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Modesto Chamber oF COMMERCE

VOL. 42 | ISSUE 1 | january 2021

Blue Diamond Growers Tech Connect Milestone Members


Happy New Year

From Our Family to Yours

In this magical time as the leaves are falling and the temperatures are dropping, we gather with

family to celebrate our holiday traditions. We are reminded of the things that are truly important and give meaning to our lives. During this season, we are especially grateful for the relationships we share with the people and the communities we have the pleasure of serving. From the entire Bank of Stockton family, we thank you and we wish you a Happy New Year.

IN MODESTO 1302 J St. & 4204 Dale Rd. bankofstockton.com

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Modesto Chamber of Commerce I ModChamber.org


Mission Statement

The Modesto Chamber of Commerce is dedicated to serving the greater Modesto Area, regional businesses and community prosperity through advocacy, collaboration, access to leaders, economic development, connectivity and business education.

january 2021 | CONTENTS

Executive Committee Chairman

Pete Zahos; Sysco Central California Inc.

Past Chairman

Steve Rank, Rank Investigations and Protection, Inc.

Vice Chair, External Operations Michael Moradian Jr. Peace of Mind Pest Control

Vice Chair, Internal Operations

Blue Diamond Growers

Patricia Gillum Pat Gillum CPA

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board of Directors

Brad Blakeley, Edward Jones Investments Kirstie Boyett, The State Theater Michael Gaffney, PG&E Warren Kirk, Doctors Medical Center Brian McDermott, Team S.O.S DeSha McLeod, Community Hospice Inc. Eric Nielsen, Gianelli Nielsen Peggy O'Donnell, Mid-Valley Productions Jason Pineda, Freshpoint Inc. Bill Robinson, Principal Financial Group Madhu Singh, Bank of Stockton Jared Steinwert, F&M Bank David Wright, Wright Insurance Company

COMMUNITY

Fiscalini Cheese

Advisors

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George Boodrookas, Modesto Junior College Melissa Williams, Modesto Irrigation District

President & CEO

Trish Christensen Modesto Chamber of Commerce tchristensen@modchamber.org

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CEO Message

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Calendar

ADvocacy

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Green Team

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Women In Business

RELATIONSHIPS

Publisher: Modesto Chamber of Commerce

209.577.5757 • Progress@ModChamber.org www.ModChamber.org

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Happy Anniversary

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Announcements

Distribution: 209 Magazine

EDUCATION

Advertising Sales:

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Inspire Youth

Graphic Design: 209 Magazine

209.634.9141 • www.209magazine.com

Printer: 209 Magazine

Leapfrog Honors

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209.634.9141 • hvanderveen@209magazine.com 209.634.9141

crogers@oakdaleleader.com 209.845.4074 © Copyright 2021 Modesto Chamber of Commerce. Some parts of this magazine may be reproduced or reprinted, however, we require that permission be obtained in writing. 209.577.5757, Progress@ModChamber.org

Staff: Administrative Assistant, Hope Gyorfi Administrative Assistant, Jolene Camarena Events Coordinator, Felicia Lopez Membership Coordinator, Sabrinna Gonzales Staff Accountant, Jaime Lastra

SERVICE Spotlight Café

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Community Foundation

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in

this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Modesto Chamber of Commerce.

Gallery Shows

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PROGRESS MAGAZINE 1114 J Street • Modesto, CA 95354 209. 577.5757 • Fax 209. 577.2673 www.ModChamber.org • Progress@ModChamber.org

january 2021

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A Message From The President & CEO Manufacturing And Industry

community

By Trish Christensen

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2021 … we made it! The common sentiment seems to be – “let’s hope the New Year brings in NEW and BETTER …” – but how that line is then completed varies by person. Some want daily living to feel normal again. Some need income and work to feel comfortable again. Most want their freedom back, and to have face to face interaction with those they’ve mostly interacted with virtually over the last 10 months. 2020 was just flat out hard, scary, and unnerving in oh so many ways … we all want those feelings to be behind us. So, what is the bottom line for what 2021 seems to hold for us? Endless possibilities and hope!

and provide to our community like Gallo Family Winery did by converting a spirit’s line to a hand sanitizer line when the need arose. These companies, and the hundreds of other companies that fall within these sectors, have one critical fact in common. They have kept people working from day one of COVID arriving in Stanislaus County. They are helping our local economy in various ways. Not only are they strong employers, but their employees primarily live here, earn a living here, and spend here when they have a need or a want. This is a sector that has helped sustain us overall and will help keep us going until the rest can catch up.

What else is at the foundation of 2021? It is truly a time to rebuild, build anew, and expand that which stands here and now. This plays into the focus of our January edition of Progress Magazine: Manufacturing and Industry.

As you read through the pages of this edition you will find submissions from some of the companies I mentioned above. You will find information on our docket of programs and committees we host here at the Chamber for you. You will learn of some upcoming events such as the return of Disney Institute Presents: Disney’s Approach to Business Excellence taking place virtually on February 11th. You will be reminded of creative new opportunities available to you via a few of our collaborative partners such as our training and retraining virtual classes through the Chamber portal with Modesto Junior College.

Our region has a wide array of companies that fall within the manufacturing and industry realm. And most have stayed strong throughout the pandemic. They are building house frames at Entekra, Fiscalini family did not stop milking cows and making cheese, and Jatco is still creating and developing products which supply customers from healthcare to construction. Nestle USA, Crystal Creamery, and Frito Lay continue to produce their food and beverage products. Blue Diamond Growers is still growing, harvesting, and distributing almonds, while companies like Garton Tractor have continued to keep equipment available to support our local agriculture enterprises, and a company like Repsco that not only works with recycling to lower their environmental footprint, they are also helping shippers to lower theirs while saving costs on transport materials. All of these companies have continued to produce and manufacture their goods throughout the pandemic. Many have even increased their volume and ability to give back

Modesto Chamber of Commerce I ModChamber.org

As always, I encourage you to follow us on social media, check our website, our community calendar, and our featured calendar for details and registration links to access our program and committee meetings, each of which is conducted virtually. Please stay tuned and engaged with us … we are constantly adding and enhancing what we have to offer. Our Chamber never sleeps … Happy New Year - Here’s to a healthy, happy, and prosperous 2021 for us all~ With Warm Regards, Trish


MISSION The Modesto Chamber of Commerce to serving theArea, greater MISSIONSTATEMENT: STATEMENT: The Modesto Chamber of Commerce is dedicatedistodedicated serving the greater Modesto regional businesses community prosperity through advocacy, collaboration, access to leaders, MISSION The Modesto Chamber of Commerce isthrough dedicated to serving the greater Modesto Area,STATEMENT: regional and businesses and community prosperity advocacy, collaboration, economic development, connectivity and business education.

Modesto Area,economic regional businesses and community prosperity through advocacy, collaboration, access to leaders, development, connectivity and business education. Toour execute our adopted mission have developed an acronym that helps keep us focused. access to leaders, economic connectivity and business education. That To execute adopted mission we development, havewe developed an acronym that helps keep us focused. That acronym is “CARES: Community, Advocacy, Relationships, Education and Service.” acronym is “CARES: Community, Relationships, Education andkeep Service.” That To execute our adopted missionAdvocacy, we have developed an acronym that helps us focused. acronym is “CARES: Community, Advocacy, Relationships, Education and Service.”

