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mbbeef.ca

Dec. 9, 2016

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Sharing Our Story theme of MBP’s 38th AGM The stage is set for Manitoba Beef Producers’ 38th Annual General Meeting. Scheduled for Feb. 2-3, 2017 at Brandon’s Victoria Inn, the theme is Sharing our Story as the beef industry continues to focus on highlighting the great work being done in areas such environmental stewardship, sustainability and animal welfare. “Our industry has a great story to tell,” said MBP President Heinz Reimer. “There are so many reasons for our producers

and those working within the industry to be proud of the work they do. However, many of those same individuals are humble, hard-working people who don’t realize they have a major role to play in making sure our customers, and the public at large, understand we produce a safe and nutritious product and that our practices are among the best in the world. “Our goal at the AGM is to not only highlight these stories, but also to encourage our members

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and give them some tools to be part of the discussion on their industry.” The AGM officially kicks off at 9 a.m. on Feb. 2 with registration and the opening of the tradeshow. As in past years interest in the tradeshow is high and MBP expects a wide variety of businesses and organizations for the show. The first session on day one begins at 10 a.m. and in keeping with the theme is entitled Industry Answers Social License. Tentatively scheduled

to be part of the panel discussion are a representative from the Verified Beef Production Plus program, Brenda Bazylewski of Manitoba Egg Producers, and Russel Hurst from CropLife. Kelly Fitzpatrick of NutriScience Solutions will serve as the facilitator of the discussion. “Our goal with this discussion is to have a cross-section of individuals from other agriculture industries that have dealt Continued to Page 4

Upcoming Events Dec. 14 — Prairie Livestock Expo Where: Victoria Inn, Winnipeg Feb. 2-3 Manitoba Beef Producers 38th Annual General Meeting and President's Banquet Where: Victoria Inn, Brandon


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Ag Minister announces changes to • Feedlot animal care assessment: FCC's young farmers loan program cattle transportation practices • Study shows the extent of grassland contributions

• The latest market report from Manitoba Agriculture

• Three considerations to maintain good rumen health

• MBFI announces exciting partnership with Winkler Canvas

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Become an Agroclimate Impact Reporter By Agriculture and Agri-food Canada Agriculture and Agri-food Canada is seeking volunteers to became an Agroclimate Impact Reporter (AIR).AIR is an online application used to input and monitor the impacts of weather and climate on the agricultural sector in Canada. It is vital to monitor how weather and climate impact agriculture as it helps AAFC step in and implement programs in times of need such as drought, flooding, hails storms, etc. AAFC is aware of the conditions persisting in Manitoba, and it is crucial to gather more data on the impact these conditions have had on agriculture. In order to gather more data we are encouraging all those involved in the agriculture industry to become AIR volunteers. Becoming a volunteer with AIR is very easy. All it takes is filling out a survey once a month, about a 3-5 min time commitment each month. We currently have a survey available, if you would like to provide AAFC with data regarding the impacts weather and climate are having on your farm follow this link: http://air. agr.gc.ca/air/public/submit.html?lang=en. Then click on ‘Submit Survey’, find your location, and fill out the survey! At the end of the survey it will ask you to ‘Subscribe Now’, if you click on that link and provide us with your name and email you will be transferred to our automated service that will email you every month-thus by passing this step.

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Sharing Our Story ... Continued from Page 1 with social license questions of their own,” Reimer said. “We feel it will beneficial for our members to hear the beef sector isn’t the only industry facing growing interest in its production practices and also to hear how those industries responded.” In an effort to engage more young producers in the AGM, a Young Producers’ Forum will be held from 12 to 1:30 p.m. Marty Seymour, the former CEO of the Canadian West Agribition and current Director, Industry and Stakeholder Relations at Farm Credit Canada will be the featured speaker for the forum. Producers 35 and under are invited to take part in the forum. The business portion of the AGM will be held on the afternoon of day one. Members will hear reports on MBP’s activities from the past year and review the association’s financial report. An update on Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives and a discussion about growing the herd will also take place. Rounding out the afternoon will be the resolutions session where members will have the opportunity to debate the 20 carried resolutions arising from the fall district meetings. Late resolutions will be accepted until noon on February 2. Please contact the MBP office if you wish to bring forward a late resolution. The evening will be highlighted by the annual President’s Banquet. Included on the banquet agenda is the awarding of The Environmental Sustainability Award for Mani

Dr. Cody Creelman toba and a presentation to retiring MBP District 11 director Caron Clarke. The keynote speaker for the banquet is Dr. Cody Creelman of Airdrie, Alberta. Creelman, who works as veterinarian with Veterinary Agri-Health Services in Airdrie, has become well known in social media circles as an advocate for the agricultural industry and will speak about the importance of producers speaking out for their industry, as well as his experiences in this area. “We are excited to have Creelman speak at the banquet,” Reimer said. “He is a passionate advocate for agriculture and has become an important voice on social media and through his blog.” Day two kicks off bright and early at 8 o’ clock with the opening of the tradeshow. The panel discussion, Is the Customer Always Right begins at 8:30 a.m. Tentatively scheduled for the panel discussion are Phil Gallagher, Executive Chef for the Earls’ restaurant chain, John Graham of the Food Solutions

Group and Dr. Kelly Main of the University of Manitoba who will speak about consumer trends. Tom Lynch-Staunton, Issues Manager for the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is scheduled to serve as facilitator for the discussion. “We are particularly excited about this panel discussion,” Reimer said. “Our consumers are inundated with all kinds of information about how their food is produced and much of that information shapes their buying decisions. It can be frustrating for producers and the industry as a whole to try and keep up with rapidly evolving public preferences about food. We believe this panel will provide a look into consumer demands and how responsive as an industry we need to be.” Closing out the AGM will be reports from some of the national beef industry organizations (National Check-off Agency, CCA and Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef) and a market forecast for 2017. “We strongly encourage our members to attend the AGM,” Reimer said. “This is truly their opportunity to help inform the association’s future direction, to learn more about the external forces that are affecting our industry and to talk about the importance of sharing our story with the public.” To register for the AGM please see http://www.mbbeef.ca/annual-meeting/. If there are any questions regarding the event please call the MBP office at 1-800772-0458.


DRAFT AGENDA 38 Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting February 2-3, 2017 Victoria Inn, Brandon, Manitoba th

Theme: Sharing Our Story Thursday, February 2, 2017 9:00

Registration Begins and Trade Show Opens

10:00 – 12:00 Industry Knowledge Session: Industry Answers Social Licence ***Facilitated by Kelly Fitzpatrick, NutriScience Solutions i. VBP+ Program – Terry Grajczyk, Canadian Cattlemen’s Association VBP National Manager ii. Manitoba Egg Producers – Brenda Bazylewski, Director, Communications & Public Relations iii. CropLife Canada – Russel Hurst, VP, Sustainability and Stewardship 12:00 – 12:55 Lunch for registered AGM delegates 12:00 – 1:30

Young Producer luncheon and forum featuring Marty Seymour, Farm Credit Canada’s Director of Industry and Stakeholder Relations

Convention Convenes 1:00 – 1:05 – MBP General Manager Brian Lemon calls meeting to order 1:05 – 1:30 – Dr. Megan Bergman, Chief Veterinary Officer, Province of Manitoba 1:30 – 1:45 – Greetings from Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler – tentative/invited 1:45 – 2:30 - Business Portion of the Annual General Meeting     

Approval of Agenda - Heinz Reimer Approval of Minutes from 2016 37th AGM - Heinz Reimer Report from the President - Heinz Reimer Report from the General Manager – Brian Lemon Report from the Finance Chair – Peter Penner o Approval of MBP’s audited financial statement o Appointment of MBP auditor for the upcoming fiscal year Introduction and Ratification of MBP Directors – Brian Lemon

2:30 – 2:45 – Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives update – Ramona Blyth 2:45 – 3:05 – Coffee Break 3:05 – 3:40 – Growing the Herd Discussion


3:40 – 5:00 – Resolutions Debate -- Marlin Beever, Parliamentarian 5:30 – Cocktail Hour 6:30 – President’s Banquet A) B) C) D) E) F)

Opening Remarks from the President Hon. Ralph Eichler, Minister of Agriculture – invited Manitoba Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) Dinner Dessert Retiring Directors Recognition

8:00 – Speaker – Dr. Cody Creelman, Cow Vet, video blogger

Friday, February 3, 2017 8:00 – 8:30

Coffee service, trade show opens

8:30 – 10:15

Panel Discussion: Is the customer always right? ***Facilitated by Tom Lynch-Staunton, CCA Issues Manager

  

Restaurant sector – Phil Gallagher, Executive Chef – Western Canada, Earls restaurant chain, Retail sector – John Graham, Food Solutions Group Consumer perceptions – Dr. Kelly Main, University of Manitoba Asper School of Business

10:15 – 10:35 Coffee Break 10:35 – 12:00 Reports from National Organizations    

Market report – Canfax Research Services – Brenna Grant, Manager National Check-off Agency – Melinda German, General Manager Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef – Fawn Jackson, Executive Director Canadian Cattlemen’s Association – Rob McNabb, General Manager

12:00 – President’s Closing Remarks 12:10 – Adjourn


Where the livestock industry CONNECTS...

Wednesday, December 14 Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre WINNIPEG, Manitoba, Canada More than 140 exhibits MULTI-SPECIES LIVESTOCK SHOW featuring: hog, beef, dairy, sheep, poultry, bison, goat... The latest in livestock production techniques NEW & EVOLVING TECHNOLOGIES: expert presentations for today’s producers Canada’s largest Pork Quality Competition...

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THANK YOU TO OUR DISTRICT MEETING SPONSORS

Manitoba Beef Producers would like to thank all of the individuals and businesses that supported our district meetings by sponsoring the beef on a bun supper District 1 Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation; G & B Farms - Gord & Brenda Adams; Steads Farm Supply Boissevain; Westway Feed Products Canada District 2 Mazergroup - Killarney District 3 Little Morden Service; Penner Stock Farms District 4 Grunthal Auction Mart; Masterfeeds - Peter Kraynyk; Mazergroup - Corey Plett

District 5 Rosehill Cattle Co. Ltd. - Harold & Ramona Blyth

District 9 Winnipeg Livestock Sales; Marquette Consumers Coop; Dianne Riding

District 6 Heartland Livestock Virden; Wegner Land & Cattle

District 10 Arborg Livestock Supply ; Interlake Co-op

District 7 Shoal Lake Vet Clinic; Russell & District Vet Clinic District 8 Neepawa-Gladstone CO-OP; John Deere - Neepawa; John Deere - Portage la Prairie; Tom Teichroeb

District 11 Noventis Credit Union District 12 Dauphin - Ste. Rose Vet Clinic District 13 Ste. Rose Auction Mart District 14 Swan Valley Consumer Co-op - Ag Division

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


mbbeef.ca

Nov. 25, 2016

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

How about a Table for Two? Who says beef isn't romantic? Table for Two is the theme Saturday on Great Tastes of Manitoba as MBP Meat Expert Adriana Findlay presents two recipes perfect for a date night at home – beef wellington and beef fondue. Findlay and GTOM host Dez Daniels will be on CTV Manitoba Saturday at 6:30 to show viewers how to make both dishes. Beef Wellington is a popular meal but one that is intimidating to some home chefs. Findlay will take viewers through the steps and show them how to make Beef Wellington

in the comfort of their own kitchen. Beef fondue is also sure to be a hit and Findlay and Daniels will again take viewers through the steps to create this tasty dish. Aaron Albas with Manitoba Liquor Marts will also join the show to highlight the perfect liquor to pair with each meal.

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Upcoming Events Dec. 8 ­— Extended Grazing Workshop 1 to 4 p.m. Where: Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Brookdale Research Farm (See ad on Page 5) Dec. 14 — Prairie Livestock Expo Where: Victoria Inn, Winnipeg Feb. 2-3 Manitoba Beef Producers 38th Annual General Meeting and President's Banquet Where: Victoria Inn, Brandon


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • One Health: recreating the future

Nutrient application deadline in effect Manitoba Sustainable Development has advised that the winter nutrient application ban was implemented effective midnight on November 21, 2016 and will continue until midnight on April 10, 2017. The winter nutrient application ban applies to all forms of nutrients including livestock manure and inorganic fertilizer.

Agricultural producers requesting authoriza• Six risk factors for BRD tion to apply manure due to an emergency in feeder calves situation or other extenuating circumstance after November 21st should contact the Environmental Approvals Branch via email at • Beef Producers mull mmpregistration@gov.mb.ca or by phone at tough season at district (204) 391-0540 or (204) 945-3078. meetings • Beef 911: Body condition scoring pays dividends • Beef School 4: Key factors to heifer selection

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca



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Main St., Grunthal, MB

For more info or to find a retailer near you:

www.hulivestock.com


Extended Grazing Workshop

E z i

Attend this field day and learn how to cut winter feeding costs by extending the grazing season. Watch infield demonstrations and learn more about: • growing and grazing crops for extended grazing • energy dense forages and poly-crops • nutrient importing and field selection • 2016 yield results Thursday, December 8, 2016 When: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Time: Where: Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Corner of Highway 353 and #10 north of Brandon, ½ mile east Agenda:

1:00 p.m.

Energy Dense Forages - Juanita Kopp, Manitoba Agriculture

1:30 p.m.

Poly-crop Production and Utilization - Pam Iwanchysko, Manitoba Agriculture

2:00 p.m.

Improving Soil Health under Forage Production

2:30 p.m.

Nutrient Management and Environmental Concerns with Extensive

Marla Riekman, Manitoba Agriculture

Wintering - Mitchell Timmerman, Manitoba Agriculture 3:15 p.m.

Swath, Corn and Bale Grazing - Shawn Cabak, Manitoba Agriculture

4:00 p.m.

Adjourn

For more information, contact the Portage Manitoba Agriculture GO Office at 204-239-3352.


Managing young calves to prevent disease By the Beef Cattle Research Council Calves are at a higher risk for sickness and disease in the first months of life. Join this webinar to hear this veterinarian’s tips on how to manage calves through this critical time for a healthier, more productive calf crop. When Thursday December 8, at 8:00 p.m. Interested but aren’t available that evening? Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live event, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too. Watching on a tablet or mobile device? If you plan to join the webinar using your tablet or mobile device, you will need to download the appropriate receiver. We recommend that you join the webinar 15 minutes early as you will be prompted to download the receiver once you log in, which may take several minutes to complete. To download the receiver ahead of time, visit: http://www.citrix.com/ go/receiver.html Cost BCRC webinars are available and free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time and expertise to support advancements in the Canadian beef industry, and through the Knowledge

Dissemination and Technology Transfer project funded by the National Check-off and Canada’s Beef Science Cluster. Speaker Dr. Claire Windeyer – veterinarian, professor and researcher at the University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Upon completion of her veterinary degree at the Ontario Veterinary College, Dr. Claire Windeyer went into rural mixed practice in southern Alberta. She then returned to the University of Guelph to complete graduate training in ruminant health management and epidemiology. She won the D.F. Forster medal, University of Guelph’s top convocation award for graduate students. Dr. Windeyer then volunteered in Nepal with the Lalitpur District Milk Producers Cooperative Union before joining UCVM in the Department of Production Animal Health. Her research focuses on cow-calf health management, particularly perinatal care, calf health, and pain and animal welfare. What is a webinar? Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to

join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
 Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible. Visit our Webinars page to find other upcoming BCRC webinars and the recordings of our past sessions.


Nominations open for The Environmental Stewardship Award Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is accepting applications for The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) until December 1st. All supporting documentation (including 2 letters of reference, photos, etc.) needs to be to provided to MBP by that time as well. A winner will be announced at the MBP AGM in February. The background information and TESA application is available online at the following websites. NOTE: Producers need to send their information directly to the MBP office, not to CCA. http://www.cattle.ca/sustainability/the-environmental-stewardship-award/ http://www.cattle.ca/assets/TESA/tesa-application-v7.3.pdf ELIGIBILITY All beef cattle operations in Manitoba are eligible to apply. Producers can either be nominated by an individual or organization or apply themselves. Both methods are equally encouraged. Nominees and applicants compete for one of five provincial awards based on their province of residence. Past nominees are encouraged to resubmit their application. Previous winners may not reapply. INFORMATION THE CANDIDATES ARE REQUIRED TO SUPPLY • Provide a description of your farm including the environment it operates in. • What have you done/what are you doing to improve environmental management on your farm? • What are your challenges and successes? Please include pictures and/or data which help show measurable results. • What factors have enabled you to make management changes? (e.g. Working with conservation organizations, programs such as the Environmental Farm Plan, funding support, education, etc.) • What are your environmental goals for the future and how do you plan to carry them out? Include two letters of reference that speak to your leadership in conservation. Please limit applications to 10 pages (not including letters of reference and photos). Electronic applications are preferred and a single, complete PDF document is requested. Submit applications to info@mbbeef.ca

Deadline to Enter December 1


Where the livestock industry CONNECTS...

Wednesday, December 14 Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre WINNIPEG, Manitoba, Canada More than 140 exhibits MULTI-SPECIES LIVESTOCK SHOW featuring: hog, beef, dairy, sheep, poultry, bison, goat... The latest in livestock production techniques NEW & EVOLVING TECHNOLOGIES: expert presentations for today’s producers Canada’s largest Pork Quality Competition...

e... s Cash Priz in w n io p m Grand Cha

...PLUS a trip for 2* to DES MOINES, Iow a for the WORLD PORK EXPO 2017! *(max $2500) See website for details.

free admission / free parking / door prizes

prairielivestockexpo.ca Formerly HOG & POULTRY DAYS


mbbeef.ca

Nov. 10, 2016

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Information for producers with flooded/inaccesible corn A number of producers throughout the province are experiencing excess moisture conditions that are preventing them harvesting their corn crop for feed and/or preventing their cattle from grazing the corn. Manitoba Beef Producers has been in touch with Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC) seeking clarification about the adjusting process and to see what can be done for producers in this situation. The following was provided by MASC to MBP:

Normal Adjusting Process

it was used for an alternate feed source. MASC considered numerous Under normal circumthings such as grain corn stances if a producer was and grazing feed values considering either grazing verses actual silage, as his silage corn or harwell as wastage when it vesting it for grain, MASC 2016 Adjusting was used for grazing. would complete a field Process As a result, it was agreed appraisal by weighing a In 2008, MASC implethat if a producers was representative sample to mented an adjusting going to harvest the corn determine the potential process for silage corn to as grain or if he was going wet tonnage and they deal extremely wet conto graze the field, MASC would also obtain a sam- ditions whereby producwould adjust and sample ple to be sent away for a ers are unable to silage the field in accordance moisture and TDN test. their corn during the with its regular adjusting Producers are not subject optimum silage period. It procedures, but it would to a coverage reduction was recognized that while apply a 50% factor to the under this scenario. silaging was no longer a appraisal, thus reducing it If a producer had a viable option, there was continued from Page 1 poor silage crop and was still value in the corn if

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wanting to destroy it, the same appraisal process above would apply, however, the coverage would be reduced by 15%.

Canada Beef wants to hear from producers! Canada Beef is looking for the stories and proof points to back what we say about producers and strengthen our sense of trust and relationship with consumers. Help tell your story, how you are committed to do the best you can do to bring quality Canadian Beef to the consumers table. We invite you to complete this 10-15 minute questionnaire that will help Canada Beef tell your story. Begin Survey


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • A list of Crown lands is available to rent. Deadline is November 18 • Some thoughts on backgrounding • Wet weather promotes foot rot • For Canada, trade and environment are worries after Trump win • Showing off the industry to tomorrow's consumers

Manitoba Farm, Rural and Northern Support Services If you are stressed and wish to speak to someone, please call the Manitoba Farm, Rural and Northern Support Services. This is a free, confidential counselling service available over the phone or via a live chat feature. For more info: http://ruralsupport.ca/ 1-866-367-3276 (Monday to Friday 10 AM to 9 PM) After hours: 1-888-322-3019

Information for producers ... continued from Page 1

in half. If a producer was not able to combine or graze the field and destroys the field, MASC would appraise the field at a zero yield at the time of destruction. The producer would then be eligible for full payment, minus the 15% coverage reduction for destroying the field. MASC is applying this policy in 2016. MASC realizes the serious impact that this fall’s extreme wet conditions is having on some producers and are willing to work with the producers to try and assess these fields and make payments (where applicable) as quickly as possible. MASC has a policy to make advance payments, in the event a producer is unable to take action or destroy his field at this time.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Province extends nutrient application deadline until November 15 Manitoba Sustainable Development advises the winter nutrient application ban has been extended until Nov. 15 as soil temperatures have not yet reached the freezing point. This means nutrients can be applied until midnight Nov. 14. Restrictions are designed to ensure nutrients are not applied when the ground is frozen and to protect the water quality of Manitoba’s lakes and rivers by reducing nutrient loading to waterways. At this time, nutrient application is allowed but certain conditions

must be met: • nutrients can only be surface applied if they are immediately incorporated; and • nutrients should not be applied in instances where the weather outlook is unfavourable, such as if snow or an appreciable amount of rainfall is expected that would result in run-off. Without a variance, the standard ban on winter nutrient application begins Nov. 10 and ends at midnight on April 10. Decisions about variations are based on actual soil temperatures, the presence of snow cover and

the long-term weather forecast. When a variance is authorized, it applies to forms of nutrients such as livestock manure and inorganic fertilizer. The process for varying nutrient application dates was developed in consultation with the Keystone Agricultural Producers, the Canadian Association of Agri-Retailers and the commercial manure applicator industry. Additional information on winter spreading restrictions and the conditions necessary for a variance are online at www.manitoba.ca/nutrientdates Government Media Release

CanaMaize Seed Inc. Box 144, Minto, MB R0K1M0 Toll Free: 1-877-262-4046 Fax: (204) 776-2250 Email: info@canamaize.com

CERTIFIED CONVENTIONAL CM440 GRAZING CORN Early maturing, leafier for increased grazing yield. Small stalks increase palatability and increase utilization rate. Low cost per grazing day. No planter required. Swath or standing grazing cattle, sheep, bison as well as for wildlife food plots. Call 1-877-262-4046 or Email info@canamaize.com



Become an Agroclimate Impact Reporter By Agriculture and Agri-food Canada

Western Canada’s Distributor for Nature’s Wave Products

ALL-NATURAL

PRO-BIOTIC SUPPLEMENTS THAT:

• BUILD IMMUNITY • REDUCE STRESS • IMPROVE FEED CONVERSION • MINIMIZE EFFECTS OF DIGESTIVE PARASITES

HAROLD UNRAU

(204) 871-0250

Main St., Grunthal, MB

For more info or to find a retailer near you:

www.hulivestock.com

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada is seeking volunteers to became an Agroclimate Impact Reporter (AIR).AIR is an online application used to input and monitor the impacts of weather and climate on the agricultural sector in Canada. It is vital to monitor how weather and climate impact agriculture as it helps AAFC step in and implement programs in times of need such as drought, flooding, hails storms, etc. AAFC is aware of the conditions persisting in Manitoba, and it is crucial to gather more data on the impact these conditions have had on agriculture. In order to gather more data we are encouraging all those involved in the agriculture industry to become AIR volunteers. Becoming a volunteer with AIR is very easy. All it takes is filling out a survey once a month, about a 3-5 min time commitment each month. We currently have a survey available, if you would like to provide AAFC with data regarding the impacts weather and climate are having on your farm follow this link: http://air. agr.gc.ca/air/public/submit.html?lang=en. Then click on ‘Submit Survey’, find your location, and fill out the survey! At the end of the survey it will ask you to ‘Subscribe Now’, if you click on that link and provide us with your name and email you will be transferred to our automated service that will email you every month-thus by passing this step.


