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MARCO ANTONIO RAVINI Syracuse University School of Architecture Selected Works


“What distinguishes architecture is not WHAT is done . . .but HOW it is done.” — REYNER BANHAM

Hi, I’m Marco! For me, architecture is METHOD; a physical construct that is usually - but not always - a building, and is produced in accordance with a specific framework. This collection of academic and professional work stands to illustrate both my curiosity for understanding the forces that shape natural and man-made landscapes, as well as to showcase the techniques that facilitated new and unexpected design outcomes. Thank you for taking the time to view the work. I hope you find it engaging!

marcoantonioravini@gmail.com


CONTENTS

LACCA

LAB2030

THICK MATTER(S)

Culinary School

Interactive Installation

Infrastructural Prototype

006

024

034

BRØNDBY STRAND

VILLA ONE

SKATE+PARK

Private Residence

Public Space

Housing Masterplan

052

058

062

MONTESSORI

52 WEEKS

MISCELLANEOUS

Footbridge Re-Cladding

Exhibition

Sketches, Photos and Sculptures

064

066

070


PART I


ACADEMIC EXPLORATIONS


COURSE: COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN STUDIO INSTRUCTOR: LARRY BOWNE TYPE: EDUCATION LOCATION: BUNKER HILL, LA YEAR: 2012 in collaboration w/ Andrew Parnas

HOW CAN ARCHITECTURE RETHINK BOTH THE ACADEMIC AND PHYSICAL IDENTITY OF AN URBAN CULINARY SCHOOL, AND EMPOWER LEARNING BEYOND THE PROPERTY LINE OF THE INSTITUTION? [SITUATION]: Food is as much a part of our health and culture as it is a part of the systemic logic of cities. Throughout history, the development of cities has been influenced, if not defined, by the pervasive systems of production, supply and distribution. Nowadays, with more than half of the world’s population residing in urban centers, the relationship between producer and consumer has grown more distant than ever, and the space between them cluttered with intermediate processes and middleman entities. In an effort to bridge the gap, consumers have begun to favor local food as a way to reconnect with producers within geographic regions and, by extension, to create more informed, self-reliant and resilient food networks. [PROJECT]: The brief calls for a new Culinary Arts College on the corner lot of S Hill St. and W 4th St in Downtown LA. The site is located in a vibrant, rapidly gentrifying neighbourhood at the nexus of West Coast corporate finance and Latino festivity. To the west, the glossy behemoths and cultural icons of Bunker Hill - MoCA (Arata Isozaki), Disney Hall (Frank Gehry) and the under-construction Broad Museum (Diller Scofidio + Renfro) - stand in antithesis to the burgeoning assemblage of swap meets, open-air markets, food trucks and taquerias located to the east along Broadway Street. This unlikely marriage of worlds offers a glimpse into the rich socio-cultural landscape of Downtown LA as well as the quintessential food scene of So Cal. [POSITION/DESIGN]: Inspired by the implications of urbanization on food systems and the efforts to rekindle the relationship between producer and consumer, the design for the Los Angeles College of Culinary Arts (LACCA) proposes a 'FARM-to-TABLE' model, consolidating the various processes of food-making into a single building. The intention is to broaden the academic scope of food professionals beyond the consumption of food, and to leverage LACCA as a prototype for how private institutions can contribute to the development of the surrounding community in more meaningful and productive ways. The design consists of two vertical slabs on either side of a raised plinth, each of which serves a programmatic zone: Teaching, Production and Consumption respectively. The eastern most slab contains the College’s administrative/academic spaces and the Social Core (SC). The latter is centered around a three-storey atrium and combines communal breakout spaces with vertical circulation in order to promote connectivity and interdepartmental mixing. The SC also serves as a thermal buffer, utilizing its mass and position to significantly reduce solar heat gains and create stack ventilation. Extending over the exterior staircase on Hill St, the western slab, also known as the Food Core (FC) addresses the College’s quantitative and qualitative food requirements. It is both urban billboard and vertical farm, simultaneously broadcasting LACCA’s radical philosophy and raising awareness on the growing shortage of arable land around the world. Conceived as a vertical extension of the adjacent park, this six story ethereal structure features a hydroponic system that boasts an agricultural yield 50% greater than the site’s footprint. Two sky bridges carry the FC’s harvests to the teaching kitchens, the student-run restaurant, and beyond to local markets. The central void framed by the two Cores becomes an outdoor atrium for students and the public to engage in food related festivities; a meeting point of city and institution to explore and experience culinary and gastronomic innovation.

6


Grand Central Market

Entrance to Pershing Square Station

Angel’s Flight

3

Angel’s Knoll

California Plaza soaring above Olive Street

California Plaza

2

One California Plaza

Grand Street Viaduct

LA MoCA

1

Million Dollar Theater

[Lack of] Synergy between Buildings and Infrastructure

3

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Br

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2

Urban Axon

Bunker Hill, LA

7


8


Aerial View approaching Helipad from the North

9


A RURAL

URBAN

Situation

Urbanization and Mass Migration In 2009, the UN estimated that over 50% of the world’s population lives in urban areas.

?

B PRODUCER

KM CONSUMER

Territorial Disconnection People have become increasingly removed from agricultural sites and the process of food making.

Post-Harvest Harvest

C

Supply + Distribution

Processing

Retail + Storage

Consumption

FARM

CITY

Processes of Food Making Intermediate processes and middle-men have cluttered the connection producers and consumers.