COMMUNITY

EDUCATION

COMMUNITY

EDUCATION

At its heart the Modesto Chamber is a community of likeminded

The Chamber serves the education community by hosting the

business owners who share the vision for enjoying a thriving economy

annual State of Business and Education event, by fund-raising for local

and creating and maintaining our community as a vibrant place to live,

students at the Ag Aware and Harvest Luncheon annual series, and

work and play. The Modesto Chamber is the go-to resource and

partnering with local schools and colleges to train and educate young

At its heart the Modesto Chamber is a community of likeminded

business owners who share the vision for enjoying a thriving economy

and creating and maintaining our community as a vibrant place to live,

work and play. The Modesto Chamber is the go-to resource and

The Chamber serves the education community by hosting the

annual State of Business and Education event, by fund-raising for local

students at the Ag Aware and Harvest Luncheon annual series, and partnering with local schools and colleges to train and educate young

facilitator of ideas and communication for nonprofits, governmental men and women, all in keeping with our pledge to help provide a ready facilitator of ideas and communication for nonprofits, governmental men and women, all in keeping with our pledge to help provide a ready

agencies, and community leaders. More More than than just ajust business club,club, the the workforce the Chamber Chamber agencies, and community leaders. a business workforcetotoserve serve local local employers. employers. Additionally, Additionally, the Modesto Chamber strives to affect its environment for positive educates its members on practical solutions and best practices through Modesto Chamber strives to affect its environment for positive educates its members on practical solutions and best practices through transformation by supporting change agents in the community. its Progress Magazine articles, monthly Chamber University and Seeds transformation by supporting change agents in the community. its Progress Magazine articles, monthly Chamber University and Seeds ofof Success speaker monthlycommittee committee Success speakerseries, series,workshops workshops and and seminars, seminars, monthly meetings, and SCORE counseling. meetings, and SCORE counseling.

ADVOCACY ADVOCACY

SERVICE SERVICE

Chamber Staff, Board of Directors and many of our topical

Chamber Staff, Board of Directors and many of our topical

committees, such as Economic Development and Government

committees, such as Economic Development and Government

Relations, are engaged and proactively representing our members by

Relations, are engaged and proactively representing our members by

The Chamber believes in service to the community and to its

The Chamber believes in service to the community and to its members. The Chamber Board and staff are active on many nonprofit

addressing business initiatives, addressing issues in our community members. The Chamber Board and staff are active on many nonprofit and government committees, donating their business expertise, time

addressing issues in our community and business working toinitiatives, relieve theaddressing regulatory burdens businesses endure due

and working toand relieve regulatory The burdens businesses due as to local statethe governments. Modesto Chamberendure gets results, to local shown and state Modestomore Chamber gets results, as by governments. recent victoriesThe in forming rational ADA legislation, shown by recent avictories in measure, forming electing more rational legislation, defeating no-growth businessADA friendly candidates, working alongside otherselecting to passbusiness Measure L, a candidates, local self-help defeating a no-growth measure, friendly measure, for our workingtransportation alongside others to and passchampioning Measure L,fora more local water self-help agribusiness, industry citizens. By working together, transportation measure, andand championing for more waterour formembers our are stronger together than they ever be on their own. agribusiness, industry and citizens. Bycould working together, our members

are stronger together than they could ever be on their own.

RELATIONSHIPS

RELATIONSHIPS

The Modesto Chamber specializes in building relationships among business and serving as the nexus to businesses, nonprofit

The Modesto Chamber in building relationships and specializes governmental agencies. We hostamong monthly organizations, businessnetworking and serving the special nexusevents, to businesses, nonprofit events, as annual an annual trade show, and our long-running Gala. Membersagencies. also may serve committees or go organizations, and governmental We onhost monthly through the Leadership Modesto program wheretrade they will build longnetworking events, annual special events, an annual show, and term relationships with key leaders in the business world and or go our long-running Gala. Members also may serve on committees

andand government their resources. committees, The Chamberdonating also serves its business individualexpertise, members time by andhosting resources. Thecuttings Chamber alsointroduce serves itsa individual members ribbon which new business to theby

hosting ribbon cuttings introduce new business to the community, valuable and which cost effective (free) amarketing opportunities, community, costworkshops effective (free) marketing exposure valuable to social and media, and training for opportunities, our business partnersto andsocial their associates, and other free andtraining discounted exposure media, workshops and forresources. our business

partners and their associates, and other free and discounted resources.

C - Community

C - Community A - Advocacy

A - Advocacy

R - Relationships

R - Relationships E - Education

ES--Education Service S - Service

throughlocal the community. Leadership Modesto program where they will build longterm relationships with key leaders in the business world and local community.

january 2021

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community

CHAMBER CALENDAR january

february

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New Year’s Day Office Closed

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Committee* Virtually Zoom* 11:30 A.M.

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Committee-DARK Virtually Zoom* 11:30 A.M.

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Ambassador & Welcome Team Meeting Virtually Zoom* 8:00 A.M.

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Ambassador & Welcome Team Meeting Virtually Zoom* 8:00 A.M.

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Business U-TBD Virtually Zoom* 12:00 P.M.

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Business U-TBD Virtually Zoom* 12:00 P.M.

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Disney’s Approach to Business Excellence Virtually Zoom 9:00 A.M.-3:00 P.M.

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Government Relations Council Virtually Zoom* 11:30 A.M.

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President's Day Office Closed

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Stanislaus Green Team Virtually Zoom 12:00 P.M.

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Stanislaus Green Team Virtually Zoom 12:00 P.M.

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Tech Connect Virtually Zoom 2:00 P.M.-3:00 P.M.

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Tech Connect Virtually Zoom 2:00 P.M.

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rising leaders Virtually Zoom 12:00 PM

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Government Relations Council Virtually* 11:30 A.M.

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Women in Business Virtually Zoom* 4:00 P.M.

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rising leaders Virtually Zoom 12:00 PM

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Women in Business Virtually Zoom* 4:00 P.M.

*See website for more detail.** Change in usual location Please note that calendar events and details are subject to change.

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Modesto Chamber of Commerce I ModChamber.org


A healthier workforce creates a stronger business. Get the tools you need to establish a healthier workforce culture, helping your employees manage stress, sleep better, and exercise more. community

Learn more at kp.org/choosebetter.

