and urological sciences including Small Business applications. Before joining CSR, he has also served as an SRO for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) where he organized the reviews of career development awards, fellowships, program projects, and centers in the areas of diabetes, digestive, and kidney diseases. Dr. Sahai received his Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry from Howard University, Washington DC, and a subsequent postdoctoral fellowship at the NIH. Since then he has held faculty positions in the Department of Medicine/Nephrology at various academic institutions and was an Associate Professor at Northwestern University, Chicago until 2005. Dr. Sahai has broad-based experience in kidney/vascular disease research, particularly cell growth and fibrosis mechanisms associated with diabetes and hypertension. During his tenure in academia, he has published numerous research articles in high quality peerreviewed journals and co-authored several book chapters.

Jesús Soriano Program Director Industrial Innovation and Partnership (IIP) National Science Foundation Jesús Soriano joined the NSF in February 2012 as a Program Director in Biological and Chemical Technologies, after 20 years of international experience in executive leadership in the biopharmaceutical and nonprofit sectors, start-up formation and funding, technology commercialization, and academic teaching and research. Prior to NSF, he was the Senior Advisor to the Puerto Rico Trust for Science, Technology and Research, a technology-based development organization. Previously, he was Executive Vice President at QRxPharma, Ltd., a commercial-stage specialty pharmaceutical company focused in pain management and central nervous system disorders. Before, he was Senior Director of Business Development at Osiris Therapeutics, Inc. During his tenure, Osiris formed a $1.4 billion partnership with Genzyme Corp. to commercialize ProchymalTM and ChondrogenTM, two first-in-class, late-stage adult stem cell therapeutics; and divested to NuVasive, Inc. the firstto market adult stem-cell orthopedic implant, Osteocel®, for $137 million. Previously, he held several executive Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


SPEAKER / MODERATOR BIOS leadership positions at the global bioresource center ATCC for 5 years, including Vice President for IP, Licensing and International Business Development, and was Associate Director for R&D Operations and Business Development at Entremed, Inc, a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company developing therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. Jesús began his career as a family doctor in Spain; he then worked for 9 years at the University of Geneva Medical School, Switzerland initially as Research Scientist and then as Assistant Professor. He initially came to the US as a visiting scientist to the National Cancer Institute (NIH) under an advanced researcher fellowship from the Swiss National Science Foundation. He holds a MBA in Corporate Finance from the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School; a Ph.D. in Medical Sciences from the University of Geneva, Switzerland; and a M.D. from the University of Alicante, Spain. Chuck Woods President OPM Financial LLC Chuck Woods is the President of OPM Financial LLC and is a 1981 graduate of the University of Louisville’s School of Business. He is responsible for managing the company’s financial services business, and acting as the CFO for several of its portfolio and client companies. Producing financial reports, budgets, and forecasting models for profit and non-profit entities comprises much of his day. Prior to joining OPM services in 1995, he served as Chief Financial Officer for Grant Homes Inc, a large California homebuilder. Mr. Woods’ experience also includes ten years as Accounting Manager and Controller for General Homes Corporation, a Texas-based builder. Mehdi Yazdanpanah CEO and Founder of NaugaNeedles Dr. Mehdi Yazdanpanah is originally from Iran and came to Louisville in 2001 in student visa on a research assistantship funding support from Professor Robert Cohn to pursue PhD degree in Electrical Engineering. In 2006 he received his doctorate degree from the University of Louisville wehre he co-invented room temperature self-assembly of metal alloy

nanostructures. He also holds the B.S. degree in Physics from Sharif University of Technology and M.S. degree in Physics from the Beheshti University (2001), where he designed and fabricated a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). In 2006 He started a postdoc position atUofL while he also was thinking about starting his own business and creating jobs rather than getting a job. In 2007 he founded NaugaNeedles but it took two more years till he quit his position with UofL and become the first fulltime employee of NaugaNeedles in 2009. While running NaugaNeedles business side, he is also actively involved in various R&D projects. He has published more than 25 papers in refereed journals, and holds two issued US patents and seven pending patents. Dr. Yazdanpanah has co-invented more than 10 different products and demonstrated their applications and benefits. These products are currently being sold to researches worldwide. Under Dr. Yazdanpanah’s leadership, NaugaNeedles has achieved tremendous milestones including: raising more than $2.5M in federal, state and private funding, established the NaugaNeedles’ manufacturing facility capable of producing more than 10,000 (~$3M value) devices per year, sold NaugaNeedles products to more than 150 customers worldwide, and expects to expand its customer base significantly in near future. Dr. Yazdanpanah is the recipient of the 2009 Vogt Innovation Award, the Kauffman Fellowship award in 2009, the 2013 Kentucky Small Business Person of the Year Award, and the 2013 Kentucky Pacesetter Award. Leah Bryant Support Contractor SBIR/STTR Program, United States Air Force Ms. Leah Bryant is a senior support contractor for the Air Force Small Business Innovative Research / Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) program. Session Title: "Air Force SBIR/STTR: From Conception to Commercialization." This presentation describes the Air Force SBIR/STTR program’s goals and objectives and its three-phased approach to commercializing innovative technologies. The program office at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, manages an annual budget of $319 million to serve the technology needs of the Air Force warfighter by stimulating small business technology research while providing the government with cost-effective technical and scientific solutions to challenging problems.

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 25


POSTER PRESENTERS - ALPHABETICAL LIST Presenter

Title

Poster number

Ali Al-Magableh

Development of Viral Based Gene Delivery for Conditional Ablation of Specific Brain Peptidergic Neurons

13

Ferhan Atici & Mustafa Atici

Parameter Estimations of Sigmoidal Models of Cancer

5

Lihui Bai

A Game Theoretical Approach to Energy Consumption Scheduling Under Smart Grid

23

Sean Bailey

Turbulence Measurement Using a 24 Nanoscale Thermal Anemometry Probe

competitors in green

Mathias J. Boland “Friction, Adhesion, and Elasticity of Graphene Edges”

31

Darren Boyd

A Multi-Physics Analysis of TerahertzBand Photoconductive Antennas with Measured Data Corroboration and Fabrication of Samples

1

Luke H. Bradley

Dependence of Gel Strength Towards Developing In Vitro Gel Mimics for Modeling Convection Enhanced Delivery to the Brain

2

Vesta Brue

Using mHealth to Aid Opioid Medication Adherence

6

Franca Cambi

“GSK3b and Regulation of Alternative Splicing, Myelination, and Re-Myelination”

3

Thomas M. Chambers

Role of the Horse in Interspecies Transmission of Influenza Viruses

7

Robert W. Cohn

Nanostructured Self-Assembly and Characterization of Ultra-Low Force Sensing and Disposable Nanomechanical Sensors

32

John G. Connell

26

Influence Of SrTiO3 Surface Preparation 33 Methods on the Transport Properties of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces

Presenter

Title

Poster number

Keith R. Davis

Plant-Based Expression of an Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Biosimilar

8

Animesh Dhara

Autophagy in the Parasitic Protozoan Toxoplasma gondii: Development of Tools to Study a “Life And Death” Pathway

20

Joseph Dvorak

Optical Sprayer Nozzle Flow Rate Sensor

9

Jimmy Fox

Environmental Sustainability of Streams Using Transfer

25

John H. Gruenewald

“Thin Film Growth and Characterization 34 of the Strongly Correlated, Spin-Orbit Coupled Perovskite Phase of SrIrO3”

Saurabh Gupta

Advanced Real-Time Modeling: Software for River Quality Predictions and Drinking Water Distribution System Management

27

Kurtis E. Heacox

Electrohydrodynamic Flows Generated Using a Nanoneedle

10

Jacob Helvey

Investigation of the Impact on the Near-Wall Flow Field by Combined Roughness and Blowing Effects

26

competitors in green

James B. Hoying Micro-Physiological Assay for Angiogenesis

44

Patrick Hunley

Correlated Catalytic Etching and 35 Parallel Bi-layer Graphene Nanoribbons

Dalton Jantzen

Remote Monitoring of a Computer in Real-Time

47

Suvid Joshi

Imprinting the Surface of Stöber Silica Nanoparticles with Surfactants to Create Selective Saccharide Adsorbent Materials

36

Qing Li

A Multiple Antibiotic-Resistant 11 Enterobacter Cloacae Strain Isolated from a Bioethanol Fermentation Facility

Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER PRESENTERS - ALPHABETICAL LIST Presenter

Title

Poster number

LanHsin Liu

Mechanisms Involved in Scar Tissue Contraction on the Retinal Surface

competitors in green

12

Presenter

Title

Poster number

Craig Sargent

Female Personality Depends on Body Size and Reproductive State in the Invasive Western Mosquitofish

Nihar Shah

“Degradable Polymers of Natural 49 Antioxidants for Biomedical, Industrial and Cosmetic Applications�

Anthony N. Shelley

Machine Vision for Precision Dairy Farming

37

competitors in green

18

Thomas M. Lucas Progress Towards a Light-Driven Bistable Microactuator

38

A Systematic Investigation of Structures and Stabilities of Lyophilized Formulations Using Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

14

John Nichols

Tuning the Electronic Structure of Epitaxial Sr2IrO4 Thin Films with Lattice Strain

39

Barbara Stone

A Non-surgical Uterine Transfer Technique for Mouse Embryos Or Sperm

21

Matt Nitzken

Computer-Aided Diagnosis System for Early Diagnosis of Autism in Young Children

48

Doug Strachan

Crystallographically-Ordered Carbon Nanotubes Grown on Few-Layer Graphene Films

40

Martin Striz

A Non-Invasive System for HighThroughput Monitoring of Mouse Sleep and Other Behaviors

4

Abhishek Sundararajan

Near-Ambient Regeneration and Polymer Encapsulation of Graphene Field Effect Devices

41

Douglas Taylor

Application of Asymmetric Field Flow Fractionation to Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis

46

Stacy Wilson

Remotely Operated Submersible

43

Esma S. Yolcu

A Novel Technology to Display Exogenous FASL Protein with Potent Apoptotic Activity on Pancreatic Islets to Achieve Transplantation Tolerance

22

Xingye Zhang

A Dynamic Systems Approach to Understanding Human Learning

19

Reddisiva Prasanth Kambham

Temperature Sensitive (ts) Mutant Library Screens in Exploring Essential Host Factors Affecting Viral RNA Replication and Recombination

50

Matthew J. Nethercott

Jeffrey E. Noland Baculovirus Expressed Cypovirus 15 Polyhedrin Used for Protein Packaging Sustainability Infrastructure Connection of Rural to Urban

29

Ligand Binding Free Energy of Glycoside Hydrolases as a Metric for Processivity and Polysaccharide Morphology Dependence

16

High Performance Materials for Structural Repair

42

Stephen E. Rankin

Interfacial Engineering of Biomass Saccharification by T. Reesei Enzymes

30

Hemali Rathnayake

Innovative Energy Harvesting Nanostructures for Organicbased Solar Cells

45

Turning Moss into Algae: Loss of Cell Adhesion and Differentiation in PrenylationDeficient Physcomitrella patens

17

Technology to Deconstructing Lignocellulosic Biomass for Biofuel Production

28

Dr. Tyra Oldham Christina M. Payne

Abheetha Peiris

Mark Running

Dipak K Sahoo

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 27


POSTER COMPETITION AND JUDGING The general public appreciates the importance of science and engineering for the advancement of social well being. However, traditional outlets (e.g. news paper or TV) for layman communication are decreasing their coverage of science. These developments will increasingly place scientists in the position of public communicator without the added advantage of media editors. Training on

how to effectively communicate your research findings with stakeholders is critical (delete imperative) to your future career and the future of public science funding. Participating poster presentations will be judged based on the criteria set below. Participants on this year’s competition are highlighted in the “poster presenters” list.

9th Kentucky Innovation and Entrepreneurship Poster Judging WorkSheet Score (1 to 10, 10 is best)

A

Appearance

1

Text readability - Is the font type and size readable from a comfortable distance?

2

Text simplicity – Are words limited to the necessary amount? (Either too wordy or to brief would represent a lower score)

3

Color – Does the color combination utilized ease the readability of the poster? (Lower scores for the use of red over blue or blue over red, yellow text, or to many flashy colors)

B.

Graphs and Data Displays – posters are meant to tell a story in few words, substituting words with graphs

4

Are there a sufficient number of graphics vs. text? (Posters heavy on words attract a lower number of readers and should receive a lower score)

5

Are the graphs easy to understand? Are their axis clearly labeled and is there a short explanation of it under each graphic?

6

Simplicity - Have the graphs been simplified to help the audience focus on the important findings or the recommendations?

7

Is the quality of the image or graphic display acceptable (sufficiently large and clear)?

C.

