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YOU ARE HERE MAPS’ Annual Review 2012-2013


CONTENTS

PAGE 1 - YOU ARE HERE

PAGE 2 - THE NUMBERS

PAGE 4 - MENTORS

PAGE 8 - LOOKED AFTER CHILDREN MENTORING

PAGE 6 - INCLUSION MENTORING

TORING PAGE 10 - LEAVING CARE MEN PAGE 12 - MENTORING ALTERNATIVE CARE

PAGE 14 - SCHOOLS MENTORING PAGE 16 - PEER MENTORING

PAGE 18 - LEAP MENTORING PAGE 20 - LEAP OUTREACH

PAGE 22 - ROMANCE ACADEMY

PAGE 23 - THE LOFT PAGE 24 - CASE STUDIES PAGE 32 - THE FUTURE PAGE 33 - FINAL WORD


1

YOU ARE HERE Welcome to ‘You Are Here 2012-2013’. This is a space for MAPS to take a breath and reflect on all that the past year has held, as well as to look forward to the next and all the exciting opportunities that it will bring. It is a chance for MAPS to share its vision and its achievements with partners, friends, supporters and all those involved in the project. MAPS’ success is testament to the commitment of our outstanding volunteer mentor community, whose support enables us, not only to exist as a project but more importantly to provide invaluable and life changing support to young people in the London Borough of Sutton (LBS). Over the past year our volunteers have gifted over 15,000 hours of their time! To each and every one of you, we say a heart felt ‘Thank you’. Thank you for the gift of your time, thank you for making a difference in your community and thank you for your generosity of spirit that is making such a huge impactful contribution to the young people that you have and are supporting. Thank you! MAPS would also like to thank all of the young people involved in our project who constantly inspire and enthuse us to do more. MAPS are committed to ensuring that we continue to be what our young people need in today’s society. As a project within Volunteer Centre Sutton, MAPS are forever grateful to our funders who make what we do possible. We would like to publicly thank, London Borough of Sutton (LBS), The Henry Smith Charity, Children In Need, The Sutton Community Fund and Big Lottery for their support over the past year. Here at MAPS we can truly say we love what we do. This year, like any other we have worked hard to achieve our two main aims: 1. To improve the quality of life and longer term opportunities for the most vulnerable, isolated and disadvantaged young people in our society. 2. To build social cohesion and derive new and improved skills and opportunities for volunteers. We hope that the following demonstrates that we have not only achieved our aims, but have excelled in the delivery of a specialist early intervention, mentoring project. Thank you for taking time out to enjoy the MAPS annual review.

Helen Gasparelli MAPS Manager


2

THE NUMBERS What a fantastic year it has been for MAPS, working with 393 young people across all projects. We have grown and diversified by adding one new project and one new course. We sit on two separate alternative provision boards, have partnered with even more organisations, run three rounds of new mentor training securing 40 new mentors, hosted a number of events, had an article published in the ‘Every Child’ journal and even held our first ever young persons residential weekend and that’s just for starters! But it’s not just our numbers that demonstrate the work that we have been doing, its our outcomes that show the difference MAPS makes. Using our 40 Developmental Assets framework we can demonstrate significant improvements for young people across eight measurable outcomes over the 12 months of mentoring, which are: Support, Empowerment, Boundaries & Expectations, Constructive use of Time, Commitment to Learning, Positive Values, Social Competencies and Positive Identity - all which empower young people to succeed in life and achieve their full potential. Using RADA (Relative Assessment of Developmental Assets) we have illustrated MAPS impact across all of our projects,with each young person gaining an average of 6.3 assets overall. Through the process of intentional asset building throughout the mentoring year we can evidence that young people have

reduced their liklihood of engaging in problem alcohol use by 16%, elicit drug use by 12% and sexual activity by 10%. Evidence also demonstrates that they are 40% more likely to succeed in school due to a renewed commitment to learning. We have also seen a 33% growth in positive identity resulting in the young person having more confidence, better relationships and ability to peacefully resolve conflict; In addition, there have been considerable increases in social competencies and constructive use of time. Improvements across the eight measurable outcomes demonstrate that young people feel more positive about their future, confident and able to influence or be in control of the things that happen to them, as well as being better equipped to make positive life choices such as choosing to access and achieve in education. The evidence: Mentoring works!

SUPPORT 10 9

POSITIVE IDENTITY

8 7

EMPOWERMENT

6 5 4 3 2

SOCIAL COMPETENCIES

1 0

BOUNDARIES & EXPECTATIONS

CONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME

POSITIVE VALUES

COMMITMENT TO LEARNING

KEY:

START DESTINATION


3

WELCOME TO SUTTON

Ethnicity

White British White Irish White other Mixed white black Caribbean Mixed white black African

MAPS exists to serve its local community. The London Borough of Sutton (LBS) is a vibrant diverse borough with contrast and character. It embraces its modern Greater London visage whilst retaining its 16 parks making us one on London’s greenest boroughs. Despite all its wonder Sutton is not without its challenges, with 18% of Suttons children living in poverty and a large educational attainment gap for vulnerable young people MAPS continue to strive to reduce inequality and are committed to supporting change.

Mixed other Asian Indian Asian Other Black Caribbean Black African Other

Young People come to MAPS via a plethora of referral routes such as teachers, psychologists, youth workers, social workers... The list is diverse, as are the needs of the young people that choose to be part of our award winning programme. The graphs depicted on this page help to build a picture of the MAPS population. This years ethnicity data evidences that 22% of young people represented BME groups, which is 5% higher than the borough as a whole, which has a BME index of 17.6%.

Disability 100 80 60

38% of our young people are recognised as having a disability with learning and/or mental illness being the most common. MAPS continue to respond to the needs of our mentees by providing professional additional training for our mentors.