Choose Better. Choose Kaiser Permanente.

| Business january 2020

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TECH CONNECT IS A NETWORKING GROUP WHOSE FOCUS AND VISION IS LEVERAGING TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE BUSINESS RESULTS. THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE BUSINESS LANDSCAPE CANNOT BE OVERSTATED. TECHNOLOGY AND DATA ANALYTICS FLUENCY ARE A KEY COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE IN A GROWING NUMBER OF INDUSTRIES AND BUSINESSES.

community

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTER PLEASE GO TO INFO@MODCHAMBER.ORG

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SPOTS ARE LIMITED. ZOOM MEETINGS EVERY 3RD THURSDAY OF THE MONTH AT 2:00 PM. OUR NEXT MEETING WILL BE JANUARY 21ST 2021

Modesto Chamber of Commerce I ModChamber.org


Farmstead Celebrates 20 Years Of Award-Winning Cheesemaking By Tara Beseda / hustlemethodmarketing@gmail.com

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n celebration of its 20th anniversary as award-winning cheesemakers Fiscalini Farmstead unveils its eagerly anticipated new brand identity to cast a bold vision for its future. Enveloped in sophistication with a new logo, packaging and website, the Fiscalini Farmstead brand draws upon its family lineage of four-generations of California dairy farming. “It is our mission to share our story and taste experience with the world,” says Laura Genasci, fourth generation family member. While anyone that has enjoyed their handcrafted cheeses is a big fan of the taste they have shared, not many know the family story that began over 100 years ago on the same soil they call home to this day. Fiscalini Farmstead was established as a dairy farm in 1914 by John Baptiste who immigrated from Switzerland and settled in Modesto, California. Almost 100 years later in the year 2000, his grandson John Brian added a cheesemaking facility to the family farm and began crafting some of the best-tasting cheeses in the world. Today the fourth-generation owners, dairy management team, and master cheesemakers take pride in sharing this tradition with consumers worldwide. The Fiscalini Family’s commitment to their land, animals, and family tradition remains top priority.

- By converting traditional waste products into renewable resources, they produce enough electricity to power their facility and 300 neighboring homes. - Use of only fresh milk from their cows ensures consistent, highquality cheese production. - Additionally, careful control over their animals, feed, and the land that they farm also contributes to their consistent highquality product: Over 70% of the feed provided to their herd is grown on their farmland. Use of all-natural recycled waste for fertilizer enriches their land and soil. Here’s to celebrating a 20-year legacy of time-honored tradition. Check out Fiscalini’s delicious selection of artisanal cheeses and sampler sets online at fiscalinifarmstead.com/collections From our land, hands, and hearts to your table, we are grateful to see our family’s cheesemaking tradition bringing your family and friends together, time after time. For more information on Fiscalini Farmstead, please visit fiscalinifarmstead.com or call 800-610-FARM.

“We push forward, are innovative in our approach, and adapt to change just as my father, grandfather, and great-grandfather did,” says current owner Brian Fiscalini.

community

Sustainable farming is a timehonored practice that has been passed down for generations and their devotion to give back to the community and future generations r e m a i n s unmatched:

january 2021

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Crystal Creamery: A California Tradition Since 1901 Source: www.crystalcreamery.com

C

rystal Creamery brand dairy products have been a part of California for well over 100 years. Founded by George Knox in 1901 — and originally known as Crystal Cream & Butter — Crystal started in the back of a small grocery store in Sacramento, California. That is where George and Caroline Knox churned butter. Twenty years later in 1921, Crystal was purchased by Carl Hansen, a Danish immigrant. The Hansen family led the company for 86 years and pioneered many new technologies, growing Crystal into one of the last large independent dairy processors in the state of California. This was the beginning of the expansion of Crystal’s family of products to include milk, cottage cheese, sour cream, and ice cream. In 2007, Crystal Creamery continued under the ownership of a family-owned dairy business with the purchase by Foster Dairy Farms. Foster Dairy Farms was founded in 1941 by Max and Verda Foster, and continues the tradition of nourishing families with simple, delicious ingredients and the freshest dairy from local farms. Over the years, Crystal Creamery expanded its capabilities, and today, we are the largest privately owned dairy in California, producing products under the Crystal Creamery, McColl’s and Humboldt Creamery brands. Integrated Manufacturing Approach Crystal Creamery knows how important it is to focus on excellence in quality and food safety so you can trust the will deliver the best dairy products for their customers. Crystal Creamery believes in continuous improvement of their products and every person on their manufacturing and quality team is dedicated to ensuring they meet above industry standards. Quality testing monitors state and federal requirements Validation of product identity standards Moseley Shelf-life Indicator Test End of Code Sensory Evaluation Elimination of metallic hazards in our food products

community

Screening for Physical, Chemical, Biological and Radiological Contamination Crystal Creamery has two major plant operations with a wide range of capabilities. Each of their plants has unique qualities, which complement each other. Their Modesto plant is a high volume, high efficiency facility and our second plant in Fernbridge is a smaller, nimble facility located in the Northern California Coast. Highlights of their Modesto facilities are: 376,418 square feet on 27 acres

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Modesto Chamber of Commerce I ModChamber.org

5 Plants Under 1 Roof: Fluid, Cultured, Ice Cream, Butter and Powder Blow-mold operation for gallon, half gallon and single serve fluid products Over 5MM gallons of fluid products and 300k to 600k gallons of ice cream produced monthly Fernbridge Plant 82,594 square feet on 11 acres Capabilities to produce: Fluid, Ice Cream and Powder Over 200k gallons of fluid products and over 1MM gallons of ice cream produced monthly Both Crystal Creamery facilities maintain active participation in Quality & Food Safety Standards and Certification Programs that ensure their products are of the highest quality and exceed industry, customer, and regulatory requirements. HACCP / HARPC they follow a systematic preventive approach to food safety from possible hazards in production processes. Crystal Creamery has active HACCP / HARPC programs for all products packaged at their facility. Kosher Certification is under the supervision of the Orthodox Union, the world's largest kosher certification agency. Organic Certification under CCOF certification they join in their mission to advance organic agriculture for a healthy world. Safety Quality Certification (SQF Ed8.1) - Crystal Creamery has embraced the Global Food Safety Initiative by achieving the most comprehensive level of the Safe Quality Foods (SQF)


water. They use this water in various ways such as to wash all of our cases that are used to ship milk to grocery stores. Air & Land Pollutants They place great importance on air quality and strive to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions. Transportation accounts for 29 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. This is why they work with local farms within 50 miles of their facility for raw milk. They use a Roadnet system that manages reduction of mileage and driver idle times resulting in lower fuel use to transport our products throughout the supply chain. Modesto Plant program. This farm to fork food safety and quality certification is recognized world-wide by retailers, brand owners and food service providers, establishing a sound food safety benchmark to their customers. Industry & Regulatory Inspections - The diverse variety of milk products processed and packaged at our facility requires that they be inspected regularly, by all three Food Safety regulatory agencies to verify our commitment to food safety. • FDA • USDA • CDFA At Crystal Creamery, environmental sustainability means always promoting responsible use and reuse of water and land, increasing energy efficiencies, reducing greenhouse gas and pollutants into the air all while providing wholesome nutritious dairy to their communities. They are constantly focused on continuous improvement and have set aggressive goals on key measures for their facility and dairy partners. Some examples include: Zero Waste - Crystal Creamery is committed to reusing valuable resources in their operations to reduce their footprint. Some ways include:

Greenhouse Gas Crystal Creamery is committed to using the most innovative approaches to manure management in controlling the amount of greenhouse gasses released into the environment. In addition to using manure as a renewable fertilizer, they are working in concert with industry leaders to utilize a digester to convert methane to biogas. With the installation of methane digesters and alternative manure-management projects California dairy farms are on track to achieve a 40-percent reduction in manure methane emissions by 2030. Crystal Creamery is California’s oldest dairy with expertise and leadership in caring for our community, environment and cows while embracing the spirit of everything the California Central Valley has to offer. “Crystal Creamery is proud of producing the freshest local dairy products, but we also recognize that we are more than just a dairy company — we are a part of each community we serve.” To find out more please visit www.crystalcreamery.com. Sources: https://cifstate.org/news/crystal_creamery_rel https://crystalcreamery.com/