Swath and bale grazing strategies: Webinar Nov. 23 By the Beef Cattle Research Council and expertise to support advanceOn the fence about incorporatments in the Canadian beef indusing swath or bale grazing on your try, and through the Knowledge operation? Join us to learn more Dissemination and Technology about this practice and why it may Transfer project funded by the Nabe a good option for you. Although tional Check-off and Canada’s Beef advice will primarily be intended for Science Cluster. producers in Eastern Canada, there Speakers will be tips and tricks that Western John Duynisveld, MSc – Research Canadians can incorporate as well, Biologist, Agriculture and Agrifollowed by an opportunity for Food Canada everyone to ask questions. John Duynisveld has been a beef When researcher in AAFC Nappan for 17 Wednesday, November 23, at 8 years. On-going research includes p.m. the effect of forage species on beef Interested but aren’t available that productivity, the effect of bio-active evening? forages on animal production, and Register anyway! This webinar will extending the grazing season. His be recorded and posted online family farm raises grass-fed beef, at a later date. All registrants will sheep, and pork, and free range receive a link to the recording and chickens and turkeys. additional learning resources. By Vern Baron, PhD – Research Sciattending the live event, you’ll have entist, Agriculture and Agri- Food the opportunity to interact and ask Canada questions too. Vern Baron was raised on a farm Watching on a tablet or mobile in South-Western Manitoba. He device? completed a BSc in Plant Science If you plan to join the webinar using at the University of Manitoba and your tablet or mobile device, you M.Sc. and Ph.D. at the University will need to download the appropri- of Guelph in Crop Science on the ate receiver. We recommend that topics of high moisture corn preseryou join the webinar 15 minutes vation and evaluation of short seaearly as you will be prompted to son corn hybrids for forage. He has download the receiver once you log worked as an Agricultural Represenin, which may take several mintative for Manitoba Agriculture and utes to complete. To download the has been at the Lacombe Research receiver ahead of time, visit: http:// Centre with Agriculture and Agriwww.citrix.com/go/receiver.html Food Canada since 1982. Cost Dr. Baron has been the Co-leader of BCRC webinars are available and the Western Forage Beef Group, is free of charge thanks to guest a Fellow of the Canadian Society of speakers who volunteer their time Agronomy, and has been a Division

chair of the Forages and Grasslands section of the Crop Science Society of America and Associate Editor for Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Agronomy Journal and currently Crop Science. Dr. Baron is a leader of research projects in the areas of extending the grazing season, environmental impacts of beef production and forage management on the environment, and the role of annual forages including corn, barley and triticale in beef systems in Western Canada. What is a webinar? Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
 Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible.


Nominations open for The Environmental Stewardship Award Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is accepting applications for The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) until December 1st. All supporting documentation (including 2 letters of reference, photos, etc.) needs to be to provided to MBP by that time as well. A winner will be announced at the MBP AGM in February. The background information and TESA application is available online at the following websites. NOTE: Producers need to send their information directly to the MBP office, not to CCA. http://www.cattle.ca/sustainability/the-environmental-stewardship-award/ http://www.cattle.ca/assets/TESA/tesa-application-v7.3.pdf ELIGIBILITY All beef cattle operations in Manitoba are eligible to apply. Producers can either be nominated by an individual or organization or apply themselves. Both methods are equally encouraged. Nominees and applicants compete for one of five provincial awards based on their province of residence. Past nominees are encouraged to resubmit their application. Previous winners may not reapply. INFORMATION THE CANDIDATES ARE REQUIRED TO SUPPLY • Provide a description of your farm including the environment it operates in. • What have you done/what are you doing to improve environmental management on your farm? • What are your challenges and successes? Please include pictures and/or data which help show measurable results. • What factors have enabled you to make management changes? (e.g. Working with conservation organizations, programs such as the Environmental Farm Plan, funding support, education, etc.) • What are your environmental goals for the future and how do you plan to carry them out? Include two letters of reference that speak to your leadership in conservation. Please limit applications to 10 pages (not including letters of reference and photos). Electronic applications are preferred and a single, complete PDF document is requested. Submit applications to info@mbbeef.ca

Deadline to Enter December 1


Where the livestock industry CONNECTS...

Wednesday, December 14 Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre WINNIPEG, Manitoba, Canada More than 140 exhibits MULTI-SPECIES LIVESTOCK SHOW featuring: hog, beef, dairy, sheep, poultry, bison, goat... The latest in livestock production techniques NEW & EVOLVING TECHNOLOGIES: expert presentations for today’s producers Canada’s largest Pork Quality Competition...

... s Cash Prize mpion win Grand Cha

...PLUS a trip for 2* to DES MOINES, Iowa for the WORLD PORK EXPO 2017! *(max $2500) See website for details.

free admission / free parking / door prizes

prairielivestockexpo.ca Formerly HOG & POULTRY DAYS


mbbeef.ca

Oct. 28, 2016

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Beef Week

Manitoba Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler stopped by the MBP office Monday to sign the proclamation to delcare Beef Week in Manitoba. Joining him was MBP President Heinz Reimer.

Find Us Online

mbbeef.ca @ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com

Canada Beef wants to hear from producers! Canada Beef is looking for the stories and proof points to back what we say about producers and strengthen our sense of trust and relationship with consumers. Help tell your story, how you are committed to do the best you can do to bring quality Canadian Beef to the consumers table. We invite you to complete this 10-15 minute questionnaire that will help Canada Beef tell your story. Begin Survey


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

MBP 2016 A look at the news and articles district meetings of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry underway In the News

• Helping consumers make an informed choice

• The revised Code of Practice is a win for everyone

• Manitoba Ag Ex caters to next generation

• The latest Beef Market Update from Anne Wasko

Manitoba Beef Producers' 2016 district meetings are underway. The first of 14 meetings took place Monday with the district 11 meeting in Ashern. The district 9 and 4 meetings were also held this week. “The district meetings provide an opportunity for you to interact with your MBP District Director and senior MBP staff,” MBP President Heinz Reimer said in an invation that was sent out to the association’s roughly 7,000 members. Like in past years the district meetings include a review of MBP’s finances and updates on industry developments, trends, programs, regulatory changes and more. Members will also have the opportunity to present resolutions for debate at the annual general meeting. “This year we also plan to have a discussion about the exciting comments made by Manitoba’s Agriculture Minister, Ralph Eichler about his interest in seeing Manitoba’s beef cow herd grow to 750,000 over the next decade,” Reimer said in the letter. “It is important to know what type of policies and tools (members) see• as key to achieving this, be it targeted business risk management programs, enhanced lending tools, research into production efficiencies, a strong labour supply, sound water management strategies, access to Crown lands and community pastures or other needs. (Member) input on this subject would be very valuable.” Director elections are also taking place at meetings in odd-numbered districts. Planning for MBP’s 38th Annual General Meeting is also underway. The theme for the upcoming AGM, which is scheduled for Feb 2-3 2017, is Sharing Our Story, and will focus on topics such as making the connection between producers, customers and the general public. “The AGM features topical breakout sessions, panel discussions, resolutions debate, industry updates, and is an opportunity to interact with your fellow beef producers, other members of our production chain and, government officials,” Reimer said. To find further information on the AGM and register online, go to: http://www.mbbeef.ca/annual-meeting/. More on speakers and the AGM agenda will be included in upcoming issues of Cattle Country.



Manitoba Livestock Expo

The Manitoba Livestock Expo is underway in Brandon. The annual event kicked off Wednesday at the Keystone Centre and will carry on until Saturday. Manitoba Beef Producers is at the expo with a booth in the Westoba Centre. Photos by Terra Begen.


Swath and bale grazing strategies: Webinar Nov. 23 By the Beef Cattle Research Council and expertise to support advanceOn the fence about incorporatments in the Canadian beef indusing swath or bale grazing on your try, and through the Knowledge operation? Join us to learn more Dissemination and Technology about this practice and why it may Transfer project funded by the Nabe a good option for you. Although tional Check-off and Canada’s Beef advice will primarily be intended for Science Cluster. producers in Eastern Canada, there Speakers will be tips and tricks that Western John Duynisveld, MSc – Research Canadians can incorporate as well, Biologist, Agriculture and Agrifollowed by an opportunity for Food Canada everyone to ask questions. John Duynisveld has been a beef When researcher in AAFC Nappan for 17 Wednesday, November 23, at 8 years. On-going research includes p.m. the effect of forage species on beef Interested but aren’t available that productivity, the effect of bio-active evening? forages on animal production, and Register anyway! This webinar will extending the grazing season. His be recorded and posted online family farm raises grass-fed beef, at a later date. All registrants will sheep, and pork, and free range receive a link to the recording and chickens and turkeys. additional learning resources. By Vern Baron, PhD – Research Sciattending the live event, you’ll have entist, Agriculture and Agri- Food the opportunity to interact and ask Canada questions too. Vern Baron was raised on a farm Watching on a tablet or mobile in South-Western Manitoba. He device? completed a BSc in Plant Science If you plan to join the webinar using at the University of Manitoba and your tablet or mobile device, you M.Sc. and Ph.D. at the University will need to download the appropri- of Guelph in Crop Science on the ate receiver. We recommend that topics of high moisture corn preseryou join the webinar 15 minutes vation and evaluation of short seaearly as you will be prompted to son corn hybrids for forage. He has download the receiver once you log worked as an Agricultural Represenin, which may take several mintative for Manitoba Agriculture and utes to complete. To download the has been at the Lacombe Research receiver ahead of time, visit: http:// Centre with Agriculture and Agriwww.citrix.com/go/receiver.html Food Canada since 1982. Cost Dr. Baron has been the Co-leader of BCRC webinars are available and the Western Forage Beef Group, is free of charge thanks to guest a Fellow of the Canadian Society of speakers who volunteer their time Agronomy, and has been a Division

chair of the Forages and Grasslands section of the Crop Science Society of America and Associate Editor for Canadian Journal of Plant Science, Agronomy Journal and currently Crop Science. Dr. Baron is a leader of research projects in the areas of extending the grazing season, environmental impacts of beef production and forage management on the environment, and the role of annual forages including corn, barley and triticale in beef systems in Western Canada. What is a webinar? Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
 Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible.


Nominations open for The Environmental Stewardship Award Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is accepting applications for The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) until December 1st. All supporting documentation (including 2 letters of reference, photos, etc.) needs to be to provided to MBP by that time as well. A winner will be announced at the MBP AGM in February. The background information and TESA application is available online at the following websites. NOTE: Producers need to send their information directly to the MBP office, not to CCA. http://www.cattle.ca/sustainability/the-environmental-stewardship-award/ http://www.cattle.ca/assets/TESA/tesa-application-v7.3.pdf ELIGIBILITY All beef cattle operations in Manitoba are eligible to apply. Producers can either be nominated by an individual or organization or apply themselves. Both methods are equally encouraged. Nominees and applicants compete for one of five provincial awards based on their province of residence. Past nominees are encouraged to resubmit their application. Previous winners may not reapply. INFORMATION THE CANDIDATES ARE REQUIRED TO SUPPLY • Provide a description of your farm including the environment it operates in. • What have you done/what are you doing to improve environmental management on your farm? • What are your challenges and successes? Please include pictures and/or data which help show measurable results. • What factors have enabled you to make management changes? (e.g. Working with conservation organizations, programs such as the Environmental Farm Plan, funding support, education, etc.) • What are your environmental goals for the future and how do you plan to carry them out? Include two letters of reference that speak to your leadership in conservation. Please limit applications to 10 pages (not including letters of reference and photos). Electronic applications are preferred and a single, complete PDF document is requested. Submit applications to info@mbbeef.ca


Industry promotes solutions-oriented approach to climate change From the CCA Action News Earlier this month Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that Canada will set a minimum price for carbon pollution of $10 per metric tonne in 2018, rising by $10 each year to $50 per tonne in 2022. The proposed measure is intended to assist Canada to meet its Paris Climate Agreement targets of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 17% below 2005 levels by 2020 and 30% below 2005 levels by 2030. The plan will be reviewed in 2022 to ensure it remains relevant to meeting this target. Many details of the tax are yet to be developed however Canada’s beef industry is well prepared to engage in discussions. The National Beef Sustainability Assessment, a recent environmental, social and economic assessment of the Canadian beef industry completed by the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef, helps to build a comprehensive understanding of the beef industry’s impact and contribution to rural communities, the environment and Canada’s economy. Of notable interest to carbon discussions include the Canadian beef industry’s strong performance regarding the GHG footprint of beef production. Canadian beef has one of the lowest GHG footprints per unit of production in the world at 12.0 kg CO2 equivalent per kilogram of live weight, less than half of the world average. Land used for beef production currently stores approximately 1.5 billion tonnes of carbon and provides for the con-

servation of 44 million acres (Ma) of pasture lands including 32 Ma of native grasslands, an at-risk ecosystem with less than 18% remaining in North America. Bob Lowe, Chair of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) Environment Committee, said farmers and ranchers have long relied on conservation and stewardship practices to ensure healthy pastures, grasslands and ecosystems are preserved for future generations. What needs to be better understood is that these same practices help mitigate the impact of climate change, he said. “Although the beef industry contributes to just 3.2% of Canada’s total GHG footprint we want to work together to find appropriate solutions,” Lowe said. “This way we ensure one well intended policy doesn’t negatively impact another environmental, social or economic goal we are working towards.” The economic portion of the sustainability assessment found that over the last decade a cow-calf herd of 200 head of cattle returned on average $17,559 to the Canadian beef producer. Many operations have diversified their incomes, including a high level of off-farm income. At the same time, the Canadian beef industry is an economic engine contributing more than $41 billion to the Canadian economy and generating 228,000 jobs. Raising cattle is not a large margin business, said CCA Executive Vice President Dennis Laycraft. “We have to remain competitive against the global market if we want to

continue to contribute meaningfully to Canada’s economy and conservation goals. That is why as climate change discussions move forward we will continue to participate and promote a solutions-oriented dialogue,” he said. The CCA has developed recommendations to reduce the GHG footprint of Canadian beef production in the document, Beef Industry Strategies for Reducing Greenhouse Gases and Building the Green Economy. High level recommendations further detailed in the report include: • Increasing productivity to reduce the per kg GHG footprint of Canadian beef • Enhancing producer resiliency to the impacts of climate change • Mitigating GHG emissions • Supporting national and international climate change dialogue and action • Scientific measuring and monitoring The CCA also views the Federal Government’s focus on climate change to be an opportunity to introduce payment for ecological services programs that could support further soil carbon sequestration or other initiatives that reduce Canada’s GHG footprint. For more detail regarding recommendations for GHG reductions and facts regarding beef production and climate change, read the CCA’s Beef Industry Strategies for Reducing Greenhouse Gases and Building the Green Economy and the results of the National Beef Sustainability Assessment.


Where the livestock industry CONNECTS...

Wednesday, December 14 Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre WINNIPEG, Manitoba, Canada More than 140 exhibits MULTI-SPECIES LIVESTOCK SHOW featuring: hog, beef, dairy, sheep, poultry, bison, goat... The latest in livestock production techniques NEW & EVOLVING TECHNOLOGIES: expert presentations for today’s producers Canada’s largest Pork Quality Competition...

... s Cash Prize mpion win Grand Cha

...PLUS a trip for 2* to DES MOINES, Iowa for the WORLD PORK EXPO 2017! *(max $2500) See website for details.

free admission / free parking / door prizes

prairielivestockexpo.ca Formerly HOG & POULTRY DAYS


mbbeef.ca

Oct. 14, 2016

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP district meetings begin October 24 The schedule has been set for Manitoba Beef Producers’ 14 district meetings. Beginning with the District 11 meeting Oct. 24 in Ashern, MBP directors and staff will spend the better part of a month

travelling the province to the 14 meetings. “The fast-approaching district meetings provide an opportunity for you to interact with your MBP District Director and senior MBP staff,” MBP President Heinz Reimer

said in a letter that was sent out to the association’s roughly 7,000 members. Reimer added that like in past years the district meetings will include a review of MBP’s finances and updates on industry

developments, trends, programs, regulatory changes and more. Members will also have the opportunity to present resolutions for debate at the annual general continued to Page 2


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News MBP district meetings

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry

• Beef School Episode 2: Corn vs. barley silage • Intranasal vacines get around maternal antibodies • Mouldy feed is dangerous for cattle • Ag Ex adds two national cattle shows to event • The latest Manitoba Markets Livestock prices from Manitoba Ag

begin October 24 continued from Page 1

meeting. “This year we also plan to have a discussion about the exciting comments made by Manitoba’s Agriculture Minister, Ralph Eichler about his interest in seeing Manitoba’s beef cow herd grow to 750,000 over the next decade,” Reimer said in the letter. “It is important to know what type of policies and tools (members) see as key to achieving this, be it targeted business risk management programs, enhanced lending tools, research into production efficiencies, a strong labour supply, sound water management strategies, access to Crown lands and community pastures or other needs. (Member) input on this subject would be very valuable.” Director elections will also take place at the meetings in odd-numbered districts. If a member is interested in letting their name stand for director, or know of someone who would be a good addition to MBP’s board, they are asked to contact Reimer who will forward the name along to MBP’s Nominations Committee. There is one director retiring this year as Caron Clarke of District 11 has reached her term limit. Planning for MBP’s 38th Annual General Meeting is also underway. The theme for the upcoming AGM, which is scheduled for Feb 2-3 2017, is Sharing Our Story, and will focus on topics such as making the connection between producers, customers and the general public. “The AGM features topical breakout sessions, panel discussions, resolutions debate, industry updates, and is an opportunity to interact with your fellow beef producers, other members of our production chain and, government officials,” Reimer said. To find further information on the AGM and register online, go to: http://www.mbbeef.ca/annual-meeting/. More on speakers and the AGM agenda will be included in upcoming issues of Cattle Country.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Find Us Online

mbbeef.ca @ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com

Canada Beef wants to hear from producers! Canada Beef is looking for the stories and proof points to back what we say about producers and strengthen our sense of trust and relationship with consumers. Help tell your story, how you are committed to do the best you can do to bring quality Canadian Beef to the consumers table. We invite you to complete this 10-15 minute questionnaire that will help Canada Beef tell your story. Begin Survey


We Are Hiring!!! Project Coordinator (Term Position) Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) has an exciting opportunity available for someone interested in working as part of a small team committed to advancing Manitoba’s beef industry. MBP is the exclusive voice of the beef industry in Manitoba. It represents roughly 7,000 beef producers across the province. MBP is a non-profit organization with a producer-elected board consisting of 14 directors, each representing cattle producers in specific regions or districts of the Manitoba, along with four staff. MBP’s mission is to represent all beef producers through communication, advocacy, research, and education—within the industry to governments, consumers and others; to improve prosperity and ensure a sustainable future. Funded 100% by producers through the collection of check-off dollars, MBP is committed to ensuring a sustainable future for the beef industry in the province for the benefit of our producers and all Manitobans. MBP is seeking a full-time Project Coordinator for a 12-month term position commencing in December. Under the direction of the General Manager, the Project Coordinator organizes project activities and ensures their delivery, fulfills reporting requirements and provides extension activities. The Project Coordinator is responsible for the planning, implementation, and tracking of project progress, as well as proactively seeking opportunities for future projects and project funding to further the vision and mission of MBP. The ideal candidate must have: • A strong background in the agriculture sector • A degree or diploma in a related field from a recognized university or college • Superior written and oral communication skills • Good organizational skills and detail focused • The ability to meet and enforce deadlines • Computer software skills (Excel/PowerPoint/Word) • A commitment to client service • A solid team focus • A valid driver’s license While not necessarily required, it would be beneficial if the candidate had: • Project management experience, including financial reporting • Proposal writing experience • Experience leading or delivering agriculture extension activities • Specific agriculture experience working with the beef sector This position is located at MBP’s office in Winnipeg. . Normal working hours are 8:30-4:30, Monday through Friday, but the candidate will be asked to periodically travel within the province and work irregular hours. MBP offers competitive compensation commensurate with the skills and experience of the successful candidate. Click here for a full job description. Please submit your resumé and cover letter by October 24, 2016 to Brian Lemon, MBP General Manager at blemon@mbbeef.ca. Thank you to all interested applicants, however only those under consideration will be contacted.


Project Coordinator – Manitoba Beef Producers Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is the exclusive voice of the beef industry in Manitoba, representing roughly 7,000 beef producers across the province. MBP is a non-profit organization with a producer-elected board that consists of 14 directors, each representing cattle producers in specific regions or districts of the Manitoba, along with five staff. MBP’s mission is to represent all beef producers through communication, advocacy, research, and education—within the industry to governments, consumers and others; to improve prosperity and ensure a sustainable future. Funded 100% by producers through collection of producer check-off, MBP is committed to ensuring a sustainable future for the province’s beef industry for the benefit of our beef producers and all Manitobans. THE ROLE: The Project Coordinator is an integral member of the team, responsible for the coordination and delivery of a variety of projects varying in size and complexity. Under the direction of the General Manager, the Project Coordinator organizes project activities and delivery, reporting requirements and provides extension activities. The Project Coordinator is responsible for the planning, implementation, and tracking of specific projects including their specified deliverables. SCOPE OF RESPONSIBILITIES:  Assist the General Manager in the drafting of project proposals, budgets, cash flows and schedules  Attend meetings and assist with determination of project requirements  Prepare project organizational structure and communication plans  Draft and distribute minutes on all project meetings  Effectively and accurately communicate relevant project information to MBP’s Board of Directors, staff, producer members and other stakeholders  Prepare all project reports, including outcomes/fulfillment of objectives, and statements of expenditures for MBP and project funders  Plan and deliver the communication of results of projects to stakeholders, MBP’s board of directors and staff, and MBP members  Evaluate the projects regularly to ensure all deliverables are on time, within budget and at the required level of quality  Proactively seek opportunities for future projects and project funding to further the vision and mission of MBP  Perform other duties as assigned by the General Manager and assist in other areas of operation of MBP, as may be required. REPORTING STRUCTURE: The position of Project Coordinator reports to MBP’s General Manager.


Beef and Forage Week Seminars Register today for beef and forage seminars to hear speakers provide new management and production information that can improve your farm production and profitability. Agenda topics include: beef market outlook, multi-paddock grazing, new online farm management tools and Ask the Vet. Seminar times are 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Monday, November 28

Vita

Vita GO Office

204-425-5050

Tuesday, November 29

Ste. Rose du Lac

Dauphin GO Office 204-622-2006

Wednesday, November 30 Holland

Portage GO Office

204-239-3352

Thursday, December 1

Virden

Melita GO Office

204-522-3256

Friday, December 2

Teulon

Ashern GO Office

204-768-2782

For more information and to register, contact the Manitoba Agriculture GO Office listed above.

Beef and Forage Week Seminars Print Ad Publication: Cattle County Insertion date: Nov.2016 Issue-Oct.28, 2016 Ad size: 4.75�w x 3.75�h (1/8 page horizontal)


Nominations open for The Environmental Stewardship Award Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is accepting applications for The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) until December 1st. All supporting documentation (including 2 letters of reference, photos, etc.) needs to be to provided to MBP by that time as well. A winner will be announced at the MBP AGM in February. The background information and TESA application is available online at the following websites. NOTE: Producers need to send their information directly to the MBP office, not to CCA. http://www.cattle.ca/sustainability/the-environmental-stewardship-award/ http://www.cattle.ca/assets/TESA/tesa-application-v7.3.pdf ELIGIBILITY All beef cattle operations in Manitoba are eligible to apply. Producers can either be nominated by an individual or organization or apply themselves. Both methods are equally encouraged. Nominees and applicants compete for one of five provincial awards based on their province of residence. Past nominees are encouraged to resubmit their application. Previous winners may not reapply. INFORMATION THE CANDIDATES ARE REQUIRED TO SUPPLY • Provide a description of your farm including the environment it operates in. • What have you done/what are you doing to improve environmental management on your farm? • What are your challenges and successes? Please include pictures and/or data which help show measurable results. • What factors have enabled you to make management changes? (e.g. Working with conservation organizations, programs such as the Environmental Farm Plan, funding support, education, etc.) • What are your environmental goals for the future and how do you plan to carry them out? Include two letters of reference that speak to your leadership in conservation. Please limit applications to 10 pages (not including letters of reference and photos). Electronic applications are preferred and a single, complete PDF document is requested. Submit applications to info@mbbeef.ca


Where the livestock industry CONNECTS...

Wednesday, December 14 Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre WINNIPEG, Manitoba, Canada More than 140 exhibits MULTI-SPECIES LIVESTOCK SHOW featuring: hog, beef, dairy, sheep, poultry, bison, goat... The latest in livestock production techniques NEW & EVOLVING TECHNOLOGIES: expert presentations for today’s producers Canada’s largest Pork Quality Competition...

... s Cash Prize mpion win Grand Cha

...PLUS a trip for 2* to DES MOINES, Iowa for the WORLD PORK EXPO 2017! *(max $2500) See website for details.

free admission / free parking / door prizes

prairielivestockexpo.ca Formerly HOG & POULTRY DAYS


Managing pregnant cows for improved cow and calf performance: Webinar October 18 Management of pregnant cows has a major effect on calf performance, cow performance, and the ability to of cows to rebreed. Register for this webinar to hear tips on managing cows during this critical time period. When Thursday, October 18th at 8 p.m. Transfer project funded by the NaWatching on a tablet or mobile tional Check-off and Canada’s Beef device? Science Cluster. If you plan to join the webinar using Speakers your tablet or mobile device, you Steve Hendrick D.V.M. – Veterinarwill need to download the appropri- ian, Coaldale Veterinary Clinic ate receiver. We recommend that Steve was raised on a cow-calf and you join the webinar 15 minutes feedlot operation in south western early as you will be prompted to Ontario. He received both his DVM download the receiver once you log and Doctor of Veterinary Science in, which may take several mindegree in epidemiology from the utes to complete. To download the Ontario Veterinary College. Steve receiver ahead of time, visit: http:// currently works at the Coaldale Vetwww.citrix.com/go/receiver.html erinary Clinic near Lethbridge, AB Interested but aren’t available that providing veterinary and consulting evening? services to feedlot, cow-calf and Register anyway! This one-hour we- dairy clients. Tracy Herbert – Beef binar will be recorded and posted Extension Coordinator, Beef Cattle online at a later date. All registrants Research Council will receive a link to the recording Tracy coordinates the development, and additional learning resources. maintenance and utilization of By attending the live event, you’ll various research extension tools, inhave the opportunity to interact cluding www.BeefResearch.ca, with and ask questions too. a focus on accelerating the dissemCost ination and uptake of innovation BCRC webinars are available and related to production efficiencies, free of charge thanks to guest animal health, and food safety and speakers who volunteer their time quality to cattle producers and othand expertise to support advanceer industry stakeholders. ments in the Canadian beef indusWhat is a webinar?
 try, and through the Knowledge Webinars are just like attending a Dissemination and Technology

workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
 Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible. Visit our Webinars page to find other upcoming BCRC webinars and the recordings of our past sessions.