40 20

Location

0 No disability

Mental health

Social communication

Physical

Learning

Hearing

Sutton Central Sutton West Sutton North Sutton South The Wrythe

LBS is made up of 18 wards, each with their own unique characteristics. Although a relatively small borough geographically, it is home to 191,123 residents of which 44,913 are young people aged 0-19 years. Latest data suggests that this figure is set to rise by 18.3% by 2021 an increase 10.4% higher than the national average; demonstrating a need for MAPS to continue to grow and develop enabling us to continue the support of Suttons most vulnerable young people. A little over 17% of our referrals are for young people housed out of the borough, these are largely LAC and LC young people, however of the 18 wards, 46% of our referrals come from just 4 areas – areas that are statistically the boroughs most deprived, have the highest obesity rates, the lowest levels of educational attainment and highest teenage pregnancy rates. However as seen in 20112012 annual evaluation, the fact that our referral locations are weighted towards the wards with greatest need, is a testament to our referral process and the professionals who are on the front line identifying these young people.

Worcester Park Carshalton Central Carshalton South & Clockhouse Wallington North Wallington South Beddington North Beddington South Wandle Valley St Helier Stonecot Nonsuch Cheam Belmont Out of Borough

0

5

10

15

20

25


4

MENTORS MAPS mentors are true heros. We can’t put in to words how grateful we are...but here’s our attempt... Another year has passed in the life of MAPS 16 years since its birth have elapsed And still in these Sutton streets we find Such numbers of volunteers so kind To give up a weekly hour of their lives For those in need and those deprived But many have been surprised to find Life as a mentor is no great bind With your mentee life can be fast Go-karting, sports, a laser blast Those wanting something more serene Choose baking, eating, and cinema scenes Few barriers exist to what anyone does Bee-keeping’s allowed, if that’s your ‘buzz’ The life of a mentor doesn’t end there Fund raising too to support more pairs Collecting money with buckets and smiles Sponsored to run twenty six miles The efforts of mentors show no bounds As the evidence in statistics can be found This year 40 new volunteers been trained Into our mentoring bank ordained 15,000 hours of mentor time given 393 young people positively driven Better equipped for life’s demands Greater confidence and in command So many people have played their part In giving these young lives a kick start On behalf of MAPS these heartfelt thanks To those new who have joined our ranks To those old and been with us for years Those who have given blood, sweat and tears The funders that fund, the charities that give This local community that continues to live People full of hope and endeavour Young lives changed forever By Peter Gasparelli


5

My mentor is like my Nanny McPhee, when you need her but don’t necessarily want her, she is there every week. When you no longer need her but you want her it’s time for her to leave Mentee aged 16


6

INCLUSION MENTORING The Inclusion mentoring stream within MAPS supports vulnerable young people aged 9-15 years who reside in the London Borough of Sutton (LBS). Through one to one mentoring by out trained volunteers, young people are empowered to achieve their full potential.

This year has seen a slight change to the panel that young people are referred through. Formerly known as the Children’s and Young Peoples Integrated Support Panel (CYPISP), our Inclusion mentoring team now sit on the Children and Young Peoples Resource Panel (CYPRP). The purpose of the multi agency panel is to offer the best package of support available to young people and their families. MAPS Inclusion stream aims to work with 40 young people per year but continues to exceed this number by referring young people in to alternative streams of mentoring for support such as LEAP and MAC providing a value added service for LBS.

Bernie Rowe, Louise Storey and Chris Mingay Inclusion Coordinators

Young people today face social exclusion for many reasons such as low self esteem, bullying, poverty, abuse, poor family relationships, domestic violence, loss or bereavement, disability, mental health or offending behaviour. MAPS support young people affected by one or many of these challenging life circumstances. At MAPS, we embrace these young people and commit to providing them with a mentor for one year, where they will meet on a weekly basis to offer support, consistency, and a non judgemental space to be heard. 50% of the young people that Inclusion mentoring works with live in just three of the 18 wards in LBS. Two of which fall within the 20% most deprived areas in the UK, which are subsequently the areas most densely populated with the highest levels of teenage pregnancies and lowest educational attainment levels. These two wards demonstrate an ongoing need for comprehensive early intervention children’s services such as mentoring.


7

INCLUSION EVALUATION: By using the self assessment evaluation tool, we are able to evidence an increase across all eight sub categories of measurement. The two areas which displayed the largest improvement were Constructive Use of Time and Empowerment with reported increases of 50% respectively, closely followed by Commitment to Learning with a 33% increase. The increase of Constructive Use of Time demonstrates that young people engaged in mentoring are accessing, or feel like they are able to access more extra curricular activities than before mentoring began. The result: they are spending their free time more wisely, with some specific examples including spending more time with family, rather than on games consoles, or coupled with another area of increase (Commitment to Learning), some young people have been attending a homework club rather than being unsure of what to do with their free time.

Many young people within the Inclusion stream have complex family situations where they feel that they have little or no power over ever changing scenarios and life circumstances. Many of these young people are also supported by statutory services or the subject of a child protection plan, often meaning that they are unable to recognise that they have a voice in these situations. Through increasing their assets in the area of Empowerment, young people are able to actively engage wtih their communities, families and other support services to communicate their needs and aspirations, demonstrating a new confidence to have a positive impact on their own lives. Inclusion mentoring provides a foundation of support which promotes the attainment of transferable skills assisting each young person in all areas of their lives, allowing them to be the best that they can be.

SUPPORT 10 9

POSITIVE IDENTITY

8 7

EMPOWERMENT

6 5 4 3 2

SOCIAL COMPETENCIES

1 0

BOUNDARIES & EXPECTATIONS

CONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME

POSITIVE VALUES

COMMITMENT TO LEARNING

KEY:

START DESTINATION


8

LOOKED AFTER CHILDREN MENTORING The MAPS Looked After Children (LAC) provision is a dedicated service that supports young people in the care of the London Borough of Sutton (LBS), aged 6 upwards. Many of these young people have faced substantial tribulations in life which have led to them being in care, reasons such as: abuse, neglect, bereavement, they may have families who are struggling to cope in difficult circumstances such as parental mental illness or substance misuse. Less than one in ten are in care because of their own behavior. Whatever the reason, these children are highly vulnerable. Their problems are often compounded by the number of placement transitions made during their time in care, which can also seriously disrupt their education, damage confidence and self esteem and be isolating if moved to a new community. The latest national statistics and key points below are from DfE: Children Looked After by Local Authorities in England (including adoption and care leavers - year ending 31 March 2012: • There were 67,050 looked after children, an increase of 2% compared to the previous year and an increase of 13% compared to 31st March 2008. • Of the children looked after, 50,260 were cared for in a foster placement. This represents 75% of all children looked after at 31 March 2012. • There were 28,220 children who started to be looked after during the year ending 31 March 2012. This represents an increase of 3% from the previous year’s figure of 27,500 and an increase of 21% from 2008. MAPS has been working with these vulnerable children for over a decade and in that time have gained a vast array of knowledge and skills that we have shared with the mentoring community to help equip them for their journey with a looked after child; A journey that empowers the young person to go on and make positive life changing decisions.