Partnerships with local food banks to take product that is approaching the sell-by date Use of by-products, spoils, and returns as high-quality animal feed Energy Conservation

community

Their facilities use renewable energy with the installation of 1.1MW solar system in 2010 at their Modesto facility. The system consists of eleven parking structures covered with 4,000 panels and contributes to about 1% of our energy usage. Wastewater Conservation They conserve water through re-use. They take in 60+ tankers of milk each day, and we condense the raw milk to produce

Fernbridge Plant january 2021

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Modesto Chamber of Commerce I ModChamber.org


advocacy january 2021

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Doctors Medical Center Earns Top Grade In Patient Safety From Leapfrog Group

D

octors Medical Center was awarded an “A” from The Leapfrog Group’s Fall 2020 Hospital Safety Grade, a national distinction recognizing the hospital’s achievements protecting patients from harm and providing safe healthcare for the Central Valley. The Hospital Safety Grade is designed to give consumers information they can use to make healthcare decisions for themselves or a loved one. The Safety Grade assigns an A, B, C, D or F grade to all general hospitals across the country based on their performance in preventing medical errors, injuries, accidents and infections. “Patient safety is our top priority here at Doctors Medical Center. We are proud to receive this rating as it recognizes our commitment to placing safety at the forefront of the care we provide, which is more important than ever as we continue dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Warren Kirk, CEO of Doctors Medical Center. “Nothing is more important to us than offering our patients trusted care in a safe environment.”

“We are extremely grateful to hospital leadership and health care workers who have remained steadfast in prioritizing patient safety as our nation battles COVID-19,” said Leah Binder, President and CEO of The Leapfrog Group. “This ‘A’ is a testament to the care and commitment of those who work for Doctors Medical Center. With the current pandemic exposing existing flaws within the U.S. health care system, we appreciate you putting patient safety first. Lives depend on it.” Developed under the guidance of a national expert panel, the Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade uses up to 27 measures of publicly available hospital safety data to assign grades to more than 2,600 U.S. acute-care hospitals twice per year. The grades are peer-reviewed, fully transparent and the results are free to the public. Doctors Medical Center was awarded an “A” grade today, when Leapfrog announced grades for the fall 2020 update. To see full grade details and access patient tips for staying safe in the hospital, visit hospitalsafetygrade. org. About Doctors Medical Center Doctors Medical Center of Modesto is the largest fullcare hospital between Stockton and Fresno, and from the Sierras to the San Francisco Bay Area, with a 394bed general acute care and a 67-bed inpatient psychiatric capacity. DMC is known for providing comprehensive inpatient, outpatient and emergency care. Doctors Medical Center offers a wide range of services including cardiology, neurosurgery, orthopedics, surgical weight loss, emergency and trauma services, minimally-invasive and robotic surgery, women and children’s services, medical/surgical, behavioral health, oncology and critical/intensive care. To learn more about Doctors Medical Center, please visit www.dmc-modesto.com. About The Leapfrog Group

advocacy

Founded in 2000 by large employers and other purchasers, The Leapfrog Group is a national nonprofit organization driving a movement for giant leaps forward in the quality and safety of American health care. The flagship Leapfrog Hospital Survey and new Leapfrog Ambulatory Surgery Center (ASC) Survey collect and transparently report hospital and ASC performance, empowering purchasers to find the highest-value care and giving consumers the lifesaving information, they need to make informed decisions. The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade, Leapfrog's other main initiative, assigns letter grades to hospitals based on their record of patient safety, helping consumers protect themselves and their families from errors, injuries, accidents and infections.

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Modesto Chamber of Commerce I ModChamber.org


OUR PURPOSE IT TO CULTIVATE SUPPORTIVE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THE BUSINESS WOMEN WITHIN OUR COMMUNITY.

EACH GATHERING WILL FOCUS ON: Successful survival tactics during an economic disruption. Round the room discussion about the struggles and victories of operating a business affected by the pandemic.

Attendees engage to support, listen, and share with on another.

Our first meeting will be January 27th, 2021 at 4PM

Gatherings will be every 4th Wednesday of the month.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT THE MODESTO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AT INFO@MODCHAMBER.ORG

january 2021

advocacy

Strategies for continued success and what that means to you.

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president’s club Circle Of Influence Diamond Level

silver Level

FreshPoint

Save Mart Supermarkets

Bank of the West (H Street)

Alpine Protective Solutions

Galletto Ristorante

Save Mart Supermarkets - Corp Office

Bank of the West (McHenry)

American Chevrolet

Gianelli Nielsen

Seven-Up Bottling Co. of Modesto/

Bank of the West (Pelandale)

American Medical Response

Gilton Solid Waste Mgmt, Inc.

Varni Brothers Corporation

Beard Land and Investment Co.

Atherton & Associates, LLP

Golden Valley Health Centers

Solecon Industrial Contractors

Capax - Giddings, Corby, Hynes, Inc.

Audi Modesto

Grimbleby Coleman CPAs, Inc.

Solid Networks, Inc.

Bank of Stockton - Dale Road

Grover Landscape Services, Inc.

Stanislaus Food Products Co.

Infiniti of Modesto

Stanislaus Surgical Hospital

International Paper Co.

Stifel Investment Services

Doctors Behavioral Health Center-DMC

Bank of Stockton - Modesto Main Branch

Doctors Medical Center-DMC

Bank of the West (Dale Road)

Frito-Lay Co., Inc.

Blue Diamond Growers

Pacific Southwest Container, Inc.

Blue Diamond Growers

Physician Referral Service-DMC

Caliber Collision

Walmart

California State University, Stanislaus

Relationships

Care One Home Health and Hospice, Inc.

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JS West & Companies Lewis Capital Advisors Maxx Value Foods Mister Car Wash (Prime Shine Car Wash) Mocse Credit Union Mocse Credit Union

Storer Coachways Sutter Gould Medical Foundation The Century and Nine3One The Farmacy The Modesto Bee

Gold Level

Central Sanitary Supply Co.

Crystal Creamery

Central Valley Automotive

Doubletree by Hilton Modesto

Central Valley Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge

EMOE, Division of Parker

Central Valley Nissan

Encompass Health Rehabilitation

Central Valley Volkswagen Hyundai

of Modesto

Chukchansi Gold Resort & Casino

Fiscalini Cheese Company

Clark Pest Control

IHeart Media

COIT Services Inc.

Modesto Irrigation District

Collins Electrical

Modesto Nuts Professional

Comcast

Baseball

Damrell, Nelson, Schrimp, Pallios, Pacher & Silva

Rizo-Lopez Foods, Inc.

Nestle USA - Carnation

Del Monte Plant #1

Rogers Jewelry

Valley Lexus

Sutter Health Valley Area

English Oaks Nursing & Rehabilitation Hospital

Rogers Jewelry Co.

Vintage Faire Mall/Macerich Company

Sysco Central California Inc.

Exceed GPR & Locating, LLC

Rose Bouquet

W.H. Breshears, Inc.