10000 sf

9000 sf

(incl. 30 cars + 2 Loading Trucks)

Program Requirements

(incl. 1000 sf storage)

2000 sf

teaching kitchens

1600 sf

wine shop

broadcast room

admin.

wc

trash

lecture hall

parking

5500 sf

3600 sf

200 sf/FL

2000 sf

500 sf

demo lab

300 sf

500 sf

625 sf

faculty offices

storage

restaurant

library

Consolidation

bake shop

900 sf

classrooms

pastry kitchen

3600 sf

2700 sf

1200 sf

Academic

Parking

Media

Commerce

WHAT IF... Processing

Position & Concept

Farming

Distribution

Other Services

LACCA Retail

Consumption

Vertical Farming (hydroponics) Digital Media (Broadcasting)

Public

STUDENTS + FACULTY

Students

LACCA

CITY

SITE Consumption (Restaurant)

Teaching

FOOD PLAZA Library

PARKING

FOOD CHAIN

PUBLIC

Retail

NEW MODEL: FARM-to-TABLE By consolidating the various processes of food-making into a single building, LACCA oers a critique both on the current academic scope of emerging food professionals and the role/responsibility of the institution towards the public.

10


4FAR

45000 sf

NSUM CO

32000 sf

CTION RP ODU ION PT ING CH TEA

PR

Site

FAR

Minimum Volume

Programmatic Groups

NEW CITY

Design Strategy

PU

60’

K PAR 145’

109’

HIS

TO

RIC

5 4 3 2 1

Material Logic

Form Optimization

Special Programs

Circulation

Multifunctional Plinth

Structural Logic

Restaurant + Food

Precast Concrete

Public Spaces + Outdoor

[Elevator Cores, Plinth, Stramp and Public Steps]

Steel Frame

Food Core: Light frame Steel Construction Academic Building: I-Beams

Academic Slab + Social Core

Concrete Shell

[Library+Reading Room]

Ribs and Trusses Food Core and Auditorium: Pratt Truss and Open Web Joists Broadcast Capsule: Elliptical Steel Ribs

11


CORE II

CORE I

CORE

G

LA

RE

CORE

ATRIUM 1

SOCIAL

FOOD

SOCIAL FOOD

west

2

Passive Systems: FOOD CORE + SOCIAL CORE While California offers ample opportunities to exploit the regional climate, it boasts the country’s most stringent energy codes. To comply with these regulations and limit the need for auxiliary systems (cooling, heating and ventilation) the project rethinks the CORE and ATRIUM in terms of their structure, position and program. 12 pm

4 pm 12 pm

9 am

12 pm

4 pm

4 pm 9 am

9 am

SUMMER

WINTER

FALL/SPRING

Sun Chart The position of two CORES allows the building to exploit the direction of prevailing winds, reduce direct solar gains and provide sufficient shading throughout the day. This guarentees maximum utility of public plaza and mitigates the energy load needed to keep the building's environment regulated.

FOOD CORE // Early Section

12

The Food Core contributes to the performance of the building both in terms of Sustainability (controls sun radiation, temperature and ventilation) and Academia (teaches students and the public about urban agriculture).


Agricultural Yield of Food Core

737

65

units

1.5x

8.75’

SITE

SF

7.5’

on

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F n te

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to local co

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Green Wall Connection

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Crea

rop

c

ction // Hyd

Bl o

ss S e

ore dC

Ax on

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Street View Rending of Food Core

Steel Grate Floor

Wire Rope Assembly

Wire Rope Cross Clamp

Sectional Elevation through Parking

13


Section through Plinth

1

PLINTH SCENARIOS Food Monument

2

Kit[chain] Project

Student Seating

Grand staircase Load Bearing Partition Wall

Grand Staircase

Crosswalks Elevator Core and Fire Egress for Academic Building

Library Roof Deck connects academic building with Restaurant

North Lobby Entrance 002 Administration Offices a Admissions b Career Services c Director’s Suite

3 Food Carts/Tailgate Party

001 Information Desk 003 Bathrooms South Entrance Lobby Main Entrance for Library

1 24

4

Ethnic Food Market

5

Street Performance

6

Food Gateway

30 Parking Spaces 2 Loading Trucks

Library 004 Secondary Entrance for Library

3

5 6 Food Core Fire Egress Stramp Mechanical Room Shipping/Loading Area Wine Shop

Trash Area Public Steps

Pershing Sq. Station Exit/Entrance Bake Shop

14

THE PLINTH // A multifunctional space intended for the celebration and exchange of LA's urban food culture.


Section through Pershing Sq.

Helicopter Landing Pad

Roof deck for students to host events, movie screenings or other collective activties.

Carbon Steel Structural Tubing [Square section 5”x 5”] relatively low in cost • high strength-to-weight ratio • easily welded, formed • punched and drilled hollow shape helps protects • and conceals wires and pipes

Elevator Core and Fire Egress Water Storage and Cooling Towers

Cable bracing system to help reduce lateral displacements, axial force and bending moment.

Broadcast Kitchen Audience Seating • Control Room • Tape Room • 3 Station Demo Kitchen •

Demonstration Laboratory

401 & 402 Teaching Kitchens

305 & 306 Classrooms 205 & 206 Classrooms

Food Core Primary Egress Elevated student lounge offers unique vantage points of Hill Street, Angel’s Knoll and the soaring skyline of the Financial District.