Teresa Martucci, LAC Coordinator


9

LAC EVALUTION: SUPPORT 10 9

POSITIVE IDENTITY

8

EMPOWERMENT

7 6 5 4 3 2

SOCIAL COMPETENCIES

1

BOUNDARIES & EXPECTATIONS

0

CONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME

POSITIVE VALUES

KEY:

START DESTINATION

COMMITMENT TO LEARNING

RADA results for the Looked After Children stream show increases in all eight areas, with the most noticeable being increases in Social Competencies, Empowerment and Commitment to Learning. The 53% increase in Commitment to learning is a really positive step forward. For many LAC, education often suffers. This is not a surprise where education is disrupted due to placement moves resulting in loss of existing peer relationships, transitioning to new educational placements, even a change in school uniform can impact a young persons identity, sense of belonging and engagement. The increase in Commitment to Learning is often achieved through a mentor being able to offer support with homework, as well as encouraging other aspects of learning, such as reading for pleasure, signposting to extra-curricular courses and helping a young person to adapt to change. The introduction of a positive adult role model helps to demonstrate responsible behaviour and encourage the child to follow these examples. A key aspect to mentoring is the

incorporation of clear boundaries and expectations from the beginning of the relationship. By introducing these boundaries at the start, twinned with the implementation of consistency by the mentor, young people have learnt to establish and recognise what is expected of them with their mentor; something that they are then able to transfer to other areas of their lives. Through mentoring, young people are encouraged to take ownership of activities and many other decisions throughout the year. This is empowering for young people, as it is equipping them with the skills and confidence they need to be active and by having the support of a mentor, they are able to be encouraged and develop. This, paired with the use of SMART goals at the quarterly reviews means that the young person is setting, planning and attaining a number of goals throughout their mentoring relationship. The 53% Increase in Empowerment on average across all LAC mentoring relationships shows a successful and substantial positive influence that mentoring has been having.


10

LEAVING CARE MENTORING

Teresa Martucci, Leaving Care Coordinator

The majority of care leavers move to independent living between 16 and 18 years of age, whereas most of their peers remain at home well into their twenties. They experience a systemic break in the continuity of care, which is frequently allied to a reduction in support and services. They are expected to undertake their journey to adulthood, far younger and in far less time than their peers. For many of these young people, leaving care is an event which often signifies the end of the final option of care support. Their problems are made worse by the number of moves that many of them are forced to make during their time in care, which can also seriously disrupt their education. Not surprisingly, many of them don’t do as well at school as their peers. This has a lasting effect on their adult lives; care leavers are more likely than children who have not been in care to be unemployed, get in to trouble with the police and they often have trouble forming stable relationships. They struggle to cope financially and often, have not had the support which allows them how to learn skills such as budgeting. Young people leaving care face more potential risks than their peers not engaged in the care system. Statistics show that care leavers are more likely to be unemployed, to become homeless or to spend time in prison. One out of every seven young women leaving care is pregnant or already a mother. Young care leavers show significantly lower academic achievement than their peers – just 11% of children in care gain five GCSEs compared to the national average of over 60%. Department for Education (DfE) published statistics for 2012 which showed that 28% of Care Leavers aged 19 were in education other than higher education, and 7% were in higher education. This compares to 30% and 6% in 2011 respectively. At MAPS, we commit to journeying with a young person (mentee) for one year, with the help from an unpaid volunteer (mentor). Mentors help and support young people who struggle with confidence and self-esteem issues, develop the life skills they will need to look after themselves, including encouraging them to undertake employment, training or further education and equips the mentee with the life skills to assist them now and in their future.


11

LEAVING CARE EVALUTION: The RADA results show increases across all 8 areas of impact. For many being in care and leaving care has a negative impact in feeling supported and empowered due to many situations being out of their control. However through mentoring we have seen three areas of significant increase which are in Empowerment, Support and Constructive Use of Time. The increase of over 100% in Empowerment comes as no surprise after reflecting upon the RADA results of Looked After Children (LAC). Young people who are leaving the care system have faced similar struggles and issues as those who are currently LAC, like many, at the beginning of their relationship empowerment is often low. However, through the support of a mentoring relationship, we can see that there is significant growth in this area, whether it is by equipping young people to learn life skills to successfully live independently, finding employment or making positive contributions to society.

With mentoring as a foundation, young people have reported a 50% increase in the area of Support, suggesting there have been improvement in areas such as knowing where to access help and guidance and recognising people in their lives that they can rely on. Feeling supported now enables young people to gain confidence is asking for support and knowing how to access it in the future. MAPS believe that providing a mentor, raising aspirations and journeying with a young person for a year empowers the young person to make positives changes and take control of their lives.

