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PUBLISHED BY MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS

MARCH 2020

Fourty-two resolutions were carried at the 2019 fall district meetings and taken forward for debate at the 41st AGM held February 6 in Brandon.

A lot of issues on the table at 41st MBP AGM It was a busy two days at the 41st MBP AGM on February 6 and 7, as the producer delegates voted on resolutions, engaged in lively debate about topics such as agricultural Crown lands, wildlife predation issues and changes to the livestock transport regulations, and listened to speakers discuss Canadian beef ’s place in the global marketplace. Thursday morning kicked off with an overview of how Manitoba beef producers’ check-off dollars are being spent. A portion of check-off dollars goes to Canada Beef for marketing initiatives, and the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) to support research work at the University of Manitoba, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada Research and Development Centres, Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives, and other Canadian university and public research programs benefiting the beef industry. Canada Beef President Michael Young gave a rundown of its domestic and inter-

national marketing and promotion strategies, including new programs. Young also unveiled some ideas to build both export and domestic demand which will include the launch in March of Project Trust, where producers tell their story of on-farm sustainability, and Project Crave, a multimedia campaign focusing on promoting the benefits of beef. Dr. Reynold Bergen, Science Director for the BCRC and Dr. Kim Ominski of the University of Manitoba outlined some of their past and ongoing beef research in areas such as how beef production impacts biodiversity and grasslands affect carbon storage. New research at the University of Manitoba is exploring the economic and environmental impacts of using growth hormones in beef production. Around 27 young beef producers attended the Young Producers luncheon to hear Stacey Stott of MNP provide some tips on succession planning, while other delegates watched a screening of two new videos that were produced by Manitoba

Beef Producers. One video involves cow-calf producer Melissa Atchison speaking about the animal care practices used on her family’s beef operation in the Pipestone area. The second video features bird expert Dr. Christian Artuso talking about the importance of maintaining beef production as the preservation of grasslands provides critical habitat for species at risk such as a number of threatened birds. This video was shot in southwestern Manitoba. MBP was also pleased to show the award-winning documentary, Guardians of the Grasslands. Created in collaboration with Ducks Unlimited Canada, the Nature Conservancy of Canada as well as the Waldron Grazing Co-op and local ranchers in Alberta, the film explores the vital role cattle play in preserving and maintaining one of the world’s most endangered ecosystems – the native prairie grasslands. A new MBP president The business portion of the AGM included ratification of directors and Ex-

ecutive members. Joining MBP’s board of directors for 2020 are Kevin Duddridge (District 4), Melissa Atchison (District 6), Matthew Atkinson (District 8), Mark Good (District 12) and Jim Buchanan (District 14). On the Executive, outgoing MBP President Tom Teichroeb is replaced by Dianne Riding (District 9), Tyler Fulton (District 7) is Vice-President, and Second Vice-President is Mike Duguid (District 10). Peter Penner (District 3) remains in his position of Treasurer and Nancy Howatt (District 2) takes on the role of Secretary. Thursday evening, Minister of Agriculture and Resource Development, Blaine Pedersen brought greetings and talked about the Manitoba Protein Advantage, announced a new livestock predation prevention program, and, to applause from the attendees, promised that changes to the Crown Lands Act will include the sale of Crown Lands to producers. Page 2   Page 1

President's Column

Market Report

Resolutions outcome

Page 3

Page 4

Page 12

POSTMASTER: PLEASE RETURN UNDELIVERABLE COPIES TO: MBP, UNIT 220, 530 CENTURY STREET, WINNIPEG, MB R3H 0Y4 CANADIAN PUBLICATIONS MAIL PRODUCT SALES AGREEMENT NUMBER 40005187 POSTAGE PAID IN WINNIPEG.

BY ANGELA LOVELL


2

CATTLE COUNTRY March 2020

Thoughts on the 41 MBP AGM st

Greetings members and industry stakeholders, I sit here writing this report shortly after wrapping our 41st Manitoba Beef Producers AGM, so I feel it is a perfect opportunity to summarize my thoughts on the event. Overall it was an excellent meeting, and I am encouraged by the optimistic feeling throughout the day-and-a-half program. I want to start by thanking all the speakers who spoke during the program. All provided such valuable information for our members. There are many important things to consider about where beef fits in an evolving marketplace. Michael Young, President of Canada Beef, gave an overview on the global status of Canadian beef. Brenna Grant with the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) gave a rundown of current markets, as well as the National Beef Strategy. We heard from two distinguished researchers, Dr. Kim Ominski of the University of

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Manitoba and Dr. Reynold Bergen of the Beef Cattle Research Council. Our panel discussion, which featured Maurice Bouvier with Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development, Andrea White from the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef, and Mark Ludwick from Chop Steakhouse & Bar, was very engaging as we talked about beef being a sustainable protein choice for consumers. Amie Peck of the CCA discussed key areas that the new Public and Stakeholder Engagement (PSE) Program under the CCA is working on to build our industry’s public trust. PSE will be a very important part of our industry moving forward. These speakers combined created a very informative agenda for our AGM. An important aspect

CARSON CALLUM

General Manager’s Column

of any AGM is an effective business meeting. During this portion of the AGM, Tom Teichroeb gave his final President’s Report, and I greatly thank him for everything he has done for the industry. The main categories covered in our resolutions session were Agricultural Crown Lands, Business Risk Management Programs, Environment/Production Management, Transportation, and Justice. Many resolutions related to these categories were carried by the delegates, which provide guidance for the organization moving forward. There was healthy debate during this section,

and MBP looks forward to continuing its work related to these. An update on which resolutions carried and which were defeated can be found in this edition of Cattle Country. The President’s Banquet at our AGM was an excellent opportunity for folks to unwind, connect with many producers/industry stakeholders, and share a great beef meal. This year we had lots of excitement during the evening. Greetings was brought forward by Agriculture and Resource Development Minister Blaine Pedersen, and he announced funding towards a predation preven-

Retiring and non-returning MBP directors, Tom Teichroeb, Larry Wegner, Jade Delaurier, Robert Kerda and Kris Kristjanson were recognized, and Outstanding Contribution Awards were presented to long-time MBP employees, bookkeeper Deb Walger, and Policy Analyst Maureen Cousins. In presenting the award, Teichroeb and Penner thanked them for their hard work and dedication to the organization over the past 20 years. This year’s Manitoba Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) went to the Hagan family – Thomas, Felicity and sons Rory and Ryan, who operate Hagan Valley Ranch near Virden. The Hagans were recognized for their contribution to the environment and conservation including efforts to incorporate habitat enhancement strategies on their 3,200 acres of largely native pastures. They have embraced new ideas in grazing management, marketing and soil health and ecology with a goal to have a sustainable ranch that ‘grows lots of grass, is diverse in wildlife and plant life, environmentally aware and financially stable’. How does beef stack up? Friday’s panel brought together speakers representing many aspects of the beef industry to weigh in on how beef stacks up to today’s competitive protein marketplace. Maurice Bouvier, Assistant Deputy Minister of the Production and Economic Development Division of Manitoba Agriculture

GORD ADAMS

R.M. of Albert, Cameron, Whitewater, Edward, Brenda, Winchester, Morton

DISTRICT 2

NANCY HOWATT - SECRETARY

R.M. of Riverside, Strathcona, Argyle, Lorne, Turtle Mountain, Roblin, Louise, Pembina

DISTRICT 5

STEVEN MANNS

R.M. of Elton, North Cypress, North Norfolk, Cornwallis, Oakland, South Cypress, Victoria, South Norfolk

DISTRICT 6

MELISSA ATCHINSON

R.M. of Wallace, Woodworth, Daly, Pipestone, Sifton, Whitehead, Glenwood

and Resource Development gave an overview of Manitoba’s Protein Advantage strategy and goals, which he said is an economic development and sustainability strategy. “We want to drive investment, new jobs, value in our rural and urban communities through the strategy,” explained Bouvier, emphasizing that although the strategy encompasses both animal and plant-based proteins, the animal protein sector right now is driving a lot of value and creating a lot of jobs. “We see beef as an important part of this [strategy] and we see that there are growth opportunities in beef production in Manitoba.” Mark Ludwick, Regional Manager for Chop Steakhouse & Bar, which has restaurants across Canada, said customers are increasingly asking questions about the source of the beef on their plate. Ludwick said his staff is excited about sharing the positive story of how Canadian beef is raised, and added this March, for the first time, the company will offer its customers a verified, sustainable Chop Burger. Around 65 per cent of Canadians want to know more about agriculture and the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB) brings together the entire beef value chain from producers to retailers, as well as other partners like NGOs and conservation groups who are all working together to promote the positive stories of beef production. The CRSB’s Community Engagement Manager, Andrea White, cited Cargill’s Canadian Beef

DISTRICT 9

DIANNE RIDING - PRESIDENT

R.M. of Woodlands, Rockwood, St. Andrews, Rosser, St. Francis Xavier, Springfield, Tache, Whitemouth, Lac du Bonnet, Brokenhead, St. Clements, LGD of Alexander, Pinawa

DISTRICT 10

MIKE DUGUID - 2ND VICE-PRESIDENT

DISTRICT 3

DISTRICT 7

R.M. of Bifrost, Gimli, Fisher, Armstrong

R.M. of Portage la Prairie, Cartier, Grey, MacDonald, Dufferin, Thompson, Roland, Morris, Stanley, Rhineland, Montcalm

R.M. of Russell, Silver Creek, Rossburn, Ellice, Birtle, Shoal Lake, Strathclair, Archie, Miniota, Hamiota, Blanshard

DISTRICT 11

DISTRICT 4

MATTHEW ATKINSON

KEVIN DUDDRIDGE

R.M. of Richot, Ste. Anne, Hanover, De Salaberry, La Broquerie, Franklin, Stuartburn, Piney, LGD Reynolds

ing on their behalf as we move forward in 2020. It’s definitely sad to see directors finish their time on the board. Progressive, thoughtful, and professional directors like these folks are really what drive this industry forward. Even though they are leaving the board, I still hope to consider them friends. I am excited to get to know many of the new board members, and work closely with our new President, Dianne Riding, on many files important to the beef industry. Before I close, I want to thank the supporters and sponsors of our AGM. Without you, this event would not be possible. I also want to thank our members for attending and for your constant support of MBP. All the best during calving season! Carson Callum

AGM highlights (cont.)