Manitoba ÂŽ

OBSOLETE COLLECTION CAMPAIGN

Return your unwanted or obsolete pesticides and livestock medications Farmers: safely dispose of your unwanted agricultural pesticides and livestock/equine medications from October 24-28, 2016 at one of the following locations, for no charge. Monday, October 24 Swan River

Richardson Pioneer 204-238-4237

Arborg

Crop Production Services 204-376-5990

Brandon

Acropolis Warehousing Ltd. 204-729-8554

Tuesday, October 25 Dauphin

Dauphin Co-op 204-622-6080

Marquette Consumers Marquette Co-operative Ltd 204-375-6570 Virden

Redfern Farm Services Ltd 204-748-1122

Altona

GJ Chemical Company Ltd 204-324-8090

Thursday, October 27

Wednesday, October 26 Inglis

Jackson Seeds Ltd 204-564-2293

Beausejour

Crop Production Services 204-268-3497

Deloraine

Crop Production Services 204-747-2877

Arnaud

GJ Chemical Company Ltd 204-427-2337

Friday, October 28

Shoal Lake

Richardson Pioneer 204-759-2917

Gladstone

Crop Production Services 204-385-2349

Steinbach

Richardson Pioneer 204-326-4483

Niverville

Paterson Grain 204-388-6565

Starbuck

Bestland Air Ltd 204-735-2258

Holland

Paterson Grain 204-526-2240

Snowflake

Double Diamond Farm Supply 204-876-4557

Portage La Prairie

Portage Co-op 204-637-3030

* Obsolete pesticides and livestock/equine medications will be accepted from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. at each site on the date indicated. Program supported by:

For more information, please call CleanFARMS at 877-622-4460 or visit www.cleanfarms.ca


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Canada Beef Is Celebrating Canadian Beef at Global Tables October 7, 2016 – Canada Beef is celebrating love for Canadian beef around the world with a series of Canadian beef experience events taking place in Mexico last night, Japan on October 18, Taiwan on October 20, and China on November 8. At the events, Canada Beef will launch an enriched global brand including a new brand mark, tagline and video for Canadian beef that further ties the premium food to the land from which it comes. Incorporating the unique traits that make Canadian beef a memorable experience, the new tagline “We put the best of Canada into our beef” links Canada’s land, hardworking people, sustainable practices and good ethics to the food itself. “In spring, we started off our brand celebration in the heart of Canadian cattle country at our culinary centre in Calgary, Alberta, the Canadian Beef Centre of Excellence. Over the next month that celebration continues internationally,” said Joyce Parslow, Executive Director of Marketing and Consumer Relations, Canada Beef. “Our sincere hope is that guests walk away with a passion for Canadian beef – the story, the brand and the premium product that it is.” The Canadian beef brand is more than a logo or mark on a product. Canada Beef’s global brand research provided the insight that Canadian beef is a powerful, emotional connection that is an embodiment of what it is to be Canadian. When we asked consumers worldwide what Canadian beef meant to them – they told us it was the goodness of Canada itself. “The practices reflected in the Canadian beef brand position help earn the trust of the marketplace with the reward being demand pull,” said Ron Glaser, Vice President of Corporate Affairs, Canada Beef. “This translates into many commercial opportunities for all partners in the value chain right through to the Canadian beef cattle farmer and rancher.” In attendance at the events will be government representatives, retail, foodservice, and end use partners of Canada Beef, and influential chefs and media. The events will be a taste experience featuring Canadian beef prepared with international culinary influences. “Through the Canadian beef experience event, we are proud to share some of the best food Canada has to offer at the global consumer’s table: Canadian beef,” added Parslow. It is Canada Beef’s good fortune to represent Canadian beef. Our beef is great because of Canada. To see us how the world sees us, visit canadabeef.ca/global-tables in the coming weeks to experience each event. Canadian beef brand video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_IH4egPtDk Canada Beef is the cattle producer-funded and run organization responsible for domestic and international beef and veal market development. It has 30 staff in offices in Canada, Mexico, Japan, China, and Taiwan. Canada Beef works to enable and sustain loyalty to the Canadian beef brand and build strong relationships with trade customers and partners around the world. These efforts increase demand for Canadian beef and the value producers receive for their cattle. -30-


mbbeef.ca

Sept. 30, 2016

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP district meetings begin October 24 The schedule has been set for Manitoba Beef Producers’ 14 district meetings. Beginning with the District 11 meeting Oct. 24 in Ashern, MBP directors and staff will spend the better part of a month travelling the province to the 14 meetings. “The fast-approaching district meetings provide an opportunity for you to interact with your MBP District Director and senior MBP staff,” MBP

President Heinz Reimer said in a letter that was sent out to the association’s roughly 7,000 members. Reimer added that like in past years the district meetings will include a review of MBP’s finances and updates on industry developments, trends, programs, regulatory changes and more. Members will also have the opportunity to present resolutions for debate at the annual general

Find Us Online

mbbeef.ca @ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com

meeting. “This year we also plan to have a discussion about the exciting comments made by Manitoba’s Agriculture Minister, Ralph Eichler about his interest in seeing Manitoba’s beef cow herd grow to 750,000 over the next decade,” Reimer said in the letter. “It is important to know what type of policies and tools (members) see as key to achieving this, be it targeted business risk

management programs, enhanced lending tools, research into production efficiencies, a strong labour supply, sound water management strategies, access to Crown lands and community pastures or other needs. (Member) input on this subject would be very valuable.” Director elections will also take place at the meetings in odd-numbered districts. If a member is interested in letting continued to Page 2

Canada Beef wants to hear from producers! Canada Beef is looking for the stories and proof points to back what we say about producers and strengthen our sense of trust and relationship with consumers. Help tell your story, how you are committed to do the best you can do to bring quality Canadian Beef to the consumers table. We invite you to complete this 10-15 minute questionnaire that will help Canada Beef tell your story. Begin Survey


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News MBP district meetings

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry

•Beef School Ep. 1: Supercharge forage with silage inoculants • Rumen management for best herd productivity • Proper implanting techniques for beef calves • Cattle infected by parasites may look healthy, but have slower gain

begin October 24 continued from Page 1

their name stand for director, or know of someone who would be a good addition to MBP’s board, they are asked to contact Reimer who will forward the name along to MBP’s Nominations Committee. There is one director retiring this year as Caron Clarke of District 11 has reached her term limit. Planning for MBP’s 38th Annual General Meeting is also underway. The theme for the upcoming AGM, which is scheduled for Feb 2-3 2017, is Sharing Our Story, and will focus on topics such as making the connection between producers, customers and the general public. “The AGM features topical breakout sessions, panel discussions, resolutions debate, industry updates, and is an opportunity to interact with your fellow beef producers, other members of our production chain and, government officials,” Reimer said. To find further information on the AGM and register online, go to: http://www.mbbeef.ca/annual-meeting/. More on speakers and the AGM agenda will be included in upcoming issues of Cattle Country.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Become an Agroclimate Impact Reporter By Agriculture and Agri-food Canada Agriculture and Agri-food Canada is seeking volunteers to became an Agroclimate Impact Reporter (AIR).AIR is an online application used to input and monitor the impacts of weather and climate on the agricultural sector in Canada. It is vital to monitor how weather and climate impact agriculture as it helps AAFC step in and implement programs in times of need such as drought, flooding, hails storms, etc. AAFC is aware of the conditions persisting in Manitoba, and it is crucial to gather more data on the impact these conditions have had on agriculture. In order to gather more data we are encouraging all those involved in the agriculture industry to become AIR volunteers. Becoming a volunteer with AIR is very easy. All it takes is filling out a survey once a month, about a 3-5 min time commitment each month. We currently have a survey available, if you would like to provide AAFC with data regarding the impacts weather and climate are having on your farm follow this link: http://air. agr.gc.ca/air/public/submit.html?lang=en. Then click on ‘Submit Survey’, find your location, and fill out the survey! At the end of the survey it will ask you to ‘Subscribe Now’, if you click on that link and provide us with your name and email you will be transferred to our automated service that will email you every month-thus by passing this step.

Western Canada’s Distributor for Nature’s Wave Products

ALL-NATURAL

PRO-BIOTIC SUPPLEMENTS THAT:

• BUILD IMMUNITY • REDUCE STRESS • IMPROVE FEED CONVERSION • MINIMIZE EFFECTS OF DIGESTIVE PARASITES

HAROLD UNRAU

(204) 871-0250

Main St., Grunthal, MB

For more info or to find a retailer near you:

www.hulivestock.com


Manitoba’s Controlled Crop Residue Burning Program

Always Call Before You Burn

1-800-265-1233 Stubble burning restrictions

Manitoba’s crop residue burning regulation restricts daytime burning between August 1 and November 15. Burning at night is illegal. Burning within Burning Permit Areas requires a permit issued by Manitoba Sustainable Development. If you do not comply, you may be fined as much as $50,000.

If you must burn, be responsible Before you burn straw, stubble or chaff this fall, call 1-800-265-1233 or visit manitoba.ca to find out whether burning is allowed in your area that day. Burning is permitted only on days when the weather conditions allow for effective smoke dispersion. It is essential that you make sure appropriate fireguards are in place during a burn and you must supervise your fires at all times.

Consider the alternatives In most years, crop residue management practices can reduce or eliminate the need to burn. For more information, contact your local Manitoba Agriculture, Growing Opportunities Centre or visit manitoba.ca.

MB Beef Producers 1/2 Page Ad (8.5”w x 5.5”d) Full Color


Managing pregnant cows for improved cow and calf performance: Webinar October 18 Management of pregnant cows has a major effect on calf performance, cow performance, and the ability to of cows to rebreed. Register for this webinar to hear tips on managing cows during this critical time period. When Thursday, October 18th at 8 p.m. Transfer project funded by the NaWatching on a tablet or mobile tional Check-off and Canada’s Beef device? Science Cluster. If you plan to join the webinar using Speakers your tablet or mobile device, you Steve Hendrick D.V.M. – Veterinarwill need to download the appropri- ian, Coaldale Veterinary Clinic ate receiver. We recommend that Steve was raised on a cow-calf and you join the webinar 15 minutes feedlot operation in south western early as you will be prompted to Ontario. He received both his DVM download the receiver once you log and Doctor of Veterinary Science in, which may take several mindegree in epidemiology from the utes to complete. To download the Ontario Veterinary College. Steve receiver ahead of time, visit: http:// currently works at the Coaldale Vetwww.citrix.com/go/receiver.html erinary Clinic near Lethbridge, AB Interested but aren’t available that providing veterinary and consulting evening? services to feedlot, cow-calf and Register anyway! This one-hour we- dairy clients. Tracy Herbert – Beef binar will be recorded and posted Extension Coordinator, Beef Cattle online at a later date. All registrants Research Council will receive a link to the recording Tracy coordinates the development, and additional learning resources. maintenance and utilization of By attending the live event, you’ll various research extension tools, inhave the opportunity to interact cluding www.BeefResearch.ca, with and ask questions too. a focus on accelerating the dissemCost ination and uptake of innovation BCRC webinars are available and related to production efficiencies, free of charge thanks to guest animal health, and food safety and speakers who volunteer their time quality to cattle producers and othand expertise to support advanceer industry stakeholders. ments in the Canadian beef indusWhat is a webinar?
 try, and through the Knowledge Webinars are just like attending a Dissemination and Technology

workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
 Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible. Visit our Webinars page to find other upcoming BCRC webinars and the recordings of our past sessions.


Governments invest in on-farm food safety and animal welfare projects Government of Manitoba Media Release

The Canada and Manitoba governments will invest $1.2 million in 275 on-farm food safety and animal welfare projects, Manitoba Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler and Dr. Doug Eyolfsen, member of Parliament for Charleswood, St. James, Assiniboia, Headingley, on behalf of Federal Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay, announced today. “This is the first year animal welfare projects were included in the program and the response from Manitoba farmers was extremely positive,” said Eichler. “Manitoba farmers continue to be innovators and leaders when it comes to biosecurity, assurance systems, animal care and food safety. We are proud to support their good work with funding from this program.” Manitoba farmers applied for funding to improve biosecurity, traceability, food safety and quality, and animal welfare practices on their farms. “Farmers are committed to producing safe, high-quality foods that consumers enjoy and trust, both in Canada and abroad,” said Dr. Eyolfson. “Investments in biosecurity, traceability and assurance systems contribute to consumer confidence and yield greater prosperity for Manitoba farmers and their families.”

In total, 255 livestock producers and 20 crop producers were approved for funding under Growing Forward 2’s Growing Assurance – Food Safety On-Farm program. To be eligible, producers must have implemented a national on-farm food safety program for their commodity where one exists. “This Growing Forward 2 funding helps farmers keep pace with technology upgrades,” said Jake Wiebe, owner of NEWEST Farms, located near New Bothwell. “The remote bird welfare monitoring equipment installed in my barns keeps me more closely connected to what is happening when I cannot be there in person.” More than half of the approved projects (141) focus on animal welfare and will help Manitoba farmers implement new requirements under national codes of practice for caring for livestock. Some of these projects, valued at more than $610,000, include: • purchasing and installing lowstress handling equipment for cows and sheep; • adding non-slip flooring and stall enhancements for dairy cows; and • improving environmental monitoring inside poultry barns. Manitoba leafcutter and honeybee producers received more than $83,000 for 50 projects including: • participation in a honeycomb exchange program,

• new microscopes to more quickly identify and address diseases onfarm, • bee cell sampling, separating or sorting equipment; and • queen honeybee rearing equipment and training. Grain farmers were able to apply for funding to support a number of projects that would improve biosecurity, including in-field pest monitoring, seed testing for pathogens, grain sample storage and managing access to equipment and fields. Eichler also noted a new biosecurity fact sheet has been developed for Manitoba Agriculture employees, to help ensure they also support on-farm efforts to reduce the spread of pests, diseases and other contaminants. The federal and provincial governments are investing $176 million in Manitoba under Growing Forward 2, a five-year, federal-provincial-territorial policy framework to advance the agriculture industry, helping producers and processors become more innovative and competitive in world markets. For more information about Growing Assurance, go to www.gov.mb.ca/ agriculture/growing-forward-2 under Strategic Initiatives. For more information on Manitoba’s agricultural programs and services, follow the Twitter account at www.twitter.com/MBGovAg.


Nominations open for The Environmental Stewardship Award Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is accepting applications for The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) until December 1st. All supporting documentation (including 2 letters of reference, photos, etc.) needs to be to provided to MBP by that time as well. A winner will be announced at the MBP AGM in February. The background information and TESA application is available online at the following websites. NOTE: Producers need to send their information directly to the MBP office, not to CCA. http://www.cattle.ca/sustainability/the-environmental-stewardship-award/ http://www.cattle.ca/assets/TESA/tesa-application-v7.3.pdf ELIGIBILITY All beef cattle operations in Manitoba are eligible to apply. Producers can either be nominated by an individual or organization or apply themselves. Both methods are equally encouraged. Nominees and applicants compete for one of five provincial awards based on their province of residence. Past nominees are encouraged to resubmit their application. Previous winners may not reapply. INFORMATION THE CANDIDATES ARE REQUIRED TO SUPPLY • Provide a description of your farm including the environment it operates in. • What have you done/what are you doing to improve environmental management on your farm? • What are your challenges and successes? Please include pictures and/or data which help show measurable results. • What factors have enabled you to make management changes? (e.g. Working with conservation organizations, programs such as the Environmental Farm Plan, funding support, education, etc.) • What are your environmental goals for the future and how do you plan to carry them out? Include two letters of reference that speak to your leadership in conservation. Please limit applications to 10 pages (not including letters of reference and photos). Electronic applications are preferred and a single, complete PDF document is requested. Submit applications to info@mbbeef.ca


Low Stress Cattle Handling Clinic Featuring Rory Sapergia

October 14 - Grunthal Auction Mart October 15 - Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Brookdale Research Farm (Near Brandon) Begins at 8:30 a.m. Cost: $45 | Pre-Register at: verifiedbeefmanitoba@gmail.com or 204-264-0294 (Space is Limited)

“At the point that you feel like you need to go faster, you usually just need to slow down.” It’s this philosphy that Rory Sapergia uses to guide his work with stock and these words have served him well. Rory is a lifelong stockman who has spent his life learning the patterns and behaviour of horses and cattle alike. Working his way across ranches, operations and feedlots across southern Alberta has allowed him to develop a unique style of handling cattle that make people stop and take notice. Moving on to learn from industry leaders like Dylan Biggs, Rory now communicates his theories and practices to anyone wishing to streamline their handling practices and improve their abilities working stock.

Growing Forward 2 Funding Provided By:

Clinic Sponsors: k Livessptoocr t n a r T

P. Quintaine and Sons Clinic Organized By:


FMC launching bridging the gap: step up to succession program to support farm families in transition Farm Management Canada Media Release Farm Management Canada (FMC) has launched an enhanced version of its former Step Up mentorship program to help bridge the gap between generations of farmers to provide Canada's future farmers with the best chance for success. Succession planning - also called transition planning, ensures farm business continuity: it is the only process that links one generation to future generations involved in the farm business, and addresses how the vision, goals and dreams of a farm will carry on. "According to the recent study, Making Dollars and Sense, less than 1/3 of Canada's farmers have a succession plan, while close to 40% are in the succession stage of their farm business," says Heather Watson, Executive Director of Farm Management Canada. She goes on to note, "this signals not only a significant risk to the Canadian agricultural sector, but also an immense opportunity to promote and provide the information, tools and resources for farmers to improve their succession planning

practices." The Bridging the Gap: Step Up to Succession program is comprised of a series of Succession & Transition Planning workshops for farm families coupled with a Successor Development program, exclusively for young farmers. FMC will be working with renowned farm family coach Elaine Froese and business management consultant Cedric MacLeod to help lead the program and coach participants throughout their journey. In the true spirit of collaboration and partnership, Canada's Outstanding Young Farmers' Program, the Canadian Young Farmers' Forum and 4-H Canada are partner-

ing with FMC to help ensure the program is a complete success. For more information on the program, please visit Farm Management Canada's website. About Farm Management Canada A national umbrella for Canadian farm business management activity, Farm Management Canada is the only organization devoted exclusively to the development and delivery of advanced business management information, tools and resources to position Canada's farmers for success. FMC's programs and activities are made possible through support from generous sponsors and supporters.


News Release CCA applauds expansion of beef access to China September 22, 2016 Calgary, AB – Chinese Premier Li Keqiang met today in Ottawa with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and announced that China will begin to allow bone-in Canadian beef from cattle under 30 months of age (UTM) effective today. The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased that this important trading partner has recognized the rigour of Canada’s bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) control measures and has taken this step to move forward in normalizing import conditions for Canadian beef. CCA President Dan Darling called today’s news a significant result for the Canadian beef sector. “On behalf of Canada’s 68,500 beef farms and feedlots, I want to thank Agriculture and Agri-Food Minister Lawrence MacAulay, International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland and Prime Minister Trudeau for their work to achieve this important threshold in the staged access process we are engaged in with China,” he said. China closed to Canadian beef in May 2003 when Canada discovered its first domestic case of BSE. During former Premier Hu’s visit to Canada in 2010, he announced that China would fully re-open to Canadian beef in stages. The first stage was boneless beef from UTM cattle. In 2013, China approved additional Canadian beef export facilities to increase our capacity to serve Chinese beef importers. In June 2014, China announced it would begin to consider the importation of bone-in UTM beef products. Today’s announcement represents the successful conclusion of that step. As Canadian beef access to China has expanded, so has Canada’s export performance. In 2012, Canada exported $4.7 million. This grew to $27.5 million in 2013 and $40.1 million in 2014. In 2015 China stepped in as a major buyer while Canadian beef was temporarily shut out of Korea and Taiwan and the Canadian dollar was weak, purchasing $256 million that year. Through July 2016, Canadian beef sales to China have returned to being comparable with the first seven months of 2014. The addition of bone-in UTM access is expected to add an additional $10 million per year in exports to China in the short term while the Canadian beef cattle herd remains contracted. This news from China on top of recent expansion of access to Mexico and Taiwan is very positive for increasing opportunities for Canadian beef producers, noted Darling. “If we can also get the Trans-Pacific Partnership implemented and viable access to Europe, the long term potential should send the right signal for beef producers to increase their herds. We can produce more beef with confidence if we know markets will be open to purchase it.” For further information, contact: Gina Teel Communications Manager Canadian Cattlemen’s Association 403-875-3616 | teelg@cattle.ca @CdnCattlemen | www.cattle.ca

The CCA is the national voice for Canada’s beef cattle industry representing 68,500 beef farms and feedlots. Visit www.cattle.ca


Where the livestock industry CONNECTS...

Wednesday, December 14 Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre WINNIPEG, Manitoba, Canada More than 140 exhibits MULTI-SPECIES LIVESTOCK SHOW featuring: hog, beef, dairy, sheep, poultry, bison, goat... The latest in livestock production techniques NEW & EVOLVING TECHNOLOGIES: expert presentations for today’s producers Canada’s largest Pork Quality Competition...

... Cash Prize s in w n io mp Grand Cha

...PLUS a trip for 2* to DES MOINES, Iow a for the WORLD PORK EXPO 2017! *(max $2500) See website for details.

free admission / free parking / door prizes

prairielivestockexpo.ca Formerly HOG & POULTRY DAYS


Manitoba ÂŽ

OBSOLETE COLLECTION CAMPAIGN

Return your unwanted or obsolete pesticides and livestock medications Farmers: safely dispose of your unwanted agricultural pesticides and livestock/equine medications from October 24-28, 2016 at one of the following locations, for no charge. Monday, October 24 Swan River

Richardson Pioneer 204-238-4237

Arborg

Crop Production Services 204-376-5990

Brandon

Acropolis Warehousing Ltd. 204-729-8554

Tuesday, October 25 Dauphin

Dauphin Co-op 204-622-6080

Marquette Consumers Marquette Co-operative Ltd 204-375-6570 Virden

Redfern Farm Services Ltd 204-748-1122

Altona

GJ Chemical Company Ltd 204-324-8090

Thursday, October 27

Wednesday, October 26 Inglis

Jackson Seeds Ltd 204-564-2293

Beausejour

Crop Production Services 204-268-3497

Deloraine

Crop Production Services 204-747-2877

Arnaud

GJ Chemical Company Ltd 204-427-2337

Friday, October 28

Shoal Lake

Richardson Pioneer 204-759-2917

Gladstone

Crop Production Services 204-385-2349

Steinbach

Richardson Pioneer 204-326-4483

Niverville

Paterson Grain 204-388-6565

Starbuck

Bestland Air Ltd 204-735-2258

Holland

Paterson Grain 204-526-2240

Snowflake

Double Diamond Farm Supply 204-876-4557

Portage La Prairie

Portage Co-op 204-637-3030

* Obsolete pesticides and livestock/equine medications will be accepted from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. at each site on the date indicated. Program supported by:

For more information, please call CleanFARMS at 877-622-4460 or visit www.cleanfarms.ca


Sept. 16, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP to host Bombers game Saturday Manitoba Beef Producers is proud to partner with Canada Beef as the host sponsors when the Winnipeg Blue Bombers meet the Toronto Argonauts Sept. 17. As part of an agreement signed in 2014, MBP will be the host sponsor for the Bombers’ game that evening when they host the Argos. Prior to the game MBP will have a booth located in the Tailgate Plaza at Investor’s Group Field where anyone attending the game can stop by and learn more about Manitoba’s cattle industry. The public continued to Page 2

For the third straight year, MBP and Canada Beef will be the host sponsors of a Winnipeg Blue Bombers game. MBP will also have a booth located in Tailgate Plaza where fans can enter to win a supper for 10 people with two Bombers' players.