SUPPORT 10 9

POSITIVE IDENTITY

8 7

EMPOWERMENT

6 5 4 3 2

SOCIAL COMPETENCIES

1 0

BOUNDARIES & EXPECTATIONS

CONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME

POSITIVE VALUES

COMMITMENT TO LEARNING

KEY:

START DESTINATION


12

MENTORING ALTERNATIVE CARE The MAC stream works with 15 young people per year between the ages of 8 and 18. Having worked with this client group for a number of years MAPS is aware of the many disadvantages they have experienced and continue to face due to the impact being looked after has on them. Many of these young people have been bereaved or have witnessed traumatic behavior from parents or other adults in their lives such as, criminal behavior, domestic violence, substance misuse, addictions, poverty and neglect. These experiences lead to low self esteem, lack of identity, attachment issues, reduced aspirations and educational attainment, problematic and risk taking behaviors as well as emotional and mental health issues. Referrals come directly from the boroughs primary and secondary schools, from statutory agencies and through the Children and Young Peoples Resource Panel. As long as the young person fits the criteria of the right age bracket, and is not living with either of their birth parents, we are able to accept them onto the project and support them to achieve their full potential and enjoy life.

Bernie Rowe and Connie Gillett, MAC Coordinators

Now, in its second year of funding from BBC charity Children in Need, Mentoring Alternative Care (MAC) supports young people looked after by adults other than their birth parents; who live with a relative under Special Guardianship Orders, are in private fostering arrangements, or who are adopted. In most cases long term support is not provided, resulting in young people unable to access services because they are not recognised as “looked after�. Latest statistics demonstrate that the number of children known to be living in private foster arrangements in 2012 increased by 8% from 2011, an increase of 38% since 2008, demonstrating the growing need to continue to support this group of young people [DfE 2012].


13

MAC EVALUATION: SUPPORT 10 9

POSITIVE IDENTITY

8

EMPOWERMENT

7 6 5 4 3 2

SOCIAL COMPETENCIES

1

BOUNDARIES & EXPECTATIONS

0

CONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME

POSITIVE VALUES

KEY:

START DESTINATION

COMMITMENT TO LEARNING

The MAC project the data shows some interesting and encouraging findings. The areas of Commitment to Learning, Constructive Use of Time and Empowerment have increased the most dramatically, with Commitment to Learning increasing by 75%. MAPS believe that the opportunity for a child or young person to set targets helps them to focus and contribute towards a sense of renewed empowerment. Children who have had to change living arrangements can often end up with a sense of disempowerment as many things have been taken out of their control. A years mentoring offers them the opportunity to make small and manageable decisions which empower them. Throughout the mentoring relationship the child or young person is encouraged to do new things and often to start travelling independently to meet the mentor if appropriate. As well as this increasing empowerment it also helps to develop their constructive use of time.

Our RADA shows an increase in Positive Identity and Support. Due to every child or young person having experienced separation from a parent for a variety of reasons these young people often have a low sense of positive identity, feel isolated and lacking in support. For many of the young people we have worked with this year the mentor has been put in place to enable the child or young person to continue to adapt to being in the new environment and to have an opportunity to talk through feelings with an independent adult. We have seen the years mentoring not only help that young person have a greater sense of self but also greatly improve and enhance their relationship with their carer. This shows that MAC mentoring is helping achieve an increase in two of the most important Asset groups for this group of vulnerable young people.


14

SCHOOLS MENTORING The MAPS school mentoring project began over a decade ago after research from the European Social Fund evidenced the success mentoring can have in schools. It is widely recognized now that effective mentoring can significantly raise aspirations and close the aspirationattainment gap.

MAPS school mentoring is aimed at providing practical help and encouragement to pupils who have the potential to do well at school but whom, for a variety of reasons, may not be fulfilling that potential. MAPS school mentoring initiates a relationship between an adult and a young person for 12 months, providing the young person with non-judgmental and consistent support, guidance and assistance. Each mentoring experience varies greatly from the next, and much will depend on the personality and needs of the student. It takes place during school time on the school grounds.

Louise Storey, Schools Coordinator

This year we have worked with four secondary schools; Glenthorne High, Stanley Park, Carshalton Boys, Overton Grange and one primary school; Manor Park. The schools directly refer their students for a number of reasons that maybe present in many different ways and types of behaviour. Our Mentors provide emotional guidance and a sense of continuity and stability, which may be lacking in the lives of the students. Through successful mentoring, constructive friendships, in which the students learn to trust and value their mentor, are born. They learn to develop new essential life skills and recognise their own strengths resulting in positive outcomes, increasing confidence, motivation and self-esteem, raising aspirations and improving organisation and study skills.


15

SCHOOLS EVALUATION: Historically, MAPS have been a low level provision for students; this is still true for primary school referrals. However, this year there has been a significant increase in the level of need of our secondary school students. This is exemplified through: - One in five students were likely to become NEET, already on five day exclusions. - A fifth of students are working with CAMHS. - Two thirds of our secondary school female students self harm including some with suicidal ideation. - One in five students made a child protection disclosure. Our role to help the student understand and identify the reasons behind their behaviours, help them find strategies to overcome barriers to learning, enabling them to be happier, healthier young people and achieve their full potential. RADA data shows that school mentoring really does impact education positively, demonstrating a 30% increase in Commitment

to Learning. Problems emerging from the student’s life are tackled holistically by addressing their social and emotional needs. This increases their self confidence, raises aspirations, improves their academic performance, bridging the gap between aspiration and attainment. We encourage the student to combine their thinking, feeling and behaviour to achieve good outcomes. We give them the time and space to reflect and think about consequences, this is particularly helpful to potential NEET students and has given rise to a 16.6% increase in positive social competencies. We challenge the students to feel good about themselves, to help them see they can make a difference and be hopeful about their future. This is imperative for those who have mental health issues but also to those lacking self esteem and confidence. The results are clear, the earlier we can support a child, the greater impact on their future. The time given through mentoring shows the investment in the students and makes them feel heard and worthwhile.

SUPPORT 10 9

POSITIVE IDENTITY

8 7

EMPOWERMENT

6 5 4 3 2

SOCIAL COMPETENCIES

1 0

BOUNDARIES & EXPECTATIONS

CONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME

POSITIVE VALUES

COMMITMENT TO LEARNING

KEY:

START DESTINATION


16

PEER MENTORING MAPS Peer mentoring stream supports and encourages young people in secondary schools in Sutton to become effective at supporting and positively influencing their peers. Peer Mentors help students in school (years 7, 8 and 9) with the transition from primary to secondary school, as well as any other issues that a lower school student may be facing including issues around bullying, being in trouble, lack of motivation, or other external factors.