DISTRICT 1

PETER PENNER - TREASURER

tion pilot project MBP has sought for some time. The Environmental Stewardship Award was presented to the Hagan family, who are very deserving of the award. Kind (and humorous) words were spoken about retiring and non-returning directors, a bittersweet moment for many in the room. It was also great to recognize two staff members, Maureen Cousins and Deb Walger, for their contribution to the industry. The evening was capped off by the hilarious comedian Dan Verville. It was such as great evening overall, and I was very happy to see all the folks enjoying themselves, especially after the tough production year in 2019. This being my first AGM, I am very pleased with how things went. The engagement by producers was outstanding, and I look forward to work-

TYLER FULTON 1ST VICE-PRESIDENT

DISTRICT 8

R.M. of Harrison, Clanwilliam, Rosedale, Glenella, Saskatchewan, Odanah, Minto, Langford, Lansdowne, Westbourne, LGD Park

ROBERT METNER

R.M. of Siglunes, Grahamdale, Eriksdale, Coldwell, St. Laurent

DISTRICT 12

MARK GOOD

R.M. of Lawrence, Ochre River, Ste. Rose, McCreary, Alonsa

Sustainability Acceleration pilot project as a good example of how the industry is working to create a certified sustainable Canadian beef supply chain. Still on the theme of the Canadian beef ‘story’, Amie Peck of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association discussed how its Public and Stakeholder Engagement Program is addressing misconceptions about the industry. CCA not only responds to issues as they arise, but has a number of proactive projects and provides science-based information through its Beef Advocacy website that gives producers and other stakeholders concise, effective messages to share about the benefits of Canadian beef production. Market outlook The conference wrapped up with reports from the BCRC including details of current research that is looking to fill the information gaps about the effects of rest stops on animal being transported over long distances. This research is important to address some of the livestock transportation regulation changes coming into effect this year. Finally, Brenna Grant, Manager of Canfax Research Services gave a market outlook for 2020 that forecasts beef prices will likely remain fairly stable, total beef production will be up slightly by around 2.2 per cent and international export demand will remain strong despite lots of competition from other beef producing countries.

DISTRICT 13

DISTRICT 14

MARY PAZIUK

R.M. of Shell River, Shellmouth,Hillsburg, Boulton, Grandview, Gilbert Plains, Ethelbert, Mossey River, Dauphin, LGD Park

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS Unit 220, 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4

Ph: 1-800-772-0458 PH - (204) 772-4542 FX - (204) 774-3264 info@mbbeef.ca www.mbbeef.ca

GENERAL MANAGER Carson Callum

POLICY ANALYST Maureen Cousins

www.mbbeef.ca

JIM BUCHANAN

R.M. of Minitonas, Swan River, Mountain, The Pas

COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR David Hultin

FINANCE

Deb Walger

OFFICE ASSISTANT Tanya Michalsky

CATTLE COUNTRY EDITOR David Hultin

DESIGNED BY

Trinda Jocelyn


March 2020 CATTLE COUNTRY

3

The 2020-2021 Board of Directors (from left to right). Back row: Matthew Atkinson (District 8); Kevin Duddridge (District 4); Gord Adams (District 1); Mark Good (District 12); Steven Manns (District 5); Carson Callum, General Manager Middle row: Jim Buchanan (District 14); Robert Mettner (District 11); Mary Paziuk (District 13); Melissa Atchison (District 6) Seated: Nancy Howatt (Secretary, District 2); Tyler Fulton (1st Vice President, District 7); Dianne Riding (President, District 9); Mike Duguid (2nd Vice President, District 10); Peter Penner (Treasurer, District 3)

New president will lead advocacy efforts I am pleased to be submitting my first column since becoming president of Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP). I thank my fellow directors for their confidence in me as I take on this important role in representing my fellow producers as we advocate on issues of importance to our industry. I’d like to tell you a bit about myself. My partner Gary and I operate a commercial cow-calf operation in the Lake Francis area. We have a mix of agricultural Crown land and deeded land. Like so many of you, our farm has seen the negative effects of adverse weather conditions over the past few years, including severe flooding as well as droughts. We have also experienced the years of more favourable production and market conditions and the opportunities that go with that. There is never a dull moment when it comes to raising cattle. As I write this we are just coming off of our very successful 41st MBP Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Brandon. I would like to extend a sincere thanks to all the delegates who came to listen to the various speakers and to participate in the resolutions session. We had some really good discussions about topics such as the changes to the Agricultural Crown Lands program, business risk management programs, wildlife management, animal transportation, rural crime and more. MBP will continue to advocate in these areas and others in the months ahead. And, no AGM is a success without the generous support of our sponsors and trade show exhibitors and

we are truly appreciative of their participation. Look for coverage of our AGM throughout this edition of Cattle Country. I would like to personally recognize our retiring and non-returning directors: Robert Kerda (District 4), Larry Wegner (District 6), Tom Teichroeb (District 8) and Jade Delaurier (District 14). Each of these directors capably served their districts over the years, taking time away from their own operations and families to do so. Your contributions are appreciated more than you know. And I’d like to extend a hearty welcome to incoming directors Kevin Duddridge (District 4), Melissa Atchison (District 6), Matthew Atkinson (District 8), Mark Good (District 12) and Jim Buchanan (District 14). As well, I would also like to congratulate Hagan Valley Ranch (Thomas, Felicity, Rory and Ryan) for being named the latest recipients of The Environmental Stewardship Award in Manitoba. They will now go on to vie for the national TESA which will be awarded in the summer at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference. We’ve had some important announcements in recent weeks involving Manitoba’s beef industry. In early January the provincial government announced the insurance program changes for the upcoming year. MBP is pleased that forages used for extended-season grazing are now eligible for compensation under the Wildlife Damage Compensation Program for Crops. MBP has long requested improved coverage to

DIANNE RIDING President's Column

bring insurance programs up to date with both current industry practices and practices being encouraged by governments, such as extended grazing. MBP continues to raise with MASC concerns about damage caused by other wildlife such as blackbirds, ravens and wild boars. At our AGM the Hon. Blaine Pedersen, Minister of Agriculture and Resource Development announced the provincial government will be providing funding toward a threeyear Livestock Predation Prevention Project aimed at reducing wildlife predation of livestock. For years MBP has pursued this type of initiative as we recognize the heavy toll that predation takes on our sector and news the province is supporting this important project is welcomed. Key areas of focus will include conducting on-farm predation risk assessments and planning in consultation with producers, testing onfarm predation prevention and removal practices, and sharing information with producers about management practices. The project will be targeted in areas such as the northern Interlake and Parkland regions where there are the highest incidences of predation. The Livestock Predation Protection Working Group (of which MBP is the co-chair) will develop and lead the project. Watch for more details in upcoming weeks. In January the pro-

vincial and federal governments announced that about 1,500 eligible producers will be receiving payments after the Hay Disaster Benefit triggered due to the 2019 forage shortfall in Manitoba. The payments are flowing to those producers who took out Select Hay or Basic Hay Insurance coverage, two of the forage insurance programs provided through Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC). MBP recognizes that this does not help all the producers affected by the drought. It is important to note that the Manitoba government recently announced that it is doing a review of the forage insurance pro-

gram. According to the province’s news release, “More than 1,200 producers currently have forage insurance, representing more than 272,000 acres. This represents about 18 per cent of the more than 1.5 million eligible acres in Manitoba. For comparison, about 90 per cent of annual crop acreage is insured through MASC.” MBP is strongly encouraging all beef producers to take part in the consultations related to the forage insurance program review. It is essential that the province and MASC have an understanding of why forage insurance does or does not work for your farm or ranch, and what needs to be done to make these insurance programs more responsive to your operation’s needs. The consultation process will be starting very soon, so watch our enewsletter and social me-

dia channels for updates. Looking ahead MBP will continue to advocate on issues like these and others that affect our industry. As we head into the next production year there is a possibility that some parts of the province may be affected by spring flooding. We encourage producers to take steps to prepare in case such an emergency arises and to watch our website and social media for information. MBP will also continue to advocate with both the provincial and federal governments for effective water management strategies to reduce future risk, such as the completion of the Lake Manitoba and Lake Manitoba outlet channels project. As we work through calving season and get ready for spring activities, I wish you all the best for the production year ahead.

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Leaders heading to Manitoba in May Just when it looked like the cattle industry was going to catch a break and the market showed strength along came the coronavirus which sent the world economy into a tail spin. The virus sent shock waves of uncertainty around the world and every commodity price dropped. The USA had just agreed to resume trade with China and Japan reduced tariffs on USA beef destined. These two agreements created a very bullish market in the beef industry. China was already suffering to the effects of the African Swine Fever that decimated their pork industry and were in the process of buying huge amounts of beef trim and pork from around the world. With travel restrictions

imposed on the Chinese population many factories were forced to close down due to a lack of workers. This disrupted production and trade world wide. Despite the fact that people still have to be fed the meat processors and the com- $170.00 to $161.00 per modity traders found a pound with the majority way to lower both the cash going to the finishing lots in market for fed cattle and the Western Canada. This drop in prices refutures market. The heavy calf mar- sulted in the backgroundket took the biggest hit. ers that purchased feeders Early January prices for a last fall took it on the chin 900-pound steer in Mani- again this spring. The bad toba was close to $1.82 news is that with the poor per pound. Cash price weather conditions last fall in the middle of Feb- the majority of the backruary had dropped to grounded cattle were pur$1.75. With very limited chased and placed on feed demand for replace- later than usual and this ment heifers for breeding means the majority of those Please keep an eye out for cattle weighing 800 pound 850-pound heifers in Maniupcoming online surveys, inperson consultations, plus will or come to market in toba had dropped from submit your comments to March. MBP. As of today, there is Forage Insurance Review very little chance of much The Minister of Agriculture and Resource Development of a market increase on wants to better understand the decisions of Manitoba producers when it comes to forage insurance products heavy during March and available through MASC. early April. Many of those cattle may not be sold with

RICK WRIGHT

The Bottom Line

@ManitobaBeef

the feedlots choosing to retain ownership and finish the cattle hoping to mitigate their potential losses. Some will finish the cattle here, but the majority will be sent south to be finished in the USA. Slightly more competition in the packing industry, more available pen space and financing available for both the feed and the cattle, makes feeding in the USA more attractive for the owners of the cattle. Interest from the Ontario and Quebec feedlot operators has been somewhat diminished this spring. Poor finished cattle prices resulting in large losses combined with unpredictable delivery times to the packers created pen space, cash flow and de-

Manitoba Beef Producers

The review will ask producers about insurance products, how they currently manage risks and how the program can evolve to support growth in the livestock sector.