Poster Message - Does the poster address the following questions:

8

Why is the research presented important?

9

What is the research expected to add to the current state of knowledge?

10

Is the methodology briefly but clearly stated?

11

Are the authors’ findings clearly stated?

12

Are the authors’ recommendations clearly stated?

D.

Becoming a Science Communicator-

13

Does the poster effectively address a general audience (within and outside its area of research?

14

Is the poster free of excessive jargon?

15

How well does the poster engage the audience and invites conversation?

Total

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Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA Information Technology and Communications

1.

A Multi-Physics Analysis of Terahertz-Band Photoconductive Antennas with Measured Data Corroboration and Fabrication of Samples John C. Young(1), Darren Boyd*(1), Stephen D. Gedney(1), Jinjun Liu(2), and Takehito Suzuki(3) (1)ECE, University of Kentucky, (2)Department of Chemistry, University of Louisville, (3)ECE, Ibaraki University The frequency demands of radiating systems are moving into the terahertz band with potential applications that include sensing, imaging, and extremely broadband communication. One commonly used method for generating and detecting terahertz waves is to excite a voltage-biased photoconductive antenna with an extremely short laser pulse. The pulsed laser generates charge carriers in a photoconductive substrate which are swept onto the metallic antenna traces to produce an electric current that radiates or detects a terahertz band signal. Therefore, analysis of a photoconductive antenna requires simultaneous solutions of both semiconductor physics equations (including drift-diffusion and continuity relations) and Maxwell’s equations. A multi-physics analysis scheme based on the Discontinuous-Galerkin Finite-Element Time-Domain (DGFETD) is presented that couples the semiconductor drift-diffusion equations with the electromagnetic Maxwell’s equations. A simple port model is discussed that efficiently couples the two equation sets in the DGFETD analysis. Computed emission intensities are compared with measured data found in the literature for typical photoconductive antennas. Optimized antenna designs based on the analysis are presented for a variety of antenna configurations. Optimization is performed using parameter sweeps and particle swarm optimization. Dipole and bowtie photoconductive antennas were fabricated using TiAu metallization on a GaAs susbstrate and the fabrication process is detailed.

Human Health and Development

2.

Dependence of Gel Strength Towards Developing In Vitro Gel Mimics for Modeling Convection Enhanced Delivery to the Brain Luke H. Bradley*(1,2), Christopher A. Brown(1), Kunal Sunthankar(1), Alyssa Fountain(1), and Peter A. Hardy(1) (1)Departments of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky; (2)Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry; University of Kentucky, College of Medicine Convection Enhanced Delivery (CED) is emerging as an effective clinical method for delivering therapeutic agents directly to the brain to treat neurological diseases, including Parkinson’s disease. While this method has had varying success in clinical trials, standardized CED in vitro models are needed to develop CED techniques which improve the reliable distribution of therapeutic compounds. Many groups, including ours, have conducted model studies using agarose gel phantom mimics, which simulate the isotropic, porous environment of grey matter structures, such as the putamen. However, the composition of the gels is not defined in the literature. To gain insight into the dependence of the infusion pressure required, and the volume of distribution of compounds as a function of varying agarose gel strength, we infused safranin O dye into 0.6% agarose gels of tensile strengths of 500, 900 and 1200 g/cm2. Our results show that the volume of distribution and the infusion back pressure are dependent on agarose gel strength, suggesting this variable needs to be better defined for standardized in vitro mimics approximating CED delivery in the brain, which would minimize the use of costly and lengthy in vivo studies.

3.

GSK3b and Regulation of Alternative Splicing, Myelination, and Re-Myelination Meera Goyal, Enrico Castroflorio, Brantley Graham, Erming Wang, and Franca Cambi*

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 29


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA Department of Neurology, University of Kentucky We have examined the function of a kinase, known as Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK) 3b, in the regulation of PLP and myelin gene alternative splicing, and myelin protein expression in myelination and re-myelination. We have used two engineered mouse models, a novel conditional knockout (cko) of GSK3b in oligodendrocytes (OL) generated in our laboratory and an established knockin mouse (GSK3bKI) in which the GSK3b response to AKT inhibitory phosphorylation is abolished. Conditional loss of GSK3b and presence of a GSK3b insensitive to inhibition by AKT lead to greater splicing of PLP over DM20 and exclusion of MAG exon 12 in the developing white matter. The resulting protein isoforms are known to be important for axonal function and integrity. In the GSK3bKI, expression of myelin proteins is higher at the peak of myelination compared to controls, suggesting greater myelin formation. The data suggest that GSK3b selectively regulates MAG and PLP alternative splicing in early development and myelin formation later at peak of myelination. To examine the function of GSK3b in re-myelination, we have used a reversible de-myelination model induced with cuprizone. GSK3b was inactivated at the end of cuprizone treatment. Expression of myelin proteins, CNP and SIRT2 was lower, while PLP and MAG was similar in the GSK3b cko vs. control littermates one week after removal of cuprizone. Inactivation of GSK3b at the beginning of recovery selectively reduces expression of some myelin proteins. Staining for myelin in the corpus callosum is underway to determine whether there is a defect in re-myelination.

Biosciences

4.

A Non-Invasive System for High-Throughput Monitoring of Mouse Sleep and Other Behaviors

Martin Striz*(1,2), Mansi Sethi(2), Ting Zhang(2), Shreyas Joshi(2), S. Ryan Gooch(1,3), Farid Yaghoubi(4), Sridhar Sunderam(4),Kevin D. Donohue(1,3), Bruce F. O’Hara(1,2) 30

(1)Signal Solutions LLC; (2)Department of Biology, University of Kentucky; (3)Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky; (4)Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Kentucky Traditional methods of characterizing sleep and wake in rodents suffer from substantial limitations. EEG/EMG is invasive and time consuming, while wheel-running and other activity monitors do not distinguish sleep from low activity periods. We developed a noninvasive, high-throughput piezoelectric system that distinguishes sleep and wake in mice with high accuracy. A piezoelectric pad placed at the bottom of the mouse cage records gross body movements, while a computer classifier analyzes features of the signal and differentiates sleep from wake. Sleep signals are characterized by regular 3 Hz rhythms, as well as several other features, while wake signals exhibit variable amplitude and frequency. The classifier correlates 90-95% with EEG and human observation. This system has been used in a variety of studies, including genetic studies of sleep-related traits, and characterizing sleep in mouse models of traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We are expanding the system to identify other mouse behaviors. We performed human observation, as well as EEG and piezoelectric recordings, of C57BL/6J mice, the most common inbred strain used in biomedical research, and CFW mice, a common outbred strain. High correlation between all three methods in identifying sleep serves as a control to validate the effectiveness of human observation in identifying other behaviors. We then use human observation as a basis for identifying quiet wake, grooming, rearing, feeding, drinking, and locomotion. When these behaviors are identified, we isolate the piezoelectric signals from those time points and train the classifier to find features that reliably distinguish each behavioral domain. Distinguishing these behaviors through the piezoelectric system would improve our phenotyping and behavioral assessments in a wide variety of projects where our system is being used—including the analysis of mouse models of traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and genetic studies designed to find genes and alleles that influence these behavioral traits.

Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA

5.

Parameter Estimations of Sigmoidal Models of Cancer

Ferhan Atici*, Mustafa Atici*, and Ngoc Nguyen Departments of Mathematics and Computer Science, Western Kentucky University We introduce fractional sigmoidal curves of tumor growth and estimate their parameters to fit the data. We outline step by step approximation techniques to choose the appropriate exponential functions of discrete and continuous fractional calculus to replace the exponential function e^(-ct) in the existing models in continuous time. We use tumor growth data which were taken over consecutive seventeen days, for twenty eight mice. We use a statistical indicator, residual sum of squares, to compare models on fitting performance and cross validation method to compare models in terms of predictive performance. Estrus cycle stages of measurement are also taken into account when comparing the four models.

6.

Using mHealth to Aid Opioid Medication Adherence

Vesta Brue*(1), Michael Bailey(1), John Littleton(2), and Sharon Walsh(2) (1)Care Team Solutions, Lexington, Kentucky; (2)University of Kentucky Opiate-agonist pharmacotherapy utilizing buprenorphine/ naloxone (bup/nal) is known to decrease illicit opiate use. However, poor medication management and misuse during self-managed opioid substitution therapy (OST) constrains efficacy, while aggrandizing relapse, hospitalizations and mortality. Thus, one of the most inescapable challenges confronted by health care professionals treating opioid dependence (OD) is assuring medications are taken as prescribed to inhibit relapse. However, the ability of clinicians to monitor and promote adherence for self-managed pharmacotherapies such as OD maintenance therapy is challenging for a number of reasons including diversion, lack of motivational support to avoid opioids, and low patient health literacy. Providing patients and physicians an interactive technological system to objectively monitor and promote medication

adherence during OST and other pharmacotherapies represents a major unmet need in the field of substance use disorders. One mechanism by which adherence behavior motivation and intervention can occur is via mobile technology. We are developing an interactive smartphone/tablet application (APP) to engage and support patients and caregivers during OST. The APP is designed to promote adherent behavior, objectively assess adherence and provide timely intervention opportunities. We have identified five key intervention strategies to incorporate in development of the application to optimize health outcomes for OD patients: 1) tracking health information, 2) involving the healthcare team, 3) leveraging social influence, 4) increasing the accessibility of health information, and 5) utilizing entertainment. The APP will be customizable to other substance use disorders wherein self-managed therapy is necessary for an extended period of time, to aid other populations.

7.

Role of the Horse in Interspecies Transmission of Influenza Viruses

Thomas M. Chambers*, Stephanie E. Reedy, and Udeni B.R. Balasuriya Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center, Department of Veterinary Science, University of Kentucky We have conducted studies exploring the possible role of the horse in interspecies transmission of influenza viruses. As our first Specific Aim, we evaluated a hypothesis that horses are susceptible to avian influenza viruses by in vitro testing, using explanted equine tracheal epithelial cultures; and in vivo testing by aerosol inoculation of ponies. Results showed that several subtypes of avian influenza viruses detectably replicated in vitro. Three viruses with high in vitro replication competence were administered to ponies. None of the three demonstrably replicated or caused disease signs in ponies. As our second Specific Aim, we performed in vivo infection experiments on mini-pigs with the objective of determining whether swine were susceptible to infection with any of a set of mutant equine H3N8 influenza viruses bearing humanlike H3 hemagglutinin. Wild-type equine H3N8 and swine H3N2 viruses were used as controls. By realtime RT-PCR, virus-positive nasal swabs were produced

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 31


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA from at least 1 pig infected with each virus although quantitatively much reduced compared to wild type swine influenza. Histopathologically, all viruses except wild-type equine influenza produced moderate to severe tracheal inflammation. Only wild-type swine influenza virus induced fevers. We conclude that (1) different subtypes of avian influenza viruses may replicate in equine tracheal cells but are restricted from readily detectable replication in live equids; (2) the influenza viral hemagglutinin protein is not a major factor in the host restriction of equine influenza viruses, and the major viral factor remains unidentified.

8.

Plant-Based Expression of an Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Biosimilar

Elizabeth J. McConnell(1), Amanda Campbell(1), Junichi Inaba(1), Christopher P. Shidal(2), and Keith R. Davis*(1,2) (1)Owensboro Cancer Research Program; (2)Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and the James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is caused by mutations in the Serpina1 gene and can cause chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and liver cirrosis. AAT augmentation therapy has been approved by the FDA for affected individuals with COPD. The available augmentation products utilize AAT purified from human plasma and are expensive, costing up to $150,000 per year. The current reliance on human plasma-derived AAT is clearly suboptimal. The plasma-derived products can be variable in purity and specific activity and have the potential of being contaminated with infectious agents. Moreover, as more COPD patients are identified with AAT deficiency, it is likely that the increased supply of purified AAT required cannot be met via isolation from human plasma. Thus, there is a pressing need to develop a recombinant AAT (rAAT) product that can be produced in large quantities at a lower cost. We have developed a plant-based rAAT production system that utilizes TMV-based vectors and Nicotiana benthamiana as the production host. This system has the advantages of high expression levels, short production times (~2 weeks), easy scale up to meet increasing demands, and elimination of safety issues related to contamination with human pathogens. We have recently demonstrated that biologically active rAAT can be expressed in N. benthamiana 32

at ~0.5 g/kg fresh weight. This represents an expression level sufficient for potential commercial production. We are currently collaborating with Kentucky BioProcessing to develop a scalable purification method for our rAAT.

9.

