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mbbeef.ca

December 21, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Happy Holidays from MBP The board and staff of Manitoba Beef Producers would like to extend to you its best wishes during the holiday season. During the holiday season MBP's office will be closed from Dec. 22 to Jan 1. The office will reopen on Jan. 2.

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In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s beef industry • Consumers increasingly interested in the basics of food production • How far should disease control efforts go? • ‘I’m not worried,’ U.S ambassador says of Congress passing USMCA • How does carbon pricing affect agriculture? • Researchers decode liver fluke behaviour with 3D modelling

Have you registered for the MBP AGM yet? Register online before Jan. 7 to get the EARLY BIRD RATE. Register at mbbeef.ca


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MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS P. (204) 772-4542 220-530 Century Street (800) 772-0458 Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 F. (204) 774-3264 www.mbbeef.ca _________________________________________________________________________

NEWS RELEASE For immediate release Dec. 19, 2018

Nominations Open for Manitoba Beef Producers Lifetime Achievement Award WINNIPEG, MB – Nominations are now open for a Manitoba Beef Producers’ (MBP) award highlighting an outstanding beef producer in the province. “The Manitoba Beef Producers Lifetime Achievement Award recognizes local beef producers who have made significant contributions to the beef industry and their commitment to excellence, exemplifying leadership and involvement in their community and province,” said Brian Lemon, MBP general manager. “It is awarded every five years to a deserving recipient. We are excited to be presenting this award during our President’s Banquet at our 40th Annual General Meeting in Brandon on February 7, 2019,” added Lemon. Individuals and families are eligible for the award. Nominations will be judged by a selection committee and the recipient will receive an award with the honour and their name inscribed on it. The recipient’s name will be added to a Manitoba Beef Producers Lifetime Achievement Award plaque at MBP’s office. Nominees for MBP’s Lifetime Achievement Award will be considered in the following areas: • Must be a current or past member of MBP or the Manitoba Cattle Producers Association; • Beef advocacy activities with a genuine interest in the beef industry; • Achievements and lasting benefit of their contribution to the beef industry; • Excellence in being involved in the beef industry as a leader, mentor, volunteer; • Their use of innovation and strategies for successful business. Nominations are due no later than 4:30 p.m. Friday, January 18, 2019. Nomination forms are available from the MBP office by calling 1-800-772-0458 or online at www.mbbeef.ca. -30Manitoba Beef Producers is the exclusive voice of the beef industry in Manitoba. Our role and mission is to represent our beef producers through communication, research, advocacy and education. MBP represents 6,500 beef producers across the province.

Download the nomination forms at http://www.mbbeef.ca

For more information, please contact: Brian Lemon, General Manager Office: 204-772-4542


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Great Tastes of Manitoba ONLINE Make a holiday meal with beef ON THIS SHOW: • Marinated Teriyaki Flank Steak • Sirloin Tip Kebab • Beef Shank Stew

See the show online at: http://greattastesmb.ca/ underrated-cuts-of-manitoba-beef/


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MBP and Manitoba Veterinarians working to ensure locally-raised beef can enter EU Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) and the Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association (MVMA) are working to ensure that local producers who wish to see their beef potentially enter the European Union (EU) market can meet the EU beef production criteria related to the use of growth enhancing products. “Through the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), Canada has the tremendous opportunity to ship as much as 50,000 tonnes of beef to Europe annually,” explained Manitoba Beef Producers President Tom Teichroeb. “However, interested cow-calf producers and feedlot operations must adhere to the Canadian Program for Certifying Freedom from Growth Enhancing Products (GEPs) for Export of Beef to the EU, and have their compliance certified by an approved veterinarian.” That certification process begins with having a Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) approved veterinarian inspect interested operations and complete necessary compliance paperwork. There are a few veterinarians based in, or working in Manitoba, who are CFIA approved vets for the EU GEP Free Program. “MBP is working with the MVMA to seek out and make available the names of Manitoba vets who have completed the CFIA training and who can assist local producers and feedlot operations to become certified,” said MBP General Manager Brian Lemon. “MBP will be making these names available to interested producers and feedlot operations so they can meet the requirements for that beef to en-

Producers wanting to be part of selling beef to the European Union marketplace have to ensure all parts of the supply chain follow EU rules.

ter the EU market.” “We have Manitoba veterinarians who have received the needed training through the CFIA and we are pleased to work with MBP to help identify the vets,” said Andrea Lear, Executive Director of the Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association. “We know there are Manitoba producers who want to participate in the program and to be able to access the services of a local vet in order to do so.” Locally, True North Foods is working to achieve certification to ship beef into the EU market. “Growing our market access is so valuable. With CETA, qualifying Manitoba beef should be able to enter the EU marketplace, and that is very exciting,” said Calvin Vaags, President and CEO of True

North Foods. “There are already a lot of local producers who are not using hormones, so I can see them looking into and participating in the program so that our high-quality local beef can end up in the hands of European consumers.” To see the list of Manitoba vets who can certify beef operations as meeting the criteria to enter the EU market visit https:// www.mvma.ca/animal-owners/ manitoba-certified-veterinarians-eu-beef-exports. For more information about the Canadian Program for Certifying Freedom from Growth Enhancing Products (GEPs) for Export of Beef to the EU go to: http://www.cattle.ca/market-access/market-access-requirements/eu/ .


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Nominations are now being accepted for the 2018 Manitoba Excellence in Sustainability Awards Government of Manitoba Press Release — Nominations are now being accepted for the 2018 Manitoba Excellence in Sustainability Awards “The Manitoba Excellence in Sustainability Awards are an excellent opportunity to recognize individuals, organizations, communities and businesses that are enhancing sustainability in our province,” Squires said. “These awards showcase great success stories and demonstrate that all Manitobans can make a difference.” This program complements many of the idea set out in the Made-in-Manitoba Climate and

Green Plan and helps encourage everyone to take steps to protect the environment while ensuring a prosperous and environmentally conscious economy, the minister added. Any individual, business, organization or community group in Manitoba is eligible to apply or be nominated for one award in the following categories: • action on climate change, air quality and energy efficiency; • sustainability in water and natural area stewardship; • sustainability in pollution prevention and product stewardship; • education for sustainability;

• innovation and research for sustainability; • champion for sustainability; • sustainable community; and • outstanding achievement in sustainability. The awards will be presented in spring 2019. The deadline for nominations and applications is noon, Feb. 1, 2019. Information about the awards program and how to apply can be found at www.gov.mb.ca/ sd/susresmb/mrtsd/mesa/index. html or by calling 204-794-2686 in Winnipeg or 1-800-282-8069 (toll-free), or e-mailing MESA@gov. mb.ca.

You don't want to miss this Former federal agriculture minister Hon. Gerry Ritz has agreed to attend our 40th AGM in Brandon, Feb. 7-8. He will be our highlight Banquet speaker. YOU CAN NOW REGISTER ONLINE www.mbbeef.ca


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Winnipeg February 19-21, 2019 A forum to discuss the latest issues, information, research and trends in the conservation of prairie landscapes, species, and species at risk

Register Today at

http://www.pcesc.ca


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McDonald’s Reveals New Antibiotic Policy for Beef By Danny Klein QSR Magazine McDonald’s menu during chief executive Steve Easterbrook tenure to date, which began in 2015, hasn’t been short on changes. And these fixes haven’t always been of the new-to-market product variety. Many of the updates, like fresh beef Quarter Pounders, are behind-the-scenes upgrades designed to carry McDonald’s into a healthier, more sustainable future. Beyond the environmental concerns, this is also where a growing number of consumers are headed. Unquestionably, it will be where Gen Z lives. About a year after the fresh beef announcement, McDonald’s said in September that it was removing artificial preservatives, flavors, and colors from seven of its classic burgers. Other recent commitments include pulling artificial preservatives from Chicken McNuggets and committing to serving cage-free eggs by 2025. McDonald’s unveiled its latest push on December 11—a broad policy to reduce the overall use of antibiotics important to human health, as defined by the World Health Organization, which applies across 85 percent of McDonald’s global beef supply chain. This is a complex undertaking. It will take the fast-food giant two years to even decide how much of the antibiotics important to human health it will be able to remove from beef. McDonald’s laid out a strategic and phased approach. • First, McDonald’s is partnering with supplying

beef producers in its top 10 beef sourcing markets (Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Poland, the U.K and the U.S.) to measure and understand current usage of antibiotics across a diverse, global supply chain. • By the end of 2020, based on what McDonald’s has learned, it will establish reduction targets for medically important antibiotics for these markets • Starting in 2022, McDonald’s will be reporting progress against antibiotic reduction targets across its top 10 beef sourcing markets. RELATED Check out the full text of McDonald’s new policy for antibiotic use for beef “McDonald’s believes antibiotic resistance is a critical public health issue, and we take seriously our unique position to use our scale for good to continue to address this challenge,” Keith Kenny, McDonald’s global VP of sustainability, said in a statement. “We are excited to partner with our beef supply chain around the world to accelerate the responsible use of antibiotics, whilst continuing to look after the health and welfare of those animals in our supply chain.” One reason antibiotic use surfaces more in regards to chicken than beef is the fact cattle tend to live longer than chickens. As cited by The Wall Street Journal, 43

percent of the medically important antibiotics sold to the U.S. livestock sector go to the beef industry, compared with only 6 percent for chicken. Wendy’s said earlier in the year it would source about 15 percent of its beef from a group of producers that have committed to a 20 percent reduction in antibiotics fed to their cattle. Chipotle and Panera Bread are among the other chains committed to reducing antibiotic use in beef. McDonald’s said it developed the policy over a year and a half. It consulted with expert stakeholders from veterinarians to public health leaders to the beef producers “responsible for taking care of the health of animals within the supply chain every day.” “Our overall approach to responsible use of antibiotics focuses on refining their selection and administration, reducing their use, and ultimately replacing antibiotics with long-term solutions to prevent diseases and protect animal health and welfare,” McDonald’s said. “With this in mind, we remain committed to treating animals when needed.”

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Mental Health may affect animal welfare Barb Glen The Western Producer OTTAWA — Stories about livestock that are found to be confined, neglected, emaciated or dead on a farmer’s property tend to generate big headlines. “I don’t understand how anyone could do that,” is the resulting refrain. Dr. Andria Jones-Bitton has heard that common response. “Frankly, if you can’t understand that, it’s probably a good thing. It means you haven’t been in the depths of low, low mental health, depression and anxiety.”

Jones-Bitton, a veterinarian and epidemiologist at the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph, Ont., is studying mental health and resilience in the agriculture and veterinary sectors. She draws a direct link between farmers’ and ranchers’ mental health and the well-being of the livestock in their care. “If farmers are struggling with their own well-being and motivation, they’re likely going to find it difficult to invest in improving animal welfare. When we’re mentally unwell, it’s hard to care for ourselves, let alone to care for others,

even when those others are really important to us.” Jones-Bitton told those at the Nov. 27-28 National Farmed Animal Health and Welfare Council Forum that her national survey of farmers’ mental health showed high levels of stress and low levels of resilience to the many pressures surrounding agriculture.

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New Antibiotic Policy for Beef Continued from last page The decision was lauded by members of the health industry. “We expect this to be the first of many commitments from food companies to purchase beef raised without medically important antibiotics; importantly, this means that the beef industry will need to change their practices to meet this growing demand,” said Christy Spees, environmental health program manager at As You Sow, a nonprofit organization that promotes environmental and social corporate responsibility, in a statement. Spees’ company filed shareholder resolutions with McDonald’s in 2016, 2017, and 2018 in partnership with Benedictine Sisters of Boerne, Texas, asking the chain to end the use of medically

important antibiotics in its meat supply chains. Added Spees: “There is still significant work to be done by food companies to curb the use of antibiotics. With McDonald’s leading the way, there is no reason why other major fast food chains should not follow with their own commitments to source responsibly raised beef.” McDonald’s first shared a position on responsible antibiotics use in 2003. In 2016, the U.S. side of the business reached its commitment to serve only chicken not treated with antibiotics important to human medicine nearly a year ahead of schedule. In 2017, the chain announced an expanded antibiotics policy for chicken in markets around the world, as well as a refreshed vision for antimicrobial stewardship

statement with commitments to create responsible-use antibiotic approaches for beef, dairy beef, and pork. “The path for creating and implementing a global antibiotic use policy for beef is unprecedented,” said Don Thompson, MS, PhD, DVM College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. “I’ve been encouraged by the thoroughness with which McDonald’s has engaged diverse experts while creating this policy and the seriousness with which they take this important issue.” Additionally, McDonald’s said it joined the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Antimicrobial Resistance Challenged. Launched in September, the AMRC Challenge is a yearlong effort to accelerate the fight against antimicrobial resistance.


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Producers' mental health matters too Continued from last page Those are major problems in themselves, and farmer mental health issues have received a higher profile in recent months through initiatives such as the Do More Ag Foundation and via a House of Commons agriculture committee study. At the welfare council forum, Jones-Bitton emphasized the link between human mental human and animal health. She cited studies out of Ireland that showed the link between animal neglect cases and the mental health, addiction and social problems of those animals’ owners. Such cases call for compassion, she said. “Even if you didn’t care about the humans that were struggling and

you only cared about the animal welfare, you’d be wise to address the issue of farmer stress.” Yet her survey revealed farmers feel increasingly vilified by uninformed public opinion about livestock production and by campaigns organized by animal activist groups. Quotes from some of the 1,100 farmers surveyed indicated feelings of being attacked, ignored by government and society, stress and overwork. “What makes me the most upset is I have everything I’ve ever dreamed of — love, family and a farm, and all I feel is overwhelmed out of control and sad,” said one respondent. One veterinarian at the forum said mental health has been a factor in every case of animal abuse with which he’s been involved.

He suggested a mental health professional be part of any team that investigates cases of livestock neglect and should perhaps be the first person to make contact with the livestock owner. Jackie Wepruk, general manager of the National Farm Animal Care Council, said the link between mental health and livestock welfare should be better articulated to animal welfare activists, who frequently claim farmers are evil and uncaring when cases arise. Jones-Bitton said there are veterinary social work programs either in operation or being developed, and similar training programs should be developed for agricultural social work in general. She and colleagues at Guelph have developed a pilot project and hope to launch a program this summer.

Don't Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to: mbfiinfo@gmail.com to sign up.


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To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


mbbeef.ca

December 7, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Happy Holidays from MBP The board and staff of Manitoba Beef Producers would like to extend to you its best wishes during the holiday season. During the holiday season MBP's office will be closed from Dec. 22 to Jan 1. The office will reopen on Jan. 2.

Find Us Online

@ManitobaBeef

@ManitobaBeefProducers1

mbbeef.ca


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In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s beef industry • Do you have livestock like this on your farm? • Cargill tests robotic cattle driver as a way to improve worker safety • What could the new drug rules cost producers? • Finding ways to improve cattle’s footing pays dividends • Time to tailor insurance, says Manitoba Beef Producers

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New Canadian Beef Check-Off Agency website goes live (News Release) — The Canadian Beef Check-Off Agency is pleased to present our very first stand alone website! www. cdnbeefcheckoff.ca. A big thank you goes out to those who helped us create content, and review the site through it’s progression. You really could say Christmas came early for us this year! We are aiming to give the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off a consistent presence and image through the site, and across many platforms. You’ll notice that you can find us anywhere online, whether its our website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or elsewhere, using the same handle: cdnbeefcheckoff. This will create consistency, and show a separate and distinct presence from our service providers and other groups. The site’s main goal is to offer up answers to the most frequently asked check-off related questions. Its is home to information on rates, regulatory framework, allocations by province, annual reports, business plans, and a whole lot more. The latest news hosts a revolving feed of success stories funded by check-off and import levy dollars, board and committee updates, check-off changes and more. We hope the site provides information helpful for conversations around the board table or the coffee table. If there is something you’d like to see added or you have any comments, let us know!

Don't Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to: mbfiinfo@gmail.com to sign up.


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What is sustainable beef? By Piper Whelan Canadian Cattlemen When you make your living in the cattle business, it’s difficult to imagine what the beef industry looks like from an outside perspective. This gap is a challenge when trying to gain a true sense of consumer perceptions of beef production. “One of the phrases I really like is that you can’t see the label when you’re inside the jar,” said Heather Tansey, Cargill’s director of sustainability, at the annual general meeting of the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB). When producers are focused on a particular initiative, such as promoting sustainably raised beef, better understanding of outside perspectives can help when evaluating whether that message is reaching the consumer. Tansey was part of a retailer panel on sustainability and consumer trends at the meeting, held September 20 in Calgary. This panel was moderated by Crystal Mackay, president of the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity, and featured representatives from some of CRSB’s retailer members, including Jeffrey Fitzpatrick-Stilwell, senior manager of North American sustainability at McDonald’s Canada, Jennifer Lambert, senior manager of sustainability for Loblaws Companies Limited, and Carl Dean, vice-president of purchasing for Cactus Club Restaurants. Given their proximity to the consumer, the retailers shared some of the feedback they receive regarding beef. This varied based on the type of retailer. With McDonald’s, customers are curious about the validity of its claims, such as that of using 100 per cent Canadian beef.

Customers are more assumptive at Cactus Club, Dean noted, trusting the restaurant to source top-quality Canadian beef. Loblaws customers are interested in how food is produced and whether it’s locally sourced. “People are looking for affordable, quality, healthy food, and that’s their number one priority,” said Lambert. Cargill recently finished a study on consumer sentiments in both Canada and the United States, which included questions on sustainability practices. “What we saw was anything that was related to no artificial flavours, hormones or antibiotics really tended to pop higher in their interest level,” said Tansey. “They cared about what happened at the farm, but we saw that there was a bit of a split when we started to dig into willingness to pay.” When it comes to communicating with consumers, the four panelists agreed that the general public’s lack of knowledge about beef production is a major barrier to success. While the beef industry is making strides in a number of facets related to sustainability, Dean sees some of these efforts as still largely invisible to the consumer. With McDonald’s launching the first beef product to use the CRSB Certified logo, however, he anticipates this exposure will catch the attention of the public. The startling amount of misconceptions and false information spread about the industry further complicates the fact that most consumers have little understanding of beef production. “I think the wrong folks have been telling the beef story for a long time,” said Dean. “I’ve got two nearly teenage boys, and what they know about the

beef industry is the documentaries they watch on Netflix,” he continued, adding that the loudest voices belong to opponents of livestock production. There is also the possibility of introducing too much information at once. “There is so much stuff that is happening within the roundtable,” said Dean. “I think when we bring this into the public forum and start to engage with consumers, we’ve got to be cautious that we don’t overload them with too much to think about.” One possible example of this is the use of the second CRSB Certified logo, which signifies a mass balance chain of custody model. This logo can be used by a company that sources a minimum of 30 per cent of its volume from CRSB-certified operations. “There is so much education that the public needs to understand what that is, versus just the fact that there’s a roundtable with a sustainable focus,” he said. “Just letting the public know how (many) sustainability practices are already there is important.” Speaking with one voice How should the beef industry face these communication and perception challenges? According to this panel, the entire supply chain needs to speak with one voice, simplify the message and determine why consumers should believe in sustainably raised Canadian beef. “I think we really need to find what in marketing they call ‘the reason to believe,’” said Fitzpatrick-Stilwell, explaining that this is the reason a consumer cares about and demands sustainability. “The worst thing that could happen is

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National standards for sustainable beef is key Continued from previous page isn’t as high as producers may exbeef becomes a guilty pleasure and that people will still do it but feel not great about doing it.” Tansey noted the concept of sustainability is technical and isn’t always easy to communicate to consumers given the major role it can play in beef production. Considering the volume of information available to the public, she also believes each step of the value chain needs to be on the same page when it comes to communication. “There’s so much noise out there, and there’s so many people talking about sustainability and so many people defining what it means.” Simplicity is key to creating a thoughtful, strategic approach, and producers can bring credibility when sharing this story with the public. “The messaging that’s going to go out there has to be kept very simple,” said Lambert. She advised using shared values to connect with consumers, keeping in mind the importance of balancing the heart and mind in creating a compelling message. Fitzpatrick-Stilwell praised the CRSB’s approach of moving towards using one set of claims and logos, though this isn’t without its challenges. “Almost every single Canadian has no connection to farming, so you are asking people who have no understanding about how their food is grown and raised to then have an understanding about how that’s done sustainably,” he said. “Aligning around common language, common vision and common ways of communicating is the best way that we’re going to start doing that.” While the retailers confirmed the importance of transparency, the level demanded by consumers

pect. “Most customers don’t want or need to know the exact farm location where their steak came from,” said Lambert. Rather, she explained, consumers are more concerned about being able to trust that a company is doing the right thing. The Canadian Centre for Food Integrity conducted an in-depth study on transparency in 2017, and Mackay reported that what consumers want in terms of this is a lot simpler than many imagine. “They want third-party audits. They want policies, practices and a track record that you’re actually doing what you said you’re going to do,” she said. Instead of sharing all the data from a sustainability audit, consumers would usually rather just know that a third-party audit has been conducted and that this information is available if they wish to learn more. She cited an example of a retailer that invested in a barcode program to show consumers exactly where their seafood came from. “Very few people actually went to the trouble of going to see the data, but they loved that they could if they wanted to.” The panelists also noted the importance of treating some aspects of the beef industry in a sensitive manner when communicating with the public, given their distance from these realities. “There is an ugly side to the beef industry because, spoiler alert, everybody dies in the end,” said Dean. Mackay advised not comparing animals to people, such as ‘mama cow’ or ‘baby calf,’ as using the proper terminology with consumers is a better way to deal with those sensitive realities. Industry-wide adoption of standards needed for greater success

To really push this message and allow for sustainable beef to capture the general public, the panelists believe that sustainability standards need to be adopted by the entire industry. “What I’d love to be able to see is that sustainability is built into the Canadian beef brand and all Canadian beef production, that it’s not a separate program that a few select producers have chosen to participate in,” said Lambert. “This needs to become an industry-wide, industry-adopted standard that all Canadians can trust.” To make this happen, those already involved with the CRSB and other programs need to share their stories with the rest of the industry to help get everyone on board. “That’s really only going to happen if people start to accept the process, start to get involved, ask some questions and then hopefully go through that certification process,” she said. “At our end of the supply chain we would love to be able to support the marketing and communications and the logos, getting products into the market, and we can only do that with volume.” Fitzpatrick-Stilwell is hopeful that when consumers are better educated on beef production, the whole industry will benefit. He explained that he wants to see “Canadians perceive Canadian beef as their primary source of nutritious protein for themselves and their families, that they would view it as a sustainable, good-for-theplanet, good-for-themselves choice and that that would then drive demand for Canadian beef, which would drive preservation of our native grasslands, and that demand would also drive producer financial and economic viability.”


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Great Tastes of Manitoba ONLINE Underrated Cuts of Beef ON THIS SHOW: • Marinated Teriyaki Flank Steak • Sirloin Tip Kebab • Beef Shank Stew

See the show online at: http://greattastesmb.ca/ underrated-cuts-of-manitoba-beef/


MBP E-Newsletter

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MBP E-Newsletter

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Nominations are now being accepted for the 2018 Manitoba Excellence in Sustainability Awards Government of Manitoba Press Release — Nominations are now being accepted for the 2018 Manitoba Excellence in Sustainability Awards “The Manitoba Excellence in Sustainability Awards are an excellent opportunity to recognize individuals, organizations, communities and businesses that are enhancing sustainability in our province,” Squires said. “These awards showcase great success stories and demonstrate that all Manitobans can make a difference.” This program complements many of the idea set out in the Made-in-Manitoba Climate and

Green Plan and helps encourage everyone to take steps to protect the environment while ensuring a prosperous and environmentally conscious economy, the minister added. Any individual, business, organization or community group in Manitoba is eligible to apply or be nominated for one award in the following categories: • action on climate change, air quality and energy efficiency; • sustainability in water and natural area stewardship; • sustainability in pollution prevention and product stewardship; • education for sustainability;

• innovation and research for sustainability; • champion for sustainability; • sustainable community; and • outstanding achievement in sustainability. The awards will be presented in spring 2019. The deadline for nominations and applications is noon, Feb. 1, 2019. Information about the awards program and how to apply can be found at www.gov.mb.ca/ sd/susresmb/mrtsd/mesa/index. html or by calling 204-794-2686 in Winnipeg or 1-800-282-8069 (toll-free), or e-mailing MESA@gov. mb.ca.

You don't want to miss this Former federal agriculture minister Hon. Gerry Ritz has agreed to attend our 40th AGM in Brandon, Feb. 7-8. He will be our highlight Banquet speaker. YOU CAN NOW REGISTER ONLINE www.mbbeef.ca


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Province launches consultations on streamlined drainage regulation Province of Manitoba Press Release — The • adjusting fees to reflect the true cost of reManitoba government has launched public viewing project applications; and consultations on a draft regulation that would • increasing protection of seasonal, semi-perstreamline approvals for lower-risk, lower-impact manent and permanent wetlands by requiring drainage and water control projects, Sustainable compensation for higher-impact projects. Development Minister Rochelle Squires an“The Association of Manitoba Municipalities nounced today. (AMM) urged the province to continue finding “Manitoba is committed to developing water ways to expedite drainage licencing proposals management strategies that promote sustainable by streamlining the process, so we welcome agricultural production and water conservation,” this announcement, which is extremely importsaid Squires. “The proposed Water Rights Regant for our members,” said Chris Goertzen, past ulation reduces red tape for president, AMM. “We want drainage and water retention to thank the Manitoba govworks while increasing protecernment for listening to our “Manitoba is tion for Manitoba wetlands, feedback and we look forward which play a critical role in the to continuing to consult on the committed to health of our environment.” next steps.” developing water The Manitoba government “Wetlands are some of the management strategies is looking for feedback on most ecologically and functhat promote sustainable tionally important habitats the draft regulatory changes aimed at: in the world,” Squires added. agricultural production • exempting certain water “Protecting wetlands supports and water control projects from departeffective surface water manconservation." mental approval requirements agement by maintaining water including culvert replaceretention capacity and reducments; ing nutrient loading in our — Rochelle Squires • harmonizing provincial watersheds. The shift toward Sustainable approvals for projects that streamlined drainage approvals Development require a licence under The at no net loss of wetlands will Minister reinforce our ability to manage Environment Act; • providing consistent water in a sustainable way.” regulatory regimes for drainComments collected during age and water control projects including a new this consultation period may be used by the Manstreamlined registration process for applications itoba government to inform changes to existing and approvals; legislative, regulatory, program and policy frame• reducing red tape by providing timely regisworks. For more information, visit www.gov. tration and licencing approvals; mb.ca/sd/consultations/index.html • ensuring departmental focus on reviewing The deadline for feedback is Jan. 19, 2019. Subhigher-risk and higher-impact projects; missions can be sent by email to drainage@gov. • increasing flexibility on requirements for mb.ca or mailed to: downstream landowner approvals; Attention: Drainage Consultation • strengthening linkages between watershed Manitoba Sustainable Development plans, municipal planning bylaws and land use Box 16 – 200 Saulteaux Cres. decision-making among communities; Winnipeg, MB R3J 3W3


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To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


mbbeef.ca

November 9, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP feeds Taste the Trade

Winnipeg Coun. Brian Mayes, CCA Executive Vice-President Dennis Laycraft, Federal Minister of International Trade Diversification Hon. Jim Carr, and MBP president Tom Teichroeb were on hand for a Taste of Trade event on Nov. 2 in downtown Winnipeg promoting Manitoba's agriculture community's impact on trade. (Photo by Keith Borkowsky)

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ABOVE: Hungry people line up for the free Manitoba Beef Producers beef on a bun as part of the Taste of Trade event at Old Market Square in Winnipeg on a snowy Nov. 2. BELOW: Federal Minister of International Trade Diversification Hon. Jim Carr and MBP president Tom Teichroeb share a word. (Photos by Keith Borkowsky)


MBP E-Newsletter

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To truck or not to truck?: That is the question as cattle come off pasture Alberta Beef Producers/Beef Cattle Research Council — This is a guest post written by Karin Schmid, Beef Production Specialist with the Alberta Beef Producers, in collaboration with Reynold Bergen, BCRC Science Director. With cows and calves coming off pasture in the coming weeks, some of these cows will likely be going to market. Producers are reminded to be very cautious when facing a temptation to market thin, weak, lame, or sick cows that are unfit for transport. Some auction markets will refuse to accept cows that are unlikely to sell, and some sales yards and packing plants will bill producers who deliver cattle that are condemned. Moreover, producers, cattle buyers and transporters have an ethical and legal obligation to ensure the well being of the cattle under their care. Given the current market conditions in both Eastern and Western Canada, cows may experience longer transport distances than usual, which should also be taken into consideration before loading those cows on the truck. Just because the cow went to auction one day does not mean she’ll be at the plant the next. Take a little extra time to think about the animals you are planning to ship before they are loaded, and consider that longer hauls may be involved. Some cows should not be shipped to auction markets under any conditions. Do not load or transport:

• Animals that are lame, downers, have broken legs, or those that cannot rise, stand and walk under their own power. • Excessively thin cows (body condition score of 1) due to hardware disease, lumpjaw, malnutrition, old age, disease or any other cause should not be transported. Cows with a body condition score of 2 (out of 5) can be transported short distances if they are segregated. • Animals with cancer eye: Do not transport animals with an obvious growth on the eyeball or eyelid. Advanced cases of cancer eye (i.e. the animal is blind or the eye has been obscured) are not fit for human consumption and will be condemned at the packing plant. • Prolapsed animals: Do not ship animals with an obviously displaced vagina, uterus, or rectum. • Lactating cows: Cows that have not been dried off should not be hauled, except for short distances, direct to slaughter. • Pregnant cows: Do not transport cows to sale if you know they are heavily pregnant or expect them to calve within a few weeks. Otherwise sick or injured animals: Except on the advice of a veterinarian, do not transport sick or injured animals until they have been treated and recovered. Old, weak or thin cows will need to be segregated from the rest of the herd while they recover. If the animal is not expected to recover, euthanize it on the farm. If a

reportable disease such as rabies, BSE, tuberculosis, etc. is suspected, it must be reported to the CFIA immediately. These animals must not be transported. Any shipper, marketer, etc. found guilty of contravening the Alberta Animal Protection Act is subject to a fine up to $20,000, and may be prevented from owning or caring for any animal for a period of time determined by the Court. Similar animal welfare laws are in place across Canada. There are alternatives for dealing with these types of cows. The best method is making culling decisions while the cows are still fit for transport. If any cows on the cusp of being unfit for transport absolutely must be transported a short distance, ensure that they are adequately bedded and loaded last in the back of the trailer by themselves (but not in the doghouse where they would need to use ramps and would be difficult to access if they became compromised during the trip), so that they come off the trailer first. Animals not fit for transport should be euthanized and properly disposed of on-farm or via a deadstock removal service. Cows that are free of drug, vaccine and chemical residues, do not have a fever above 39oC (104.5oF), have a body condition score of 2 out of 5 or higher, and are able to walk under their own power may be salvageable through emergency

Continued on next page


MBP E-Newsletter

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MASC announces changes Western Livestock Price Insurance program Province of Manitoba News Release — Manitoba Agriculture’s Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC) would like to notify livestock producers about an upcoming change to the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program (WLPIP). WLPIP protects Manitoba’s cattle and hog producers against unexpected price declines by allowing them to purchase insurance policies based on a market-driven insured price and a producer-selected coverage level. Settlement prices are based

directly on the Western Canadian cattle/hog markets. WLPIP coverage and policy options help manage market price volatility by providing an insurable floor price on cattle and hogs. New for the WLPIP program is the payment on account option, which will allow producers to carry WLPIP premium payments until 30 days after their policy expires, subject to interest. This will allow producers to participate in the program without having to immediately access operating capital for payment upon

purchase. Since its introduction in 2014, WLPIP has insured over 191,000 Manitoba cattle and paid $3 million in indemnities against drops in the market. Price insurance policies are available year-round for finished cattle, feeders and hogs. Calf policies will be available Feb. 5 to May 30, 2019. For more information on WLPIP in Manitoba, contact a MASC office or visit: www.masc.mb.ca/masc. nsf/program_western_livestock_ price_insurance.html.

When should cattle be on the move? From previous page slaughter. Changes to the Canada-Alberta BSE Surveillance Program, effective November 1, 2012, have removed the upper age limit of 107 months, as well as the 30-day ownership requirement, so some cows unfit for transport in Alberta may be eligible for this program and the $75 payment from CFIA for participation. Contact your regional CFIA office for information on the National BSE Surveillance Reimbursement Program. For more advice on whether an animal is fit to load, please consult your veterinarian, auction market, or a reputable trucker. The Canadian Livestock Transport Training Program is also an excellent resource for truckers, shippers,

and receivers; offering speciesspecific customized training on livestock and poultry handling, loading, and biosecurity. We can help to maintain consumer confidence in our industry, especially in trying times, by ensuring that our treatment of our animals is beyond reproach. We know that treating our animals with respect and care is the right thing to do, and this includes recognizing when animals are unfit for transport, and taking the proper corrective actions. It only takes seconds of video

from a smartphone to damage our industry’s integrity, and make us less credible when we say “we care.” If you’re making the right decisions, you don’t have to worry about who might be watching. For more information on cattle transport issues and related research projects, visit the Transport page at BeefResearch.ca. For more information on carcass disposal methods and links to deadstock removal services across Canada, visit the Disposal of Cattle Moralities page at BeefResearch. ca.

to sign up.