F&M Bank (Carpenter Road)

Round Table Pizza #1033

Warden's Office Furniture Outlet

platinum Level

F&M Bank (Dale Road)

Round Table Pizza #1034

Warden's Office Products Center

E & J Gallo Winery

F&M Bank (McHenry)

Round Table Pizza #186

Wells Fargo Bank

Kaiser Permanente

Flooring Liquidators, Inc.

Round Table Pizza #701

Winton-Ireland, Strom & Green Insurance Agency

Flowers Baking Co. of Modesto, LLC

Round Table Pizza, Corporate

Winton-Ireland, Strom & Green Insurance Agency

Food Maxx

San Joaquin Valley College

Yosemite Meat Co., Inc.

Modesto Toyota Nine3One NT Nail Spa O'Brien's Market Oak Valley Community Bank Opportunity Stanislaus Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Pepsi Bottling Group PMZ Real Estate Residence Inn by Marriott Modesto North

TSM Insurance & Financial Services Turlock Irrigation District Union Bank US Bank US Bank (Modesto Main) US Bank Turlock Valley BMW Valley Children's Healthcare Valley First Credit Union Valley First Credit Union (Dale Branch) Valley First Credit Union Administrative Offices

Contact the chamber to learn more about our president's club level benefits Modesto Chamber of Commerce I ModChamber.org


ATTENDEES WILL BE A SOUNDING BOARD IN SUPPORT OF ONE ANOTHER. VETERAN PROFESSIONALS WILL ENGAGE AND MENTOR YOUNG PROFESSIONALS. WHAT SUCCESS MEANS TO EACH OF US.....

HIGHLIGHTING ONE YOUNG PROFESSIONAL'S EXPERIENCES IN BUSINESS, HIS/HER "FROM THEN TO NOW" STORY. ROUND THE ROOM DISCUSSION ABOUT THE STRUGGLES AND VICTORIES WITHIN THEIR INDIVIDUAL CAREERS.

Our next meeting is January 27th, 2021

relationships

Gatherings will be every 4th Wednesday of the month at 12:00 PM

january 2021

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Celebrating 120-Year Milestone

By Jolene Camarena - Modesto Chamber of Commerce

To kick off the brand-new start of 2021, we are excited to celebrate 120 years with the Bank of America and the Chicago Title Insurance Company. To us, this means 120 years of the greatest commitment, a mutually beneficial relationship between itself and those it serves, trust and connectedness. It means inspiration, guidance, and fellowship.

If you’re not buying crop insurance, you don’t know Jack Farmers and ranchers can now purchase crop insurance for protect themselves against the loss of crops due to natural disasters or the loss of revenue due to declines in the prices of agricultural commodities. Purchasing crop insurance will reduce your exposure to a variety of risks and bring you piece of mind. If you want to learn more about the programs that are available and how you can benefit, you need to know Jack.

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MEET JACK Jack Roudebush is a leading crop insurance expert. His combination of industry knowledge and insurance company insight makes him uniquely qualified to help you navigate the intricacies of these programs. Call Jack today to learn how you can minumize your risk and protect your bottom line.

Direct: 209.550.3710 • Mobile: 209.483.0650 jroudebush@capax.com Lic#0B67204

Business Insurance | Group Health | Workers Comp | Home and Auto

capax.com

1.800.94CAPAX • 209.526.3110 Giddings, Corby, Hynes Lic# 0144783

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Over the last 120 years we have not only supported our members, but also cheered them on as they grew into the large successful businesses they are today. We take pride in every year we achieve another milestone. The Modesto Chamber of Commerce uses the acronym C.A.R.E.S. which is our adopted mission that keeps us focused within the Community, Advocacy, Relationship, Education, and Services here in Modesto. We specialize in building relationships, serving the community, and the partnership with one another building a long-term relationship. We promote and protect the interests of the business community and foster immediate connections and promote your business. Community support, our relationships and anniversaries are what keep us motivated. We look forward to celebrating another 120 years. “Responsible growth has four pillars: We have to grow — no excuses. We have to grow by delivering more for our customers and clients. We have to grow by managing risk well. And, our growth must be sustainable. Sustainable means we have to share our success with our communities, we have to be a great place to work for our teammates, and we have to drive operational excellence. This creates the ability to reinvest the savings back into our team, our capabilities, our client experience, and our communities and shareholders.” -Bank of America “Protecting your most valued asset, your home, from fraudulent claims against your ownership, liens, and undisclosed heirs are just some of the reasons you need title insurance. In this site you will find information on the steps you need to take to purchase a home and secure your ownership. Chicago Title takes pride in the fact that we have helped homebuyers through the real estate transaction process for more than 150 years. It’s your investment – it’s your choice: contact your Real Estate agent and insist on Chicago Title Insurance.” -Chicago Title Insurance Company For more information visit Chicago Title Insurance Company- www.ctic.com Bank of America: www.bankofamerica.com


Flavor Of The Month Make A Stop At The Spotlight Cafe By Angela Huerta, Owner

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he Spotlight Cafe is the perfect place for anyone on the go! We are a family-owned, small business coffee shop located at 603 H Street, Modesto, CA. We serve coffee, smoothies, frappes, tea, breakfast sandwiches, Gluten-free sweetbread and more! We are open Monday through Friday from 6:30 am to 2:00 pm and on Sundays from 8:30 am to 1:30 pm. We are accepting curbside pickup orders and to-go orders. We love to feature art from local artists in our coffee shop! We would like to welcome any artists to come and showcase their art. We are looking forward to post-COVID events on our stage for open mic nights, poetry, comedy, drama, and singing. Make sure to follow us on Instagram and like our page on Facebook: @TheSpotlightCafeModesto and contact us at our phone number (209) 422-2509.

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We practice social distancing and wearing masks and are asking that our customers do so as well.

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Congratulations 120 + years Bank of America Chicago Title

110 years +

Pacific Gas & Electric Co.

90 + years JS West & Companies Modesto & Empire Traction Co. Capax - Giddings, Corby, Hynes, Inc. The Modesto Bee

85 + years Modesto Irrigation District

75 years +

Beard Land and Investment Co. Wille Electric Supply Co., Inc. I.C. Refrigeration Service, Inc.

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60 + years AT&T Seven-Up Bottling Co. of Modesto/Varni Brothers Corporation Storer Coachways

40 + years Sysco Central California Inc.

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to this MONTH'S milestone memberships

Gianelli Nielsen Skeet's Insurance Service Inc.

35 + years Bank of the West (McHenry) Community Hospice, Inc.