Find Us Online

mbbeef.ca @ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com

Canada Beef wants to hear from producers! Canada Beef is looking for the stories and proof points to back what we say about producers and strengthen our sense of trust and relationship with consumers. Help tell your story, how you are committed to do the best you can do to bring quality Canadian Beef to the consumers table. We invite you to complete this 10-15 minute questionnaire that will help Canada Beef tell your story. Begin Survey


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

CFL - Canada Beef partnership enters third year continued from Page 1

will also have the opportunity to enter a draw where the winner will receive a steak dinner for 10 people in the Blue and Gold Club at IGF and be joined by Mo Leggett and Stanley Bryant of the Bombers for the meal. The supper for the winning entry will be held on Oct. 4. Also, MBP members interested in attending the game can do so at a discounted price through an agreement between the Bombers and MBP. To receive the discount go to the Blue Bombers ticket page on their website and enter the code CATTLE in the offer code area. The three-year agreement between Canada Beef and the CFL was signed in 2014. According to a Canada Beef press release, the partnership is in conjunction with five provincial beef producer organizations from across the country, who will represent the Canadian beef farmers and ranchers to thousands of fans at CFL games across the country. This will

give consumers the opportunity to meet the people who raise beef, and bring beef to their tables. "We're really excited to involve our provincial partners in this unique opportunity. It will allow us to leverage these partnerships with boots on the ground, highlighting local beef farmers and ranchers at their games. This will build brand loyalty and allow grassroots producers to interact with consumers, while sharing their passion and the benefits of en-

joying Canadian beef," said Rob Meijer, President, Canada Beef. MBP is also the sponsor of the Family of the Game promotion throughout the 2016 season. Bombers fans can enter a draw on the club’s website for four tickets to a home game. The winning family will also get a sideline experience prior to the game and will be announced as the Manitoba Beef Producers Family of the Game on the video board during the pre-game program.

To purchase a discounted ticket to the Sept. 17 Winnipeg Blue Bombers game use the the code: CATTLE


In the News

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • The September Hay Situation and Price Update from Manitoba Forage and Grasslands Association • How to be an agvocate on social media - and do it well

Western Canada’s Distributor for Nature’s Wave Products

ALL-NATURAL

PRO-BIOTIC SUPPLEMENTS THAT:

• BUILD IMMUNITY • REDUCE STRESS • IMPROVE FEED CONVERSION • MINIMIZE EFFECTS OF DIGESTIVE PARASITES

• The latest livestock prices from Manitoba Agriculture • When you should move cattle during the grazing season

HAROLD UNRAU

(204) 871-0250

Main St., Grunthal, MB

For more info or to find a retailer near you:

www.hulivestock.com


Nominations open for The Environmental Stewardship Award Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is accepting applications for The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) until December 1st. All supporting documentation (including 2 letters of reference, photos, etc.) needs to be to provided to MBP by that time as well. A winner will be announced at the MBP AGM in February. The background information and TESA application is available online at the following websites. NOTE: Producers need to send their information directly to the MBP office, not to CCA. http://www.cattle.ca/sustainability/the-environmental-stewardship-award/ http://www.cattle.ca/assets/TESA/tesa-application-v7.3.pdf ELIGIBILITY All beef cattle operations in Manitoba are eligible to apply. Producers can either be nominated by an individual or organization or apply themselves. Both methods are equally encouraged. Nominees and applicants compete for one of five provincial awards based on their province of residence. Past nominees are encouraged to resubmit their application. Previous winners may not reapply. INFORMATION THE CANDIDATES ARE REQUIRED TO SUPPLY • Provide a description of your farm including the environment it operates in. • What have you done/what are you doing to improve environmental management on your farm? • What are your challenges and successes? Please include pictures and/or data which help show measurable results. • What factors have enabled you to make management changes? (e.g. Working with conservation organizations, programs such as the Environmental Farm Plan, funding support, education, etc.) • What are your environmental goals for the future and how do you plan to carry them out? Include two letters of reference that speak to your leadership in conservation. Please limit applications to 10 pages (not including letters of reference and photos). Electronic applications are preferred and a single, complete PDF document is requested. Submit applications to info@mbbeef.ca


Manitoba’s Controlled Crop Residue Burning Program

Always Call Before You Burn

1-800-265-1233 Stubble burning restrictions

Manitoba’s crop residue burning regulation restricts daytime burning between August 1 and November 15. Burning at night is illegal. Burning within Burning Permit Areas requires a permit issued by Manitoba Sustainable Development. If you do not comply, you may be fined as much as $50,000.

If you must burn, be responsible Before you burn straw, stubble or chaff this fall, call 1-800-265-1233 or visit manitoba.ca to find out whether burning is allowed in your area that day. Burning is permitted only on days when the weather conditions allow for effective smoke dispersion. It is essential that you make sure appropriate fireguards are in place during a burn and you must supervise your fires at all times.

Consider the alternatives In most years, crop residue management practices can reduce or eliminate the need to burn. For more information, contact your local Manitoba Agriculture, Growing Opportunities Centre or visit manitoba.ca.

MB Beef Producers 1/2 Page Ad (8.5”w x 5.5”d) Full Color


Low Stress Cattle Handling Clinic Featuring Rory Sapergia October 14 - Grunthal Auction Mart October 15 - Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Brookdale Research Farm (Near Brandon) Begins at 8:30 a.m. Cost: $45 | Pre-Register at: verifiedbeefmanitoba@gmail.com or 204-264-0294 (Space is Limited)

“At the point that you feel like you need to go faster, you usually just need to slow down.” It’s this philosphy that Rory Sapergia uses to guide his work with stock and these words have served him well. Rory is a lifelong stockman who has spent his life learning the patterns and behaviour of horses and cattle alike. Working his way across ranches, operations and feedlots across southern Alberta has allowed him to develop a unique style of handling cattle that make people stop and take notice. Moving on to learn from industry leaders like Dylan Biggs, Rory now communicates his theories and practices to anyone wishing to streamline their handling practices and improve their abilities working stock.

Growing Forward 2 Funding Provided By:

Clinic Sponsors:

Steve’s Livestock Transport

P. Quintaine and Sons

Clinic Organized By:


NEWS RELEASE

4-H Canada Launches 4-H Club for Alumni September 13, 2016 – Woodstock, ON – 4-H Canada announced today at Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show, the launch of a new 4-H alumni program. This new initiative, 4-H’s Club 1913, is an online community for the more than 350,000 4-H alumni across Canada, who were at one time a youth member in Canada’s longest standing rural youth organization and who are looking to get back to their roots. 4-H Canada is encouraging alumni across Canada to register online at Club1913.ca—an online hub for 4H alumni who are interested in re-connecting and networking with other alumni, and finding unique opportunities at the local and national level, while celebrating their pride in being part of the 4-H Canada community. “I often speak with individuals, both within agriculture community and beyond, who are excited to tell me about the profound and positive impact 4-H had in their lives,” says Donna Bridge, President of 4-H Canada’s Board of Directors. “For most, 4-H served as the foundation for their success, no matter how they define the word.” Since 1913, 4-H Canada has been empowering young Canadians to become responsible, caring and contributing leaders who are passionate about making meaningful contributions to the world around them. Across Canada, 4-H alumni continue to use their Heads, Heart, Hands and Health to make a difference as community champions, Olympic athletes, industry leaders and politicians at every level of government. Being a member of 4-H’s Club 1913 also represents an opportunity for 4-H alumni to help grow future generations of leaders, by volunteering, becoming mentors and engaging in knowledge and skills transfer opportunities with 4-H youth. “Our wide network of 4-H alumni are proof that 4-H programming builds strong leaders, who are equipped with confidence, positive values, decision-making abilities and other invaluable skill sets,” said Shannon Benner, CEO of 4-H Canada. “In the Canadian economy, and in the Canadian agriculture sector, we see a growing demand for these skills, and our alumni can play an instrumental role in addressing these gaps. There is no greater time than now for 4-H.” 4-H alumni are encouraged to register today at Club1913.ca and share their stories of the positive impact 4-H Canada has had in their lives, using #4HClub1913.

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Manitoba ÂŽ

OBSOLETE COLLECTION CAMPAIGN

Return your unwanted or obsolete pesticides and livestock medications Farmers: safely dispose of your unwanted agricultural pesticides and livestock/equine medications from October 24-28, 2016 at one of the following locations, for no charge. Monday, October 24 Swan River

Richardson Pioneer 204-238-4237

Arborg

Crop Production Services 204-376-5990

Brandon

Acropolis Warehousing Ltd. 204-729-8554

Tuesday, October 25 Dauphin

Dauphin Co-op 204-622-6080

Marquette Consumers Marquette Co-operative Ltd 204-375-6570 Virden

Redfern Farm Services Ltd 204-748-1122

Altona

GJ Chemical Company Ltd 204-324-8090

Thursday, October 27

Wednesday, October 26 Inglis

Jackson Seeds Ltd 204-564-2293

Beausejour

Crop Production Services 204-268-3497

Deloraine

Crop Production Services 204-747-2877

Arnaud

GJ Chemical Company Ltd 204-427-2337

Friday, October 28

Shoal Lake

Richardson Pioneer 204-759-2917

Gladstone

Crop Production Services 204-385-2349

Steinbach

Richardson Pioneer 204-326-4483

Niverville

Paterson Grain 204-388-6565

Starbuck

Bestland Air Ltd 204-735-2258

Holland

Paterson Grain 204-526-2240

Snowflake

Double Diamond Farm Supply 204-876-4557

Portage La Prairie

Portage Co-op 204-637-3030

* Obsolete pesticides and livestock/equine medications will be accepted from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. at each site on the date indicated. Program supported by:

For more information, please call CleanFARMS at 877-622-4460 or visit www.cleanfarms.ca


Sept. 2, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP to host Bombers game September 17 Manitoba Beef Producers is proud to partner with Canada Beef as the host sponsors when the Winnipeg Blue Bombers host the Toronto Argonauts Sept. 17. As part of an agreement signed in 2014, MBP will be the host sponsor for the Bombers’ game that evening when they host the Argos. Prior to the game MBP will have a booth located in the Tailgate Plaza at Investor’s Group Field where anyone attending the game can stop by and learn more about Manitoba’s cattle industry. The public will also have the opportunity to enter a draw where the winner will receive a steak dinner for 10 people in the

Blue and Gold Club at IGF and be joined by two members of the Bombers for the meal. The date of the supper will be determined once the winner is selected. Also, MBP members interested in attending the game can do so at a discounted price through an agreement between the Bombers and MBP. To receive the discount go to the Blue Bombers ticket page on their website and enter the code CATTLE in the offer code area. The three-year agreement between Canada Beef and the CFL was signed in 2014. According to a Canada Beef press release, the partnership is in conjunction

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mbbeef.ca @ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com

with five provincial beef producer organizations from across the country, who will represent the Canadian beef farmers and ranchers to thousands of fans at CFL games across the country. This will give consumers the opportunity to meet the people who raise beef, and bring beef to their tables. "We're really excited to involve our provincial partners in this unique opportunity. It will allow us to leverage these partnerships with boots on the ground, highlighting local beef farmers and ranchers at their games. continued to Page 2

Canada Beef wants to hear from producers! Canada Beef is looking for the stories and proof points to back what we say about producers and strengthen our sense of trust and relationship with consumers. Help tell your story, how you are committed to do the best you can do to bring quality Canadian Beef to the consumers table. We invite you to complete this 10-15 minute questionnaire that will help Canada Beef tell your story. Begin Survey


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

CFL - Canada Beef partnership enters third year continued from Page 1 This will build brand loyalty and allow grassroots producers to interact with consumers, while sharing their passion and the benefits of enjoying Canadian beef," said Rob Meijer, President, Canada Beef.

MBP is also the sponsor of the Family of the Game promotion throughout the 2016 season. Bombers fans can enter a draw on the club’s website for four tickets to a home game. The winning family will also get a

sideline experience prior to the game and will be announced as the Manitoba Beef Producers Family of the Game on the video board during the pre-game program.

To purchase a discounted ticket to the Sept. 17 Winnipeg Blue Bombers game use the the code: CATTLE


MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS P. (204) 772‐4542 220‐530 Century Street (800) 772‐0458 Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 F. (204) 774‐3264 www.mbbeef.ca _________________________________________________________________________

NEWS RELEASE

For immediate release August 29, 2016

Manitoba Beef Producers announces 2016 bursary recipients WINNIPEG – With the start of another school year just around the corner, Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is pleased to announce the six recipients the MBP bursaries for 2016. Each year MBP offers six $500 bursaries to members, or the children of members, who are attending university, college or other post‐secondary institutions. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference is given to students who are pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or those acquiring a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. “Ensuring that our rural communities have the services and trades they need to thrive is of utmost importance to MBP,” said President Heinz Reimer. “A number of our past bursary recipients have gone on to careers in rural Manitoba and are making significant contributions to their respective communities. We are pleased to play a small role in helping these students reach their goals.” The students were asked to submit a 600 word essay on what the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Manitoba at large. Students were also asked to include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. The winning essays will be published in the September issue of Cattle Country. The six recipients of the MBP bursaries for 2016 are:  Marianne Sytnyk – Oakburn, MB, District 7  Dawson Procter – Woodlands, MB, District 9  Emily Barteaux – Birtle, MB District 7  Rebecca Zimmer – Inglis, MB District 13  Josey Millward – Garland, MB, District 13  Sheena Meggison – Goodlands, MB, District 1 “These deserving recipients were chosen from a field of over 30 strong candidates,” Reimer said. “On behalf of MBP I wish the students all the best in their academic endeavours in the upcoming school year.

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Manitoba Beef Producers is the exclusive voice of the beef industry in Manitoba. Our role and mission is to represent our beef producers through communication, research, advocacy and education. Manitoba Beef Producers represents 7,000 beef producers across the province.

For more information, please contact: Brian Lemon, General Manager Office: 204‐772‐4542

Chad Saxon, Communications Coordinator Office: 204‐772‐4542


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

Province to consult Manitobans on the use of cosmetic pesticides Provincial Government Media Release Manitoba is entering the second year of implementation of the Non-Essential Use of Pesticides Regulation and the province wants to hear from Manitobans about their experiences with this legislation, Sustainable Development Minister Cathy Cox announced today. “The purpose of the legislation is to reduce the exposure of people and pets to herbicides used in lawn care for non-essential or cosmetic purposes,” Cox said. “We are committed to finding the right balance between protecting the environment, minimizing the impact, and providing usable, aesthetic green spaces in our communities.” Manitobans can email submissions to pesticide.review.2016@gov.mb.ca or respond through an online survey at: www.gov.mb.ca/conservation/envprograms/initiatives/cosmetic_pesticides/ until Sept. 12.


In the News Cattlemen's Young

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Five simple and inspiring back to school recipes • Sanfoin's forage potential tested

• The Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Fund is accepting applications • Pain mitigation: just one more way to show producers care • Reasons for optimism in the beef trade

Leaders announces 2016 mentorship recipients Calgary, AB – The Cattlemen’s Young Leaders (CYL) program is pleased to announce its 2016 national mentorship recipients. The 16 recipients were selected following the final selection round at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference (CBIC), held in Calgary on August 9, 2016. A total of 23 semi-finalists vied for a spot in the national youth initiative of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). Among the 2016 mentorship recipients were two Manitobans, KristyLayne Carr of Marchand and Wilco van Meijl of Brandon. The CYL Selections at CBIC brought together the semi-finalists, current graduates, and industry leaders for a week of networking and learning. The event included the five-year reunion celebration of the CYL national launch, where over 60 alumni mentors and mentees gathered for the graduation of the current group and acknowledgement of the success of the program. “Before the creation of the CBIC, CYL selections were held in the spring as a standalone event and with so many people attending the conference in August, it just made sense to combine the two” said Jill Harvie, CCA Programs Manager. “In the end, it was both a huge attribute to the conference and a considerable benefit to the semi-finalists and graduates. Between the speakers, sessions, and ample networking opportunities, these young cattlemen and women gained a lot from the experience, whether they were chosen as finalists or not. Many positive comments were also made by other CBIC delegates about the amount of young faces in the crowd and the strong representation by the future of Canadian beef.” Congratulations to the 2016 recipients, who will soon be paired with an industry mentor to guide them over the next eight months. The CYL Program provides industry-specific training and mentorship opportunities to young producers. CYL participants have the opportunity to explore a potential career choice or involvement with a provincial/national producer organization, while gaining the expertise and business acumen necessary to sustain the cattle industry into the future. Funding for the CYL Program is made available through its foundation partners, UFA Co-operative Ltd., the Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency (ALMA), Cargill, and MNP. The program also receives support from Gold Sponsors Farm Credit Canada and New Holland.


The economics of pregnancy testing: webinar Sept. 15 By the Beef Cattle Research Council Producers are invited to join this free webinar to better understand the economics of choosing to pregnancy check and whether it is more profitable for your operation to cull cows in the fall or spring. When The webinar begins at 8 p.m. in Manitoba. Watching on a tablet or mobile device? If you plan to join the webinar using your tablet or mobile device, you will need to download the appropriate receiver. We recommend that you join the webinar 15 minutes early as you will be prompted to download the receiver once you log in, which may take several minutes to complete. To download the receiver ahead of time, visit: http://www. citrix.com/go/receiver.html Interested but aren’t available that evening? Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live event, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too. Duration Approximately 1 hour. Cost BCRC webinars are available and free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time and expertise to support advancements in the Canadian beef industry, and through the Knowledge Dissemination and

Technology Transfer project funded by the National Check-off and Canada’s Beef Science Cluster. Speakers Brenna Grant – Manager at Canfax Research Services Brenna has a Master’s of Science in Applied Economics, Professional Agrologist designation and nine years’ experience with Canfax Research Services (CRS). As manager of CRS, Brenna provides industry with statistical information, economic analysis and market outlooks focusing on both the Canadian and global beef markets. Jessica Gordon D.V.M., D.V.Sc. – Assistant Professor at the Ontario Veterinary College Dr. Gordon focuses her teaching on beef cattle health and management. Her most recent research involved parasite control in cow-calf herds. She completed her BS in Animal Science at Michigan State University. After graduation from veterinary school, she held a position in a food animal practice in Wisconsin servicing mostly dairy and cow-calf producers. She left the practice after 3 years to pursue a DVSc at the University of Guelph in Ruminant Health. Reynold Bergen, Ph.D. – Beef Cattle Research Council Science Director Dr. Bergen provides scientific and industry expertise to the BCRC, Beef Science Cluster and Canadian Cattle-

men’s Association (CCA). He works with industry to identify research priorities, reviews research proposals and scientific reports, and engages with industry and research experts on an ongoing basis. To ensure producers have access to current research information, he develops factsheets for projects funded through the BCRC, and writes articles that are available through the CCA, provincial beef organizations, various ag media outlets and BeefResearch.ca. What is a webinar?
 Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
 Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible.


Manitoba AG EX Launches a New Lineup for 2016 Submitted by Karen Burton, Provincial Exhibition of Manitoba

Manitoba Livestock Expo, Fall Fair, Manitoba AG EX, no matter what the name the Provincial Exhibition has been successfully hosting a fall fair to celebrate traditional agriculture practices for over 130 years. “Our fall cattle show has gone through a few different names and looks over the years. “Said Ron Kristjansson, General Manager of the Provincial Exhibition of Manitoba. “The one thing that hasn’t changed though is the support. Even through the severe financial setbacks in the beef industry during the BSE crisis, this show has continued to be a significant event for local cattle producers and the city of Brandon.” In early 2015, the Provincial Exhibition released a new corporate logo and focused on growing their fall cattle event to include more agriculture components. The name Manitoba AG EX was chose to reflect the vision of an agricultural event in Brandon that would appeal to a broader audience. The ProvincialExhibition signed a 3-year agreement with the Manitoba Rodeo Cowboys Association in the fall of 2015 to host the Manitoba Finals Rodeo (MFR). “We know from experience that the crowds want action packed entertainment.” said Kristjansson. “There is nothing more exhilarating than the year-end rodeo competition so becoming the new home of the MFR is an excellent fit for Mani-

toba AG EX.” For the last decade, a standalone group has been organizing the rodeo and equine events that took place on a separate weekend from the Provincial Exhibition’s fall cattle show. “This isn’t our first rodeo.” Joked Kristjansson. “We had a partnership with the Manitoba Rodeo Cowboy Association in the early 2000’s to host the MFR. We are fired up to restore this partnership and continue to expand Manitoba AG EX.” said Kristjansson “An event like this has a significant economic impact on the Brandon region and gives our local producers an important opportunity to showcase their industry. “ This year’s event will also include a variety of equine events as part of the free daily shows including the Manitoba Superhorse 50/50 Show & Sale, NAERIC Barrels of Cash Prospect Sale, Fall Classic Ranch Sorting and the Hagan Performance & Ranch Horse Sale. “Every time we make one of our events bigger, that means more rental income for the Keystone Centre and more people coming in to our city to spend time in our hotels and restaurants. It’s a winwin situation. “ said Kristjansson. The cattle shows will start on Wednesday, October 26 and run through until Saturday, October 29 in the Westoba Ag Centre at the north end of the Keystone Centre. The equine events, including the rodeo will start Thursday, October 27 and run through until Saturday, October 29 in Westman Place main arena.

Stalling for all of the animals will fill the north end barns as well as the Kinsmen and Enns Brothers Arenas. The Taste of Beef luncheon will pay tribute to the beef industry at the Canad Inn Road House on Wednesday, October 26. Tickets for the luncheon are $25 and available by contacting the Provincial Exhibition office at info@provincialexhibition.com. As Manitoba’s largest all breeds cattle show, the 2016 Manitoba AG EX event has attracted national attention. “For the first time ever, we will host the Western National Hereford Show as well as we will see a return of the Canadian National Limousin Show for this year. “ said Kristjansson. “With close to 600 head of cattle at last year’s show, we anticipate that the prominence of this event will attract even more animals and industry leaders.” An extra day has been added to this event to accommodate the expected increase in cattle. The daily equine and cattle shows are open to the public free of charge. Tickets for the evening rodeo are available for purchase at the Keystone Centre Box Office. Cost is $20 for adults and $10 for children 6-12 yrs plus the cost of the Keystone Centre ticket service fee. Registration forms for the Cattle Show are available for download at www.manitobaagex.com until October 1, 2016. Register before September 17 and you could win 2 tickets to the Manitoba Finals Rodeo.



Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc.

220-530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 Aug 25, 2016

Research Technician

Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives Inc. (MBFI), has an opportunity available for someone interested in participating in leading edge beef and forage research and extension. MBFI is collaborating with multiple stakeholders to develop a made-in-Manitoba beef and forage research and extension farm in the Brandon area. MBFI is seeking a full-time, six-month term Research Technician. This term position will be reviewed for an extension at the end of the six months. The candidate must be willing to work flexible hours as necessary, including weekends. Reporting to the Site Manager and the Research Coordinator, the Research Technician is responsible for: collecting, tracking and recording of research data; providing assistance on research projects; caring and handling of cattle and, operating large and small farm equipment. The Research Technician will record and maintain detailed information on farm activities including: equipment maintenance, standard operating procedures, and research results. The Research Technician will also assist in the setup and running of research experiments and extension activities. This position is based out of the Brandon area. Class 5 driver’s license is required and a Class 1 driver’s license would be an asset but is not required. Physical skill, dexterity and coordination are required when handling cattle as well as for other farm activities. For a detailed job description and list of qualifications, visit http://www.mbfi.ca/page.php?id=235 Please submit your resumé and cover letter by Sept 16, 2016 to Ms. Carollyne Kehler, General Manager, ckehler@mbbeef.ca. Thank-you to all interested applicants, however only those under consideration will be contacted.


Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc. 220-530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4

Job Description for Research Technician Work under the general supervision of the Site Manager and Research Coordinator performing standard and complex procedures. Maintain accurate and timely record of test results; apply standard quality control procedures to assure accuracy of test results; operate, calibrate and perform routine maintenance on specialized equipment; maintain supply inventory; collect data; organize and centralize files and records. The successful candidate will be expected to exhibit individual initiative, work independently; be technically proficient and accurate; effectively communicate in both written reports and presentations; initiate and ensure compliance with applicable safety procedures; and possess attention to detail. The majority of the work will be outdoors with some in laboratories or research facilities or rural locations within Manitoba. Requires a Bachelor’s degree in a related field or high school education (some college preferred) with 1-2 years of related lab experience. Must be willing to work flexible hours as necessary, including weekends. Specific duties include: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Conducting tests and experiments on crops and livestock. Gathering, inputting, interpreting, and distributing recorded data. Operating and maintaining computer, laboratory and field equipment. Analyzing specific substances. Ensuring research conducted is done so using the highest standards leading to quality data and the efficient use of farm resources. Maintaining farm and laboratory inventory records, and ordering replacements as necessary. Shipping forage, soil, and other types of samples using approved procedures. Operating small and large farm equipment during field activities and feeding/handling/hauling cattle. Caring for and handling of livestock, including administering certain veterinary treatments. Ensuring all equipment is maintained properly, and procedures recorded. Ensuring all Standard Operating Procedures are updated and available to staff. Other duties as required.