MAPS Peer mentoring has provided interactive and explorative mentor training to upper school students in two secondary schools within the London Borough of Sutton. As well as this, the schools have received a range of group matching sessions, mentor support sessions, and there has also been a steering group set up within one of the schools which acts as a communication link between the MAPS peer coordinator, and the Peer mentors themselves. This has proved to be successful in it’s pilot year, as it has helped provide the MAPS Peer coordinator with feedback about the project, as well as offering a direct, simple outlet to mentors and mentees about any issues, concerns or stories of celebration or success within their relationships. The Peer mentoring key aims are: To improve self-esteem for pupils in year 7 and 8 To enable them to achieve To reduce exclusion To improve the skills of the young people involved To support younger students in their transition to secondary school We have found that young people are particularly skilled at supporting and encouraging each other. Our Peer programme of study has proven an excellent resource to schools looking to boost leadership skills, pupil voice and emotional intelligence. ‘With so many other factors creating a busy schedule for the students, the commitment that they are showing to the Peer Mentoring project displays the value that is placed on it by the mentors, mentees and staff involved. The stories of success as well as hardly any relationship breakdowns give an encouraging overview for the future-not just for Peer Mentoring, but also for the young people involved.’

Chris Mingay, Peer Coordinator


17

PEER EVALUATION:

Evaluation data from the Peer Mentors evidenced that they have significantly improved their constructive use of time. This is an unsurprising statistic. Peer mentors are voluntarily giving their time to help lower school students in the development of social, personal and educational skills during their sessions. This time could previously be occupied with other tasks that do not carry the same value or importance, so it is a really positive result that the peer mentors have identified that th time they give for peer mentoring is valuable; not just for the mentee, but also for themselves. This year, MAPS have been delighted to work intensively with two secondary schools within LBS, Greenshaw and Glenthorne. Through the mentoring pairs, we have directly worked with 104 young people. The gender split is 55% girls and 45% boys with ages of mentors ranging between 16-18 years while the young people receiving mentoring support have ranged from 11-16 years old. We have found that young people are particularly skilled at supporting and ecouraging each other. Our peer programme of study has proven an excellent resource to schools looking to boost leadership skills, pupil voice and emotional intelligence.


18

LEAP MENTORING LEAP (Learning, Experience and Action Programme) is designed to help young people (aged 16-24) make decisions about their future. Although originally envisaged as an ‘employability’ programme, LEAP has developed to also provide support in accessing further education, apprenticeships or starting a new business. We have established relationships with local colleges and training providers to identify suitable short courses, including pre-apprenticeship and access to further education courses, all of which are available to LEAP participants.

Derek Terrell and Tammie Blaikie, LEAP coorddinators

We work with those furthest from the workplace (e.g. living in multi-generation workless households or lacking basic qualifications); those at risk of dropping out of the education system or becoming NEET (Not in Education, Employment or Training) or those who have been unemployed for more than 6 months. Participants benefit from a year of mentoring support, the aim of which is to encourage continued participation in education or job search; keep participants target-focused and maintain motivation to achieve goals. This is a one-to-one mentoring relationship; additionally we also run group sessions to focus on specific skills or capabilities (e.g. developing interview techniques, how to volunteer, C.V workshops and job searching techniques). Personal Development Planning is at the heart of what we do; participants create their own plan, documenting the steps they need to take to achieve their objectives. LEAP will support them in achieving this by identifying suitable training courses which can provide valuable and recognised qualifications and providing structured volunteering placements to match the area of training or study of their choice; providing valuable subject experience and experience of working life. LEAP will identify those Volunteer Involving Organisations best equipped to offer appropriate support to participants, and use our expertise in volunteering to develop structured, meaningful placements which support the aspirations of our participants.


19

LEAP EVALUATION SUPPORT 10 9

POSITIVE IDENTITY

8

EMPOWERMENT

7 6 5 4 3 2

SOCIAL COMPETENCIES

1

BOUNDARIES & EXPECTATIONS

0

CONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME

POSITIVE VALUES

KEY:

START DESTINATION

COMMITMENT TO LEARNING

LEAP has worked with 23 young people during the past year; the great majority of these have found the support provided by the project to be beneficial in helping them with their goals of achieving paid work or further education/training. 8.7% of our participants have found paid work while on the programme (compared to a national average of 3.5% through the DWP Work Programme). Additionally, over 50% of our participants have joined an apprenticeship, college or training course. We use RADA to monitor our participants across a range of attributes; over the past year we have seen an overall improvement in all of these attributes, showing that each participant has experienced some positive outcomes as a result of their mentoring. The 2 areas where we have seen the greatest improvement are ‘Commitment To Learning’ (+50%) and ‘Constructive Use Of Time’ (+40.9%); these are tremendous results in 2 of the key attributes that will equip young people to decide on, and

develop, their careers. By making better use of their free time and focussing on the qualifications and skills needed to be successful, our participants are putting in place the foundation stone for a successful future. The highest rated attribute overall was ‘Social Competencies’ (7.7 out of 10) and this also shows that our participants are better able to make decisions, communicate well and understand how to behave in group situations. This attribute will be beneficial during job/college interviews and also during the first few weeks of settling into a new job or training course. By working with their mentors to improve their ratings across all of these attributes, our participants are developing as individuals and gaining the confidence and skills to not only find work but also to settle into their chosen careers and make progress towards their goals.


20

LEAP OUTREACH LEAP Outreach works with 16-19 year olds who are not in Education, Employment or Training. This LBS (London Borough of Sutton) funded project helps facilitate lasting change for young people wanting to boost their opportunities for future employability. There were three main objectives to work to during the course of this pilot year which will be unpacked during this report. The objectives were: 1. To meet with 60 young people at least 3 times each. 2. To successfully refer 30 young people to agencies for more support. 3. For 19 young people to move from NEET to EET status (To move into Employment, Education or Training.) Why are young people NEET?