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mand issues. This has also put extra pressure on the Manitoba markets. On the other side of the coin the really good news as been in the grass cattle trade. Demand for the cattle under 700 pounds opened the year strong and has never looked back. The grassland operators came off a profitable fall in 2019 and the long-term futures look very positive for the fall delivery on grass yearlings. There were a lot of grass cattle buyers that did not purchase any inventory in the fall due to the poor weather and pen conditions. Many producers were short of feed and sold more feeders in the fall than usual. The supply/demand ratio kicked in and the buyers of light weight grass type cattle threw caution to the wind. Heifers saw the biggest price improvement as some buyers switched from steers to heifers. The spread is still

20 cents per pound between heifers and steers but with the high steer market sellers are more satisfied than they were last fall. With the hope that coronavirus will be under control by fall and the predictions of $2.00 per pound for 800-pound steers and $1.90 plus for 900-pounders the grass operators have created a very strong market this spring. In other industry news Manitoba was selected by the Livestock Marketing Association of Canada to host the 2020 LMAC convention. The convention will be held in Brandon May 7 to 10 at the Clarion Hotel. The Canadian Livestock Auctioneering Championships is held in conjunction with the convention and will held at Heartland Livestock Services in Virden on May 8. The convention will bring the leaders of the livestock marketing business from across Canada to Brandon to listen to speakers and discuss issues that affect the auction market and livestock marketing sector. The Auctioneering competition will see over 40 auctioneers from across Canada competition for the Canadian crown. The competition is free for the public to attend. Virden Heartland manager Robin Hill will be taking a limited number of cattle for this special sale so book early. The convention and competition also attract extra buyers from across the country and they like to do a little business adding extra competition. Watch for more details over the next few weeks. Until next time. Rick


March 2020 CATTLE COUNTRY

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StockTalk Q&A Feature brought to you by Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development, Livestock Extension Branch Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development Livestock Extension Specialists Shawn Cabak.............Portage la Prairie.....204-239-3353 Ray Bittner.................Ashern.......................204-768-0010 Elizabeth Nernberg...Roblin.........................204-247-0087 Kathleen Walsh.........Swan River................204-734-3417 Jane Thornton...........Souris.........................204-483-2153 Tim Clarke...................Gladstone..................204-768-0534 Pam Iwanchysko.......Dauphin.....................204-648-3965 Question. My beef operation has had a difficult couple of years. What can I do to prevent further setbacks if the weather doesn’t cooperate in 2020? Answer: As Manitoba Agriculture Livestock staff we answer the difficult questions on livestock and forage management, but the experts on forage and pasture risk are found at MASC Insurance. We asked them to answer this question and would like to remind producers to get the details on the forage insurance programs prior to the enrollment deadline at the end of March. Answer (Courtesy of MASC Insurance): There’s only one sure guarantee for agriculture in Manitoba: the weather does not always cooperate. Lately, cattle producers might wonder if it ever cooperates, and with two straight years of province-wide forage shortfalls, you’re right to search for ways to prevent further setbacks. As a cattle producer, your best option is to decrease the risk your operation will face in the coming year. You can lessen your risks by enrolling in business risk management (BRM) programs. When your forage production, forage quality or calf prices fall short, or the weather doesn’t cooperate, BRM programs can mean the difference between an average-to-good year and a terrible-to-devastating year. MASC has BRM programs that target the unpreventable challenges you face as a cattle producer. Rheal Bernard, Manager of Insurance at MASC, points out that for the reasonable cost of a program premium, you’ll be paid an indemnity if your operation suffers a forage production or quality shortfall, diminished calf prices, or other setbacks. Livestock producers face more than just the whim of Manitoba weather. From calving until sale,

you are also exposed to market forces and fluctuations that push and pull on daily livestock prices. How can you budget for your operation when you have a successful calving season and still lose out due to low sale prices? “Your operation is too important to be managed by a gut feeling of future price predictions,” said Bernard. “The Western Livestock Price Insurance Program (WLPIP) is a BRM tool that provides a floor price protection for your livestock. With the program, you can insure a sale price for a specific weight of cattle on a certain date. Then, if the market price is lower than your insured price, you are paid an indemnity on the difference. This is one way beef producers can protect their investment.” Producers may see program premiums as costly, or even wasteful in good years when no indemnity is paid. While there’s some merit to this way of thinking, producers should understand that when they do not collect an indemnity, they are building their coverage over time, as hay is an Individual Coverage crop. However, Bernard said, “If you are not willing to invest in your operation, no one else will. This is like putting money in the bank.” Producers need to view premiums as an investment for the long-term protection of their businesses. “The good news is, MASC and the governments of Manitoba and Canada recognize the costs of sustaining BRM programs are too much for producers to bear alone,” said Bernard. “That means premiums for the business risk management programs are shared and producers only have to foot the bill for about 40 per cent of the costs.” For forage producers, MASC offers a whole subset of insurance products designed to protect against the challenges of growing forages in Manitoba. This includes: • Select Hay Insurance • Basic Hay Insurance • Forage Establishment Insurance

• Corn Silage Insurance • Greenfeed insurance • Pasture Days Insurance “With so many programs and various levels of premiums, it might seem like a daunting task for producers to even try to figure out what might be the best options for their operation. That’s why we have knowledgeable staff available to help walk our clients through all the options and make decisions on what makes sense for them based on their operation. It’s not a one-size fits all situation,” said Bernard. What some producers may not realize is that MASC’s Forage Insurance also gives them access to additional benefits, such as the Forage Restoration and Hay Disaster benefits. “Take the Hay Disaster Benefit, for instance,” said Bernard. “We paid out approximately $3.2 million on 1,000 claims for 2018, and an estimated $5.3 million for 2019 in production shortfalls. This is one risk management tool that more producers could be taking advantage of.” While farmers always hope for favourable weather and positive results, it is a good idea to plan for less than ideal circumstances to protect yourself, your family and your business operations. Contact your local MASC Insurance office for more details. We want to hear from you! For the next issue of Cattle Country, a Manitoba Agriculture livestock specialist will answer a selected question. Send your questions to Ray.Bittner@gov. mb.ca The StockTalk Q&A Feature for Cattle Country is brought to you by Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development. Our forage and livestock team, who have a combined 230 years of agronomy experience, are here to help make your cattle operation successful. Contact us today.

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CATTLE COUNTRY March 2020

Field trial in pasture cropping BY DR. MARY-JANE ORR

MBFI General Manager

Revitalizing tame pasture and hay land through direct seeding into sod minimizes soil disturbance, retaining soil moisture and limiting erosion losses. Pasture cropping is a variation of sod seeding promoted by Colin Seis and Darryl Cluff in Gulgong region of Australia starting in the early 1990s. The strategy to seed winter annual cereals into dormant forage stands was designed to capture two windows of productivity while avoiding the costs of breaking and re-establishing forage stands. As one of the first Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives (MBFI) led onfarm trials, a comparison of approaches to pasture cropping is being evaluated at the Johnson Farm over the 2019 and 2020 growing seasons. The field trial is an opportunity to showcase the potential to increase productivity in forage stands and increase plant diversity while minimizing negative environmental impacts. The aim of pasture cropping is to see successful seeding establishment and increased productivity over the winter annual growing seasons with minimal disturbance to the existing forage stand. The trial objectives are to measure the establishment and yield of two pasture cropping strat-

egies relative to the preexisting forage stand. Measurements of the baseline forage yield before the start of the trial and two months following seeding were collected in 2019, and samples will be collected in the 2020 growing season at green feed - hay harvest. The Australian model of pasture cropping was adapted to accommodate the shorter Manitoba growing season. The trial area is located on loamy fine sands with dominate forage of Kentucky bluegrass, brome grass, and less than ten per cent legumes. The stand has been managed for grazing and hayed in years with adequate moisture. To use a late summer seeding window the pre-existing forage stand was setback by either grazing or chemical suppression and was compared to a control without any setback or seeding. The three treatments were replicated three times and randomly applied to the field plot area. In July 2019, two weeks before seeding grazing suppression was carried out by mob grazing to 80% utilization of the forage stands. Chemical suppression was applied one week prior to seeding as 360 g glyphosate per acre. All treatments were given the same base fertility. In both the chemi-

COMPETITIVE FEED COSTS

TIM E T O BO O K YO UR WINT E R / SPR IN G G RAI N & P R O T E IN N E ED S

cal and grazing suppression treatments a mix of fall rye, winter triticale, Hungvillosa hairy vetch, tillage radish, and Hercules turnips were seeded on August 8, 2019 with a John Deere 750 no-till drill. Available moisture is the most critical element to successfully seeding into a forage stand, and in this trial the rains were timely beginning on August 12, 2019. The baseline sampling of yield and forage quality established no differences between plot areas. In the two months following suppression and seeding, the per cent of canopy cover in the chemical suppression treatment showed a trend of an increase in bare ground, decrease in established grasses, and increase in all seeded crops relative to the grazing suppression and control. The grazing

suppression showed com- ability to quickly respond nual over wintering and parable winter cereals cov- to favorable growing con- evaluating the impact of fall erage to chemical suppres- ditions out yielded the Au- rye and winter triticale on sion, but significantly lower gust seeded winter annuals forage yield to be harvested brassicas, hairy vetch, and in the fall of 2019. MBFI is green feed at the soft dough bare ground. The grazing looking forward to spring stage compared to hay yield suppression also showed observations of winter an- in the control plots. a decrease in established grass canopy cover. Initial observations indicate that while all plant varieties seeded were able to establish in both suppression treatments, the seeded varieties thrived more under the chemical suppression. The observed increase in plant stand diversity did not translate to early increase in yield compared to the control forage plots. The control plots showed an average of approximately 400 lbs dry weight per acre more grass yield compared to both suppression and seeding treatments. The fall moisture combined with the established forages’ Chemical Suppression – October 2019

Control Forage – October 2019

Grazing Suppression – October 2019

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7

New research supported by Manitoba Beef Producers Watershed-scale assessment of water and nutrient dynamics of pastures utilized by beef cattle BY CHRISTINE RAWLUK

National Centre for Livestock and the Environment, University of Manitoba

Marcos Cordeiro, Assistant Professor in Animal Science and soil scientist David Lobb lead new research funded by the Beef Cattle Research Council and Manitoba Beef Producers that will provide science-based information on the environmental goods and services provided by the beef industry. The Canadian beef industry has been under constant scrutiny regarding environmental performance. One area for which there is relatively little data is nutrient dynamics in grasslands, as detailed assessments describing the contribution of beef cattle to nutrient cycling in grasslands and its relationship to land management and water cycling in these landscapes are still lacking. This area is a priority for the beef industry at both the national (Beef Cattle Research Council, Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef) and provincial levels (e.g. Manitoba Beef Producers). Cordeiro’s and Lobb’s research will narrow this knowledge gap by estimating the impact of grazing on water cycling and nutrient dynamics in pasture landscapes in the

Prof. Marcos Cordeiro

Canadian Prairies. Specifically, the objectives of the project are to (1) estimate nitrogen and phosphorus excretion by beef cattle based on a range of pasture quality and productivity, weather conditions, and pasture management practices commonly adopted in Canada, (2) simulate the major water budget components by a set of algorithms developed specifically for Canadian conditions, (3) estimate relative contribution from vegetation, soils, and manure to the overall nutrient dynamics from pasture land, and (4) integrate objectives 1-3 to identify prominent processes, sources, and management practices impacting nutrient cycling in pasture and grasslands. This project will provide datasets and models quantifying pasture productivity and quality, hydrological responses, nutrient accumulation in different pools, and the impact of management practices on nutrient export. Understanding of the

relationships between climate, hydrology, nutrient sources and land management in grasslands will (1) provide the industry with science-based information necessary to identify the merits of grassland and pasture systems in achieving whole-farm sustainability, (2) enable risk management analysis under periods of feed shortage by clearly describing the relationship between precipitation and pasture productivity and quality, and (3)

equip producers to better manage these landscapes. This research will investigate the climatic and hydrological processes driving nutrient dynamics, creating a link between water and nutrient cycles in grasslands. It will also illustrate the importance of beef cattle as a source of exported nutrients from pasturelands, converting plant biomass into a high quality protein for human consumption. The outcomes of this research

will inform future policy development and effective public communication regarding environmental goods and services provided by the beef industry. The research team: Marcos Cordeiro, David Lobb, Kim Ominski and Don Flaten (University of Manitoba), Tim McAllister (AAFC - Lethbridge, AB), Henry Wilson (AAFC - Brandon, MB), John Pomeroy (University of Saskatchewan), Helen Baulch (University of Sas-

katchewan) and Merrin Macrae (University of Waterloo). The U of M Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences beef production systems research team includes Kim Ominski, Emma McGeough, Argenis Rodas-Gonzalez, Marcos Cordeiro, Kateryn Rochon, Claudia Narvaez, Doug Cattani, Yvonne Lawley, Francis Zvomuya, Mario Tenuta, Don Flaten, David Lobb and Derek Brewin.