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Great Tastes of Manitoba ONLINE A Week in a Day ON THIS SHOW:

See the show at: https://youtu.be/ fz3yNbhjZzI

• Slow Cooked Beef Brisket with Braised Onions, served with Fort Garry Dark Ale • Gourmet Grilled Beef Dip, served with Fort Garry Pale Ale • Thai Beef Noodle Salad, served with Fort Garry Pilsner DYK: Manitoba’s unique climate and central location make it one of the most productive barley-growing areas in the world? Malt barley is processed locally and the malt is used by the province’s thriving micro-brewing industry, and also exported around the world.

Your last chances to attend a District Meeting are next week

• District 1 – Tuesday, Nov. 13, Deloraine Mountview Centre • District 8 – Wednesday, Nov. 14, Arden Community Hall • District 6 – Thursday, Nov 15, Oak Lake Community Hall All meetings start at 6 p.m., with a free beef-on-a-bun supper. Get a meal. Have your say. Be heard.


MBP E-Newsletter

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Beef audit offers tips to limit losses Beef Cattle Research Council — Injection site lesions visible on the carcass surface have increased to nearly 14 per cent of non-fed cattle and eight per cent of fed cattle. Even in areas that are inches away from injection sites can result in tissue damage causing tougher meat and lower eating quality. As a result, injection site lesions cost the industry $0.56/head or $1.63 million in 2016. That’s up considerably from 0.21/ head or $662,951 in 2011. What do you need to know? Animals should be properly restrained to ensure the safety of both yourself and the animal. This will also give greater access to the neck area to improve delivery accuracy and reduce the risk of broken needles. Use subcutaneous (below the skin) when possible versus intermuscular (into the muscle) when administering injections. Intermuscular injections generate a greater risk of developing a reaction to the treatment and can create injection abscesses and bruising. It is recommended to deliver only 10 mL of treatment per injection site. Although, antibiotics such as penicillin may require multiple injections per dose. To do this, deliver the treatment in the soft tissue area between the spine, shoulder and neck veins which forms a triangle. Deliver multiple

Cattle carcass quality can be impacted by injections earlier in life. (File photo) injections of 10 mL or less about one hand width apart. Alternatively, injections may be delivered behind the shoulder blade by tenting the skin and injecting in a downward motion. It is best to avoid injections in the hip region. Avoid delivering treatments in an area with mud or tag on the hide. Injections through areas of tag and debris can introduce bacteria into the injection site and cause a reaction. In remote locations, animals may be treated using a dart gun. While the darts may hold more than 10 mL, the same rule applies to only give 10 mL

per injection site. This method may not be appropriate for treatments that need more than 10 mL per dose. When retrieving the dart make sure that the entire needle has been removed. Multi-dose needles should be changed every 10-15 animals or when dull, burred, or bent and should be changed before every new drug or vaccine. Information is based on results from the 2017/18 National Beef Quality Audit (NBQA). Learn more at http:// www.beefresearch.ca/NBQA and download the full NBQA results.

You don't want to miss this Former federal agriculture minister Hon. Gerry Ritz has agreed to attend our 40th AGM in Brandon, Feb. 7-8. He will be our highlight Banquet speaker.


MBP E-Newsletter

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mbbeef.ca MBP E-Newsletter

®

Right Now Emerald with Altosid IGR

®

fly control mineral for beef cattle on pasture For more information, visit your local Cargill dealer or call Doug Allison at 204.724.2652

the 30 - 30 method for horn fly control proven to

BREAK THE LIFE CYCLE

30 Days after the first frost

Left untreated, a few adult horn flies can quickly explode to a population of 4,000 flies or more per animal. Feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR using the 30/30 formula prevents flies from multiplying, successfully breaking their life cycle. 30 Days before emergence

• Continue feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR for 30 days after the first frost to help prevent horn flies from overwintering again. Exposing horn fly larvae to Altosid® IGR can reduce the number of overwintering pupae.

• Horn files overwinter in the pupal stage and jump start adult populations in the Spring.

• Begin feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR 30 days before overwintering flies emerge. Horn flies emerge in the spring when the average daily temperatures reach 18°C (65°F) • Put out a five-to-seven-day supply of the mineral near watering holes or loafing areas, allowing one feeder for every 15-20 animals.

Female flies leave the animal for a few seconds to lay eggs in manure less than five minutes old.

Adult horn flies live two-to-four weeks taking 20-to-40 blood meals per day.

• Continue for 30 days after the first frost as a temperature bounce-back could allow additional horn fly generations to develop.

In one to two days eggs hatch into larvae

• Check mineral consumption and increase or decrease the number of feeders, or move them if necessary, to adjust for proper consumption.

Right Now® Emerald

Pupae molt into adults in six to eight days. Altosid® IGR breaks the life cycle preventing adults from emerging. In three to five days the larvae molt into pupae

"Always read and follow label directions. Altosid and the cow head design are registered trademarks of Wellmark International."


MBP E-Newsletter

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In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s beef industry • What do US midterms mean for Canadian Ag? • Is beef to blame for climate change • Grade alignment with US • What to expect from second half of beef price cycle


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To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


MBP E-Newsletter

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Help us tell your story Send us photos and videos from your farm

Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry. If you are interested, please send them to Manitoba Beef Producers Communications Coordinator Keith Borkowsky by email: kborkowsky@mbbeef.ca


mbbeef.ca

November 23, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Find Us Online

@ManitobaBeef

@ManitobaBeefProducers1

mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

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MBP E-Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s beef industry • Cows are getting a bad rap and it's time to set the record straight: Giving up meat won't save the planet • U.S. trade mess is Canada’s chance to gain advantage • Cargill plants introduce cattle handling robots • Beef Watch: Canadian cattle herd inventories down • Strategies for year-round grazing • Polycrop grazing goes under the microscope • CCA Report: Legislative update

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Federal efforts to improve mental and physical wellbeing in agriculture sector Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada News Release — Canadian farmers and food processors across the country work hard every day to put safe, high-quality food on our tables, while driving our economy and creating good, middle-class jobs. Farming can provide an amazing lifestyle with great rewards, but it can also be hard on mental health. Farmers and their families often face high levels of stress because of forces that are beyond their control, such as weather, disease, commodity prices, and trade. Following Budget 2018, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Minister Lawrence MacAulay mandated Farm Credit Canada (FCC) to work with and support like-minded organizations to assist Canadian producers with mental health issues through greater awareness and knowledge dissemination and to provide greater access to services and supports in rural Canada. The Parliamentary Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food recently studied the issue during their sessions on “Mental Health Challenges that Canadian Farmers, Ranchers, and Producers Face” and is producing a report based on the testimonies they hear. The Minister, along with Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture Jean-Claude Poissant, today recognized the efforts of FCC and other industry organizations who are working together to remove the stigma around mental health. FCC is collaborating with 4-H Canada and industry partners to create a national program that supports the mental and physical health of 4-H youth. FCC will contribute $50,000 toward the National 4-H Healthy Living Initiative, which will be made available to more than 7,700 volunteer leaders and 25,000 4-H members across Canada. FCC has also partnered with mental health experts to create a resource for managing stress and anxiety on the farm titled, Rooted in Strength, and has produced a series of public service announcements to promote mental health awareness in agriculture. In addition, the Minister also indicated that Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada is working with Farm Management Canada to support a project that will explore the link between mental health and the impact on farm business management decisions. These initiatives will support industry efforts to better understand and address the mental health needs of the agriculture industry.


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Don't Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to: to sign up.


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Great Tastes of Manitoba ONLINE Underrated Cuts of Beef ON THIS SHOW: • Marinated Teriyaki Flank Steak • Sirloin Tip Kebab • Beef Shank Stew

See the show online at: http://greattastesmb.ca/ underrated-cuts-of-manitoba-beef/


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Food guide concerns for beef industry Amanda Stephenson, Calgary Herald (Nov. 20, 2018) — Some farm groups are worried that an expected new version of the Canada Food Guide, the familiar rainbow illustration that has shaped the public’s ideas about healthy eating for decades, could have far-reaching consequences for their industry. The Canada Food Guide — a mainstay of schools, daycares and hospital kitchens — has not had an update since 2007. Last year, after a six-week public consultation period, Health Canada released a set of draft recommendations for a new food guide that was expected to be unveiled this month. However, the new guide is now not anticipated until early 2019. Health Canada spokesman Geoffroy Legault-Thivierge said in an email that the department is still finalizing the new version of the food guide and updating its evidence base with “the latest nutrition science.” However, Sylvain Charlebois, a professor in the faculty of management at the University of Dalhousie, said he believes Health Canada may have had to make adjustments to reflect the feedback of farmers and ranchers who were upset by some of the recommendations in the draft guidelines. Among other things, the draft document contained a call for “more plantbased sources of protein,” more water and less saturated fat — all of which would have the potential to steer consumers away from meat and dairy products. “I think they (Health Canada) over-reached,” Charlebois said. “I think they’ve been under a lot of pressure to come up with something a little more balanced. And I don’t think they’re there yet.” Marie-France MacKinnon, spokeswoman for the Canadian Meat Council, said she believes Canadians

understand that meat is nutrient-dense and plays a key role in a balanced diet. “It even has benefits when added to diets that are largely plant-based by helping the body absorb nutrients, like iron and zinc,” MacKinnon said, adding the Canadian Meat Council met with federal Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor in May. “She assured us that the new Food Guide will not tell Canadians to eat less meat.” Prioritizing plant-based sources of protein over animal-based sources of protein is not supported by evidence, said Lucie Boileau, Dairy Farmers of Canada spokesperson. She added her organization made a submission to Health Canada warning a disproportionate emphasis on plant-based foods and beverages could encourage parents of young children to choose almond and rice beverages over milk. “This could put their children’s health at great risk,” Boileau said. “Other than soy-fortified beverages, plant-based drinks are not nutritionally adequate for young children.” In addition to the new food guide, Health Canada has also proposed placing front-of-package warning labels on foods high in sugar, sodium and saturated fat. The saturated fat rule would apply to things such as cheese, yogurt and even ground beef. “Something like a diet soda would not have a warning label on it but something that is extremely nutritious, like ground beef, would,” said Fawn Jackson, senior manager of government and foreign relations for the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association.

Continued on Page 8

You don't want to miss this Former federal agriculture minister Hon. Gerry Ritz has agreed to attend our 40th AGM in Brandon, Feb. 7-8. He will be our highlight Banquet speaker.


MBP E-Newsletter

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MBP E-Newsletter

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Province announces contracts for Outlet Channels Project Channels to provide better flood protection for Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Province of Manitoba News Release — Two engineering firms have been awarded the contracts for engineering design and construction oversight for the Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels project, Infrastructure Minister Ron Schuler announced today. “The Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels project is vital to protect Manitobans who have sacrificed so much because of flooding,” said Schuler. “Better water control means better protection against flooding for these Manitobans and the sooner this work begins, the better.” Hatch Ltd. was awarded the Lake Manitoba engineering design and construction oversight contract. The Lake Manitoba channel includes the flood protection chan-

Premier Brian Pallister and MBP President Tom Teichroeb discuss flooding issues.

nel, water control structure and preliminary design of two bridges. TREK Geotechnical Inc., Stantec Consulting Ltd. and Dillon Consulting Ltd. will assist. KGS Group was awarded the Lake St. Martin engineering design and construction oversight contract. The Lake St. Martin channel in-

cludes the flood protection channel and water control structure. WSP Global Inc. and North/South Consultants Inc. will assist. The provincial government recognizes the vital importance and urgency of this project, given previous flood events around Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin. Severe flooding in 2011 and 2014 resulted in extensive damage to homes, businesses and infrastructure in the province, as well as emergency evacuations in the communities around Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin. The flooding resulted in thousands of evacuations, damage to homes and properties, significant economic disruption, and billions of dollars in costs for response and recovery. The overall cost of the project is $540 million, the minister noted.

What do food guide changes really mean? From Page 6 “We want to make sure that an accessible, highly usable and nutritious product like ground beef isn’t put into the back of people’s minds as something they shouldn’t be eating.” The effect of the Canada Food Guide on consumers can’t be underestimated, said Charlebois. “It’s been so institutionalized that it affects us all, whether we admit or not,” he said. “It will influence how we eat food, and how we see food.”

He added he and University of Dalhousie colleagues recently conducted a study that found more than 6.4 million Canadians are already limiting the amount of meat they eat. That number is likely to grow as, according to the study, younger and more educated consumers are less likely to choose meals with meat and more likely to want plant-based alternatives. Sixty-three per cent of the survey respondents that identified as vegans were under the age of 38. While there’s no need for meat

and dairy producers to panic, Charlebois said, the reality is the market share for plant-based proteins are growing. “Instead of just going out and saying, ‘please, Canadians, eat more beef,’ producers might want to position beef with lentils and chickpeas and other sources of protein,” he said. “Befriend the enemy, basically. Perhaps the market is ready to hear a recipe for meat loaf that uses both ground beef and lentils, instead of just ground beef.”


mbbeef.ca MBP E-Newsletter

®

Right Now Emerald with Altosid IGR

®

fly control mineral for beef cattle on pasture For more information, visit your local Cargill dealer or call Doug Allison at 204.724.2652

the 30 - 30 method for horn fly control proven to

BREAK THE LIFE CYCLE

30 Days after the first frost

Left untreated, a few adult horn flies can quickly explode to a population of 4,000 flies or more per animal. Feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR using the 30/30 formula prevents flies from multiplying, successfully breaking their life cycle. 30 Days before emergence

• Continue feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR for 30 days after the first frost to help prevent horn flies from overwintering again. Exposing horn fly larvae to Altosid® IGR can reduce the number of overwintering pupae.

• Horn files overwinter in the pupal stage and jump start adult populations in the Spring.

• Begin feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR 30 days before overwintering flies emerge. Horn flies emerge in the spring when the average daily temperatures reach 18°C (65°F) • Put out a five-to-seven-day supply of the mineral near watering holes or loafing areas, allowing one feeder for every 15-20 animals.

Female flies leave the animal for a few seconds to lay eggs in manure less than five minutes old.

Adult horn flies live two-to-four weeks taking 20-to-40 blood meals per day.

• Continue for 30 days after the first frost as a temperature bounce-back could allow additional horn fly generations to develop.

In one to two days eggs hatch into larvae

• Check mineral consumption and increase or decrease the number of feeders, or move them if necessary, to adjust for proper consumption.

Right Now® Emerald

Pupae molt into adults in six to eight days. Altosid® IGR breaks the life cycle preventing adults from emerging. In three to five days the larvae molt into pupae

"Always read and follow label directions. Altosid and the cow head design are registered trademarks of Wellmark International."


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


mbbeef.ca

October 26, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP expresses concern over carbon tax plan Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) have a role to play in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. However, MBP are also concerned about the potential impacts the federal carbon tax plan will have on their operations. “We have concerns this tax will negatively affect our operations due to higher costs related to transporting cattle, inputs and many other products and services we need on a daily basis,� MBP president Tom Teichroeb said.

Continued to Page 2 Grassland pastures help sequester carbon. (Photo by Don Guilford)

Find Us Online @ManitobaBeef

@ManitobaBeefProducers1

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MBP E-Newsletter

Thinking about becoming an MBP Director? There will be vacancies in Districts 5, 7 and 13 as those directors are retiring. Call the MBP office at 1-800-772-0458 for details.

mbbeef.ca

Carbon tax, higher costs create concerns Continued from Page 1

“While there are exemptions proposed for on-farm use of fuels for tractors, trucks and other farm machinery, Manitoba’s beef producers will still be affected by these types of pass-through costs.” “As our producers don’t set the price of their herds, they will be adversely impacted and will have to absorb these costs at a time when we are seeking to increase the size of the provincial herd,” Teichroeb said. “Higher taxes place a barrier in the way of fulfilling that objective and decrease our ability to compete in a global marketplace.” Teichroeb added studies show that pastures and grasslands utilized by cattle producers can sequester as much as eight tonnes of carbon per hectare per year. “Rather than a carbon tax, additional supports for increasing and enhancing grassland and pasture acres would help the environment as multiple benefits accrue from the carbon sequestration,” Teichroeb said. “Not only would this support protection of biodiversity, these efforts enhance resilience against floods and droughts and provide valuable habitat for an array of species.” MBP seek further dialogue with the federal and provincial governments to find solutions which both reduce carbon emissions and support the agriculture sector.


MBP E-Newsletter

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Great Tastes of Manitoba ONLINE A Week in a Day ON THIS SHOW:

See the show at: https://youtu.be/ fz3yNbhjZzI

• Slow Cooked Beef Brisket with Braised Onions, served with Fort Garry Dark Ale • Gourmet Grilled Beef Dip, served with Fort Garry Pale Ale • Thai Beef Noodle Salad, served with Fort Garry Pilsner DYK: Manitoba’s unique climate and central location make it one of the most productive barley-growing areas in the world? Malt barley is processed locally and the malt is used by the province’s thriving micro-brewing industry, and also exported around the world.

You don't want to miss this Former federal agriculture minister Hon. Gerry Ritz has agreed to attend our 40th AGM in Brandon, Feb. 7-8. He will be our highlight Banquet speaker.


MBP E-Newsletter

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Manitoba Agriculture Minister Hon. Ralph Eichler and Manitoba Beef Producers president Tom Teichroeb celebrate the declaration of Beef Week on Oct. 22 at the Manitoba Legislative Building. (Photo by Keith Borkowsky)

Webinar on new antibiotics regulations offered Beef Cattle Research Council — As of Dec. 1, you will need a prescription to purchase virtually any antibiotic on your farm. How will that effect your operation? Join us to learn what the regulations mean when it comes to working with your veterinarian and purchasing medicated feed, and the facts about antibiotic use and resistance in Canadian beef cattle. Registering on your smartphone? After you click ‘I am not a robot’, scroll up until you find the task to complete. When Wednesday, November 14 at

8:00pm in SK and MB Interested but aren’t available that evening? Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live broadcast, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too. Duration Approximately 1 hour. Cost BCRC webinars are available and free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time

and expertise to support advancements in the Canadian beef industry, and through the Technology Transfer project funded by the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off and Canada’s Beef Science Cluster. Guest Speakers Melissa Dumont – Executive Director of the Animal Nutrition Association of Canada (ANAC). Dr. Cody Creelman — received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine in 2011 from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Reynold Bergen, Ph.D. – Beef Cattle Research Council Science Director.


E-Newsletter 8.5 MBP x 11 v2

Buy approved ear tags online and save. ORDER TODAY SAME DAY SHIPPING

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MBP E-Newsletter

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CCA applauds action on CPTPP Canadian Cattlemen's Association Press Release — Calgary, AB Today the Senate of Canada passed Bill C-79 to implement the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). The bill then immediately received Royal Assent. Following a few more documentary necessities, the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) expects that in the next few days, Canada will notify the CPTPP Secretariat in New Zealand that we have ratified the Agreement and join Australia, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Singapore as the first six to ratify. The CPTPP will come into force 60 days after New Zealand receives Canada’s notification. CCA President David Haywood-Farmer offered his congratulations to International Trade Minister Jim Carr and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for placing a priority on ensuring that Canada would be among the first six countries to implement the CPTPP. We were also pleased to see the Senate of Canada work quickly to approve Bill C-79, and are particularly grateful to Senator Raynell Andreychuk who chaired the Committee review

and Senator Sabi Marwah who sponsored the bill in the Senate. Finally, sincere thanks go to former International Trade Ministers François-Phillippe Champagne and Ed Fast for their key roles in negotiating the landmark trade agreement. “It’s great news for beef producers that the deal will be coming into effect this year,” Haywood-Farmer said. “The long years of recovering lost market access are firmly behind us now, and we have the bonus of seeing new markets open up to high quality Canadian beef.” The key objective for Canadian beef producers in the CPTPP was to improve access to the Japanese market by lowering the tariff and shielding Canadian beef from Japan’s safeguard tariffs. The current Japanese tariff on Canadian beef is 38.5 per cent. When the CPTPP comes into force, the Japanese tariff will immediately drop to 27.5 per cent on Canadian fresh beef and to 26.9 per cent on frozen beef. On April 1, 2019 Canada will enjoy a second cut down to 26.6 per cent on both fresh and frozen and eventually

down to 9 per cent over several years. In 2017, Canada exported $160 million of beef to Japan with the 38.5 per cent regular tariff on fresh and a 50 per cent safeguard tariff on frozen beef. With CPTPP, Canadian beef will be exempt from the Japanese safeguard, noted Haywood-Farmer. “I expect that exports of Canadian beef to Japan can easily double in 2019 with this lower and more predictable tariff,” he said. The CCA expects the remaining five CPTPP signatory countries (Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, Peru and Vietnam) to bring the Agreement into force as well in 2019. When they do, they will have to catch up by making two tariff cuts immediately on implementation. Vietnam is an emerging market and expected to represent important growth potential for Canadian beef. Canadian beef exports to Vietnam in 2017 were $3.9 million with a 20 per cent tariff. Once Vietnam implements CPTPP in 2019, their initial two tariff cuts will immediately bring the tariff down to 6.6 per cent and then to zero in 2020.

Don't Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to mbfiinfo@gmail.com to sign up.


mbbeef.ca MBP E-Newsletter

®

Right Now Emerald with Altosid IGR

®

fly control mineral for beef cattle on pasture For more information, visit your local Cargill dealer or call Doug Allison at 204.724.2652

the 30 - 30 method for horn fly control proven to

BREAK THE LIFE CYCLE

30 Days after the first frost

Left untreated, a few adult horn flies can quickly explode to a population of 4,000 flies or more per animal. Feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR using the 30/30 formula prevents flies from multiplying, successfully breaking their life cycle. 30 Days before emergence

• Continue feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR for 30 days after the first frost to help prevent horn flies from overwintering again. Exposing horn fly larvae to Altosid® IGR can reduce the number of overwintering pupae.

• Horn files overwinter in the pupal stage and jump start adult populations in the Spring.

• Begin feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR 30 days before overwintering flies emerge. Horn flies emerge in the spring when the average daily temperatures reach 18°C (65°F) • Put out a five-to-seven-day supply of the mineral near watering holes or loafing areas, allowing one feeder for every 15-20 animals.

Female flies leave the animal for a few seconds to lay eggs in manure less than five minutes old.

Adult horn flies live two-to-four weeks taking 20-to-40 blood meals per day.

• Continue for 30 days after the first frost as a temperature bounce-back could allow additional horn fly generations to develop.

In one to two days eggs hatch into larvae

• Check mineral consumption and increase or decrease the number of feeders, or move them if necessary, to adjust for proper consumption.

Right Now® Emerald

Pupae molt into adults in six to eight days. Altosid® IGR breaks the life cycle preventing adults from emerging. In three to five days the larvae molt into pupae

"Always read and follow label directions. Altosid and the cow head design are registered trademarks of Wellmark International."


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

US Study says:

Restrict grazing on public rangelands – increase habitat loss on private lands CCA Action News — If governments impose restrictions to cattle grazing on publicly managed rangelands, the likely result will be increased loss of habitat for species like the sage-grouse on private lands. This is one of several findings by a team of US researchers in their study published in the September 26, 2018 issue of the Journal of Applied Ecology. The study area covered counties within 10 states (Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, South Dakota, North Dakota, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming) that contain sage-grouse habitat. The researchers used econometric modelling to predict changes in ranch profitability and factored in historical data on land use changes as well as profits on rangelands and cropland. A key assumption in the study is that rangeland is more likely to be converted to cropland when the benefits obtained by having the land under crop outweigh all other benefits a rancher might obtain by keeping the land as range. A lot of other variables were accounted for in the study design and methods, including the understanding not all ranchers would have the same economic trigger-point to convert their rangeland into cropland. The authors conclude that restricting grazing of public lands in the study area by 50 per cent

US study shows allowing cattle to graze public land has positive impacts. would result in the loss of an additional 171,400 ha of sage-grouse habitat on private lands by 2050, on top of the 842,000 ha predicted loss if the rate of conversion continues as it has in recent years. The authors also estimate an additional 105,700 ha (3.24 per cent) of sagegrouse mesic habitat, vital to the species during brood rearing, held on private land in the study region would be lost by 2050. In short, efforts to improve habitat on public lands using grazing restrictions are apt to result in greater system-wide fragmentation of sage-grouse habitat from

unintended habitat loss on private lands. "Policy that manages resources on public lands while also supporting sustainable, economically viable ranching operations on private lands is a promising approach to maximizing sage-grouse habitat", the authors conclude. The full article, 'Unintended habitat loss on private land from grazing restrictions on public rangelands', is on-line at: Unintended Habitat Loss and appears in the Journal of Applied Ecology 2018; 1-11.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

STAY ONE STEP AHEAD

Your work doesn’t stop when summer ends. Look ahead and protect what you’ve earned. We know what it takes to prepare your livestock for market — and how an unexpected turn can impact your future profits. That’s why The Western Livestock Price Insurance Program is there to help you protect your business. Producers can purchase price insurance year-round for their feeder cattle, finished cattle or hogs. Price insurance for calves will be available for purchase again in February 2019. Choose from a range of coverage options every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. To purchase your policy, contact yourlocal MASC office. To purchase your policy, contact your local MASC office.

wlpip.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Show your 4-H Colours Day fast approaching This November 7, 4-H Canada is calling on all supporters to share their 4-H pride by participating in Canada’s annual Show Your 4-H Colours Day. 4-H’ers across the country are encouraged to dig into their closets, pull out their favourite green clothing, wear it for the day, and join more than 32,000 4-H youth members and volunteer leaders – along with tens of thousands of alumni, government leaders and partners – in celebrating one of Canada’s leading positive youth development organizations. In addition to wearing green, as a proud 4-H’er you can show the world what 4-H means to you by visiting www.showyour4hcolours.ca. Here you can share your own stories, photos and videos on the impact of 4-H in your life and why you support 4-H in your community, in your country, and around the world. You can also demonstrate your 4-H pride by using the #ShowYour4HColours hashtag to share your thoughts and experiences. Show Your 4-H Colours Day on November 7 is just one of many activities taking place, with green continuing as the theme for the entire month of

In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s beef industry

November. Landmarks across Canada – including Toronto’s iconic CN Tower and Vancouver City Hall – will be lighting up in green in support of 4-H. “Show Your 4-H Colours is the best possible way to share the positive impact 4-H has had on your life,” said 4-H Canada CEO, Shannon Benner. “We encourage everyone to get out into your communities and use social media to tell your story, so that others can learn about 4-H, its values, and our deep commitment to positive youth development.” To learn more about Show Your 4-H Colours Day, visit www.showyour4hcolours.ca.

• Does Manitoba's Carbon Tax plan still have life? • Know the signs of Fog Fever • Fall run at auction marts hold steady • Developing faster, cheaper diagnostic tests for calves


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


MBP E-Newsletter

Have your say at a District Meeting

ABOVE: Attendance was high and the aucience was engaged at District 4's annual meeting near Stonewall on Oct. 23. (Photo by Keith Borkowsky) LEFT: District 4 also had a solid turnout with people learning about MBP's activities this past year at Grunthal on Oct. 25. (Photo by Kate Cummings) Check Page 10 for the full District Meeting schedule. Meetings start with a free Beef on a Bun supper at 6 p.m. Elections will be held in all odd-numbered districts this year.

mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Help us tell your story Send us photos and videos from your farm

Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry. If you are interested, please send them to Manitoba Beef Producers Communications Coordinator Keith Borkowsky by email: kborkowsky@mbbeef.ca


mbbeef.ca

October 12, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Changes to Crown Lands Act proposed by Minister Eichler Province of Manitoba Press Release — The Manitoba government has introduced legislation that would improve how agricultural Crown lands (ACL) and community pastures are managed, Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler announced today. “We are pleased to be introducing amendments to The Crown Lands Act that will modernize the process of crown land leases,” said Eichler. Continued to Page 2 MBP President Tom Teichroeb is interviewed at the Legislature.

Find Us Online @ManitobaBeef

@ManitobaBeefProducers1

mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s beef industry • Beef Market Update: A strong fall run, attractive retail prices, and full feedlots • Tularemia, a potentially serious and life-threatening disease • MASC trusts — protecting farmers’ money or better bookkeeping?

mbbeef.ca

Changes to Crown Lands Act could mean auctions, public tenders Continued to Page 2 “We are also making changes that will better enable government to maintain and protect community pastures. These lands not only provide opportunities for cattle farmers, but also provide numerous environmental benefits including carbon sequestration, protecting threatened species and maintaining biodiversity.” The Crown Lands Amendment Act would allow agricultural Crown lands to have their rent determined by a public auction and allow government designate ACL as community pastures. Currently, fees or rent for leases and permits for agricultural Crown lands may be determined by public tender. This proposed bill would enable regulations that provide for public auctions to also be used.

The new subsection to the bill would allow rent to be calculated in one of four ways: 1. by setting out or prescribing the amount of method/formula to determine rent in regulation, 2. by having a public tender, 3. by having a public auction, or 4. a combination of ways one to three. The bill would also enable government to designate certain lands as community pastures and to regulate their use. The purpose of community pastures is to support haying and grazing on rangelands in a manner that conserves the lands’ ecological integrity and biodiversity. Once designated, community pastures must be managed in accordance with this purpose. The proposed bill would come into force upon receiving royal assent, the minister noted.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Great Tastes of Manitoba episodes available online: A Week in a Day ON THIS SHOW:

See the show at: https://youtu.be/ fz3yNbhjZzI

• Slow Cooked Beef Brisket with Braised Onions, served with Fort Garry Dark Ale • Gourmet Grilled Beef Dip, served with Fort Garry Pale Ale • Thai Beef Noodle Salad, served with Fort Garry Pilsner DYK: Manitoba’s unique climate and central location make it one of the most productive barley-growing areas in the world? Malt barley is processed locally and the malt is used by the province’s thriving micro-brewing industry, and also exported around the world.

You don't want to miss this Former federal agriculture minister Hon. Gerry Ritz has agreed to attend our 40th AGM in Brandon, Feb. 7-8. He will be one of our insightful keynote speakers.


E-Newsletter 8.5 MBP x 11 v1

FINALLY... SOMETHING EASY ABOUT RANCHING Buy approved ear tags online and save. ORDER TODAY SAME DAY SHIPPING

mbbeef.ca

8.5 x 1


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Temporary Suspension of Crown Land and Property Sales in place The following information is from the Manitoba government’s Real Estate Services Division’s website (formerly the Crown Lands and Property Agency). The Manitoba Government has recently conducted an internal review of the Crown land and property sales process as part of its ongoing efforts to ensure value for money for all Manitobans. As a result of this review, the Manitoba Government has temporarily suspended the acceptance of all applications for the purchase of Crown land or property. Efforts are currently underway to modernize and improve the process to identify Crown land and property available for sale and to develop a fair and transparent way of communicating this information. Applications previously received at Real Estate Services Division (formerly Crown Lands and Property Agency) will continue to be processed. Furthermore, in response to consultations on the administration of the agricultural Crown lands leasing program, Manitoba Agriculture is temporarily suspending the acceptance of applications for unit transfers. Unit transfers, the ability of an existing lease holder to assign their lease to the purchaser of their farm operation, was identified by stakeholders as an aspect of the leasing program that required more in-depth review to improve

transparency and fairness to new and existing program participants. Existing unit transfer applications will continue to be processed and additional stakeholder consultations on unit transfers will be scheduled over the winter. Frequently Asked Questions: How long will the temporary suspension of sales last? Unsolicited sales are suspended until a revised and more efficient sales process is complete. Anticipated for Summer 2019. How does this suspension affect any sales applications previously submitted? Applications previously received at Real Estate Services Division will continue to be processed. Applicants whose sales are currently under review will be provided with the results after the review is completed. Will the purchase price of Crown lands change? Under the new process land and property sales will be fair and transparent. The Manitoba Government wants to make sure that it provides the best possible return to Manitobans. Will the process review decrease processing times? The objective of the review is to develop a more efficient process so that sales transactions are completed in a timely manner.

Will the results of the review be communicated to the public? Once the sales process review is complete, the province will notify the public and stakeholders. Will the public have an opportunity to provide any input in the review? Existing unit transfer applications will continue to be processed and additional stakeholder consultations on unit transfers will be scheduled over the winter. Can clients currently under a lease or permit purchase the land they are occupying? Applications to purchase Crown land and property will not be accepted while the sales process is under review. Will the Province accept applications for leases or permits during the suspension of sale applications? Yes. Only applications to purchase are temporarily suspended. All other applications will be accepted during this review. Will registration of interests in Crown lands sales be offered during the suspension? No. The Province will not be accepting interests in Crown lands sales for registration. Source: https://clpamb.ca/

Thinking about becoming an MBP Director? There will be vacancies in Districts 5, 7 and 13 as those directors are retiring. Call the MBP office at 1-800-772-0458 for details.


mbbeef.ca MBP E-Newsletter

®

Right Now Emerald with Altosid IGR

®

fly control mineral for beef cattle on pasture For more information, visit your local Cargill dealer or call Doug Allison at 204.724.2652

the 30 - 30 method for horn fly control proven to

BREAK THE LIFE CYCLE

30 Days after the first frost

Left untreated, a few adult horn flies can quickly explode to a population of 4,000 flies or more per animal. Feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR using the 30/30 formula prevents flies from multiplying, successfully breaking their life cycle. 30 Days before emergence

• Continue feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR for 30 days after the first frost to help prevent horn flies from overwintering again. Exposing horn fly larvae to Altosid® IGR can reduce the number of overwintering pupae.