General Competencies include:

Continued to next page


• • • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

Ability to work independently and as a team member. Takes ownership and pride in their work and the image of the organization. Critical thinking, with an ability to identify ways of improving operational efficiencies. Strong attention to detail when recording and interpreting research results, and when preparing specimens and samples. Proficient understanding of Microsoft Excel and Word, and a quick learner of any new programs. Strong communication skills, including public speaking. Follows instructions exactly as prescribed by the researcher, in a consistent and precise manner. Carries out routine tasks accurately and follows strict methodologies to carry out analyses. Ability to maintain and operate standard laboratory/research equipment. Proficient in farm equipment use and maintenance. Keeps up to date on technical developments in the livestock and forage industry, using all tools, including conducts searches (online or otherwise) on identified topics relevant to improving the efficiency, accuracy and relevancy of research operations. Follows strict safety procedures and safety checks. A valid Class 5 driver’s license (Class 1 or 3 an asset). The ability to travel to the job site up to 20 km from Brandon. Physical skill, strength, dexterity and coordination for handling cattle and other farm operations.


Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc.

220-530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 Aug 31, 2016

Casual Farm Labour

Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives Inc. (MBFI), has an opportunity available for someone interested in participating in leading edge beef and forage research and extension. MBFI is collaborating with multiple stakeholders to develop a made-in-Manitoba beef and forage research and extension farm in the Brandon area. MBFI is seeking part time farm labour. Hours for this position will depend on need and could range from 20 to 60 hours per week. Must be willing to work flexible hours as necessary, including weekends. Reporting to the Site Manager and the Research Coordinator, the farm labourer is responsible for working with cattle, working with farm equipment, operating yard equipment, feeding cattle, helping collect research data, cleaning, maintenance of equipment, repairing and maintaining farm buildings, helping prepare the sites for tours and recording data onto a computer. This position is based out of the Brandon area. The majority of the work will be outdoors with some in farm buildings or rural locations within Manitoba. Class 5 driver’s license is required and a Class 1 driver’s license would be an asset but is not required. Physical skill, dexterity and coordination are required when handling cattle as well as for other farm activities. Please submit your resumÊ and cover letter by Sept 16, 2016 to Ms. Carollyne Kehler, General Manager, ckehler@mbbeef.ca. Thank-you to all interested applicants, however only those under consideration will be contacted.


August 22, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

New National Check-Off study shows increased benefits to Canadian cattle producers August 18, 2016 – The Canadian Beef Cattle Research, Market Development and Promotion Agency (the Agency), in partnership with Canfax Research Services is pleased to release a study evaluating the economic benefits from the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off. The study, prepared by Dr. James Rude and Dr. Ellen Goddard, is an update on the 2010 Cranfield Study which had reported results ahead of the 2010

merge of the Beef Information Centre, Canadian Beef Export Federation and the National CheckOff Agency. The new study reports that on average from 2011/12 to 2013/14, every check-off dollar invested in national research and marketing activities resulted in a benefit cost ratio of 14:1 or $14 of benefit for Canadian cattle producers. This is up from the $9 average between 2005 and 2008. In addi-

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tion, the average benefit cost ratio grew steadily between 2011 and 2014. This implies that despite positive benefits, there has been under-investment in research and marketing activities for the Canadian beef cattle industry. Newly elected Agency Chair Linda Allison is confident that setting goals based on the study results will ensure that the industry moves forward together.

“The 14:1 benefit seen from each National Check-Off dollar confirms the value of producer investment,” said Allison. “However, with the declining purchasing power of the National Check-Off and reduced marketings in recent years, under-investment is evident. It is imperative that we continue to find ways to optimize the return for our producers across the country.” continued to Page 2

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News National check off study

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Opening the door to more Canadian beef in China

• Cover crops finally get their due

• Searching for stability in the beef market

• Applied research already well underway at Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives

continued from Page 1 The change in benefit cost ratio for research, overseen by the Beef Cattle Research Council dropped from $46 to $34.50 during 2005 to 2008, while marketing, managed by Canada Beef, had a benefit cost ratio of $13.50, up from $7.55 in the previous study. Generally, an inverse relationship exists between the amount of money spent on a promotion or research activity and its marginal benefit cost ratio. It is this diminishing marginal return that helps explain why as investment has increased for research over the past five years, that the benefit cost ratio has declined, just as marketing dollars have declined and the benefit cost ratio has increased. While the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-off provides the core industry funding for research and marketing programs, it does not fully cover the costs of all programs and activities. Supplementary funding is obtained by leveraging the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-off, attracting on average $3 for every $1 for research and $1 for every $1 for marketing between 2011/12 and 2013/14. Melinda German, General Manager of the Agency, spoke highly of the research and marketing organizations responsible for investing check-off dollars. “The work that the Beef Cattle Research Council and Canada Beef carry out, continues to show great returns for our industry,” German said. “By ensuring a sustained and increasing benefit cost ratio, we can continue to work towards common industry goals laid out in the National Beef Strategy.” The Agency is dedicated to continually monitoring the benefit cost ratio of the National Check-Off through ongoing studies, and ensuring that extra value is derived from producer check-off and import levy investments. Along with the full study from Dr. Rude, the Agency and Canfax Research Services developed two supplementary documents to pinpoint the highlights of the study and how they are applicable to the Canadian beef industry. To learn more about the study and to view the supplementary documents, please click below: 2016 National Check-Off Study – Fact Sheet 2016 National Check-Off Study – Q & A 2016 National Check-Off Study – Full Report The Canadian Beef Cattle Research, Market Development and Promotion Agency manages the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off. Through the National Check-Off, Canadian beef cattle producers collectively invest in research, market development and promotion to achieve the industry’s long-term vision of a dynamic and profitable Canadian beef industry, with Canadian high-quality beef products recognized as the most outstanding by Canadian and world customers.


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

Province to consult Manitobans on the use of cosmetic pesticides Provincial Government Media Release Manitoba is entering the second year of implementation of the Non-Essential Use of Pesticides Regulation and the province wants to hear from Manitobans about their experiences with this legislation, Sustainable Development Minister Cathy Cox announced today. “The purpose of the legislation is to reduce the exposure of people and pets to herbicides used in lawn care for non-essential or cosmetic purposes,” Cox said. “We are committed to finding the right balance between protecting the environment, minimizing the impact, and providing usable, aesthetic green spaces in our communities.” Manitobans can email submissions to pesticide.review.2016@gov.mb.ca or respond through an online survey at: www.gov.mb.ca/conservation/envprograms/initiatives/cosmetic_pesticides/ until Sept. 12.


MBP to host Bombers game September 17 Manitoba Beef Producers is proud to partner with Canada Beef as the host sponsors when the Winnipeg Blue Bombers host the Toronto Argonauts Sept. 17. As part of an agreement signed in 2014, MBP will be the host sponsor for the Bombers’ game that evening when they host the Argos. Prior to the game MBP will have a booth located in the Tailgate Plaza at Investor’s Group Field where anyone attending the game can stop by and learn more about Manitoba’s cattle industry. The public will also have the opportunity to enter a draw where the winner will receive a steak dinner for 10 people in the Blue and Gold Club at IGF and be joined by two members of the Bombers for the meal. The date of the supper will be determined once the winner is selected.

Also, MBP members interested in attending the game can do so at a discounted price through an agreement between the Bombers and MBP. To receive the discount go to the Blue Bombers ticket page on their website and enter the code CATTLE in the offer code area. The three-year agreement between Canada Beef and the CFL was signed in 2014. According to a Canada Beef press release, the partnership is in conjunction with five provincial beef producer organizations from across the country, who will represent the Canadian beef farmers and ranchers to thousands of fans at CFL games across the country. This will give consumers the opportunity to meet the people who raise beef, and bring beef to their tables. "We're really excited to involve

our provincial partners in this unique opportunity. It will allow us to leverage these partnerships with boots on the ground, highlighting local beef farmers and ranchers at their games. This will build brand loyalty and allow grassroots producers to interact with consumers, while sharing their passion and the benefits of enjoying Canadian beef," said Rob Meijer, President, Canada Beef. MBP is also the sponsor of the Family of the Game promotion throughout the 2016 season. Bombers fans can enter a draw on the club’s website for four tickets to a home game. The winning family will also get a sideline experience prior to the game and will be announced as the Manitoba Beef Producers Family of the Game on the video board during the pre-game program.

To purchase a discounted ticket to the Sept. 17 Winnipeg Blue Bombers game use the the code: CATTLE



Media Release Canadian beef industry ‘Puts It Together…’ with strong national conference August 12, 2016 CALGARY, AB — The rising momentum toward a fresh era of national connectivity, teamwork and success for Canada’s beef industry took a major step forward with the successful delivery of a sold-out, progress packed inaugural Canadian Beef Industry Conference, August 9 – 11 in Calgary. The event drew a diverse participation of over 650 producers, industry members and supporters from across the country and all beef producing provinces, including a strong representation of young participants representing the industry future. It featured a dynamic and broad-spanning agenda rich in ideas, knowledge, insights and inspiration for moving the industry forward, including many buzz-generating topics that propelled the conference’s “#CBIC2016” hashtag to become a top trending Twitter topic in Canada. “We couldn’t have asked for a better first time experience delivering this new national conference for Canada’s beef and cattle industry,” says Rob Smith, Canadian Angus Association Chief Executive Officer and co-chair of the conference. “The theme was ‘Putting It Together…’ and that’s exactly what happened. The response has been absolutely amazing. It bodes well for making this an annual event and that’s what we’re talking about now.” The conference met its core objectives to create a truly national meeting place to bring together all facets of the industry involved in beef production, from the grass roots level through all parts of the supply chain – including everyone from the producer with 20 cows to the feeder with 20,000, head – and to help move forward the opportunity represented by the National Beef Strategy. “We have a lot to celebrate,” says Virgil Lowe, conference co-chair and also an Associate with Dentons Canada LLP. “The momentum and strengthened connections established here will help drive ahead the National Beef Strategy and all of our interests for years to come. The event was also designed to be an enjoyable event with a strong social side that people could build in around their summer vacation plans, and that was achieved as well. There were a lot of great discussions and strengthening of relationships that took place informally. Already we have received a lot of feedback that this was a very positive event and step forward for our industry.” Media Release

Page 2 of 2

CBIC 2016


The conference exceeded expectations in registrations and sponsorship support, with over 60 major sponsors contributing, as well as in proceeds raised through the Canadian Cattlemen’s Foundation Golf Classic. Among many highlights, the conference speaker agenda featured entrepreneur and former Dragon’s Den star Arlene Dickinson, along with keynote speakers on each of the National Beef Strategy’s four pillars: connectivity, productivity, beef demand and competitiveness. In addition to covering a wide range of important developments, issues and hot topics, the event also recognized several outstanding contributors to the industry. The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) was presented to Anderson Ranch Inc. of Fir Mountain, operated by Miles and Sheri Anderson. Since 1996, TESA has recognized producers who go above and beyond in exemplifying significant innovation and attention to a wide range of environmental stewardship aspects in their farm operations. These innovations extend beneficially to areas far beyond their land, including water, wildlife and air. The Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation was presented to Dr. Tim McAllister, a long-time outstanding research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada based in Lethbridge. This award is presented by the Beef Cattle Research Council each year to recognize a researcher or scientist whose work has contributed to advancements in the competitiveness and sustainability of the Canadian beef industry. The inaugural conference was a joint collaboration of four organizations – the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC), Canada Beef, the Canadian Beef Breeds Council (CBBC) and the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). Visit www.canadianbeefindustryconference.com for more information. Follow the Canadian Beef Industry Conference on Twitter and Facebook . ###


Beef Cattle Research Council 180, 6815 – 8th Street NE Calgary, Alberta T2E 7H7 Tel: 403.275.8558 Fax: 403.274.5686 www.beefresearch.ca

NEWS RELEASE For immediate release August 10, 2016

Dr. Tim McAllister receives the 2016 Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation Calgary, AB – Respected nationally and internationally for his work on antimicrobial resistance, beef cattle nutrition, silage science, greenhouse gas emissions, E. coli O157:H7 and prion science, Dr. Tim McAllister was formally recognized tonight by the Canadian beef industry. Presented with the 2016 Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation at the inaugural Canadian Beef Industry Conference, he was honored by hundreds of producers and industry stakeholders, including many past and present colleagues and students. Dr. McAllister is a Principal Research Scientist at the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Lethbridge Research and Development Centre. He also holds adjunct appointments at six universities in Canada, as well as universities in China and Ghana. He has made phenomenal contributions to advancements in the competitiveness and sustainability of the Canadian beef industry through his passion and dedication to progressive science, and exceptional collaboration, leadership and communication with industry, as well as governments around the world. His research is helping beef producers in Canada remain as leaders in producing high quality beef in a safe and environmentally sound manner. Dr. McAllister has conducted years of research to develop a safe means of composting specified risk materials, which is influencing new regulations for their disposal following the BSE crisis is 2003. He has made tremendous advances in the area of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in cattle, which is leading to the development of alternatives to antibiotics. In addition, he has led many other important projects related to optimizing the nutrition of beef cattle. Most recently, he led a research project that found that the amount of greenhouse gas generated in producing one kilogram of Canadian beef has dropped by 15 per cent over the past three decades. Dr. McAllister brings current Canadian science to the global stage through his active participation in a number of international initiatives, including the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organizations Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership. Dr. McAllister takes a collaborative approach to research. He is well known for his ability to assemble and lead Canadian and International research teams to advance the field of beef science. The importance of Dr. McAllister’s research is aptly demonstrated by requests for his participation in numerous national and international committees and conferences. His publication record is exemplary,


with over 585 peer-reviewed scientific papers and 60 reviews, as well as 1050 abstracts and conference proceedings. He has trained over 60 graduate students, as well as numerous undergraduate students, technicians, postdoctoral fellows, and has collaborated with scientists from around the world. Dr. McAllister is a sought after speaker at not only producer meetings and industry events but also at international conferences, symposiums, and policy meetings, where he skillfully shares his knowledge, research findings, and opinions on pertinent industry issues. He is an effective communicator not only at highly technical scientific forums but also in communicating research findings in a practical and applicable manner to cattle producers and industry stakeholders. “His ongoing impact on animal agriculture is monumental,” said Bryan Thiessen, Chair of the Beef Cattle Research Council and Manager of Namaka Farms near Strathmore, Alberta. “While maintaining a stellar scientific career, Dr. McAllister has never lost sight of the practical application of his research, and his willingness to transfer knowledge to beef producers, industry associations, and the general public never diminishes.” The Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation is presented annually by the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) on behalf of Canada’s beef industry stakeholders. The award recognizes scientists and academics that are actively involved in strong research programs aligned with industry priorities, continually engage with industry stakeholders, and demonstrate their passion and long-term commitment through leadership, teamwork, and mentorship. Nominations are accepted by the BCRC from industry stakeholders and must be accompanied by letters of support from industry stakeholders and scientific colleagues. The recipient is selected by a committee comprised of beef producers, industry experts and retired beef-related researchers located across the country. The award was established in 2015. Nominations for the 2017 award must be submitted to the BCRC by May 1, 2017. It will be presented at the 2017 Canadian Beef Industry Conference. - 30 For further information, contact: Tracy Herbert Beef Extension Coordinator Beef Cattle Research Council 306-850-5026 | herbertt@beefresearch.ca http://www.beefresearch.ca/about/award.cfm


News Release Anderson Ranch Inc. CCA’s 2016 TESA recipient August 10, 2016 Calgary, AB - The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased to announce Anderson Ranch Inc. of Fir Mountain, Saskatchewan as the 2016 recipient of The Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA). The ranch is operated by Miles Anderson and his wife Sheri, who received the award this evening in Calgary, Alberta in an awards ceremony during the inaugural Canadian Beef Industry Conference (CBIC). The Andersons expressed sincere gratitude as they accepted the award during the conference banquet. CCA Environment Committee Chair Bob Lowe presented the Andersons with a belt buckle and local artwork in honour of the event. “The relationships that the Andersons have built between the conservation and agriculture communities to work together on Species at Risk habitat are truly unique. They have no misgivings reaching across the fence and accepting suggestions in order to truly do what’s best for the species that live on their ranch.” The Andersons manage a ranching operation that includes private holdings and large provincial grazing leases south of Fir Mountain, Saskatchewan. The area features a wide range of ecosystems including rolling grasslands, rich riparian areas and sprawling sagebrush in the heart of the Great Plains. Most significantly, the ranch is home to many endangered and at-risk wildlife species that the Andersons work hard to protect. For example, Anderson has studied sage grouse nesting habits and adapted his grazing rotation to ensure dense vegetation necessary for nesting is kept intact during peak times of the year. He has also installed an innovate style of fencing to prevent endangered sage grouse from becoming injured in collisions. This innovation has also holds benefit for antelope and other species and has captured the attention of other sustainable ranchers and conservationists around the world. Anderson Ranch Inc.’s commitment to managing rangeland in a manner that not only benefits their cattle, but wildlife who find refuge in these fragile environments demonstrates the commitment to sustainability that the TESA embodies.

About TESA The CCA’s national annual award, TESA has recognized the outstanding stewardship efforts of Canadian beef producers since 1996. For more information, click here. Thank you to our Platinum Sponsor MNP for sponsoring the TESA program. For further information, contact: Fawn Jackson Manger, Environment and Sustainability Canadian Cattlemen’s Association 403-275-8558 jacksonf@cattle.ca

The CCA is the national voice for Canada’s beef cattle industry representing 68,500 beef farms and feedlots. Visit www.cattle.ca



August 5, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

McDonald's Canada Production Day Tour a success Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives' Brookdale Research Farm was abuzz July 26 for the first McDonald's Canada Production Day Tour. Attended by just under 100 people, the tour was a chance for producers and the public to see the facility and learn more about the ongoing research projects and how the work can be applied to their operations. Manitoba Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler brought greetings on behalf of the province and spoke about the importance of research for the industry at large. An extensive article on the tour can be found in the September issue of Cattle Country.


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

Province to A look at the news and articles consult Manitobans of interest on the use of to Manitoba’s Beef industry cosmetic pesticides In the News

• Steak cooking know-how for the best backyard barbecues • The August issue of the Agri-Info Newsletter • Get hail damaged crops tested before feeding to livestock • Stockmanship expert Curt Pate provides insight on low stress handling methods • Antibiotic alternative approved in Canada

Provincial Government Media Release Manitoba is entering the second year of implementation of the Non-Essential Use of Pesticides Regulation and the province wants to hear from Manitobans about their experiences with this legislation, Sustainable Development Minister Cathy Cox announced today. “The purpose of the legislation is to reduce the exposure of people and pets to herbicides used in lawn care for non-essential or cosmetic purposes,” Cox said. “We are committed to finding the right balance between protecting the environment, minimizing the impact, and providing usable, aesthetic green spaces in our communities.” Manitobans can email submissions to pesticide.review.2016@ gov.mb.ca or respond through an online survey at: www.gov.mb.ca/conservation/envprograms/initiatives/cosmetic_pesticides/ until Sept. 12.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

Manitoba priorities represented at policy framework meetings Provincial Government Media Release

Federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) meetings held in Calgary from July 20 to 22 concluded after hosting key discussions on Canada’s next agricultural framework, which is set to launch in 2018, Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler announced today. “These meetings are essential for Manitoba Agriculture in ensuring our priorities are established as we work together with federal, provincial and territorial partners in developing the next agricultural framework for Canada,” said Eichler. Discussions at the FPT meetings

were based on business risk management; market access, market development and trade policy; science and innovation; environment and climate change; public trust; food processing; food policy; emergency management; and regulatory framework. “Discussions on public trust were greatly encouraging with all voices committed to openness and transparency, which are key commitments of Manitoba’s new government,” Eichler said. “We were glad to see many other priorities of

Manitoba Agriculture discussed at the FPT meetings, including continued investments in research and development, a focus on growing market access and maintaining a consultative approach while growing the agricultural sector.” The current agriculture policy framework, Growing Forward 2, is a $3-billion investment over five years (2013 to 2018) by federal, provincial and territorial governments and the foundation for government agricultural programs and services.



Next Agricultural Policy Framework – Share Your Experience and Ideas Growing Forward 2 (GF2) is the current federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) agricultural policy framework and will be in place until 2018. Now at the midway point of GF2, FPT governments are working in partnership to develop the next framework and are seeking feedback to better understand where GF2 is working well, and where challenges could be addressed. We want to hear about your experience as we work with provincial and territorial governments to develop the next framework. Your feedback is important and will help shape the direction of future policy and programs for the agriculture and agri-food sector. There will be more opportunities to share your ideas and priorities in the coming months. Learn more about Growing Forward 2. • mail to Contributing Your Comments Next Policy Framework

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada 1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7 Floor 5, Room 300 • completing this Ottawa ON K1A 0C5 • e-mail to aafc.npf-pcs.aac@canada.ca Next Steps We will summarize input received and post it on our website. Questionnaire Check back again for upcoming opportunities to share your views on the development of the next agriculture policy framework.

You can provide your comments by:


RuR al De velopment InstItute

Courtesy of Dimitrios Tellidis, Agronomist

Rural Innovation In Manitoba:

Reducing Barriers to Commercialization and Growing Capacity in the Agri-food Sector A place-based approach to facilitating commercialization

BACkGRound While there is creativity, thinking and science across Canada, the Conference Board of Canada reports an “innovation gap” that is mostly related to commercialization – the transformation of ideas and knowledge into value1. This “innovation gap” is complex, not well understood and can be largely attributed to systemic barriers. Three such barriers are access to venture capital, fragmented services to innovators and commercialization, and a wide-spread riskadverse culture. The research and activities undertaken in this project aim to close the knowledge gap that exists around understanding the complex of issues that slow down innovation in the Manitoba Agri-Food sector. This applied research project is funded by the Canada and Manitoba governments through Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincialterritorial initiative. It attempts to create new knowledge that enhances the process of innovation by addressing barriers and opportunities in commercialization in Manitoba’s Agri-Food sector, and improves 1 Conference Board of Canada. 2012. Innovation Metrics and Management.

capacity in organizations so they can facilitate innovation. Often innovation services and processes are located in larger urban areas where both density and specialization exist. This project aims to focus on innovation in rural Manitoba, a less studied area, where limited information exists about the commercialization aspects of innovation.

PuRPoSe The purpose of this project is two-fold. First to identify and address systemic barriers impacting on the commercialization cycle as experienced by selected innovators and stakeholders involved in the Manitoba Agri-food industry. Second to investigate the innovation culture and riskadversity in Manitoba’s Southwest region within the context of the Manitoba Agri-Food industry. The project will determine the commercialization gap that exists in Manitoba’s Agri-Food industry based on recent experiences of Agri-Food Innovators and aims to enhance existing capacity and leadership in Manitoba’s Southwest region for commercialization activity in the Agri-Food industry.

Rural Development Institute Project Team William (Bill) Ashton, MCIP, PhD (Director) 204-571-8513 ashtonw@brandonu.ca Gillian Richards, PhD (Project Lead) 204-571-8554 richardsgi@brandonu.ca Naomi Finseth (Student Research Assistant) 204-571-8551 finsethn@brandonu.ca Eleni Galatsanou, MSc (Research Associate) 204-571-8552 galatsanouh@brandonu.ca Lonnie Patterson, MRD (Research Associate) 204-571-8515 pattersonl@brandonu.ca

www.BrandonU.ca/RDI Copyright © September 2015


RuR Al InnovAtIon In M AnItoBA SouRCeS of InfoRM AtIon A variety of information sources will be used to develop empirical evidence to address the systemic barriers to innovation and commercialization from a rural perspective. In addition to literature reviews and contacting innovation centers and organizations supporting innovators and entrepreneurship development, this project has two principal sources of information. First, in depth interviews with 3-5 Manitoba Agri-Food innovators and associated Manitoba Agri-Food stakeholders (25 interviews) will be conducted. Second, a survey of about 400 individuals from at least 8 communities in Southwest Manitoba; including leaders, food processors, other business people and those who assist them.

PARtneRShIPS This project is made possible through partnerships with many individuals and organizations. The number of project partners is expected to increase over the duration of this project. The partners’ list includes but is not limited to: Southwest Regional Development Corporation, Community Futures Westman, Innovate Manitoba, Manitoba Food Development Centre, Life Sciences Association of Manitoba, Westman Agricultural Diversification Organization, representatives from all levels of government, producer and Agri-Food associations and NGOS. These organizations will have key roles, including input on the tools to collect data, participating in roundtable discussions and assisting the research team through their knowledge, experiences, networks and contacts.