Ben Webb, LEAP Outreach Worker

The questions and issues around NEET young people is one that is regularly spoken about in the media and many images are shown, stereotypes portrayed and general information given of who these young people are. During the work carried out through LEAP Outreach, MAPS have found a very different picture of the young people and the problems that they are up against. Young people face a wide array of issues that can affect circumstances, and these often then have a knock on effect to their opportunities; one of these being employment. Some of these issues are completely external from the young people themselves and are often beyond their control. Such issues are family bereavement, lack of support at home, educational difficulties and many others. As well as having practical implications such as poor exam grades or difficult to manage behaviour, it can also have a longer lasting effect on self esteem and confidence. The young person may not feel that aspirations are attainable and so may not aspire to be what they would have liked to have been.


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LEAP OUTREACH EVALUATION The aim of LEAP Outreach is to provide regular contact to a number of NEET young people in order to facilitate the development of key skills in them to acquire employment, education or training. This could be through one to one support, sign posting or raising self esteem and confidence within themselves. The idea of the project before we started was for each young person to have three points of contact. After consideration, it was decided that MAPS should be more intentional in their work to strive for EET, so the Outreach Worker has been meeting with them many times more than this to try and bring about lasting change in their lives. There are of course practical things that can help them too, such a C.V. writing, filling in application forms, finding out qualifications and exam results. This can also be used as an opportunity to build relationships to a deeper level to understand some of the external issues that may influence their current situations. This gives the opportunity to sign post to specific services that are more equipped for providing support in the specific area(s) of need. As well as other agencies we also try to find opportunities for the young people ourselves. The Information, Advice and Guidance Drop-In allows us to meet young people with need and have time to help them practically but also to arrange other times to meet and find options and opportunities for them. As part of the project we also work alongside ‘Be Connected’ and have set up a day of volunteering a month for the young people working with the LEAP Outreach Project.

The LEAP Outreach Worker also attends the biweekly Leaving Care drop in, in conjunction with the Leaving Care Mentoring Coordinator. Providing help, support and guidance about available courses, apprenticships, job and volunteering opportunities., signpostng and by providing CV writing support coupled with other practical skills helps to improve employability and assist young people to achieve their full potential. The total number of young people that successfully moved from NEET to EET during the year was 19; however only 13 remained EET for at least 3 months.

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13

KEY:

TRAINING PROVIDED EMPLOYMENT


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ROMANCE ACADEMY Of the young people that are NEET in Sutton the most frequently occurring reason given by 24% of the young people is that they are a teen parent. Teenage pregnancy is linked with deprivation and its risk factors such as low educational attainment, poorer physical/ mental health, early onset sexual activity, poor contraceptive use and substance abuse. This program protects young people by addressing the underlying causes of risky behaviour and reduces their vulnerability of becoming NEET through early intervention

MAPS Romance Academy-an innovative sex and relationships programme targeting young people aged between 14 to 16 years in the London Borough of Sutton. The Academy is a 14 week program where young people are taken through a holistic safe sex and relationships education course with the aim of increasing self esteem, improving family relationships, equipping them with information to make better life style choices and reduce risk taking behaviour as well as improving interpersonal skills and relationships. Weekly sessions cover topics that include communication, confidence building, emotional intelligence, STI prevention, sexual delay, building and sustaining healthy relationships, drugs and alcohol, coping with peer pressure and the media.

Impact results are fantastic! MAPS Romance Academy has seen improvements across all eight measurement points on the RADA scale with a focus on positive identity, support and the ability to use time constructively. With these impacts in mind young people are encouraged to look beyond Romance Academy to other areas of their life, giving them new confidence, self respect and a maturity in dealing with life situations resulting in more responsible citizens equipped to handle themselves and relationships whilst using their skills to model positive behaviour with peers. MAPS would like to take this opportunity to thank its funders, Sutton Community Fund for their support and recognition of this effective programme.


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THE LOFT The LOFT is a six week drugs and alcohol information course, aimed at cohorts of young people form various schools across the borough aged between 13-16. Partnering with a number of external organisations and educational placements, the partnership team of MAPS and Community Inspirations delivers the LOFT, and offer schools the chance to send cohorts of young people to an off site venue to receive in depth information on the issues surrounding the misuse of drugs and alcohol.

At the off site venue, the young people are welcomed to come and engage in the project which covers a series of current topics, delivered by in the field experts. The six sessions are as follows: Week 1 – An introduction to drugs Week 2 – Smoking sensation Week 3 – Alcohol Week 4 – Cannabis Week 5 – Sex education (session facilitated by the NHS ‘Check it out’ team) Week 6 – Drugs and the law As well as providing support in this capacity the group sessions have also allowed the staff the opportunity to identify any extra needs of any young people that come through The LOFT. This has ranged from offering more intentional one to one drugs support, to making referrals to children’s services panels throughout the borough. As of September 2012, there has also been a self-referral drop-in running for any individuals that wish to receive one to one support. This extra branch of support has meant that extra support has been available for young people that would otherwise not be able to access support around drugs and alcohol misuse.


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CASE STUDIES


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CASE STUDY: INCLUSION Katie, a 16 year old young lady, struggled with low self esteem and social anxiety. Afraid to go out alone, she found herself more and more isolated, having to rely on the support of her family to leave the house. The impact was far reaching; her education was suffering due to poor attendance and her peer relationships were negatively impacted. Feeling isolated and alone, Katie struggled to imagine a positive future. Katie desperately wanted to feel safe, to grow in confidence and become more outgoing – with the help of Gemma, her mentor, this is exactly what happened. Katie instantly liked Gemma; they developed a positive relationship, always looked forward to her weekly mentoring session. Over the mentoring year Gemma supported Katie to access her community, to find places where she felt safe and to enjoy her environment. Through discussions and practical activities, Katie was able to address some of her anxieties and move beyond them. During her mentoring year, Katie, with Gemma’s support grew in confidence enabling her to successfully access education. With her first year at college complete with excellent attendance and grades, and buoyed on by her own success she felt confident enough to enrol for a second and third year; she has passed her driving test, got a part time job and even developed a social life as she is able to go out independently. Katie is now able to express herself confidently and feels positive about her future. At the end of the mentoring relationship, Katie said “I didn’t feel I was ever going to change, I couldn’t see a way out. I can’t believe how far I have come”. Both Gemma and the mentoring coordinator are proud of all of Katie’s achievements and the bright future she has created herself.