• Horn files overwinter in the pupal stage and jump start adult populations in the Spring.

• Begin feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR 30 days before overwintering flies emerge. Horn flies emerge in the spring when the average daily temperatures reach 18°C (65°F) • Put out a five-to-seven-day supply of the mineral near watering holes or loafing areas, allowing one feeder for every 15-20 animals.

Female flies leave the animal for a few seconds to lay eggs in manure less than five minutes old.

Adult horn flies live two-to-four weeks taking 20-to-40 blood meals per day.

• Continue for 30 days after the first frost as a temperature bounce-back could allow additional horn fly generations to develop.

In one to two days eggs hatch into larvae

• Check mineral consumption and increase or decrease the number of feeders, or move them if necessary, to adjust for proper consumption.

Right Now® Emerald

Pupae molt into adults in six to eight days. Altosid® IGR breaks the life cycle preventing adults from emerging. In three to five days the larvae molt into pupae

"Always read and follow label directions. Altosid and the cow head design are registered trademarks of Wellmark International."


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Meeting the Minister Manitoba Beef Producers officials met with Federal Minister of International Trade Diversification Hon. Jim Carr to discuss various matters. From left: MBP policy analyst Maureen Cousins, MBP Vice-President Gord Adams, Hon. Jim Carr, and MBP general manager Brian Lemon.

Show your 4-H colours day coming up This November 7, 4-H Canada is calling on all supporters to share their 4-H pride by participating in Canada’s annual Show Your 4-H Colours Day. 4-H’ers across the country are encouraged to dig into their closets, pull out their favourite green clothing, wear it for the day, and join more than 32,000 4-H youth members and volunteer leaders – along with tens of thousands of alumni, government leaders and partners – in celebrating one of Canada’s leading positive youth development organizations. In addition to wearing green, as a proud 4-H’er you can show the world what 4-H means to you by visiting www.showyour4hcolours.ca. Here you can share your own stories, photos and videos on the impact of 4-H in your life and why you support 4-H in

your community, in your country, and around the world. You can also demonstrate your 4-H pride by using the #ShowYour4HColours hashtag to share your thoughts and experiences. Show Your 4-H Colours Day on November 7 is just one of many activities

taking place, with green continuing as the theme for the entire month of November. Landmarks across Canada – including Toronto’s iconic CN Tower and Vancouver City Hall – will be lighting up in green in support of 4-H. “Show Your 4-H Colours is the best possible way to share the positive impact 4-H has had on your life,” said 4-H Canada CEO, Shannon Benner. “We encourage everyone to get out into your communities and use social media to tell your story, so that others can learn about 4-H, its values, and our deep commitment to positive youth development.” To learn more about Show Your 4-H Colours Day, visit www.showyour4hcolours.ca or follow @4HCanada on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using the #ShowYour4HColours hashtag.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Don't Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to mbfiinfo@gmail.com to sign up.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Carcass defects cost industry an estimated $110 million By Beef Cattle Research Council — Beef quality defects, like bruises and lesions, cause economic losses to the Canadian beef industry due to reductions in usable meat and the added labour to remove these defects from the carcass. A video (see link below, click on link to access it) from a new video series on the results of the latest National Beef Quality Audit (NBQA) provides the answers to which carcass defects the beef industry has improved upon since the previous audit and the areas we as an industry need to work on. The ultimate objective of the NBQA is to enhance the quality and safety of Canadian beef while increasing the profitability of the Canadian beef and cattle industry. The NBQA results indicate the overall cost of carcass defects has increased 15 per cent to $85/head on fed cattle and increased by five per cent to $47/head on non-fed cattle. By assigning dollar values to the various defects, those with the greatest expense to the industry can be identified. This informs the areas to be tackled first through research or through communications about prevention.

Improvements made since the previous NBQA: The number of cattle with horns continues to decrease and is now considered to be below 10 per cent. The number of cattle with brands has decreased to 13 per cent. (The number of branded non-fed cattle has decreased, but the number of branded fed cattle has increased.) Bruises in non-fed cattle has decreased significantly from 86 per cent to 63 per cent. Areas that require improvement: • Injection site lesions have increased significantly in both fed and non-fed cattle. • Hide manure and mud (tag) percentage has increased (which may be due to seasonal weather). • Liver abscesses have increased in both fed and non-fed cattle. The economic loss from liver discounts alone in 2016 is estimated at $20.98/head for all cattle, with a total industry loss of $61.2 million.

Click on photo to access video link: https://youtu.be/VFg4jcxbdUc


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Help us tell your story Send us photos and videos from your farm

Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry. If you are interested, please send them to Manitoba Beef Producers Communications Coordinator Keith Borkowsky by email: kborkowsky@mbbeef.ca


mbbeef.ca

September 28, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Hon. Gerry Ritz agrees to be Keynote Speaker at MBP's 40th AGM in Brandon

You don't want to miss this one!

Registration will soon open for Manitoba Beef Producers' 40th AGM. Former federal agriculture minister Hon. Gerry Ritz has agreed to attend as a keynote speaker.

Find Us Online @ManitobaBeef

@ManitobaBeefProducers1

mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

District meetings begin Oct. 22 Three MBP director positions open this fall Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is seeking to fill three positions on its board of directors during its 2018 fall district meetings which kick off later this month. The retiring directors are Ramona Blyth, District 5; Larry Gerelus, District 7; and, Ben Fox, District 13. The first of 14 meetings kicks off Oct. 22 as MBP members gather at the Ashern Legion. MBP President Tom Teichroeb encourages interested beef producers to think about running for one of the three director vacancies. “MBP’s board of directors undertakes a lot of important work on behalf of the province’s beef industry, including the cow/calf, backgrounding and finishing sectors,” Teichroeb says. “It is important that we have strong representation from all these sectors around MBP’s board table to help inform our decision making on behalf of our fellow beef producers. This is especially important as we seek to grow our industry.”

Teichroeb adds that MBP directors not only have the opportunity to represent beef producers’ interests within the province, but also nationally. For example, MBP directors participate on the boards of organizations such as the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association, Canadian Cattle Identification Agency, and the Beef Cattle Research Council, among others. “MBP’s board and staff work on a wide range of topics, including business risk management programs, wildlife management, livestock traceability, sustainability initiatives, trade, research, water management and many, many more,” notes Teichroeb. “By working together we are creating a stronger industry for producers.” MBP members interested in becoming a director and learning more about the position should contact their local director or the MBP office. Current directors’ contact information can be found at http://www.mbbeef. ca/about-mbp/board-and-staff/ or call 1-800-772-0458.

Along with the director elections in odd-numbered districts, the meetings will include a look back at MBP’s finances for the past year, as well as review of some of the association’s activities on behalf of members. Other topics, such as pending changes to prescription requirements and the need for producers to have a valid client patient relationship with their veterinarian will also be discussed. “The district meetings are extremely valuable for MBP, providing us with direct input and ideas from farmers and ranchers about matters affecting their operations,” MBP General Manager Brian Lemon said. “We strongly urge producers to attend the meetings and to have their say in the future of MBP. I look forward to hearing from and speaking with all those in attendance.” All meetings begin at 6 p.m. with a free beef on a bun supper. For more information please go to mbbeef.ca or contact the MBP office at 1-800-7720458.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s beef industry • Fall run heats up • Cargill's Sustainability Pilot Yields +1 Million Pounds Of Beef in 3Q • Canadian Cattlemen's Association Welcomes Progress Made on CPTPP • Be more assertive in talking-up red meat’s sustainability credentials, producers urged • New standardized beef grading system could help exports

Manitoba’s Controlled Crop Residue Burning Program

Always Call Before You Burn

1-800-265-1233 Stubble burning restrictions

Manitoba’s crop residue burning regulation restricts daytime burning between August 1 and November 15. Burning at night is illegal. Burning within Burning Permit Areas requires a permit issued by Manitoba Sustainable Development. If you do not comply, you may be fined as much as $50,000.

If you must burn, be responsible Before you burn straw, stubble or chaff this fall, call 1-800-265-1233 or visit manitoba.ca to find out whether burning is allowed in your area that day. Burning is permitted only on days when the weather conditions allow for effective smoke dispersion. It is essential that you make sure appropriate fireguards are in place during a burn and you must supervise your fires at all times.

Consider the alternatives In most years, crop residue management practices can reduce or eliminate the need to burn. For more information, contact your local Manitoba Agriculture office or visit manitoba.ca.


mbbeef.ca MBP E-Newsletter

®

Right Now Emerald with Altosid IGR

®

fly control mineral for beef cattle on pasture For more information, visit your local Cargill dealer or call Doug Allison at 204.724.2652

the 30 - 30 method for horn fly control proven to

BREAK THE LIFE CYCLE

30 Days after the first frost

Left untreated, a few adult horn flies can quickly explode to a population of 4,000 flies or more per animal. Feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR using the 30/30 formula prevents flies from multiplying, successfully breaking their life cycle. 30 Days before emergence

• Continue feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR for 30 days after the first frost to help prevent horn flies from overwintering again. Exposing horn fly larvae to Altosid® IGR can reduce the number of overwintering pupae.

• Horn files overwinter in the pupal stage and jump start adult populations in the Spring.

• Begin feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR 30 days before overwintering flies emerge. Horn flies emerge in the spring when the average daily temperatures reach 18°C (65°F) • Put out a five-to-seven-day supply of the mineral near watering holes or loafing areas, allowing one feeder for every 15-20 animals.

Female flies leave the animal for a few seconds to lay eggs in manure less than five minutes old.

Adult horn flies live two-to-four weeks taking 20-to-40 blood meals per day.

• Continue for 30 days after the first frost as a temperature bounce-back could allow additional horn fly generations to develop.

In one to two days eggs hatch into larvae

• Check mineral consumption and increase or decrease the number of feeders, or move them if necessary, to adjust for proper consumption.

Right Now® Emerald

Pupae molt into adults in six to eight days. Altosid® IGR breaks the life cycle preventing adults from emerging. In three to five days the larvae molt into pupae

"Always read and follow label directions. Altosid and the cow head design are registered trademarks of Wellmark International."


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

SARPAL Town Hall planned for Hartney on Oct. 10 Manitoba Beef Producers is hosting a SARPAL information Town Hall in Hartney on Oct. 10, at the Community Hall from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. The event is intended to provide information about existing SARPAL projects in Manitoba, and the benefits the projects, as well as grassland grazing by livestock provide to the overall environment. Also on the proposed agenda

is a discussion on how SARPAL diversity. projects in Saskatchewan opA free Beef on a Bun superate, as well as how SARPAL per will be provided to those projects impact endangered attending. bird species and support bioAdmission is free.

Don't Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to mbfiinfo@gmail.com to sign up.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Assoc. of Manitoba Community Pastures develops Environmental Farm Plans By Barry Ross, General Manager In early August of this year the Governments of Canada and Manitoba announced new funding opportunities for the Association of Manitoba Community Pastures (AMCP) under the new Canadian Agricultural Partnership related to improved forage and pasture quality and riparian area management. As a component of the funding, AMCP is obtaining Environmental Farm Plan certification for each of the pastures under its management: Alonsa, Bield, Birch River-Lenswood, Cote-San Clara, Ellice-Archie, Ethelbert, Gardenton-Pansy, Langford, Libau, McCreary, Mulvihill, Narcisse, Spy Hill-Ellice, Sylvan-Dale, Turtle Mountain, and Wallace. Within two weeks of the government announcement, Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) facilitators from Manitoba Agriculture had organized and delivered a workshop for AMCP Pasture Managers – the first time that the EFP process and certification have been made available for the

Association of Manitoba Community Pastures. Similar to the process for private producers, each Community Pasture Manager will develop a confidential five-year environmental plan outlining management activities that support the long term health of the community pastures with a view to ensuring continued economic viability. Representatives from the Keystone Agricultural Producers review each workplan and issue the Statement of Completion certificate. To support the implementation of the EFPs, the Governments of Manitoba and Canada have made funding available for best management practices such as managing livestock access to riparian areas, enhancing forage quality, and managing brush control. Not only is the funding a direct benefit for the Association of Manitoba Community Pastures, it also benefits the over 350 livestock producers who make use of the community pasture program every year.

About the Association of Manitoba Community Pastures The Association of Manitoba Community Pastures (AMCP) is a not-forprofit producer-led organization unparalleled in Manitoba. Its mandate is to sustainably manage productive and biodiverse rangelands enhanced by livestock production. Located in all corners of agro-Manitoba, AMCP’s 20 Community Pastures provide grazing lands and animal care throughout the grazing season. Over 40,000 head of livestock graze the Community Pastures annually from local livestock producers over some of the largest tracts of native prairie remaining in the province. Applications are being accepted for the 2019 grazing season and are available on AMCP’s website at pastures. ca. 2019 rates will be held at 2018 levels - 75 cents per day for yearling cattle, mature cows, bulls, horses for a minimum 100 days; and a $40 seasonal fee per calf. The deadline for applications is November 1.

Recently, workshop attendees were offered instruction on Environmental Farm Plans. (Submitted)


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Manitoba Agriculture ADM honoured by Government of Japan for improving ties PROVINCE OF MANITOBA PRESS RELEASE — Dori Gingera-Beauchemin, deputy minister for Manitoba Agriculture, is being recognized for her work on Manitoba–Japan relations at an awards ceremony hosted by Consul-General Shigenobu Kobayashi on behalf of the Japan Foreign Ministry tomorrow in Winnipeg, Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler announced today. “Our government is beyond proud of the work that Dori does on a daily basis, showcasing the agriculture industry across the province, across the country and around the world,” Eichler said. “This award, bestowed by the people of Japan, shows the work Dori does not only impacts Manitoba producers, but producers across the country and around the world.” The Foreign Minister’s Commendations are awarded to individuals and groups with outstanding

achievements in international fields, in order to acknowledge their contributions to the promotion of friendship between Japan and other countries. The commendations also help inform the Japanese public about the activities of the recipients. Gingera-Beauchemin was recognized for being a critical player in the creation of the 4-H Manitoba– Japan Homestay program. Since 1987, 726 Japanese students and chaperones have been hosted by Manitoba 4-H families and enjoyed authentic Manitoba summer experiences including community events, outdoor recreation and host families’ cultural traditions. To date, nearly 200 Manitoba students and their chaperones have travelled to Japan every second year for a two-week homestay, which includes tours of agricultural and other cultural sites.

“We are so glad that Dori is being recognized for a project she believes so passionately in,” said Carlie Whetter, president of the Manitoba 4-H Council. “She has been a champion of the Manitoba– Japan Homestay program over the course of 30 plus years, and shares her understanding and respect for the Japanese culture with those around her.” Gingera-Beauchemin joined Manitoba Agriculture as an assistant agricultural representative summer student. In 1979, she joined the department full-time as a 4-H and youth specialist in Beausejour and in 1984, became the chief of the Manitoba 4-H Program. Since 1993, Gingera-Beauchemin has held a number of senior level positions within the department and has been the deputy minister for Manitoba Agriculture since March 2013.

Show your 4-H colours day coming up This November 7, 4-H Canada is calling on all supporters to share their 4-H pride by participating in Canada’s annual Show Your 4-H Colours Day. 4-H’ers across the country are encouraged to dig into their closets, pull out their favourite green clothing, wear it for the day, and join more than 32,000 4-H youth members and volunteer leaders – along with tens of thousands of alumni, government leaders and partners – in celebrating one of Canada’s leading positive youth development organizations. In addition to wearing green, as a proud 4-H’er you can show the world what 4-H means to you by visiting www.showyour4hcolours.ca. Here you can share your own stories, photos and videos on the impact of 4-H in your life and why you support 4-H in

your community, in your country, and around the world. You can also demonstrate your 4-H pride by using the #ShowYour4HColours hashtag to share your thoughts and experiences. Show Your 4-H Colours Day on November 7 is just one of many activities

taking place, with green continuing as the theme for the entire month of November. Landmarks across Canada – including Toronto’s iconic CN Tower and Vancouver City Hall – will be lighting up in green in support of 4-H. “Show Your 4-H Colours is the best possible way to share the positive impact 4-H has had on your life,” said 4-H Canada CEO, Shannon Benner. “We encourage everyone to get out into your communities and use social media to tell your story, so that others can learn about 4-H, its values, and our deep commitment to positive youth development.” To learn more about Show Your 4-H Colours Day, visit www.showyour4hcolours.ca or follow @4HCanada on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using the #ShowYour4HColours hashtag.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Help us tell your story Send us photos and videos from your farm

Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry. If you are interested, please send them to Manitoba Beef Producers Communications Coordinator Keith Borkowsky by email: kborkowsky@mbbeef.ca


mbbeef.ca

September 14, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Cattle producers have more funding options to combat dry conditions Province of Manitoba — The Manitoba government is taking another step to help livestock producers who have been affected by dry conditions across the province, Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler announced today. “Manitoba Agriculture supports our livestock sector across the province, and we recognize that many areas are feeling the effects of the hot, dry summer,” said Eichler. “Effective management of both surface and groundwater sources used for livestock production is essential for ensuring the health and longevity of the livestock, pastures and associated water sources.” Ag Action Manitoba – Assurance: Beneficial Management Practices provides targeted incentive programming to agricultural producers and select industry service providers to advance the adoption of beneficial management practices (BMPs) that reduce identified environmental risks, improve agro-ecosystem resilience, build public trust and improve environmental sustainability of farm options in Manitoba. The Managing Livestock Access to Riparian Areas BMP provides funding for livestock producers to protect surface water. Recognizing that limiting livestock access to surface water may require alternate water sources, clarifications

have been made to the BMP to enable funding for water source development. New eligible costs to the BMP include: • water source development – wells; drilling new or deepening existing wells, test hole drilling, screening, casing, well caps, etc.;water pumps and required plumbing components; and professional and contractor fees. • water source development – dugouts;constructing new or rehabilitating existing dugouts, test hole drilling, etc.; and professional and contractor fees. To be eligible for funding under Ag Action Manitoba – Assurance: Beneficial Management Practices, applicants are required to complete an Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) to assist them to manage risk on their farm operations with respect to water quality and supply, soil health, air quality and biodiversity. Producers have until Feb. 15, 2019, to submit their EFP Statement of Completion.

Continued to Page 2

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In the News Applications for funding A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Cattle volumes on lighter side as fall run draws near • Four options to help deal with a feed shortage • Spotty cellphone coverage a dangerous fact of life on the farm • What we learned from the Canada Beef Quality Audit

programs now accepted From Page 1 Applications for several BMPs will be accepted on a continual basis throughout the fall, the minister said. “Weather conditions have created a challenging summer for many livestock producers across the Prairies. I commend Minister Eichler for launching this program to help Manitoban producers improve the

environmental sustainability of their operations,” federal Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay said today. Producers can contact their local Manitoba Agriculture office or call the department (toll-free) at 1-84-GROW-MB-AG (1-844-7696224) for more information on any of these programs and services or go to www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture under Quick Links.

IJC seeks public input into Souris River Basin study International Joint Commission — The Public Advisory Group of the International Souris River Study Board has created a public survey to better understand the impacts and benefits to communities in different parts of the basin as flows increase and water levels reach different elevations. Please share this questionnaire in

your networks and help us get important feedback on water levels along the Souris River. Responses are requested at the end of September 2018. Link to online questionnaire: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ ISRSB_PAG_Questionnaire Or view it on the IJC Facebook page.

Don't Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to mbfiinfo@gmail.com to sign up.


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Help us tell your story Send us photos and videos from your farm

Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry. If you are interested, please send them to Manitoba Beef Producers Communications Coordinator Keith Borkowsky by email: kborkowsky@mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Designated Regions for 2018 under the Livestock Tax Deferral Provision named Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada News Release — Extreme weather conditions have caused feed shortfalls in several provinces, which has led to designated regions in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Quebec being eligible for livestock tax deferral provision. "This year’s growing conditions across several provinces have brought many challenges to Canadian livestock producers. The Government has prioritized the approval of the Livestock Tax deferral to give farmers more certainty about their financial situation and help them keep their businesses strong, while growing the economy and strengthening the middle class," said Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. The Federal Government released an initial list of these designated regions where livestock tax deferral has been authorized for 2018 due to drought or excess moisture conditions. The livestock tax deferral provisions allow livestock producers in prescribed drought, flood or excess moisture regions to defer a portion of their 2018 sale proceeds of breeding livestock until 2019 to help replenish the herd. The cost of replacing the animals in 2019 will offset the deferred income, thereby reducing the tax burden associated with the original sale. Eligibility for the tax deferral is limited to those producers located inside the designated prescribed areas. Producers in those regions can request the tax deferral when filing

their 2018 income tax returns. Quick facts • Low moisture levels resulted in significant forage shortages for livestock producers in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Quebec in 2018. One option for producers is to reduce their breeding herd in order to manage feed supplies. • In addition to the livestock tax deferral provision, producers have access to assistance through existing Canadian Agricultural Partnership Business Risk Management programs, which include AgriInsurance, AgriStability and AgriInvest. Related products • Livestock Tax Deferral Provision - Designated Areas Eligible for 2018 Designated Municipalities in Manitoba – 2018 Livestock Tax Deferral 1. Alexander 2. Argyle 3. Armstrong 4. Bifrost-Riverton 5. Boissevain-Morton 6. Brenda-Waskada 7. Brokenhead 8. Cartier 9. Cartwright-Roblin 10. Coldwell 11. De Salaberry 12. Deloraine-Winchester 13. Division No. 18, Unorganized, East Part 14. Dufferin 15. Elton 16. Emerson-Franklin 17. Fisher 18. Gimli 19. Glenboro-South Cypress 20. Grahamdale

21. 22. 23. 24. 25. tain 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63.

Grassland Grey Hanover Headingley Killarney - Turtle MounLa Broquerie Lorne Louise Macdonald Montcalm Morris Norfolk-Treherne North Cypress-Langford North Norfolk Oakland-Wawanesa Pembina Piney Portage la Prairie Prairie Lakes Rhineland Ritchot Rockwood Roland Rosser Souris-Glenwood Springfield St. Andrews St. Clements St. François Xavier St. Laurent Stanley Ste. Anne Stuartburn Taché Thompson Two Borders Victoria West Interlake West St. Paul WestLake-Gladstone Whitehead City of Winnipeg Woodlands


mbbeef.ca MBP E-Newsletter

®

Right Now Emerald with Altosid IGR

®

fly control mineral for beef cattle on pasture For more information, visit your local Cargill dealer or call Doug Allison at 204.724.2652

the 30 - 30 method for horn fly control proven to

BREAK THE LIFE CYCLE

30 Days after the first frost

Left untreated, a few adult horn flies can quickly explode to a population of 4,000 flies or more per animal. Feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR using the 30/30 formula prevents flies from multiplying, successfully breaking their life cycle. 30 Days before emergence

• Continue feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR for 30 days after the first frost to help prevent horn flies from overwintering again. Exposing horn fly larvae to Altosid® IGR can reduce the number of overwintering pupae.

• Horn files overwinter in the pupal stage and jump start adult populations in the Spring.

• Begin feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR 30 days before overwintering flies emerge. Horn flies emerge in the spring when the average daily temperatures reach 18°C (65°F) • Put out a five-to-seven-day supply of the mineral near watering holes or loafing areas, allowing one feeder for every 15-20 animals.

Female flies leave the animal for a few seconds to lay eggs in manure less than five minutes old.

Adult horn flies live two-to-four weeks taking 20-to-40 blood meals per day.

• Continue for 30 days after the first frost as a temperature bounce-back could allow additional horn fly generations to develop.

In one to two days eggs hatch into larvae

• Check mineral consumption and increase or decrease the number of feeders, or move them if necessary, to adjust for proper consumption.

Right Now® Emerald

Pupae molt into adults in six to eight days. Altosid® IGR breaks the life cycle preventing adults from emerging. In three to five days the larvae molt into pupae

"Always read and follow label directions. Altosid and the cow head design are registered trademarks of Wellmark International."


MBP E-Newsletter

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MBFI Hires New General Manager By Duncan Morrison Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives (MBFI) bolted into the busy fall season with a surge of great news announcements. Firstly, the long-awaited grand opening of the MBFI Learning Centre in late August at the MBFI Brookdale site provided a great stage for the Canada and Manitoba governments to announce that they are investing $2.85 million over the next five years at MBFI to support the sustainable growth of the livestock sector. The buzz around the Learning Centre and the governments’ funding announcement had barely subsided when MBFI announced the hiring of MaryJane Orr as the new MBFI general manager. Orr will oversee all aspects of the three MBFI research and demonstration sites near Brandon at Brookdale Farm, First Street Pasture and Johnson Farm, as well as the new MBFI Learning Centre. MBFI is a partnership between Manitoba Agriculture, Manitoba Beef Producers, Ducks Unlimited Canada and the Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association. “The competition for our general manager’s position was really intense and we congratulate all the candidates who interviewed for the position,” said Ramona Blyth, MBFI chair. “Mary-Jane’s areas of expertise and experience were a really great fit for MBFI. We are thrilled to have Mary-Jane on board.” Orr comes from a background of mixed farming, growing up on a small cow-calf operation near Carberry, MB. Throughout Orr’s career, she has had strong interests in the intersection of agricultural

Mary-Jane Orr industry and environmental stewardship, including recent work with David Rourke in Minto, MB to initiate development of an on-farm research & learning hub, targeting regenerative practices for annual crop production with livestock integration. Orr also gained Manitoba agricultural industry perspective working as a Nutrient Management Specialist based in La Broquerie for Hylife Ltd. “I am elated to be joining the team at MBFI, and truly honoured to have the opportunity to build on a framework created by dedicated partners and outstanding staff,” said Orr. “I am looking forward to engaging with producers, the

research community, and Manitoba extension specialists to drive innovation through demonstration, applied, and peer-reviewed research to meet challenges facing Manitoba producers.” Academically, Orr received a Doctor of Philosophy, Department of Agronomy (Soil Microbiology), from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana U.S.A after graduating with Bachelor of Science, with honors, Major in Botany from Brandon University.

Continued to next page


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New MBFI GM on site supporting work From Page 1 Orr also worked as a postdoctoral associate at Purdue University on sustainable bioenergy and conservation cropping systems before returning to Manitoba. The vast potential of the MBFI Learning Centre hit very close to home for the well-educated Orr. “The multi-use space in the newly opened Learning Center is especially exciting for the promotion of education in beef cattle and forage production across diverse groups and all ages,” said Orr. “I am eager to be a part of MBFI’s unique role as a centre of agricultural innovation and to facilitate its mission of building social awareness, benefiting ecosystems, and improving

producer profitability.” MBFI currently has 27 research projects underway led by researchers and staff from Manitoba Agriculture, the University of Manitoba, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Brandon University and University of Winnipeg. Blyth said the hiring of the MBFI general manager was a priority for the organization as it now heads into Year Four of operations, extension, and research at the three MBFI sites. Blyth acknowledged the work and support of past MBFI general managers Melinda German, Carollyne Kehler, Tod Wallace and Shawn Cabak in helping position MBFI for the times ahead. Blyth also had kind words for MBFI senior staffers Kristelle Harper, Leah

Rodvang and Warren Boles for their hard work and leadership, especially during the hiring process. Blyth said Orr’s familiarity with Manitoba producers combined with Orr’s professional expertise, research background, and academic resume will bode well for MBFI. “Basically, Mary-Jane’s ability, education and personality check off all the key boxes within our MBFI priority areas,” said Blyth. “On top of that, we believe Mary-Jane will be a valuable mentor to our staff, including our summer students. MBFI takes great pride in giving Manitoba students that are pursuing agricultural careers a great place to further and enhance their careers in the forage and livestock sector.”

Manitoba’s Controlled Crop Residue Burning Program

Always Call Before You Burn

1-800-265-1233 Stubble burning restrictions

Manitoba’s crop residue burning regulation restricts daytime burning between August 1 and November 15. Burning at night is illegal. Burning within Burning Permit Areas requires a permit issued by Manitoba Sustainable Development. If you do not comply, you may be fined as much as $50,000.

If you must burn, be responsible Before you burn straw, stubble or chaff this fall, call 1-800-265-1233 or visit manitoba.ca to find out whether burning is allowed in your area that day. Burning is permitted only on days when the weather conditions allow for effective smoke dispersion. It is essential that you make sure appropriate fireguards are in place during a burn and you must supervise your fires at all times.

Consider the alternatives In most years, crop residue management practices can reduce or eliminate the need to burn. For more information, contact your local Manitoba Agriculture office or visit manitoba.ca.


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mbbeef.ca

To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


mbbeef.ca

Aug. 22, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBFI Learning Centre opens

RM of Elton Coun. Cameron Hales, Dauphin-Swan River-Neepawa MP Bob Sopuck, MBFI President Ramona Blyth, Manitoba Minister of Agriculture Ralph Eichler and Brandon Mayor Rick Chrest cut the ribbon on Aug. 21, officially opening the $500,000 Learning Centre near Brookdale. For full coverage and photos, please see Page 2. (Photo by Keith Borkowsky)

Find Us Online @ManitobaBeef

@ManitobaBeefProducers1

mbbeef.ca


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At far right, MBFI president Ramona Blyth speaks to a packed hall at the Grand Opening of the MBFI Learning Centre at the Brookdale farm site north of Brandon. (Photo by Keith Borkowsky)

Centre to showcase forage research BY MBFI — Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives (MBFI) officially opened the new Learning Centre at the MBFI Brookdale Farm north of Brandon on Aug. 21. Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives (MBFI) is a partnership between Manitoba Agriculture, Manitoba Beef Producers, Ducks Unlimited Canada and the Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association. As a critical piece to three MBFI research and demonstration sites at Brookdale Farm, First Street Pasture and Johnson Farm, the new MBFI Learning Centre will allow Manitoba and Western Canada agricultural producers and the general public to learn with and from producers, researchers, experts on the subjects of forage and livestock production and innovation.

“The MBFI Learning Center will act as a hub to host and create opportunities for producers, students and the general public to gather, learn and network,” says Ramona Blyth, MBFI president. “We now have the ability to provide a comfortable learning environment in the MBFI Learning Centre that can be paired with hands-on learning from MBFI researchers in our fields to represent a valuable experiential experience for visitors to MBFI.” The new facility includes a 2,200-square-foot classroom, internet access and audiovisual equipment for distance learning, and a food preparation area. Offices and an interpretive gallery are to be added at a later date. The $500,000 project was built

with a combination of federal and provincial government funding through the Growing Forward 2 program and private-sector contributions that has positioned MBFI for bright days ahead. “MBFI is a partnership we are all proud of and the addition of the MBFI Learning Centre is a great representation of the potential and success of our partnership” says Blyth. “However, without the generous support of Agriculture and AgriFood Canada and Manitoba Agriculture as well as private funders like Federated Cooperatives Ltd, Manitoba Zero Till Research Association, Farm Credit Canada, DLF Pickseed and others, we would not be here today. We are grateful to all our supporters and funders for their role in bringing us to this excellent position.”


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Terrible trade wars erupting • Culling cattle for drought • Adapting the adaptive grazing program • $500K  facility to aid forage, livestock production

Manitoba Beef Producers Directors Peter Penner (left) and Kris Kristjanson (right) met Dancing Gabe at the Winnipeg Blue Bombers game on Aug. 10. (Photo by Keith Borkowsky)

Put Your Environmental Farm Plan into Action Apply now for funding to help implement environmental beneficial management practices.

Deadline is September 3, 2018

Manitoba Agriculture Website: MB Beef Producers E-Newsletter


MBP E-Newsletter

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Producers gain temporary access to cut hay and graze animals on Crown land Province of Manitoba — Livestock producers will temporarily be allowed to cut hay and allow animals to graze on Crown land not normally designated for agricultural use due to dry conditions across parts of the province, Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler announced today. “Pastures and forage crops in parts of Manitoba have been greatly affected by low levels of rain and dry soils this summer,” said Eichler. “By providing producers with additional options, such as access to Crown land, we are easing the burden on farmers who are seeing low yields on forage crops.” Under certain circumstances, Crown land can be made available for agricultural use. The Agricultural Crown Lands Leasing program will administer the use of available land and provide necessary permits. Livestock must be removed when the naturally existing forage is exhausted or by Oct. 31, 2018. Baled hay must be removed by Nov. 15, 2018. “With many beef producers facing poor pasture conditions and a shortage of feed, having the ability to graze and hay these Crown lands is both necessary and welcomed,” said Tom Teichroeb, interim president, Manitoba Beef Producers. “Cattle grazing inside these wildlife management areas can deliver important conservation benefits as well as be an important strategy during times of feed shortages.” Manitoba Agriculture provides a number of additional tools and resources for producers affected by dry conditions which can be found at www.gov.mb.ca/ agriculture/livestock/beef/index.html#resources. The

resources include the Manitoba hay listing service, information on managing pastures during dry conditions, alternative feed for beef cattle and options to stretch feed when supplies are tight. Producers with AgriInsurance contracts who intend to put their crop to alternate use are required to contact the Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC) office to arrange for a field appraisal prior to harvesting the crop. Crop producers should also consider making crop residue available to livestock producers. Manitoba also provides risk management programs under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership, which help producers to manage production and price risk. These include: • Forage insurance under the AgriInsurance program, which insures hay and pasture production and establishment against potential losses. Producers can check their 2018 coverage and learn more at www. masc.mb.ca or by calling their local MASC office. • The Western Livestock Price Insurance Program, which provides a range of coverage and policy options to help manage price risk and protect against volatility in the marketplace. Producers can purchase price insurance year-round for their feeder and fed cattle. More information is available at www.wlpip.ca. Producers can contact their local Manitoba Agriculture office or call the department toll-free at 1-84-GROW-MB-AG (1-844-769-6224) for more information on any of these programs and services or go to www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture under Quick Links.