301-303 Teaching Kitchens

Fire Egress

201-203 Teaching Kitchens Skybridge

Second Floor Student Terrace

Catwalks 737 Omega Hydroponic Units Escalators adjacent to Pershing Sq. Station lead the public onto the Plinth and then up to the Restaurant

Faculty Offices 104 Main Storage 105 Ingredients are distributed from this area to the individual kitchens Channel Glass Panels Restaurant [Capacity 150-200 people] Staircase leading up to Outdoor Lounge

FOOD CORE // Production and Consumption

Pastry Kitchen 103

Exposed Fire Egress Restrooms 102 Auditorium 101

ACADEMIC CORE // Preparation and Presentation

15


K

1

2

1

1.3

3

2.1

4

4.1

GROUNDFLOOR // Parking, Receiving Area & Bake Shop A

2.2

3

4

4.1

5

6

2ND FLOOR // Restaurant, Auditorium & Pastry Kitchen 1.1 1.2

2.1

1

3

3.1

4

4.1

A A1

A

BB

B CC D

C C

D D FF

E E GG F

F HH G

G

JJH

H

J2

J1

K

K

K

5TH FLOOR // Teaching Kitchens & Hydroponic Food Core 1

2

2.1

3

3.1

4

6TH FLOOR // Broadcast Room, Roof deck & Food Core 1

4.1

2

3

2.1

4

4.1 A

A

1

1.3

2.2

3

4

4.1

6

5

A A1

BB CC

CC D

D

C

D

E

FF

F

E

G

GG F

H

HH G

J

JJ H

J2

K

K

K

16


SITE PLAN // Plinth

1.1

1.2

1

2

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

4

3

A

CIRCULATION DESK

COMPUTER CLUSTER

B

RECIPE ARCHIVE

RECEPTION

CARGO DROP ZONE

C

LOBBY

LIBRARY

CAREER SERVICES

STORAGE

D

INFO DESK

ADMISSIONS OFFICE

E

GASTRO PLAZA

F

DIRECTOR’S SUITE S. HILL ST. WC

G

STRAMP WC GRAND STAIRCASE LOUNGE

H

RESTAURANT ESCALATORS

PERSHING SQ. STATION

PUBLIC SEATING

PARKING ENTRANCE

W. 4TH STREET 0 4 8

16

32

64

17


DETAIL A

Kitchen Hood Return Air Duct Membrane Roof Over Steel Decking

W18 Steel Beam Supply Air Duct

Composite Decking

Aluminum Glazing Frame Assmebly Bolte to Steel Tubing

External Wall and Roof Deck Scale 1:4

W12 Steel Beam Facade System Support Clips Bolted Over Steel Channel HP12 Steel Column Double Glazing Insulated Glass

DETAIL B

Operable Louvre System

2” Steel Channel Frame

1/2” Steel Threaded Rod

Membrane Roof over Steel Decking

2” Rigid Insulation

Channel Glass Cladding

Steel Truss Top Cord, Box Beam Open Web Joists LED Lighting

Lecture Hall Upper Chord and Balustrade Scale 1:4

Hard Resin Finish

DETAIL C

Steel Truss Bottom Cord, Box Beam

Surfaced Concrete Pavers Water Proof Membrane Precast Double-T Concrete Beams

Concrete Plinth Column

Lecture Hall Bottom Chord and Flooring Scale 1:4

18


Membrane Roof over Steel Decking

Cooling Tower

Steel Decking 2” Rigid Insulation

2” Steel Channel Frame

1/2” Steel Threaded Rod Concrete Fin Slab

Fluorescent Lighting

Steel Attachment Points

01 // Auditorium

Double Glazing Insulated Glass W18 Steel Beam Steel Fin Girder Bolted to Primary Structure

Atrium

2nd Floor Crosswalk: Teaching Kitches and Classrooms

Steel Truss Top Cord, Box Beam

Concrete Cladding 2” Rigid Insulation Precast Concrete Wall 1st Floor Crosswalk: clad in Perforated Steel

02 // Restaurant and Food Plaza Steel Truss Bottom Cord, Box Beam

Aluminium Mullions 8” x 2”

Grand Staircase

Precast Doubte-T Concrete Beams

Concrete Girder Beam

Concrete Plinth Column Asphalt Parking Surface Expansion Joint

Seismic Base Isolation Bearing Water Proof Membrane Wraps Footing

03 // Library & Parking (Below)

19


04 // Atrium View

05 // Grand staircase

20


DETAIL D Membrane Roof over Steel Decking

Cooling Tower

Steel Decking 2” Rigid Insulation

2” Steel Channel Frame

1/2” Steel Threaded Rod Concrete Fin Slab

Fluorescent Lighting

Concrete Fin Girder and Glazing Scale 1:4

Steel Attachment Points

DETAIL E Double Glazing Insulated Glass W18 Steel Beam Steel Fin Girder Bolted to Primary Structure

Atrium

2nd Floor Crosswalk: Teaching Kitches and Classrooms

Steel Truss Top Cord, Box Beam

Concrete Cladding 2” Rigid Insulation Precast Concrete Wall 1st Floor Crosswalk: clad in Perforated Steel

Grand Staircase and Concrete Girder Scale 1:4

Steel Truss Bottom Cord, Box Beam

Aluminium Mullions 8” x 2”