Optical Sprayer Nozzle Flow Rate Sensor

Joseph Dvorak* and Luke Bryant Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Department; University of Kentucky This project embedded an optical cross correlation based sensor just above the nozzle of a sprayer to determine the flow rate from a single nozzle. The sensor provided the time delay of a change in optical properties between an upstream and a downstream location within the sensor. A regression model was created to relate this time delay to the flow rate through the nozzle. Testing compared this estimate from the sensor to the actual flow rate from the nozzle to assess the ability of this approach to estimate individual nozzle flow rate.

10.

Electrohydrodynamic Flows Generated Using a Nanoneedle

Kurtis E. Heacox*(1), Brigitte H. Fasciotto(2), Robert W. Cohn(2), and Stuart J. Williams(1,2) (1)Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Louisville; (2)ElectroOptics Research Institute and Nanotechnology Center, University of Louisville When a colloidal system is subjected to a non-uniform electric field several particle and fluid electrokinetics are induced including dielectrophoresis, electrothermal flow, and electro-osmosis. Sub-micrometer, three-dimensional electrodes generate greater electrokinetic forces compared to micrometer and/ or planar geometries. This poster numerically models and experimentally investigates several of these phenomena using an electrokinetic nanoneedle.

Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA

11.

A Multiple AntibioticResistant Enterobacter cloacae Strain Isolated from a Bioethanol Fermentation Facility

Qing Li*(1), Colin A. Murphree(1), E. Patrick Heist(2), and Luke A. Moe(1) (1)Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky; (2) Ferm Solutions Inc, Danville, KY Production of grain-based bioethanol in the United States has seen a sharp increase within the last decade, with production capacity increasing six-fold and the number of operating facilities increasing from 61 to 209. This growth has brought to the forefront issues with largescale production of bioethanol, especially issues with bacterial contamination of the yeast-based fermentation. Bacteria can outcompete yeast for the available sugars and nutrients, resulting in a process referred to as bacterial bloom. Bloom events can decimate a production facility, resulting in significant financial losses in addition to fermentor downtime for cleaning and repairs. Prophylactic addition of antibiotics to fermentors has been used with some success to minimize bacterial growth in the large (often 500,000 gallon or more) vessels. However, antibiotic resistance has been noted among the most common bacterial contaminants of the Gram positive lactic acid bacteria. Despite the fact that the majority of bacteria isolated from fermentors are Gram positive, certain Gram negative bacteria have been identified as well. Here we describe identification of a multiple antibiotic resistant Gram negative Enterobacter cloacae strain and characterization of the mechanisms used to persist in a fermentation vessel under conditions of antibiotic stress and ethanol stress. While members of the E. cloacae complex are near ubiquitous (e.g. found associated with plants, in soil, and in animal gastrointestinal tracts), they are also noteworthy as opportunistic pathogens involved in hospital-acquired infections.

12.

Mechanisms Involved in Scar Tissue Contraction on the Retinal Surface

LanHsin Liu*, Rintaro Tsukahara, Kazuhiko Umazume, and Shigeo Tamiya

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Louisville Scarring is caused by persistent and/or deregulated response to wounding. The excessive fibrous connective tissue that forms upon scarring disrupts normal tissue structure and function resulting in organ dysfunction. Aberrant wound healing response following trauma to the posterior segment of the eye can lead to scarring on the retinal surface and loss of vision. Past studies, including our own, have demonstrated that contraction of this scar tissue plays a critical role in traction retinal detachment, the debilitating complication that results in loss of vision. In this study, we have modified existing assays to develop an in vitro collagen gel contraction model that mimics the situation within the eye. In this model, formation of multilayered cellular complex, similar to dense scar tissue that forms during retinal scarring, was associated with extensive contraction. Examination of the molecules/ signaling pathways involved revealed that the pro-fibrotic molecule transforming growth factor-beta induced multilayering of cells and significantly increased matrix contraction. In addition, beta-catenin signaling plays a key role as inhibitors of this pathway prevented cellular multilayering and significantly reduced matrix contraction. To summarize, we have successfully mimicked scar tissue contraction that occurs on the retinal surface using an in vitro model. Data obtained using this model have identified beta-catenin signaling pathway, in addition to transforming growth factor-beta, as a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of this blinding complication.

13.

Development of Viral Based Gene Delivery for Conditional Ablation of Specific Brain Peptidergic Neurons

Ali Al-Magableh* and Robert Lundy Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine Learning plays a crucial role in the establishment and strengthening of food preference and we hypothesize that specific limbic system neuropeptide pathways play an important role. Identifying neural mechanisms that mediate affective aspects of taste perception will further our understanding of how the brain controls eating and

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 33


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA overeating. We have identified two neuropeptides, corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) and somatostatin (Sst), which are expressed in limbic system neurons that project to a hindbrain neural substrate critical for establishment of gustatory hedonic value; the pontine parabrachial nucleus. Our goal is to develop a viral construct capable of directing conditional expression of nitroreductase gene (NTR) to Sst and CRF cell populations in the limbic system of mice using a cre/lox system. Thus, specific peptide producing neurons can be rapidly ablated in isolation following treatment with the prodrug CB1954 allowing assessment of their role in central taste processing and taste-guided behaviors. In vitro cell culture of HEK293 cells combined with FLOW cytometric analysis indicate that we can conditionally express NTR, which causes cell death in the presence of CB1954.

14.

A Systematic Investigation of Structures and Stabilities of Lyophilized Formulations Using Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

Matthew J. Nethercott*(1), Donia Arthur(1), and Eric Munson(1) (1)Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kentucky PURPOSE: To determine structure and stability of drugs and excipients in lyophilized formulations using solidstate NMR spectroscopy. METHODS: Three compounds were used in this study, gabapentin, aspartame, and insulin. Gabapentin was studied using natural abundance 13C whereas aspartame and insulin required selective 13C/15N isotopic enrichment. Gabapentin was prepared at concentrations of 2, 4, and 8mg/mL and lyophilized. Three lyophilization cycles were designed to test the effect of freezing, drying times and temperatures on the formulations as determined by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. 13C solid-state NMR experiments were used to identify forms produced by lyophilization. RESULTS: There are four known forms of gabapentin, Form I, Form II, Form III, and an isomorphous desolvate. The lyophilized samples of gabapentin resulted in primarily an isomorphous desolvate form being produced with Forms I and III also present. Solid-state NMR identified that at 2mg/mL forms I and III were present in greater percentage than at 8mg/mL. The solid-state NMR results 34

identified a possible new form of gabapentin, which has not previously been reported based on the 13C chemical shifts. Isotopically labeled aspartame has been synthesized from the 15N aspartic acid and 13C phenylalanine using the Thermolysin enzymatic reaction. CONCLUSIONS: Solid-state NMR was used to identify the structure of gabapentin formulations after lyophilization. Three forms including the presence of Forms I and III and a possible new form of gabapentin were present in the lyophilized product. Synthesis of 13C/15N aspartame will be used to determine structures of lyophilized protein formulations using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

15.

Baculovirus Expressed Cypovirus Polyhedrin Used for Protein Packaging

J. E. Noland*, J. Deacutis, P. Houtz, and B.A. Webb Department of Entomology, University of Kentucky Polyhedrin is a protein that incorporates virions into a matrix that allows for the virus to persist in the environment for an extended period of time. Polyhedrin has evolved independently in both insect RNA and DNA viruses. Cypoviruses (Reoviridae) are segmented dsRNA viruses that infect primarily insects where they are known to cause minor, non-lethal infections in the guts of lepidopterans that result in delayed growth and some mortality in severe infections. However, cypoviruses have not been studied in most lepidopteran systems (the exception being Bombyx mori) due to insignificant pathology and in particular has not been investigated in the context of impacts of CPV infection on parasitic wasps having infected lepidopteran hosts. We recently discovered a new cypovirus, the Heliothis virescens Cypovirus 5 (HvCPV5贸wild type virus) in both the wasp and the parasitized lepidopteran host as well as a mutant of this virus (HvCPV5dm) which has provided a unique opportunity to study protein expression and packaging of various compounds. Baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS) have previously studied cypovirus polyhedrin expression for packaging of several compounds, but only provides information on wild type species. In our system, mutant polyhedrin expression is 30 fold greater compared to the wild type, which can allow for packaging Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA of a wider array of compounds that are otherwise limited by the wild type polyhedrin. Using this novel virus, we intend to study the packaging dynamics of the mutant protein using the BEVS technology to produce a delivery system capable of controlling insect pest populations.

16.

Ligand Binding Free Energy of Glycoside Hydrolases as a Metric for Processivity and Polysaccharide Morphology Dependence

Christina M. Payne*(1), Wei Jiang(2), Michael E. Himmel(3), Michael F. Crowley(3), and Gregg T. Beckham(4) (1)Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky; (2) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL; (3)Biosciences Center; and 4 National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Many glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes act via a processive mechanism whereby an individual carbohydrate polymer chain is decrystallized and hydrolyzed along the chain without substrate dissociation. Despite considerable structural and biochemical studies, a molecular-level theory of processivity that relates directly to structural features of GH enzymes does not exist. Here, we hypothesize that the degree of processivity is directly linked to the ability of an enzyme to decrystallize a polymer chain from a crystal, quantified by the binding free energy of the enzyme to the cello-oligosaccharide. We develop a simple mathematical relationship formalizing this hypothesis to quantitatively explain the thermodynamics of processivity. We then calculate the absolute ligand binding free energy of cellulose chains to the biologically and industrially important GH Family 7 processive cellulases with free energy perturbation/replica-exchange molecular dynamics. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide additional insight into the contributions of enzyme structural features to binding free energy. Taken with previous observations, our results suggest that degree of processivity is directly correlated to the binding free energy of cellooligosaccharide ligands to GH7s. The binding free energies also suggest polymer morphologies susceptible to enzyme

action when compared to the work required to decrystallize cellulose chains. We conclude that the ligand binding free energy is a key parameter in comparing the activity and function of GHs and may offer a molecular-level basis towards a general theory of carbohydrate processivity in GHs and other enzymes able to process linear carbohydrate polymers such as cellulose and chitin synthases.

17.

Female Personality Depends on Body Size and Reproductive State in the Invasive Western Mosquitofish

Claire Hemingway(1), Sarah Schaeffer(2), and Craig Sargent*(3) (1)Department of Biology, St. Edward’s University, Austin TX; (2)Lafayette High School, Lexington KY; (3)Department of Biology, University of Kentucky The western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) is one of the top 100 invasive species worldwide. Native to North America, this fish has been expanding its range naturally up the Mississippi River drainage. They are native to western Kentucky, and over the last 50 years have expanded their range eastward throughout the entire Commonwealth. We study the ecological and social determinants of microhabitat choice, dispersal and range expansion in this species. Predation, body size, sexual conflict, and personality of the focal fish and its shoal mates are all known to affect microhabitat choice and dispersal in this species. This summer we focused on the interaction between personality and body size. Personality in animal behavior is a multivariate behavioral phenotype that consists of repeatable individual behaviors (e.g. shoaling, predator inspection), and is thought to be fixed over an individual’s lifetime. We found, however, that female personality is plastic rather than fixed. Larger females are less likely to shoal and more likely to inspect predators than smaller females. Females about to give birth are also less likely to shoal and more likely to inspect predators than are females earlier in their reproductive cycle. These results suggest that female personality changes as she grows, and with stage of her reproductive cycle. We also examined these fish in social groups. Both predation and sexual conflict disrupt female social networks and

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 35


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA result in smaller shoals. Predator inspection in solitary trials positively correlates with predator inspection and negatively correlates with shoal size in social groups.

18.

Turning Moss into Algae: Loss of Cell Adhesion and Differentiation in PrenylationDeficient Physcomitrella patens

Julie M. Thole(1), Pierre-Francois Perroud(1), Ralph S. Quatrano(1), and Mark P. Running*(2) (1)Washington University in Saint Louis; (2)University of Louisville During early plant evolution, the emergence of specialized cell types facilitated the colonization of land by allowing cells to serve separate roles in anchoring, nutrient uptake, adventitious spreading, photosynthesis, and reproduction. The moss Physcomitrella patens is an excellent model system for understanding how developmental and physiological processes aided the transition to terrestrial environments. Studies in Arabidopsis have shown that prenylation, a key posttranslational modification of many signaling molecules, regulates cell differentiation, cell polarity, and abscisic acid responses, all of which play significant roles in moss. We used gene replacement to generate prenylation knockout mutants in P. patens. Mutations in the genes orthologous to Arabidopsis PLP and GGB lack cell polarity, fail to elongate or form filaments, and fail to adhere to each other, while mutants of the gene orthologous to Arabidopsis ERA1 have reduced cell elongation but still organize into filaments. In addition, mutations in the ggb gene may cause an enhanced response to ABA. Microscopy examination and cell wall markers indicate that P. patens ggb mutants fail to show signs of differentiation, with each cell retaining a pluripotent state. Our studies also indicate that prenylation enzyme specificity is more stringent in P. patens and is more similar to that found in animals and yeast. Investigation of the role of prenylation target proteins should yield clues into several key developmental processes in P. patens.