Don't Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to mbfiinfo@gmail.com to sign up.


mbbeef.ca MBP E-Newsletter

®

Right Now Emerald with Altosid IGR

®

fly control mineral for beef cattle on pasture For more information, visit your local Cargill dealer or call Doug Allison at 204.724.2652

the 30 - 30 method for horn fly control proven to

BREAK THE LIFE CYCLE

30 Days after the first frost

Left untreated, a few adult horn flies can quickly explode to a population of 4,000 flies or more per animal. Feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR using the 30/30 formula prevents flies from multiplying, successfully breaking their life cycle. 30 Days before emergence

• Continue feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR for 30 days after the first frost to help prevent horn flies from overwintering again. Exposing horn fly larvae to Altosid® IGR can reduce the number of overwintering pupae.

• Horn files overwinter in the pupal stage and jump start adult populations in the Spring.

• Begin feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR 30 days before overwintering flies emerge. Horn flies emerge in the spring when the average daily temperatures reach 18°C (65°F) • Put out a five-to-seven-day supply of the mineral near watering holes or loafing areas, allowing one feeder for every 15-20 animals.

Female flies leave the animal for a few seconds to lay eggs in manure less than five minutes old.

Adult horn flies live two-to-four weeks taking 20-to-40 blood meals per day.

• Continue for 30 days after the first frost as a temperature bounce-back could allow additional horn fly generations to develop.

In one to two days eggs hatch into larvae

• Check mineral consumption and increase or decrease the number of feeders, or move them if necessary, to adjust for proper consumption.

Right Now® Emerald

Pupae molt into adults in six to eight days. Altosid® IGR breaks the life cycle preventing adults from emerging. In three to five days the larvae molt into pupae

"Always read and follow label directions. Altosid and the cow head design are registered trademarks of Wellmark International."


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Province’s Hay Situation calls for wise planning Dryness across province signals necessary preparations for fall and winter feeding periods By Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association — While weekend rains might help things in some regions, Manitoba hay producers have been increasingly reporting decreased hay yields and slow regrowth due to previous dry conditions. Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association (MFGA) is reminding all producers that now is the time to plan ahead for the fall and winter feeding periods. “It looks like our weather extremes have taken a turn to the drier side of things over the past year in Manitoba as well as Saskatchewan and North Dakota,” says Darren Chapman, MFGA Chair and Virden-area producer. “We all need to prepare a plan for the rest of this season and forthcoming winter feeding requirements. This will require some tough decisions, but necessary ones.” John McGregor, MFGA’s hay expert and Green Gold Program lead, has been keeping tabs on the provincial scene. He agrees with Chapman. “Fall pasture growth often provides additional opportunity for grazing livestock. However, careful management of pastures is essential for the over-wintering of forages and improvement into the next growing season,” says McGregor. “The dry summer this year has stunted fall pasture regrowth dramatically and for many producers, feed supplementation will be necessary. “ Rains fell in various areas over the course of July and early August which may have aided some pastures and hay fields in some regions. That will be relief for some, says McGregor, but the overall

MFGA’s Top Ten Tips: Prepping for Fall and Winter in dry times

1. Start to consider annual crop fields to cut as green feed and to bale straw off. 2. Line-up corn fields to take as silage, or having producers drop the stalks so they can be baled. 3. Electric fencing on corn fields for grazing the stover. 4. Weaning early to reduce feed requirements. 5. Reduce need for feed via herd management such as preg-checking cows to determine energy needs. 6. Buying feed in advance. 7. Feed to real weights. It's important to only feed enough hay to support the true weight of the cows in the herd. 8. Feed the right amount of hay and meet the nutritional needs at different stages of life. 9. Use Supplement and look for alternative feed sources. 10. Feed test your feed and balance your rations.

provincial picture leans toward a reduced hay yield heading into fall and winter. “Most alfalfa growers have completed their second cut of alfalfa and many producers have the first cut of hay just finished or are close to finished,” says McGregor. “The continued dry conditions have had a drastic effect on both yield and regrowth. Producers across the province are reporting yields in the 40-60 per cent of normal range with very limited re-growth. Without additional moisture many areas won’t have the opportunity to take a second cut of hay which will affect hay supplies for the coming fall

and winter feeding period.” Shawn Cabak, Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives interim general manager and Manitoba Agriculture forage and livestock specialist, said the yield from the first cut of 2018 was only around 40 per cent of what was baled in the first cut of 2017. He feels the same reduced outcomes as the first cut will happen with the second cut that is now under way. “Straw and grain will need to be sourced to help with feed supplies,” says Cabak. “The cattle will also come off of pasture earlier than normal at our MBFI Brookdale site. Grazing the riparian areas will help along with the polycrops and rye, vetch, triticale.” Dave Koslowsky is past chair of MFGA and runs a mixed farming operation near Killarney. Koslowsky says putting up and testing green feed is one sure-fire way to bridge the impacts of the dry growing season. “With all the green feed being put up, there is a need to promote feed testing,” says Koslowsky, who suggested interested producers contact Manitoba Agriculture for more details. When it comes to the impacts of supply and demand, one good source of pressure relief and information for Manitoba producers is Manitoba Agriculture’s Hay Listing Service that helps connect those looking for hay, pasture or alternative feed with those that have supplies available. The key, says Chapman, is acting now. And, Chapman stresses, don’t be worried about reaching out to peers and organizations like MFGA for advice and expertise.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Help us tell your story Send us photos and videos from your farm

Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry. If you are interested, please send them to Manitoba Beef Producers Communications Coordinator Keith Borkowsky by email: kborkowsky@mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

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Manitoba Youth Beef Round-up Results

The Manitoba Youth Beef Round-up was held in Neepawa Aug. 3-5, with 68 participants taking part in various competitions. The full results from this event are as follows. (Photo by Prairie Pistol Designs - Melissa McRae) Round-Up 2018 Committee: Lois McRae (Chairperson), Rilla & Travis Hunter, Wenda & Naomi Best, Blair McRae, Andrea Bertholet, Samantha Rimke, Albert & Michelle Rimke, Candace Johnston, Laura Horner, Jake Rawluk, Melissa McRae, Gracie and Katie Falconer, Adrianne Vandersluis, Nanette Glover, Jackie Cavers , Cody Carson and Nolan Glover. 2018 Results Showmanship Sponsored by Manitoba Beef Producers, Manitoba Angus, Manitoba Shorthorn and Manitoba Simmental Associations. Winner Hon. Mention Senior Justin Carvey Levi Rimke Intermediate Sam deRocquigny Claire Lavallee Junior Ty Nykoliation Joran Frey PeeWee Aklen Abey Declynn Allum Individual Judging Sponsored by Manitoba Charolais Assn. Winner Hon. Mention Senior Naomi Best Levi Rimke Intermediate Laine Muir Cody Carson Junior Nia Devonald Ty Nykoliation PeeWee Aklen Abey Ben Fox 2018 Round-Up Agribition Judging Team Sponsored by Manitoba Charolais Association Naomi Best, Kaitlyn Davey, Gracie Falconer, Orianna Hyndman and Levi Rimke, Team Judging Division Senior— Justin Carvey & Amanda Scott

Hon. Mention — Nolan Glover & Kaitlyn Davey Intermediate — Cody Carson & Rylee Paterson Hon. Mention — Royce Moellenbeck and Brooklyn Hedley Junior — Emma Fox & Ty Nykoliation Hon. Mention — Sully Fox and Nia Devonald PeeWee — Jagger Allum and Emily Murray Hon. Mention — Aklen Abey and Ben Fox Public Speaking Division Judge Austen Anderson and Dillon Hunter Winner Honourable Mention Senior Naomi Best Leah Graham Intermediate Laine Muir Royce Moellenbeck Junior Nia Devonald Fischer Cavers PeeWee Aklen Abey Emily Murray Photography Division Judge Melissa McRae Winner Honourable Mention Senior Orianna Hyndman Naomi Best Intermediate Emily Speers Sam deRocquigny Junior Lane Nykoliation Piper Bigney PeeWee Aklen Abey Declynn Allum Graphic Design Judge Katie Anderson Winner Senior Kaitlyn Davey Intermediate Cody Carson Junior Teegan Hyndman PeeWee Aklen Abey

Honourable Mention Naomi Best Sierra Inglis


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Manitoba Youth Beef Round-up Results Continued

Young Handlers Award — Brett Grieve Digger Award — Jonathan Karsin Art Division Judge Katie Anderson Winner Intermediate Cody Carson Junior Nathan deRocquigny PeeWee Declynn Allum

Hon. Mention Emma Harms Carson Baker Jagger Allum

Scrapbook Division Judge Katie Anderson Winner Honourable Mention Senior Orianna Hyndman Amanda Scott Intermediate Taylor Carlson Junior Teegan Hyndman Sierra Inglis PeeWee Aklen Abey Emily Murray Stall Card Winner Junior — Joran Frey PeeWee — Declynn Allum Stockman’s Knowledge Winner Senior Cindy Jack Intermediate Royce Moellenbeck Junior Emma Fox

Honourable Mention Angel Grieve Taylor Carlson Nia Devonald

2017 Bob Gordon Memorial Overall Stockman’s Knowledge Award presented in memory of Bob Gordon on behalf of the Gordon Family. Bob was a strong supporter of all Junior programs. Winner: Cindy Jack Cook-Off Sponsored by Enns Brothers Winner: Team 11 — Bobbi Foster, Sully Fox, Jaylin Hill, Hayden Bigney, Bree Russell and Lukas Cavers Honourable Mention: Team 1 —Naomi Best, Reegan Frey, Fischer Cavers, Sierra Inglis, and Zane Finlay Team Grooming Winner: Team 5 — Nolan Glover, Angel Grieve, Brooklyn Hedley, Emma Falconer, Hannah Mann and Aklen Abey. 2018 Round-Up Scholarship $1000 Recipient: Amanda Scott 2018 Herdsman Award — Sierra Inglis 2018 All Star Team Team 3 — Kaitlyn Davey, Elektra Breault, Garnett Speers, Piper Bigney and Rhett Sigurdson Grand Aggregate Sponsored by Enns Brothers Winner Honourable Mention Senior Naomi Best Kaitlyn Davey Intermediate Emily Speers Cody Carson Junior Ty Nykoliation Lane Nykoliation PeeWee Aklen Abey Declynn Allum Confirmation Class Results Angus Show Class 1 Angus heifer Calf 1. Lane Nykoliation, Crandall 2. Justin Carvey, Alexander 3. Emma Harms, Crystal City

Heifer Calf Champion: Lane Nykoliation with N7’s Blackwood Lady Reserve Grand Champion Heifer Calf: Justin Carvey with Swindon Ruby Tuesday Class 2A Angus bred heifers 1. Levi Best, Harding 2. Levi Best, Harding 3. Joran Frey, Oxbow, SK 4. Naomi Best, Harding Class 2 B Angus bred heifers 1. Lane Nykoliation, Crandall 2. Reegan Frey, Oxbow, SK 3. Emma Fox, Dauphin 4. Ty Nykoliation, Crandall 5. Dylan Frey, Oxbow, SK Junior Champion Female — Lane Nykoliation with N7’s Mary Kate Reserve Junior Champion — Levi Best with CHL Dolly 80E Class 3 Angus two year old with calf at foot 1. Justin Carvey, Alexander 2. Emma Harms, Crystal City Class 4 Angus Cow with calf at foot 1. Levi Best , Harding 2. Lane Nykoliation, Crandall Senior Female—Justin Carvey with Sunny Grove Ruby 48D Reserve Senior — Levi Best with CHL Karama 58C Grand Champion Angus Female — Justin Carvey with Sunny Grove Ruby 48D Reserve Grand Champion Angus Female —Levi Best with CHL Karama 58C Bull Calf Champion —Levi Best with CHL Big Interest 73F Hereford Show Grand Champion Heifer Calf — Teegan Hyndman with TEEG 23B Rosebud 810F Class 2A Hereford bred heifers 1. Levi Rimke, Oak Lake 2. Emma Falconer, Hartney 3. Orianna Hyndman, Hamiota 4. Bobbi Foster, Dropmore Junior Champion Hereford Female — Levi Rimke with MAR 719T Miss LA 16E Reserve Junior Champion Hereford Female – Emma Falconer with CCR 60B 1 ANH 45E Class 3 Two year old Hereford with calf at Side and Senior Champion Female 1. Levi Rimke, Oak Lake Grand Champion Hereford Female — Levi Rimke with CCR 7110 Felecity 59D Reserve Grand Champion Hereford Female — Levi Rimke with MAR 719T Miss LA 16E Class 5 – Hereford Bull Calf 1. Levi Rimke, Oak Lake 2. Teegan Hyndman, Hamiota Bull Calf Champion— Levi Rimke with MAR 21C Fred 6F Reserve Bull Calf Champion — Teegan Hyndman with TEEF 23B Fireball 811F


MBP E-Newsletter

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Manitoba Youth Beef Round-up Results Continued

Shorthorn Show Class 2A Shorthorn Bred Heifers 1. Royce Moellenbeck, Shellbrook,SK 2. Brooklyn Hedley, Rapid City 3. Orianna Hyndman, Hamiota 4. Rylee Paterson, Minnedosa 5. Sierra Inglis, Rapid City 6. Harleigh Carlson, Elm Creek 7. Taylor Carlson, Elm Creek Junior Champion Shorthorn Female — Royce Moellenbeck with Hawken Erica 6E Reserve Junior Champion Female — Brooklyn Hedley with Uphill Jessie 22E Class 3 Two year old Shorthorn female and calf at side 1. Sierra Inglis, Rapid City Class 4 Shorthorn Cow and calf at side 1. Brooklyn Hedley, Rapid City Grand Champion Shorthorn Female — Royce Moellenbeck with Hawken Erica 6E Reserve Grand Champion Female — Sierra Inglis with Hargrave Tiffaney 13D Class 5 Shorthorn Bull Calf 1. Brooklyn Hedley, Rapid City 2. Sierra Inglis Rapid City. Bull Calf Champion — Brooklyn Hedley with Hedley’s Manny 1F Reserve Bull Calf — Sierra Inglis with Little Valley Waylon 813F Simmental Show Class 1 Heifer Calf 1. Cody Carson, Rossburn Grand Champion Simmental Heifer Calf — Cody Carson with NAC Merlot 92F Class 2A Simmental Bred Heifers 1. Cody Carson, Rossburn 2. Bree Russell, Reston 3. Katie Falconer, Hartney Class 2B Simmental Bred Heifers 1. Sam deRocquigny, Haywood 2. Kira Dagg, Wapella, SK 3. Emily Speers, Alexander Junior Champion Simmental Female — Cody Carson with RJP Pocahontas 41E Reserve Junior Champion Female — Sam deRocquigny with Bert’s Ms Electric 14E Class 3 Two year old Simmental female and calf at side 2. Cody Carson, Rossburn Senior Champion Simmental Female —Cody Carson with NAC 36D Grand Champion Simmental Female — Cody Carson with NAC 36D Reserve Grand Champion Female — Cody Carson with RJP Pocahontas 41E Class 5 Simmental Bull Calf 1. Sam deRocquigny, Haywood 2. Cody Carson, Rossburn 3. Nathan deRocquigny, Haywood Bull Calf Champion — Sam deRocquigny with Bert’s Fired Up 15F

Reserve Bull Calf Champion — Cody Carson with NAC Almost Famous 2F Mixed Breed – Charolais, and Limousin Class 1 Mixed Breed Heifer Calf 1. Kaitlyn Davey, Portage ( Limousin) 2. Amanda Scott, Virden ( Limousin) Grand Champion Heifer Calf — Kaitlyn Davey with KAD Girl Power (Limousin) Reserve Heifer Calf Champion — Amanda Scott with Faith Class 2 Mixed Breed Yearling Heifer Class 1. Jaylin Hill, Lenore ( Charolais) 2. Fischer Cavers, La Riviere ( Charolais) 3. Amanda Scott Virden ( Limousin) Junior Champion Mixed Breed Female — Jaylin Hill with Steppler’s Miss 13E ( Charolais) Reserve Junior Champion Female — Fischer Cavers with McTavish Sage 87E ( Charolais) Class 3 Mixed Breed 2 year old with calf 1. Naomi Best, Harding ( Limousin) 2. Kaitlyn Davey, Westbourne ( Limousin) 3. Amanda Scott, Virden ( Limousin) Senior Champion Mixed Breed Female —Naomi Best with TWD Dirty Dancer ( Limousin) Reserve Senior Female — Kaitlyn Davey with JL Wonder Girl ( Limousin) Grand Champion Mixed Breed Female — Naomi Best with TWD Dirty Dancer ( Limousin) Reserve Grand Champion Mixed Breed Female — Jaylin Hill with Steppler’s Miss 13E ( Charolais) Bull Calf Champion Mixed Breed — Naomi Best with CHL Firestone 14F ( Limousin) Commercial Show Class 1 Heifer Calf 1. Emily Speers, Alexander Champion Heifer Calf — Emily Speers Class 2A— Commercial Bred heifer Class 1. Ty Nykoliation, Crandall 2. Elektra Breault, Ste Rose 3. Ella Marzoff, Inglis 4. Jaylin Hill, Lenore 5. Dawson Cruikshank, Brandon Class 2B- Commercial Bred heifer Class 1. Claire Lavallee, Portage 2. Brock Sigurdson, MacGregor 3. Hannah Mann, Roblin Class 2C- Commercial Bred heifer Class 1. Kaitlyn Davey, Westbourne 2. Gracie Falconer, Hartney 3. Angel Grieve, Filmore, SK 4. Bobbi Foster, Dropmore 5. Lucas Cavers, La Riviere Junior Champion Commercial Female — Kaitlyn Davey Reserve Junior Champion — Gracie Falconer Class 3 Commercial 2 year old Female with calf at side 1. Emily Speers, Alexander


MBP E-Newsletter

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Manitoba Youth Beef Round-up Results Continued

2. Sveinna Bjarnarson, Gladstone Class 4 Commercial Cow with calf at side 1. Cindy Jack , Portage Senior Champion Commerical Female — Emily Speers Reserve Senior Champion Female — Sveinna Bjarnarson Grand Champion Commercial Female — Kaitlyn Davey yearling heifer Reserve Grand Champion Female— Emily Speers with cow Class 5 Commercial Bull Calf 1. Cindy Jack, Portage 2. Sveinna Bjarnarson, Gladstone 3. Emily Murray, High Bluff Commercial Bull Calf Champion — Cindy Jack Reserve Bull Calf Champion — Sveinna Bjarnarson

Fat Steer Show Class 6A – Steer class 1. Brett Grieve , Fillmore 2. Elektra Breault, Ste Rose 3. Sully Fox, Dauphin 4. Nia Devonald , McCreary Class 6 B Steer Class 1. Claire Lavallee, Portage 2. Brock Sigurdson , MacGregor 3. Sierra Inglis, Rapid City 4. Shayden Manz,Brandon 5. Ben Fox, Dauphin Grand Champion Steer Award—Claire Lavalee Reserve Grand Champion — Brock Sigurdson

How do Bomber fans fare at roping? On Aug. 10, Manitoba Beef Producers Directors and staff were on hand at Winnipeg Blue Bombers football game tailgate party, where they offered fans a chance to try their hand at roping. Clockwise from top: A member of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers cheerleading squad catches on one horn of the steer; The Granny's Turkey was not so lucky with its throw; MBP Director Larry Gerelus shows everybody how it's realy done in the field. (Photos by Keith Borkowsky)


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BMP Funding Available under Ag Action Manitoba for Farmers Program Province of Manitoba — Eligible producers have until September 3 to apply for cost-shared funding through the Ag Action Manitoba for Farmers program (Assurance: Beneficial Management Practices component) to implement beneficial management practices (BMPs) identified in their Environmental Farm Plan (EFP). Producers must have a valid Statement of Completion for an EFP and meet other eligibility requirements to apply for this funding. The province will be holding workshops related to the EFP in the near future. Interested producers should call their local Manitoba Agriculture office and have their name added to the EFP workshop waiting list if they have not yet completed a plan or need to update their statement of completion. An EFP needs to be reviewed every five years to remain valid. Examples of BMPs eligible for cost-shared funding include: resource management planning, establishment of a cover crop, improved pasture and forage quality, intercropping, managing livestock access to riparian areas, sub-surface drainage water management, pesticide storage and secondary containment.

For more information about the BMPs and how to apply for funding see: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/environment/ environmental-farm-plan/ag-action-manitoba-assurance-beneficial-management-practices.html For more information on the Environmental Farm Plan go to: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/environment/ environmental-farm-plan/ Watch the aforementioned websites for future program intake deadlines. Ag Action for Manitoba Farmers has a number of other initiatives that may be of interest to your operation. For example, assistance is available for the pursuit of training or consulting opportunities, with applications accepted on a first come first serve basis. And, there is an October 1 application deadline for producers interested in pursuing distribution and marketing alliances. For complete details on these and other initiatives go to: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/canadian-agricultural-partnership/ag-action-manitoba-program/for-farmers.html .

Flow reduction at Fairford River Water Control Structure will be staged into September and October Province of Manitoba — The Hydrologic Forecasting and Water Management branch of Manitoba Infrastructure advises the flow reduction at the Fairford River Water Control Structure initiated last week will be staged over the next couple of months to accommodate rehabilitation work currently underway at the structure. The staged operation is intended to reduce outflow through the Fairford River Water Control Structure to approximately 60 per cent of its full capacity and is in accordance

with existing operating guidelines. The lake level is in the middle of the target operating range of 810.5 to 812.5 feet. The water level on Lake Manitoba will continue to decrease gradually due to the combination of lake outflows and evaporation losses, but will remain above 811 ft. This fall, Lake Manitoba inflows, outflows and precipitation conditions will continue to be monitored and evaluated. Adjustments will be made if necessary to ensure that the lake will be within the tar-

get operating range heading into the spring break up.

1-800782-0076


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Governments invest in beef and forage research to support growth in Manitoba's livestock sector Governments of Canada and Manitoba — The Canada and Manitoba governments are investing up to $2.85 million over the next five years at the Manitoba Beef and Forage Institute (MBFI) in Brandon, supporting the sustainable growth of the livestock sector, Federal Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay and Manitoba Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler announced Aug. 21. "The Government of Canada is proud to invest in Manitoba’s forage research that helps producers adopt best practices in land and herd management and other innovations that will advance the sustainability of the industry,” said MacAulay. “This support for the forage and beef industries will help these sectors grow, innovate and prosper, while creating good, well-paying jobs for the middle class.” “The beef and forage sectors have economic and environmental benefits for our entire province,” said Eichler. “Our investment recognizes applied research, like the work being done at MBFI, is an invaluable resource for producers and the agricultural sector as a whole. MBFI is a prime example of what can be achieved through a partnership between beef and forage producers, conservation organizations, industry stakeholders and governments.” Funding for MBFI will support continued beef and forage research at sites throughout the Westman region and share this information with producers and other stakeholders throughout the province. Research focuses on innovation, herd management, land productivity, environmental effects and benefits of grazing and other technological advancements to support profitability, sustainability and value-added opportunities. Project partners and other industry stakeholders will also contribute funding and inkind support to MBFI over the next five years, making the entire commitment to the project more than $4.9 million. Ministers announced the investment at the grand opening of the MBFI learning centre, located north of Brandon on a 640 acre section of land which includes pasture, hay and crops as well as 240 acres of wetlands. Today’s commitment builds on previous federal-provincial funding provided to MBFI under Growing Forward 2 totalling $2.85 million, and $300,000 from the Manitoba government. “The MBFI learning centre will act as a hub to host and create opportunities for producers, students and the general public to gather, learn and network,” said Ramona Blyth, MBFI president. “We now have the ability to provide a comfortable learning environment in the MBFI Learning Centre that can be paired with hands-on learning from MBFI researchers in our fields to represent a valuable experiential experience for visitors to MBFI.”

Manitoba Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler MBFI is a partnership between Manitoba Agriculture, Manitoba Beef Producers, Ducks Unlimited Canada and the Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association. MBFI is a centre of agricultural innovation, engaging in science-based research to benefit valuable ecosystems, improve producer profitability and build social awareness around the beef and forage industry. For more information, visit www.mbfi.ca. The value of this collaboration between the province and these agencies was recognized with a Manitoba Service Excellence Award in 2016. More information about Ag Action Manitoba is available at www.manitoba.ca/agriculture under Canadian Agricultural Partnership, by calling 1-844-769-6224 (toll-free) or emailing agaction@gov.mb.ca. Manitobans can also sign up for a digital newsletter at www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/ online-resources/signup-for-growing-manitoba-ag.html or follow Manitoba Agriculture’s Twitter channel at www. twitter.com/MBGovAg for more information about Ag Action Manitoba. The five-year, $3-billion Canadian Agricultural Partnership includes $2 billion for cost-shared strategic initiatives delivered by the provinces and territories and $1 billion for federal programs and services. For more information, visit www.canada.ca/Agri-Partnership.


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To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


Manitoba Beef Producers

Newsletter July 20, 2018

Manitoba MP picked to lead trade diversification efforts By David Ljunggren, Reuters — There is “an awful lot of affection for Canada” around the world that will help the government’s push to diversify exports away from the United States, the country’s new trade minister said on Thursday, as ties with Washington become more strained. Winnipeg MP Jim Carr, previously the minister for natural resources, received the trade portfolio in a cabinet reshuffle on Wednesday, when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said finding new export markets was a priority. Canada sends 75 per cent of its goods exports to the U.S., which imposed tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum at the end of May and is now mulling punitive measures

against autos. “There is goodwill towards Canada, there is a willingness to hear our story, and I think there is an awful lot of affection for Canada, for our values… for our political leadership,” Carr said in a phone interview. “So I think there are all kinds of ways in which we can capture the world’s attention at a number of levels and that is what we will do.” Although Trudeau took office in November 2015 stressing the need to boost trade with major emerging markets like China and India, the government has had little success. Trudeau visited Beijing last December but the two sides failed to agree on the launch of talks on a free trade

treaty. Officials say negotiations on a potential deal with India have stalled. Carr, whose title is trade diversification minister, did not give details when asked about his travel plans for the next few months. He said he had not spoken to his U.S. counterpart, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer.

Continued on Page 2

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MBP NEWSLETTER

Need for new trade partners highlighted From Page 1

Great Tastes of Manitoba host Dez Daniels (left) and MBP food columnist Elisabeth Harms were on the set this week shooting episodes for the 29th season of the food show featuring the best our province has to offer. Watch for the episodes this fall to discover how to make some great meals using Manitoba products. (Photo by Keith Borkowsky)

In the News A look at articles of interest to the beef industry in Manitoba and beyond • Cattle prices hold firm due to feed crop values • Protein makes a difference • Where’s the hay? Some fields are behind schedule due to dry weather. • Are legumes the answer to forage shortages?

“The reality is that 75 per cent of our trade goes to the United States and it continues to be our most important trading partner,” he said. A senior Canadian diplomat on Thursday told a U.S. Commerce Department hearing into the auto tariffs that if Washington imposed the measures, Canada would respond with sanctions. Brian Kingston, vice-president of international issues at the Business Council of Canada, said Ottawa should launch trade talks with China and consider boosting ties with other Asian nations. “We are literally standing at the edge of a cliff now and if we don’t start trying to make some headway on diversification, we’re even more at risk than we were before,” he said by phone. In several tweets Thursday, Carr reiterated Canada is “absolutely on track to be among the crucial first six” member nations to ratify the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). The CPTPP trade pact can only enter into force 60 days after at least six of the 11 signatories’ governments ratify it. For the remaining five nations, the deal would enter into force 60 days after the date of their respective ratifications. For Canadian farmers, a CPTPP deal would grant preferential market access to member countries including Japan, Vietnam and Malaysia, where Canadian exports now face tariff walls. Export-oriented farm commodity groups have pressed for Canada to be in the first tranche of signatories to ratify the deal.


MBP NEWSLETTER

MB Soil Science Society hosts info tour The Manitoba Soil Science Society’s summer tour will include a trip through the Interlake’s diverse soil conditions on Aug. 16. As part of the trip, participants will have an opportunity to visit the PESAI Research Station, where issues related to drainage, annual cropping and forage production will be covered. Nutrient management issues as they relate to forage production and annual crops will also be covered. Other unique soil conditions, such as a visit to a commercial limestone quarry and interaction with peat in soil will also be a part of the tour. The program is part of the summer events targeted towards graduate

students in agriculture, summer students, extension agrologists and other agriculture stakeholders. The bus tour leaves Winnipeg at 7:30 a.m. There is also an option to be picked up in Stonewall at 8:15 a.m. Regular admission to the tour is $85. A student rate of $55 per participant is also available. Registration is required and those registratuons received after the Aug. 3 deadline will be charged an additional fee of $15 per person. For more information on this tour, you are invited to go online to: http://www.mbsoils.ca/event/summer-field-tour/.

Newsletter Advertising email: info@mbbeef.ca

The Ag Action Manitoba program funds research and innovation projects in agriculture. Deadline for letters of intent is August 31, 2018.


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MBP NEWSLETTER

Fitness matters for farmers too Manitoba Farm Safety Program — Sitting long hours in the tractor cab is hard on the body so here’s some tips to help prevent injury. Paul Gregory, 60, is a farmer and president of Interlake Forage Seeds Ltd. in Fisher Branch. He is also an avid skier and running marathoner who believes one must condition their body for farming just like for sport. “Lower back pain is a part of long days in the cab of a tractor or truck. I really like stretching and doing some yoga in the off-hours, and even for a few minutes while fuelling up,” says Gregory. “With beekeeping and chucking seed bags, your wrists really get a workout so I try to stretch them between yards as well.” Gregory also stresses the importance of hydrating. “Always carry a water bottle. You can work when you’re hungry but it’s brutal when you’re thirsty.” As a farmer, it is not uncommon to spend hours in the tractor cab, but because the human body is designed to move, if you get out to fix or lift something after sitting for so long the risk of injury increases. While you want to take advantage of good weather to get the job done, your health must not take a back seat. For more information, view: https://www. manitobacooperator.ca/country-crossroads/farmersneed-to-keep-in-shape/?utm_source=GFM+Publications&utm_campaign=11a6115ac3-Manitoba+Co-operator+daily+enews+Jul+20%2C+2018&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_2da8244677-11a6115ac3-88076081

In the House Manitoba Beef Producers will be a game sponsor at two Winnipeg sporting events in August. The fun starts with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers, where MBP will be on hand at the tailgate party for the Aug. 10 home game against the Hamilton Tiger-Cats at Investors Group Field. MBP is also sponsoring the Family of the Game at every Bomber home game this season. On Aug. 27, MBP will be part of the Winnipeg Goldeyes game festivities when the defending American Association champs host the St. Paul Saints. If you are at either of these games, be on the lookout for a MBP director. You never know if there may also be a prize or two available during the game.

Don’t Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to mbfiinfo@gmail.com to sign up.


Manitoba Beef Producers

Newsletter July 6, 2018

USDA lifts need for bovine TB test for Manitoba cattle exports The removal of a federal United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) requirement that required breeding cattle and bison from Manitoba be tested for bovine tuberculosis pre-export is welcome news to Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP). This requirement was removed as of July 1, 2018. “This is a tremendous win for the beef producers of Manitoba. For many years producers in the Riding Mountain Eradication Area have borne a heavy cost in the yearly mustering and surveillance testing of their animals. This USDA decision recognizes the decades of hard work undertaken by MBP and producers on the bovine TB issue and is very good news for our sector, said MBP

President Ben E. Fox. “It is a testament to the diligence of the producers in the RMEA, as well as the efforts of many other stakeholders that we have achieved this long sought-after result.” This USDA decision is a result of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s detailed case outlining why pre-export testing for these Manitoba breeding cattle and bison is no longer required. Bovine tuberculosis had been detected in livestock and wildlife around the Riding Mountain National Park area, resulting in the establishment of the Riding Mountain Eradication Area (RMEA). Continued on Page 2

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MBP NEWSLETTER

Hard work on bovine TB rewarded From Page 1

Manitoba Beef Producers General Manager Brian Lemon is interviewed by CTV on the USDA lifting of Bovine TB tests for Manitoba export cattle.

In the News A look at articles of interest to the beef industry in Manitoba and beyond • Questions remain about Lake Manitoba Outlet • Beef Market Update: Live cattle futures hold following cash price recovery • When it’s time to say goodbye to the herd • Going beyond grass for forage • Meat industry wants CPTPP passed quickly

Herds in Manitoba were subject to surveillance testing, which stressed the animals and placed them at risk for injury. The CFIA recognizes Manitoba’s domestic livestock herd has been free of this disease for several years. “It is gratifying to see the hard work of the many partners finally rewarded,” said Dr. Allan Preston, Bovine Tuberculosis Coordinator. “Manitoba had its last case of bovine tuberculosis in 2008 – a long ten years later, the USDA has recognized our TB free status and all federal US restrictions on Manitoba breeding stock moving into the US have been lifted. My hat is off especially to the dedicated cattle producers in the Riding Mountain Eradication Area whose efforts have made this TB freedom a reality.” The presence of bovine TB has also required producers to take special biosecurity measures to prevent the spread of the disease from deer and elk. These measures include barrier fencing to protect feed supplies and the use of livestock guardian dogs. MBP has also worked with many other stakeholders to address this issue, including: Parks Canada, Manitoba Sustainable Development, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, Manitoba Agriculture, First Nations and the Manitoba Wildlife Federation. These measures will continue to reduce the risk of interaction with wildlife that could carry bovine TB. While the USDA pre-export testing requirement has been lifted, individual American states continue to have their own state-level bovine tuberculosis testing requirements. Producers are advised to check with appropriate authorities in the United States prior to shipping their cattle for export.