20 + years Kenni Friedman Modern Steel Structures Modesto Junior College Agriculture Dept. Bank of the West (Dale Road) Bank of the West (H Street) Bank of the West (Pelandale) O'Brien's Market Bank of the West (Oakdale Road) Andrews, Glenn & Carol Nexus Engineering

10 + years US Bank Turlock US Bank US Bank (Modesto Main) Standard Party Rentals Brenda Athletic Clubs Modesto Sports I.J. Larsen Pumps, Inc. Popeyes Chicken & Biscuits #10584 O'Brien's Market Garton Tractor, Inc Valley Children's Healthcare Simile Construction Service, Inc. Chukchansi Gold Resort & Casino Stuart-David League of California Cities Walmart

Network Builders IT, Inc. Bank of Stockton - Dale Road Andersons Tow

5 + years Modesto Academy of Music & Design Waterford Irrigation Supply, Inc. Hawks & Associates CPAs, Inc. Franklin & Downs Funeral Homes Modesto Reprographics & Signs COIT Services Inc. Valley Recovery Resources Redwood Family Center kitchenCRATE & bathCRATE Edward Jones - Brad Blakeley Financial Advisor Kemper Sports - Creekside GC/ Dryden Park GC Mid Valley IT Rodin Ranch LLC

1 + years Vylla Flooring Liquidators, Inc. Gold Star Referral Clubs La Perla Tapatia La Familia Market The JRP Group Farmers Insurance - Aleen Ortiz Inderjit S. Toor Construction, Inc. Opera Modesto Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Ceres Pipe & Metal Dittos Copy Centers, Inc. Caliber Collision Nestle USA - Carnation Apple Spice Box Lunch & Catering Valley Builders Exchange


announcements Oak Valley Bancorp And Oak Valley Community Bank Appoint New Director

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n December 15, 2020, Lynn Reeves Dickerson accepted her appointment to the Board of Directors of Oak Valley Bancorp (the “Company”) [NASDAQ: OVLY] and its whollyowned subsidiary Oak Valley Community Bank (the “Bank”), effective January 5, 2021. Since 2009, Dickerson has been the CEO of the Gallo Center for the Arts. Her decade-long tenure was marked with operational excellence and tremendous community support. Prior to joining the Gallo Center, Dickerson had a successful 29-year career in the newspaper industry; serving as Publisher & President of The Modesto Bee from 2000-2006 and subsequently as Vice President of Operations for The McClatchy Company, the parent company of The Modesto Bee. As a corporate officer at McClatchy, she oversaw 11 of their 30 newspapers throughout the country. Dickerson is extremely active in the community, serving on many boards over the past 20 years. She currently serves on the board of the Stanislaus Community Foundation and Opportunity Stanislaus. She also represents Arts, Entertainment, and Sports on the Stanislaus County CEO’s Focus on Prevention Task Force. She was recently named a Board member Emeritus for the Stanislaus Education Foundation. “Lynn has been incredibly successful collaborating with community resources and supporters to drive the economic viability of the Gallo Center and enrich the quality of life in our region. We couldn’t be more pleased to have her join our Boards of Directors,” stated Chris Courtney, President and CEO.

Dickerson and her husband Ron, of 40 plus years, are proud Stanislaus County residents. She is a native Texan and a graduate of Texas A&M University where she earned a degree in Marketing. In 2010, she was awarded the Toastmaster International Communication and Leadership Award for the 33rd District. She has been recognized by numerous Lynn Reeves Dickerson organizations with prestigious accolades with honors ranging from Citizen and Woman of the Year to Lifetime Achievement. Upon accepting the new Board position, Dickerson commented, “I have always respected Oak Valley Community Bank’s commitment to investing in the communities they serve. I am delighted to join their Board of Directors and leverage my experience to provide perspective and help provide guidance and governance to ensure the Company’s continued growth and success.” Oak Valley Bancorp operates Oak Valley Community Bank & their Eastern Sierra Community Bank division, through which it offers a variety of loan and deposit products to individuals and small businesses. They currently operate through 17 conveniently located branches: Oakdale, Turlock, Stockton, Patterson, Ripon, Escalon, Manteca, Tracy, Sacramento, two branches in Sonora, three branches in Modesto, and three branches in their Eastern Sierra division, which includes Bridgeport, Mammoth Lakes, and Bishop. For more information, call 1-866-844-7500 or visit www.ovcb.com.

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ak Valley Community Bank, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Oak Valley Bancorp (NASDAQ: OVLY), announced that Kim Parco has joined the bank as Vice President, Commercial Loan Officer. She is based out of the Tracy Branch. Parco has over 30 years of commercial banking experience managing many complex relationships in the region. In her new role, she will be responsible for commercial lending, agricultural lending, SBA loans, and relationship management in the Tracy and surrounding markets. “I’ve had roots in the Tracy business community since 1995, so I am very excited to be working for a local community-based bank with a strong reputation that will allow me to provide my clients with bestin-class banking services,” Parco stated. “We are very pleased to welcome Kim to our commercial banking team,” stated Gary Stephens, EVP Commercial Banking Group. “Kim’s background as an experienced banker with a successful career in commercial lending, agribusiness lending, and portfolio management, coupled with her extensive knowledge of the local market make her a perfect fit.”

Parco received a Degree in Business Administration from the University of Phoenix, and a certificate from the Agricultural Lending Institute at California State University - Fresno. She is a former board member of Tracy Hospital Foundation and the Tracy Chamber of Commerce. She is currently the treasurer of the Sugar Bowl Ski Kim Parco Team & Academy Parent Association. Parco resides in Tracy with her husband, Fernando, and their four children. She enjoys horseback riding, skiing, hiking, and spending time with her family. Oak Valley Bancorp operates Oak Valley Community Bank & their Eastern Sierra Community Bank division, through which it offers a variety of loan and deposit products to individuals and small businesses. They currently operate through 17 conveniently located branches: Oakdale, Turlock, Stockton, Patterson, Ripon, Escalon, Manteca, Tracy, Sacramento, two branches in Sonora, three branches in Modesto, and three branches in their Eastern Sierra division, which includes Bridgeport, Mammoth Lakes, and Bishop. For more information, call 1-866-844-7500 or visit www.ovcb.com. january 2021

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Commercial Loan Officer Hiring At Oak Valley Community Bank

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2021 Exhibitions Announced at Mistlin Gallery

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istlin Gallery (Central California Art Association) has published its 2021 schedule of art exhibitions. The exhibitions range from CCAA member shows, to student shows, to themed shows on a variety of topics — 10 shows in all — which will begin in January. Information, including show entry forms, can be found on the website at https://ccaagallery.org/exhibitions/currentupcoming-shows/. The retail gallery space in downtown Modesto will be open to the public with modified hours beginning Thursday, Jan. 7. Admission is free. The mission of CCAA’s gallery and gift shop is to give established and emerging artists from throughout the region an opportunity to show and sell their work. The exhibitions are a mix of member shows, invitationals and open calls. Several 2020 shows that were cancelled due to COVID shut downs will be turning up in 2021, including exhibits of pleinair painting, quilts and fiber arts, and CCAA’s annual Autumn Art Festival, a juried show featuring the best of regional artists. A schedule of classes and workshops will gradually be added in the new year, when restrictions are lifted for meeting in groups. Meanwhile, shows and classes can be accessed on their YouTube channel at https://www.youtube. com/channel/UCf3zr0HnUuQUKjiboWcHJuQ/videos

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The first show of 2021, “Art in the Time of COVID” will open on Jan. 7 and run through Jan. 29.