19.

A Dynamic Systems Approach to Understanding Human Learning

T. Michael Seigler, Xingye Zhang*, and Jesse B. Hoagg Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kentucky The human learning process possesses capabilities that are not present in current automatic control methods. However, the control strategies that humans learn and the processes used to learn them are currently unknown. Human motor control has been studied in the neuroscience community for over 30 years with the objective of determining how the central nervous system directs motion. The predominant neuroscience theory is the internal model hypothesis, which proposes that the CNS constructs models of the body and its interactions with the physical world, and that these models are used for control. The objective of this research is to understand how humans learn to interact with unknown dynamic systems. The motivation for this research is to advance understanding of human learning and control processes, with specific focus on identifying those beneficial human learning mechanisms that are not present in automatic control methods. We conducted a series of experiments, which involve human test subjects, to capture learning response data. The learning response data was used to identify each subject’s control strategy. Our research to date indicates that humans use approximate feedforward plant model inversion for command following. We believe that these findings provide the strongest evidence to date in support of the internal model hypothesis, which proposes that humans learn to control unknown dynamic systems by learning the plant.

20.

Autophagy in the Parasitic Protozoan Toxoplasma gondii: Development of Tools to Study a “Life And Death� Pathway

Animesh Dhara*, Debasish Ghosh, and Anthony P. Sinai Department of Microbiology Immunology and Molecular Genetics, University

36

Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA of Kentucky College of Medicine The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes severe disease in immune suppressed individual. The need for new classes of drugs is acute. Our recent description of autophagy as a cell death pathway in Toxoplasma has demonstrated that nutrient limitation results in a specific effect leading to the degradation of the mitochondrion and parasite death. In order to characterize the mechanism leading to mitochondrial breakdown we have adapted a yeast autophagy reporter system termed Rosella targeted to the parasite mitochondrion will allow for both the tracking of mitophagy and the development of a high thruput platform to screen for drugs. Our attention has also focused on the implementation and adaptation of tools to tag specific genes to inform on localization (GFP, HA, Myc), spatio-temporal distribution (CLIP and SNAP tags), binding partners and complexes (BioID, APEX) of key parasite proteins in the autophagy pathway. In addition we have implemented systems to target essential genes by the generation of conditional mutants (DD-domain, Tet and Cre-lox based genome deletion). Autophagy must be under tight regulatory control given that unchecked autophagy leads to parasite death. One of the candidate mechanisms is encoded by the OUT-family of deubiquitinases which target ATG8. The characterization the TgOTU gene family provides new insights into the regulation of autophagy in this and other related parasites, providing a new target for investigation. Support provided by the KSEF2624-015 award has generated preliminary data for least 2 NIH grants focused on the role of autophagy in promoting both parasite growth and death respectively.

21.

Non-surgical Uterine Transfer Technique for Mouse Embryos Or Sperm

Barbara Stone, PhD* ParaTechs Corporation Many procedures used for assisted reproductive techniques can be damaging to the integrity of embryos. Therefore, we chose to determine if embryos could be successfully transferred with non-surgical methods after cryopreservation, in vitro fertilization (IVF), or embryonic stem (ES) cell injection as an alternative to traditional surgical embryo transfer. The non-surgical embryo transfer or NSET technique requires the use of a device

that has a tapered Teflon catheter capable of precise liquid delivery. Once embryos are loaded into the device, the catheter passes through the vagina and traverses the cervix to deposit embryos into the uterine horn of a recipient mouse. The NSET technique was used to transfer cryopreserved embryos to female CD-1 recipients with a birth rate of 39.4%. Embryos generated from IVF resulted in a birth rate of 43.3%. The birth rate from NSET transfers of ES cell-injected blastocysts was 30.5%. These results indicate that the non-surgical transfer of blastocysts is effective for transfer after embryo manipulations and cell culture. We also hypothesized that the non-surgical transfer technique could be used for delivery of sperm for artificial insemination. Fresh sperm transferred to the uterine horn of CD-1 females resulted in live births and a 36% pregnancy rate. The non-surgical transfer technique for embryos or sperm is fast, does not require anesthesia or analgesia, and post-procedure recovery is not necessary. These results provide proof that the technique successfully produces live pups after transfer of 1) embryos after cryopreservation, IVF, or ES-cell injection, and 2) sperm during artificial insemination.

22.

A Novel Technology to Display Exogenous FASL Protein with Potent Apoptotic Activity on Pancreatic Islets to Achieve Transplantation Tolerance

Esma S. Yolcu*, Hong Zhao, and Haval Shirwan Institute for Cellular Therapeutics and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville Fas/FasL-induced apoptosis is critical to lymphocyte development, immune homeostasis, and tolerance to self-antigens. Therefore, FasL has been used as an apoptotic molecule to eliminate alloreactive lymphocytes for the induction of tolerance to allografts with conflicting observations. In the majority of these studies, FasL was expressed ectopically in cells or tissues of interest using conventional gene transfer approaches, which have various complications and safety being the most important one. Therefore, we have developed an alternative approach to the gene therapy called ProtEx™ that involves i) the

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 37


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA generation of chimeric immunological ligands with a modified form of streptavidin, ii) modification of cell membrane with biotin, iii) the display of chimeric proteins on biotinylated cells or tissues for immunomodulation to treat diseases. We have generated a chimeric Fas ligand molecule (SA-FasL) and used this molecule as an immunomodulator to engineer pancreatic islets for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. BALB/c pancreatic islets were engineered with SA-FasL protein and transplanted into streptozotocin diabetic C57BL/6 mice under a transient cover of rapamycin. Unmodified islets or those engineered with SA protein served as controls. All islets showed effective engineering with SA-FasL and survived in the allogeneic hosts over the observation period of 100-400 days without detectable signs of rejection or toxicity. In contrast, all control islets underwent acute rejection within 40 days. This study provides strong proofof-feasibility and efficacy data for ProtEx™ technology as a novel, practical, and safe alternative to gene therapy for the induction of transplantation tolerance to allogeneic islets with significant clinical potentia

Environmental and Energy Technologies

23.

A Game Theoretical Approach to Energy Consumption Scheduling Under Smart Grid

Lihui Bai*, Michael L. McIntyre, and Hongxiang Li University of Louisville The department of energy estimates residential buildings accounted for 22% of U.S. energy consumption in 2008. Thus, energy consumption management in residential buildings becomes a pressing issue. On the other hand, load shifting, e.g., shifting high-load appliances to off-peak hours, has been proposed for demand side management (DSM) since 1980s. Recently, in the advent of smart grid, DSM has gained growing attention. One key component in load shifting is to provide appropriate incentives, so that when residents respond to incentives rationally, the load shifting is realized, thus avoiding expensive ancillary services to meet peak demands. In the literature, many use game theoretical approaches to 38

describe residents’ behavior in determining their energy consumption scheduling (ECS). However, most assume cost is the only consideration for users to determine when to use appliances, thus the only consideration in devising incentive schemes. This is unrealistic because not all people value these monetary incentives equally and some people may use electricity despite higher costs if they feel strongly about the inconvenience caused by cost-saving based arrangements. Thus, this project considers payoffs consisting of two parts: the disutility of the total cost, and the utility of using appliances within preferred time windows. Hence, the proposed model studies consumers’ behavior of maximizing their payoffs in determining an optimal ECS, giving considerations to real-time pricing, control dynamics and secure data exchange in a smart grid. If successful, the model will provide a tool for utilities to evaluate the efficiency of various incentive schemes for demand response.

24.

Turbulence Measurement Using a Nanoscale Thermal Anemometry Probe

Sean Bailey*(1), John Mullen(1), Marcus Hultmark(2), Margit Vallikivi(2), and Alexander Smits(2) (1)Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kentucky, (2) Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University Measurements of the streamwise component of the turbulent fluctuations in fully-developed smooth and rough pipe flow are presented over an unprecedented Reynolds number range. These measurements were made possible through the development of a new nanoscale thermal anemometry probe (NSTAP), combined with a unique pressurized air flow facility. The NSTAP has a sensing volume 60 microns x 2 microns x 800 nanometers, resulting in unprecedented spatial resolution and thereby minimizing the impact of spatial filtering on the measurements. It is believed that spatial filtering has contaminated all prior measurements of turbulent wallbounded flows at high Reynolds numbers. The results from these investigations have lead to many new insights on the Reynolds number scaling of wall-bounded turbulence including previously unknown universal scaling behavior Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA for the turbulent velocity fluctuations, which is remarkably similar to the well-known scaling behavior of the mean velocity distribution; the robustness of very large scale motions in the turbulence spectra; and a robust estimate of the value of the von Karman constant in the mean flow.

25.

Environmental Sustainability of Streams Using TRANSFER

William Ford(1), Jimmy Fox*(1), Carmen Agouridis(2), and Gail Brion(1) (1)Civil Engineering, University of Kentucky; (2)Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, University of Kentucky Agricultural nitrogen sources from small streams account for more than 70% of the nitrogen delivered to the Gulf of Mexico, however an accurate model that can be used to make nitrogen management and watershed restoration decisions in small agriculturally-impacted streams does not exist. Through our unique collaboration, we are developing numerical model software called TRANSFER (Technology for estimating Removable Annual Nitrogen by Sediments For Ecosystem Restoration.) TRANSFER estimates net annual nitrogen yield and net annual nitrogen removal by sediments in agriculturallyimpacted streams by simulating the nitrogen, carbon, phosphorous, sediment transport and nitrogen stable isotopes cycles. The end goal of our research is that TRANSFER will be useful for stream and watershed restoration practitioners. Our TRANSFER research project includes numerical modeling, field data collection, model uncertainty analyses and statistical hypothesis testing. Our research results so far show the ability of stables isotopes to help calibrate the modeling tool and constrain uncertainty. The project deliverables are a theoretical model framework, a numerical model executable code, an uncertainty analysis algorithm, and a field dataset. We bring a well-positioned research team with experience in sediment, carbon and nitrogen modeling and data collection in streams and strong industry knowledge to rapidly develop this significant scientific and engineering support tool in environmental sustainability.

26.

Investigation of the Impact on the NearWall Flow Field by Combined Roughness and Blowing Effects

Jacob Helvey*, Mark Miller, Alexandre Martin, and Sean Bailey Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kentucky A turbulent channel flow facility was used to study the scaling of the combined effects of roughness and flow injection on the mean flow and turbulence characteristics of turbulent plane Poiseuille flow. Two surfaces were investigated, a sinusoidal regular roughness pattern and a fibrous surface analogous to the surface of carbon-fiberbased ablative thermal protection systems. It was found that the additional momentum injection through the surface enhanced the roughness effects and, for the mean flow, the effect of blowing was indistinguishable from that of increased roughness. This analogy broke down for the turbulence statistics in that the addition of blowing resulted in behavior which did not follow that predicted by Townsend’s hypothesis. Instead, the outer-scaled Reynolds stress was found to deviate from that for the rough-walled boundary condition without blowing well into the outer layer. It was found that this deviation from the expected Reynolds stress scaling behavior was caused by the suppression of kinetic energy content associated with large-scale motions. This work was supported by a NASA Office of the Chief Technologist’s Space Technology Research Fellowship (grant number NNX12AN20H) and by Commonwealth of Kentucky funding in association with a NASA EPSCoR award (grant number NNX10AV39A).

27.

Advanced Real-Time Modeling: Software for River Quality Predictions and Drinking Water Distribution System Management

Sudhir Kshirsagar(1), Saurabh Gupta*(1), Benjamin Bedinghaus(1), and Ben Chenevey(2) (1) Global Quality Corp. [GQC]; (2)iITbiz LLC Real-time environmental sensor data can be leveraged to

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 39


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA provide unique benefits to communities and to utilities. The first application was created to provide guidance for recreation activities on the Ohio River, and the second application was created for water utilities that need a toolset to reduce energy costs and pinpoint leaks while maintaining water quality. Global Quality Corp. (GQC) was engaged by Metropolitan Sewer District of Greater Cincinnati (MSDGC) and its partners, the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), and Sanitation District No. 1 of Northern Kentucky (SD1), to develop a recreational management toolset consisting of a mobile application (Recr8OhioRiver) and a website (Recr8OhioRiver.org) to help recreational users such as boaters, paddlers, swimmers, jet skiers, and fishermen make informed decisions about where and when to recreate on the Ohio River. The toolset focuses on water quality (E. coli levels), hydrology and other ambient conditions. The E. coli levels are based on a predictive model that was developed using artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. GQC was also awarded an SBIR grant by the U.S. Army and a matching grant by the State of Kentucky to develop advanced drinking water distribution system modeling technology that leverages real-time hydraulic and water quality data. The resulting software, HydroTrek, provides capabilities for optimizing energy usage, reducing leaks and sustaining water quality.