MBP NEWSLETTER

Ergot contamination more complex than first imagined By Piper Whelan, Canadian Cattlemen — The process of converting ergot-contaminated grain into feed pellets may decrease its toxicity, contrary to popular belief, according to a recent Alberta Agriculture study. However, the concentration as well as the types of ergot alkaloids present affects its toxicity to livestock, raising more questions about this harmful fungus. “The impact of the ergot is going to depend on the form that it came in, so if it’s a pelleted diet, probably having 300 parts per billion is maybe less of an issue than if they’re just feeding rolled grain to their stock,” said Kim Stanford, beef research scientist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. “If the concentration of (ergot) alkaloids gets very high, pelleting alone is not going to be enough to protect the livestock, so I think that’s probably the best information that we’ve got: that pelleting is some help at lower concentrations.” Stanford, who works out of the Research Centre in Lethbridge, recently completed a three-year study on ergot alkaloids in collaboration with the University of Sask­atchewan and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. The prevalence of ergot contamination has significantly increased in Western Canada over the last several years, likely due in part to wet conditions. The fungus contaminates grain at the flowering stage, replacing the kernel with an ergot body. “If it’s very wet, humid, cloudy weather when the grain is flowering, that promotes the spread of the fungus,” said Stanford.

“A lot of people are feeding screenings pellets, and when the grain is cleaned that tends to concentrate the ergot, and the livestock bear the brunt of that,” she said. Testing feed for ergot can be extremely challenging. “The ergot alkaloids are very complicated structures, and they’re not easy to measure, so you need very complicated, expensive equipment and really skilled people to do the analyses, and even then it’s difficult.”

If the concentration of (ergot) alkaloids gets very high, pelleting alone is not going to be enough to protect the livestock. — Kim Stanford Researcher

One reason that ergot alkaloids are harder to measure than other mycotoxins is because they have two forms, called epimers. The form is based on the rotation of the molecule, and one form of epimer can convert to the other. “It’s kind of a nightmare because we don’t really understand what makes the epimers interconvert back and forth.” Of the two epimers, the R-epimer is more toxic than the S-epimer. When the R-epimer combines with

the receptors in an animal’s cells, it can cause some of the larger problems related to ergot. “The S-epimer doesn’t bind as well, but if it’s going back and forth between those two, it makes it difficult to tell how toxic it is.” Given the complex nature of ergot, Stanford said that much more work is required. The next step is to investigate how the process of pelleting decreases the toxicity of the ergot alkaloids. As of April, Stanford and her research group have applied for funding to continue this work. If successful, the next study will be conducted on cattle. “Even though sheep and cattle presently have the same allowable limits based on the current CFIA regulations, which are under review as well, whether sheep and cattle actually do have the same tolerances is another question.” They also want to investigate the specific types of ergot alkaloids found in the Prairie provinces. “The ergot alkaloids are very location specific, so it’s important that we have some information on what’s here in Western Canada,” she said. Knowing the more prevalent alkaloid profiles in the Prairies would be useful to identify “a bad mixture of alkaloids versus one that may cause less problems.” Sharing this information with producers is a vital step. “There’s a lot of misinformation about ergot out in the industry,” she said. “There’s a lot of people thinking that if you have 100 parts per billion in your diet your livestock are doomed, and that is not always going to be the case.”


®

Right Now Emerald with Altosid IGR

®

fly control mineral for beef cattle on pasture For more information, visit your local Cargill dealer or call Doug Allison at 204.724.2652

the 30 - 30 method for horn fly control proven to

BREAK THE LIFE CYCLE

30 Days after the first frost

Left untreated, a few adult horn flies can quickly explode to a population of 4,000 flies or more per animal. Feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR using the 30/30 formula prevents flies from multiplying, successfully breaking their life cycle. 30 Days before emergence

• Continue feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR for 30 days after the first frost to help prevent horn flies from overwintering again. Exposing horn fly larvae to Altosid® IGR can reduce the number of overwintering pupae.

• Horn files overwinter in the pupal stage and jump start adult populations in the Spring.

• Begin feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR 30 days before overwintering flies emerge. Horn flies emerge in the spring when the average daily temperatures reach 18°C (65°F) • Put out a five-to-seven-day supply of the mineral near watering holes or loafing areas, allowing one feeder for every 15-20 animals.

Female flies leave the animal for a few seconds to lay eggs in manure less than five minutes old.

Adult horn flies live two-to-four weeks taking 20-to-40 blood meals per day.

• Continue for 30 days after the first frost as a temperature bounce-back could allow additional horn fly generations to develop.

In one to two days eggs hatch into larvae

• Check mineral consumption and increase or decrease the number of feeders, or move them if necessary, to adjust for proper consumption.

Right Now® Emerald

Pupae molt into adults in six to eight days. Altosid® IGR breaks the life cycle preventing adults from emerging. In three to five days the larvae molt into pupae

"Always read and follow label directions. Altosid and the cow head design are registered trademarks of Wellmark International."


MBP NEWSLETTER

Job Opportunity — Office Assistant Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) has an exciting opportunity available for someone interested in working as part of a small team committed to advancing Manitoba’s beef industry. MBP is the exclusive voice of the beef industry in Manitoba. It represents roughly 6,500 beef producers across the province. MBP is a non-profit organization with a elected board consisting of 14 producer-directors, each representing cattle producers in specific regions or districts of the Manitoba, along with four staff. MBP’s mission is to represent all beef producers through communication, advocacy, research, and education—within the industry to governments, consumers and others; to improve prosperity and ensure a sustainable future. Funded 100% by producers through the collection of check-off dollars, MBP is committed to ensuring a sustainable future for the beef industry in the province for the benefit of our producers and all Manitobans. MBP is seeking a full-time Office Assistant to work as part of the team. Under the direction of the General Manager, the Office Assistant performs reception and general administrative functions, provides functional support to other members of the MBP staff as well as to MBP Directors, leads planning, coordination and promotion of the Annual General Meeting, solicits advertisers for MBP’s industry newspaper, and oversees office informatics needs. Specifically, the Office Assistant: • • • • • • • • •

provides first point of contact (includes receptionist duties) for producers, government officials and the general public; provides administrative support to the General Manager and the Board of Directors; provides assistance and services to producers including the Age Verification Program of the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency; works in support of the MBP Communication Coordinator, assisting with the solicitation of advertisements and proofing of content; organizes, files, and retrieves documents and information, and maintain proper office filing systems and inventory lists, including office supplies and promotional/resource documents inventory; records meeting minutes when required; leads the planning of the Annual General Meeting (AGM), annual district meetings and numerous tradeshows; provides general office administrative support, including taking the lead in the maintenance of informatics systems and related equipment; provides support and carry out other duties as assigned. Continued on Page 6


MBP NEWSLETTER From Page 5 The ideal candidate must have: •

Good organizational skills and detail focused

A commitment to client service

Computer software skills (Excel/PowerPoint/Word)

The ability to meet and enforce deadlines

The ability to multi-task and be adaptable to changing priorities

A solid team focus

A valid driver’s license

While not necessarily required, it would be beneficial if the candidate had: •

Knowledge and competencies related to office network maintenance and informatics

Experience working as an assistant in an office environment

Specific agriculture experience working with the beef sector

The Office Assistant for the Manitoba Beef Producers must be friendly, well organized and have the ability to communicate effectively in written, oral and e-mail form. The Office Assistant is required to show discretion and tact, and to work well as part of a team. The position reports directly to the General Manager. This position is located at MBP’s office in Winnipeg. Normal working hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, but the candidate will be asked to periodically travel within the province and work irregular hours. MBP offers competitive compensation commensurate with the skills and experience of the successful candidate. Please submit your resumé and cover letter by July 13, 2018 to Brian Lemon, MBP General Manager at blemon@ mbbeef.ca. Thank you to all interested applicants, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Report ALL Wildfires 1-800-782-0076


MBP NEWSLETTER

New MBFI Board in place From Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives — With summer fast approaching and the completion of the new Learning Centre at the Brookdale Farm on the near horizon, the Manitoba Beef and Forages Initiatives Inc., (MBFI) has announced the 2018-19 MBFI Board of Directors. Ramona Blyth of MacGregor will return to the helm as MBFI chair for the 2018-19 year, while Virden’s Larry Wegner was selected o take on the MBFI vice-chair position for the upcoming year. The roster of 2018-19 MBFI Board and leadership positions were confirmed through a motion by the Manitoba Beef Producers’ Board of Directors on June 6, 2018. “I am pleased to be able to again work with such a great team and look forward to the upcoming year with many research projects and workshops planned,” says Blyth. “MBFI continues to be successful in advancing opportunities within our partnerships and governance structure.” Blyth says that MBFI will once again be busy and bustling with producer events and private tours at the three

MBFI Board of Directors 2018-19 Chair — Ramona Blyth, Beef Producer, MacGregor Vice-Chair — Larry Wegner, Beef Producer, Virden Secretary/Treasurer — Brian Lemon, Manitoba Beef Producers (appointed) Directors Tracy Gilson Kristine Tapley Darren Chapman Lawrence Knockaert Don McIntyre

Manitoba Agriculture Ducks Unlimited Canada Manitoba Forage and Grasslands Beef Producer, Bruxelles Beef Producer, Clearwater

MBFI research and demonstration sites — Brookdale, Johnson and First Street — and that the still-in-planning grand opening of the much-awaited MBFI Learning Centre at the Brookdale site north of Brandon will be the marquee event for MBFI this summer. “The addition of the Learning Centre to MBFI represents an incredible opportunity for MBFI to shine,” says

Blyth. “It really is adding huge value to Manitoba – especially western Manitoba – as a place for producers, industry leaders and the general public to learn about and showcase beef and forage research, on-farm innovation and beneficial practices and agriculture as a whole. We will have news on our Grand Opening of the MBFI Brookdale Learning Centre in the near future.”

Don’t Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to mbfiinfo@gmail.com to sign up.


mbbeef.ca

June 22, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Funding announced for Lake Manitoba Outlet Channel Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is pleased the Government of Canada and the Province of Manitoba have announced a combined $540 million in funding for needed flood protection measures for Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin. “MBP has strongly sought and supported the construction of outlet channels at Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin. Producers in the Interlake, around Lake Manitoba and beyond have repeatedly sacrificed their valuable production land to protect their fellow Manitobans, and this has placed a heavy toll on our industry,” said MBP President Ben E. Fox. “The steep financial costs to producers, caused by flooding, has forced many to leave the industry.” The project involves the construction of two approximately 23-kilometre-long diversion channels. The Lake Manitoba Outlet Channel will run north from Watchorn Bay on Lake Manitoba to Birch Bay on Lake

St. Martin; the Lake St. Martin Outlet Channel will run northeast from Lake St. Martin to Lake Winnipeg south of Willow Point. Of particular importance to beef producers is that the Lake Manitoba outlet channel will carry water from Lake Manitoba to Lake St. Martin which will then flow via the Lake St. Martin channel into Lake Winnipeg. This will be essential during times of flooding and high water levels on Lake Manitoba. Repeated flooding and water management challenges have cost cattle producers income, and has limited Manitoba’s ability to expand its beef cattle herd.

Continued to Page 2

Find Us Online @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

@ManitobaBeefProducers1


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Farm equity values on the rise • Beef consumption in Canada is up • Seaweed makes cattle less gassy? • Pre-turnout procedures can pay off in productivity • Eating lean, unprocessed red meat reduces heart disease risk

At left, Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister shares a chuckle with Manitoba Beef Producers Vice-President Tom Teichroeb on June 18 in St. Laurent at an funding announcement for the Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin outlet channel.

From Page 1

Outlet channel funding needed That’s why MBP has lobbied on behalf of producers for many years to improve flood protection measures. Flooding’s severe impact on pasture and forage land can at times take it out of production for years during the event and the recovery phase. Beef producers recognize that for the Lake Manitoba outlet channel to be built, there will be impacts to some producers’ operations. Producers have already suffered

greatly from flooding and water management policies. “Mitigating the effects of natural hazards before they happen is critical to reducing the devastating social, personal and economic costs of recovering after the fact,” Federal Minister of Natural Resources Jim Carr said. “With investments like these we will make communities across Canada more resilient to climate change and ensure residents and businesses can thrive for generations to come.”

MBP continues to push for governments to follow land valuation practices when expropriating land needed to complete this project. In recognition of the long-term sacrifices of producers have made to prevent catastrophic flooding — and are still being asked to make for the greater good of fellow Manitobans — MBP requests these producers be compensated the loss of land, and inefficiencies added to their overall operations due to the expropriation process.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Outlet channel open house on June 27 Province of Manitoba —The next phase of the Manitoba government’s proposed plans for the construction of the Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin outlet channels will be presented at a series of open house sessions, Infrastructure Minister Ron Schuler announced. “These are major flood management projects and will be as essential as the Red River Floodway and the Portage Diversion in provincial flood-fighting efforts,” said Schuler. “Manitoba is a collection point of major watersheds that start outside of the province but can result in widespread flooding, devastation, costly cleanup and years of restoration.” Open house topics will include environmental approvals, design and construction, and the next steps in the delivery of this major flood infrastructure project. There will also be an opportunity to learn more about

the operation of the Portage Diversion. The diversion moves Assiniboine River water north into Lake Manitoba during heavy spring flooding and unusual summer storms. The waters of the Assiniboine and Red rivers and Lake Manitoba through the Fairford River all eventually flow into Lake Winnipeg and north to the northern river systems. “The projects are designed to provide maximum water movement in times of heavy flooding with minimal impact to landowners and the environment,” said Schuler. “This will be the third round of open house information sessions to ensure residents have the opportunity to review plans and ask questions.” The last open house features two sessions from 2 to 5 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m., and will be held at the Canad Inns Destination Centre Fort Garry, 1824 Pembina Hwy., on Wednesday, June 27.

Upcoming traffic disruptions due to highway infrastructure upgrades Province of Manitoba — As the summer construction season continues, proejcts are underway which may affect your travel plans. Here are some of the upcoming work projects. Highway 16 near Highway 1 Railway repairs at the CN railway crossing on PTH 16 (3.75 km north of PTH 1) will result in lane closures for all vehicular traffic. Both north and south bound lanes of Highway 16 north of Highway 1 are scheduled to close for one day starting at 9:00 a.m. Wednesday July 4th, 2018 until 9:00 p.m. Wednesday July 4th, 2018. Commercial vehicles will be able detour around the closure using Highway 34 from Highway 1 to

Highway 16. Permitted oversized/ overweight vehicles will be required to use alternate routes that have been approved by Manitoba Infrastructure. Rocky Mountain Double long combination vehicles (32.5 m long) that typically use Highway 16 will be able to use Highway 10 from Highway 1 to Highway 16 as an alternate route during the closure. To discuss specific permit requirements/alternate routes, Permit Services may be contacted directly at 204-945-3961 or toll free at 1-877-812-0009. Highways 3 at Highway 100 Traffic signals at the intersection of Highway 3 and Highway 100 will be turned off in all directions on Sunday, June 24, from 8:00 a.m.

until 4:00 p.m., to accommodate maintenance repairs for the signals. Traffic will be reduced to one lane in all directions and flagpersons will be on site to facilitate traffic control. Road users can expect reduced speed limits and possible delays through the area. In the event of heavy rain, the maintenance work will be re-scheduled. Information and updates regarding the lane closures are available on the Highway Information (Manitoba 511 – Road and Traveller Information) website, http://www. manitoba511.ca/en/ or by calling 204-945-3704 or toll free at 1-877627-6237.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Help us tell your story Send us photos and videos from your farm

Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry. If you are interested, please send them to Manitoba Beef Producers Communications Coordinator Keith Borkowsky by email: kborkowsky@mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

MFGA Aquanty Model funded From Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association —

The Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association (MFGA) Aquanty Project model aims to mitigate the impacts of flood and drought across the Assiniboine River Basin by assessing the role of forages and grasslands in times of future flood and drought in the region. This project has drawn support from The Co-operators, a co-operative insurer and financial services organization. To help MFGA advance the project, a $10,000 contribution was provided to MFGA as part of the insurer's ongoing efforts to contribute to flood resiliency in Canada. The contribution immediately placed The Co-operators among the Platinum Sponsors of MFGA - the organization's highest support level. "As floods increase in frequency and severity in communities across Canada, up-to-date flood models are critical to help municipalities

and Canadians better understand the risks they are facing," said Barbara Turley-McIntyre, vice-president of Sustainability and Citizenship of The Co-operators. "The MFGA Aquanty project is a great example of the kind of analysis that can help us mitigate and adapt to the changing nature of floods in Canada." The MFGA Aquanty Project is a HydroGeoSphere high-resolution model of the Assiniboine River Basin that will help plan for future flood and drought events by examining the basin's water movement and highlighting the role of forages and grasslands. The model-building component of the MFGA Aquanty Project has been recently completed and the group is now finalizing the public access components. MFGA is the project proponent and holder of the licence for stakeholders and land managers to access the model. According to Darren Chapman, MFGA Chair, The Co-op-

erators support is a testament to the ability of the model to look at reducing the impact of flood and drought on citizens and property in the Assiniboine River Basin. "The Co-operators represent a very key supporter for MFGA and the MFGA Aquanty Project to have onboard with us" Chapman said. "To have such a prominent player in Canada's insurance industry come forward and support our project in this manner really speaks volumes about the potential of our MFGA Aquanty for the people, properties and communities in the ARB as a risk mitigation and land-planning tool." The Co-operators' support marks the second major Platinum Sponsor from the insurance and financial community for MFGA recently. Last month, nine Manitoba Credit Unions stepped up with a three year commitment in the Platinum Support level for MFGA and the MFGA Aquanty Project.

Don't Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to mbfiinfo@gmail.com to sign up.


®

For more information, visit your local Cargill dealer or call Doug Allison at 204.724.2652

fly control mineral for beef cattle on pasture

with Altosid IGR

Right Now Emerald ®

• Continue feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR for 30 days after the first frost to help prevent horn flies from overwintering again. Exposing horn fly larvae to Altosid® IGR can reduce the number of overwintering pupae.

• Begin feeding Right Now Emerald with Altosid IGR 30 days before overwintering flies emerge. Horn flies emerge in the spring when the average daily temperatures reach 18°C (65°F)

In one to two days eggs hatch into larvae

"Always read and follow label directions. Altosid and the cow head design are registered trademarks of Wellmark International."

In three to five days the larvae molt into pupae

Pupae molt into adults in six to eight days. Altosid® IGR breaks the life cycle preventing adults from emerging.

Right Now® Emerald

• Continue for 30 days after the first frost as a temperature bounce-back could allow additional horn fly generations to develop.

• Check mineral consumption and increase or decrease the number of feeders, or move them if necessary, to adjust for proper consumption.

Female flies leave the animal for a few seconds to lay eggs in manure less than five minutes old.

Adult horn flies live two-to-four weeks taking 20-to-40 blood meals per day.

• Horn files overwinter in the pupal stage and jump start adult populations in the Spring.

• Put out a five-to-seven-day supply of the mineral near watering holes or loafing areas, allowing one feeder for every 15-20 animals.

®

30 Days after the first frost

®

30 Days before emergence

Left untreated, a few adult horn flies can quickly explode to a population of 4,000 flies or more per animal. Feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR using the 30/30 formula prevents flies from multiplying, successfully breaking their life cycle.

BREAK THE LIFE CYCLE

the 30 - 30 method for horn fly control proven to

MBP E-Newsletter mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Nominate a producer for TESA Applications are being sought from Manitoba beef producers for consideration for The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA). Since 1996, TESA has recognized producers who go above and beyond standard industry conservation practices and set positive examples for other cattle producers and the general public. At the local level, a producer receives provincial recognition for their outstanding contributions. These recipients move forward as nominees for national recognition from the CCA. The national TESA recipient is announced during the CCA semi-annual meeting at the Canadian Beef Industry

Conference. Each nominee exemplifies significant innovation and attention to a wide range of environmental stewardship aspects in their farm operation. Such innovations extend beneficially to areas far beyond their land, including water, wildlife and air. The deadline for people to submit their TESA nominations to MBP for local consideration is Monday, December 3. Completed application packages can be sent to Manitoba Beef Producers, 220-530 Century St. Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 or by email at info@mbbeef.ca. Indicate in the subjection line of your email: Attention: TESA Application.

MBP announces the provincial TESA winner in conjunction with its Annual General Meeting in February. Producers can either nominate themselves, another individual or be nominated by an organization. All methods are equally encouraged. Complete details and application forms, requirements re: letters of support, etc. can be found on the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association website at: http://www.cattle.ca/sustainability/the-environmental-stewardship-award/ http://www.cattle.ca/assets/ TESA/d8b10a2137/tesa-application-v7.3.pdf

New MARIC members appointed Province of Manitoba — The Manitoba government has appointed nine members to the newly formed Manitoba Agriculture Research and Innovation Committee (MARIC), which will provide analysis and recommendations on strategic investments in agricultural research, Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler announced today. “The new appointees to the committee all reflect the diversity of the research community and the agricultural sector as a whole,” said Eichler. “Their expertise, experience and commitment to agricultural research will ensure our government receives the best advice on making investments and how to sustainably grow our industry for the future.” The MARIC will be responsible for assessing and making funding recommendations related to research proposals submitted under the five-

year, federal-provincial-territorial Canadian Agricultural Partnership. Current priority areas include grain innovation, livestock production, agri-resource management, processing and value-added, and market development. Committee members will also be responsible for developing and maintaining a provincial strategic plan for agricultural research and supporting research extension and communication with provincial, national and international stakeholders. The following individuals have been appointed to MARIC on a twoyear term: • Joanne Buth (Winnipeg), chairperson; • Betty Green (Fisher Branch), vice-chairperson; • Francois Labelle (Carman); • Dr. Allan Preston (Hamiota); • Trust Beta (Winnipeg);

• Kim Ominski (Winnipeg); • Gary Plohman (Beausejour); • William (Bill) Ashton (Brandon); and • Bruce Hardy (Winnipeg). The minister noted the creation of this committee meets the government’s broader commitment to streamline and reduce the number of appointments, boards and committees. MARIC replaces advisory committees related to the previous federal-provincial-territorial framework, Growing Forward 2, as well as those connected to the province’s Grain Innovation Hub, Manitoba Livestock Manure Management Initiative Inc., and the Manitoba Consumer Monitor Food Panel. This consolidation is expected to create savings of approximately $500,000 per year, while also reducing administrative burdens for researchers.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


mbbeef.ca

June 8, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Outlet Channel Open Houses Set The Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin outlet channels will be the topic of discussion at a series of Manitoba Infrastructure open houses from June 19 to 27. These open houses will give people in affected areas a chance to learn more about the government’s plans for the project, as well as the environmental planning updates This also offers an opportunity to offer comments about the environmental assessment process. The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency has finalized its Environmental Impact Statement Guidelines. This document notes the information that Manitoba Infrastructure must include in preparing an EIS for the project. To view a copy of the guidelines, please visit the CEAA registry at www.ceaa.gc.ca/050/ details-eng.cfm?evaluation=80148 As is required, Manitoba Infrastructure has filed a proposal for the Lake Manitoba Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels with Manitoba Sustainable Development under The Environment Act. The proposal information includes a project description and an environmental assessment scoping document.

Open House Dates Open Houses will take place from 2:00 - 5:00pm and 6:00 - 8:00pm at the following locations: • June 19 — Moosehorn, Moosehorn Community Hall • June 20 — St. Laurent, St. Laurent Recreation Centre • June 21 — Portage La Prairie, Canad Inns Destination Centre • June 27 — Winnipeg, Canad Inns Destination Centre - 1824 Pembina Hwy Public comment on the proposal will be accepted until June 19, 2018. Access the proposal documents and online public registry at www.gov.mb.ca/sd/eal/ registries/5966lstmartin/index.html If you would like additional information about the project, go to the website at www.gov.mb.ca/mit/ wms/lmblsmoutlets/index.html or provide comment by email at OutletChannels@gov.mb.ca.

Find Us Online @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

@ManitobaBeefProducers1


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

MBP develops relationships during Ottawa Fly-In meetings

In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry

Federal Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Hon. Lawrence MacAulay and Manitoba Beef Producers President Ben Fox had a conversation during MBP's annual Ottawa Fly-In meetings.

• Is synthetic beef a threat to the cattle industry? • Supplementing young bull calves before weaning pays off • Producers urged to keep anthrax risks in mind • The benefits of alternative feed options • Do RFI ratings predict cattle performance on pasture? • This is what happens when the giant begins to roar

Members of MBP's board and staff also met with Conservative MPs Bob Sopuck (above, centre) of Dauphin- Swan River-Neepawa, as well as James Bezan (below, Centre) of Selkirk-Interlake-Eastman.


the 30 - 30 method for horn fly control proven to

BREAK THE LIFE CYCLE Left untreated, a few adult horn flies can quickly explode to a population of 4,000 flies or more per animal. Feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR using the 30/30 formula prevents flies from multiplying, successfully breaking their life cycle. 30 Days before emergence

30 Days after the first frost

• Begin feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR 30 days before overwintering flies emerge. Horn flies emerge in the spring when the average daily temperatures reach 18°C (65°F)

• Continue feeding Right Now® Emerald with Altosid® IGR for 30 days after the first frost to help prevent horn flies from overwintering again. Exposing horn fly larvae to Altosid® IGR can reduce the number of overwintering pupae.

• Put out a five-to-seven-day supply of the mineral near watering holes or loafing areas, allowing one feeder for every 15-20 animals. • Check mineral consumption and increase or decrease the number of feeders, or move them if necessary, to adjust for proper consumption.

Right Now Emerald with Altosid IGR

• Horn files overwinter in the pupal stage and jump start adult populations in the Spring. • Continue for 30 days after the first frost as a temperature bounce-back could allow additional horn fly generations to develop.

®

Adult horn flies live two-to-four weeks taking 20-to-40 blood meals per day.

®

fly control mineral for beef cattle on pasture For more information, visit your local Cargill dealer or call Doug Allison at 204.724.2652

Female flies leave the animal for a few seconds to lay eggs in manure less than five minutes old.

Right Now® Emerald

Pupae molt into adults in six to eight days. Altosid® IGR breaks the life cycle preventing adults from emerging. In three to five days the larvae molt into pupae

In one to two days eggs hatch into larvae

"Always read and follow label directions. Altosid and the cow head design are registered trademarks of Wellmark International."


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Job Opportunity General Manager MBFI Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives (MBFI) is continuing its search to find a knowledgeable, experienced, and energetic person to be our General Manager to drive science and innovation at our research farm. The General Manager will work out of MBFI’s Brookdale farm site, north of Brandon, and will be responsible to implement research and provide day-to-day leadership to all of the activities at MBFI’s three farm sites. As a centre of agricultural innovation engaging in science-based research, MBFI is committed to: advancing the long-term profitability and sustainability of producers, enhancing the profitability of beef and forage production by evaluating foundational research at the ranch level, transferring the knowledge gained to producers, governments, and private stakeholders interested in advancing the industry, and fostering the growth and understanding of sustainable beef production. The complete job description is available at www.mbfi.ca. MBFI has extended its application deadline to June 29, 2018. If you have a university degree in agriculture, animal science or veterinary medicine, and 5 years of experience working on a livestock operation (an acceptable combination of education and experience may also be considered) please send a cover letter and resume to: Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives Inc. Attention: Don Guilford, Management Committee Chair Email: ghr@mymts.net


MBP E-Newsletter

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CCA talks trade with partners Canadian Cattlemen's Association — CCA President David Haywood-Farmer was in Mexico to attend the annual convention of Confederación Nacional de Organizaciones Ganaderas (CNOG) May 7-9. Discussions focused on the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) negotiations and the uncertainty around the ongoing trade talks. Haywood-Farmer talked about the benefits of the North American beef and cattle industry and reiterated that CCA is in lockstep with Mexico and U.S. producer organizations about the need to leave the terms of trade for beef untouched in the renegotiations.

Haywood-Farmer also congratulated his Mexican counterparts for being the first country to ratify the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). This will be a great opportunity for the growing Mexican beef export sector to gain access to the Japanese market once six CPTPP countries complete their ratification process. The meeting was also a good opportunity for Haywood-Farmer to get to know the new officers in the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) leadership hierarchy. NCBA was represented by President Kevin Kester from California,

President-Elect Jennifer Houston from Tennessee and Vice President Marty Smith, from Florida. Following conclusion of the meetings, CNOG provided Haywood-Farmer with a tour of a cattle show at the grounds of the Neuvo Leon Cattle Producers Union where he observed many breeds familiar to producers in Canada crossbred with Bramhan genetics: Brangus, Brahmousin, Simbrah, Charbray, Brahford and Beefmasters were all on display. CCA will host the next Trilateral Leaders meeting during the Canadian Beef Industry Conference in London, Ontario on August 15.

Agricultural Crown Lands report released Government of Manitoba Press Release — The Manitoba government released a new report based on public consultations for the modernization of the agricultural Crown lands (ACL) program, Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler announced on June 4. “Our government is focused on consultations and listening to Manitobans, and we have taken the time to hear from industry and stakeholders,” said Eichler. “We look forward to continuing those consultations as we continue to pursue program modernization and develop legislation that mirrors what we heard.” Manitoba’s entry into the New West Partnership Trade Agreement with British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan required a number of legislative changes that affected

the ACL program. The province also committed to review and modernize the ACL program as part of this process, with the goal of improving the productivity, processes, utilization and stewardship of these lands and contributing to the growth of the livestock industry in Manitoba. In February 2018, the province launched a consultation to ensure upcoming policy changes reflected the views of the livestock industry while reducing the administrative burden, and improving fairness and transparency in the system. The consultations focused on land management, leasing restrictions, and the length of terms and renewability of forage leases. Manitoba Agriculture hosted 14 meetings with key stakeholders and received 37 written responses

related to the ACL program, the minister said. Further dialogue is ongoing and more consultation will take place in the lead up to the introduction of legislation. For more information on the agricultural Crown lands program and to access the full report, visit: www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/.

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Help us tell your story Send us photos and videos from your farm

Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry. If you are interested, please send them to Manitoba Beef Producers Communications Coordinator Keith Borkowsky by email: kborkowsky@mbbeef.ca


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To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


mbbeef.ca

May 25, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Big wins for beef cattle sector in 2017 Sustainability Awards Presented on May 22, the 2017 Manitoba Excellence in Sustainability Award (Water and Natural Area Stewardship category) was awarded to the Association of Manitoba Community Pastures (AMCP). Manitoba Beef Producers also earned an honourable mention for its role with the Species at Risk Partnership on Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) initiative, completing a beef sector sweep of the awards category. “Seeing both organizations recognized shows just how important beef producers are to conservation and enhancement of natural habitats and the environment in Manitoba,” said Tim Sopuck, Chief

Executive Officer of the Manitoba Heritage Habitat Corporation, which nominated Manitoba Beef Producers. He noted that pastures and haylands managed for cattle represent the single largest source of natural habitat in Manitoba’s agricultural region. Manitoba Beef Producers President Ben E. Fox added the work by beef producers to protect natural habitats for species at risk and preserve our natural grasslands, demonstrates how beef production can be a part of the solution for many of society’s environmental concerns. “Where bison once grazed and

maintained natural grasslands, cattle now have an important place in the protection and maintenance of this threatened natural ecosystem. Helping protect healthy grasslands and water supplies is beneficial not only for beef production, but for the overall environment,” Fox said. “As beef producers, we are some of the best stewards of the environment, and have long recognized the importance of a healthy environment to our industry and the integral role that producers play in protecting it.”

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In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Up to Date information on Manitoba Wildfires • Why Public Trust Matters • New government funding under Canadian Agriculture Partnership • Stay safe when towing vehicles

From Page 1 MBP is pleased to be involved with Environment and Climate Change Canada and its SARPAL initiative which offers cost-shared funding to promote grassland management practices that protect the habitat of grassland birds such as the Sprague’s pipit, Ferruginous hawk, Chestnut-collared longspur, Loggerhead shrike, Burrowing owl and the Baird’s sparrow. Already, 4,000 hectares (9,884 acres) of land in southwestern Manitoba has been impacted by this work in just one year. “The birds need the cattle”, says Tim Poole, Manitoba Important Bird Areas Coordinator with Nature

At left, Manitoba Beef Producers District 10 Director Mike Duguid of Camp Morton receives the Manitoba Excellence in Sustainability Award (Water and Natural Area Stewardship category) honourable mention from Swan River MLA Rick Wowchuk. (Photo by Keith Borkowsky) Manitoba, who adds, “without the cattle to graze, the grasslands get overgrown with brush or plowed under, and the birds lose important nesting grounds. It is essential to the survival of these at-risk birds that the grasslands be protected.” MBP congratulates the AMCP on winning the award. The work AMCP does is important to the growth of the beef sector in Manitoba and helps provide environmental protections to more than 350,000 acres of grassland in 20 pastures. The AMCP’s work, founded in efforts to rehabilitate marginal lands and make them a productive resource for cattle production

coming out of the dry 1930s is still important today to help grow the beef sector. AMCP’s efforts are critical in managing these valuable landscapes, enhancing water filtration and retention, carbon sequestration, soil conservation as well as the protection of wetlands and wildlife habitat. Manitoba’s beef industry is proud of the recognition that our producers received with these awards for their long-standing efforts to be good stewards of our environment. The awards were presented by Manitoba Sustainable Development.