Credit: Emma McGeough

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CATTLE COUNTRY March 2020

Quality colostrum key to successful calving season DR. TANYA ANDERSON, DVM

The Vet Corner

The requirement for the development of a VCPR (Vet Client Patient Relationship) has resulted in very positive discussions between veterinarians and their clients as they work together to improve herd health through better management rather than relying on drugs. Today’s topic is about the oldest “drug” available for the newborn calf – colostrum, something that requires review for clients every year prior to calving season. Calves are born with virtually no protection against disease and rely on rapid efficient absorption of their dam’s colostrum to ensure their survival. Recent research continues to find out just how invaluable colostrum is for the survival of the newborn calf.

Colostrum isn’t just a source of antibodies. The high fat provides a sustained energy source while an abundance of hormones and growth factors stimulate appetite and ensure growth by promoting sugar and amino acid uptake. Still other hormones promote the development of the reproductive system and enhance immunity to disease. Each mL of colostrum contains over 10 million white blood cells which teach the calf ’s immune system how to work. This perinatal programming is maximized with adequate colostrum consumption. Unfortunately a study of well-managed Western Canadian beef herds indicated that 30% of calves do not receive enough colostrum. The calves most at risk were those born to heifers, twins, or those follow-

ing a difficult or prolonged birth. Breed factors also play a role with calving ease and time to stand and nurse post-calving. Vigour at birth is largely influenced by the bull genetics. If your calves are slow at birth, look at changing your bull battery. Quality colostrum starts with quality cow care. Thin cows or those that are malnourished produce poorer quality and lower quantities of colostrum. Good nutrition including a trace mineral and vitamin program ensures that high levels of immunoglobulins, fats and hormones are available for colostrum production. Scour vaccines should be administered according to label recommendations to ensure that there is adequate time for the cow to mount an immune response and direct those antibodies into the colostrum. Keep in mind that the final week before calving is when colostrum

volume accumulates. The antibodies have largely already been deposited in the udder so cows that calve a week early should still have adequate colostrum available for the calf. Levels can be measured using a BRIX refractometer or supplementation can be provided to ensure adequate protection. Beware that supplementation can create a sense of false security. Calves absorb their own dam’s colostrum better than that of others. If the calf is orphaned or its mother’s colostrum is inadequate, the next best option would be from an older cow in the same herd. Herd mates have had similar disease exposures and have protection against the pathogens on the premise. Quality commercial powdered colostrum supplements such as Head Start or Calf ’s Choice would be a third choice. Fresh is definitely the best as freezing,

drying and pasteurization destroys >85% of the white blood cells that are critical in helping develop the calf ’s own immune system. Dairy colostrum is the least ideal due to the dilution of antibody levels (higher volume) and disease risks from unpasteurized milk. Timing of colostrum administration is critical. The first six hours are optimal for absorption as the calf ’s ability to absorb colostrum begins to lessen more rapidly by 12 hours with a marked decrease in absorption by 18 hours of age. Assist calves early and if in doubt, fully milk the cow (all four quarters) and tube the calf with the whole volume. Partial milking means that the next feed will be a mix of colostrum and milk as the udder begins milk production. Recent research has also determined that if a cow is not nursed within several hours of giving birth, she will start to resorb the

immunoglobulin in her colostrum - 3-4% loss per hour. Early intervention is critical. Calves that get sick at under six weeks of age almost always did not receive enough colostrum. Calves treated at <3 months of age are 2.5x more likely to die before reaching maturity and will have a decreased growth weight pre-weaning. Heifers are 2.4x more likely to have calving difficulty and to calve later. If you experience high sickness amongst your young calves, talk to your veterinarian about colostrum management and test calves to ensure that their antibody levels are adequate. Remember to look after your cow this calving season and ensure calves mother up early. No drug or management tool comes close to outperforming colostrum. Program your calves to not only survive but to thrive.

LIMOUSIN THE NATURAL GENETIC ADVANTAGE FROM BIRTH TO PLATE

ATTENTION PRODUCERS Amaglen Limousin 204-246-2576 / 204-823-2286 View bulls & Females for sale online at www. amaglenlimousin.ca Campbell Land & Cattle 204-776-2322 Email: cam.limousin@gmail.com Bulls & Females for sale by Private Treaty on the farm Cherway Limousin 204-736-2878 View Bulls & females for sale online www.cherwaylimousin.ca Diamond T Limousin 204-838-2019 / 204-851-0809 (Cell) Email: diamondtlimo@gmail.com 2yr old & yearling bulls for sale by Private Treaty on the farm Hockridge Farms 204-648-6333 Brad/ 204-648-5222 Glen www.hockridgefarms.ca Bulls for sale on farm.

Jaymarandy Limousin 204-937-0828 Email: ne262527@gmail.com Bulls for sale at the farm Todd Jay-Dean Angus Jules Smyth L&S Limousin Acres 204-838-2198 Bulls sell March 28 at Douglas Bull Test Maplehurst Farms 204-274-2490 Bob Bulls for sale on farm &at Douglas Bull Test Station

Year after year, we buy Limousin bulls because they give us great calves that we get a premium for. Raising superior calves is why we farm.” Craig and Lorna Marr 250 Head Cow/Calf 2013 MB COMMERCIAL

Silver Ridge, MB BREEDER OF THE YEAR

We use quiet Limousin bulls for the big beefy calves with great hair and hip. They have been our terminal cross for over 20 years and the calves are vigorous at birth, do well in the feedlot, and have great carcass yield. Gord Kozroski 500 Head Black Cow Herd Gull Lake, SK 2013 SK COMMERCIAL

BREEDER OF THE YEAR

Park Performance Limousin Rick 701 340-2517 2 yr old Bulls available by Private Treaty Calves for Sale Fall of 2020 Triple R Limousin 204-685-2628 / 204-856-2440 Email: triplerlimo@yahoo.ca Bulls for sale at the farm. 40 Limousin and Limousin/Angus, 2-yr olds and yearlings

Marketing Limousin influence calves this fall? List them on our website and contact the CLA for marketing assistance!

Using Limousin bulls on our black cows gave us calving ease and a cross breeding advantage. Our ranch was able to sell market topping 1000 pound grass yearlings in late July.

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~ ASSOCIATION ~ #13, 4101-19 STREET NE CALGARY, AB T2E 7C4 PHONE 1. 403.253.7309 TOLL-FREE 1.866.886.1605 FAX 1.403.253.1704 EMAIL limousin@limousin.com WEB www.limousin.com Find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/pages/ManitobaLimousin-Association/572198599475105


March 2020 CATTLE COUNTRY

9

South American delights BY: ELISABETH HARMS In an effort to broaden my beef-cooking horizons, I attempted to cook some skirt steak this weekend. I have also been curious about cooking beef in a more South American style, as they are one of the world’s leaders in beef consumption and they approach cooking beef in a very different way. For my first attempt at South American cooking, I chose something quite simple in both preparation and cooking: skirt steak, grilled, with chimichurri sauce. For those of you who don’t know, the skirt steak comes from the side of the cow, right next to the flank steak. These two cuts of meat can be used interchangeably in a variety of recipes, but they are not the same thing. The biggest difference is the degree of tenderness of each of these cuts. The best way to get a tender flank steak is to either pound it or to marinate it. A skirt steak is naturally tender and does not require a marinade (or pounding) to make it that way. Skirt steak also contains a lot of marbling. Your instinct may be to cut as much as you can off, but it will be best if you don’t. The fat will render during cooking, adding to the tenderness and flavour of the finished product. In South American tradition, the best way to cook beef is over wood on a grill for a long period of time. However, in North America we don’t usually grill over wood barbeques, and we don’t usually like to take too long when grilling something. Luckily, skirt steak is a cut of meat that can be cooked over any kind of heat source and it doesn’t take longer than about 15 minutes. If you haven’t heard of chimichurri sauce, think of it like a South American version of pesto: a mixture of herbs, garlic, oil and red wine vinegar. Traditionally, oregano and parsley are used, but chimichurri sauce is fairly customizable. You could substitute rosemary or thyme for one of these herbs, or you could add red pepper flakes or fresh chillies if you like more heat with your meal. If you like to experiment even further, you could swap out the red wine vinegar for balsamic to add more depth of flavour. When you’re ready to prepare the meat, it doesn’t take long. There are a couple of different ways you can cook it. You can heat a very heavy pan, preferably cast iron, over medium heat, or you can heat your barbeque to a medium temperature, like 375F. When you cook the meat, make sure it’s been patted dry. This will help avoid flare-ups on a gas grill,

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and you will limit the amount of splattering if you are cooking stovetop. Season lightly with salt and pepper before placing in the pan, or on the grill. For a medium doneness, cook each piece of meat no longer than 4-5 minutes per side. You will also want to rest your meat before you slice or serve it. When ready to serve, slice your skirt steak into 1/2” slices and serve with chimichurri sauce, either beside or on top. For other interesting skirt steak ideas, visit www. canadabeef.ca. Skirt Steak with Chimichurri Sauce 2 lbs skirt steak, trimmed of any excess fat Salt and pepper 4 tbsp parsley, finely chopped

2 tbsp oregano, finely chopped 2-3 cloves garlic, finely minced 3 tbsp olive or canola oil 1.5 tbsp red wine vinegar Salt and pepper 1. Prepare meat by trimming any excess fat or silverskin. Cut into smaller pieces if you need to make them fit into a pan. 2. Combine herbs, garlic, oil and vinegar in bowl. Set aside. Season with salt and pepper to taste. 3. Heat large cast-iron pan over medium heat, or preheat grill to 375F. 4. Cook skirt steak until medium doneness – about 4-5 minutes a side, no longer. 5. Slice and serve with chimichurri.