28.

Technology to Deconstructing Lignocellulosic Biomass for Biofuel Production

Dipak K Sahoo* and Indu B. Maiti KTRDC, College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky Lignocellulosic biomass, from plant cell walls has the advantage as a biofuel feedstock due to its abundance and high production rate. However, the use of lignocellulosic biomass for saccharification is limited mainly due to recalcitrant of plant cell walls. It has been demonstrated that, in Arabidopsis, the point mutation in the CESA3 cellulose synthase gene, named ixr1-2, results in greater conversion of plant biomass to fermentable sugar. OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to establish translational capacity and show that a mutated CESA3ixr1-2 from Arabidopsis could be functionally expressed in tobacco and results in improved enzymatic 40

saccharification efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: We have successfully demonstrated in model transgenic tobacco that over expression of a construct M24 promoter::GFP- CESA3ixr1-2 resulted in lower acid insoluble glucose and an irregular lignin deposition pattern as compared with wild type indicating disturbance of secondary cell wall biosynthetic patterns. During enzymatic saccharification, we measure 45% and 26% more sugar was released from transgenic leaf and stem samples respectively when compared to the wild type samples. Such gain in saccharification was achieved without chemical or heat pretreatment. Additionally, leaf and stem biomass from transgenic AtCESA3ixr1-2 needs less amount of enzyme compared to wild-type plant biomass for saccharification. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of AtCESA3ixr1-2 in tobacco resulted in cellulose that was more prone to enzymatic digestion. From a practical viewpoint, a similar strategy could be employed to translate mutated CESA into energy crops like poplar and switch grass to improve the efficiency of biomass conversion.

29.

Sustainability Infrastructure Connection of Rural to Urban

Tyra Oldham* LAND sds The research is on the application sustainability infrastructure through the interconnectivity of ruralization and urbanization to produce sustainability. A state’s infrastructure is connected by the identification of its city’s ecosystems, environment, resources and technologies to support economic growth, socioeconomic development, educational gaps, social injustice and intelligences required to produce sustainability. The study reviews how the lack of connectivity between rural cites and urban centers cause instability and lower state performance. It highlights lack of synthesis in states that are in danger of less economically disadvantaged centers in part but collectively have an effect on new energy adoption, technological growth and global competitiveness, as well as the agility to manage changing energy and resource prices. The attention to income groups and the city’s financial rating is influential to economic development, infrastructural changes by the ability to acquiring capital for expansion and the attraction of new workers/residents Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA that bring innovation. The paper concludes by identifying the advantages for cities to assess their ecosystems and the importance of its performance on state-wide sustainability.

30.

Interfacial Engineering of Biomass Saccharification by T. Reesei Enzymes

Stephen E. Rankin*(1), Ravinder Garlapalli(1), Hsin-Fen Li(1), Barbara L. Knutson(1), and Sue E. Nokes(2) (1)Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky; (2) Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Department, University of Kentucky Three types of model cellulose films (MCFs) are prepared by dissolution and spin coating procedures. The first (type II) is prepared by dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose into hydrated N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO) at high temperature followed by thinning with dimethylsulfoxide and spin coating. The solid substrates are coated using a poly(ethylene imine) adhesion layer. The second type of film (type I) is prepared by dissolving microcrystalline cellulose in concentrated sulfuric acid to create a colloidal “nanocrystalline� cellulose solution which is subsequently cast onto films. The third type of film (amorphous) is prepared by dissolution of cellulose in dimethylacetamide with stabilization by lithium chloride, and results in uniform amorphous MCFs. Model lignin films are also prepared by spin coating Krafft lignin dissolved in ammonia. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-d) studies reveal a 4-stage hydrolysis process due to the competition between mass increase upon cellulase binding and mass loss due to cellulose hydrolysis. A new modified enzyme kinetics model is developed to describe the entire kinetic curve. By changing process parameters, evidence is found that (1) T. reesei cellulase hydrolysis activity is inhibited by the presence of 5 g/L of cellobiose, (2) hydrolysis activity decreases with cellulose density on the surface, and (3) hydrolysis activity depends model cellulose film type, with type I nanocrystalline films showing least and amorphous films the most activity. The effects of the nonionic surfactant Tween-80 on the binding and hydrolysis of cellulase derived

from T. reesei are shown to be consistent with reducing nonproductive binding with lignocellulosic biomass.

Materials Science and Advanced Manufacturing

31.

Friction, Adhesion, and Elasticity of Graphene Edges

D. Patrick Hunley(1), Tyler J. Flynn(1), Tom Dodson(1), Abhishek Sundararajan(1), Mathias J. Boland*(1), and Douglas R. Strachan(1) (1)Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky Graphene has tremendous potential to be used in a wide range of applications owing to its incredible mechanical, thermal, and electronic properties. The structural properties of graphene edges are expected to play an important role in electrical and thermal transport, particularly as the dimensions of graphene elements are reduced to the nanoscale. Although recent investigations of the mechanical properties of bulk graphene have demonstrated its tremendous strength and low friction, such characteristics have been relatively unexplored in the vicinity of its edges. We report frictional, adhesive, and elastic characteristics of graphene edges through lateral force microscopy (LFM). Measurements reveal a significant local frictional increase at exposed graphene edges, whereas a single overlapping layer of graphene removes this local frictional increase. This result indicates graphene could be an ideal, atomically thin coating for reducing local friction associated with atomic steps, while maintaining the overall atomic-scale surface topography. Comparison of lateral force and atomic force microscopy measurements shows that local forces on the probe are successfully modeled with a vertical adhesion in the vicinity of the atomic-scale graphene steps. Lateral force microscopy performed with carefully maintained probes shows evidence of reversible elastic straining of graphene edges. Estimates of the strain energy are consistent with out-of-plane bending of graphene edges when sharp LFM tips are dragged into them. The ability to locally strain graphene edges provides a possible route form reversibly tuning the electronic properties of graphene.

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 41


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA

32.

Nanostructured Self-Assembly and Characterization of Ultra-Low Force Sensing and Disposable Nanomechanical Sensors

J.M. Rathfon(1), M. Yan(2), J-F Berret(2), and Robert W. Cohn*(1) (1)University of Louisville; (2) Universite Paris-Diderot The purpose of this KSEF project is to develop specific preliminary data that will markedly enhance planned proposals to NSF, NIH, and Department of Energy. To date we have performed preliminary demonstrations of making ultraflexible nanomechanical “bead-on-a-string” (BOS) nanostructures through a fluid mechanically driven type of self-assembly, and we already have preliminary measurements showing that these structures are sensitive to forces as low as 10 piconewton (pN). Significantly, slight modifications to the length to diameter ratio of the structures can extend the sensitivity to 1 pN (and below) - making it more sensitive to force than the highest sensitivity commercial atomic force microscopes (AFM). These low levels correspond to the forces exerted by protein and flagellar motors, and by growth of single actin filaments, as well as bonding forces of single DNA nucleotides, hydrogen and other chemical bonds. The envisioned sensor also appears to be less costly and easier to use than AFMs, and compared to the disposable sensor probe used in AFMs, it appears to be mass producible at even faster rates and lower costs than the AFM probes. The project is currently staffed by two PhD students on fellowships and a grant supported postdoctoral scientist.

33.

Influence Of SrTiO3 Surface Preparation Methods on the Transport Properties of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces

J. G. Connell*(1), O.B. Korneta(1), J. Nichols(1), and S.S.A. Seo(1) (1)Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces are known to display various 42

intriguing properties such as metallic, insulating, superconducting, and magnetic properties at low temperatures depending on their growth conditions. Here we show that the transport properties of the interfaces are also affected by substrate surface-preparation methods. Using our deionized-water leaching method and the commonly-used buffered hydrofluoric acid (BHF)-etching method, we have prepared atomically-flat, TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 (001) substrates. We have then grown epitaxial LaAlO3 thin-films of various thicknesses using pulsed laser deposition. Electrical transport measurements show that the surface preparation has little effect on the transport properties of metallic samples with ns > 10^14 cm-2. However, less metallic samples with ns < 10^13 cm-2 show clear changes in their transport properties depending on the chemical etching methods. Our results suggest that the substrate preparation method is critical to the interfacial-transport properties.

34.

Thin Film Growth and Characterization of the Strongly Correlated, Spin-Orbit Coupled Perovskite Phase of SrIrO3

J.H. Gruenewald*, J. Terzic, G. Cao, and S.S.A. Seo Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky The unusual electronic and magnetic properties exhibited by 5d transition metal oxides are quite distinct from those exhibited by 3d transition metal oxides and other materials used in device applications. We specifically have investigated strontium iridate SrIrO3, which exhibits a correlated metallic state due to the strong interplay between spin orbit coupling and on site electron-electron repulsion. These compounds are thought to be candidates for novel topologically protected electronic states, termed topological insulators. The orthorhombic perovskite phase in bulk crystals can only be fabricated at high pressures and temperatures (~5 GPa and ~1000 ∞C, respectively); however, the desired phase can be synthesized as an ultrathin film and stabilized at ambient temperatures and pressures by depositing polycrystalline SrIrO3 onto closely lattice-matched substrate materials. The orthorhombic perovskite phase of SrIrO3 is synthesized using our custom-designed pulsed laser deposition system. The Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA films are of good crystalline and stoichiometric quality as measured by x-ray diffraction measurements and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy measurements. The films are measured to be in a metallic state down to 2K by a physical properties measurement system. The potential effects of biaxial lattice strain, as imposed by various lattice-mismatched substrates, on the electronic structure is also discussed. The progress of this research is promising for the development and understanding of novel device applications utilizing the unique electronic properties of this and other related compounds.

35.

Correlated Catalytic Etching and Parallel Bilayer Graphene Nanoribbons

D. Patrick Hunley*(1), Abhishek Sundararajan(1), Tom Dodson(1), Stephen L. Johnson(1), and Douglas R. Strachan(1) (1)Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky One of the greatest challenges in developing nanoelectronics is controlling their fabrication with atomic precision. Graphene is an exciting new 2-dimensional carbon material with numerous fascinating fundamental properties. Due to its incredible mechanical, thermal and electronic properties, graphene has tremendous potential for use in a wide range of applications. While graphene typically does not have a band gap, lateral confinement in graphene, such as in nanoribbons, can induce one. And in these cases where the dimensions of graphene elements are reduced to the nanoscale, the atomic structure of graphene edges is expected to play an important role in its electrical and thermal transport. Catalytic etching of graphene shows promise in constructing graphene edges along specific crystallographic orientations and with an atomically precise edge structure. By selecting parameters that facilitate and promote short range ordering during the etching of graphene, this method could have significant relevance to the emerging field of graphene nanoribbons and other electrical elements by producing atomically precise edges. We will present our recent experiments and simulations on the catalytic etching of graphene, and discuss the short-range and long-range order found in these interesting systems. The

short-range order can lead to multiple parallel graphene nanoribbons oriented along the same crystallographic directions in bi-layer graphene. The typical nanoribbons produced during correlated etching are several hundred nanometers in length and approximately 10 nm (or less) in width. We use electrostatic force microscopy to probe and determine the properties of the resulting electrically isolated regions of these etched graphene nanostructures.

36.

Imprinting the Surface of Stöber Silica Nanoparticles with Surfactants to Create Selective Saccharide Adsorbent Materials

Suvid Joshi*(1), Alex Rao(2), Alicia Modenbach(3), Hans Joachim Lehmler(4), Barbara L. Knutson(1), and Stephen E Rankin(1) (1)Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky; (2) Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA; (3)Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, University of Kentucky; (4)Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA The synthesis of silica particles by precipitation of silica precursor in ammonia-containing aqueous ethanol solutions (the Stöber process) was reported four decades ago. The resulting particles have led to many modifications and applications in adsorption, chromatography and sensing. Recent investigations in our group have shown that if surfactants are added to the synthesis solution at the time of precipitation of silica particles, it is possible to directly imprint their surface with adsorption sites selective for particular carbohydrate molecules. This imprinting process is expected to be inexpensive, scalable and versatile. Here, we summarize work done in our lab in which the Stöber particle surface is imprinted by using mixtures of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and n-octyl-fl-D-glucopyranoside (C8G1) to target enhanced selective adsorption of D-glucose. The effect of imprinting on carbohydrate adsorption will be compared between non-imprinted particles and imprinted particles. The surface imprinting hypothesis will be shown to be valid by showing that adding surfactants immediately after

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 43


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA particle formation (indicated by turbidity of the synthesis solutions) leads to enhanced adsorption of target molecule (D-glucose). Characterization using nitrogen adsorption and SEM will show that this enhancement in adsorption is not due to the introduction of porosity, but instead is consistent with surface imprinting. Comparison of adsorption of saccharides onto the particles, as measured by depletion with ATR-FTIR or HPLC analysis, will show the selectivity of this process. Particles imprinted using a 1:1 mixture of CTAB and C8G1 provide significantly enhanced adsorption of D-glucose, compared with no enhancement of D-xylose or L-glucose adsorption, and slightly enhanced adsorption of carbohydrates with subtle chiral differences with glucose (such as galactose). The generality and versatility of this approach will be demonstrated by showing that particles using a 1:1 mixture of CTAB and n-octyl-fl-D-xylopyranoside (C8X1) exhibit selectively enhanced adsorption of D-xylose over D-glucose.