DETAIL F

Grand Staircase

Precast Doubte-T Concrete Beams

Concrete Girder Beam

Concrete Plinth Column Asphalt Parking Surface Expansion Joint

Seismic Base Isolation Bearing Water Proof Membrane Wraps Footing

Foundation and Seismic Base Isolators Scale 1:4

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1 Study Models 1:32 Conceptual forms generated through ideas of program, materiality and massing. [Chipboard, Blue foam, Foam core, Bass wood and Wire Mesh]

2 Final Model 3:32 The models articulates the different structural components of the building's design (Food Core, Academic Core and Plinth) [Steel frame: Bass wood // Concrete construction: Foam core and Zcorp Powder 3D Print // Composite Deck Flooring: Spray painted Blue-grey chipboard]

3 Cross-sectional Model A conceptual model revealing the spatial and systemic dialogue between the two Cores.

22


4 Urban Data Block 3D DATASCAPE: Overlapping social, economic, topographic and environmental information to gain a better understanding of the building’s immediate context. [Inspired by Geographic Information Systems (GIS)]

23


COURSE: ADVANCED DESIGN STUDIO INSTRUCTOR: MICHAEL PELKEN TYPE: INSTALLATION LOCATION: TATE MODERN, LONDON YEAR: 2012 in collaboration w/ Alec Hembree, Phil Bongard and McNisky Jeantus

HOW CAN ARCHITECTURE USE INTERACTIVE DESIGN TO ENGAGE THE PUBLIC AND FACILITATE DISCUSSIONS ABOUT THE THREATS LONDON FACES FROM CLIMATE CHANGE? [SITUATION]: The Thames is a prominent feature of London's urban infrastructure, and is inextricably linked to both human activity and climate change. As such, the river has been a major source of concern for the public’s health and urban landscape for much of the city’s history. Rapid population growth during the industrial revolution overloaded the city's sewer system, causing spillage into the river. Storms exacerbated this effect, and despite sewer upgrades London still frequently struggles with this problem. The city is also at major risk from climate change. The Thames is a tidal river that fluctuates as much as 8m between high and low tides. Areas at risk of tidal flooding house more than 1.5 million residents and billions of pounds worth of property, not to mention the city’s rich cultural heritage and numerous landmarks. Even a marginal increase in sea level could produce storm surges with devastating impacts, as seen following the floods of 1928 and 1947. Numerous innovative infrastructures, including Joseph Bazalgette’s sewer system, the Thames Tideway Tunnel and the Thames Barrier, have been designed in order to manage these risks and serve as catalysts for the Thames’ recovery. Despite the Thames’ remarkable transformation over the past fifty years, from a biologically dead river to one of the world’s cleanest urban waterways, its vulnerabilities continue to define the way people perceive the river and engage with its waters. [PROJECT]: Set-up as a precursor to the final studio project, the exercise was designed to get students to explore and think critically about the Thames and its natural and man-made ecologies. The brief called for a ‘device’ to be installed near the Tate Modern and Millennium Bridge at the nexus of culture, arts and technology. After carefully selecting our site, the aim was to create an interactive experience that was informed by a thorough analysis of the context, not unlike designing a building. The device invites users to learn about certain aspects of the Thames, while providing a new lens through which to engage the river and its waters. [POSITION/DESIGN]: The London Aqua Bike (LAB2030) is an interactive installation that speculates London’s future in the year 2030, when major flood defenses such as the Thames River Barrier are rendered obsolete. Specifically, the focus of the installation is on transportation and the systemic failures that will occur when portions of the city become immersed in floodwater. Conceptually, LAB2030 is a new hybrid vehicle that offers commuters unrestricted mobility during periods of inundation. It is not only a response to the rise of cyclists and riverboat commuters in London, but also a critique of the city’s approach to designing against failure, rather than for it. To simulate the experience, the design of LAB2030 consists of physical and virtual components. The installation is mounted on the concrete bench in front of the Tate Modern, facing St. Paul’s Cathedral. It serves as both an extension of the urban furniture and a piece of sculpture. Considering the rate of change in transportation vehicles, LAB2030’s dynamic form is influenced by the cycling ergonomics of concept bikes. The main body is constructed from ¾ inch plywood sheets CNC-milled to form a spine, and sixty-five custom ribs that fluctuate in length to support and balance the user’s body. Two leg-brackets bolt the main body to the concrete bench, counteracting the loads from the spine’s cantilever. Integrated at the tip of the cantilever, inside the light hood, is a slot for a laptop. Here, the user is immersed in a 3-minute video of a virtual commute around London’s inundated streets and landmarks.

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15 m

7m

82’

1 Greater London Area Floodplain

2 The Thames Barrier

3 Typology and Scale of London's Flood

Vir

tua l

Sim

ula

12’

4

30’

Exp

Thames Barrier closures since 1982

eri

en

ce

tio

nR ou

te

KIT OF PARTS

Sculpture

Furniture

65 custom wood elements

Micro perforated fabric screen

Rubber padded concrete

CNC Milled Plywood Spine

Rubber mat (1") Tensile Cable (1/8") Laptop Device

25


In a new report, TFL notes that car levels in the capital have plummeted while bicycles and river traffic are on the rise.

10 m 8.2 m Population

Bus

Train

Car

Bicycle

River Boat

CHANGES IN POPULATION GROWTH AND MODES OF INNER CITY TRANSIT

HOW WILL LONDON’S TRANSPORTATION ADAPT/RESPOND TO THE INEVITABLE FAILURE OF THE CITY’S FLOOD MEASURES?