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Canadian beef exports and the China factor also knocking on the door of European pork producMichael Young, Presiers like Germany – one dent of Canada Beef, has of the largest, although worked in the Canadian some experts believe that meat industry for more it might not be as devastatthan 40 years, and says that ing thanks to the stringent in all that time he has never biosecurity measures Euseen the economic indicaropean countries employ. tors [for any export market] A huge protein gap line up the way that they Nevertheless, there currently are for China. is currently a huge gap in African Swine Fever, pork supply to China. It’s which has decimated Chihard to get an exact numna’s pork industry, will be a ber and estimates range game changer in the animal from an 18 million tonne protein world, Young told to a 32 million tonne Manitoba beef producers shortfall. Whatever the figat their Annual General ure, said Canfax Research Meeting in Brandon on Services Manager Brenna February 6. Grant, also speaking at the Why? AGM, the reality if that First of all, the virus once the supply gap reachis very hard to kill, there is es anything over 15 million no vaccine and mortality tonnes, it cannot be filled. rates are over 95 per cent. So, while many coun“Seventy-five per cent tries, including Canada, of the world’s hogs are are positioning themselves now threatened in the EU to fill that gap with beef Michael Young, President of Canada Beef, on the opening day of the 41st AGM. and Asia combined,” said products and other proYoung. “It’s going to drive teins, Grant is cautious build their domestic herd restocking,” said Grant. ing to be a high risk, high demand for global animal about how big an opportu- in order to have food secu- “This means it’s going to reward market for major protein for five to seven nity this disaster will actu- rity for their consumers.” be a volatile market as they exporters.” years.” ally offer. Pork producers in try to rebuild and figure Lots of competition That’s the expected “China doesn’t want China who are able to keep out what’s successful and Canada will have amount of time it will take that gap filled,” she said. a sow and her piglets alive what’s not. There’s lots of some stiff opposition as to rebuild China’s domestic “The Chinese government will currently make $400 a failure and successes hap- market leaders including pork supply, and although has a commitment to re- head, she added. pening and it’s a really Brazil, Uruguay, Argen“There has to be a big messy market, but it means tina, Australia, New Zeaenough reward for those that over the next five to land, the United States, producers to take on the seven years there is going Mexico and others vie for risk of doing all the work to be lots of volatility, and position on the Chinese of decontaminating and China, consequently, is go- mainland. “The Chinese have been approving a lot of (processing) and market newcomers like Japan and India will all be looking at exporting beef to China,” said Young. Australia, although it’s had issues over the past year and its agricultural exports are expected to be down almost 20 per cent this year as a result, is still a At the farm , South of Glenboro, MB 1:00 p.m. major competitor to watch Your source for Elite Angus Genetics! out for, said Grant. “They have been priSelling 50 Red & 50 Black Angus Yearling Bulls oritizing China over the Selling 25 Red & 15 Black Angus 2 Year old Bulls last year and that means China, which had been their third largest export destination [for beef] was their top destination in congratulations 2019, surpassing Japan and to the 2019 Scholarship Recipents the US,” she said. “They Gracie Falconer, Hartney, MB have been pulling product Box 274, Austin, MB R0H 0C0 Shaelyn Beswitherick, Austin. MB President: Tracy Wilcox 204-713-0029 out of North America in Cody Carson, Rossburn, MB Secretary: Laurelly Beswitherick 204-637-2046 b2@inetlink.ca order to prioritize Asian markets.” üMany are AI sired Total beef Australian 2020 CSA AGM & YCSA Show üBulls semen tested Portage La Prairie, mb imports into Canada are üBulls on home performance test - data available down 30 per cent (with üDeveloped on a high forage TMR ration New Zealand imports also üSelected from a 530 purebred cow herd down by 27 per cent), but üFree board until April 15 most of the product imüOnline Bidding with DLMS ported from these two Please join us for lunch 12:00 p.m. on Sale Day countries is lean trim, where prices remain strong For more information or catalogues view us on line and will offer opportuniat hamcocattleco.com or contact us ties for Canadian beef producers. Watch for more information The Hamiltons “From the second half to sponsor please contact Laurelly Glen & Carleen (204) 827-2358 Dr. David & Shelley (204) 822-3054 of last year on we have seen Larissa & Kyle (204) 526-0705 Cell (204) 325-3635 Cell w w w . m b s i m m e n t a l . c o m larissa_hamilton@hotmail.com Embryo@mymts.net really Page 11 

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the Chinese government is committed to doing that, it’s not going to be an easy task, and might mean that the Chinese people’s appetite for pork could change. “If they don’t have this product, after five to seven years of rebuilding [their domestic supply], experts are saying that the Chinese flavor for pork will have changed,” said Young. “Chinese consumption will shift, they won’t eat as much pork, opening the door for other protein and we will be one of those suppliers if we can maintain access.” The Chinese consume around 88 pounds of pork per capita annually and the Chinese pork supply represents 20 per cent of total global meat and poultry consumption. By October 2019, just 13 months after the outbreak, the World Organization of Animal Health estimated that African Swine Fever had killed more than 300 million pigs in China alone, and it’s also decimated herds in Vietnam and other countries across Southeast Asia. African Swine Fever is

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July 23-26

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March 2020 CATTLE COUNTRY 11

Brenna Grant, Manager, Canfax Research Services

WHERE THE GOOD BULLS COME 52n d An nu a l

LUNDAR

in phase one of the new U.S.-China trade agreement are the equivalent to what Canada already had, said Grant, except that they had all age restrictions removed, while Canada still has restrictions on OTM [over 30 months] access. “They also got group plant approvals for all of their federally inspected plants, whereas Canada’s all have to be one on one inspected and approved,” remarked Grant. “The hype about purchase agreements, that’s going to be decided by markets and prices, the real wins on that agreement were the nontariff barriers that were removed.” Young believes the new U.S.-China trade deal will not make much of a dent in Canadian exports. “Although they [the U.S.] will have an advantage in some areas, they

will still have a much higher tariff than we do, so I think we will still have a

great share as long as China will treat us the same on some of the things that

they have relaxed on [with the U.S.],” said Young.

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per cent in 2019 is projected to be up by one per cent this year,” said Grant. “There is going to be a gap in the Canadian pork market that is either going to be backfilled by US pork product or we are going to have smaller per capita pork consumption here at home. So there are opportunities for other commodities as the switching occurs.” Another issue could simply be cost, said Grant. “It’s questionable if a lot of these southeast Asian countries are going to be able to compete to pay for product, whether it’s pork or other livestock proteins, so the expectation is, in a lot of these countries, there is going to be a switch back to plant protein options and that is going to impact future consumption patterns in the next generation,” she said. What about the U.S.China trade deal? Many of the things that the U.S. were granted

 Page 10 strong lean trim prices, and this is expected to continue in 2020, so this will be supporting cow prices,” says Grant. “It’s got the potential to raise all boats in terms of the cut-out value overall when you have got underutilized cuts that actually end up being ground into ground beef.” Canadian beef exports will continue to rise Despite some reservations about the Chinese market, Canada will likely still export more beef to China in the years ahead. It’s a market that has been growing steadily over the past couple of years, and China (and Hong Kong) are now Canada’s third largest export market for beef. Exports were up 17 per cent in 2019 to China despite import restrictions from July to October. “We are looking at exports [to China] being up 10 per cent in 2020 while pork production, which was up six to seven

14 t h An n u al

Blue Collar Bull Sale

NORTHERN VIEW ANGUS Neudorf, SK Troy, Amy, Bret, Alexis & Talon Frick Cell: 306-728-8911 Alvin & Marlene Frick - 306-728-3295 northernviewangus@imagewireless.ca

VIEW THE CATALOGUE ONLINE AT:

www.buyagro.com www.castlerockmarketing.com

PARKWOOD FARM Yorkton, SK Jack & Joyce - 306-782-7112 Scott, Mandy, Katie, Landon & Macy Burkell 306-783-7986 • Cell: 306-621-3638 E: s.a.burkell@sasktel.net

VIEW THE SALE VIDEOS ONLINE AT: www.cattlevids.ca FIND US ON FACEBOOK

SWAN HILLS RANCH Swan River, MB Scott, Cindy, Martina, Robyn & Parker Tibble Cell: 204-734-0210 • Ranch: 204-539-2570 stibblemail@gmail.com

SALE MANAGEMENT

Shane Castle Devin Warrilow Cell: 306-741-7485 780-581-4329 castlerock.mktg@sasktel.net

WHEN POUNDS MATTER

Charolais Gets The Job Done!

Purebred Beef Cattle Sale

Saturday, April 4, 2020 LUNDAR Sale: 1:00 p.m. Offering at Lundar Agri-Ed Centre 54 Lots HEREFORD 13

GELBVIEH 2

LIMOUSIN 6

Yearling Bulls

Yearling Bulls

Yearling Bulls

2 Year old Bulls

2 Year old Bulls

HEIFERS 1

6

ANGUS 1

3

SIMMENTAL 6

Simmental

1

Pens of 3 Heifers

Yearling Bulls

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2 Year old Bulls

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Angus

check o ut these bull sales for yo u ne x t herdsire:

3

March 8 th Steppler Farms 9th Annual Bull Sale, Steppler Sale Barn, Miami MB

6

March 21 st Pleasant Dawn Charolais 17th Annual Bull Sale, at the farm, Oak Lake MB

For more information, Contact: Jim 1-204-461-0884 Ken 1-204-793-4044 lundarbullsale@gmail.com

March 20 th High Bluff Stock Farm Charolais & Simmental Bull Sale, at the farm Inglis MB

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12 CATTLE COUNTRY March 2020

Outcome of Resolutions for debate at MBP’s 41st Annual General Meeting Forty-two resolutions were carried at Manitoba Beef Producers’ (MBP) 2019 fall district meetings and taken forward for debate at MBP’s 41st Annual General Meeting held February 6 in Brandon.

Where appropriate, MBP’s Resolutions Committee proposed consolidating resolutions covering similar topics and asks/intent into single resolutions for debate at the AGM. Instances where this has occurred are outlined below. Also outlined are instances in which resolutions were amended at debate. The following list of the resolutions is categorized by theme, their district of origin, and the outcome of each vote. Explanatory notes are included where required. One late resolution was also debated.