37.

Machine Vision for Precision Dairy Farming

Anthony N. Shelley*(1), Daniel L. Lau(1), Amanda E. Sterrett(2), and Jeffrey M. Bewley(2) (1)Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky; (2)Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Kentucky Precision Dairy Farming is the use of technology to measure physiological, behavioral, and production indicators on individual animals to improve management strategies and farm performance. The main objectives of Precision Dairy Farming are (1) maximizing individual animal potential, (2) early detection of disease, and (3) minimizing the use of medication through preventive health measures. The decision making landscape for the modern dairy manager has changed dramatically with increased emphasis on consumer protection, continuous quality assurance, natural foods, pathogenic free food, zoonotic disease transmission, reduction of the use of medical treatments, and increased consumer emphasis on animal well-being increased concern for the care of animals. These changing demographics reflect a continuing change in the way in which dairy operations are managed. To assist in this endeavor, we are integrating machine vision systems to 44

augment the existing precision workflow of the University of Kentucky’s dairy farming operations. Machine vision refers to computer technologies that employ cameras to measure physical objects. For precision dairy farming, we are attempting the replace subjective animal evaluations currently made by trained professionals with quantitative image-based metrics to both increase the accuracy of evaluations as well as their frequency since machine vision systems can continuously monitor the animals.

38.

Progress Towards a LightDriven Bistable Microactuator

Thomas M. Lucas*(1), Evgeniya V. Moiseeva(1), and Cindy K. Harnett(1) (1)Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Louisville This poster presents characterization of the optical absorption and thermal properties of a thin-film platinum device coated with gold nanoparticles (GNPs). These particles are engineered to have a light absorption peak near 808 nm. The response of bare and particle-coated thin-film platinum was examined under an 808 nm infrared laser. The results show that a particle coating is a significant factor in the thermal efficiency. This work is the foundation for wavelength-specific microelectromechanical actuators powered by infrared light. This hybrid of infrared absorbent gold nanoparticles and MEMS fabrication technology has potential applications in light-actuated switches and other mechanical structures. Deposition methods and surface chemistry are being integrated with three-dimensional MEMS structures in the next phase of this work. The long-term goal of this project is a system of light-powered microactuators for exploring cells’ response to mechanical stimuli. Such devices could apply forces at the cellular scale, offering potential therapies for heart disease and osteoporosis, and increasing our fundamental understanding of tissue response to everyday mechanical stresses at the molecular level.

39.

Tuning the Electronic Structure of Epitaxial Sr2IrO4 Thin Films with Lattice Strain

J. Nichols*, O.B. Korneta, J. Terzic, Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA E.G. Bittle, L.E. De Long, J.W. Brill, G. Cao, and S.S.A. Seo Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky The single layered perovskite Sr2IrO4 was anticipated to be a paramagnetic metal due to its 5d electrons being more spatially extended than in its 3d and 4d counterparts. However, it has been recently shown that this material exhibits a novel Jeff=1/2 Mott ground state. This exotic behavior is due to strong spin-orbit coupling which has an energy scale comparable to the on-site Coulomb interaction and crystal fields. The coexistence of these strong fundamental interactions generates great potential for unprecedented electronic states. We will present our results on epitaxial Sr2IrO4 thin films grown on numerous single crystalline substrates. We have measured their structural, electrical transport, and optical properties and will show that these films are of high quality, electrically insulating, and highly anisotropic. We have observed that applied crystal strain affects not only the electronic bandwidth but also the effective electronic correlation energy. In addition, our results conclude that the electronic structure of this material is more susceptible to modification of the out-of-plane lattice parameters than the in-plane lattice parameters.

40.

Crystallographically-Ordered Carbon Nanotubes Grown on Few-Layer Graphene Films Mohsen Nasseri, David P. Hunley, Abhishek Sundararajan*, Mathias J. Boland, and Douglas R. Strachan Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky Carbon nanotubes are grown on graphene and few-layer graphene films through chemical vapor deposition. The nanotube growth is found to depend on the thickness of the few-layer graphene films. The thinnest films show significant alignment of the nanotubes with the crystallographic axes of the graphene. This alignment is compared to the orientation of the crystallographic etch tracks, permitting the orientation of the nanotubes to be determined. Related nanotube/graphene structures will also be presented and discussed.

41.

Near-Ambient Regeneration and Polymer Encapsulation of Graphene Field Effect Devices Abhishek Sundararajan*(1), Mathias J Boland(1), D. Patrick Hunley(1), and Douglas R. Strachan(1) (1)Department of Physics, University of Kentucky Graphene has had tremendous interest as a sensor because its mobile charge carriers are located completely on its surface. This makes graphene more susceptible to atmospheric adsorbents which are potentially detrimental to overall graphene performance. For example, hysteresis, uncontrolled doping, and electrical mobility degradation plague graphene devices exposed to and processed in ambient conditions. These issues are particularly pertinent for potential graphene sensors because they are typically completely exposed to the environment, making it difficult to interpret their electrical characteristics. This also makes regeneration of graphene devices in approximately ambient conditions important for sensing applications. Various cleaning procedures have been shown effective in reducing these detrimental effects to graphene devices after ambient exposure and processing, however, these cleaning processes are typically performed far away from ambient conditions. Here we discuss the near-ambient regeneration of graphene devices after ambient exposure and processing. After regeneration, we utilize polymer encapsulation to reduce environmental effects on graphene devices. The electrical properties of these polymer encapsulated graphene devices are explored in various environmental conditions, with long-term environmental isolation observed. Four probe graphene devices with unobtrusive voltage probes are also used to determine the environmental effects on the contact resistance of graphene devices. These four-probe measurements reveal that the electrical contacts to graphene can be even more sensitive to their environment than the bulk sheet resistance of the device channel. These results suggest that rigorous effort needs to be taken when discerning gas sensor behavior of graphene from that of its electrical contacts.

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 45


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA Kentucky Commercialization Fund Technologies

42.

High Performance Materials for Structural Repair

I.E. Harik(1), A. Jawdhari(1), M, Crossley(2), and N.A. Abheetha Peiris*(2) (1)Department of Civil Engineering, University of Kentucky; (2)Kentucky Transportation Center, University of Kentucky The use of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) laminate plates and fabric for the repair and strengthening of concrete members is well established. Carbon FRPs (CFRPs) have been preferred over other FRP material for strengthening civil structures due to their higher stiffness. This research analytically and experimentally investigates the bond characteristics of CFRP carbon rods, the development of the CatStrong CFRP rod panels, and the flexural behavior of concrete members strengthened with CatStrong. Flexural tests are carried out under 4-point bending on several small scale reinforced concrete beams strengthened with CatStrong. Field application of CatStrong was carried out on two bridges in Kentucky.

43.

Remotely Operated Submersible

Stacy S. Wilson* and Ron Rizzo* Engineering Manufacturing Commercialization Center, Western Kentucky University A remotely operated submersible vehicle has been designed and developed for underwater applications by the WKU Engineering-Manufacturing-Commercialization Center (EMCC). The development of this device has occurred in several stages and resulted in three versions of the device that will be commercially available: the Pioneer Basic, the Pioneer Pro, and the Pioneer Elite. The Pioneer devices are more portable and smaller in size than the competition. A cost analysis of the device was developed and is detailed in this report. The commercialization process has determined that 46

there are at least eight possible markets for the Pioneer system. A review of the competition in these fields reveals that the WKU submersible vehicles can be built at a much lower cost and with equal or better quality. The market analysis also revealed that city and county water tanks offer one of the most promising markets, since new EPA standards are soon to be released. The EMCC has recently partnered with a local company to bring the new technology to the marketplace.

44.

Micro-Physiological Assay for Angiogenesis

Adam M. Hoying(1), Stuart K. Williams(1,2), and James B. Hoying*(1,2) (1)Angiomics Inc., Louisville KY; (2) Cardiovascular Innovation Institute, University of Louisville More and more, the microvasculature (capillary beds) is being seen as a viable therapeutic target for treating a variety of diseases including cancer, macular degeneration and heart attack. In all cases, effective development and translation of solutions targeting the microvasculature depends on informative assays that recapitulate as much of the biology as possible, while maintaining experimental simplicity and cost effectiveness. We have developed a versatile assay that accurately recapitulates native angiogenesis (new capillary growth) as a next-generation component of early phase efforts in the drug discovery pathway. The system is based on the incorporation of isolated, intact microvessels (e.g. arterioles, capillaries and venules) into a 3-D matrix environment and is uniquely positioned to enable the assessment of an integrated angiogenesis response in the simplified culture setting. This model system has been effectively used to identify and characterize putative angiogenic factors, evaluate microvascular instability, and define tissue dynamics during angiogenesis. It is estimated that the number of angiogenesis-dependent diseases (e.g. cancer, eye diseases, ischemic conditions, skin disorders, chronic inflammatory conditions, obesity, and healing-related disorders) will affect over 400 million people worldwide and therapies for these diseases targeting angiogenesis will be a $2 billion dollar plus industry. The ability to use a more informative microvessel assay, such as the one we have developed, would have a significant impact on the Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA ability to effectively move drug candidates through early phases when crucial decisions are made as to which agents are to advance to the later and most expensive phases of pre-clinical development, clinical testing and FDA approval.

45.

Innovative Energy Harvesting Nanostructures for Organic-based Solar Cells Hemali Rathnayake*(1), Manda Venkata Ramana*(1), Lan Xu(1), Fouzia Begum(1), John Ferguson(1), and Steve Guffey(1) (1)Department of Chemistry, Western Kentucky University Linear conjugated polymers (LCPs) exhibit very complex self-assembly behavior due to their structural flexibility, longer chain length, and wide molecular weight distribution. It is essential to develop LCPs having both improved optoelectronic and organizable self-assembly properties. To improve the progress of organic-based devices, synthetic methods need to be developed to make well-defined three-dimensional structures with a controlled size and shape in conjunction with delicately organized self-assembly properties. Here I will discuss a series of donor- and acceptor-functionalized nanostructures having both improved optoelectronic and well defined self-assembly properties for low-cost, high efficiency, and flexible solar cells. This work will contribute to the fundamental knowledge in this discipline by developing better synthetic methodologies, designing novel hybrid nanostructures, and assembling them in organic polymer matrices. Incorporating linear conjugated polymers to self-guidable three-dimensional structures should avoid the formation of micrometer-sized phase segregated domains, which leads to incomplete exciton dissociation. Improvements in efficiency will be realized by obtaining nanoscale phase separation using these hybrid materials.

46.

Application of Asymmetric Field Flow Fractionation to Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis Douglas Taylor* and Cicek Gercel-Taylor OB/GYN, University of Louisville

In the US, ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancerrelated deaths in women, resulting in more than 25,500 new cases and 15,310 deaths annually. Long-term survival has not significantly changed in 3 decades, primarily due to inadequacy of diagnostic markers. Compared with other cancers, 73% of endometrial cancers, 55% of breast cancers and 50% of cervical cancers are diagnosed as Stage I, while only 23% of ovarian cancers are diagnosed at Stage I. The majority of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma will recur within 12-18 months after first-line therapy. Among patients with stage III disease, 80-85% will recur, as will 30% of stage II and 10% of stage I patients. There are no clinically useable markers to identify early stage cancers and there are no methods to evaluate therapeutic responses, to identify recurrent cancer. We have developed a non-invasive, high-throughput, blood-based platform to address a critical issue - the need to evaluate in real time the presence of tumors in asymptomatic patients and their response to therapy. We have applied the novel technology of asymmetric field flow fractionation to the analyses of circulating exosomes in ovarian cancer patients and defined a unique, tumor-specific population, previously undetected by other techniques. The fraction is also not observed in patients with benign ovarian disease. We hypothesize that by selective isolation of these cancer-specific exosomes, we can identify the presence of early ovarian tumors in asymptomatic patients and determine, in real time, the tumorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response to therapy.

47.