LONDON AQUA BIKE (LAB 2030): A NEW HYBRID ROAD + RIVER VEHICLE

G F 30°

E D C B A

CONSTRUCTING THE EXPERIENCE

26


i nt er l oc k

BASE RIBS

ABDOMINAL RIBS

TORSO RIBS + HAND GRIPS

FRONT VIEW RIBS

ROOF ENCLOSURE RIBS

BENCH + LEG BRACKETS

SPINE

SEAT PADDING + LIGHT SCREENS

TENSILE CABLES + ANCHORS

DIGITAL HARDWARE

DESIGN FABRICATION

1A 1B 3 4 5

2A 2B 2C 2D 2E

Bo lt

ASSEMBLY

27


REALITY

28


SIMULATION

Canada House

Destination: Trafalgar Square, Westminster Route: Continue West on Pall Mall Credit Time (£) : 22:42 ETA: +/- 1 min Passenger(s): 1 LAB Patent # : 52 890

Trafalgar Sq.

LAB Docking Station

N National Gallery

Trafalgar Square Canada House

NAVIGATION MAP

29


SIMULATION LOOP MI5 NATIONAL SECURITY

ST. THOMAS HOSPITAL

COUNTY HALL LONDON EYE ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL SOUTHBANK CENTER

TATE MODERN SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE

30


Start

VISUAL SEQUENCE

1

PALACE OF WESTMINSTER MINISTRY OF DEFENCE BANQUETING HOUSE 2

SOMERSET HOUSE

VICTORIA EMBANKMENT SOMERSET HOUSE

7

11

13

UNILEVER HOUSE ST. PAUL’S CATHEDRAL

Parks

Historic Zones

City Context

Special Buildings Millenium Bridge

Path

Thames Path

Globe Theatre

Tate

31


01 // FABRICATION PROCESS

02 // MOVING COMPONENTS TO SITE

32


03 // ON-SITE ASSEMBLY 04 // PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

33


COURSE: BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS PRIMARY ADVISOR: JULIE LARSEN SECONDARY ADVISOR(S): LAWRENCE CHUA & TED BROWN TYPE: URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE LOCATION: PITTSBURGH, PA YEAR: 2014-15

HOW CAN ARCHITECTURE ENABLE FUTURE INFRASTRUCTURES TO PERFORM BEYOND THEIR TECHNICAL SCOPE AND ENGAGE ISSUES OF URBAN, SPATIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL URGENCY? THICK MATTERS: The ‘De-Optimization’ of Infrastructural Redundancies [SITUATION]: Closed system design methodologies anticipate only a single lifetime use. This approach has burdened many urban areas with a perpetual need to modify and repair deficient infrastructure. Rather than continuing to over-engineer these vital frameworks to resist the inevitable failure of individual components, future systems must go beyond their technical scope and seek ways to create greater synergy between different parts of the urban fabric. Infrastructures are inextricably linked to the development of cities and the delivery of improved living standards. The quintessential connector is the bridge; a structure indispensable to the efficacy of transportation networks. Optimized to facilitate the continuous flow of people and goods, the current state of bridges forecasts a future of urban dysfunction. Over the last decade, bridges in the United States have become a significant feature in the growing crisis of public infrastructure. Built during the post-war era when the growth of transportation networks was more akin to an explosion than mere expansion, many bridges have now exceeded their 50-year lifespan. [PROJECT]: This thesis calls for a renewed understanding of redundancy in order to strategically infuse infrastructure with public agency and diverse utility. Such an approach has the capacity to yield new urban potential and greater systemic outputs over a lifespan, allowing future infrastructures to be positioned both as a collective good and as a resilient service. This is tested through the prototyping and design of a new Liberty Bridge in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in order to demonstrate how infrastructural thickening might enable the next generation of public works to perform as resilient systems rather than standalone structures. [POSITION/DESIGN]: “Infrastructural Thickening” is the term I propose to describe a strategy that aims to modify the spatial, systemic and experiential utility of infrastructure; a strategy that works towards shifting the understanding of infrastructure from line to volume. This shift is achieved by virtue of ‘de-optimization’, a design technique that seeks to augment engineered specifications into scenarios for inhabitation, participation and added value. In pursuit of infrastructural thickening, this thesis explores relationships between structure, space and form, in order to generate redundancies that exceed the agenda of transportation and engage broader urban issues, specifically waste management, run-off and public space. Reimagined as a porous superstructure of piers, the new Liberty Bridge facilitates synergy between stormwater, cars, and pedestrian flows at both a local and infrastructural scale, incorporating into the design both adjacencies and planned future developments. The bridge, therefore, is understood not as a 2D single-use system but rather as a unified, heterogeneous volume comprised of a synthesis of integrated systems. Ultimately, this thesis envisions the next generation of infrastructure as (a) thick matter – a new public territory that allows people to engage in mutually productive dialogues with issues of urban, spatial and environmental urgency.

34


Exploded Axon of Bridge Midspan

Flows

(x): cars (y): stormwater

Pier 1

1

2

2

3

3

4

4

5

5

6

6

Situated where the two flows overlap

35


1 Stormwater Collection

2 Sedimentation

3 Treatment Plant 4 Reprocessing

5 Reuse

6 Urban Spectacle 7 Water Plaza

8 Visitor’s Pavilion 9 Release/Absorb

De-Optimization of the Pier Drawing inspiration from the spatial and systemic qualities of water towers, the collage seeks to elaborate the purely structural function of the pier with circulation and programs, transforming it into an experiential stormwater facility. The figural forms embedded in the poche articulate the journey and treatment of stormwater from the car deck down to the river.