In the end, 24 resolutions were carried (several of which were consolidated versions), nine resolutions were defeated, one was referred back to MBP’s Executive for further analysis and consideration, and one resolution was not debated as there was no mover or seconder. MBP thanks all delegates who participated in the resolutions debate, as well as parliamentarian Roger Woloshyn for chairing the session. CATEGORY: AGRICULTURAL CROWN LANDS 1: Whereas the Government of Manitoba is making changes to the rental formula for agricultural Crown lands forage leases whereby the rate will be based on a three-year rolling average of cattle prices; and Whereas this period is too short and may not allow producers to retain income earned during the years of more competitive cattle prices. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to have a rental rate formula for agricultural Crown land forage leases which should be based on a 10-year rolling average instead

of a three-year rolling average. District 8 Outcome: DEFEATED 2: Whereas the rental rate formula outlined in the modernized Agricultural Crown Lands Leasing Program in part is based on the market price of cattle, and Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to have a rental rate formula for agricultural Crown land forage leases which includes a reasonable cap on the market price of beef. District 13 Outcome: DEFEATED 3: Whereas there are concerns about the amount that the rental rate for forage leases under the revised Agricultural Crown Lands Leasing Program is rising and the speed at which the new rental rate is being implemented; and Whereas in other provinces such as Alberta there are different rental rates in different regions/zones of the province to reflect the productivity of the agricultural Crown lands. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to implement a longer transition period for the rental rate increase under the modernized Agricultural Crown Lands (ACL) Leasing Program, and Be it further resolved that MBP lobby the Government of Manitoba to investigate and implement a system of regions where the rental rate better reflects the productivity of the ACL forage parcels. District 13 Outcome: CARRIED 4: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to include

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the cost of production in the calculation for the rental rate formula for agricultural Crown lands, not just the market price. District 9 Outcome: DEFEATED Original Resolution 5: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba that agricultural Crown land auction bids be based on the price of improvements (less the administrative fee), and that this value be transferred to the outgoing lessee. District 11 NOTE: Two amendments to this resolution were carried to add the words “an agreed upon” and “predetermined” before the words “price of improvements.” The word “the” before “price” was also deleted from the original resolution. The following amended resolution was debated and voted upon: Amended Resolution 5: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba that agricultural Crown land auction bids be based on an agreed upon predetermined price of improvements (less the administrative fee), and that this value be transferred to the outgoing lessee. Outcome: CARRIED AS AMENDED 6: Whereas a producer who is bidding on the right to agricultural Crown land forage leases is expected to pay the entire bid amount at the time of the auction; and Whereas depending on the dollar value of the winning bid this may be a large amount and it may be cost prohibitive for the bidder to have to pay the entire amount at the time of the auction. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to allow the winning bidder for the right to a forage lease at an agricultural Crown land auction to have the ability to pay the bid amount over the period of the lease. District 8 Outcome: DEFEATED Explanatory note part 1: Producers in Districts 10, 11 and 12 passed three resolutions (numbers 7, 8 and 9 below) with similar content and intent with respect to having a 10,000 Animal Unit Month (AUM) cap on agricultural Crown land leases and District 13 passed a resolution seeking a 15,000 AUM cap (number 10 below). Page 15 

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March 2020 CATTLE COUNTRY 13

Minister announces new Wildlife Predation Prevention Project at AGM BY ANGELA LOVELL A new, three-year Livestock Predation Prevention Project was announced at Manitoba Beef Producers’ (MBP) 41st Annual General Meeting by Blaine Pedersen, Minister of Agriculture and Resource Development. “I know that in my short time as Agriculture Minister this has been front and centre with Manitoba Beef Producers, and we are very happy to be coordinating this [program] with them,â€? said Pedersen in his address during the MBP President’s Banquet on February 6 in Brandon. Livestock predation, including outright losses and injuries to animals, is a significant problem for Manitoba producers, who have repeatedly requested action through MBP resolutions. This year’s AGM resolution debate included four resolutions related to wildlife predation, all of which were carried, including one requesting that MBP continue to lobby the Manitoba government for predator control initiatives. Other resolutions recommended that MBP administer the Problem Predator Removal Program, that compensation paid to trappers participating in the program be increased, and that compensation to producers for cattle losses reflect the true value of those losses. The province will provide $300,000 for the project which will be developed and led by the Livestock Predation Protection Working Group (LPPWG). MBP co-chairs the LPPWG and other members include the Manitoba Sheep Association, Manitoba Goat Association, Manitoba Trappers Association, Manitoba Ag-

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“Manitoba Beef Producers has long advocated for strategies to reduce the risk of negative wildlife-livestock interaction and conflict, and we are pleased to see this important project moving forward." Dianne Riding, President of MBP riculture and Resource Development, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

Reducing economic losses from wildlife predation The applied research project will identify and test ways to reduce economic losses from wildlife predation of cattle and sheep herds. “Manitoba Beef Producers has long advocated for strategies to reduce the risk of negative wildlifelivestock interaction and conflict, and we are pleased to see this important project moving forward,â€? said Dianne Riding, President of MBP in a press release. “Predation-related challenges pose a significant concern for Manitoba’s livestock producers, who pride themselves on providing quality animal care and husbandry. This project will help improve the understanding of the risks, and work toward developing effective prevention and mitigation methods to reduce future losses.â€? The project’s key activities will be conducting onfarm predation risk assessments and planning in consultation with producers, testing on-farm predation prevention and removal practices, and sharing information with producers about management practices and research project results. Pedersen noted the research project will target the highest-known predation areas and emerging problem areas. Currently, the highest incidence of predation is in the northern Interlake and Parkland regions. The governments of Canada and Manitoba currently provide compensation to affected producers through the Wildlife Damage Compensation Program, up to a maximum of $3,000 per animal. This program has paid producers an average of more than $1.8 million annually in compensation in recent years.

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14 CATTLE COUNTRY March 2020

Government activities update Forage insurance review, wildlife damage compensation and more MAUREEN COUSINS

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There have been several provincial and federal government announcements in recent weeks that will impact Manitoba’s beef industry. Many involve issues on which Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) has been advocating and MBP is pleased that progress is being made on these important files. The following is a brief rundown of each of announcement. Forage Insurance Review Agriculture and Resource Development Minister Blaine Pedersen has announced a review of forage insurance products provided through Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC). Over the next few weeks producers will be asked about their perceptions of the existing forage insurance products, how they currently manage forage production risks and how they believe the program can be improved. The provincial government notes that the rate of take-up on forage insurance is low, with only about 18 per cent of the more than 1.5 million eligible acres in Manitoba being covered by insurance. By comparison, about 90 per cent of annual crop acreage is insured through MASC. “We have repeatedly heard from beef producers that the forage insurance offerings are not as effective as they would like them to be, so we are strongly encouraging producers to provide feedback into these

consultations,â€? said MBP President Dianne Riding. “This is an important opportunity to get not only our concerns out there, but also to raise ideas about how to potentially improve forage insurance. Having sound business risk management tools is key.â€? Insurance Program Changes Also on the insurance front, the province has announced that forages used for extended-season grazing are now eligible for wildlife damage compensation. MBP had been advocating for this change recognizing that many producers are using extended grazing but also experiencing challenges related to wildlife. Eligibility includes crops used for in-field bale and swath grazing, as well as standing annual crops intended for grazing (e.g. corn). Producers will receive 45 per cent of the value of the loss caused by big game and waterfowl during the extended grazing period. Of note from the Wildlife Damage Compensation Program for Crop Damage fact sheet: • Baled hay must be gathered from the field and placed in an eligible storage site, unless the bales are intentionally left for winter grazing. If bales cannot be gathered due to wet field conditions, they remain eligible for wildlife damage compensation. • Producers must have a grazing plan, and use controls (e.g. fences) to control access • Eligibility ends when livestock have

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access • The crop must be suitable for livestock feed Compensation is not provided for hay left standing after it could have been harvested, stockpiling or winter grazing of hay fields, or pastures. Further, MASC states that compensation is equal to the amount of lost or damaged production, multiplied by the AgriInsurance dollar value, multiplied by 90% (45% for extended grazing forage). For damage to stored forages, compensation is determined by multiplying the tonnes of destroyed hay by the AgriInsurance dollar value for that type of hay, multiplied by 90%. For more information speak to your local MASC agent. Livestock Predation Protection Project The provincial government will be providing up to $300,000 over three years toward the applied research Livestock Predation Prevention Project. The aim is to reduce economic losses from wildlife predation of cattle and sheep. See Angela Lovell’s story in this edition of Cattle Country for further details. DFA for October’s Severe Weather The province has announced that disaster financial assistance (DFA) will be available for farms and others affected by the severe weather in October 2019. As the province notes, “Disaster financial assistance is generally available as a last resort for evacuations, municipal response costs, repairs to damaged infrastructure and non-insurable damage to principal residences and buildings essential to the operation of eligible farms and small businesses. Home and business owners affected by the fall severe weather are encouraged to seek assistance first through private insurance claims, and to carefully check insurance coverage to ensure they are protected against potential risks in their area.â€? More information and applications

can be found at www.manitobaemo.ca or call the Manitoba Emergency Measures Organization at 1-888-267-8298. Applications are also available at most municipal offices. Basins Conditions Report The provincial government continues to monitor the risk of spring flood, having released its latest basins conditions report at the start of February, with the first full 2020 Flood Outlook to be released in late February. Of note: • soil moisture levels range from well-above average in southeast Manitoba including the Red River Valley, southwest and southeast Manitoba to near normal in northern Manitoba. In the United States portion of the Red River watershed, soil moisture levels were at record high levels. • Since November 2019, precipitation is tracking below to well-below normal in most parts of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. However, precipitation in the US portions of the Red and Souris rivers are tracking as much as 150 to 300 per cent of normal accumulation. • Base flows and levels in Manitoba’s rivers have been declining since the fall of 2019, but are still above normal for southern and northern Manitoba, and normal to above normal in central Manitoba basins. The Basins Condition Report is available at www.gov.mb.ca/mit/floodinfo/index.html. Also at this site is information such as the daily flood reports, river levels, lake levels and forecasts and more. The Manitoba government has a number of useful resources to help people prepare for a possible flood, including which level of government to contact about flood-related matters. See https://www. gov.mb.ca/flooding/preparations.html

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March 2020 CATTLE COUNTRY 15