Remote Monitoring of a Computer in Real-Time

Dalton Jantzen*(1), Zhongzhong Chen(2), Siddhartha Bhattacharyya(3), and Chi Shen(2) (1)Elizabethtown Community and Technical College; (2)Kentucky State University; (3)Rockwell Collins The proposed application in this research work is to monitor server hardware remotely in real time. A group of devices and sensors will be deployed in a server farm to monitor the health of the several servers in a Server Room or a Network Operating Center or a Data Center. This can be achieved by the integration and networking of diverse wireless sensors. The data collected from the external monitoring of the devices will allow the users to determine if a particular server or

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 47


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA a group of servers in a cluster is malfunctioning. Alert will be generated based on the changing dynamics of the servers being monitored if abnormal situations are encountered. This will eventually through predictive analyses lead to preventive maintenance and thus prevent losses incurred due to failing servers.

48.

Computer-Aided Diagnosis System for Early Diagnosis of Autism in Young Children Matthew J. Nitzken*(1), Manuel F. Casanova(2), Ayman S. El-Baz(1) (1)Bioengineering Department, University of Louisville; (2)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville Initial research studies on autistic patients indicate that early diagnosis and prompt behavioral intervention can lead to improved IQ, language, and adaptive skills in autistic patients. Despite the fact that the CDC has identified 1-in-88 American children as on the autism spectrum, with prevalence rates increasing 10 to 17 percent annually in recent years, no definitive diagnosis option for autism exists. The University of Louisville BioImaging Laboratory (Louisville, KY) is developing a non-invasive, objective, and fully automated computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) software that will definitively detect autism in young children. Since autism is a spectrum disorder, an individualized brain of autistic patients and control subjects, through the use of non-invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This software will permit clinicians to have enhanced clinical knowledge of each patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique condition and provide targeted therapy and treatment recommendations based on metrics specific to each diagnosis. The objective of this work is to develop and prove feasibility of a software tool designed to aid clinicians in the diagnosis of autism in children as young as 6 months old, and to develop and test the feasibility of tools and technologies for constructing a brain map to enhance clinicianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knowledge.

48

49.

Degradable Polymers of Natural Antioxidants for Biomedical, Industrial and Cosmetic Applications Nihar M Shah*, Paritosh Wattamwar, Prachi Gupta, Vinod Patil, Andrew Vasilakes, J Zach Hilt, Thomas D Dziubla Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Kentucky Oxidative damage deleteriously affects the functional life and properties of materials in numerous application areas including biomedicine, food, lubricants, adhesives, paints, and cosmetics. Failure of medical implants, flavor and nutritive losses in foods, and engine oil wear are classic examples of oxidative damage. Additionally, a number of human disease conditions (e.g. oral mucositis, glaucoma, and chronic ulcers) are an outcome of oxidative stress. Products not targeted for the human body, i.e. non-food/ non-biomedical products, commonly incorporate organic and/or inorganic antioxidants like tert-butyl catechol and zinc dialkyldithiophosphates. Although very effective, their high toxicity and stricter environmental regulations have made them less favorable. On the other hand, food and biomedical products commonly use vitamin C, vitamin E and similar safer antioxidants. However, they suffer from short useable lives because of degradative losses from exposure to heat, air, light, and humidity. Our proprietary technology converts naturally-derived polyphenolic antioxidants into biodegradable polymers. Use of natural antioxidants, such as quercetin and curcumin, greatly reduces safety concerns, as indicated by preliminary examination of our polymers in animals. We have developed a variety of physical forms such as solutions, powders, pastes, gels, and films to suit the target application. The protected antioxidant molecules are released only on exposure to water, and then scavenge reactive oxygen species responsible for oxidative damage/stress. The speed of polymer degradation and thus antioxidant release is tunable from hours to weeks by smart selection of the polymer chemistry. We are currently developing formulations for skin wounds, engine oils, and cosmetics.

Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


POSTER ABSTRACTS -- BY FOCUS AREA Late Submissions

50.

temperature and overexpression of RPN11 reduces TBSV recombination, signifying an inhibitory role for RPN11 in TBSV recombination. Altogether, our work could lead to the identification of novel targets for antiviral approaches.

Temperature Sensitive (ts) Mutant Library Screens in Exploring Essential Host Factors Affecting Viral RNA Replication and Recombination

51.

Reddisiva Prasanth Kambham* and Peter D. Nagy

Zhi David Chen*

Plant Pathology Department, University of Kentucky Plus-stranded (+)RNA viruses, which are important pathogens of plants, animals and humans, depends on their ability to alter the host cell metabolism to support the viral infection and to suppress host defense mechanisms. Understanding the roles/functions of the subverted host factors in virus replication will help in development of novel antiviral strategies. A model host such as yeast (S. cerevisiae) with a small eukaryotic genome (~6000 genes), reduced level of gene redundancy and only 7% of yeast genes carrying introns, would be highly advantageous to use for virus – host interaction studies. By using multiple genome-wide screens of yeast and global proteomics approaches, our lab has already identified over 400 host genes/proteins that affected TBSV replication and/ or recombination. In spite of the identified host genes/ proteins, it is still not known how many host genes affect RNA virus replication and/or recombination. In addition to the already existing list of TBSV (Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus) host factors for recombination and to explore the new list of host proteins affecting NOV (Nodamura Virus) replication, here, we have used a novel temperaturesensitive (ts) mutant library representing ~500 essential yeast genes. Temperature sensitive (ts) library screen allowed us to identify 54 host proteins affecting TBSV recombination and 151 host proteins affecting NOV replication. To authenticate the results from the (ts)-library screen, we analyzed the effect of proteasome regulatory particle protein (RPN11), a metalloprotease involved in fission of mitochondria and peroxisomes. Temperaturesensitive mutant of RPN11 (RPN11-14) showed a high level of TBSV recombination at semipermissive

Fabrication of Novel Moisture Sensors Based on Surface Modification of Aluminum Oxide Nanostructures

Advanced Semiconductor Processing Technology, LLC Most solid-state moisture sensors for low-moisture-level (dew point) measurement on the market use a porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) film as the sensing material. AAO is gama-phase aluminum oxide (gama-Al2O3). It is notorious that these sensors exhibit long-term instability or “drift”, because gama-Al2O3 experiences phase change when it reacts with water molecules. The current aluminum oxide moisture sensors on the market are unreliable. This is a long-standing unsolved problem in the moisture sensor industry. It is well known that alpha-Al2O3 (sapphire) is the most stable phase, i.e. alpha-phase does not change to other phases. However, porous alpha-Al2O3 films produced usually exhibit a “continuous open-pore structure”, in which no insulating barrier layers are present at the pore bases, causing short-circuiting of sensors. In order to solve the problem, prototype sensor was fabricated by modifying the surface of porous alpha-Al2O3 films. The prototype sensor exhibited high sensitivity, fast response, very good selectivity, and superior long-term stability.

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 49


CONFERENCE ATTENDEES Last Name:

First Name:

Institution/Company:

Email Address:

City:

Adkins

Danielle

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

dadkins@kstc.com

Lexington

Agarwal

Mukesh

Invenio Threpeutics Inc

agarwamukesh@yahoo.com

Lexington

Atici

Ferhan

Western Kentucky University

ferhan.atici@wku.edu

Bowling Green

Atici

Mustafa

Western Kentucky University

mustafa.atici@wku.edu

Bowling Green

Bai

Lihui

University of Louisville

lihui.bai@louisville.edu

Louisville

Bailey

Sean

University of Kentucky

scbailey@engr.uky.edu

Lexington

Beran

John

NorthStar Advisors

jeberan@twc.com

Louisville

Bingue

Jacques

Innovative Energy Solution

jpbingue@innesol.com

Lexington

Boccanfuso

Anthony

The National Academy of Sciences

tony@uidp.net

Washington DC

Boland

Mathias

University of Kentucky

mathias.boland@uky.edu

Lexington

Boyd

Darren

University of Kentucky

darren.boyd@uky.edu

Lexington

Bradley

Luke

University of Kentucky

lhbradley@uky.edu

Lexington

Brehob

Ellen

University of Louisville

brehob@louisville.edu

Louisville

Brewer

Steve W.

Clear Site, Inc.

steve@take5.org

Louisville

Brooks

Wes

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

wbrooks@kstc.com

Lexington

Brothers

Lou

Okeanos Technologies, LLC

loubrothers@gmail.com

Union

Brothers

Michael

Okeanos Technologies, LLC

mikebrothers@okeanostech.com

Union

Brue

Vesta

MedSignals / VitalSignals LLC

vbrue@medsignals.com

Lexington

Bryant

Leah

MacAulay-Brown, Inc.

leah.bryant.ctr@wpafb.af.mil

Lexington

Bucklew

Timothy

Western Kentucky University

timothy.bucklew122@topper.wku.edu

Bowling Green

Cambi

Franca

University of Kentucky

franca.cambi@uky.edu

Lexington

Carreon

Moises

University of Louisville

macarr15@louisville.edu

Louisville

Carrithers, Ph. D. Stephen

Sequela

sequelasteve@yahoo.com

LaGrange

Chambers

Thomas

University of Kentucky

tmcham1@uky.edu

Lexington

Charoenphon

Sutthirut

Western Kentucky University

Sutthirut .Charoenphon221@topper.wku.edu Bowlilng Green

Chen

Zhi

Advanced Semiconductor Processing Technology LLC

zhi.chen@uky.edu

Lexington

Chen

Zhongzhong

Kentucky State University

zhongzhong.chen@kysu.edu

Frankfort

Chenevey

Ben

Global Quality Corp.

ben@iitbiz.com

Covington

Cho

Alex

Alloy Technology Innovations Inc.

alex.cho@ati-ky.com

Lexington

Cohn

Robert

University of Louisville

rwcohn@louisville.edu

Louisville

Connell

John

University of Kentucky

johnconnell@uky.edu

Lexington

Craddock

John

University of Kentucky

john.craddock@uky.edu

Lexington

Creager

Mitch

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

mcreager@kstc.com

Lexington

Crossley

Michael

University of Kentucky

michael.crossley@uky.edu

Lexington

Daugherty

Laurie

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

lcdaugherty@kstc.com

Lexington

50

Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


CONFERENCE ATTENDEES Last Name:

First Name:

Institution/Company:

Email Address:

City:

Davis

Deborah

University of Kentucky

ddavis@uky.edu

Lexington

Davis

Keith

University of Louisville

keith.davis@louisville.edu

Owensboro

Dhara

Animesh

University of Kentucky College of Medicine

animesh.dhara@uky.edu

Lexington

Daigrepont

Rebecca

OPM Financial LLC

Rebecca.Daigrepont@opmfinancial.com

Louisville

Dresch

Tom

DRS Environmental Systems, Inc

akrumpelman@drs.com

Florence

Dvorak

Joseph

University of Kentucky

joe.dvorak@uky.edu

Lexington

Dziubla

Thomas

University of Kentucky

dziubla@engr.uky.edu

Lexington

Elliott

Jennifer

TiER1 Performance Solutions

j.elliott@tier1performance.com

Covington

Feldhoff

Pamela

University of Louisville

pwfeld01@louisville.edu

Lexington

Ferrell

Blaine

Western Kentucky University

blaine.ferrell@wku.edu

Bowling Green

Fox

Jimmy

University of Kentucky

james.fox@uky.edu

Lexington

Frudakis

Tony

Okeanos Technologies, LLC

tfrudakis@okeanostech.com

Union

Fuqua

Gene

Commonwealth Seed Capital, LLC

gene.fuqua@commonwealthseed.com

Lexington

Ganesan

Kalyan

Minerva Systems & Technologies, LLC

kganesan@minervatechnology.com

Lexington

Gao

Qingming

University of Kentucky

qgao2@g.uky.edu

Lexington

Garrity

Patrick

Kentucky State University

patrick.garrity@kysu.edu

Frankfort

Gentry

Matthew

University of Kentucky

matthew.gentry@uky.edu

Lexington

Geoghegan

Thomas

University of Louisville

tegeog01@louisville.edu

Louisville

Godsey

Judi

The University of Hawaii - Manoa

nurse.judi@yahoo.com

Ludlow

Gossen

Paul

Clear Site, Inc.

pdgossen@gmail.com

Louisville

Goyal

Meera

University of Kentucky

meera.goyal@uky.edu

Lexington

Gruenewald

John

University of Kentucky

john.gruenewald@uky.edu

Lexington

Gupta

Ramesh

3P Biotechnologies

rcgupta3p@gmail.com

Louisville

Gupta

Saurabh

Global Quality Corp.

saurabh@gqc.com

Covington

Hahn

Jerome

MedSignals / VitalSignals LLC

jhahn@MEDSIGNALS.COM

Lexington

Haire

Glen

Twin Rivers Industries, Inc.