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CASE STUDY: LAC & LC Destiny joined the MAPS mentoring project after being referred by the London Borough of Sutton’s Looked After Children team. Destiny was about to turn 16 and faced the daunting challenge of being transitioned from the familiarity of a Children’s home into semiindependent living as she began the road towards exiting the ‘care system’. Life was turbulent for Destiny with complex friendships “One of my friends turned up after taking an overdose and was all ‘high’… she was trying to commit suicide”. MAPS matched Destiny with a mentor who had formally been in care herself – Tina (mentor) admits that things weren’t easy at first with Destiny; “At the beginning I felt like I was getting in the way of her life, I couldn’t read her… I understood the dynamics of living in care and just gave her time.” After a couple of months of mentoring, Destiny and Tina had developed a relationship that was thriving. Tina recalls “Some of the best sessions were spent sitting and just having a chat – I saw her confidence really grow”. Destiny comments “I liked recording my singing and go-karting best, it made us closer.” As the mentoring year drew to an end, it became apparent that Destiny was facing a myriad of support coming to a conclusion all at the same time, plus with the news that she would be moving to new accommodation, Destiny voiced that she feared that she would become isolated and wouldn’t cope. MAPS worked closely with Sutton’s Leaving care team and together developed a strategy to ensure that there would be support throughout this transition period. As such, the Leaving care team supported MAPS to continue mentoring Destiny for a further 3 months, until she’d had chance to settle into her new home and develop a support network. Destiny has recently been successful at an interview that will allow her to study ‘Catering Level 2’ at a local education establishment. She has hopes and dreams- “I enjoy cooking. I get happy when I cook. My best dish is Jambalaya rice… I might be a cook but I also want to be a fire-fighter because I used to be the fire warden at my children’s home.” MAPS had the privilege of journeying with Destiny from being a Looked After Child to a young adult leaving care. Whatever the future holds for Destiny, it is clear that it will be a brighter one because of the work that has been done with her mentor, but most importantly the work that has been done in Destiny herself.


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CASE STUDY: MAC Abbey was referred to MAC in November 2011 by her primary school. At the time, Abbey had been living with her Grandma for a few years, ever since her mother had passed away. At school Abbey was experiencing difficulties within her peer group, which sometimes resulted in arguments and falling out. The aim was that through mentoring, Abbey would start to understand her feelings of loss and relate better within her peer group. Abbey identified through the use of the RADA that mentoring could also help her improve her positive identity, social competencies and constructive use of time. In late December 2011, Abbey was matched with Janet who was a new mentor. At first, both of them were quite shy and apprehensive, however their relationship soon blossomed and they became very close. During their time together Janet and Abbey managed to do a huge variety of activities; highlights included fishing in the local park, lots of cooking and a trip to Harrods. By the end of the 12 months Abbey’s RADA score had dramatically improved in all eight areas, and the difference in Abbey was noted by all around her! Abbey herself said “I think I am happier, more confident...I enjoy going to school more”. Her mentor Janet felt that Abbey “… has a bit of sparkle back, she is not so serious, she has allowed herself to be young again”. At school it was noted that she “ …seems calmer and much more able to get on with those around her”. Both Abbey and Janet looked back over their year with great fondness and happy memories. Abbey said that she would recommend mentoring to any of her friends, “it’s like gaining an extra member of your family!”.


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CASE STUDY: SCHOOLS Max, a 15 year-old boy from a close, supportive family, came to mentoring in order to deal with a number of issues he had. Max suffered from anxiety which caused him severe abdominal pain; he described the pain to be at its greatest in the morning but never present at night. Max regularly missed school with his attendance dropping below 80%. He worried members of his family might die and had difficulty sleeping before tests. Max struggled with peer interactions and social situations. He found his insecurity, need for constant reassurance and absence from school frustrating and upsetting. Children experience fears; fears that are developmentally normal but Max’s were excessive and impacting on his life. Mentoring started to help build his self-esteem, to develop problem solving skills and better his communication. After three months of mentoring, goals were set to help him identify and rationalise stress and help him become more involved in the community. He started making progress and this showed in his attendance at school. Max began volunteering with a local charity and his self esteem increased. By nine months his attendance was just below 100%. Max was sitting exams and attained good results. Relationships with his peers improved and he rated his enjoyment of school much higher. During this time he had to deal with a close family members illness and bereavement. Although this was a challenge, he applied his newly learnt skills and was confident enough to cope. Mentoring ended after 12 months and Max was very positive, looking forward to sixth form and university. He said “mentoring was helpful, fun and nice, the highlight of his week� His RADA showed improvement in areas of empowerment, commitment to learning and positive identity. His mentor, school and family all recognised his progress but more importantly so did Max!


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CASE STUDY: PEER Sandra has been a peer mentor to a year 7 student called Thomas. Sandra has been an excellent mentor this year, going out of her way to provide support for Thomas. One example of this was when Sandra emailed all Thomas’ subject teachers and asked if there were any particular areas she could help Thomas with when he was doing his homework. As a result, Thomas’ homework has improved dramatically over the course of the year, which has in turn enhanced his confidence. Sophie has been mentoring a year 11 student called Melissa. Sophie has been conscientious mentor, always putting the needs of Melissa first, despite Sophie being in her important final year of sixth form. Sophie always looked for ways of developing her mentoring skills by seeking advice from specialist staff. She has made a major impact on Melissa’s preparation for her year 11 exams, by talking through her experiences and being an excellent role model for her. Becky has been mentoring Jack (year 7). She has taken her role as a sixth form mentor seriously . She has maintained her weekly meeting with Jack throughout the year and has shown a real interest in Jack’s progress which has encouraged him to develop as an all-round pupil in his first year at the school. Becky’s attitude and enthusiasm should be commended.