Outcome of Resolutions Continued...  Page 12 These resolutions were as follows: 7: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to reverse the removal of the cap on animal unit months (AUM) on agricultural Crown land leases and to instead apply a cap of 10,000 AUMs. District 10 8: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers reverse its current position on the Animal Unit Month (AUM) cap, which advocated to remove the AUM cap on agricultural Crown land (ACL) leases, and to instead lobby for a cap of 10,000 AUM on ACL leases. District 11 9: Whereas the Government of Manitoba has removed the 4,800 Animal Unit Month (AUM) cap on agricultural Crown lands, and Whereas the AUM cap should be inclusive of the producer’s ACL leases only and not take into account a producer’s deeded land. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to change the Animal Unit Month cap on agricultural Crown land leases to 10,000 AUMs. District 12 10: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba for a cap of 15,000 Animal Unit Months per agricultural Crown land lease holder, not including their deeded lands. District 13 Explanatory note part 2: The four aforementioned resolutions from Districts 10, 11, 12 and 13 were combined into a single resolution for debate at the AGM as follows: PROPOSED COMBINATION OF RESOLUTIONS 7, 8, 9 AND 10: Whereas the Government of Manitoba has removed the 4,800 Animal Unit Month (AUM) cap on agricultural Crown lands (ACL), and Whereas the AUM cap should be inclusive of the producer’s ACL leases only and not take into account a producer’s deeded land. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers revise its current position on the Animal Unit Month (AUM) cap on agricultural Crown land (ACL) leases, (which advocated for the removal of the AUM cap), and to instead lobby the Government of Manitoba to reverse its removal of the cap on AUMs on ACL leases and to instead apply a cap of ________ AUMs, not including their deeded lands. Proposed combined resolution from Districts 10, 11, 12 and 13 Explanatory note part 3: At the AGM, parliamentarian Woloshyn worked through a process with the delegates to come to an agreement on the amount of the AUM cap that would be debated as part of the consolidated resolution. The majority favoured the inclusion of a 10,000 AUM cap. The following combined resolution was then debated and put to a vote: COMBINATION OF RESOLUTIONS 7, 8, 9 AND 10: Whereas the Government of Manitoba has removed

the 4,800 Animal Unit Month (AUM) cap on agricultural Crown lands (ACL), and Whereas the AUM cap should be inclusive of the producer’s ACL leases only and not take into account a producer’s deeded land. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers revise its current position on the Animal Unit Month (AUM) cap on agricultural Crown land (ACL) leases, (which advocated for the removal of the AUM cap), and to instead lobby the Government of Manitoba to reverse its removal of the cap on AUMs on ACL leases and to instead apply a cap of 10,000 AUMs, not including their deeded lands. Combined resolution from Districts 10, 11, 12 and 13 Outcome: CARRIED as the combined resolution with the 10,000 AUM cap 11: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to give producers the first right of renewal on all Agricultural Crown Land leases, be they existing leases or new leases. District 12 Outcome: CARRIED 12: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to allow for the continuation of the practice of both unit transfers and family transfers under the modernized agricultural Crown lands program. District 13 Outcome: CARRIED Original 13: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers continue to lobby the Government of Manitoba against the use of proxy bids at agricultural Crown land lease auctions. District 9 NOTE: Two proposed amendments to the resolution were carried, one to add the words “to have proxy bidders announce” before the word “whom” and, to add “prior to the auction” at the very end of the resolution. The amended

resolution was debated and voted upon as follows: Amended 13: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers continue to lobby the Government of Manitoba to have proxy bidders announce whom they are bidding on behalf of at agricultural Crown land lease auctions prior to the auction. Outcome: CARRIED AS AMENDED 14: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to move the date of the agricultural Crown land lease auctions to June 1, but maintain the date of possession to be January 1, to allow for a longer period of negotiation for transfer/removal of improvements. District 9 Outcome: DEFEATED Explanatory note part 1: Districts 12 and 13 passed two resolutions (15 and 16 below) with similar content and intent with respect to producers being able to purchase agricultural Crown lands. These resolutions were as follows: 15: Whereas some beef producers have expressed an interest in being able to purchase their agricultural Crown land leases, and, Whereas in the past the process to purchase agricultural Crown land leases from the provincial government has been lengthy and cumbersome. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to make it easier and swifter for beef producers to be able to purchase provincial agricultural Crown lands. District 12 16: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to re-institute sales of agricultural Crown lands to the lease holders, and that the process move much more swiftly than it has in the past. District 13 Explanatory note part 2: Resolutions 15 and 16 were combined into a single resolution as follows for debate and voted upon: Page 16 

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16 CATTLE COUNTRY March 2020

Outcome of Resolutions Continued...  Page 15 CONSOLIDATION OF RESOLUTIONS 15 AND 16: Whereas some beef producers have expressed an interest in being able to purchase their agricultural Crown land leases, and, Whereas in the past the process to purchase agricultural Crown land leases from the provincial government has been lengthy and cumbersome. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to re-institute sales of agricultural Crown lands to the lease holders and to make it easier and swifter for beef producers to be able to purchase these lands than it has been in the past. Combined resolution from Districts 12 and 13 Outcome: CARRIED as the combined resolution 17: Whereas all monies collected through the Agricultural Crown Lands Leasing Program currently go into the general revenue of the Government of Manitoba. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to set aside twenty five per cent of the revenue generated through agricultural Crown lands leases to an agricultural Crown lands improvement program which lease holders could access. District 12 Outcome: CARRIED 18: Whereas the fall 2019 snowstorm resulted in significant tree damage to fences on agricultural Crown land leases. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby to Government of Manitoba to increase the allowable width of fence lines on agricultural Crown land leases from the existing 50 feet to 100 feet. District 11 Outcome: CARRIED 19: Whereas there is considerable confusion about the changes the Government of Manitoba has made to the Agricultural

Crown Lands Leasing Program, such as term limits, transfers, improvements, the speed at which the rental rate is being increased, etc. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to revisit the areas of concern related to the Agricultural Crown Lands Leasing Program to ensure that it is fair and equitable to lease holders before it is implemented, thereby helping to protect producers’ economic sustainability. District 10 Outcome: CARRIED 20: Whereas Manitoba Beef Producers has outlined its positions on the proposed Government of Manitoba changes to the Agricultural Crown Lands program in an October 2, 2019 media statement, e.g. with respect to family and unit transfers, first right of renewal, the rental rate formula, and informed access. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers continue to lobby the Government of Manitoba for changes to the Agricultural Crown Lands Leasing Program as per its October 2, 2019 media statement. District 12 Outcome: CARRIED 21: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers organize peaceful rallies at the Manitoba Legislature to draw awareness to producer concerns about the impact of the Agricultural Crown Lands Leasing Program changes until such time as the concerns are addressed. District 11 Outcome: DEFEATED CATEGORY: BUSINESS RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS 22: Whereas producers have sustained losses in the fall of 2019 related to excess moisture conditions and overland flooding, much of which is not insurable. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby government to provide compensation to producers. District 4

Outcome: DEFEATED 23: Whereas damage to crops, perennial forages/pastures and property caused by wild boars is an increasing concern to agricultural producers; and Whereas there is the lack of a funded Government of Manitoba program to monitor the problem and to address it. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to immediately develop and implement a funded strategy to address the wild boar problem and also to provide compensation to producers for damage to crops and property. District 5 Outcome: CARRIED 24: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby to have wild boars/pigs added as an eligible species under the Wildlife Damage Compensation Program for Crops. District 5 Outcome: CARRIED CATEGORY: ENVIRONMENT/ PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 25: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers continue lobbying the government for predator control initiatives. District 4 Outcome: CARRIED 26: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to allow MBP to administer the Problem Predator Removal Program. District 11 Outcome: CARRIED 27: Whereas trappers participating in the Government of Manitoba’s Problem Predator Removal Program receive little in the way of financial compensation, which may limit the number of trappers willing to do this type of work; and Whereas this has a negative impact on producers needing to have problem predators removed in order to protect their livestock. Be it resolved to recommend that

Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to increase the amount of compensation paid to trappers who participate in the Problem Predator Removal Program. District 14 Outcome: CARRIED 28: Whereas cattle producers continue to incur considerable financial losses related to wildlife predation; and Whereas there is currently a cap on the amount of compensation paid under the Wildlife Damage Compensation Program for Livestock Predation. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to ensure that the amount of compensation paid under the Wildlife Damage Compensation Program for Livestock Predation for identified cattle losses reflects the true value of those losses. District 8 Outcome: CARRIED 29: Whereas challenging weather conditions have made it very difficult for producers to clean cattle handling facilities and to spread that manure in the fall of 2019. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to extend the nutrient application deadline to an appropriate date depending on the conditions. District 2 Outcome: CARRIED 30: Whereas beef producers are bearing pass-through costs related to the implementation of carbon taxes. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the federal and provincial governments to use some of the monies generated through the carbon tax to provide programs to help reduce the financial burden producers are bearing of these pass-through costs. District 5 Outcome: CARRIED 31: Whereas the retention guarantee on RFID tags is only one year, yet they are required to be in the animal for its life; and Page 17 

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March 2020 CATTLE COUNTRY 17

Outcome of Resolutions Continued...  Page 16 Whereas there is currently a limited variety and style of RFID tags available for sale through the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency, many of which are produced by the same manufacturer; and Whereas cattle producers would like more product options when it comes selecting RFID tags for their cattle, including tags with a better retention rate. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers advocate that the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency provide a wider variety and style of RFID tags with an improved retention rate for sale to cattle producers. District 7 Outcome: CARRIED 32: Whereas Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development used to have a large number of staff dedicated to providing extension and other services which are valuable to the beef industry, and Whereas there is currently a high vacancy rate in the department, with many positions going unfilled across the province. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to make a concerted effort to fill its vacant positions in Manitoba Agriculture and Resource Development. District 7 Outcome: CARRIED CATEGORY: TRANSPORTATION Explanatory note part 1: Districts 8 and 6 passed four resolutions (numbers 33, 34, 35 and 36 below) with very similar content and intent with respect to the changes to the federal government’s Health of Animals Regulations (Part XII) on animal transportation. These resolutions were as follows: 33: Whereas the Government of Canada is implementing changes to the Health of Animals Regulations (Part XII) on animal transportation that come into effect in February 2020; and Whereas the beef industry has concerns about the effects of these changes

from an animal health and welfare perspective, a cost perspective, etc. and; Whereas additional scientific research is underway about the effects of transporting cattle in Canada that should help inform the content of these regulations; Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers and its industry partners continue to lobby the Government of Canada for a two-year extension on the coming into force date of the Health of Animals Regulations (Part XII) on animal transportation until such time as additional science-based research is completed to ensure the best outcomes in humane transportation are achieved. District 8 34: Whereas the Government of Canada is implementing changes to the Health of Animals Regulations (Part XII) on animal transportation that come into effect in February 2020; and Whereas the changes will have an impact on commerce with respect to Manitoba cattle being moved to markets in locations such as Ontario and Quebec in that cattle will need to be unloaded more frequently and currently there is no infrastructure in place to accommodate this; and Whereas it is anticipated that the costs of building new infrastructure will be borne by producers. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Canada to pay for the cost of the additional infrastructure required to unload, feed and house cattle as a result of the changes to the Health of Animals Regulations (Part XII) on animal transportation. District 8 35: Whereas the Government of Canada is making changes to the Health of Animals Regulations (Part XII) on animal transportation that will take effect in February 2020 that will result in the need to unload, feed and rest cattle more frequently; and Whereas these changes will result in

more cattle being comingled at rest stops which poses a risk to cattle in terms of potential biosecurity issues. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Canada to make sure there are provisions in place to manage the industry’s biosecurity concerns related to the comingling of cattle at rest stops and to ensure that these costs are not borne by producers. District 8 36: Whereas the Government of Canada is making changes to the Health of Animals Regulations (Part XII) on animal transportation that will take effect in February 2020 that will result in the need to unload, feed and rest cattle more frequently; and Whereas the beef industry has concerns about the effects of these changes from an animal health and welfare perspective, a cost perspective, etc. and; Whereas scientific research conducted in Canada has demonstrated that 99.5 per cent of cattle on a longer haul arrive at their destination injury free and additional research is still pending; Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers and its industry partners continue to lobby the Government of Canada to revisit the proposed

Verified Beef Production Plus

Thurs., Feb 1 Tues., Feb 6

• Webinars take place in the evenings so producers aren’t taken away from their daily chores. • The interactive webinars are delivered using web based video conferencing software. • Participants can interact during the presentations, hear the presenters, and ask questions or make comments in real time. • Also available via app for iOS and Android.