ReSe ARCh PRoduC tS And Courtesy of Dimitrios Tellidis, Agronomist

dISSeMInAtIon This research project will generate a variety of research products over its two-year duration such as research reports and organized information resources (e.g. resources of innovation programs, strategies and tools from both existing websites and networks but also gained from interviews and roundtables, inventory assets to better utilize infrastructure and knowledge of commercialization). The project will apply a variety of modes (website, webinars, and print) to disseminate this research. This research will produce a comprehensive package of strategies, tools and support programs available to Agri-Food innovators in Manitoba and Agri-Food sector stakeholders involved in innovation and commercialization (including scientists and researchers, economic and business professionals, financing agencies, patent lawyers, business advisors, government agencies organizations). The Rural Innovation in Manitoba research project will assist in enhancing exporting and manufacturing opportunities as well as in facilitating entrepreneurship in rural Manitoba.

Rural development Institute, Brandon university 270-18th Street, McMaster hall, lower level, Brandon, Manitoba R7A 6A9


CANADIAN CATTLE IDENTIFICATION AGENCY ANNOUNCES TRACEABILITY SYMPOSIUM 2016 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE July 18, 2016 Calgary, A.B. – Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA) is pleased to announce Traceability Symposium 2016 on November 2-3, 2016. This two-day event and trade show will bring together governments, universities, research teams, the private sector and industry to identify gaps, share successes and lessons learned – bridging the gaps as traceability moves forward in Canada and globally. “We anticipate delegates from across Canada, United States, European Union, Australia and New Zealand will attend this unique event – best described as an international traceability brain-trust,” affirms Paul Laronde, CCIA’s Tag and Technology Manager, and Research and Development Cluster lead. “For the inaugural year, CCIA will host the event in Calgary – providing international guests with the opportunity to explore the Canadian Rockies and other local attractions.” “We are excited to confirm Dr. Sylvain Charlebois will moderate Traceability Symposium 2016 as keynote speaker,” states Anne Brunet-Burgess, CCIA General Manager. “As an award-winning researcher and teacher, Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre’s Advisory Board and the National Scientific Board of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. He has testified before parliamentary committees on food policy-related issues as an expert witness, and acted as an advisor on food and agricultural policies across Canada and in more than 10 countries. We are honoured and delighted to have Dr. Charlebois lead this one-of-a-kind, think-tank event. We warmly welcome one and all to join our discussions. Please share this invitation – we look forward to being your host this November!” Quick Facts: • Traceability Symposium 2016 will be held at the Coast Plaza Hotel & Conference Centre, located at 1316 – 33 Street N.E., Calgary, Alberta, Canada. • The agenda will address traceability’s role, regulations and compliance, challenges and solutions, other assurance systems, and lessons learned. • Early Bird registration is now open at www.traceabilitysymposium.ca. • Event sponsorship and trade show opportunities are now available. – 30 – Canadian Cattle Identification Agency is a not-for-profit, industry-initiated and led organization incorporated to establish a national beef and dairy cattle, bison and sheep identification program to support efficient trace back and containment of serious animal health and food safety concerns in the Canadian herd. The agency is led by a board of directors made up of representatives from all sectors of the livestock industry and it manages the Canadian Livestock Tracking System (CLTS) database, which is a trace-back system that maintains approved radio frequency identification (RFID) tag information. The CLTS database allows producers to record tag information pertaining to the three pillars of traceability (i.e., animal identification, premises identification and movement), as well as value-added information (e.g., age verification). For more information or media contact: Kori Maki-Adair, Communications Manager at kmaki-adair@canadaid.ca 7646 – 8 Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 8X4 Tel: (403) 275-2083 Fax: (403) 275-1668 Toll-free: 1-877-909-2333 canadaid.ca


July 22, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBFI-McDonald's Canada Production Day Tour Tuesday The public will get its first chance to peek behind the curtain at Manitoba's newest beef and forage research farm Tuesday. The McDonald's Canada Production Day Tour will go rain or shine at Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives' (MBFI) Brookdale Research Farm, which is located north of Brandon at the corner of Highway 10 and Highway 353. Originally announced at the Manitoba Beef Producers' Annual General Meeting in February, the tour will provide producers, researchers and the

general public with an opportunity to tour MBFI's facilities at Brookdale and learn more about the

Upcoming Events July 26 — ­ Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives McDonald’s Production Tour Day Where: MBFI Brookdale location, northeast of Brandon August 22 — Holistic Management Open Gate Field Day Where: Dauphin

projects underway at the farm. Producers will also learn how the research can be applied to their

own operations. The tour is a result of a continued to page 2

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Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Click here for the Cosmetic Use of Pesticides Consultation Documents

continued from Page 1 partnership between MBFI and McDonald's Canada that saw the popular restaurant chain contribute $25,000 to help with MBFI's outreach and extension efforts to Manitoba's beef and forage producers. The schedule of events kicks off at 9:30 with opening comments from officials with McDonald's, MBFI and Manitoba Agriculture. The rest of the day will include a tour of MBFI's research projects, information about new grazing techniques and methods of increasing forage and soil health, and a demonstration on remote sensing in agriculture by Craig Linde of Manitoba Agriculture. There is a $10 fee for the tour which includes a lunch. Attendees are asked to pre-register at mbfiinfo@gmail.com MBFI is a collaboration between Manitoba Agriculture, Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP), Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) and the Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association (MFGA) with direction from stakeholders collaborating for the advancement of the industry.

• With capital and trust, Canada can become an agrifood powerhouse

• Untreated pinkeye in cattle can be costly

• Small lungs make cattle prone to respiratory diseases

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

Achieving growth through development of Canadian beef markets July 20, 2016, 2016 – Calgary, Alberta – Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Media Release

lished or expanded in Mexico, Ukraine, South Korea and Taiwan, while the Country of Origin Labelling law was successfully repealed giving Canadian Beef has built a reputation as beCanadian Beef full access to the United States. ing some of the tastiest and best quality beef By developing Canadian Beef markets abroad, in the world. The Government of Canada is the Government of Canada is meeting its plan proud to support Canadian ranchers and help to create quality agriculture jobs at home and them realize the great potential of the Canadi- grow Canada's middle class. an Beef sector. "Canada Beef is very pleased to partner with To that end, Agriculture and Agri-Food Ministhe federal government to drive, enhance and ter Lawrence MacAulay today announced an sustain loyalty to Canadian beef with customers investment of up to $6.4 Million over three from around the world through the Growing years to help Canadian Beef increase global Forward 2 initiative," said Jack Hetxall, Canaconsumer demand and loyalty for the Canadi- da Beef Chairman. "The industry development an Beef brand. funding Canadian cattle producers are able to "Canadian farmers and ranchers take pride leverage with their own investment is critical to in producing a premium-quality safe beef positioning the industry for long term growth product," said Lawrence MacAulay, Minister and success in these lucrative markets." of Agriculture and Agri-Food. "This investment will help strengthen the Canadian beef Quick facts brand globally, leading to greater returns for • In 2015, the Canadian beef industry (including our farmers and their families and continued veal) exported to 58 countries with a value of growth in the middle class." $2.2 billion. This strategic initiative will support Canadian • Canada's beef industry contributes $33 bilBeef's three-year market development and lion worth of sales of goods and services either promotion plan targeting key regional hubs in directly or indirectly to the economy. Asia, Europe, North America and Latin Ameri- • This project is funded under the Growing Forca. The initiative will enhance consumer trust ward 2, AgriMarketing – Market Development and appreciation for the value and desirability stream which supports the agriculture industry of Canadian Beef through activities that aim to by creating and maintaining access to markets understand and meet consumer needs. and taking advantage of market opportunities. This investment builds on the significant • Canada Beef is the cattle producer-funded achievements made by this Government to and run organization responsible for domestic develop international markets for Canadian and international beef and veal market developbeef. Beef export markets have been re-estab- ment.


Grey Cup Tour ®

Join us at your local CO-OP® Store The Grey Cup® is on the move across the Prairies. Come out and show your support! Meet the Grey Cup Handler and have your photo taken. Bring your friends and neighbours!

See when the Grey Cup will be in YOUR town:

ALBERTA July 17 July 18 July 19

11:00 - 1:00 PM 4:30 - 7:30 PM 11:00 - 1:00 PM 4:30 - 7:30 PM 11:00 - 1:00 PM

SASKatcheWAN

July 19 July 20 July 21 July 22

4:30 - 7:30 PM 11:00 - 1:00 PM 4:30 - 7:30 PM 11:00 - 1:00 PM 4:30 - 7:30 PM 11:00 - 1:00 PM

MANITOBA July 22 July 23

4:30 - 7:30 PM 11:00 - 1:00 PM 4:30 - 7:30 PM

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STRATHMORE CALGARY EDMONTON FORT SASKATCHEWAN VERMILION

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DAUPHIN PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE WINNIPEG

#CDNBEEFfuelingtheCFL


Excitement rising for first ever Canadian Beef Industry Conference, Aug 9-11 July 21, 2016 CALGARY, AB — The executives of Earls Restaurants, Sysco Canada and Tim Hortons on the hot seat. A front-row behind-the-scenes view of the operations of some of the sectors’ leading producers. An All Star lineup of speakers on the important topics of the day. A fresh vision of strong connections and opportunity for everyone involved in Canada’s beef industry. These are just a few among many reasons why the motto “If you build it, they will come,” is proving true for Canada’s beef industry, as registrations mount and anticipation builds for the inaugural Canadian Beef Industry Conference, slated for August 9-11 in Calgary. The conference is a joint collaboration of four organizations partnering in the event – the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC), Canada Beef, the Canadian Beef Breeds Council (CBBC) and the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). Registrations are over 500 and counting, with opportunities to register still available via the conference website. Over 60 major sponsors have stepped up to lend support. And a first rate conference agenda featuring numerous leading speakers on a wide range of important developments, issues and hot topics is now set, offering plenty of options for all types of interests. “The response we’ve received both in terms of early registration and sponsorship has been just phenomenal,” says Rob Smith, Canadian Angus Association Chief Executive Officer and co-chair of the conference. “It says a lot about the spirit and positive attitude of our industry from coast to coast, particularly given the current economy in Alberta and the fact this is the first time for our conference.” “We can’t say enough how much we appreciate the support,” says Virgil Lowe, conference co-chair and also an Associate with Dentons Canada LLP. “And the speakers and agenda that have been pulled together are just incredible. We can’t wait to get started and to see everyone in Calgary. If you haven’t already registered, there’s still time to do it now. Don’t miss this chance to participate.”


Media Release

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CBIC 2016

The conference, spawned as an idea during discussions around the National Beef Strategy, is designed to create a national meeting place for everyone involved in beef production, from the grass roots level through all parts of the supply chain. Among many anticipated highlights, given the recent Earls beef controversy, buzz is building around a Beef Demand panel session that will include none other than Earls Restaurants President Mo Jessa as one of the panelists. Interest is also rising around a unique “Bovinnovation” session covering topics such as best options for pre-weaning management, how to improve forage production, how to strengthen internal parasite control programs and how to take advantage of genomic selection tools. High on the list of attractions for many conference goers is opening day keynote speaker, the high profile entrepreneur and former Dragon’s Den star Arlene Dickinson. The agenda will also include keynote speakers on each of the National Beef Strategy’s four pillars: connectivity, productivity, beef demand and competitiveness, along with educational presentations and interactive workshops on new developments, market and brand opportunities and product innovations. Related events include meetings of the partners, their provincial affiliates and various other beef industry groups, along with the Cattlemen’s Young Leaders selections and graduation. The early bird registration has passed but the opportunity to register is still available at the regular rate of $450 per person. Although the Grey Eagle Hotel has sold out, limited space is still available at nearby hotels. Full registration includes opening night (Tuesday) reception; also Wednesday night banquet and entertainment, featuring the band Ain’t No Rodeo. Extra tickets are available for purchase for both of these evening events, proving an option for additional guests or for those who want to share in the networking but can’t make it to the full conference. Additional options available by separate ticket purchase include a pre-conference Monday tour hosted by Alberta Beef Producers, the Canadian Cattlemen’s Foundation Classic Golf Tournament on Tuesday, and a Thursday evening Heritage Park supper. Visit www.canadianbeefindustryconference.com for more information and to register. Follow the Canadian Beef Industry Conference on Twitter and Facebook for updates. ###

Contact

More information: Allison Jacoby, CBIC 2016 Event Manager C: 403-512-8146 E: info@canadianbeefindustryconference.com Web: www.canadianbeefindustryconference.com

Media Release

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CBIC 2016



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 20, 2016

Take Safety Precautions While Working in Summer Heat Extreme summer temperatures can cause reactions ranging from discomfort to serious illness in most people. For workers who are exposed to the heat over the course of a work day, taking safety measures is an important part of staying healthy and comfortable.

NEWS RELEASE

High daytime temperatures can make it challenging to work outdoors or in buildings without air conditioning. Here are some ways to increase comfort during periods of peak temperature:    

Wear clothing that is lightweight, light-coloured and loose-fitting. Use fans indoors. Take rest breaks and drink cool beverages. Focus on lighter activities whenever possible and leave physically demanding tasks for cooler periods.

More serious situations can lead to heat stress, a condition in which the body is unable to control its internal temperature. The following symptoms can result:   

Heat illness – headaches, dizziness, upset stomach and vomiting Heat exhaustion – fatigue, weakness, moist skin, rapid and weak pulse Heat stroke – hot dry skin, a rapid, strong pulse, mental confusion, unconsciousness, seizures and convulsions

Take these steps to prevent heat stress:    

Monitor yourself and your co-workers. Take breaks and remember to drink when you're thirsty. Work in the shade, away from heat sources. Build up tolerance to high temperatures.

Follow these measures to treat someone who is experiencing heat stress:    

Move the person to a cool, shaded area. Loosen or remove heavy clothing. Provide cool drinking water. Call 911 immediately.

Employers should work with their safety and health committees, worker representatives or workers to create a hot weather plan and determine work procedures for periods of elevated temperature.

www.safemanitoba.com


Next Agricultural Policy Framework – Share Your Experience and Ideas Growing Forward 2 (GF2) is the current federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) agricultural policy framework and will be in place until 2018. Now at the midway point of GF2, FPT governments are working in partnership to develop the next framework and are seeking feedback to better understand where GF2 is working well, and where challenges could be addressed. We want to hear about your experience as we work with provincial and territorial governments to develop the next framework. Your feedback is important and will help shape the direction of future policy and programs for the agriculture and agri-food sector. There will be more opportunities to share your ideas and priorities in the coming months. Learn more about Growing Forward 2. • mail to Contributing Your Comments Next Policy Framework

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada 1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7 Floor 5, Room 300 • completing this Ottawa ON K1A 0C5 • e-mail to aafc.npf-pcs.aac@canada.ca Next Steps We will summarize input received and post it on our website. Questionnaire Check back again for upcoming opportunities to share your views on the development of the next agriculture policy framework.

You can provide your comments by:


RuR al De velopment InstItute

Courtesy of Dimitrios Tellidis, Agronomist

Rural Innovation In Manitoba:

Reducing Barriers to Commercialization and Growing Capacity in the Agri-food Sector A place-based approach to facilitating commercialization

BACkGRound While there is creativity, thinking and science across Canada, the Conference Board of Canada reports an “innovation gap” that is mostly related to commercialization – the transformation of ideas and knowledge into value1. This “innovation gap” is complex, not well understood and can be largely attributed to systemic barriers. Three such barriers are access to venture capital, fragmented services to innovators and commercialization, and a wide-spread riskadverse culture. The research and activities undertaken in this project aim to close the knowledge gap that exists around understanding the complex of issues that slow down innovation in the Manitoba Agri-Food sector. This applied research project is funded by the Canada and Manitoba governments through Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincialterritorial initiative. It attempts to create new knowledge that enhances the process of innovation by addressing barriers and opportunities in commercialization in Manitoba’s Agri-Food sector, and improves 1 Conference Board of Canada. 2012. Innovation Metrics and Management.

capacity in organizations so they can facilitate innovation. Often innovation services and processes are located in larger urban areas where both density and specialization exist. This project aims to focus on innovation in rural Manitoba, a less studied area, where limited information exists about the commercialization aspects of innovation.

PuRPoSe The purpose of this project is two-fold. First to identify and address systemic barriers impacting on the commercialization cycle as experienced by selected innovators and stakeholders involved in the Manitoba Agri-food industry. Second to investigate the innovation culture and riskadversity in Manitoba’s Southwest region within the context of the Manitoba Agri-Food industry. The project will determine the commercialization gap that exists in Manitoba’s Agri-Food industry based on recent experiences of Agri-Food Innovators and aims to enhance existing capacity and leadership in Manitoba’s Southwest region for commercialization activity in the Agri-Food industry.

Rural Development Institute Project Team William (Bill) Ashton, MCIP, PhD (Director) 204-571-8513 ashtonw@brandonu.ca Gillian Richards, PhD (Project Lead) 204-571-8554 richardsgi@brandonu.ca Naomi Finseth (Student Research Assistant) 204-571-8551 finsethn@brandonu.ca Eleni Galatsanou, MSc (Research Associate) 204-571-8552 galatsanouh@brandonu.ca Lonnie Patterson, MRD (Research Associate) 204-571-8515 pattersonl@brandonu.ca

www.BrandonU.ca/RDI Copyright © September 2015


RuR Al InnovAtIon In M AnItoBA SouRCeS of InfoRM AtIon A variety of information sources will be used to develop empirical evidence to address the systemic barriers to innovation and commercialization from a rural perspective. In addition to literature reviews and contacting innovation centers and organizations supporting innovators and entrepreneurship development, this project has two principal sources of information. First, in depth interviews with 3-5 Manitoba Agri-Food innovators and associated Manitoba Agri-Food stakeholders (25 interviews) will be conducted. Second, a survey of about 400 individuals from at least 8 communities in Southwest Manitoba; including leaders, food processors, other business people and those who assist them.

PARtneRShIPS This project is made possible through partnerships with many individuals and organizations. The number of project partners is expected to increase over the duration of this project. The partners’ list includes but is not limited to: Southwest Regional Development Corporation, Community Futures Westman, Innovate Manitoba, Manitoba Food Development Centre, Life Sciences Association of Manitoba, Westman Agricultural Diversification Organization, representatives from all levels of government, producer and Agri-Food associations and NGOS. These organizations will have key roles, including input on the tools to collect data, participating in roundtable discussions and assisting the research team through their knowledge, experiences, networks and contacts.

ReSe ARCh PRoduC tS And Courtesy of Dimitrios Tellidis, Agronomist

dISSeMInAtIon This research project will generate a variety of research products over its two-year duration such as research reports and organized information resources (e.g. resources of innovation programs, strategies and tools from both existing websites and networks but also gained from interviews and roundtables, inventory assets to better utilize infrastructure and knowledge of commercialization). The project will apply a variety of modes (website, webinars, and print) to disseminate this research. This research will produce a comprehensive package of strategies, tools and support programs available to Agri-Food innovators in Manitoba and Agri-Food sector stakeholders involved in innovation and commercialization (including scientists and researchers, economic and business professionals, financing agencies, patent lawyers, business advisors, government agencies organizations). The Rural Innovation in Manitoba research project will assist in enhancing exporting and manufacturing opportunities as well as in facilitating entrepreneurship in rural Manitoba.

Rural development Institute, Brandon university 270-18th Street, McMaster hall, lower level, Brandon, Manitoba R7A 6A9


CANADIAN CATTLE IDENTIFICATION AGENCY ANNOUNCES TRACEABILITY SYMPOSIUM 2016 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE July 18, 2016 Calgary, A.B. – Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA) is pleased to announce Traceability Symposium 2016 on November 2-3, 2016. This two-day event and trade show will bring together governments, universities, research teams, the private sector and industry to identify gaps, share successes and lessons learned – bridging the gaps as traceability moves forward in Canada and globally. “We anticipate delegates from across Canada, United States, European Union, Australia and New Zealand will attend this unique event – best described as an international traceability brain-trust,” affirms Paul Laronde, CCIA’s Tag and Technology Manager, and Research and Development Cluster lead. “For the inaugural year, CCIA will host the event in Calgary – providing international guests with the opportunity to explore the Canadian Rockies and other local attractions.” “We are excited to confirm Dr. Sylvain Charlebois will moderate Traceability Symposium 2016 as keynote speaker,” states Anne Brunet-Burgess, CCIA General Manager. “As an award-winning researcher and teacher, Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre’s Advisory Board and the National Scientific Board of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. He has testified before parliamentary committees on food policy-related issues as an expert witness, and acted as an advisor on food and agricultural policies across Canada and in more than 10 countries. We are honoured and delighted to have Dr. Charlebois lead this one-of-a-kind, think-tank event. We warmly welcome one and all to join our discussions. Please share this invitation – we look forward to being your host this November!” Quick Facts: • Traceability Symposium 2016 will be held at the Coast Plaza Hotel & Conference Centre, located at 1316 – 33 Street N.E., Calgary, Alberta, Canada. • The agenda will address traceability’s role, regulations and compliance, challenges and solutions, other assurance systems, and lessons learned. • Early Bird registration is now open at www.traceabilitysymposium.ca. • Event sponsorship and trade show opportunities are now available. – 30 – Canadian Cattle Identification Agency is a not-for-profit, industry-initiated and led organization incorporated to establish a national beef and dairy cattle, bison and sheep identification program to support efficient trace back and containment of serious animal health and food safety concerns in the Canadian herd. The agency is led by a board of directors made up of representatives from all sectors of the livestock industry and it manages the Canadian Livestock Tracking System (CLTS) database, which is a trace-back system that maintains approved radio frequency identification (RFID) tag information. The CLTS database allows producers to record tag information pertaining to the three pillars of traceability (i.e., animal identification, premises identification and movement), as well as value-added information (e.g., age verification). For more information or media contact: Kori Maki-Adair, Communications Manager at kmaki-adair@canadaid.ca 7646 – 8 Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 8X4 Tel: (403) 275-2083 Fax: (403) 275-1668 Toll-free: 1-877-909-2333 canadaid.ca


July 8, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Spreading the Great Tastes The cameras were rolling this week at Winnipeg's Grant Park Liquor Mart for the taping of season 27 of Great Tastes of Manitoba (GTOM). As in past years, Manitoba Beef Producers will be featured in two episodes with Adriana Findlay presenting five fantastic beef-centric recipes. Joining Findlay on the broadcasts is Winnipeg radio personality Dez Daniels who is returing for her second season as host of GTOM. Season 27 is scheduled to begin airing across the province on CTV in early September. The

theme for episode one is Eat Like An Athlete with Manitoba Beef Producers. The theme for episode two is a Table for Two with Manitoba Beef.

Upcoming Events July 26 — ­ Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives McDonald’s Production Tour Day Where: MBFI Brookdale location, northeast of Brandon August 22 — Holistic Management Open Gate Field Day Where: Dauphin

Find Us Online

mbbeef.ca @ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News Government of Canada A look at the proposes stronger rules news and articles for antimicrobial drugs of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry

• The latest Manitoba markets livestock prices from Manitoba Agriculture • Canada gets approval to send live exports to Turkey • Infected from within ­— diagnosing an atypical case of lameness • Categorizing, treating and preventing neonatal scours in calves

Health Canada Media Release Health Canada has taken a step forward in protecting Canadians against the increasing risk of antimicrobial resistance. The department is seeking feedback on a regulatory proposal that would strengthen rules governing the importation, sale and use of antimicrobial drugs in livestock. Antimicrobial resistance occurs when an antimicrobial drug – an antibiotic, antifungal or antiviral drug – is no longer effective at controlling an infection it was once used to treat. This can cause an increased risk of infection, longer infection times, and a greater risk of death. The decreasing effectiveness of antimicrobial drugs is having a significant impact on our ability to protect Canadians from infectious diseases. It also has profound impacts on our healthcare system, global trade, agriculture, environment and health sectors. The proposed changes to the Food and Drug Regulations would restrict the importation of certain veterinary drugs, require drug manufacturers to follow stricter rules, require provision of sales information to regulators to allow for improved monitoring of antimicrobial use, and introduce an easier way for manufacturers to sell low-risk veterinary health products. This proposed regulatory action is a priority under the Federal Action Plan on Anti-Microbial Resistance. Canadians will be consulted on the proposed regulatory changes for a 75 day consultation period, ending on September 8, 2016. This proposal will be published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on July 2, 2016. Fast Facts: • The World Health Organization has concluded that inappropriate use of antibiotics in livestock is a key contributor to the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant germs, and that the use of antibiotics in animal feeds should be restricted. • The Federal Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance identifies concrete steps that the Government of Canada will undertake in the areas of: o Surveillance - Detecting and monitoring trends and threats to inform strategies to reduce the risks and impacts of antimicrobial resistance. o Stewardship - Conserving the effectiveness of existing treatments through infection prevention and control guidelines, education and awareness, regulations, and oversight. o Innovation - Finding new solutions to counteract loss in antimicrobial effectiveness through research and development.