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CASE STUDY: LEAP Mark was referred to LEAP by the local Job Centre. He had completed a Horticulture and Gardening course at a local college but had been struggling to find work for several months. Mark has Aspergers Syndrome and it was clear from the outset that he was very concerned about his future and where he fits in the world. He struggled with feelings of low self-worth and wasn’t sure that he could really do any type of job apart from very menial tasks. As part of LEAP, Mark attended a number of group sessions including: CV Writing; Confidence & Identity Building and Personal Development Planning. He also volunteered at a short term gardening project which ran for six weeks. This gave him the opportunity to put his college course work into practice and it was noticed that he got deeply involved in the work, starting asking detailed questions and looked more at ease with the other volunteers. Towards the end of his mentoring year, Mark applied for some other volunteering roles and even undertook some paid work as a painter and decorator with a family member. Mark’s confidence and ability to interact with other people had improved dramatically by the end of the year, to the extent that he has been able to take on a volunteering/study role at a local community centre cafÊ and has joined a national employment programme aimed at young people with additional learning needs. Mark is now established in his new volunteering role where he has been able to support other participants. He has also grown in his communication, selfawareness and his caring and expressive attitude towards others. All of these new skills and abilities will help him to achieve paid employment in the future.


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CASE STUDY: LEAP OUTREACH Ray is 17 years old. He left school at the end of year 11 and did not go to college or 6th form. After living out of home for an extended period of time, he moved back in with his mother having had a very negative experience with other family members for the year before this. He visited a Drop-In for young people who are not in education, employment or training at the Life Centre in Sutton and explained a little of his situation; this involved regular drug use in his past which affected his psychological state even after the regular misuse ended. When he came into the drop-in, we arranged a meet where Ray came and spent some time with the MAPS NEET Outreach Worker. At the meeting, Ray discussed, in more detail, the issues that he was facing. With the support of the Outreach Worker, Ray constructed a curriculum vitae (CV). At the end of the afternoon Ray went away with a few copies of his CV and seemed much more confident. From the progress made, he actively organised two months of work experience working for construction companies. He has plenty more work experience and is now working with a qualified tree surgeon, assisting in his work and helping to support the ongoing work within the company. The difference between Ray six months ago, when we first met him, and now, is huge. In those six months he has gone from a young person with an absence of confidence and no aspiration based on a variety of concerning circumstances, to a man at the start of a journey, looking forward in his life, full of opportunities to better himself and become successful in something he is very interested in.


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THE FUTURE So what next for MAPS? Well its quite simple really, we continue to place people who listen with young people who need to be heard. MAPS are committed to building a valuable community who value community. Mentoring is a term we use to say nobody should miss out. It is an action that reaches the most marginalised and most vulnerable. Many children today are faced with a poverty of support and receive a poor serving of positive role models. MAPS mentoring does not seek to replace traditional support systems but rather seeks to empower the young person to bridge the gap step by step. Through the use of the 40 Developmental Assets framework MAPS have been able to clearly measure the impact that mentoring is having on the lives of the young people that we support. The model continues to empower mentors to make a difference and supports young people to recognise and celebrate their achievements. Last year we committed to do more, to learn from our results and we have. Using our impact data we were able to identify specific areas of need that have resulted in the development of new initiatives such as MAPS Romance Academy which proved to be a real success. Year of Year 40 Assets has proven its worth and we commit to its development and the development of MAPS to further enable young people achieve and reach their full potential. Whilst the UK is still in a period of austerity MAPS are encouraged by the continued support we receive and in our indicators of resilience as a result of our clear strategy for the future. MAPS are committed to 5 principles over the next year.

1. Grow

A vision to see every young person who needs a mentor to have a mentor. MAPS are committed to the continual growth of mentoring within current streams of mentoring and in response to gaps in services in LBS & its neighbouring boroughs.

2. Sustain

A drive towards financial sustainability through emerging social enterprise opportunities, local commissioning models, and diversifying funding.

3. RE:Source

The intentional development of mentor resourcing (guiding STARS) framed within our 40 assets model and inspired by our vision regarding the source of what we do.

4. Connect

An aspiration to be known by name and by face within our local community. For community to understand our essence and respond to our cause through a variety of opportunities.

5. Engage

A desire to inspire local business to engage with our service for a mutually beneficial partnership.


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THE FINAL WORD It is an absolute privilege to be given the opportunity to have the final word in this amazing annual review. This time last year I was in the seat of Helen Gasparelli (MAPS Manager) and know firsthand how much work, energy and passion goes into making the outcomes achieved through MAPS’ work a reality. Simply putting a young person alongside a mentor doesn’t produce magical outcomes. It takes leadership, a team, a community and commitment to make a difference. These qualities are woven into the fabric of the MAPS team – and by team I mean staff, volunteers and young people in equal measure! As I read this annual review, the word that comes back to me time and time again is ‘inspire’. I am continually inspired by Helen and her brilliant team, our volunteers and young people and simply want to say a genuine, heartfelt thank you for every second you have invested into making our community a brighter place. The case studies inspire me, the impact of mentoring inspires me and I truly believe that MAPS have inspired a generation. Inspiring a generation was the tag line of the Olympics, and the legacy lives on a year down the line. In the closing ceremony it was the volunteers that received the biggest round of applause and so I hope you will join me in an emblematic round of applause for all who have given of their time to make MAPS the incredible project it is! Here at the Volunteer Centre Sutton we are proud parents of MAPS. We’re proud that through volunteering, MAPS makes isolation extinct, builds foundations for positive self-esteem, nurtures leadership, tackles drug issues, promotes healthy relationships, embraces education and stands up to bullying. Mentoring empowers young people to be the change they want to see in their world. But my final words in this, ‘Final Word’ must simply be Thank you!

Chris Parker Chief Officer VCS


Mentoring And Peer Support Volunteer Centre Sutton 31, West Street Sutton SM1 1SJ T: 020 8661 5900 www.mapsmentoring.co.uk


Maps annual report 12 13 final (low res)