• Webinar may be cancelled on a given week due to a lack of registered participants. • Pre-registration is required. • Contact Melissa Atchison at (204) 264-0294 or email: verifiedbeefmanitoba@gmail.com for details.

How to register for webinars or LIVE workshop • To sign up to attend a webinar or the LIVE workshop, please contact Melissa Atchison at (204) 264-0294 or email verifiedbeefmanitoba@gmail.com. • Alternate times and days can be arranged based on producer demand.

Thurs., Feb 8

Tues Mar 3

Tues., Feb 13

Fri Mar 6

Thurs., Feb 15

Butcher Sale

9:00 am;

Bred Cow Sale

1:00 pm

Feeder Sale

9:00 am

Butcher Sale

9:00 am

Presort Sale

9:30 am

Butcher Sale

9:00 am

Regular Sale

Cattlemans Connection Bull Sale

Tues Mar 10 Presort Sale Bred Cow Sale Regular Sale in the afternoon

9am

930am

1:00 pm

Tues., Feb 20

Feeder Sale

9:00 am

Thurs., Feb 22

Butcher Sale

9:00 am

Tues., Feb 27

Presort Sale

9:30 am

Tues Mar 17 Regular Sale Tues Mar 24 Regular Sale

Tues Mar 31 Regular Sale Fri., Mar 2 Cattleman’s Connection Bull Sale

APRIL MARCH

Webinars will take place on Tuesdays at 7 p.m.

20202018 SPRING Sale Schedule Winter Sale Schedule

MARCH FEBRUARY

Workshops are being delivered by webinar during the evening

changes to the Health of Animals Regulations (Part XII) on animal transportation to recognize that beef cattle are arriving at their destination in good condition and should not be subject to changes in feed, water and rest as are being applied to other sectors. District 6 Explanatory note part 2: The four aforementioned resolutions from Districts 6 and 8 were combined into a single resolution for debate as follows. CONSOLIDATION OF RESOLUTIONS 33, 34, 35 AND 36: Whereas the Government of Canada is implementing changes to the Health of Animals Regulations (Part XII) on animal transportation that come into effect in February 2020; and Whereas these changes will result in the need to unload, feed and rest cattle more frequently at rest stops, and this comingling poses a risk to cattle in terms of potential biosecurity issues; and Whereas the changes will have an impact on commerce with respect to Manitoba cattle being moved to markets in locations such as Ontario and Quebec in that cattle will need to be unloaded more frequently and currently there is no infrastructure in place to accommodate this; and Page 18 

Tues Tues.,Apr Mar26

Regular FeederSale Sale

Tues Sale Tues.,Apr Mar913 Regular Presort Sale Pen of 5 Replacement Heifers Thurs., Mar 15

Bred Cow Sale

Tues Apr 16 Regular Sale Tues., Mar 20 Feeder Sale Tues Tues.,Apr Mar23 27 Regular FeederSale Sale

Tues Apr 30

Regular Sale

9am

9am 9am

1:00 pm

9:009am am 9:309am am

1:00 pm

9am

9:00 am

9:009am am

9am

ALL PRESORT SALES WILL BEinBROADCAST LIVEcow ON THE Presorts MUST be booked advance. Bred salesINTERNET. must be Presorts MUST be booked in advance. cow sales must be pre-booked and in by NOON on Bred Wednesday prior. pre-booked and in bypapers NOON on Wednesday prior. Age verification must be dropped offAge withverification cattle. papers must be dropped off with cattle.

www.mbbeef.ca

Heartland Livestock Services


18 CATTLE COUNTRY March 2020

Outcome of Resolutions Continued...  Page 17 Whereas it is anticipated that the costs of building new rest stop infrastructure will be borne by producers; and Whereas the beef industry has concerns about the effects of these changes from an animal health and welfare perspective, a cost perspective, etc. and; Whereas scientific research conducted in Canada about the effects of transporting cattle has demonstrated that 99.5 per cent of cattle on a longer haul arrive at their destination injury free; and Whereas additional scientific research is underway about the effects of transporting cattle in Canada that should help inform the content of these regulations. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers and its industry partners continue to lobby the Government of Canada to revisit the proposed changes to the Health of Animals

Regulations (Part XII) on animal transportation to recognize that beef cattle are arriving at their destination in good condition and should not be subject to changes in feed, water and rest as are being applied to other sectors; and Be it resolved to recommend that MBP and its industry partners continue to lobby the Government of Canada for a two-year extension on the coming into force date of the Health of Animals Regulations (Part XII) on animal transportation until such time as additional science-based research is completed to ensure the best outcomes in humane transportation are achieved; and Be it further resolved to recommend that MBP lobby the Government of Canada to pay for the cost of the additional rest stop infrastructure required to unload, feed and house cattle as a result of the changes to the regulations; and Be it further resolved to recom-

FORAGE BASED BLACK ANGUS BULLS & REPLACEMENT FEMALES

mend that MBP lobby the Government of Canada to make sure there are provisions in place to manage the industry’s biosecurity concerns related to the comingling of cattle at rest stops and to ensure that these costs are not borne by producers. Combined resolution from Districts 6 and 8 Outcome: The combined livestock transportation resolution was not voted upon. After some initial debate a motion was moved and carried to refer this matter back to MBP for further analysis. This was in light of a decision made by the federal government in mid-December (after MBP’s fall district meetings ended) to not immediately begin to enforce the regulatory changes as they pertain to livestock transportation. Instead, there will be a 2-year “transition period” on the revised feed, water, and rest interval provisions for the livestock sector to allow for a period of adjustments to meet the new transport of animal requirements. CATEGORY: OTHER 37: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers not accept late resolutions at its Annual General Meetings. District 11 Outcome: DEFEATED 38: Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the Government of Manitoba to provide the explanation as to how it plans to expand or sustain the beef industry in challenging production conditions.

District 9 Outcome: There was no mover for this resolution, so it was not debated. CATEGORY: JUSTICE 39: Whereas activists have been entering agricultural operations, posing a risk with respect to biosecurity and animal care. Whereas other provincial governments are enacting legislation to address this serious situation. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby government to impose stricter and higher minimum penalties on those who trespass on agricultural operations in Manitoba. District 4 Outcome: CARRIED Explanatory note part 1: Districts 2 and 5 passed resolutions (numbers 40 and 41) with similar content and intent with respect to the issue of rural crime. They were as follows: 40: Whereas rural crime continues to be a growing problem. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the federal government to invest more resources in rural policing. District 2 41: Whereas rural crime is a growing problem that is having a detrimental impact on rural residents with respect to costs, personal safety, mental health, anxiety and other concerns. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers align with other concerned Page 20 

• Complete Performance Data Available • Bulls can be viewed anytime

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Bill and Isabel Acheson P: 204-744-2525 | C: 204-825-8364 | I: 204-245-0480 E: isabel.acheson@gmail.com Box 123, Somerset, MB R0G 2L0

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Put extra money in your pocket and pride in your herd. Choose some replacements from a herd like this. We have four head in the sale at Manitoba Bull Test Station March 28 - one bull and three replacement quality heifers.

Box 569, Roblin, MB R0L 1P0 Doug & Marianne Hunter T 204-937-2531 C 204-937-7737 Jimmy Hunter 204-937-0219 Michael & Candace Hunter 204-247-0301 @HunterCharolais • huntchar@mymts.net

A Charolais family operation for over 30 years

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Sale Manager:

Helge By 306.536.4261 Jon Wright 306.807.8424 charolaisbanner@gmail.com www.bylivestock.com


March 2020 CATTLE COUNTRY 19 Photo courtesy of Staden Farms

Photo courtesy of Canadian Sheep Federation

GET TO KNOW US BETTER Photo courtesy of Connie Seutter

CCIA is the responsible administrator for beef and dairy cattle, bison, sheep and pending regulation cervids and goats in Canada (with exception of Quebec where CCIA only administers bison and goats.)

canadaid.ca

CCIA

CANADIAN CATTLE IDENTIFICATION AGENCY

KNOW | CLTS DATABASE clts.canadaid.ca Login to your CLTS account via your home computer or MOBO app; input your premises ID number and update your account information.

Prepare for proposed regulatory amendments now, to save time later. Get to know the Canadian Livestock Tracking System (CLTS), learn how by using the CLTS Resource Centre. Take a look at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s TRACE newsletters for information on the proposed amendments at https://www.canadaid.ca/traceability/newsletters/

LEARN | CLTS RESOURCE CENTRE support.canadaid.ca An online information and learning source on how to use the Canadian Livestock Tracking System (CLTS).

USE | TRACEABILITY TECHNOLOGY support.canadaid.ca/clts-mobo/ Download the CLTS MOBO phone app from your favorite app store and put the CLTS database in your hand.

To learn more about how we are working towards traceability together,

visit www.canadaid.ca

info@canadaid.ca | 1-877-909-2333 www.mbbeef.ca


20 CATTLE COUNTRY March 2020

Outcome of Resolutions Continued...  Page 18 stakeholders, including producers to lobby the provincial and federal governments to implement more robust and effective strategies to reduce rural crime and to enact timely and meaningful penalties against those who commit crimes or profit from them. District 5 Explanatory note part 2: Resolutions 40 and 41 were combined into a single resolution for debate as follows: CONSOLIDATION OF RESOLUTIONS 40 AND 41: Whereas rural crime continues to be a growing problem that is having a detrimental impact on rural residents with respect to costs, personal safety, mental health, anxiety and other con-

cerns. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers align with other concerned stakeholders, including producers to lobby the provincial and federal governments to implement more robust and effective strategies to reduce rural crime and to enact timely and meaningful penalties against those who commit crimes or profit from them; and Be it further resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers lobby the federal government to invest more resources in rural policing. Districts 2 and 5 Outcome: CARRIED as the combined resolution 42: Whereas there is a growing

u o y k n a h T

need to convey information to the public about the variety of ecosystem services and other benefits that the beef industry provides that benefit larger Canadian society. Be it resolved to recommend that Manitoba Beef Producers encourage the Canadian beef industry to invest more of its check-off dollars into public and stakeholder engagement activities aimed at building public understanding and trust of the beef industry. District 13 Outcome: CARRIED LATE RESOLUTION L1: Whereas Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) board of directors members are leaders in Canada, and Whereas some MBP directors go

on to serve on the boards of national beef organizations and it takes a few years to get the understanding of national beef organizations, and a few years to become leaders of these organizations, and Whereas directors on the MBP board of directors are limited to a maximum of three, two-year terms with the MBP board. Be it resolved to recommend that the Manitoba Beef Producers board of directors allow its directors who are on national beef organizations and in leadership positions to continue IN that role until the term of that position is completed, even when that person has termed out on the MBP board. Outcome: DEFEATED

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PRESIDENT’S BANQUET SPONSORS

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