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

Expansion of Canadian Beef trade access to Mexico good for business Canada Beef Media Release Canada Beef celebrated the announcement by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau that effective October 1, 2016, Mexico will further amend its beef import requirements enabling the full range of Canadian beef products to be eligible for shipment to Mexico. This decision will greatly increase the amount of product eligible for export to Mexico and sets an important precedent for market access conditions in other markets around the world. “Canada’s beef and veal industry is grateful for the hard work and dedication of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Agriculture and AgriFood Canada Minister Lawrence MacAulay for working to secure greater market access in Mexico for Canadian beef and veal,” said Rob

Meijer, President of Canada Beef. “Our loyal Canadian brand partners in Mexico will now have a more diversified offering of our world class protein. This decision will provide enhanced product offerings in foodservice, retail, quick serve, casual dining and other end use segments.” As its third largest export customer, the Canadian beef and veal industry highly values the Mexican market. Last year, Canadian beef shipments to Mexico reached 19,400 tonnes, valued at $155 million. The expanded import requirements will likely lead to a modest increase in exports to Mexico, but also sends an important message to other markets affirming the quality and safety of Canadian beef. “Canada Beef is already well-posi-

tioned and aligned with brand partners to take advantage of the newly expanded market access. We want to thank the Mexican Government as well for this decision as it sends a clear signal that Canada and Mexico are partners in trade at the highest levels,” added Meijer. Canada Beef is the cattle producer-funded and run organization responsible for domestic and international beef and veal market development. It has offices in Canada, Mexico, Japan, China, and Taiwan. Canada Beef works to increase awareness of the Canadian beef brand and build strong relationships with trade customers and partners. These efforts increase demand for Canadian beef and the value producers receive for their cattle.



Canada and Manitoba invest in water management solutions for the RM of Bifrost-Riverton Media Release The governments of Canada and Manitoba will invest $1 million in a pilot project to improve drainage and address other water-related issues affecting agricultural producers in the Rural Municipality (RM) of Bifrost-Riverton, Federal Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay and Manitoba Agriculture Minister Ralph Eichler announced today. “Dealing with excess moisture from extreme weather events has created many challenges for Manitoba farmers in recent years,” said MacAulay. “This investment will help find ways to effectively manage and improve water-related issues ensuring long-term sustainability of the land and economic prosperity for farmers.” Over the next three years, Bifrost Agricultural Sustainability Community Service Cooperative Inc. (BASIC) will use this funding to increase profitability and competitiveness of area producers by: • examining the effects of artificially induced excess moisture, varying seeding rates and varietal differences on several crops, through innovative field research; • identifying alternative crops for the region that might be suitable and economically viable with improved water management; • researching ways to mitigate soil erosion and maintain water quality on agricultural lands; and • rehabilitating more than 330 kilometres of municipal drainage.

“We are committed to finding effective solutions to deal with chronic excess moisture, to help reduce the devastating effects on farm families and the rural economy,” said Eichler. “This project supports on-farm competitiveness and profitability and may offer lessons that can be applied in other parts of the province dealing with similar challenges. It may also help reduce the demand on business risk management programs by dealing with the root causes of the issue.” The field research will utilize innovative water management infrastructure such as tile drainage and irrigation developed at the Prairies East Sustainable Agricultural Initiative diversification centre near Arborg. Soil erosion and water quality work will be completed through partnership with the East Interlake Conservation District, with contributions from local area farmers. “Our farmer-members are very excited about the opportunities presented by this project,” said Eric Fridfinnson, BASIC chair. “This cooperative effort will allow us to begin capturing the advantages of farming in a higher rainfall area, instead of having chronic problems. This project recognizes that effective risk management can be based on unique, local needs.” Ministers noted between 2008 and 2010, significant rains resulted in producers triggering over $10 million in payments from the AgriStability program alone. This project, to be led by the cooperative and

the municipality, is based on the results of a feasibility study focused on land and water management options for the area. The cooperative was formed in 2008 to help find solutions for crop and livestock farmers dealing with excess moisture. Today, it includes 90 per cent of farmers in the RM of Bifrost-Riverton as members. Farmers in the municipality will contribute $4 million to this initiative through a levy on agricultural land administered by the rural municipality. This pilot project will be funded under Growing Forward 2 – Growing Actions, which advances industry-led initiatives to increase competitiveness and create innovative solutions for agricultural organizations, including market development, trade advocacy, research projects, adopting best business practices and attracting investment. The federal and provincial governments are investing $176 million in Manitoba under Growing Forward 2, a five-year, federal-provincial-territorial policy framework to advance the agriculture industry, helping producers and processors become more innovative and competitive in world markets. For more information, visit www.gov. mb.ca/agriculture under Growing Forward 2. For more information on Manitoba’s agricultural programs and services, follow the Twitter account at www.twitter.com/MBGovAg.


Little Saskatchewan River Conservation District Tours July 19 and July 21, 2016 East Tour—Little Saskatchewan River Watershed Tuesday, July 19 Departs from the Riverdale Community Centre in Rivers at 9:00 a.m.

West Tour—Oak River Watershed Thursday, July 21 Departs from the Olha Hall at 9:00 a.m. From Oakburn— travel 7.5 miles north on Provincial Road 577. Pre-registration required by Tuesday, July 12, 2016 Registration fee $15 per person per tour Lunch provided Register by calling the LSRCD at 204-566-2270 or email lsrcd.admin@mymts.net



Friday, JULy 29, 2016 12:00 - 3:00 PM Registration & Cattle Arrival 3:00-5:00 PM Clipping & Grooming Workshop 5:00-6:00 PM Supper 6:30-8:30 PM Welcome & Agri Challange SatUrday, JULy 30, 2016 8:00-9:00 AM Breakfast & Cattle Tie In 9:00 AM-5:00 PM Pee Wee & Junior Stall Card Comp. 9:00-10:30 AM Judging (JR & SR) Workshops (PW & INT) 10:30-11:45 AM Judging (PW & INT) Workshops (JR & SR) 11:45 AM-1:00 PM Lunch 1:00-2:00 PM Team Grooming 2:00-4:00 PM JR, INT, SR Team Judging JR, INT, SR Demonstrations PW Learning Clinic & Stall Card Comp. 4:00-5:00 PM Cattle Tie Out & Chores 5:00-6:00 PM Steak Supper 6:30-8:00 PM Cook Off followed by Karaoke SUnday, JULy 31 8:00-9:00 PM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 10:00AM-12:00PM Showmanship - Both Rings 12:00 NOON GROUP PHOTO 12:00-1:00 PM Lunch 1:00-5:00 PM Conformation Show - Both Rings 5:00-6:00 PM Supper & Awards Ceremony

WHO:

Any young cattle producers under the age of 25 years of age as of January 1, 2016. Whether you are a commercial, purebred, 4-H or new junior, you are all welcome to attend.

WHAT:

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up All Breeds Junior Cattle Weekend

WHERE:

Beautiful Plains Ag Society, Neepawa, Manitoba

WHEN:

Friday - Saturday, July 29-31, 2016

WHY:

To bring juniors of all ages, breeds and locations together for a fun, educational weekend for cattle and non cattle events.

FEATURES: • • • • •

Chance to be on the MYBR Agribition Judging Team ALUMNI SHOWMANSHIP - Open to past Round Up Participants and committee members (Costumes encouraged) MYBR Scholarship check out the MYBR Facebook Page for more information or email jrkristjansson@live.ca GRAND AGGREGATE AWARDS Educational Workshops

FOR DETAILS:

Chairperson - Lois McRae - 204-728-3058 - marmac@inetlink.ca Treasurer - Rilla Hunter - 204-838-2019 Secretary - Wenda Best - 204-838-2236

Angus: Naomi Best - 838-2236 Ken Williams - 855-2275 Nanette Glover - 534-2552 Charolais: Jackie & Keegan Cavers - 242-3467 Hereford: Albert & Samantha Rimke - 855-2534 Limousin: Travis & Dillion Hunter - 838-2019

Simmental: Andrea Bertholet - 483-0319 Carson Rodgers - 871-0261 Shorthorn: Adrianne Vandersluis - 436-3122 Justin Kristjansson - 720-7196 Committee Members Blair McRae - 728-3058 Candace Johnston - 720-3986 Laura Horner - 868-5335 Melissa Falconer - 576-0154

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up #MYBR2016


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RULES

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up is open to all Canadian Juniors under the age of 25 as of January 1, 2016. Entry fees are $40 per person plus $10 per confirmation class. The $40 flat fee includes entry to all competitions (excluding conformation), show clothing and scheduled meals. Compulsory events are judging class with oral reasons, team grooming, cook off and Round Up Agri Challange. 2016 calves are eligible to be entered in cow calf pair and calf classes. Entry fee for pair is $10 and calf class is $10. All cattle must be halter broke and manageable or will be asked to leave. CCIA tags are required A junior who does not have cattle may use another participants animal in grooming and showmanship. AS THIS IS A JUNIOR EVENT, ALL ENTRIES MUST BE SHOWN AND LOOKED AFTER BY THE JUNIORS. ABSOLUTELY NO ADULT or nonentrant participation will be tolerated. Pee Wees may be assisted by a parent or guardian for safety reasons only. Mentors will be around to provide help for the participants and answer any questions. Alcohol and drugs are prohibited in the barns and at the Roundup functions for the duration of the show. Tampering with and any unethical fitting is prohibited. Show apparel is to be worn for all the showmanship and confirmation classes.

OUTLINES FOR CLASSES

Team Judging • Juniors will judge a class of four animals. • One of the team members will act as the ring person and the other one will act as the judge. • The participant acting as the judge must give oral reasons over the microphone in front of the audience. • All other teams must be out of the judging area and unable to hear the reasons. • Score: 55% teamwork ability; 20% clarity of reasons; 20% logic of reasons 5% appearance. Team Grooming - Compulsory Event • Teams have 15 minutes to groom with power. • Animals must have no fitting prior to competition. • Once at the chute area you are not allowed to leave so bring all the equipment with you. • Score: 35% knowledge and skill; 25% teamwork; 20% use of equipment; 15% final appearance; 5% presentation of animal Cook Off - THE ULTIMATE BURGER - Compulsory Event • Team event, teams will be announced at Round-Up. • Teams will be provided with two Hamburgers and a barbecue • Participants are encouraged to bring their own utensils and ingredients for marinades and garnishes and to provide a recipe to the judges. • Costumes and themes are encouraged. • Participants are encouraged to add fixings to the burger and add one side dish and dessert. • Score: 50% taste; 25% appearance; 15% presentation and 10% creativity. Stall Card • Pee Wees & Juniors create a stall card to be displayed with their animals in the stalls. • Stall cards must be made Saturday at Round-Up only • Scoring: 35% clarity; 35% originality and 30% neatness Photography • The photo must be taken by the junior exhibiting it and cannot be digitally enhanced and must be taken within the last year & dated • Photographs must be 4”x 6”, No Frame, Must be of listed theme • 2016 THEMES PW - Landscape/Scenery with cattle JR - Kids & Cattle INT& SR - Picture of cattle from any angle • Please put name and age category on the back. • Scoring: 40% clarity; 35% quality and 25% originality. Graphic Design • All work must be done at home by the junior created using computer technology. • The graphic design must be promoting a breed, industry or an individual herd. • 2016 THEMES - product must be based list theme PW & JR - 1 Page Poster Promoting Round Up INT& SR - 1 Brochure Promoting Your Herd or An Animal • Please put name and age category on the back. Scoring: 30% creativity; 30% originality; 30% clear and concise message; 10% organization

Art • All work must be done at home by the junior in the last year & dated • Art cannot contain photos and should not be larger than 9”x14”. • You can use (pencil, paint, clay, wood, etc.). • All art is judged in the same category. One entry per person. • Please put name and age category on the back. • Score: 40% originality; 40% creativity and 20% skill/quality. Scrapbook • Include photographs, newspaper and magazine clippings, for the 2015-2016 year. • Scrapbooks must be done by the junior exhibiting. • The scrapbook is to encourage junior members to record different cattle functions they have attended over the past years. • Scrapbooks should have a theme and begin with a title page, table of contents and numbered pages. • Score: 25% cover; 25% creativity; 25% originality; 25% neatness and organization. PowerPoint and Video Topic • Pee Wee and JRs minimum of 6 slides INT and SRs minimum of 12 slides • Presentations must have at least two pictures or clip art that support the idea of the presentation. • Presentations may include but do not require music or video clips. • Videos and/or presentations must come on the first day on a USB memory stick, DVD or CD. Videos must be in Quick Time, AVI or MPEG file format. • JR and INT videos must be 30-60 seconds in length, SR videos must be 60-90 seconds in length. • The junior member will produce file and edit the videos them selves, no professional editing allowed. • Animated and or computer generated graphics will not be allowed in the video. • Score: 40% on graphics; 35% originality; 15% technical merit; 10% overall effect of the presentation. Group Herdsman Competition • The purpose of this contest is to encourage cooperation, fellowship and teamwork among juniors in developing and maintaining a display of cattle and stall area. The competition begins on Saturday morning and ends after the confirmation classes. Must have a minimum of two head tied in your display. • Score: 25% aisle and bedding, cleanliness and appearance; 25% animals, cleanliness and well groomed; 25% personnel attending cattle, knowledgeable, friendly and teamwork; 25% equipment, boxes, signs, well arranged and general appearance. Grand Aggregate • One participant from each division will be selected. • Score: 1 point for every animal you bring, no matter where they place. All other non cattle classes will be scored 10 points for first place and down. Ex: 1st - 10pts, 2nd - 9 pts, 3rd - 8pts, etc. • The grand aggregate competition encourages all juniors to participate in all the events.

WORKSHOPS - 40 Minutes Each MORNING WORKSHOPS AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS You must pick 2 out of 3 at registration desk Photography and Videoing Cattle Showmanship

Artificial insemination Money /Farm Management Farm Safety

Please let the registration desk know if you are participating in Team Judging at same time.


Participant Name:__________________________________________________________________ Birth Date:_______/_______/_______ Age Division:_________

MAIL ENTRIES & FEES TO :

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up C/O Lois McRae RR 1 Box 57 Brandon, MB R7A 5Y1 marmac@inetlink.ca

Age Groups (as of Jan 1, 2016): PW: 8 and Under; JR 9-12; INT: 13-16; SR: 17-25

Full Address:______________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________ Email: __________________________________________ Show Apparel Size:

XS

S

M

L

XL

2XL

-

YOUTH

ADULT

Please circle one size and either youth or adult

ENTRIES DUE JULY 10th, 2016

For MYBR Windpants or Jacket ($30 deposit by July 10) CLASS #

BREED

ANIMAL NAME

ANIMAL TATTOO

ANIMAL REG #

SIRE NAME REG #

DAM NAME REG #

Breeds: (If animal doesn’t have a registration number please list as a CO) A: Angus, CH: Charolais, H: Hereford, L:Limousin,

Cattle Classes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

ANIMAL D.O.B.

Heifer Calf Female born in 2015 Female born in 2014 w/ nat calf at foot Female born in 2013 or earlier w/ nat calf at foot Bull Calf Fat Steer Showmanship

S: Simmental, M: Mixed Breeds (Purebred breeds not listed); CO: Commercial, G: Gelbvieh; SH : Shorthorn

If you are showing purebred animals, you must be a member in your respective breed association we require 8 head in each breed or you will show in the mixed breed class.

Meals:

Compulsory Classes:

8. Judging 9. Team Grooming 10. Cook Off 11. Round Up AgriChallange 12. Breed Quizzes for Simmental Exhibitors 13. Workshops & Demonstrations

Adults full weekend of meals $75 ___ Adults: Breakfast $8; Lunch $10; Supper $15 Saturday Night Steak Supper $20 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___ Sunday Night Supper $15 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___

Fees:

Registration Fee: $40.00/participant Cattle Fees: $10.00/class Adult Full Weekend Meal Fees Extra Meal Fees Late Fees: $20.00/person after July 10 Total Fees:

$________ $________ $________ $________ $________ $________

Onsite camping fees - POWER SITE - $25 X ____ nights NON POWER SITE - $20 X ____ nights

Make cheques payable to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up - ENTRIES DUE JULY 10TH, 2016 Waiver Claim: I hereby release the Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up, their organizers, officials, volunteers, as well as the Beautiful Plains Ag Society in case of a loss of or damage property or injury

Participant Signature:_________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature:______________________________________

Accommodations: Bay Hill Inn & Suites - 1-888-476-8802 - Westway Inn - 1-800-448-0994 Camping is also available at the fair grounds for a nominal fee further accommodation info at www.neepawa.ca


June 24, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Telling Cattle Tales at the Red River Ex

The Red River Ex was held from June 17-26 in Winnipeg and as always agriculture had a strong presence. Manitoba Beef Producers was pleased to present the Cattle Tales exhibit in the Touch the Farm area of the Ex. The exhibit included a number of pieces of equipment as well as information about the beef industry in Manitoba.

Upcoming Events July 26 — ­ Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives McDonald’s Producer’s Day Where: MBFI Brookdale location, northeast of Brandon August 22 — Holistic Management Open Gate Field Day Where: Dauphin

Find Us Online

mbbeef.ca @ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News New opportunities to

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives receives provincial award • Conventional beef is more efficient, yet still high quality

• Emergency response is about learning the right things • Irradiated ground beef plan decades in the making

secure cash advances on western cattle Courtesy of Agri Info If you are a cattle producer in Western Canada, you can now use coverage under the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program to secure a cash advance under the Advance Payments Program. Currently, under the Advance Payments Program, cattle producers can access an advance on calves, feeders, fed animals and breeding stock intended for sale using the animals and AgriStability as security. With this new change, cattle producers can now choose between AgriStability or Western Livestock Price Insurance Program to secure a cash advance. To request a cash advance using the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program as security, cattle producers in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba are encouraged to contact one of the following producer organizations: Manitoba Livestock Cash Advance Inc.

1-866-869-4008

The Advance Payments Program is a federal loan guarantee program that increases producer cash flow allowing them the financial flexibility to market their commodities at the most opportune time. The Western Livestock Price Insurance Program is a risk management tool available to livestock producers in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. AgriStability is a Business Risk Management Program that provides support when producers experience a large margin decline. Producers may be able to receive an AgriStability payment when current year program margin falls below 70% of reference margins.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

Government of Canada announces proposal to permit the irradiation of ground beef to enhance food safety Health Canada has announced the launch of a consultation on a proposal that would allow irradiation of fresh and frozen ground beef to enhance food safety. After a thorough safety review, Health Canada has determined that ground beef treated with irradiation is safe to eat and retains its nutritional value, taste, texture and appearance. Following the largest recall of beef products in Canadian history, the Independent Expert Advisory Panel that reviewed the 2012 XL Foods Inc. recall made several recommendations to strengthen the food safety system, including that the beef industry should submit a proposal to Health Canada to permit irradiation as an effective food safety intervention. Health Canada subsequently received a submission from industry and, following a scientific review of the submission, is proposing to authorize the irradiation of fresh and frozen raw

ground beef to reduce the level of harmful bacteria. Irradiation is a process in which food is exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. This can have several benefits to food safety, including reducing the level of bacteria such as E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter. It can also prevent premature spoilage and increase a food’s shelf life. It is an optional tool that can be used by the food industry on certain foods to enhance their safety. Irradiation is meant to complement, not replace, existing food safety processing standards and practices, such as appropriate handling, sanitation and storage. This is not a new process. Irradiation is already approved in Canada to treat potatoes, onions, wheat, flour, spices and seasoning preparations. Irradiation has also been used as a sterilization technique for medical supplies, food packaging

materials and cosmetic ingredients for many years. More than 60 countries worldwide allow the irradiation of various foods. International organizations such as the World Health Organisation recognize irradiation as a safe and effective way of reducing disease-causing organisms in food, while preserving its nutritional qualities. Ground beef that is irradiated under the proposed conditions retains its nutritional value, taste, texture and appearance. All irradiated foods must be clearly labelled. Packages must display both a written description as well as a distinctive symbol, the Radura. Canadians will be consulted on the proposed regulatory changes that would permit the irradiation of ground beef for a 75 day consultation period, ending on September 1, 2016. This proposal will be published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on June 18, 2016.


save the date ! Your chance to CONNECT with LIVESTOCK producers

Wednesday, December 14

Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre WINNIPEG, MB For info see our website or E-mail: info@prairielivestockexpo.ca

prairielivestockexpo.ca Formerly HOG & POULTRY DAYS


Federal investment will help Manitoba farmers predict the effects of flood and drought on farmland Manitoba Forage and Grassland Associaton Media Release Recent flood events in the Assiniboine River Basin have resulted in significant crop losses, property and infrastructure damage, leading to unprecedented Agri-Recovery claims above and beyond crop insurance. This project seeks to develop new risk management tools to reduce the impact of extreme flood or drought events for the agricultural industry within the Basin by identifying preventative measures, implementing risk prevention and mitigation activities, all with the intention of lessening the need for government disaster programming in response to such events. This project will construct a hydrology model of the Assiniboine River Basin to model the effects of flood and drought on soils and topography as well as simulating various mitigation measures to lessen flood/ drought event impacts on agricultural lands. The model will encompass the Assiniboine, Qu'Appelle and Souris sub-basins, as well as a more detailed drill down on the Birdtail watershed located in the upper reaches of the Assiniboine sub-basin. The model will be multi-faceted, in that it will have the utility for assessing: flood, drought, and excess moisture risks to agricultural producers; flood risks to urban centers; as well as both flood and drought risk mitigation strategies within the ARB. The model will also serve as a tool to test the hydrologic sensitivity of the ARB to projected future climate conditions and different synthetic flood inducing snow melt and precipitation scenar-

ios. It is anticipated that the model could become a standardized platform for a number of different stakeholders, including multiple levels of government, research institutes, and NGOs who want to perform targeted hydrologic analyses and research across a wide range of temporal and spatial scales within the ARB. Individuals such as primary agricultural producers and/or the business sector such as the oil and gas sector, may utilize the model on a much smaller scale, right down to individual fields or properties. The project has two key objectives (1) to develop the customized, user friendly integrated hydrologic model for the Basin, and (2) to develop a detailed model base assessment of how perennial forages, grasslands and wetlands influence the hydrologic characteristics of the Basin under conditions ranging from flood to drought, and may play a key role in moderating/mitigating the risks of flooding and drought. Term of the Project: March 1, 2016 -March 31, 2018 Applicant/Recipient: Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association (MFGA) Primary Funder/Program: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Growing Forward 2, AgriRisk Initiative Secondary Funding Partner: Manitoba Agriculture, Growing Forward 2, federal-provincial-territorial Initiative. Key Partner: The Assiniboine River Basin Initiative (ARBI) Core Contractors: 1. Aquanty Inc : Aquanty Inc.'s core technology is the hydro geosphere (HGS) hydrologic simulation software. Aquanty Inc. uses a range of high

performance computing resources to run physically complex simulations of water movement through surface water and groundwater flow systems. 2. ISM/IBM : ISM, sub-contracted to Aquanty Inc.,will develop a web based data analytics system (based on the Cognos platform) to interpret the output from the HGS model for the ARB and its major sub-basins, and will provide user friendly interfaces for multiple stakeholders to interact with the HGS output. Supporters: Keystone Agricultural Producers (KAP), Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan (APAS), Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP), Manitoba Conservation Districts Association (MCDA), Upper Assiniboine River Conservation District (UARCD), Brandon University (BU), Assiniboine Community College (ACC), Manitoba Sustainable Development, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), City of Minot, North Dakota, Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation (MHHC), Manitoba Canola Growers Association (MCGA), Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC), and Prairie Improvement Network (PIN). Governance: Project Management Team comprised of MFGA and ARBI will oversee project. Steering Committee of 12 key supporters will provide feedback and liaison to their organizations.