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Wildfires burn across Province Province of Manitoba — Provincial resources including Manitoba Sustainable Development, Emergency Measures Organization and the Office of the Fire Commissioner continue to work on a number of fires around the province. Manitobans are reminded there are fire and travel restrictions in place across parts of south, central and western Manitoba. Warm temperatures and strong winds continue to make firefighting difficult in many areas. Good progress made by firefighters and response personnel on fires near the community of Ashern. Precipitation has assisted fire control efforts. Firefighters continue working hot spots. One hundred twenty firefighters from Ontario and four water bombers from Quebec are currently assisting firefighting activities across Manitoba. Burning permits in parts of the eastern, central and western Manitoba remain cancelled. New permits

will not be issued until conditions improve. Travel restrictions remain in place for parts of eastern, central and western Manitoba as well as the Mars Hill Wildlife Management area, the Duck Mountain and Porcupine Forest and southern Manitoba parks. Campfire restrictions are also in place for many provincial parks in southern Manitoba. Campfire restrictions for provincial Parks in the south Whiteshell have been lifted. Visitors to provincial parks should check with park staff for updated information (www.gov.mb.ca/sd/parks/fire_restriction.html). Additional information on restrictions is available at www.gov.mb.ca/sd/fire/Restrictions/ index.html. Please exercise caution when in or near forested areas. If using an ATV in areas where backcountry travel is permitted, please remember to stay on developed trails, stop frequently to check areas around the engine and exhaust for debris and carefully dispose of any debris found. A small

shovel, axe, and fire extinguisher should be carried with your ATV at all times. Open fires are prohibited from April 1 to November 15 annually, except under a burning permit or in enclosed, approved fire pits such as grated campfire pits in provincial campsites where permitted. Activities in wooded areas involving fireworks or sky lanterns may also require written authorization during this time period in certain areas. For information on required authorization or permits, please contact your local Sustainable Development office. Municipalities often implement their own restrictions. Please check with your local Manitoba Sustainable Development district offices and local municipal offices for information on burning bans or other restrictions. A list of local Manitoba Sustainable Development offices is available at www.gov.mb.ca/sd/wildlife/about/ who.html.

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Help us tell your story Send us photos and videos from your farm

Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry. If you are interested, please send them to Manitoba Beef Producers Communications Coordinator Keith Borkowsky by email: kborkowsky@mbbeef.ca


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With regional support from BDO, Farm Credit Canada and Parrish and Heimbecker

MAJOR JAY FOX MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP The Major Jay Fox Memorial scholarship has been developed by the Manitoba Outstanding Young Farmers in honour of Jay and the contribution that he made to agriculture in Canada. An annual scholarship will be presented to recognize a student continuing in the field of agriculture that has made a significant difference in their communities. One bursary will be awarded annually in the amount of $500.00. The following criteria have been developed and applications must be received no later than June 11, 2018. All applications can be sent electronically to “Manitoba Outstanding Young Farmers”, c/o Angie Fox to steadfast@xplornet.ca Eligibility: must be at least 17 years of age as of January 1, 2018 must use the bursary within two years. Requirements: Must submit a 250 word (maximum) typed essay stating their future goals in agriculture and “In your opinion, what could be done to retain a larger number of young people in agriculture in Manitoba (Canada)”. must submit proof of enrolment in a recognized institution (e.g. transcript). Must submit a list of community involvement (e.g. 4-H, community clubs, volunteer work, etc.) Post-secondary program or trades training must be a minimum of 6 months in duration Provide two letters of reference from persons outside of your family that indicate your work experience, community involvement, etc. All essays will become the property of Manitoba’s Outstanding Young Farmers and as such will be published at the discretion of the association with proper credit to the author. Preference will be given to those students pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or to those acquiring a skilled trade that would be beneficial to the rural economy. Completed applications must be submitted by 4:00 p.m. on June 11, 2018. Winners will be notified and award will be presented at the following years Manitoba’s Outstanding Young Farmers Regional Event.


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CCA talks trade with US Canadian Cattlemen's Association — CCA Executive Vice President Dennis Laycraft and Director, Government and International Relations John Masswohl participated in discussions at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) in Washington, DC. There, they met with key officials to discuss many trade issues including how Canada and the U.S. can work together to resolve ongoing trade issues with China and the European Union (EU). For example, the U.S. and Canada face identical Sanitary and Phyto-Sanitary (SPS) barriers in the EU that undercut their negotiated access for beef. Working together to remove these barriers will be more effective than going it alone. The CCA outlined several ways that Canada-U.S. beef and cattle

trade could be improved, such as by eliminating redundant inspections of beef and removing duplicative requirements for animal ID. The CCA also shared the Canadian perspective of how the Canada-U.S. live cattle trade might change once Canada implements the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) without U.S. participation. Given the tariff preference Canada will enjoy over the U.S. on beef exports, one likely outcome is on the trade in feeder cattle. Historically this trade has been predominantly from Canada to the U.S., but with the tariff preference it is likely that more feeder cattle will remain in Canada and it is possible that we will see some feeders moving from the U.S. into Canada.

UPCOMING EVENTS JUNE Manitoba Farm Safety Program - Intro to workplace safety and health issues and health legislation for Farmers. Various dates across Manitoba. 15-24 – Manitoba Beef Producers Cattle Tales exhibit at the Red River EX 20 – Hay Day at Friedensfeld Community Hall. Call 204622-2007 for details NOVEMBER 27-28 – Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association's first-ever Regenerative Agriculture Conference, Brandon

PURCHASE CALF PRICE INSURANCE BY MAY 31 AND PROTECT YOUR INVESTMENT. We know what it takes to prepare your livestock for market — and how an unexpected turn can impact your profits. That’s why the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program is there to help you protect your business. Choose from a range of coverage options every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

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Last call for six MBP bursaries: applications due June 1 Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) will again award six $500 bursaries to deserving Manitoba students in 2018. The bursaries are available to MBP members, or their children, who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or those acquiring a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. “Awarding these bursaries to our members and the children of our members is always a highlight of the year,” said Manitoba Beef Producers President Ben E. Fox. “Each year these bursaries go to deserving recipients, many of whom have returned to their communities following graduation and made substantial contributions to rural Manitoba.” Those applying must be at least 17

years old as of Jan. 1, 2018 and be an active beef producer or the child of one. Applicants must use the bursary within two years of receiving it and the program they are attending must be at least one year in duration. Interested students are required to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what the beef industry means to them, their

family, community and Manitoba at large. Students are also asked to include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at www.mbbeef.ca/producers/mbp-bursary/. The winners are selected by a group of MBP directors. The names of applicants are redacted from the essays to ensure fairness in the selection process. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 1, 2018. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified by July 31, 2018. The winning essays will also be reprinted in the September issue of Cattle Country.

Protect crops and livestock from fire The following information is from Manitoba Sustainable Development’s wildfire evacuation guidelines. Owners should have an evacuation plan for livestock threatened by fire. If animals can’t be moved to a safe area on your property, make and confirm transportation and feeding arrangements in advance. Obtain insurance coverage for all farm resources at risk from fire, including crops and livestock. The risk to farm animals can be reduced by preparing and maintaining fuel-reduced areas. Livestock can be moved and held there during a fire. Use a plowed or

heavily grazed field with a minimum of grass or stubble. If possible, this field should be shaded and located well away from any forested areas. Water should be available. Concrete or metal buildings located away from forest vegetation are another livestock shelter option. As a last resort, if you are unable to move livestock to a safer area, cut fences and turn the animals loose, as long as there is no danger to people or traffic. See: https://www.gov.mb.ca/ wildfire/evacuation_guidelines. html

Wildfires 1-800782-0076


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To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


mbbeef.ca

May 11, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Be prepared for high fire risk Government of Manitoba Press Release — Manitoba communities are reminded that taking steps before the fire season hits can greatly reduce the risk of wildfire damage, Growth, Enterprise and Trade Minister Blaine Pedersen, minister responsible for the Office of the Fire Commissioner, and Sustainable Development Minister Rochelle Squires announced May 4. “We know that conditions are dry this year and we have already seen wildfires cause significant damage to parts of southeast Manitoba,” said Pedersen. “We encourage all communities and property owners to continue working on prevention and taking steps to make their communities and properties safer.”

The Office of the Fire Commissioner (OFC) and Sustainable Development have been working proactively with many communities, helping them achieve the designation as FireSmart communities. FireSmart is living with and managing for fire on the landscape. By being FireSmart, communities reduce the threat to homes and properties by removing or reducing the hazards that put them at risk. Whether it is a permanent home or a summer cottage in a wooded area, everyone has a reason to take precautions. Small actions can make a big difference if a fire breaks out in a local area. “Our Wildfire Program is already busy with wildfire response, and we all need to work together

to minimize the risk of future fires,” Squires said. “A little bit of work ahead of time can save thousands of dollars in damage or even the loss of an entire community.” In collaboration with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction (ICLR), and The Co-operators, FireSmart Canada will be launching the fourth annual National Wildfire Community Preparedness Day in Canada May 5. On this day, communities across Canada are encouraged to participate in local projects to help reduce the risk of wildfire damage to their homes and neighbourhoods.

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and articles of interest

Deadline for MBP bursaries looms

to Manitoba’s Beef

Six awards available for students

In the News A look at the news

industry • Public trust is key in beef industry • New supplement leads to more beef, less methane • Big data means big opportunities • $174 million for Manitoba's agriculture sector • Bovine Tuberculosis probe closed • Ryan sets May 17 deadline for NAFTA Deal

Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) will again award six $500 bursaries to deserving Manitoba students in 2018. The bursaries are available to MBP members, or their children, who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or those acquiring a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. “Awarding these bursaries to our members and the children of our members is always a highlight of the year,” said Manitoba Beef Producers President Ben E. Fox. “Each year these bursaries go to deserving recipients, many of whom have returned to their communities following graduation and made substantial contributions to rural Manitoba.” Those applying must be at least 17 years old as of Jan. 1, 2018 and be an active beef producer or the child of one. Applicants must use the bursary within two years of receiving it and the program they are attending must

be at least one year in duration. Interested students are required to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Manitoba at large. Students are also asked to include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at www.mbbeef.ca/producers/mbp-bursary/. The winners are selected by a group of MBP directors. The names of applicants are redacted from the essays to ensure fairness in the selection process. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 1, 2018. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified by July 31, 2018. The winning essays will also be reprinted in the September issue of Cattle Country.

bris or items stored under decks and porches; • pruning low-hanging tree branches up to a height of two metres; • disposing of downed tree limbs, broken branches and other flammable items on the property; • ensuring address numbers

are visible from the street; • developing a phone/text list that can be used for fire evacuation alerts; and • distributing FireSmart information to neighbours. To find out more about Wildfire Community Preparedness Day and the FireSmart initiative, visit www. firesmartcanada.ca.

Fire Safety from Page 2 Every project, from mowing yards to mowing the right of ways, counts as a step toward the larger goal of a safer community. Making homes, cottages or communities FireSmart includes ideas such as: • clearing leaves, pine needles and combustible debris from roofs and gutters; • removing combustible de-


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Job Opening -- MBP Office Assistant Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) has an exciting opportunity available for someone interested in working as part of a small team committed to advancing Manitoba’s beef industry. MBP is the exclusive voice of the beef industry in Manitoba. It represents roughly 6,500 beef producers across the province. MBP is a non-profit organization with a elected board consisting of 14 producer-directors, each representing cattle producers in specific regions or districts of the Manitoba, along with four staff. MBP’s mission is to represent all beef producers through communication, advocacy, research, and education—within the industry to governments, consumers and others; to improve pros-

perity and ensure a sustainable future. Funded 100 per cent by producers through the collection of check-off dollars, MBP is committed to ensuring a sustainable future for the beef industry in the province for the benefit of our producers and all Manitobans. MBP is seeking a full-time Office Assistant to work as part of the team. Under the direction of the General Manager, the Office Assistant performs reception and general administrative functions, provides functional support to other members of the MBP staff as well as to MBP Directors, leads planning, coordination and promotion of the Annual General Meeting, solicits advertisers for MBP’s industry newspaper, and oversees office informatics needs.

Specifically, the Office Assistant: • provides first point of contact (includes receptionist duties) for producers, government officials and the general public; • provides administrative support to the General Manager and the Board of Directors; • provides assistance and services to producers including the Age Verification Program of the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency; • works in support of the MBP Communication Coordinator, assisting with the solicitation of advertisements and proofing of content for Cattle Country and the newsletter; • organizes, files, and retrieves documents and information, and maintain proper office filing systems and inventory lists, including office supplies and promotional/resource documents inventory; • records meeting minutes when required; • leads the planning of the Annual General Meeting (AGM), annual district meetings and numerous tradeshows; • provides general office administrative support, including taking the lead in the maintenance of informatics systems and related equipment; • provides support and carry out other duties as assigned. The ideal candidate must have: • Good organizational skills and detail focused • A commitment to client service • Computer software skills (Excel/PowerPoint/Word) • The ability to meet and enforce deadlines

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• The ability to multi-task and be adaptable to changing priorities • A solid team focus • A valid driver’s license While not necessarily required, it would be beneficial if the candidate had: • Knowledge and competencies related to office network maintenance and informatics • Experience working as an assistant in an office environment • Specific agriculture experience working with the beef sector The Office Assistant for Manitoba Beef Producers must be friendly, well organized and have the ability to communicate effectively in written, oral and e-mail form. The Office Assistant is required to show discretion and tact, and to work well as part of a team. The position reports directly to the General Manager. This position is located at MBP’s Winnipeg office. Normal working hours are 8:30 a.m., to 4:30 p. m., Monday through Friday, but the candidate

will be asked to periodically travel within the province and work irregular hours. MBP offers competitive compensation commensurate with the skills and experience of the successful candidate. Click here for a full job description. Please submit your resumé and cover letter by May 25, 2018 to Brian Lemon, MBP General Manager at blemon@mbbeef.ca. Thank you to all interested applicants, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

PURCHASE CALF PRICE INSURANCE BY MAY 31 AND PROTECT YOUR INVESTMENT. We know what it takes to prepare your livestock for market — and how an unexpected turn can impact your profits. That’s why the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program is there to help you protect your business. Choose from a range of coverage options every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

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New staff hired at MBP

Keith Borkowsky has been hired as the new Communications Coordinator for the Manitoba Beef Producers and the editor of Cattle Country. He has 17 years of experience in political communications and journalism. In that time, he has previously worked at the Manitoba Legislative Assembly, and as a reporter and section editor for several newspapers across western Canada. His work has been published in the the Winnipeg Free Press, Brandon Sun, and Portage Daily Graphic. Over those years, he has reported on the 2011 Flood of the Assiniboine River and Souris River valley systems as well as municipal, provincial and federal politics. He has a degree in political science from the University of Winnipeg as well as a journalism degree from University of Regina. He is completing a Master of Arts in Leadership through Royal Roads University. He can be reached at kborkowsky@mbbeef.ca.

Kate Cummings grew up on her family's cow-calf farm in eastern Ontario. Growing up in a cattle-producing family, she became familiar with many aspects of the agricultural industry such as crop production, ration formulation, sustainability, animal handling and overall the needs and requirements of producers. She has been involved in 4-H, Junior Herefords and other agriculture-based organizations for many years. She worked as a vet assistant, as an agronomy assistant and on a dairy farm. After graduating from McGill University, she worked in the feed industry, working for two years as a ruminant specialist gaining experience in both dairy and beef nutrition. In her role as our Beef Production Specialist, Kate will be leading our producer extension efforts and will be key to our support of research and project delivery. Kate’s email is kcummings@mbbeef.ca


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Canadian Agricultural Partnership Update Looking for information on programming under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership (CAP) in Manitoba? Check out Manitoba Agriculture’s website: https://www. gov.mb.ca/agriculture/canadian-agricultural-partnership/index.html In early April the federal and Manitoba governments signed the bilateral agreement to implement CAP in Manitoba. This is a five-year agreement to strategically invest $176 million in Manitoba’s agricultural and agri-food sector. It is the successor to Growing Forward 2 which ended March 31, 2018. The bilateral agreement ensures Manitoba’s priorities, opportunities and issues are reflected under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership. Farmers, agri-processors, industry organizations,

researchers and industry service providers will be able to apply for funding for specific activities and strategic investments under the streamlined Ag Action Manitoba program. Activities and strategic investments will support a sustainable, profitable and environmentally responsible agriculture sector, with a focus on industry-led research, innovation, market development and competitiveness. It focuses on six main areas: science, research and innovation; markets and trade; environmental sustainability and climate change; value-added agriculture and agri-food processing; public trust; and risk management. Under the CAP, farmers will also continue to have access to a

complete and effective suite of business risk-management programs to help them manage significant risks that threaten the viability of their farm. See also: https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/canadian-agricultural-partnership/business-risk-management-programs/index.html Farmers, agri-processors, industry organizations, researchers and other stakeholders are encouraged to sign up for the digital newsletter at www.gov.mb. ca/agriculture/online-resources/ signup-for-growing-manitoba-ag. html to receive updates on program information. Details will also be shared on Manitoba Agriculture’s Twitter channel at www.twitter.com/MBGovAg.

Helpful information links for producers Looking for the latest crop reports, pasture and hay listings, wildfire and drought information? The following websites may be of use to you. Manitoba Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report provides information on progress of seeding and crop establishment, crop development, any pest activity including weeds, insects and disease, harvest progress, crop yields and grades, fall field work progress, and status of winter cereal crop seeding and establishment. In addition, it provides information on haying progress and estimated yields, as well as pasture conditions. See: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/ crops/seasonal-reports/crop-report-archive/index.html

Looking for current agricultural weather conditions? The Manitoba government maintains a system of ag weather stations where the data is retrieved hourly and the current conditions pages are updated shortly after the hour. This includes information such as temperature, soil temperature, soil moisture, precipitation, wind speed, etc. The site also contains daily regional summaries. See: https://www.gov. mb.ca/agriculture/weather/current-ag-weather-conditions.html Looking for pasture to rent or to rent out some pasture? See the following Manitoba Agriculture pasture listing website for more information: https://www.gov. mb.ca/agriculture/online-resources/pasture-for-rent-and-pasture-

wanted.html Looking for hay? Check out Manitoba Agriculture’s hay listing website at: https://web31.gov. mb.ca/haylistclntextrnl Manitoba Sustainable Development maintains a Manitoba Drought Monitor website. It contains a variety of information, including precipitation conditions, reservoir conditions and access to the Canadian and US drought monitor. See: https:// www.gov.mb.ca/waterstewardship/water_info/drought/index. html

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Helpful links from Previous Page 7 Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada maintains the Canadian Drought Monitor website which gives a national overview of drought conditions. See: http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/ programs-and-services/droughtwatch/canadian-drought-monitor/?id=1463575104513 Information about burning restrictions and wildfires is available from a couple of sources. Manitoba Sustainable Development has a wildfire information page that includes the latest fire situation reports and updates, fire bulletins and information on fire and travel restrictions issued by the provincial government. See: Wildfire Information page. It also contains the FireView map and table showing the location and status of wildfires in the province. FireView is updated hourly between 11:05 a.m. and 3:05 p.m. with the most current tabular and map data available at that time. As well, municipal governments can implement their own local burning restrictions. For more details see: Municipal Burning Restrictions Map.

Don't Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to mbfiinfo@gmail. com to sign up.

Dear young cattle producers, Are you under the age of 35 and looking to make a difference for your industry? Think about the Young Cattlemen’s Council (YCC)! Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is looking for their new appointment to the YCC, and is inviting young cattle producers who care about our industry to come forward. The vision of the YCC is to cultivate youthful leadership by exposure to industry policy development while allowing for the opportunity to gain experience and bring fresh insight to the table. The YCC strives to be a conduit of information between industry organizations and the youth of the beef industry. For more details see: youngcattlemenscouncil.com If you are actively involved in the beef industry, have an interest in policy development and government relations, and want to make a difference, this is an opportunity to work with the MBP board of directors and represent the youth in our Manitoba industry on a national stage. This is a chance to travel across Canada and engage with other young beef producers to better our industry. If you find this to be interesting, please submit your name and contact information, along with a short letter (maximum 1000 words) outlining why this opportunity is of interest to you, and how you would make the best representative of Manitoba’s young cattlemen and women. Submit your name and letter to MBP General Manager Brian Lemon at blemon@mbbeef.ca no later than May 18, 2018. MBP’s board of directors will consider all applications and make the selection from all the names submitted.


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To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


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March 16, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Manitoba Beef Producers to offer six bursaries in 2018

Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) will again award six $500 bursaries to deserving Manitoba students in 2018. The bursaries are available to MBP members, or their children, who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or those acquiring a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. “Awarding these bursaries to our members and the children of our members is always a highlight of the year,” said Manitoba Beef Producers President Ben E. Fox. “Each year these bursaries go to deserving recipients, many of

whom have returned to their communities following graduation and made substantial contributions to rural Manitoba.” Those applying must be at least 17 years old as of Jan. 1, 2018 and be an active beef producer or the child of one. Applicants must use the bursary within two years of receiving it and the program they are attending must be at least one year in duration. Interested students are required to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Manitoba at large. Students are also asked to include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture.

Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at www.mbbeef.ca/producers/mbp-bursary/. The winners are selected by a group of MBP directors. The names of applicants are redacted from the essays to ensure fairness in the selection process. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 1, 2018. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified by July 31, 2018. The winning essays will also be reprinted in the September issue of Cattle Country.

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In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • MFGA Announces New Chairperson at 2018 AGM • Province announces new CEO for Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation • Province unveils MadeIn-Manitoba environmental vision • Post-calving nutrition determines next year’s success

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Share Your Views Today Modernizing the Agricultural Crown Lands Program Manitoba Agriculture is aiming to recognize modern agricultural practices in the administration of the Agricultural Crown Lands (ACL) Program. Efficient, innovative use of agricultural Crown lands provides an opportunity to increase the forage productivity to generate more feed, which enables the growth of the livestock industry. The provincial government invites you to provide your thoughts and suggestions by reviewing the public consultation paper (PDF 59 KB). They have also provided answers to frequently asked questions (PDF 98 KB) about ACL. Send your written comments, on or before Friday, April 6, 2018 to: Email: Manitoba Agriculture with the subject line ACL Program Consultation Mail: Attention: ACL Program Consultation Manitoba Agriculture 36 Armitage Ave, P.O. Box 1286 Minnedosa, MB R0J 1E0 Fax: 204-867-6578 Or contact your Manitoba Agriculture Agricultural Crown Lands District Farm Production Extension Specialist.

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MBP E-Newsletter

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Get Up and Running with a Manitoba Livestock Associations Loan Guarantee “[Association members] deal directly with the association, not the lender, and they can borrow up to $500,000 from their association, using the livestock they purchase as collateral,” said Rozecki. The maximum lending limit for an individual association is $8 million. Members can finance 100 per cent of their purchases, with feeder associations requiring members to deposit five per cent in the association’s assurance fund. Breeder associations require a 10 per cent deposit. Kristina Unruh, Clayton Unruh and daughter

Manitoba livestock producers are independent, but they’re also open to co-operating with their neighbours so all may benefit. It was this spirit of collaboration that gave rise to Manitoba’s livestock associations. “We started in 1999,” said Sherry Rozecki, President of the Association of Manitoba Feeder Co-operatives, an umbrella organization that represents the mutual interests of feeder and breeder associations in Manitoba. With six feeder and two breeder associations now operating, Rozecki is optimistic about the growth of these associations in Manitoba. “People who use the program continue using it over and over,” she said. The Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC) proudly supports the efforts of livestock association members through the Manitoba Livestock Associations Loan Guarantee Program (MLALG). The program provides the participating lender with a guarantee that the funds will be repaid. Associations borrow money from a participating lender, and then lend funds directly to their members to purchase livestock. The MLALG gives members the benefit of lower costs associated with more favorable financing terms than they would be able to access individually. Members also benefit from reduced handling costs because of the association’s higher sales volume. Clayton Unruh, a member of the A-1 Cattle Co-Op since January 2017, understands the benefits of association membership. “The feeder association fits in well, because it doesn’t tie up all your collateral,” said Unruh. Unruh prefers financing directly through his association. As a beginning farmer with limited capital, he receives financing through the association that is more favourable than what he’d receive elsewhere.

New members like Unruh soon find that livestock associations, by their nature, promote camaraderie and mentorship. “They’re a friendly fraternity. There’s trust involved,” said Rozecki. “You’re dealing with people on common ground. Shared ownership means that members want each other to succeed.” “The association adds experience and safeguards into the process,” said Unruh. Unruh noted that he could rely on the mentorship of existing members, who have a vested interest in his success. “I had help with buying cattle – a check [by more experienced members] to see if they were worth what I was paying,” he said. Unruh calls it an ‘appreciating’ loan. “The animals gain value faster than costs occur, and as long as the market is good, you should make money.” When a member’s feeder livestock mature, they can be sold for profit (minus what’s owing on the association loan), but feeder association members can also roll heifers over to a breeder association. In this situation, the breeder association lends money to the producer to pay off the feeder association contract. Livestock associations in Manitoba are small, but growing in size and number. “If we get more awareness about this program, membership will only go up,” said Rozecki. For more information about Manitoba’s feeder and breeder associations, visit the website for the Association of Manitoba Feeders Co-operatives at www.amfc.biz. For more information about the Manitoba Livestock Associations Loan Guarantee Program, visit the MASC website at www.masc.mb.ca or contact MASC’s Guarantee Program Specialist at 204-239-3244.

“The association isn’t focused on making a profit, it’s more about supporting my success” – Clayton Unruh

PO# 4501061890 Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter Run Date - Fri. Dec. 8, 2017 MASC MB Beef_CU_Dec 8.17.indd 1

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Job Opening -- MBP Communications Coordinator MBP is seeking a full-time Communications Coordinator for its office situated in Winnipeg. Reporting to the General Manager, the Communications Coordinator is responsible for the development and delivery of an overall communications strategy. The Coordinator assists in internal and external communications with producers, the media, the public and other agriculture and industry associations. The Coordinator will utilize traditional communication tools, social media and other outreach methods to perform these duties. Who is Manitoba Beef Producers? MBP is the exclusive voice of Manitoba’s beef industry. Our role and mission is to represent the province’s 6,500 beef producers through communication, research, advocacy and education.

The Communications Coordinator’s key responsibilities include: • Leading the publication of MBP’s newspaper Cattle Country; • Production of a bi-weekly electronic newsletter; • Developing, in coordination with the General Manager and the Communications Committee, MBP’s annual communication strategy, including budgets for marketing and promotions, trade shows and other awareness-building events and activities; • Leading implementation of MBP’s communication strategy; • Continually seeking strategic opportunities to advance the objectives and perception of Manitoba’s beef sector; • Writing and editing news releases, speaking points, web content and a variety of other communications materials; • Informing beef producers of the activities MBP undertakes on their behalf; • Increasing awareness by the general public of the beneficial production practices carried out by beef producers and the importance of this sector to Manitoba’s economy; • Organizing MBP’s participation in trade shows and other promotional and awareness events, and staffing these events as required; • Coordinating all aspects of the development of MBP’s Annual Report; • Helping to organize and promote MBP’s district meetings and Annual General Meeting, including the development of print and radio ads, mailers, etcetera; • Maintaining MBP’s website and managing its social media presence; • Other administrative and support duties as required.

Continued to Page 5


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Qualifications: • Postsecondary education in communications, journalism, public relations or a related field, or, a suitable combination of education and experience; • A minimum of three years’ experience in providing communication services; • Familiarity with and understanding of beef production a definite asset; • Strong oral and written communication skills essential, as well as a very strong attention to detail; • Skilled in writing and editing news releases, newsletters, articles, columns, web and social media content, etcetera; • Experience in using social media to raise the overall profile of an organization and to keep members informed of upcoming events and news of interest; • Experience in working with the media; • Experience in writing documents for government and industry an asset; • Ability to work on multiple projects simultaneously in a fast-paced environment; • Experience with organizing and publicizing events, e.g. meetings, trade shows, special promotions, etcetera; • Experience in dealing with the public; • Graphic design skills would be an asset; • Strong technical abilities, i.e. experience with the full suite of Microsoft Office programs, web content and development programs, and the Adobe suite of programs, notably Acrobat, Photoshop and InDesign; and, • A highly motivated self-starter with the capacity to work both in a self-directed manner, and as part of a small team. For more on the Communication Coordinator’s responsibilities please click here. Some occasional travel is required, mostly within Manitoba. Occasional evening work may be required.

Application Process: Please submit your cover letter and resumé, along with at least at least 2 writing samples (approx. 400-1000 words) and the names of 3 references, by March 30, 2018 to: Mr. Brian Lemon, General Manager, blemon@mbbeef.ca . Manitoba Beef Producers encourages applications from all qualified individuals. We thank all interested applicants; however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.


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LUNDAR'S 50TH ANNUAL ALLBREED BEEF CATTLE SALE APRIL 7, 2018 ----- 1 PM CENTRE - LUNDAR AGRI-ED , r r

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View catalogue at: www.buyagro.com


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Highlights of 2018-19 Manitoba Provincial Budget The 2018-19 Manitoba budget was delivered by Finance Minister Cameron Friesen on March 12. Following are some highlights. Manitoba’s carbon tax will impose a $25 tax per tonne of greenhouse gas emissions effective September 1, 2018 and will apply to gas, liquid, and solid fuel products intended for combustion in Manitoba. The tax will be 5.32 cents a litre on gasoline, 6.71 cents a litre on diesel, 3.87 cents a litre on propane, and 4.74 cents a cubic metre on natural gas. Diesel and gas marked for farm use will be exempt from the tax. As well, all agricultural process-related emissions are exempted from the carbon tax, i.e. emissions from soil and animals. The province will create a $102 million Conservation Trust Fund intended to “provide significant financial support to achieving the goals and objectives of the provincial climate strategy, particularly those related to conserving ecosystems, green infrastructure (natural assets), water quality and carbon sinks. The independently from government administered Trust would provide matching funds to municipalities, community groups, non-government conservation organizations and academic institutions.” The Winnipeg Foundation will manage this Trust, with the Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation administering the use of the proceeds. The province again referenced the development of a Livestock Growth Strategy, but with no

additional details provided. Also identified was a new Sustainable Agriculture Incentives Program, which the province stated “will grow our livestock industry and align with our Made-In-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan.” Details are pending. The province made the following commitments: • providing targeted financial assistance of $1.5 million to agriculture producers in advance of the adoption of beneficial management practices to improve environmental sustainability of their operations; • investing an additional $3.6 million for the farmland school tax rebate program; • providing a $133,000 increase in funding for the Veterinary Diagnostic Services Laboratory to purchase specialized equipment; and • increasing the Wildlife Damage Compensation Program budget by $151,000 to mitigate damages caused by wildlife. Coated fertilizer grain bins will be exempt from the PST starting May 1. Re: water management, the province has committed to providing: • $70 million toward the channels project to improve regulation of water levels on Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin, and to enhance flood protection for communities, First Nations, farms and businesses; • $33.6 million to rehabilitate and reconstruct provincial dams, flood protection infrastructure and agricultural drains,

including projects at Fairford Dam on PTH 6, at the Shellmouth Dam and reservoir, and improvements to river control structure and outlet structure at the Portage Diversion. The province is investing $40 million for green projects, such as green infrastructure to adapt to climate change, green technology to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, and transition to a low-carbon economy and support for green best practices and training in emissions-intensive sectors such as agriculture. Effective for 2019, the calculation of the Education Property Tax Credit will be based on school taxes and the $250 deductible will be eliminated. The Seniors’ Education Property Tax Credit would also be calculated on the school tax portion. This change makes all property tax credits, including the Education Property Tax Credit, Farmland School Tax Rebate, Seniors’ School Tax Rebate, and the School Tax Credit for Homeowners based on school taxes. Effective for the 2019 tax year, the Basic Personal Amount (BPA) will be increased from $9,382 to $10,392, equal to $109 tax savings for an individual. Effective for the 2020 tax year, the BPA will be increased from $10,392 to $11,402, equal to another $109 tax savings for an individual. This increases the BPA by a combined $2,020 by 2020. For more details see the budget documents.