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When many artists find themselves “sheltering in place”, they become more productive, and sometimes more creative as well. Mistlin Gallery’s next exhibition, Art in the Time of COVID features recent works by Central California Art Association artists and crafters. The exhibit opens Thursday, Jan. 7, and runs through Friday, Jan. 29. Though subject to change, listed gallery hours are Thursdays and Fridays 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturdays noon to 4 p.m. Gallery admittance is free to the public. With a few exceptions all art is for sale. Gallery visitors are asked to put on a face covering. In February, “Foto Modesto: Themes, Projects and Stories” is on the schedule. This year’s annual Foto Modesto invitational photography exhibition, organized by David Schroeder, will feature the works of a dozen regional photographers who have submitted works on themes ranging from rodeos to churches.


Rounding out the first quarter of the year, the Young@Art Annual Student Exhibition runs from March 2 through March 27. After 45 years, CCAA’s annual student show is still going strong. Once called Young Masters, the show is all about showcasing the creativity and artistic efforts of our local youth. Last spring, after hanging over 200 student works, the show was cut short by statewide stay-at-home orders. However, with precautions in place, this March’s show will move forward, exhibiting an array of works in all mediums from preschool through high school aged students. Prizes are awarded in eight categories, divided into age groups and mediums. Works may be entered by teachers, families or individuals with a limit of two entries per student. Each entry fee is $2.00. This year will feature a collaborative project for kids initiated by the new StArt Magazine — an arts magazine for families now being published by Linda Knoll Graphics. The Yosemite Tapestries and Preserving Our Wilderness Open April 1 to 30 Nine large panels by Miriam McNitt (1917-1998) will be featured in the main gallery during this open exhibition. The “tapestries” are yarn stitcheries that were originally commissioned by Yosemite National Park for their visitor center theater. Three large pieces (7’x8’) describe the natural biomes within the park boundaries. Six smaller panels (7’x4’) tell the cultural history of the park, from its Native American tribes, to John Muir’s visits, Camp Curry’s creation, through the 1970s when the works were created. McNitt was a noted fiber artist from the Fresno area, who lived in Yosemite for a time, and retired to Modesto with her family in the 1980s. She created a similar tapestry for the McHenry Museum which showed the valley’s agricultural landscape. In addition to the tapestries, the show will have an open call for art from regional artists on the wide-ranging theme of wildlife, wilderness, environmentalism and the conservation of our National Parks. Works may be entered in any medium and size. Show host, Linda Knoll, hopes for an exhibit that delves deeply into our relationship with the earth. This show will be CCAA’s first show to use an online entry format using Smarter Entry.

Visions Reimagined: From Little to Big Open June 1 - 25 Brought to life by noted “plein air” artists Chella, Rick Ingraham and Janet Hardie, this show will be an open call to artists for pairs of works — one plein air “study”, along with a bigger companion studio piece based on the study. Plein air paintings are primarily landscapes, but also include sea and cityscapes, and tree or plant studies that have been produced in the open air, reminiscent of the late 19th century French impressionists. The paired works will show the contrast between quickly produced outdoor studies, and more carefully rendered pieces produced in the studio. There will be cash prizes awarded, sponsored by Valley Suncatchers plein air painting group. Country Crossroads Quilters: Fiber Arts Open July 1 - 30 This semi-annual show features quilts and other fiber art created by the Country Crossroads quilting guild. The quilts range from mini to full size, in an array of artistic forms. Other items include weaving, knitting, felting and other fiber related mediums. 5th Annual Autumn Art Festival Open August 10 to October 8 The Autumn Art Festival will invite regional artists to bring their best for this juried show. Prizes are awarded in several categories based on mediums including painting, drawing, photography, graphics and mixed media. A fundraising gala is planned during the show which brings the bulk of donations for the gallery’s programming. Memorial Medical Center’s Healing Arts Open October 12 - November 13 Participants in Memorial Medical Center’s complementary art therapy classes, held at Mistlin Gallery, annually put on this show featuring their art, photography and poetry. The artists are cancer patients, survivors and caregivers who attend the classes as a way to work through the challenges of a cancer diagnosis. Artists in the group range in experience from beginner to professional which gives the show a broad range of appeal. Home for the Holiday’s CCAA Member Show Open November 16 - December 23

Open May 4 - 28

CCAA’s member artists are given this opportunity to show all kinds of works in every medium. Many are smaller in scale and perfect for the giving season. The gallery encourages folks to shop locally to support the areas small galleries which can offer unique pieces for every taste.

College students from around the area will be featured in our May show. Works from Modesto Junior College, CSU Stanislaus, may be joined by students from Stockton to Columbia to Merced. More details will be forthcoming.

Throughout the year, CCAA member artists will be featured in the east window space of the gallery. Ceramicist, Randy Crimmell, will start the year off in January, followed by Carolyn Huff, Valentino Alexander, Vicki Reid and others.

Our Emerging Artists: Regional College Students

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The show opens Feb. 2 and runs through Feb. 27. Featured artist, Bill Harris will tell the story of Circus Vargas with images that depict the traveling circus from days gone by, when they would appear in the area for a few days each year. Photographers will include Lorraine Nilson, Dan Souza, Anna Barber, and Larry Lew among others.

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BUSINESS AND EDUCATION COMMITTEE PRESENTS

CO-HOSTED BY

COMING FEBRUARY 2021 education

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE GO TO WWW.MODCHAMBER.ORG

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SPONSORED BY

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Meeting The Challenges Of COVID-19 With No Impact To Receiving Operations By Dennis Bettencourt / Site Director, Blue Diamond Growers

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t Blue Diamond Growers’ Modesto facility on Sisk Road, the Almond Receiving Department has excelled in meeting the challenges of COVID-19, while stepping up to meet the demands of receiving this year’s record-breaking almond crop. Since the pandemic began, the hard work of the receiving department has enabled continued processing operations. Thanks to their diligence, there has been no impact to operations during the entirety of COVID-19. Our newest addition to the Blue Diamond Modesto facility is Bulk Warehouse 8, which broke ground February of 2019. The warehouse was constructed without any safety incidents by the Blue Diamond Growers team, as well as no safety incidents by any third-party contractors. This has all contributed to Blue Diamond’s world class “Zero Harm” Behavioral Based Safety Program, which recently celebrated 5 million hours without a lost time incident. The last incident occurred in 2015. The Blue Diamond Receiving Team successfully had Warehouse 8 fully operational to receive the first crop delivery on August 10, 2020.

Warehouse operations are automated, allowing a single employee to operate the entire system. This feature helps to mitigate the risk of COVID-19. Warehouse 8 is capable of storing 50 million pounds of bulk almonds and can receive a 50,000-pound delivery into the warehouse in less than 10 minutes. The warehouse was designed with the versatility to receive bulk and box deliveries. Bulk Warehouse 8 positions Blue Diamond Growers to successfully receive record-breaking crops well into the future. FAST FACTS Blue Diamond Modesto Plant started in1969 as a receiving station and has grown into a processing facility that now sits on 44 acres. Blue Diamond Modesto has two processing plants, a distribution center and the largest almond receiving station in the world. Blue Diamond’s Receiving Department works safely and efficiently. This focus has contributed to Modesto’s record-breaking 5 million hours worked without a lost time incident. Blue Diamond Growers offers a variety of almond based products, which you can find at our on-site gift shop here in Modesto at 4800 Sisk Road. The gift shop follows strict COVID-19 safety guidelines. Operating hours may vary.