36


Modulation Series: Overlapping Surfaces Horizontal aggregation of structure generates spatial qualities and forms that respond to water in plan.

Modulation Series: Porous Blocks Vertical aggregation of structure generates spatial qualities and forms that respond to water in section.

Physical Constructs 3D printed composites that respond to water movement/containment both in plan and section.

37


SITE CONDITIONS

1 Post-Industrial Re-Zoning

2 Redevelopment of Brownfield Sites

3 Infrastructure traversing the River

4 Infrastructure along the River

ISSUES/CONCERNS

5 Pittsburgh’s Surface Water Hydrology

38

6 Aging sewers experience perpetual Overflows

7 Riverfront Accessibility


NEW INFRASTRUCTURAL PROTOTYPE

Bridge ∙ Water Tower ∙ Stormwater Treatment Facility

Two Birds with One Stone Proposing a hybrid infrastructure that can address issues of both waste management and transportation.

During Cloudburst: INUNDATION Like a modern day Roman aqueduct, Pittsburgh’s vertiginous terrain can be utilized to guide stormwater from elevated areas to the bridge for treatment and temporary storage. In doing so, synergy emerges between the infrastructure and landscape.

After Rainfall: INFILTRATION Similar to water towers, stormwater is gradually drained into the river and low lying areas. There, the water either undergoes ground infiltration or is introduced into the adjacent buildings as graywater.

Residential Zone

River

Urban Industrial Zone

Riverbank Civic Complex

WETSCAPES: Blurring the boundary between the Infrastructure and Landscape Implementing stormwater infrastructure as both horizontal and vertical systems allows for spatial and systemic overlap between the bridge and its adjacencies. The strategy seeks to transform leftover spaces beneath/around the bridge into a system of wetscapes that combine a diversity of programs and multiple biotopea to manage runoff and promote urban sustainability. Ultimately, defining a new amphibious landscape that invites the public to engage, explore and experience the city and riverfront through a different lens; stormwater.

39


Design Development: Porous Superstructure

2620’

80’

Basic Grid

+

The distortion in the structural grid is directly related to vertical movement of water through the bridge.

40

-


Warren Truss

Steel Cage

Light Frame Filigree

Pier Grid

Porosity ‘Heat’ Map

EXPRESS

Design Strategy: Structure, Water Flow and Circulation SCENIC

B

EXPRESS

A

Car vs Pedestrian Flows

41


Dry Plan

Wet Plan


Cascading Plan (Left) - Zoom In (Right)


WETCAPE SCENARIOS I. Before

After

II.

Stormwater from the bridge is stored in underground cisterns and recycled into adjacent buildings for graywater use. Beneath the bridge, a new park invites the public to engage and learn about water quality issues through biotopeas and areas of play.

URBAN FOOD GARDEN

Spanning a Manufacturing Zone adjacent to the Three Rivers Trail

After

46

NEIGHBOURHOOD PARK

Spanning a Moderate Density Multi-unit Residential

Treated stormwater is used to cultivate and support the needs of a vegetable garden. This community-run facility invites the public to participate in the day-to-day operations, promoting self-reliance and sustainability as well as opportunities for employment.


III.

Before

After

IV.

The Water Bowl is a year-round multifunctional sports plaza that also functions as a resevoir during heavy rainfall or snowmelt.

MONONGAHELA RIVER PAVILION (MRP) Spanning the Riverbank

After

V.

MULTIFUNCTIONAL SPORTS PLAZA

Spanning a Municipal Complex adjacent to the Three Rivers Trail

Before

After

The boardwalk and MRP features various community facilities, serving as a public forum to discuss and engage Pittsburgh's river ecologies.

PUBLIC VIEWING DECK(S) Spanning the River

An intricate network of paths connects a series of platforms where the public can congregate, interact and appreciate the surrounding vistas.

47


01 // Monongahela Visitor’s Pavilion

02 // Pier River Foundation

Structural Heterogeneity

48

Composite Section Elevation

Cross Sections


03 // Spanning the River

49


PART II


PROFESSIONAL ENDEAVOURS ** (The following images are of work that I have produced or been involved with during internships and are included with the office's permission) **


VILLA ONE Built on the outskirts of Copenhagen, Villa ONE is a new prefab prototype designed to both match the cost and surpass the quality of the cheapest standardized houses on the market. The Y-shaped floorplan was developed to provide a flexible framework for living. It distributes the program effectively while allowing for the best use of the outdoor space, which is subjected to noise from the adjoining highway. The social program is consolidated at the point where the three wings meet, surrounded by views to the landscape and access to a south-facing courtyard and gardens. Three ‘service cores’ provide buffer zones for the bedrooms and study located at edge of each wing. Anticipating that the family’s structure and needs will change over time, the study and garage can be be easily converted into bedrooms.

00 12 2

m

0 41 2

m

IN

IST EX G SO UN D IER RR BA

.10 16

.54

m

m

22

N

m

2.5 0 1 2

5

10

Site Plan The planning restrictions and context defined the allowable building area and, ultimately, inspired the form of the villa.