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Job Opening - MBFI General Manager Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives (MBFI) is seeking a knowledgeable, experienced and energetic person to become our General Manager to drive innovation at our research farm. The General Manager will work out of MBFI’s Brookdale farm site (north of Brandon) and be responsible for providing day-to-day leadership to all the activities at all three of MBFI’s farm sites. As a centre of agricultural innovation engaging in science-based research, MBFI is a collaboration between Manitoba Agriculture, theManitoba Beef Producers, Ducks Unlimited Canada, and the Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association, MBFI is committed to advancing the long-term profitability and sustainability of producers, enhancing the profitability of beef and forage production by evaluating foundational research to the ranch level, transferring the knowledge gained to producers, cultivating partnerships between beef producers, governments, and private stakeholders interested in advancing the industry, and fostering the growth and understanding of sustainable beef production. POSITION SUMMARY The General Manager (GM) is hired as the key on-site staff leader for MBFI. The GM is expected to direct and provide leadership to staff, manage financial and human resources, oversee implementation of research, demonstration and outreach activities, and represent MBFI to partners, stakeholders, visitors and the general public. The GM is responsible for the implementation of the strategic goals and operations of MBFI as determined by MBFI’s Board of Directors and as directed by the MBFI Management Committee. The GM provides leadership, direction to MBFI staff, represents MBFI to stakeholders, and provides general management of the MBFI’s operations. CANDIDATE REQUIREMENTS • Candidates for the position must have a university degree in animal science or veterinary medicine, and a minimum of 5 years of experience* working on a beef cattle operation. Alternatively, an acceptable combination of education and experience may also be considered. • Ideally the ideal candidate will also have knowledge and experience in systems-based approaches (such as Holistic Management) and have knowledge of poly-cropping. • Applicants must have a detailed knowledge of cattle production practices. • Applicants must have experience managing staff, and ideally managing staff on a beef farm operation. • The successful candidate must have excellent written and verbal communication skills • Applicants must have the ability to apply knowledge, research and analysis and collaborate with other professionals, • Applicants must be able to write and manage funding grants. • Applicants must be comfortable leading extension discussions. • Applicants must be willing work flexible hours and travel within the province, and occasionally across Canada. For a complete job description please click here. * Experience is defined as working full-time and having the breadth of decision-making for a typical beef cattle farm operation. MBFI offers a competitive salary and benefits package. More information about the General Manager position and MBFI may be found at www.mbfi.ca MBFI will be accepting applications until March 30, 2018. Interested applicants should forward a cover letter and resume to: Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc. Attention: Don Guilford, Management Committee Chair Email: ghr@mymts.net


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News Release Canadian beef producers applaud signature of CPTPP Agreement March 08, 2018 Calgary, AB – International Trade Minister François-Philippe Champagne gathered with his counterparts from 10 other countries today in Santiago, Chile today to sign the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for TransPacific Partnership (CPTPP), also referred to as TPP11. Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) Vice President David Haywood-Farmer, a beef farmer from Savona, British Columbia, was present to witness the signing. Haywood-Farmer congratulates the Government of Canada for joining the new trade agreement, which provides beef producers with competitive access to Japan, Vietnam and other dynamic markets in the Asia-Pacific region. “This is an extremely positive development for Canada’s entire beef sector,” said Haywood-Farmer. “The CCA is very proud to have been a principal advocate for resurrecting the market access provisions of the TPP. I applaud and thank Minister Champagne and Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay for their diligence and leadership in achieving this landmark agreement,” he said. The CPTPP is a massive opportunity for Canada’s beef sector, particularly in the Japanese market. Japan imported US$4.4 billion of beef in 2017. Canada was the fourth largest beef supplier to Japan with $133 million, behind Australia ($1.9 billion), United States ($2.1 billion), and New Zealand ($152 million). Those trade figures were achieved with Canada, the U.S. and New Zealand all paying a 38.5 per cent tariff on beef exports to Japan, while Australia enjoys an increasingly preferential tariff. Once the CPTPP is implemented, Canadian beef will immediately be imported into Japan at the same preferential tariff as Australian beef. We will also be relieved from the current Japanese 50 per cent safeguard tariff on frozen beef that has been in place since July 2017. Importantly, we will enjoy a competitive advantage over American beef as the U.S. will not be part of the agreement and will remain at a much higher tariff. This new market access in the Asia Pacific region is of vital importance to the hard-working farm families who operate Canada’s 60,000 beef farms and feedlots. Earlier estimates for the original TPP including the U.S indicated that Canadian beef exports to Japan would see an increase of over $200 million. More recent analysis from the Government of Canada indicates that without the U.S., CPTPP is expected to increase Canadian beef exports by $380 million. The CCA believes this increase is realistic and will be enjoyed across Canada with processors in Eastern Canada and thriving regional brands like Ontario Corn Feed Beef and Prince Edward Island Certified Beef also benefitting alongside their Western counterparts and the Alberta Beef brand. Moreover, the CPTPP will be beneficial for the Canadian economy. When the Canadian economy is growing, and Canadians are confident in their financial situation, domestic demand for Canadian beef remains strong. For further information, contact: Gina Teel Communications Manager Canadian Cattlemen’s Association 403-275-8558 x 306 | teelg@cattle.ca www.cattle.ca The CCA is the national voice for Canada’s beef cattle industry representing 60,000 beef farms and feedlots. Visit www.cattle.ca


e s a c w o h S s ’ t Le ! y r t s u d n I r u O • Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. • We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. • What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry.

If you have photos and videos you would like to share contact MBP Communications Coordinator Chad Saxon at csaxon@mbbeef.ca


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To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


mbbeef.ca

March 2, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

NCO increase takes effect April 1 Let’s try this again. After the approvals process caused a delay in September, Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) has announced it will start collecting the increased National Check-Off (NCO) of $2.50/head on behalf of the Canadian Beef Check- Off Agency (the Agency) April 1. The much talked about increase from $1 to $2.50/head, has been in the planning stages for the past two years as a means of supporting the goals laid out in the National Beef Strategy. Manitoba producers passed a resolution supporting

the increase at MBP’s 37th Annual General Meeting in February 2016. MBP had initially intended to enact the increase on Sept. 1 2017 but a delay in the Farm Products Council of Canada approval processes forced the delay. Released in 2015, the National Beef Strategy is based around four pillars – connectivity, productivity, competitiveness and beef demand – that each contain a number of goals and outcomes, which were developed by an industry-led planning group. That same group also determined that if the

beef industry is to meet those goals an increase in the checkoff, the first since 2002, was required. Although the resolution by MBP’s membership passed roughly two years ago, a great deal of work to implement it has been taking place behind the scenes in the proceeding months. MBP General Manager Brian Lemon says the association has been working with the national Agency and lawyers to ensure all the proper procedural steps were taken to enact the increase. He added that both SaskatchContinued to Page 2

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National Check-Off increase ... ewan and Alberta are also expected to enact the increase April 1 while B.C. will be begin in July. MBP President Ben Fox said the move to begin collecting $2.50 has been a long and sometimes drawn out process but he added that MBP believes in the National Beef Strategy and the potential it holds for the industry. “The increase is needed to support the strategy which, we believe, will ultimately lead to a stronger industry for our producers here in Manitoba,” Fox said. “The check-off increase will be invested into market development, promotion and research initiatives that will continue to advance the Canadian beef industry as a whole,” added Canadian Beef Check-Off Agency General Manager Melinda German. German noted that studies show producers have received a strong return on their checkoff investment and can expect that to continue into the future. “The benefit-cost ratio of the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off was calculated at returning $14 to the industry for every $1 that was invested between 2011 and 2014. "This is incredible value for the $1 check-off, and we expect to continue seeing a high rate of return for the industry with an increased check-off across

INCREASE TO THE CANADIAN BEEF CATTLE CHECK-OFF Canadian beef producers continue to support research, market development and promotion for Canadian beef and cattle through the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off. To achieve the objectives of the National Beef Strategy, the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off will increase from $1 to $2.50 per head. This increase will ensure support of the industry’s long-term vision of a dynamic and profitable Canadian industry with sustainable beef demand, competitiveness, productivity and connectivity. The Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off delivers measurable value to Canadian beef producers, bringing $14 in benefits to producers for every $1 producers invest through research, market development and promotion initiatives across the country. For information on the value of the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off, visit: www.canadabeef.ca/national-check-off For information on the National Beef Strategy, and to learn more about the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off increase in your province, please contact your provincial cattle association below. Sign up for the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off newsletter at http://bit.ly/cdnbeefcheckoff

the country.” At their May 2017 meeting the MBP board decided that 67.5 per cent of the check-off will go towards market development and promotion initiatives such as promoting the Canadian Beef brand, the Canadian Beef Centre of Excellence and global marketing of Canadian Beef. Twenty-three per cent of the monies collected go towards beef and cattle research, three per cent to Issues Management and 6.5 per cent has been earmarked for investment into the marketing and research priorities as directed by the MBP board. Lemon said he recognizes that although the resolution to support the increase passed with near unanimous consent, there will be some MBP members unhappy to see an additional $1.50 check-off on their animals. “We know there are always financial pressures on our mem-

bers and margins are razor thin,” he said. “However these checkoffs, whether it be our provincial check-off or the national check-off, fund our work on behalf of members. It enables us to market their product, support research and to advocate with governments and other organizations on their behalf. “The beef industry is fortunate to have a number of dedicated and talented people working to ensure everything is in place for all involved to be successful. The funds collected through the provincial and nationa check-offs are the lifeblood of that work." Lemon added that MBP’s $3 per head checkoff will not be increasing. The provincial check-off funds MBP’s operations and the association’s annual allocation to the Canadian Cattleman’s Association to support their activities on behalf of producers.


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Growing Your Herd with a Manitoba Livestock Associations Loan Guarantee Four years ago, Allen Rawluk began with a herd of eight Black Angus heifers. This spring, he and his brother Jake calved out 180 near Moosehorn, Manitoba, and they plan to expand the herd further. Their plans are based on the essentials of raising livestock in Manitoba: hard work, attention to detail and taking advantage of available support. “We first heard of the Baldy Mountain Feeders Associations Co-op by word-of-mouth from one of the members,” said Rawluk. Feeder and breeder associations in Manitoba are overseen by the Association of Manitoba Feeder Co-operatives (AMFC). They act as intermediaries between banks and livestock producers.

“The association helped fast-track our operation to get up and running” – Allen Rawluk “Producers can borrow up to $500,000 from their association, and use the cattle they purchase as collateral,” said Sherry Rozecki, president of the AMFC. The maximum lending limit for an individual association is $8 million. The Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC) proudly supports their efforts through the Manitoba Livestock Associations Loan Guarantee (MLALG) Program. The MLALG gives members the benefit of lower costs associated with more favourable financing terms than they would be able to access individually. Members also benefit from reduced handling costs because of the association’s higher sales volume. MASC guarantees funds borrowed by the association from participating lenders to purchase eligible livestock. “The idea was to roll the heifers into a breeder contract,” said Rawluk. Like Rawluk, some producers are members of both a feeder association and a breeder association. If you’ve raised heifers through the first year, you can roll them over to a breeder contract. In this situation, the breeder association can lend money to the producer to pay off the feeder association contract. For their services and administration, feeder associations require members to deposit five per cent in the association’s assurance fund. Breeder associations require a 10 per cent deposit.

Jake Rawluk, Allen Rawluk, Paul Gobin (MASC)

association is there to help. It’s a good feeling knowing the guy you talk to knows what you’re talking about.” “Being young, it’s a good environment to grow up with,” said Jake Rawluk, Allen’s younger brother. Now, after four years of membership, the circle of mentorship has turned. Each of the Rawluks’ Black Angus herd can be traced genetically, ranked by weight, health, consumption, disposition and so on, all stored digitally. Allen, now a board member of his association, can advise on and demonstrate cutting edge practices for pasturing, calving and more. “It’s a friendly fraternity. There’s trust involved,” said Sherry Rozecki. “You’re dealing with people on common ground. Shared ownership means that members want each other to succeed.” With 51 members, Central Plains Cattle Breeders Co-Op is the largest breeder association in Manitoba, but Allen Rawluk sees growth in the association’s future, from inside and out. “We want new members,” he said. “and we want to grow the operations of our existing members.” Rozecki agrees with the continued growth of associations. “If we get more awareness about this program, membership will only go up.” For more information about Manitoba’s feeder and breeder associations, visit the Association of Manitoba Feeders Co-operatives website at www.amfc.biz. For more information about the Manitoba Livestock Associations Loan Guarantee Program, visit the MASC website at www.masc.mb.ca or contact MASC’s Guarantee Program Specialist at 204-239-3244.

The Rawluk brothers run separate herds, but both see the advantages of association membership. “There’s the ease of it,” said Allen Rawluk. “Your association application and financing is reviewed by the association, and all aspects of your operation are looked at. If you need to know something about the business, someone from the

PO# 4501061891 Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter Run Date - Fri. Mar. 3, 2018 MASC MB Beef_AR_Mar 3.18.indd 1

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In the News

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Notice to Producers

A look at the news The following warning was recently issued by the Canadian Beef Breeds Council: and articles of interest The CBBC wishes to alert producers to a reto Manitoba’s Beef cent incidence of seedstock producers from industry • Pasture blends • Grass cattle see strength in largely local marketings • Beef producers get trade rundown at AGM • Manitoba Beef Producers pushes for predation action • Be leery of buying fat bulls

multiple breed associations having been contacted by an individual wanting to buy cattle. The individual may make mention that they will be responsible for transportation arrangements. After several emails discussing the details, an authentic looking cheque is sent to the breeder for the cattle. This is then followed by notification that the order has changed and asking for a partial refund to be deposited to a bank account that they give you.

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LUNDAR'S 50TH ANNUAL ALLBREED BEEF CATTLE SALE APRIL 7, 2018 ----- 1 PM CENTRE - LUNDAR AGRI-ED , r r

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View catalogue at: www.buyagro.com


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Province announces Crown land consultations Government Media Release

The Manitoba government has launched a consultation focused on agricultural Crown lands, to ensure upcoming policy changes reflect the views of the livestock industry while improving fairness and transparency in the system, Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler announced Feb. 20. “This is an important step toward modernizing the agricultural Crown lands leasing policies with the goal of supporting a thriving livestock industry in our province,” said Eichler. “I encourage all Manitobans with an interest in this issue to review the consultation document and share their opinions. This will help guide our government’s policies and ensure the new tendering process is transparent and accountable.” A consultation document released today highlights a number of areas to provide input on including: • possible limits on how much agricultural Crown land a person or farm entity can hold under a lease or permit, • what additional eligibility criteria should be considered to hold a lease or permit, • design considerations of a forage tendering process, and • appropriate terms for the length of forage leases and

Share Your Views Today Modernizing the Agricultural Crown Lands Program

Manitoba Agriculture is aiming to recognize modern agricultural practices in the administration of the Agricultural Crown Lands (ACL) Program. Efficient, innovative use of agricultural Crown lands provides an opportunity to increase the forage productivity to generate more feed, which enables the growth of the livestock industry. The provincial government invites you to provide your thoughts and suggestions by reviewing the public consultation paper (PDF 59 KB). They have also provided answers to frequently asked questions (PDF 98 KB) about ACL. Send your written comments, on or before Friday, April 6, 2018 to: Email: Manitoba Agriculture with the subject line ACL Program Consultation Mail: Attention: ACL Program Consultation Manitoba Agriculture 36 Armitage Ave, P.O. Box 1286 Minnedosa, MB R0J 1E0 Fax: 204-867-6578 Or contact your Manitoba Agriculture Agricultural Crown Lands District Farm Production Extension Specialist. renewable permits. The public consultation document is available online at www. gov.mb.ca/agriculture under Surveys and Consultations. The deadline to submit comments is April 6. The new Agricultural Crown Lands Leases and Permits Regulation was introduced in December 2017 and deals with forage leases, hay and grazing permits, and cropping leases. As of Jan. 1, agricultural Crown lands for

grazing and haying will be made available through a tendering system, consistent with how these lands are accessed for other uses such as growing crops. The minister noted the system will ensure prices paid by producers for these leases and permits will more accurately reflect their market value. He added the shift to a tendering system for all agricultural Crown lands is expected to be in place for fall 2018.


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Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Outlet Channel public open houses scheduled Manitoba Infrastructure is hosting two open house events to discuss the proposed Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels Project. These events are intended to provide the public with an opportunity to learn about the project and to provide comments on environmental concerns. The first open house will take place on Tuesday March 6, 2018 at the community hall in Moosehorn, MB. The second is scheduled for Thursday March 8, 2018 at the Canad Inns Destination Centre, 1824 Pembina Hwy in Winnipeg, MB. Both events will take place from 2:00pm to 4:00pm and 6:00pm to 8:00pm. Brief presentations will be given with open discussion to follow. The project website (http://www.gov.mb.ca/mit/wms/lmblsmoutlets/index.html) was recently updated, and that the project is now featured on the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency’s (CEAA) registry at http://www.ceaa.gc.ca/050/details-eng. cfm?evaluation=80148. Please continue to visit these sites for more information.


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The Cannadian Food Innspection Agency (CFIA) is dediccated to safeguaarding food, animals and plants too enhance the health and well-beinng of Canadianns, the environm ment and economy. Livestocck traceability iss the ability to follow w an animal or group g of animals during all stagges of its life. Theere are three main pillars to livestockk traceability syystems: • Identification of liveestock with an approved indicaator; • Identification of preemises wherre livestock aree kept, asseembled or dispoosed of; and, • Repoorting events reelated to livesstock such as movement m of anim mals from one premises p to anotther.

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Liveestock Id dentificattion and Traceabbility Proggram (TRA ACE) – Regulato R ory Updatte 1 Maarch 2018 This update u aims to provide an ovverview of proggress on proposed amendm ments to Part XV of the federal Heealth of Animaals Regulationss (hereafter reeferred to the “Regulations”) that peertains to livesstock identificaation and traceeability. Industry and goverrnment workiing together ttowards full ttraceability t last decade, industry andd governmentt representativves have been working Over the togethher to develop strategies andd action plans for moving livvestock traceability initiativess forwarrd in Canada. This hard worrk and effort haas resulted in regulatory reqquirements for identiffying and reporting the slaugghter of cattle, bison, sheep and pigs, as w well as reporting the movem ment of pigs. TThese activitiess help to safegguard the health and safety of livestock and the food supply c hain. Consuultations with inndustry and prrovinces identtified some gaps and opporttunities to improvve the livestocck traceability ssystem in Cannada. Feedbacck received seet the foundaation for changges being propposed to the R Regulations. TThe objective oof the proposed d regulaatory amendmeents is to addrress the gaps previously ideentified during consultations in 2013 and 2015.

The objeective of the livvestock traceability system is too provide timely, aaccurate and reelevant informattion to reduce the t impacts of a diseease outbreak, food safety issue orr natural disasteers originating from and/orr affecting livestockk.

Who will w be impactted by the prooposed channges to the reggulations?

The Liveestock Identificcation and Traceabbility Program (TRACE) has beeen administeredd jointly by CFIA annd industry sincce 2001. The proggram is regulatted and enforcedd under Part XV V of the Health oof Animals Reggulations, made unnder the authority of the Health oof Animals Act.

What are some of the t changes being propossed?

Persons who own or have care off cattle, bison, sheep, pigs oor farmed wild boars (e.g. operattors of a farm, auction, asseembly yard, faiirground, abatttoir, renderingg plant) are alreaddy subject to trraceability requuirements undder the Regulaations. In addittion to those personns, the propossed regulatory amendment w would also appply to persons who own or have care c of goats and a farmed deeer and elk. Thhe requiremennts would applyy to all operattions regardlesss of size.

The prroposed livesttock traceabilitty regulation aamendments w will align with livestock identiffication and traaceability requuirements alreaady adopted bby provincial annd territorial governnments. Somee of the changees under the pproposed ameendments are: - Ideentification requirements for goat, farmed deer, and elk thereby broaddening the scope of activities and animals thaat are subject to traceabilityy requirementss; mptions, the doomestic movem ment of animals for all regulaated species - With some exem will bee required to be reported;


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Regulattory Implemen ntation Committtee Members • Agri-Traaçabilité Québeec • Canadiaan Bison Assocciation • Canadiaan Cattlemen’s Associattion • Canadiaan Cattle Identification Agency • Canadiaan Cervid Alliannce • Canadiaan National Goaat Federatiion • Canadiaan Pork Counciil / PigTrace • Canadiaan Sheep Fedeeration • Dairy Faarmers of Canaada • Provincees of: o B British Columbia o A Alberta o S Saskatchewan o M Manitoba o O Ontario o Q Quebec o N Nova Scotia • Canadiaan Food Inspecction Agency • Agricultuure and Agri-Foood Canada

• • • •

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- Thee allowable tim me to report thee movement oor death of animals to the responsible adminiistrator will be reduced to seeven (7) days ffrom 30 days; - Cerrtain informatioon will be requuired to accom mpany a load oof animals andd/or animal carcassses being trannsported. Thee format/mediaa on which thee information should be provideed will not be prescribed p witthin the regulaations, but could include papper or electroniic forms. This federal requirement woould not applyy for species w where similar pprovincial regulattory requiremeent already ex ist. To supporrt transporters with compliannce in province es that doo not currently require any m movement docuumentation, a voluntary movvement docum ment template would w be mad e available, annd; - Perrsons who ownn or have the ccare of livestoock would be reequired to provide the premisses identificatioon number forr the location w where approveed indicators aare applied to their annimals. Shouldd the animals be moved to a new locationn, outside of thhe farm operation, the premises identificat ion number foor the destination location woould also need d p A preemises identifiied by a provinncial or territorrial governmennt will not be to be provided. requireed to be re-ideentified throughh the proposedd federal regulations. When are the propo osed changess expected too come into eeffect? The prroposed regulaations are expeected to be puublished in sprring or fall 2018. Following the pubblication of thee proposed reggulations in Paart I of the Cannada Gazette (www.ggazette.gc.ca)), stakeholderss will have 75 days to review w and provide comment. CFIA will w review andd consider all ccomments receeived prior to ffinalizing the rregulation amenddments and puublishing them in Part II of thhe Canada Gaazette. Once published in Pa art II of thee Canada Gazzette, the reguulations will bee considered final and immeddiately come into forrce. Regulaatory Implem mentation Com mmittee An industry-governm ment Regulatorry Implementaation Committeee has been foormed with the e objective to collaboraatively identifyy and prioritizee actions to help prepare for a smooth mentation of prroposed amenndments to thee Regulations. Current priorities of this implem commiittee include:

Coordinate communicatioons with provinnces, industry and those whho will be subjeect to the reguulations; Develop a template t for coollecting inform mation to accoompany the moovement of annimals that cann be used in thhe absence of a provinciallyy regulated doccument or mannifest; Verify that databases d aree ready for the collection of domestic d moveement informaation for all reggulated speciees; and, Inform and train inspectoors and front linne staff on thee new requirem ments.

The foocus of this committee leadinng up to publiccation of the draft regulationn amendment iin Canada Gazette (Part I) w will be comm munications witth regulated paarties so that they t are awaree of the propossed changes aand what it will mean for theem and their busineess when the new n regulationns come into foorce. For more information about a the Liveestock Identificcation and Traaceability proggram, as well as the latest updates on thhe proposed ameendments to th he Health of Animals A Regullations, visit w www.inspectioon.gc.ca/traceaability.


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Applications open for the Beef Mentorship Research Program

By the Beef Cattle Research Council Applications for the 2018-19 term of the BCRC Beef Researcher Mentorship Program are now being accepted. The deadline to apply is May 1, 2018. 2017-18 mentorship program participants with BCRC staff and mentor Graeme Finne. Three researchers were selected to participate in the program this past year. Each was paired with two mentors – an innovative producer and another industry expert – for a one year term (ending July 31, 2018). Each of the researchers have reported very successful and valuable experiences through the opportunities provided,

including: • Establishing partnerships with industry and other researchers to further their research programs • Meeting several producers and industry leaders with whom they ask questions and have meaningful discussions about cattle production, beef quality and safety, and the Canadian beef value chain • Attending industry events and touring farms and ranches to better understand the impacts, practicalities and economics of adopting research results The BCRC is excited to continue the program and invite applica-

tions from upcoming and new applied researchers in Canada whose studies are of value to the beef industry, such as cattle health and welfare, beef quality, food safety, genetics, feed efficiency, or forages. A new group of participants will begin their mentorships on August 1st. The Beef Researcher Mentorship Program launched in August 2014 to facilitate greater engagement of upcoming and new applied researchers with Canada’s beef industry. Learn more about the program and download an application form at: http://www.beefresearch.ca/about/mentorship-program.cfm


e s a c w o h S s ’ t Le ! y r t s u d n I r u O • Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. • We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. • What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry.

If you have photos and videos you would like to share contact MBP Communications Coordinator Chad Saxon at csaxon@mbbeef.ca


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To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


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February12, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

New directors, TESA winners highlight 39th AGM (Winnipeg, MB) – There will be a number of new faces on the Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) board as four new directors were installed at MBP’s Annual General Meeting, Feb. 8-9 in Brandon. The new directors were among the many highlights at the 39th AGM, which also saw strong attendance, a lively resolutions debate, engaging and informative speakers and the unveiling of The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) winners for Manitoba. The new board was ratified during the business portion of the meeting Feb. 8. The new directors are: Robert Kerda, District 4; Mike Duguid, District 10; Kris Kristjanson, District 12 and Jade Delaurier, District 14. They join incumbent directors, Gord Adams, District 1, Peter Penner, District 3; Ramona Blyth, District 5; Larry Wegner, District 6; Larry Gerelus, District

MBP President Ben Fox

7; Tom Teichroeb, District 8; Dianne Riding, District 9; Robert Metner, District 11; and Ben Fox, District 13. The MBP executive was also selected following a vote by the directors. Fox returns as president while Teichroeb is vice-president. Adams has moved into the second vice-president position while Penner returned as treasurer and Riding as secretary. Twenty-six resolutions were also de-

bated and voted upon Feb. 8. Among the notable resolutions to be carried was one calling for MBP to lobby the provincial government to implement mandatory livestock inspection in Manitoba. “There were some (resolutions) that passed (during the resolutions debate) and some things that we are working on that are going to be changing the face of the Manitoba beef industry for years to come,” Fox said during his closing remarks at the AGM. “That is something this board takes very seriously and is something that we will work and strive to make sure we have the most beneficial outcomes for all of our membership.” The announcement of the TESA winners was made during the annual President’s Banquet, which included an entertaining speech from Dauphin-Neepawa-Swan River MP Robert Continued to Page 2

Find Us Online @ManitobaBeef

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Facebook.com


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The Environmental Stewardship Award for Manitoba (TESA) was presented at the recent AGM. Capturing the award was the Harper family of Circle H Farms near Brandon. From left to right: Tere Stykalo of award sponsor MNP, Thomas Harper, Sonja Harper, Brian Harper, Kristelle Harper and Larry Wegner, chair of MBP's Environment Committee. Continued from Page 2

Sopuck. Capturing the coveted award is Brian, Sonja, Thomas and Kristelle Harper of Circle H Farms near Brandon. The Harpers have been farming just outside of Brandon since 1990. Their 500-acre, 80 head purebred cow/calf operation consists of three breeds known and designed for production on grass/forage only - Lincoln Red, North Devon and Shaver Beefblend. The Harpers’ cattle program is focused on breeding, developing and marketing forage-only breeding stock to commercial producers. In their application it was noted that Circle H Farms is situated on light soils, which can present challenges such as soil erosion and vulnerability during drought. The Harpers use strategies to deal with that, including planting perennial forage and perennial crops. They have also planted more than 5,000 trees. They have also installed off-site watering sys-

tems, dug wells to feed water lines, and use a solar powered winter water system. The Harpers have also carefully managed their grazing practices over the year. After starting with rotational grazing they moved to high stock density management or adaptive multi-paddock grazing. This is a system using a short graze of a few hours to one day on an area, followed by a long rest period. As part of this approach, the Harpers participated in a project funded through the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC). The project aimed to showcase management practices that improve profitability and environmental sustainability. This system has generated positive results for the Harpers. From 20142017 beef production increased by 9,400 pounds off the same 130 acres. Zero inputs were used, just animal impact and time management. As the Harpers note, regenerating soils pays dividends and creates a healthy eco-

system. In 2017 Circle H Farms was selected to be part of the Canadian National Carbon Sequestration study, a multi-year on farm/ranch study that will compare high stock density grazing management compared to conventional pasture management. As the Harpers note, “healthy soil produces nutrient dense foods and having nutrient dense food promotes healthier people.” General Manager Brian Lemon said MBP is thankful to the many speakers and sponsors who make the AGM possible. “We also thank our members who made the trip to Brandon and took part in the AGM. We’ve said it many times in the past and it remains true as ever – this is their organization and the AGM is their opportunity to have a say in the direction of MBP and the focus of the work we do on their behalf. We were pleased to see spirited, yet respectful debate on the many resolutions which will direct our lobbying efforts over the next year.”


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In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • First EPDs for udder and teat conformation in the works • Understanding the new drug regulations • Cow condition key element to calving • Canada's beef quality audit: What have we learned? Webinar Feb. 14.

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Don't Miss Out!! Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to mbfiinfo@gmail.com to sign up. CanaMaize Seed Inc. Box 144, Minto, MB R0K1M0 Toll Free: 1-877-262-4046 Fax: (204) 776-2250 Email: info@canamaize.com

CERTIFIED CONVENTIONAL CM440 GRAZING CORN Early maturing, leafier for increased grazing yield. Small stalks increase palatability and increase utilization rate. Low cost per grazing day. No planter required. Swath or standing grazing cattle, sheep, bison as well as for wildlife food plots. Call 1-877-262-4046 or Email info@canamaize.com


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CANADIAN CATTLE IDENTIFICATION AGENCY ANNOUNCES NEWLY APPROVED BEEF ID DEVICES FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE February 6, 2018 Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA) is pleased to announce three newly-approved CCIA radio frequency identification (RFID) animal indicators for application to bovine in Canada – 1) the Zee Tags® FDX-B RFID tag with a Hereford species-branded backing stud; 2) the Temple Tag® ComfortEar® FDX-B tag and 3) the Temple Tag® ComfortEar® HDX tag. “Part of CCIA’s role as a Responsible Administrator for livestock ID and traceability initiatives is to assess animal identification devices using requirements defined in the National Performance Standards document. In order to meet these requirements, all animal ID devices must pass a series of extensive trials to test visual, mechanical, physical, electrical, readability and environmental capabilities at an ICAR-approved laboratory and in a one-year field trial on livestock,” states Paul Laronde, CCIA Tag and Technology Manager. “CCIA’s Technical Advisory Committee reviews the results of the testing and provides analysis with recommendations to CCIA’s Board of Directors whether to reject or recommend the device for approval by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.” “Approved CCIA indicators for beef animals bear a unique 15-digit ID number and CCIA’s trademark; are yellow in colour with a yellow backing stud – unless otherwise approved; and they meet all requirements in the Canadian National Standards for RFID technology,” affirms CCIA General Manager Anne Brunet-Burgess. “It is important to note, the Zee Tags® FDX-B indicator is intended for application to the Hereford breed only, using a Zee Tags® applicator only. The Temple Tag® ComfortEar® FDX-B and HDX indicators are approved for application to non-breed specific beef cattle using the Herdsman® or Herdsman II applicators only. Since the ComfortEar® FDX-B and HDX design is different from other approved beef indicators, we look forward to industry’s invaluable response and comments.” QUICK FACTS: • View the full list of approved indicators for bovine on Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s website at inspection.gc.ca/animals/terrestrialanimals/traceability/indicators/eng/1331582406844/1331582476216 • For more information on the Zee Tags® FDX-B RFID tag for the Hereford species, please contact Canadian Hereford Association directly by toll-free telephone at 1-888-836-7242 or email at herefords@hereford.ca – 30 – For more information or media contact: Kori Maki-Adair, Communications Manager @ kmaki-adair@canadaid.ca

7646 – 8 Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta T2E 8X4


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MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS P. (204) 772‐4542 220‐530 Century Street (800) 772‐0458 Winnipeg, MB R2X 0Y4 F. (204) 774‐3264 www.mbbeef.ca _________________________________________________________________________

NEWS RELEASE

For immediate release February 5, 2018

Manitoba Beef Producers applaud CPTPP agreement (Winnipeg, MB) – Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) applauds the recent announcement that Canada is one of 11 countries to sign onto the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans‐Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). The agreement will put Canada on a level playing field with respect to tariffs on beef imports into a number of markets with strong potential for growth, said MBP President Ben Fox. “Growing Manitoba’s beef herd will require more markets for our beef,” Fox said. “Manitoba exports a significant portion of its beef while nationally, approximately 45 per cent of our production is exported. This agreement will enable Canada to seize a larger portion of the coveted Japanese market as we will now have the same level of tariffs as our primary competitors, notably Australia.” According to figures reported by the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA), Canada was the fourth largest exporter of beef to Japan with $115 million in 2016. However, prior to the deal, Australia, which is the largest supplier to Japan at $1.8 billion, enjoyed a preferential tariff rate while Canada, New Zealand and the US had a rate of 38.5 per cent. Upon implementation of CPTPP Canada will enjoy the same rate as Australia. “The nations involved in the CPTPP agreement have very promising markets, but Japan alone represents an incredible opportunity for our industry,” Fox said. The CCA said it anticipates beef exports to Japan will increase by over $200 million under CPTPP. MBP General Manager Brian Lemon said many of the other markets included under the agreement also hold potential for Manitoba’s beef producers. “As these TPP economies grow, the demand for higher quality protein in their diets will also increase,” Lemon said. “This is a huge opportunity for Canada’s beef sector.” “Our sustainable production practices and recognized quality will allow us to compete in these markets and increased demand internationally will drive growth and profitability to Manitoba’s beef sector.”

‐30‐

Manitoba Beef Producers is the exclusive voice of the beef industry in Manitoba. Our role and mission is to represent our beef producers through communication, research, advocacy and education. Manitoba Beef Producers represents 6,500 beef producers across the province.