What Small Businesses Can Expect In 2021 By Brandon Schwartz / boomajoom (www.boomajoom.com)

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020 is behind us, but we can expect 2021 to be full of just as much change. There are three key trends that small business owners in the Central Valley need to pay attention to.

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First, marketing is increasingly becoming transparent and traceable. There’s an old joke that half your marketing budget is wasted, but you don’t know which half. The last several years have begun to carve away at the truth behind the joke, and 2021 will likely accelerate the trend. As more and more marketing efforts become tied to the internet, small business owners have the opportunity to track which media are effective and which aren’t. Methods include dedicated call forwarding numbers, advanced analytics to track individual users across devices, and even tying actual transactions to marketing campaigns. 2021 will see tighter budgets with more emphasis on traceability.

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Second, local businesses are reaching customers outside their immediate geography. In an era of shelter in place orders and social distancing, business owners are turning to the internet to sell. A tamale maker in Texas uses sophisticated online advertising programs to reach customers across the country. Because they have a commercial kitchen and have already passed health inspection, restaurants and food makers are in a prime position to sell nationwide with little barriers to entry. Modesto Chamber of Commerce I ModChamber.org

A shoe retailer local to the valley can likewise sell significant product on the East Coast. 2021 will see more local businesses taking their product nationwide. Third, small businesses will expand their reliance on larger platforms to reach their audience. It is no longer enough to have a website. Business owners who sell product online are partnering with Amazon, eBay, Walmart, Google, Facebook, and others to increase their reach. It’s a love/ hate relationship to be sure; Walmart and Amazon especially have placed a lot of competitive pressure on small businesses. Yet at the same time, small retailers can sell product to consumers through those websites. 2021 will see more businesses reluctantly partner with giants who have immediate reach to customers. 2020 has forced everyone’s hand; we have to think differently to survive. The traditional approaches don’t work. As Chamber members plan ahead, it will be very important to keep these trends in mind. For additional information, contact Brandon Schwartz at (408) 429-0585 or brandon@boomajoom.com


New Member Highlight COVID Clinic By Nolan Meadnis

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OVID Clinic was founded earlier this year by Dr. Matthew Abinante DO, MPH. Dr. Abinante strongly feels that testing is a key to patient safety and will help to reduce the spread of the virus in our workplaces, homes, and communities. Over the past eight months, COVID Clinic has grown to over 40 drive-thru locations, including one right here in Modesto, at 3401 Dale Road, Modesto, CA 95356. COVID Clinic offers the Quidel Corporation Sofia SARS Antigen FIA Test. This test has received an emergency use authorization from the FDA. A nasal swab on the edge of the nostril collects the specimen. Results are available within 60 minutes and delivered to the patient via text and email. We also specialize in on-site group testing for businesses, organizations and events, which includes consultations to help determine how to keep workplaces safe as we move into reopening.

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To inquire about group testing for your business, please email grouptesting@covidclinic.org. You may also visit our website for more information on tests and appointments. www.covidclinic.org. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/covidclinic Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/covidclinic/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/covid-clinic

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Stanislaus Community Foundation One Of Fastest Growing In The Country By Yolanda Meraz / Stanislaus Community Foundation

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he Stanislaus Community Foundation has been named one of the fastest growing community foundations in the country by the Community Foundation Research and Training Institute (CFRTI). CFRTI provides training for community foundation staff and board members and publishes research on topics of interest to community foundations. As part of its research, CFRTI tracks basic information about USbased community foundations, including asset size. Between 2014 and 2018, Stanislaus Community Foundation increased its asset size from just over $17 million to more than $38 million. Based on this growth, Stanislaus Community Foundation is among the top 5 percent of the fastest growing community foundations in the country with assets over $10 million. “Our organization tracks financial results of all community foundations in the country,” said David Bennett, President of CFRTI. “Stanislaus Community Foundation stands out for its ability to increase its assets, thereby allowing Stanislaus Community Foundation to significantly increase the support it provides to the community it serves.” “We have always known that we live in an incredibly generous community and this ranking proves this,” said Marian Kaanon, President and CEO of Stanislaus Community Foundation. “Because of our donors, we’ve been able to respond to our community’s most pressing needs in past years, and that’s even more the case during the COVID-19 pandemic.” To date this year, Stanislaus Community Foundation has given out more than $5 million in grants and scholarships to students and nonprofits, almost double its giving from the previous year.

This includes $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits from the Resilient Stanislaus Fund; $150,000 to support Stanislaus County’s Business Grant Program; and $65,000 in hardship grants to Modesto Junior College and CSU Stanislaus students. To further support local nonprofits as they navigate the current crisis, Stanislaus Community Foundation published the report “The State of Stanislaus County’s Nonprofit Sector.” This report describes the impact of COVID-19 on nonprofit operations, clients, and capacity needs and provides recommendations regarding how funders can better support nonprofits. Stanislaus Community Foundation has also hosted a number of webinars for local organizations, donors and the community at large. For more information about Stanislaus Community Foundation, visit www.StanislausCF.org. About Stanislaus Community Foundation: Since 2002, Stanislaus Community Foundation (SCF) has been a catalyst to transform local resources into common good through strategic philanthropy and bold leadership. Since its inception, SCF has granted more than $23 million to nonprofits and scholarship recipients in Stanislaus County. SCF houses more than 160 funds and close to $40 million in total charitable assets.

The Food Initiative: The New Face Of Interfaith Ministries

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nterfaith Ministries recently revealed their new name and logo after months of planning. The Food Initiative of Greater Stanislaus, formerly Interfaith Ministries of Greater Modesto, has made this change to better reflect their purpose and whom they serve: serving food to low-income individuals throughout the county. With a rich history of helping those in need for over 40 years, The Food Initiative keeps the same heart, soul, and purpose, with a new look and a hunger to eliminate local food insecurity with agility, innovation, and sustainability.

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Elizabeth Wight, CEO of The Food Initiative, shared that her vision for the new look and brand would be reminiscent of vintage Modesto and have notes of symbolic meaning.

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The fig, FI’s icon, represents welcome and abundance in many religions, honoring their heritage as an interfaith organization. The goal of the rebrand is to bring about ease of recognition of services, and be a symbol that is known throughout the greater Stanislaus area. Though the name is changing and the reach is expanding, the mission remains the same; restoring dignity, health, and hope. Facts about the change to the organization: Figs as an icon reflect the acronym - Food Initiative of the Greater Stanislaus Change in a more recognizable name to reach a larger client pool New name but same organization New approaches are being taken to create a healthier and satisfied with programs and events offered About The Food Initiative: A nonprofit located in Modesto, CA. Founded in the 1960’s and incorporated in 1978, The Food Initiative (formerly IFM) proudly serves low-income residents, increasing access to healthy, fresh foods as well as offering various programs to create a flourishing Central Valley.

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OUR RIVE RS AR E EXHAUSTED. OUR PEOPL E NEED WATER. OUR F ISH STRUG G L E. SCIENCE OFFER S SO L UTIO NS.

W HO W IL L L IS T E N? FEATURE-LENGTH DOCUMENTARY PREMIERES LABOR DAY WEEKEND L E A RN MOR E A T MID.ORG /LA S TDROP

december 2020

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Profile for Manteca Bulletin

Progress January 2021  

Progress January 2021  

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