ghaire@twinriversinc.com

Livermore

Harrell

Meredith

Biomedical Development Corporation

meredith.bdc@gmail.com

Lexington

Hartman

Eric

customKYnetics, Inc.

hartman@customkynetics.com

Versailles

Hay

Jeff

University of Louisville

jeffrhay@gmail.com

Louisville

Heacox

Kurtis

University of Louisville

kurtis.heacox@gmail.com

Louisville

Heist

Pat

Ferm Solutions

eheist@ferm-solutions.com

Danville

Helvey

Jacob

University of Kentucky

jacob.helvey@uky.edu

Lexington

Hickman

Robert

APIQ Semiconductors LLC.

rhickman@apiqsemi.com

Louisville

Hilt

J. Zach

University of Kentucky

hilt@uky.edu

Lexington

Hime

Paul

University of Kentucky

paul.hime@uky.edu

Lexington

Hoying

Adam

Angiomics, Inc.

aahoying@gmail.com

Louisville

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 51


CONFERENCE ATTENDEES Last Name:

First Name:

Institution/Company:

Email Address:

City:

Hoying

James

Angiomics, Inc.

jay.hoying@louisville.edu

Louisville

Hu

Liang

3H Company

lianghu59@yahoo.com

Lexington

Hu

Zongyang

Advanced Dynamics Inc.

zongyang.hu@gmail.com

Lexington

Hunley

Patrick

University of Kentucky

patrickhunley@uky.edu

Lexington

Jain

Mahendra

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

mjain@kstc.com

Lexington

Jantzen

Dalton

Elizabethtown Community and Technical College

dalton.jantzen@kctcs.edu

Elizabethtown

Jawdhari

Akram

University of Kentucky

akram.hassan@uky.edu

Lexington

Jaynes

John

University of Louisville

jhjayn01@louisville.edu

Louisville

Johnson

Rick

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

rjohnson@kstc.com

Lexington

Johnson

Stephen

nGimat, LLC

sjohnson@ngimat.com

Lexington

Joshi

Suvid

University of Kentucky

suvid.joshi@uky.edu

Lexington

Kakar

Sham

University of Louisville

sskaka01@louisville.edu

Louisville

Kambham

Reddisiva Prasanth

University of Kentucky

reddisiva@gmail.com

Lexington

Karan

Goutam

Invenio Threpeutics Inc

kgoutam@yahoo.com

Lexington

Kessler

Bruce

Western Kentucky University

bruce.kessler@wku.edu

Lexington

Knapp

Liz

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

lknapp@kstc.com

Lexington

Knutson

Barbara

University of Kentucky

bknutson@engr.uky.edu

Lexington

Kuhn

Robert

Alkymos Inc.

rjkuhn1@email.uky.edu

Lexington

Kumar

Ashok

Kentucky Sate University

ashok.kumar@kysu.edu

Frankfort

Kurzynske

Rick

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

kurzynske@kyepscor.org

Lexington

Labreveux

Maria

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

mlabreveux@kstc.com

Lexington

Lau

Dan

University of Kentucky

dllau@uky.edu

Lexington

Leggas

Mark

CoRe Therapeutics

coretrx@gmail.com

Lexington

Li

Qing

University of Kentucky

qing.li8306@gmail.com

Lexington

Linville

Linda

KY Council on Postsecondary Education

linda.linville@ky.gov

Lexington

Liu

LanHsin

University of Louisville

lan_hsin@yahoo.com

Louisville

Lorkiewicz

Pawel

University of Louisville

pklork01@louisville.edu

Louisville

Lucas

Thomas

University of Louisville

tmluca01@louisville.edu

Louisville

Lundy

Robert

University of Louisville

r0lund01@exchange.louisville.edu

Louisville

Magableh

Ali

University of Louisville

a0alma04@exchange.louisville.edu

Louisville

Mager

Nancy

Western Kentucky University

nancy.mager@wku.edu

Bowling Green

Maiti

Indu

University of Kentucky

imaiti@uky.edu

Lexington

Maj

Magdalena

James Brown Cancer Center at Universisty of Louisville

m0maj001@louisville.edu

Louisville

Marsh

Andrew

University of Louisville

andrew.marsh@louisville.edu

Louisville

52

Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


CONFERENCE ATTENDEES Last Name:

First Name:

Institution/Company:

Email Address:

City:

Martin

Thomas

Council on Postsecondary Education

thomas.martin@ky.gov

Frankfort

McLachlan

Angus

Liberate Medical

angus@liberatemedical.com

Crestwood

Milek

Wade

DRS Environmental systesm, Inc

akrumpelman@drs.com

Florence

Moe

Luke

University of Kentucky

luke.moe@uky.edu

Lexington

Soriano Molla

Jesus

National Science Foundation

jsoriano@nsf.gov

Washington DC

Micoli

Keith

NYU Langone Medical Center

Keith.Micoli@nyumc.org

New York, NY

Morrow

Jennifer

Equine Diagnostic Solutions, LLC

jmorrow@edslabky.com

Lexington

Munson

Eric

University of Kentucky

eric.munson@uky.edu

Lexington

Murphy

David

Peerless Technologies

david.murphy.ctr@wpafb.af.mil

Lexington

Mushini

Prabhu

APIQ SEMICONDUCTORS LLC.

pmushini@apiqsemi.com

Louisville

Nethercott

Matthew

University of Kentucky

matthew.nethercott@uky.edu

Lexington

Nichols

John

University of Kentucky

john.nichols@uky.edu

Lexington

Nitzken

Matthew

University of Louisville / NeuroAtlas, LLC

mjnitz02@louisville.edu

Louisville

Noland

Jeffrey

University of Kentucky

jeff.noland@uky.edu

Lexington

Noland

Jeffrey

University of Kentucky

jeffrey.noland@uky.edu

Lexington

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara

Bruce

Signal Solutions, LLC & University of Kentucky bruce.ohara@sigsoln.com

Lexington

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary

Sean

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

soleary@kstc.com

Lexington

Oberlink

Anne

NuForm Materials

anne.oberlink@nuformmaterials.com

Sadieville

Payne

Christina

University of Kentucky

christy.payne@uky.edu

Lexington

Peiris

Abheetha

University of Kentucky

abheetha.peiris@uky.edu

Lexington

Penmetsa

Vidya

Kentucky State University

vidya.penmetsa@gmail.com

Frankfort

Price

Steven

University of Kentucky

steven.price@uky.edu

Lexington

Prichard

Martin

Innovative Energy Solution

mprichard@innesol.com

Lexington

Ramage

Michael

Murray State University

mramage@murraystate.edu

Murray

Rankin

Stephen

University of Kentucky

srankin@engr.uky.edu

Lexington

Rathnayake

Hemali

Western Kentucky University

hemali.rathnayake@wku.edu

Bowling Green

Ratterman

Allison Griffin

University of Louisville

allison.griffin.ratterman@louisville.edu

Louisville

RebolledoMendez

Jovan

University of Louisville

jdrebo01@louisville.edu

Louisville

Rempfer

Debbie

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

drempfer@kstc.com

Lexington

Rempfer

Bob

Amazingly Creative Inc

brempfer@amazinglycreative.com

Lexington

Rizzo

Ron

Western Kentucky University

ron.rizzo@wku.edu

Bowling Green

Ronald

Ken

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

kronald@kstc.com

Lexington

Running

Mark

University of Louisville

mprunn01@louisville.edu

Louisville

Sahai

Atul

National Institutes of Health

sahaia@csr.nih.gov

Washington DC

Sahoo

Dipak

University of Kentucky

dipak_sahoo11@rediffmail.com

Lexington

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 53


CONFERENCE ATTENDEES Last Name:

First Name:

Institution/Company:

Email Address:

City:

Sargent

Craig

University of Kentucky

csargent@uky.edu

Lexington

Seigler

Michael

University of Kentucky

seigler@engr.uky.edu

Lexington

Seo

Ambrose

University of Kentucky

a.seo@uky.edu

Lexington

Shah

Nihar

University of Kentucky / Bluegrass Advanced Materials

nihar.shah@uky.edu

Lexington

Shelley

Anthony

University of Kentucky

anshel2@uky.edu

Lexington

Shen

Chi

Kentucky State University

chi.shen@kysu.edu

Frankfort

Siegel

Phyllis

Biomedical Development Corporation

psiegelbdc@gmail.com

Lexington

Sikora

David

United States Air Force

david.sikora@wpafb.af.mil

Lexington

Sinai

Anthony

University of Kentucky

sinai@uky.edu

Lexington

Stinchcomb

Audra

Alltranz

astinchc@rx.umaryland.edu

Lexington

Stone

Barbara

ParaTechs Corporation

barbarastone@paratechs.com

Lexington

Strachan

Doug

University of Kentucky

doug.strachan@uky.edu

Lexington

Striz

Martin

Signal Solutions, LLC & University of Kentucky mstriz@gmail.com

Lexington

Sundararajan

Abhishek

University of Kentucky

asund2@g.uky.edu

Lexington

Talbott

Debra

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

dtalbott@kstc.com

Lexington

Tapolsky

Gilles

Advanced Cancer Therapeutics

gtapolsky@advancedact.com

Louisville

Taylor

Douglas

University of Louisville School of Medicine

ddtaylor@louisville.edu

Louisville

Tivol

Ed

EWA, GSI

etivol@ewa.com

Bowling Green

Van Horn

Amy

Baker College

avanhorn21@yahoo.com

Van Lanen

Steven

University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy

svanl3@uky.edu

Lexington

Venkata Ramana

Manda

Western Kentucky University

venkataramana.manda953@topper.wku.edu

Bowling Green

Voor

Michael

University of Louisville

mike.voor@louisville.edu

Louisville

Wang

Shuxia

University of Kentucky

swang7@uky.edu

Lexington

Ward

George

University of Kentucky

george.ward@uky.edu

Lexington

Webb

Bruce

University of Kentucky

bawebb@uky.edu

Lexington

Wehrle

John

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

jwehrle@kstc.com

Lexington

Weisrock

David

University of Kentucky

dweis2@uky.edu

Lexington

Wheatley

Buddy

Collaborate Health Consultants

cwheatley43@hotmail.com

White

Marvis

nGimat, LLC

mwhite@ngimat.com

Lexington

Wildes

Christine

Kentucky Science & Technology Corporation

cwildes@kstc.com

Lexington

Williams

Stuart

University of Louisville

stuart.williams@louisville.edu

Louisville

Wilson

Stacy

Western Kentucky University

stacy.wilson@wku.edu

Bowling Green

Winchester

Randall

Murray State University

rwinchester1@murraystate.edu

Murray

Woods

Chuck

OPM Financial LLC

chuck.woods@opmfinancial.com

Louisville

Wyse

Joe

Wyse Innovations

jwyse@wyseinnovations.com

Lexington

54

Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


CONFERENCE ATTENDEES Last Name:

First Name:

Institution/Company:

Email Address:

City:

Yang

Ruigang

Direct i2i Technology LLC

ruigangyang@hotmail.com

Lexington

Yazdanpanah

Mehdi

NaugaNeedles, Inc.

mehdi@nauganeedles.com

Lexington

Yolcu

Esma S

University of Louisville

esma.yolcu@louisville.edu

Louisville

Young

John

University of Kentucky

jyoung@engr.uky.edu

Lexington

Yu

Keshun

University of Kentucky

kyu0@uky.edu

Lexington

Yu

Ning

University of Kentucky

nyu.yuning@gmail.com

Lexington

Zhang

Hailiang

Hitron Technologies Inc.

kzhang@hitron-technologies.com

Lexington

Zhang

Xingye

University of Kentucky

xingyezhang86@gmail.com

Lexington

Zhang

YuMing

Adaptive Intelligent Systems LLC

ymzhang@aiswelding.com

Lexington

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 55


“My favorite thing I

have learned is that you must learn how to fail correctly in becoming a successful entrepreneur.” (Rising Junior)

Mentors:

12 y l u J e 22—

n u J 4 1 0 GSE 2 “We came here

because we knew GSE could give us the tools we needed and the opportunity to network with people that could help us move from a great idea, to a great business.”

A3 week residential summer program where high school students work in teams, apply design-thinking to their ideas, and create business models for their products.

Help Entrepreneurs to: Think it Explore it Validate it Create it Test it Tweak it Sell it

Entrepreneurs: Wake Up Innovate Repeat

(Rising Junior) Website: gse.kstc.com

Twitter: @gse_kstc

Facebook : Kentucky’s Governor’s School for Entrepreneurs

56

Kentucky Innovation & Entrepreneurship Conference 2013


CONFERENCE NOTES

Lexington, Kentucky - Thursday August 29, 2013 57


2013 KIEC Program Book