For more information, please contact: Brian Lemon, General Manager Office: 204‐772‐4542

Chad Saxon, Communications Coordinator Office: 204‐772‐4542


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News Release Invitation to Canadian cow-calf producers to participate in testing of Herdly software February 09, 2018 Calgary, AB – The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) invites producers to test drive the new cow-calf management software to provide feedback on the performance and usability of the Herdly app on the farm. Starting today and through to at least April 1st, 2018, Canadian producers can download the Herdly software to their iPhone or iPad as well as a Windows or Mac computer. The evaluation period follows extensive field testing in Alberta and will enable further feedback from producers across Canada. Information about the testing, and shortly a link to an electronic survey document for producers interested in providing feedback, can be accessed at www.cattle.ca/tech The software and a pocket-sized RFID tag reader have been under development since 2014 in response to a request by then CCA President Travis Toews to find an easier way to upload and manage animal ID information. Ultimately the software has evolved to become a comprehensive herd management tool developed by Synergy Farm Solutions. Mark Klassen, CCA Director of Technical Services and project lead, said the feedback from Canadian producers will be invaluable. “From the start of this project the goal has always been to develop a practical and effective tool that helps cow-calf operations become more efficient and ultimately more profitable. To achieve this outcome, we have consistently looked to producers to help us understand what they need,” he said. “We are pleased that the software will be available for testing during calving this spring.” Herdly is a comprehensive record-keeping and herd management tool that provides seamless automatic syncing between any number of iPhones, Macintosh, and Windows computers to ensure producers always have the latest information about their herds in hand. The software’s advanced functionality means it can accommodate information on more than 100 attributes including those related to breeding, animal identification and traceability, veterinary care, performance and marketing. The software is fully compatible with the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA) Canadian Livestock Tracking System and movement events as well as other information can be automatically transmitted to CCIA if the user permits.

Following the testing period, voice the app be made by Synergy Farm Solutions for farms a monthly subscription fee The CCA is the national for will Canada’s beefavailable cattle industry representing 60,000 beef and feedlots. of $5 plus .33 cents per head per month. For an Visit average sized herd of 85 cows this works out to be about $18 per www.cattle.ca month. No payment information will be required or requested during the testing period. The CCA is seeking a commercial partner to build and market the Pocket Tag Reader for Mobile Devices developed in collaboration with the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT). Further information on the reader will be made available in the next month. Until the reader is available commercially, Klassen notes the Herdly app has some innovative features to make it easier to enter in CCIA ID information without a reader and it will eventually be compatible with some existing readers on the market. The CCA would like to take this opportunity to thank our funding partners including the former Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency (ALMA), Alberta Agriculture and National Check-Off. We have also greatly appreciated the involvement and contribution made by Alberta cattle producers who have tested the software and tag reader on their operations as well as support from the CCIA.


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MBP E-Newsletter

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CANADA’S AGRICULTURE DAY | February 13, 2018

What will you do to celebrate? Here are some ideas to get you started:

1

2

3

Take a pic of your farm or family, say why you love ag

Share a pic of your favourite Canadian foods

Host an event at work, school or in your community

#Foodie #CdnAgDay

#AgProud #CdnAgDay

#AgProud #CdnAgDay

Visit AgDay.ca for more ideas

Let’s celebrate the food we love

AgDay.ca | #CdnAgDay


e s a c w o h S s ’ t Le ! y r t s u d n I r u O • Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. • We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. • What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry.

If you have photos and videos you would like to share contact MBP Communications Coordinator Chad Saxon at csaxon@mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


mbbeef.ca

January 5, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Now is the time for Canada to move forward on a Pacific trade deal Canadian Cattlemen's Association Statement Calgary, AB – Japan is strongly signaling that it wants to move forward quickly with the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), aka TPP11. This will be an extremely positive development for Canada’s entire beef sector, if Canada chooses to be part of the agreement. The CPTPP is a massive opportunity for Canada’s beef sector, particularly in the Japanese market. Japan imported US$3.8 billion of beef in 2016. Cana-

da was the fourth largest beef supplier to Japan with $115 million, behind Australia ($1.8 billion), United States ($1.6 billion), and New Zealand ($163 million). Those trade figures were achieved with Canada, the U.S. and New Zealand all paying a 38.5 per cent tariff on beef exports to Japan, while Australia enjoys an increasingly preferential tariff. If Canada accepts Japan’s proposal to be one of 11 countries signing on to the CPTPP, then we will immediately enjoy the same preferential tariff as Australian beef, as will New

Zealand and Mexico. The U.S. will not be part of the agreement and will remain at a much higher tariff. If Canada chooses not to join the deal, it appears likely that Japan and the other nine CPTPP-member countries will proceed without us. This outcome would leave Canada at a widening disadvantage to Australia, and also falling behind our competitors in New Zealand, Mexico and Ireland[1], as they gain the same access as Australia. Continued to Page 3

Find Us Online @ManitobaBeef

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Building Our Future

39th AGM&

President’s Banquet

February 8 - 9, 2018 | Victoria Inn, Brandon, MB • REGISTER AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR CALL 1-800-772-0458.

REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR MAIL OR FAX YOUR REGISTRATION TODAY! EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION $75 PER PERSON

PERSON 1: q EARLY BIRD $75 q GENERAL $90

• Must be purchased by January 5, 2018 at 4 p.m.

NAME: _______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 8, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50).

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• Non-refundable.

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________

Book early to get your best value!

MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 PER PERSON GENERAL REGISTRATION $90 PER PERSON - AFTER JAN. 5 Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 8, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). • Non-refundable.

q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________ PHONE: ______________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ PERSON 2 (IF REQUIRED): q EARLY BIRD $75 q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 q GENERAL $90 q YOUNG PRODUCER *Complimentary with mentor’s registration NAME: _______________________________________________

NEW! YOUNG PRODUCER MENTORSHIP OFFER

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• MBP members are encouraged to mentor and register a young producer (ages 18 to 39).

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________

• The young producer receives a complimentary registration with a mentor’s registration.

PHONE: ______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 8, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). MAKE CHEQUE PAYABLE TO: Manitoba Beef Producers 220 - 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 PHONE: 1-800-772-0458 FAX: 204-774-3264

RESERVE A ROOM: Call the Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre toll free: 1-800-852-2710 Quote booking number: 285676

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ EXTRA BANQUET TICKET NAME: _______________________________________________ q BANQUET $50 *Banquet tickets are non-refundable.

PLEASE GO TO

WWW.MBBEEF.CA

FOR THE AGM AGENDA

CALL 1-800-772-0458 FOR REMOVAL FROM MAILING LIST OR ADDRESS CHANGE.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS 39TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

In the News Now is the time ... A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Are your cattle fit to travel? • Better bale storage can improve cattle health • Make sure your calves get off to a proper start • Beeftalk: Keeping more heifers turned out well • Certified Sustainable Beef

Continued from Page 1

In short, there can be no status quo for Canadian beef. Either Canada joins the CPTPP and Canadian beef will join the club of preferential suppliers to Japan or Canada remains outside the CPTPP and Canadian beef producers will watch helplessly as our exports to Japan erode. Securing market access in the Asia Pacific region is of vital importance to the hard-working families who operate Canada’s 60,000 beef farms and feedlots. With the CPTPP, Canadian beef exports to Japan are anticipated to see an increase of more than $200 million. This increase will be enjoyed across Canada with processors in Eastern Canada and thriving regional brands like Ontario Corn Feed Beef and Prince Edward Island Certified Beef also benefitting alongside their Western counterparts and the Alberta Beef brand. The uncertainty in the minds of beef producers over the status of the North American Free Trade Agreement and the security of access for $3 billion in annual Canadian cattle and beef exports to the U.S. further underscores the necessity of securing access to alternate markets for Canadian beef. The CPTPP can be the secure alternative that Canadian beef producers desperately need. [1] Ireland will obtain similar beef access to Japan under the EU-Japan Free Trade Agreement as is provided to CPTPP members.

CanaMaize Seed Inc. Box 144, Minto, MB R0K1M0 Toll Free: 1-877-262-4046 Fax: (204) 776-2250 Email: info@canamaize.com

CERTIFIED CONVENTIONAL CM440 GRAZING CORN Early maturing, leafier for increased grazing yield. Small stalks increase palatability and increase utilization rate. Low cost per grazing day. No planter required. Swath or standing grazing cattle, sheep, bison as well as for wildlife food plots. Call 1-877-262-4046 or Email info@canamaize.com


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Draft agenda for the 39th Manitoba Beef Producers Agenda for Manitoba Beef Producers’ 39th Annual General Meeting Annual General Meeting Location: Victoria Inn Hotel & Conference Centre, 3550 Victoria Avenue, Brandon, MB R7B 2R4

Theme: Building Our Future Day One − Thursday, February 8, 2018 9:00 Registration Begins and Trade Show Opens 10:00 – 12:00 Industry Knowledge Sessions 10:00 −11:00

Topic: Market Access  Fred Gorrell, Assistant Deputy Minister, Markets and Industry Services Branch, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

11:00 – 12:00 Topic: Disruption and agriculture  Marty Seymour, FCC 12:00 – 12:55 Lunch for registered AGM delegates 12:00 – 1:30 Young producer luncheon and forum (*targeted at producers under 39)  Challenging the capital paradigm – Peter Manness, MNP

MBP’s Annual General Meeting Convenes 1:00 – 1:05 MBP General Manager Brian Lemon calls meeting to order 1:05 – 1:45 Update on movement reporting – Rick Wright, Manitoba Livestock Marketing Association 1:45 – 2:30 Business Portion of the Annual General Meeting o Approval of Agenda o Approval of Minutes from 2017 38th AGM o Report from the President o Report from the General Manager o Report from the Finance Chair o Review of MBP’s audited financial statement o Appointment of MBP auditor for the upcoming fiscal year o Introduction and ratification of MBP Directors 2:30 – 3:00 Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives research update – Don Guilford, Management Committee chair 3:00– 3:20 Coffee Break 3:20– 3:40 Verified Beef Production Plus+ program update – Virgil Lowe, Business Manager, VBP+ 3:40 – 5:00 Resolutions Debate


MBP E-Newsletter

5:30

Cocktail Hour

6:30

President’s Banquet  Opening Remarks from the President  Greetings from Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler  Presentation Manitoba’s Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA)  Recognition of five retiring MBP directors

8:30 

Speaker Robert Sopuck, Member of Parliament for Dauphin-Swan River-Neepawa Topic: Eat Canadian Beef, It's Good For The Environment

mbbeef.ca

Day Two − Friday, February 9, 2018 8:00 – 8:30 Coffee service, trade show opens 8:30 – 10:15 Production Session Panel discussion: Adding Value Without Adding Acres *** Facilitated by Dr. Derek Brewin, University of Manitoba Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences  Dr. John Crowley, University of Alberta  Dr. Bart Lardner, Western Beef Development Centre  Mark Klassen, Director of Technical Services, Canadian Cattlemen’s Association 10:15 – 10:35 Coffee Break 10:35 – 12:00 Reports from National Beef Organizations  Market report – Canfax Research Services  Canada Beef  National Cattle Feeders Association 12:00 President’s Closing Remarks


MBP E-Newsletter Elanco Canada is looking for an enthusiast Beef Sales Representative in the Manitoba region to deliver value, support our beef customers and work closely with a highly energized, committed and competent Elanco team from across Canada. If you enjoy, working within the beef industry and building long‐term relationships, then this opportunity is worth consideration. As a successful candidate, you should possess exceptional skills in communication, interpersonal relationships, leadership, and planning including data analysis. You will be expected to expand our business with existing customers and develop new accounts. Your primary customers will be beef producers, beef veterinarians, and feed channel contacts. Elanco is a world leader in developing products and services that enhance animal health, wellness and performance. Elanco products contribute to the production of an affordable and abundant supply of food. Our half‐century of innovative products, services and global partnerships help to fulfill our vision of food and companionship enriching life.

Elanco Canada is committed to employment equity. We encourage applications from qualified women, members of visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, and persons with disabilities. We look forward to meeting you. Email us at puddoo_ravi@network.lilly.com or apply online at www.elanco.ca

mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

We're Hiring!!

MBP seeking a Beef Production Specialist Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is seeking a knowledgeable, experienced and energetic person to become our Beef Production Specialist. The Beef Production Specialist will work in our Winnipeg office and be responsible for providing technical support and strategic direction to MBP in all areas of beef production, providing project support, and guiding extension and tech-transfer activities. The successful candidate will work with MBP staff and directors, as well as cattle producers, external organizations, research agencies, and government officials, to identify issues, compile and analyze information, and provide advice on appropriate policy positions and strategies for MBP. Candidates for the position must have a university degree in animal science or veterinary medicine, and a minimum of 3 to 5 years of experience working in the beef industry. Alternatively, an acceptable combination of education and experience may be considered. Applicants must have a de-

tailed knowledge of cattle production practices. The successful candidate must have excellent written and verbal communication skills and the ability to apply knowledge, research and analysis and collaborate with other professionals towards understanding and solving complex technical issues. Applicants should have a basic knowledge of government regulations and policy processes, as well as some experience dealing with government officials. Applicants must be comfortable public speaking and leading extension discussions. Applicants must be willing work flexible hours and travel within the province, and occasionally across Canada. MBP offers a competitive salary and benefits package. Manitoba Beef Producers is the exclusive voice of the beef industry in Manitoba. It represents roughly 6,500 beef producers across the province. MBP is a non-profit organization with a producer-elected board of 14 directors, along with 5.5 staff. The mission

of MBP is to represent all beef producers in Manitoba through communication, advocacy, research, and education—within the industry to governments, consumers and others; to improve prosperity and ensure a sustainable future. Funded 100% by producers through collection of producer check-off, MBP is committed to ensuring a sustainable future for the beef industry in the province for the benefit of our beef producers and all Manitobans. For a work description of the Beef Production Specialist position please click here. MBP will be accepting applications until January 26, 2018. Interested applicants should forward a cover letter and resume to: Manitoba Beef Producers Attention: Brian Lemon, General Manager 220, 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 Email: blemon@mbbeef. ca Fax: 204 774 3264



MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

2018 Western Canadian Holistic Management Conference Moosomin, Sk - February 2-4 This year's conference, Learning from Regenerative Leaders, will prove to be both thought provoking and inspiring! A highlight for those of you considering bringing your children; free children's programming (with family registration), including a bowling alley and sports simulator experience followed by sleigh rides, stock dog demonstration, and education portion on root structure, plant growth and a water infiltration table. There is also free childcare for children 5 years and under at a family resource center that will keep them busy and entertained while the rest of the family partakes in the conference. Deadlines for registration is January 1st, so don't miss out! Registration fees for Early bird (January 1st deadline): Single $125 Double $220 Family $350 Late registrations are due January 15th: Single $175 Double $280 Family $500 Please see the link below for registration forms and sponsorship/trade show opportunities. http://holisticmanagement.ca/2018-conference/ Agenda Details: Friday: Local food production appies and supplementary farm income trade show -conference registrants are welcome to set up a table and display any home business that your family uses as a supplemental income for your farm -we are encouraging anyone that has a farm food production (ie. honey, freezer beef etc.) to provide an appetizer featuring your product. If you choose to provide appetizers you will receive one free admission to the conference! ($125 value) -the tables are free of charge for anyone to use for Friday evening Please contact Cheryl at (306)739-2924 or gbtangus@sasktel.net if you are interested in participating Saturday: Pam Iwanchysco Planned grazing demonstration Brandon, Mb. Presented by Kristelle Harper Open Gate Tours Panel: featuring producers that participated in open gate tours Cover Crops panel: featuring producers that have, or are planning to incorporate cover crops into their production and their experiences. Video presentation on local carbon sequestration study by Richard Teague Leadership Panel: Holistic Management is full of leaders. Here's a chance to speak with some featured leaders and see what they do to fill their role as a leader in their particular field or on their operation. Saturday evening wraps up with an inspirational speech from former NHL'er and current organic beef producer, Jeff Odgers. Sunday: Regenerative agriculture: Blaine Hjertaas Blaine is a certified Holistic Management educator and practitioner from the area. Blaine is part of the Soil Carbon Coalition and uses regenerative agriculture methods to build organic matter. Learn the importance of capturing solar energy and optimize water and mineral cycles to grow nutrient dense food. Grassland Bird Research: Dr. Stephen Davis and grad student. Dr. Davis is from the University of Regina, a wildlife biologist, part of Canadian Wildlife Service Prairie and Northern Region, specializing in avian ecology and grassland birds. Exploring the Value of Ecologically Intensive Farming to enhance Prairie agro ecosystem resilience: Dr. Christy Morrissey. Dr. Morrissey's research expertise is in ecotoxicology of birds and aquatic ecosystems, agricultural pesticides and wildlife conservation. Information on her current projects and publications can be found at http://christymorrissey.wix.com/morrisseylab.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Calving season safety

S.F. No. 24

Calving season can be a challenging time of year at the best of times, especially when having to deal with Manitoba’s extreme weather conditions. As farmers work hard to maintain and welcome new additions to their herds, SAFE Farms reminds you to keep safety top of mind during this calving season, and make safety and health your number one priority when working around livestock.

Tips for staying safe during calving season Develop a “safety first” approach with family members and workers. Follow safe practices and set good examples for others. Young and new workers, including family members, are at particular risk when handling livestock. Train, discuss and demonstrate all the tasks you expect them to do. Livestock often have strong maternal instinct and can be very difficult to handle. First-time mothers are especially dangerous since it is unknown how they will react to motherhood. Cows with newborn calves are unpredictable. Look for signs of aggression: o Pinned or raised ears o Rapid tail movements o Hackle hairs raised on back of neck o Pawing o Snorting

    

Know your surroundings and always be cautious when working around livestock and their young. Have an action plan when working with livestock. Assess the situation, know what you need and plan for the unexpected. Plan an escape route whenever you work in an enclosure with livestock. Approach livestock in their field of view to avoid startling. Ensure a working alone plan is in place. Supply all workers with personal protective equipment (PPE) appropriate to the tasks performed, and ensure workers are wearing and using PPE when required to do so.. Ensure first aid kits/fire extinguishers are stocked/full and in good working condition.

      

Youth safety

Expect that any child on the farm (resident, visitor, etc) will be naturally curious about the animals, especially newborns and young animals. Children may even slip away from adult supervision to go visit the animals.

*Ensure children are supervised at all times around livestock.* Reference to legal requirements under workplace safety and health legislation:   

First Aid: Workplace Safety and Health Regulation, M.R. 217/2006, Part 5 Personal Protective Equipment: Workplace Safety and Health Regulation, M.R. 217/2006, Part 6 Working Alone or in Isolation: Workplace Safety and Health Regulation, M.R. 217/2006, Part 9

Additional workplace safety and health information available at: safemanitoba.com Created: February 2015


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

1st Annual Farm Safety Workshop January 23rd, 2018

Delta Hotel, Winnipeg MB

Theme: ‘DEVELOPING A PRACTICAL EMERGENCY PLAN FOR YOUR FARM’

Agenda

9:30-10:00 a.m

Registration: Coffee & refreshments

10:00-12:00 p.m

Presentations by: o o o

Manitoba 911 Manitoba RCMP Manitoba Medical Emergency Responders

12:00-1:00 p.m

Lunch

1:00-3:00 p.m

Mock scenarios: Emergency calls Working session: Preparing an emergency plan for your farm Technological solutions: When cell phones aren’t an option

3:00-3:15 p.m

Refreshment break

3:15-4:00 p.m

Safe Work Certification – How it applies to you Keith Castonguay, Manitoba Farm Safety Program Director


e s a c w o h S s ’ t Le ! y r t s u d n I r u O • Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. • We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. • What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry.

If you have photos and videos you would like to share contact MBP Communications Coordinator Chad Saxon at csaxon@mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Preventing reproductive wrecks: webinar January 23 By the Beef Cattle Research Council Even small changes in the open rates of cows can have a major economic impact. Join this webinar for tips to increase and maintain high pregnancy rates with information on everything from mineral intake to disease management. When Tuesday, January 23 at 8 pm Interested but aren’t available that evening? Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live event, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too. Watching on a tablet or mobile device? If you plan to join the webinar using your tablet or mobile device, you will need to download the appropriate receiver. We recommend that you join the webinar 15 minutes early as you will be prompted to download the receiver once you log in, which may take several minutes to complete. To download the receiver ahead of time, visit: http://www.citrix.com/go/ receiver.html Duration Approximately 1 hour. Cost BCRC webinars are available

and free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time and expertise to support advancements in the Canadian beef industry, and through the Knowledge Dissemination and Technology Transfer project funded by the Canadian Beef Cattle Checkoff and Canada’s Beef Science Cluster. Speakers Dr. Cheryl Waldner- Professor in Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Waldner is part of the outbreak investigation unit and is actively involved in research examining factors affecting the productivity of cow-calf herds in Western Canada. She is particularly interested in antimicrobial use and resistance as well as the prevention and control of infectious diseases such as BVDV, vibrio, trichomoniasis, and neospora. She has also examined the effects of trace mineral and vitamin nutrition on reproductive performance in cow-calf herds. Dr. Waldner has more than 190 peer-reviewed publications. Cheryl and her husband own and operate a small commercial cowcalf herd west of Saskatoon.

What is a webinar? Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible. Visit our Webinars page to find other upcoming BCRC webinars and the recordings of our past sessions.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


mbbeef.ca

January 5, 2018

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

We're Hiring!!

MBP seeking a Beef Production Specialist Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is seeking a knowledgeable, experienced and energetic person to become our Beef Production Specialist. The Beef Production Specialist will work in our Winnipeg office and be responsible for providing technical support and strategic direction to MBP in all areas of beef production, providing project support, and guiding extension and tech-transfer activities. The successful

candidate will work with MBP staff and directors, as well as cattle producers, external organizations, research agencies, and government officials, to identify issues, compile and analyze information, and provide advice on appropriate policy positions and strategies for MBP. Candidates for the position must have a university degree in animal science or veterinary medicine, and a minimum of 3 to 5 years of

experience working in the beef industry. Alternatively, an acceptable combination of education and experience may be considered. Applicants must have a detailed knowledge of cattle production practices. The successful candidate must have excellent written and verbal communication skills and the ability to apply knowledge, research and analysis and collaborate with other professionals towards understanding

and solving complex technical issues. Applicants should have a basic knowledge of government regulations and policy processes, as well as some experience dealing with government officials. Applicants must be comfortable public speaking and leading extension discussions. Applicants must be willing work flexible hours and travel within the province, and occasionally across Canada. Continued to Page 3

Find Us Online @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Facebook.com


Building Our Future

39th AGM&

President’s Banquet

February 8 - 9, 2018 | Victoria Inn, Brandon, MB • REGISTER AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR CALL 1-800-772-0458.

REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR MAIL OR FAX YOUR REGISTRATION TODAY! EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION $75 PER PERSON

PERSON 1: q EARLY BIRD $75 q GENERAL $90

• Must be purchased by January 5, 2018 at 4 p.m.

NAME: _______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 8, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50).

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• Non-refundable.

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________

Book early to get your best value!

MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 PER PERSON GENERAL REGISTRATION $90 PER PERSON - AFTER JAN. 5 Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 8, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). • Non-refundable.

q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________ PHONE: ______________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ PERSON 2 (IF REQUIRED): q EARLY BIRD $75 q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 q GENERAL $90 q YOUNG PRODUCER *Complimentary with mentor’s registration NAME: _______________________________________________

NEW! YOUNG PRODUCER MENTORSHIP OFFER

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• MBP members are encouraged to mentor and register a young producer (ages 18 to 39).

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________

• The young producer receives a complimentary registration with a mentor’s registration.

PHONE: ______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 8, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). MAKE CHEQUE PAYABLE TO: Manitoba Beef Producers 220 - 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 PHONE: 1-800-772-0458 FAX: 204-774-3264

RESERVE A ROOM: Call the Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre toll free: 1-800-852-2710 Quote booking number: 285676

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ EXTRA BANQUET TICKET NAME: _______________________________________________ q BANQUET $50 *Banquet tickets are non-refundable.

PLEASE GO TO

WWW.MBBEEF.CA

FOR THE AGM AGENDA

CALL 1-800-772-0458 FOR REMOVAL FROM MAILING LIST OR ADDRESS CHANGE.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS 39TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING


MBP E-Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry

• Wintering cows can experience unexpected challaenges • Product for reducing shrink worth considering • MBFI tackles the ins and outs of winter grazing • CCA plans 'Issues Management' team • Alternatives to livestock antibiotics are difficult to assess

mbbeef.ca

We're Hiring!! Continued from Page 1

MBP offers a competitive salary and benefits package. Manitoba Beef Producers is the exclusive voice of the beef industry in Manitoba. It represents roughly 6,500 beef producers across the province. MBP is a non-profit organization with a producer-elected board of 14 directors, along with 5.5 staff. The mission of MBP is to represent all beef producers in Manitoba through communication, advocacy, research, and education—within the industry to governments, consumers and others; to improve prosperity and ensure a sustainable future. Funded 100% by producers through collection of producer check-off, MBP is committed to ensuring a sustainable future for the beef industry in the province for the benefit of our beef producers and all Manitobans. For a work description of the Beef Production Specialist position please click here. MBP will be accepting applications until January 26, 2018. Interested applicants should forward a cover letter and resume to: Manitoba Beef Producers Attention: Brian Lemon, General Manager 220, 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 Email: blemon@mbbeef.ca Fax: 204 774 3264

Don't Miss Out!!

Stay up to date on all the events taking place at MBFI by joining their mailing list. Send an email to mbfiinfo@ gmail.com to sign up.



MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

2018 Western Canadian Holistic Management Conference Moosomin, Sk - February 2-4 This year's conference, Learning from Regenerative Leaders, will prove to be both thought provoking and inspiring! A highlight for those of you considering bringing your children; free children's programming (with family registration), including a bowling alley and sports simulator experience followed by sleigh rides, stock dog demonstration, and education portion on root structure, plant growth and a water infiltration table. There is also free childcare for children 5 years and under at a family resource center that will keep them busy and entertained while the rest of the family partakes in the conference. Deadlines for registration is January 1st, so don't miss out! Registration fees for Early bird (January 1st deadline): Single $125 Double $220 Family $350 Late registrations are due January 15th: Single $175 Double $280 Family $500 Please see the link below for registration forms and sponsorship/trade show opportunities. http://holisticmanagement.ca/2018-conference/ Agenda Details: Friday: Local food production appies and supplementary farm income trade show -conference registrants are welcome to set up a table and display any home business that your family uses as a supplemental income for your farm -we are encouraging anyone that has a farm food production (ie. honey, freezer beef etc.) to provide an appetizer featuring your product. If you choose to provide appetizers you will receive one free admission to the conference! ($125 value) -the tables are free of charge for anyone to use for Friday evening Please contact Cheryl at (306)739-2924 or gbtangus@sasktel.net if you are interested in participating Saturday: Pam Iwanchysco Planned grazing demonstration Brandon, Mb. Presented by Kristelle Harper Open Gate Tours Panel: featuring producers that participated in open gate tours Cover Crops panel: featuring producers that have, or are planning to incorporate cover crops into their production and their experiences. Video presentation on local carbon sequestration study by Richard Teague Leadership Panel: Holistic Management is full of leaders. Here's a chance to speak with some featured leaders and see what they do to fill their role as a leader in their particular field or on their operation. Saturday evening wraps up with an inspirational speech from former NHL'er and current organic beef producer, Jeff Odgers. Sunday: Regenerative agriculture: Blaine Hjertaas Blaine is a certified Holistic Management educator and practitioner from the area. Blaine is part of the Soil Carbon Coalition and uses regenerative agriculture methods to build organic matter. Learn the importance of capturing solar energy and optimize water and mineral cycles to grow nutrient dense food. Grassland Bird Research: Dr. Stephen Davis and grad student. Dr. Davis is from the University of Regina, a wildlife biologist, part of Canadian Wildlife Service Prairie and Northern Region, specializing in avian ecology and grassland birds. Exploring the Value of Ecologically Intensive Farming to enhance Prairie agro ecosystem resilience: Dr. Christy Morrissey. Dr. Morrissey's research expertise is in ecotoxicology of birds and aquatic ecosystems, agricultural pesticides and wildlife conservation. Information on her current projects and publications can be found at http://christymorrissey.wix.com/morrisseylab.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

1st Annual Farm Safety Workshop January 23rd, 2018

Delta Hotel, Winnipeg MB

Theme: ‘DEVELOPING A PRACTICAL EMERGENCY PLAN FOR YOUR FARM’

Agenda

9:30-10:00 a.m

Registration: Coffee & refreshments

10:00-12:00 p.m

Presentations by: o o o

Manitoba 911 Manitoba RCMP Manitoba Medical Emergency Responders

12:00-1:00 p.m

Lunch

1:00-3:00 p.m

Mock scenarios: Emergency calls Working session: Preparing an emergency plan for your farm Technological solutions: When cell phones aren’t an option

3:00-3:15 p.m

Refreshment break

3:15-4:00 p.m

Safe Work Certification – How it applies to you Keith Castonguay, Manitoba Farm Safety Program Director


e s a c w o h S s ’ t Le ! y r t s u d n I r u O • Each year Manitoba Beef Producers attends events throughout the province to promote awareness of the beef industry, the work done by our members and the incredible product they produce. • We want to expand our library of materials and are looking for the help of members to do that. We are seeking videos and photos shot with your camera or other devices such as a drone! The photos and videos we receive will be used for our displays at events such as the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Red River Ex. • What are we looking for? We want to show the public what life on the farm is all about. Everything from calving, winter feeding, daily chores, your cattle in the pasture; basically anything that highlights Manitoba’s beef industry.

If you have photos and videos you would like to share contact MBP Communications Coordinator Chad Saxon at csaxon@mbbeef.ca


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Preventing reproductive wrecks: webinar January 23 By the Beef Cattle Research Council Even small changes in the open rates of cows can have a major economic impact. Join this webinar for tips to increase and maintain high pregnancy rates with information on everything from mineral intake to disease management. When Tuesday, January 23 at 8 pm Interested but aren’t available that evening? Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live event, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too. Watching on a tablet or mobile device? If you plan to join the webinar using your tablet or mobile device, you will need to download the appropriate receiver. We recommend that you join the webinar 15 minutes early as you will be prompted to download the receiver once you log in, which may take several minutes to complete. To download the receiver ahead of time, visit: http://www.citrix.com/go/ receiver.html Duration Approximately 1 hour. Cost BCRC webinars are available

and free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time and expertise to support advancements in the Canadian beef industry, and through the Knowledge Dissemination and Technology Transfer project funded by the Canadian Beef Cattle Checkoff and Canada’s Beef Science Cluster. Speakers Dr. Cheryl Waldner- Professor in Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Waldner is part of the outbreak investigation unit and is actively involved in research examining factors affecting the productivity of cow-calf herds in Western Canada. She is particularly interested in antimicrobial use and resistance as well as the prevention and control of infectious diseases such as BVDV, vibrio, trichomoniasis, and neospora. She has also examined the effects of trace mineral and vitamin nutrition on reproductive performance in cow-calf herds. Dr. Waldner has more than 190 peer-reviewed publications. Cheryl and her husband own and operate a small commercial cowcalf herd west of Saskatoon.

What is a webinar? Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible. Visit our Webinars page to find other upcoming BCRC webinars and the recordings of our past sessions.


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

Coca-Cola Canada Invests $150,000 in 4-H Canada’s New First-Generation Scholarship Ottawa, December 22, 2017 – 4-H Canada is excited to announce a new program that will provide $150,000 in scholarships towards first-generation post-secondary students, thanks to a grant from The Coca-Cola Foundation. The scholarship program will focus on supporting students interested in making a positive impact in communities across Canada through skills and knowledge gained in their continued education. As a Canada 150 signature partner, 4-H Canada is looking beyond 2017 to the next 150 years, and the tools youth need to ensure their personal and professional success. The launch of the First-Generation Scholarship will support this legacy, providing 150 bright young minds with $1,000 towards their postsecondary education. Any 4-H member who is the first in their immediate family attending a postsecondary institution or a post-graduate program is eligible to apply. This new partnership with The Coca-Cola Foundation supports 4-H Canada’s work to help youth explore their career interests, develop new skill sets, prepare for the workforce and become leaders in a widerange of sectors. By playing an active role in helping students pursue their education goals and encouraging a love for lifelong learning, 4-H Canada aims to empower Canadian youth to become responsible, caring and contributing leaders that affect positive change in the world around them. “At Coca-Cola, we believe education holds an extraordinary promise to change lives,” said Helen Smith Price, President, The Coca-Cola Foundation. “By providing financial assistance to youth who are pursuing post-secondary education, we hope they are encouraged to pursue their academic dreams and realize their full and unique potential.” “We know that education creates opportunities and it makes a positive impact on the minds of brilliant young people,” said 4-H Canada CEO, Shannon Benner. “We are grateful to The Coca-Cola Foundation for showing their strong commitment to supporting the development of Canadian youth as they find their voice on issues important to them through their academic studies and involvement in 4-H.” The application period starts March 1, 2018, and closes May 31, 2018. Visit 4-h-canada.ca/scholarships to learn more. - 30 -


MBP E-Newsletter

mbbeef.ca

To learn more about the Manitoba projects taking place under the Species at Risk on Protected Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) program, click the photo below to be directed to the new web page.


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