-4.50 m 73 db

12PM 68

SITE SITE

db

8AM

-3.50 m

6PM

-0.60 m

63 db

WINTER SPRING/FALL SUMMER

+0.00 m

Terrain (m)

Noise (dB)

Nature Reserve

Sun Chart

3 3

2

P

2

1

FORM FORM

1 ST

RE

FO

N

W LA

Soundproofing

Max Sun Exposure

Max Views

+

Y-Bar Hybrid

DESIGN DESIGN

ACCESS + PRIVACY VIEWS + KEPT VEGETATION

SUN ZONE + NOISE PROTECTED

Spatial Organization

Social vs Private

Facade Variation

Land Distribution

Diagrams The Y-Bar is the by-product of a rigorous formal investigation to develop a typology that offers diverse and hybrid living experiences.

52


Unfolded Social Space

Children's Bedroom

Study

Second Bathroom

Master Bedroom

Master Bathroom

Cross Sections The diagrams reveal the relative scale of programs and their proximity to different outdoor spaces.

GR

EE

NW AL

SECRET GARDEN L

7

C2 5 2

C3 1

SUN COURTYARD 3

6

C1

D

OO W

GLASS

4

SPACES 1. Living Room 2. Kitchen 3. Dining Room 4. Master Bedroom 5. Children’s Bedroom I 6. Study —> Bedroom II 7. Garage —> Guest Room

MEADOW

CORES C1. WC + Walk-in Closet C2. WC + Washer/Dryer Cabinets C3. Book Stack + Small Closet

Exploded Axon The relationship betweem interior and exterior programs is negotiated/defined by three major facades. Each facade is materially distinct and responds to the unique characteristics of the site and climate.

NATURE RESERVE

25.1m

10m

10m

SOUND BARRIER

1.2m

Site Section The Y-Bar is the by-product of a rigorous formal investigation to develop a typology that offers diverse and hybrid living experiences.

53


SUN COURTYARD south-facing garden outdoor social zone shielded from noise

SECRET GARDEN entry promenade privacy from neighbours native vegetation

C

C

MEDOW views towards landscape low mainteinance vegetation completely private

54


A. Glass Facade

1. Living Room & Studio

B. Foundation

2. Master Bedroom

C. Timber Frame Construction

Floor Plan, Sections & Wall Details Along the length of the site the floor plates are tiered in order to mimic the slope of the landscape.

55


02 // ThermoWood Facade + Sun Terrace

56

03 // Green wall facade + Secret


01 // Glass facade + Meadow

04 // Generous social spaces feature panoramic views

05 // Access to sun garden

57


LEMVIG SKATEPARK EFFEKT was one of four teams selected to participate in the national “Byg-Det-Op” (Built It!) campaign to help various municipalities across Denmark transform their neighborhoods via new public amenities. The town of Lemvig, desperate to revitalize their waterfront, won the bid for a new skatepark on the harbor and chose EFFEKT to help realize their vision. Working closely with the local community and various stakeholders, the design team proposed a ‘Skate+Park’ hybrid. To create an effective and lasting public space, the hybrid stitches together the ‘hard’ logics of skateparks with ‘soft’ features of an urban park to support a multitude of activities and provide a variety of spaces for all age groups and users. Hard Features: Skate Elements

Inverse Park

Soft Features: Recreational Activities

CITY

HARB OUR

SEA

Continuous Skate Loop

Site

Design Strategy

Concept

Seating Island

Barbeque Stalls

Playhouse Folly & Sandpit

Sponsor’s Sign

1

2

3

4

2 3

1 4

Site Plan [Above]: Assisted in the design of a seating area, playground, grilling area and a sponsor’s sign for the green space of skatepark.. [Right]: Worked on-site for a week with two project architects, two fellow interns, contractors and members of the public to finish the final stage of construction.Assisted in laying turf, planting shrubs/trees, building the play and seating area, painting the basketball court and installing flood lights.

58


DAY #1

DAY #7

01 // Before & After

02 // Packing Dirt and Laying Turf

04 // Installing Flood Lights

05 // Planting grasses and trees

03 // Building the Play and Seating Area

06 // Painting Ball Court

07 // Testing BBQ Stalls

59


08 // Project exhibition at DAC

09 // Aerial view of Opening Ceremony


BRØNDBY STRAND A masterplan competition for the revitalization of a 600,000 m2 Modernist housing complex located 40 minutes west of Copenhagen. In addition to new amenities, the team's proposal focused on rethinking the overall infrastructure, facades and public space of the various building typologies. Responsibilities included producing CAD drawings and 3D models of the site and building typologies, researching prefab material assemblies and developing facade strategies for the Lavhuse (4-storey apartment block).

Masterplan Overview The housing complex is comprised of 12 towers (Højhuse), 66 4-storey apartment blocks (Lavhuse) and 8 townhouse blocks (Rækkehus).

lavhuse

rækkehus

Højhuse

Site Plan The aim of the new masterplan is twofold. Along the north-south axis, the design utilizes hard and soft infrastructures to alleviate stormwater runoff and create synergy between built and natural landscapes. Along the east-west axis, a thick promenade seamlessly transitions between the ground plane and raised plazas, creating a vibrant, navigable and multi-functional armature.

East facade

West facade

West/South facade

Lavhuse Facade Alternatives Breaking the homogeneity through changes in material and facade configurations.

62

West/South facade


Phases of Facade Renovation Rehabilitating the shell and facade improves the building’s energy and operational efficiency.

Interior Conditions Considering the quality of the interior environment in response to different facade alternatives.

Lavhuse Entrance Lavhuse section combined with close-up of the west facade.

63


LARRY BOWNE A R C H I T E C T S FOOTBRIDGE RENOVATION Collaborated with the principal on a short deadline to design and develop schematic proposals for a footbridge renovation at the Montessori School of Syracuse. Responsibilities included conducting measured site surveys, participating in client meetings, producing technical drawings, 3D models and visualization for different cladding options.

1

A1.2

SECTION 1 SECTION 1 SECTION 2 1 SECTION A1.2 A1.2 1’-0” A1.2 Scale A1.2 1/4”=Scale 1’-0” 1/4”= Scale 1/4”= Scale 1’-0”1/4”= 1’-0”

SECTION 2 SECTION 2 SECTION 3 SECTION 3 SECTION 3 SECTION 4 2 SECTION A1.2 3 SECTION A1.2 A1.2 A1.2 1’-0” A1.2 A1.2 1’-0” A1.2 Scale A1.2 1/4”=Scale 1’-0” 1/4”= 1’-0” 1/4”= Scale 1/4”= Scale 1’-0”1/4”= 1’-0” Scale 1/4”=Scale Scale 1/4”= Scale 1’-0”1/4”= 1’-0”

SECTION 4 SECTION 4 SECTION 5 4 SECTION A1.2 A1.2 1’-0” A1.2 Scale A1.2 1/4”=Scale 1’-0” 1/4”= Scale 1/4”= Scale 1’-0”1/4”= 1’-0”

Cross Sections

S

L E NE AM FR G PA ING ED F T T IS EX UGA RR CO

G CIN BRA ED ADD EQUIR R AS

G

KIN

EC

WD

NE

U

CE

OR

F EIN

CM

NG

DI

AD

CL

S

AL

OS

OP

PR

R

Exploded Axon Overview of the proposed renovations focusing specifically on the structure, decking and exterior envelope.

64

H

WIT

LES

G HIN GS FIN OO ANELS R E P NT LAC REP SLUCE N TRA

SECTION 5 SECTION 5 SECTION 5 SECT A1.2 1’-0” A1.2 Scale A1.2 1/4”=Scale 1’-0” 1/4”= Scale 1/4”= Scal 1’


1

2

A1.4

A1.4

3

4

A1.4

A1.4

Longitudinal Section

existing building to be demolished

existing building existing building

SOUTH ELEVATION Scale 1/4”= 1’-0”

West Elevation

Corten Steel

Polycarbonate

Wood Slats

1

Visualizations Conceptual renderings showing the proposed cladding options from different views.

65


52 WEEKS, 52 CITIES An exhibition documenting Iwan Baan’s year long photographic journey around the world. The exhibition design, fabrication and assembly was completed in one-week in collaboration with McNisky Jeantus and Eric LeBlanc.

Conceptual framework

52

1

1

Linear Sequence Creating an experience where each city can be viewed autonomously...

52

Axis Mundi but also part of a larger journey, empowering the viewer to define their own order

Contextualization Situating the journey within the premise of the SOA Gallery

Design Strategy M U RI O IT D AU

RY LE AL G R O ID RR CO

The Gallery The Gallery is beneath the Auditorium adjacent to main corridor

Spatial Synergy Establishing a dialogue between the Gallery and Corridor

Unrolling the Film A photographic veneer defines the enclosure of the exhibit

52 W

System of Display Images are mounted on a double row of timber frames suspended from the Auditorium

Floor Decals The tickers reinforce the geometry of the exhibit and include commentaries from the Iwan Baan

Assembly Process 1 1/2”

3/4”

4”

1 The project uses off-the-shelf standard lumber cut in 18” and 28” increments

66

2 Images are mounted on the frames fastened together with eye hooks and fishing wire

1 2

3 Floor decals reinforce the form of the exhibit and include Baan's personal accounts


23 24

25 26

27 28

29 30 31 32

21 22

33 34

19 20

35 36

17 18

37

16

15

38

13 14

39 40

11 12

41 42

9 10

43 44

7 8

45 46 47 48

5 6

52 WEEKS 3 4

49 50

1 2

51 52

University Pl.

Campus Quad

Plan

Cafeteria

Woodshop

Slocum Atrium

Elevation

18” 4” 18”

20”

67


PART III


MISCELLANEOUS


SKETCHES A series of freehand drawings documenting various sites and buildings while traveling in Europe. Specifically, exploring ideas of architectural form, spatial sequence and structure through diagrams and other more technical views.

La Sangrada Familia, Barcelona - Section

Pantheon - Isometric

Lloyd’s Building Atrium, London

Trajan’s Market, Rome - Composite

70


Hemeroscopium House, Madrid - Construction Sequence

Canary Wharf Tube Station, London - Analysis

Sant’ Andrea al Quirinale, Rome - Analysis

Millenium Dome, London - Composite

Sant’ Andrea al Quirinale, Rome - Isometric

71


PHOTOGRAPHY An effort to capture the complex stories and spatial situations embedded in the urban and natural landscape(s).

72


73


SCULPTURE Experimented with different methods and techniques of fabrication using wood, metals and plastics. Through academic instruction and self-initiated investigations I became familiar with wood and metalworking, vacuum forming, casting and mold making.

Friend Request (2011)

The sculpture critiques the intimacy found on social media platforms....or arguably the lack thereof. It is comprised of various wax casts of hands/forearms mounted on screen of a discarded monitor.

74


THANK YOU! marcoantonioravini@gmail.com

75


Copyright © 2016 All rights reserved


Marco Antonio Ravini Architecture Portfolio  

A collection of academic and professional work produced, both independently and collaboratively, during a 5-year BArch degree at Syracuse Un...

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