Bov-innovation workshop to provide beef producers with a unique extension experience By the Beef Cattle Research Council

Calgary, AB – The Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) is pleased to help power a new extension event for producers, titled Bov-Innovation. Bov-Innovation will be held as part of the inaugural Canadian Beef Industry Conference, which will take place from August 9-11, 2016 at the Grey Eagle Resort and Casino in Calgary, Alberta. “The BCRC has a great track record of sharing meaningful science-based information to Canada’s beef producers online and in print, and we are looking forward to the opportunity to partner on this in-person session,” explained Tim Oleksyn, a cow-calf producer based out of Shellbrook, SK and the Chair of BCRC. “Bov-Innovation will bring leading research and expertise to producers in a unique format that encourages producer participation,” Oleksyn added. Canadian Beef Industry ConferenceBov-Innovation will feature innovative and emerging production practices that feedlot and cow-calf operators may want to consider implementing in their operations. The session format itself will be engaging and unlike mainstream producer events,

with experts delivering information in a fast-paced lightning-round style. The audience will be able to choose between six topics presented during two concurrent sessions and participants will be able to discuss the recommendations with presenters and fellow producers. The BCRC will provide additional resources to producers on-site. Bov-Innovation will take place on August 10 from 3:00pm to 6:00pm and include sessions lead by industry leaders with input from producers who are actively incorporating some of the featured practices on their own operations. Topics will include: The economic benefits associated with preconditioning, as presented by Brenna Grant of Canfax Research Services, with Dr. Oliver Schunicht sharing his producer perspective on why he chooses to precondition. Using cover crops to maximize soil health while providing forage for grazing cattle, as shared by Dr. Jill Clapperton of Rhizoterra. Antimicrobial usage and resistance and effective prevention measures, as discussed by Dr. Cody Creelman of Veterinary Agri-Health Services. The increasing challenge of sustainable internal parasite

management in beef cattle, as presented by Dr. John Gilleard of the University of Calgary. Pain management methods and techniques, as explained by Dr. John Campbell with Tamara Carter providing a producer perspective. Demystifying genomic selection tools, as covered in a tag-team presentation by Dr. John Crowley of the Canadian Beef Breeds Council and Dr. Kim McLean, the provincial beef specialist with the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture. “There is so much value in collaborating with other stakeholders and beef industry partners who are organizing the first Canadian Beef Industry Conference. Bov-innovation will be just one important part of this comprehensive and worthwhile national event,” Oleksyn added. This unique extension event is possible because of funding through the National-Check-Off and the Beef Science Cluster, and collaboration with other industry stakeholders through the National Beef Strategy and the organizing committee of the Canadian Beef Industry Conference. For more information, visit www. canadianbeefindustryconference. com.



Friday, JULy 29, 2016 12:00 - 3:00 PM Registration & Cattle Arrival 3:00-5:00 PM Clipping & Grooming Workshop 5:00-6:00 PM Supper 6:30-8:30 PM Welcome & Agri Challange SatUrday, JULy 30, 2016 8:00-9:00 AM Breakfast & Cattle Tie In 9:00 AM-5:00 PM Pee Wee & Junior Stall Card Comp. 9:00-10:30 AM Judging (JR & SR) Workshops (PW & INT) 10:30-11:45 AM Judging (PW & INT) Workshops (JR & SR) 11:45 AM-1:00 PM Lunch 1:00-2:00 PM Team Grooming 2:00-4:00 PM JR, INT, SR Team Judging JR, INT, SR Demonstrations PW Learning Clinic & Stall Card Comp. 4:00-5:00 PM Cattle Tie Out & Chores 5:00-6:00 PM Steak Supper 6:30-8:00 PM Cook Off followed by Karaoke SUnday, JULy 31 8:00-9:00 PM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 10:00AM-12:00PM Showmanship - Both Rings 12:00 NOON GROUP PHOTO 12:00-1:00 PM Lunch 1:00-5:00 PM Conformation Show - Both Rings 5:00-6:00 PM Supper & Awards Ceremony

WHO:

Any young cattle producers under the age of 25 years of age as of January 1, 2016. Whether you are a commercial, purebred, 4-H or new junior, you are all welcome to attend.

WHAT:

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up All Breeds Junior Cattle Weekend

WHERE:

Beautiful Plains Ag Society, Neepawa, Manitoba

WHEN:

Friday - Saturday, July 29-31, 2016

WHY:

To bring juniors of all ages, breeds and locations together for a fun, educational weekend for cattle and non cattle events.

FEATURES: • • • • •

Chance to be on the MYBR Agribition Judging Team ALUMNI SHOWMANSHIP - Open to past Round Up Participants and committee members (Costumes encouraged) MYBR Scholarship check out the MYBR Facebook Page for more information or email jrkristjansson@live.ca GRAND AGGREGATE AWARDS Educational Workshops

FOR DETAILS:

Chairperson - Lois McRae - 204-728-3058 - marmac@inetlink.ca Treasurer - Rilla Hunter - 204-838-2019 Secretary - Wenda Best - 204-838-2236

Angus: Naomi Best - 838-2236 Ken Williams - 855-2275 Nanette Glover - 534-2552 Charolais: Jackie & Keegan Cavers - 242-3467 Hereford: Albert & Samantha Rimke - 855-2534 Limousin: Travis & Dillion Hunter - 838-2019

Simmental: Andrea Bertholet - 483-0319 Carson Rodgers - 871-0261 Shorthorn: Adrianne Vandersluis - 436-3122 Justin Kristjansson - 720-7196 Committee Members Blair McRae - 728-3058 Candace Johnston - 720-3986 Laura Horner - 868-5335 Melissa Falconer - 576-0154

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up #MYBR2016


1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8.

RULES

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up is open to all Canadian Juniors under the age of 25 as of January 1, 2016. Entry fees are $40 per person plus $10 per confirmation class. The $40 flat fee includes entry to all competitions (excluding conformation), show clothing and scheduled meals. Compulsory events are judging class with oral reasons, team grooming, cook off and Round Up Agri Challange. 2016 calves are eligible to be entered in cow calf pair and calf classes. Entry fee for pair is $10 and calf class is $10. All cattle must be halter broke and manageable or will be asked to leave. CCIA tags are required A junior who does not have cattle may use another participants animal in grooming and showmanship. AS THIS IS A JUNIOR EVENT, ALL ENTRIES MUST BE SHOWN AND LOOKED AFTER BY THE JUNIORS. ABSOLUTELY NO ADULT or nonentrant participation will be tolerated. Pee Wees may be assisted by a parent or guardian for safety reasons only. Mentors will be around to provide help for the participants and answer any questions. Alcohol and drugs are prohibited in the barns and at the Roundup functions for the duration of the show. Tampering with and any unethical fitting is prohibited. Show apparel is to be worn for all the showmanship and confirmation classes.

OUTLINES FOR CLASSES

Team Judging • Juniors will judge a class of four animals. • One of the team members will act as the ring person and the other one will act as the judge. • The participant acting as the judge must give oral reasons over the microphone in front of the audience. • All other teams must be out of the judging area and unable to hear the reasons. • Score: 55% teamwork ability; 20% clarity of reasons; 20% logic of reasons 5% appearance. Team Grooming - Compulsory Event • Teams have 15 minutes to groom with power. • Animals must have no fitting prior to competition. • Once at the chute area you are not allowed to leave so bring all the equipment with you. • Score: 35% knowledge and skill; 25% teamwork; 20% use of equipment; 15% final appearance; 5% presentation of animal Cook Off - THE ULTIMATE BURGER - Compulsory Event • Team event, teams will be announced at Round-Up. • Teams will be provided with two Hamburgers and a barbecue • Participants are encouraged to bring their own utensils and ingredients for marinades and garnishes and to provide a recipe to the judges. • Costumes and themes are encouraged. • Participants are encouraged to add fixings to the burger and add one side dish and dessert. • Score: 50% taste; 25% appearance; 15% presentation and 10% creativity. Stall Card • Pee Wees & Juniors create a stall card to be displayed with their animals in the stalls. • Stall cards must be made Saturday at Round-Up only • Scoring: 35% clarity; 35% originality and 30% neatness Photography • The photo must be taken by the junior exhibiting it and cannot be digitally enhanced and must be taken within the last year & dated • Photographs must be 4”x 6”, No Frame, Must be of listed theme • 2016 THEMES PW - Landscape/Scenery with cattle JR - Kids & Cattle INT& SR - Picture of cattle from any angle • Please put name and age category on the back. • Scoring: 40% clarity; 35% quality and 25% originality. Graphic Design • All work must be done at home by the junior created using computer technology. • The graphic design must be promoting a breed, industry or an individual herd. • 2016 THEMES - product must be based list theme PW & JR - 1 Page Poster Promoting Round Up INT& SR - 1 Brochure Promoting Your Herd or An Animal • Please put name and age category on the back. Scoring: 30% creativity; 30% originality; 30% clear and concise message; 10% organization

Art • All work must be done at home by the junior in the last year & dated • Art cannot contain photos and should not be larger than 9”x14”. • You can use (pencil, paint, clay, wood, etc.). • All art is judged in the same category. One entry per person. • Please put name and age category on the back. • Score: 40% originality; 40% creativity and 20% skill/quality. Scrapbook • Include photographs, newspaper and magazine clippings, for the 2015-2016 year. • Scrapbooks must be done by the junior exhibiting. • The scrapbook is to encourage junior members to record different cattle functions they have attended over the past years. • Scrapbooks should have a theme and begin with a title page, table of contents and numbered pages. • Score: 25% cover; 25% creativity; 25% originality; 25% neatness and organization. PowerPoint and Video Topic • Pee Wee and JRs minimum of 6 slides INT and SRs minimum of 12 slides • Presentations must have at least two pictures or clip art that support the idea of the presentation. • Presentations may include but do not require music or video clips. • Videos and/or presentations must come on the first day on a USB memory stick, DVD or CD. Videos must be in Quick Time, AVI or MPEG file format. • JR and INT videos must be 30-60 seconds in length, SR videos must be 60-90 seconds in length. • The junior member will produce file and edit the videos them selves, no professional editing allowed. • Animated and or computer generated graphics will not be allowed in the video. • Score: 40% on graphics; 35% originality; 15% technical merit; 10% overall effect of the presentation. Group Herdsman Competition • The purpose of this contest is to encourage cooperation, fellowship and teamwork among juniors in developing and maintaining a display of cattle and stall area. The competition begins on Saturday morning and ends after the confirmation classes. Must have a minimum of two head tied in your display. • Score: 25% aisle and bedding, cleanliness and appearance; 25% animals, cleanliness and well groomed; 25% personnel attending cattle, knowledgeable, friendly and teamwork; 25% equipment, boxes, signs, well arranged and general appearance. Grand Aggregate • One participant from each division will be selected. • Score: 1 point for every animal you bring, no matter where they place. All other non cattle classes will be scored 10 points for first place and down. Ex: 1st - 10pts, 2nd - 9 pts, 3rd - 8pts, etc. • The grand aggregate competition encourages all juniors to participate in all the events.

WORKSHOPS - 40 Minutes Each MORNING WORKSHOPS AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS You must pick 2 out of 3 at registration desk Photography and Videoing Cattle Showmanship

Artificial insemination Money /Farm Management Farm Safety

Please let the registration desk know if you are participating in Team Judging at same time.


Participant Name:__________________________________________________________________ Birth Date:_______/_______/_______ Age Division:_________

MAIL ENTRIES & FEES TO :

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up C/O Lois McRae RR 1 Box 57 Brandon, MB R7A 5Y1 marmac@inetlink.ca

Age Groups (as of Jan 1, 2016): PW: 8 and Under; JR 9-12; INT: 13-16; SR: 17-25

Full Address:______________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________ Email: __________________________________________ Show Apparel Size:

XS

S

M

L

XL

2XL

-

YOUTH

ADULT

Please circle one size and either youth or adult

ENTRIES DUE JULY 10th, 2016

For MYBR Windpants or Jacket ($30 deposit by July 10) CLASS #

BREED

ANIMAL NAME

ANIMAL TATTOO

ANIMAL REG #

SIRE NAME REG #

DAM NAME REG #

Breeds: (If animal doesn’t have a registration number please list as a CO) A: Angus, CH: Charolais, H: Hereford, L:Limousin,

Cattle Classes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

ANIMAL D.O.B.

Heifer Calf Female born in 2015 Female born in 2014 w/ nat calf at foot Female born in 2013 or earlier w/ nat calf at foot Bull Calf Fat Steer Showmanship

S: Simmental, M: Mixed Breeds (Purebred breeds not listed); CO: Commercial, G: Gelbvieh; SH : Shorthorn

If you are showing purebred animals, you must be a member in your respective breed association we require 8 head in each breed or you will show in the mixed breed class.

Meals:

Compulsory Classes:

8. Judging 9. Team Grooming 10. Cook Off 11. Round Up AgriChallange 12. Breed Quizzes for Simmental Exhibitors 13. Workshops & Demonstrations

Adults full weekend of meals $75 ___ Adults: Breakfast $8; Lunch $10; Supper $15 Saturday Night Steak Supper $20 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___ Sunday Night Supper $15 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___

Fees:

Registration Fee: $40.00/participant Cattle Fees: $10.00/class Adult Full Weekend Meal Fees Extra Meal Fees Late Fees: $20.00/person after July 10 Total Fees:

$________ $________ $________ $________ $________ $________

Onsite camping fees - POWER SITE - $25 X ____ nights NON POWER SITE - $20 X ____ nights

Make cheques payable to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up - ENTRIES DUE JULY 10TH, 2016 Waiver Claim: I hereby release the Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up, their organizers, officials, volunteers, as well as the Beautiful Plains Ag Society in case of a loss of or damage property or injury

Participant Signature:_________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature:______________________________________

Accommodations: Bay Hill Inn & Suites - 1-888-476-8802 - Westway Inn - 1-800-448-0994 Camping is also available at the fair grounds for a nominal fee further accommodation info at www.neepawa.ca


June 10, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

CRSB recognizes McDonald’s for leadership through Sustainable Beef Pilot Project Calgary, AB – As the McDonald’s Sustainable Beef Pilot Project (the Pilot) draws to a close, the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB) would like to recognize McDonald’s for their tremendous work and leadership in advancing sustainable beef initiatives in Canada, and for raising awareness about sustainable beef production by taking the conversation mainstream. In 2014, McDonald’s engaged with the newly-established CRSB on the possibility of establishing a sustainable beef pilot

project in Canada. The CRSB and McDonald’s agreed to collaborate on the project framework, with the goal being for McDonald’s to source a portion of beef in Canada from verified sustainable operations and to share their practical implementation learnings with the CRSB. Over the last two years, McDonald’s has shown strong commitment to engaging with a multi-stakeholder audience, accepting feedback and working collaboratively to advance and recognize the sustainability

of Canada’s beef industry. “Without a doubt, this has been a very constructive exercise,” notes CRSB Chair, Cherie Copithorne-Barnes. “We are excited to be in a position to carry this work forward.” The CRSB is currently developing a unique verification framework, building on the McDonald’s Pilot, which should be finalized in late 2017. There will be a period of time between the conclusion of the Pilot (June 2016) and the time the CRSB’s verification framework is finalized (Q4,

2017). During this interim period, the CRSB will be working with stakeholders to further develop the verification framework, incorporate learnings from the Pilot and trial the CRSB framework. “The McDonald’s pilot highlighted the value of testing the verification framework in an iterative manner,” says Fawn Jackson, Executive Director of the CRSB. “The Pilot accelerated CRSB’s progress in developing a beef sustainability framework by testing and sharing important learnings about framework mancontinued to page 2

Upcoming Events

Find Us Online

June 23 — Manitoba Hay Day Where: MBFI Brookdale location, northeast of Brandon

mbbeef.ca

July 26 — ­ Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives McDonald’s Producer’s Day Where: MBFI Brookdale location, northeast of Brandon August 22 — Holistic Management Open Gate Field Day Where: Dauphin

@ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

recognizes McDonald’s ... In the News CRSB continued from page 1

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry

agement, participant enrollment, indicator development, scoring and performance levels, verification/assurance processes, chain of custody and information sharing.” With the conclusion of the Pilot, McDonald’s will continue to be engaged with the CRSB and carry on their sustainable sourcing journey in Canada. Producers involved in the Pilot will be transitioned into the new CRSB verification program, with new producers being accepted into the verification trial on a limited basis.

Frequently Asked Questions for Producers • Why farmers should care what consumers think • Beef market update wholesale prices holding firm, negative feeder margins finally narrowing • Important tips for cattle processing • A guide to low stress cattle handling

If I was a verified producer in the McDonald’s Pilot Project, do I have to go through the verification process again? No. Participants in the Pilot will be transitioned/grandfathered into the CRSB recognized verification framework, with the date they were verified under the Pilot serving as the starting date for the new assurance cycle. Over the next year, McDonald’s will continue to work with producers who were verified under the Pilot to maintain verification status. Once the CRSB has developed its verification framework, they will work together with McDonald’s and producers to fully integrate their verifications into the CRSB system. I did not participate in the McDonald’s Pilot Project, can I become verified sustainable? Yes. Over the next year, the CRSB, in collaboration with CRSB membership, will be trialling the CRSB verification framework with a limited number of producers. New producers interested in participating can Contact Us to be involved in CRSB trials via the CRSB website. If I am not involved in the McDonald’s Pilot or the CRSB Project what should I do to prepare for 2017 when the CRSB verification framework will be released? The CRSB has committed to utilizing, where appropriate, existing programs and tools across Canada in the development of the verification framework. By participating in existing programs or utilizing existing tools that address one or more of the five principles of sustainable beef (natural resources, people and the community, animal health and welfare, food, and efficiency and innovation) producers will be better prepared to join the verification journey once the framework is fully established. If I am verified sustainable, can I make a label claim on my product? Not today. There are many steps to developing a verified sustainable sourcing program that can then be communicated through methods such as product labelling. Over the coming months, the CRSB will be developing a claims guide, however until this is completed, the CRSB does not recommend making product claims.


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

Manitoba Hay Day Attend this field day and learn how to increase the quality of your valuable hay resources. Watch infield demonstrations of new equipment from manufacturers and learn more about:  how to harvest high quality hay  fertility for optimum forage production  soil salinity  hay quality differences When:

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Time:

9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Where:

Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives Farm Corner of Highway 353 and #10 north of Brandon

Agenda:

10:00 a.m.

Greenfeed – Winning the Battle From Start to Finish Ray Bittner, Manitoba Agriculture

10:30 a.m.

Hay Production Tips, Tricks and Must Do’s Tim Clarke, Manitoba Agriculture

11:00 a.m.

Forage Producer Panel Beef producer, hay producer, silage producer

1:00 p.m.

Green Gold Alfalfa Monitoring Program - for optimal forage harvesting. John McGregor, Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association

1:30 p.m.

How Important is Forage Fertility? John Heard and Ray Bittner, Manitoba Agriculture

2:00 p.m.

New Hay Equipment Demonstrations Major Manufacturers

Cost: Register:

$10 per person and includes lunch. This is a rain or shine event. Portage GO Office at 204-239-3352


save the date ! Your chance to CONNECT with LIVESTOCK producers

Wednesday, December 14

Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre WINNIPEG, MB For info see our website or E-mail: info@prairielivestockexpo.ca

prairielivestockexpo.ca Formerly HOG & POULTRY DAYS


Don’t miss early registration deadline for Canadian Beef Industry Conference CALGARY, AB — Inspiring speakers, fun events and outstanding learning opportunities are all part of the fresh energy for Canada’s beef industry building around this summer’s “can’t miss” event – the first ever Canadian Beef Industry Conference (CBIC), Aug 9 – 11 in Calgary. Beef producers and others from across all regions and sectors of the industry are encouraged to take advantage of special discounted early registration rates available until June 15. “We couldn’t be more excited to be hosting this first-of-its-kind event designed to bring people together from across our great industry, from across the country, to learn, share and help drive our industry forward,” says Virgil Lowe, co-chair of the 2016 CBIC and also an Associate with Dentons Canada LLP. “CBIC is set up so that people can attend as part of their summer vacation or summer travel plans. It’s partly about advancing awareness and progress with the new National Beef Strategy. But it’s also about really having a great time visiting, sharing ideas, and sharing experiences together as a beef industry community. This national meeting place is something our industry has needed and been working toward for a long time. We’re looking forward to an outstanding event.” Among a diverse range of topics and speakers, the conference

features very practical, educational sessions for producers. A leading example is a session called “Bov-innovation,” which covers topics such as making informed decisions on pre-weaning management, how to improve forage production, how to strengthen internal parasite control programs and how to take advantage of genomic selection tools. Opening day keynote speaker is entrepreneur, consultant and former Dragon’s Den star Arlene Dickinson. The agenda will also include keynote sessions on each of the National Beef Strategy’s four pillars: connectivity, productivity, beef demand and competitiveness, along with educational presentations and interactive workshops on new developments, market and brand opportunities and production innovations. Full registration includes all conference sessions, the opening night (Tuesday) reception and the Wednesday night banquet and entertainment, featuring the band

Ain’t No Rodeo. Extra tickets are available for purchase for both of the evening events. Additional options available by separate ticket purchase include a pre-conference Monday tour hosted by Alberta Beef Producers, the Canadian Cattlemen’s Foundation Classic Golf Tournament on Tuesday, and a Thursday evening Heritage Park supper. “The sessions, speakers and topics are all excellent – there is something for everyone depending on their interests,” says Rob Smith, Canadian Angus Association Chief Executive Officer and the other cochair of the conference. “There’s so much to do and choose from. It’s something you can bring the whole family for and enjoy a great week in Calgary.” Full registration information is available at www.canadianbeefindustryconference.com. Follow CBIC on Twitter and Facebook for updates.


Register Now!!

Opportunities in livestock genetics in Mexico Webinar The Canadian Trade Commissioner Service is organizing a webinar to give Canadian livestock genetics companies an overview of the current opportunities in livestock genetics in the Mexican market. The event will feature a consultant and a distributor. The consultant will focus on cattle, swine, sheep, and goats to identify business opportunities for Canadian companies in the Mexican market, while the distributor will share his experience in dairy cattle, characteristics of the Mexican genetics market, do’s and don’ts, and practical advice on how to better enter this market. There will also be time for questions and answers. You will learn: • Structure and Size of the market • Market trends • Key industry players • Main local and international competitors • Main distribution channels • Suggested market entry strategies Where: Online and Free! Event Password: Genetics When: Thursday, June 16th, 2016, from 11:00 am to 12:00 pm ET Language of Presentation: English Key Contact: Marie-Pier Bouchard-Valade mpbv@international.gc.ca



Friday, JULy 29, 2016 12:00 - 3:00 PM Registration & Cattle Arrival 3:00-5:00 PM Clipping & Grooming Workshop 5:00-6:00 PM Supper 6:30-8:30 PM Welcome & Agri Challange SatUrday, JULy 30, 2016 8:00-9:00 AM Breakfast & Cattle Tie In 9:00 AM-5:00 PM Pee Wee & Junior Stall Card Comp. 9:00-10:30 AM Judging (JR & SR) Workshops (PW & INT) 10:30-11:45 AM Judging (PW & INT) Workshops (JR & SR) 11:45 AM-1:00 PM Lunch 1:00-2:00 PM Team Grooming 2:00-4:00 PM JR, INT, SR Team Judging JR, INT, SR Demonstrations PW Learning Clinic & Stall Card Comp. 4:00-5:00 PM Cattle Tie Out & Chores 5:00-6:00 PM Steak Supper 6:30-8:00 PM Cook Off followed by Karaoke SUnday, JULy 31 8:00-9:00 PM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 10:00AM-12:00PM Showmanship - Both Rings 12:00 NOON GROUP PHOTO 12:00-1:00 PM Lunch 1:00-5:00 PM Conformation Show - Both Rings 5:00-6:00 PM Supper & Awards Ceremony

WHO:

Any young cattle producers under the age of 25 years of age as of January 1, 2016. Whether you are a commercial, purebred, 4-H or new junior, you are all welcome to attend.

WHAT:

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up All Breeds Junior Cattle Weekend

WHERE:

Beautiful Plains Ag Society, Neepawa, Manitoba

WHEN:

Friday - Saturday, July 29-31, 2016

WHY:

To bring juniors of all ages, breeds and locations together for a fun, educational weekend for cattle and non cattle events.

FEATURES: • • • • •

Chance to be on the MYBR Agribition Judging Team ALUMNI SHOWMANSHIP - Open to past Round Up Participants and committee members (Costumes encouraged) MYBR Scholarship check out the MYBR Facebook Page for more information or email jrkristjansson@live.ca GRAND AGGREGATE AWARDS Educational Workshops

FOR DETAILS:

Chairperson - Lois McRae - 204-728-3058 - marmac@inetlink.ca Treasurer - Rilla Hunter - 204-838-2019 Secretary - Wenda Best - 204-838-2236

Angus: Naomi Best - 838-2236 Ken Williams - 855-2275 Nanette Glover - 534-2552 Charolais: Jackie & Keegan Cavers - 242-3467 Hereford: Albert & Samantha Rimke - 855-2534 Limousin: Travis & Dillion Hunter - 838-2019

Simmental: Andrea Bertholet - 483-0319 Carson Rodgers - 871-0261 Shorthorn: Adrianne Vandersluis - 436-3122 Justin Kristjansson - 720-7196 Committee Members Blair McRae - 728-3058 Candace Johnston - 720-3986 Laura Horner - 868-5335 Melissa Falconer - 576-0154

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up #MYBR2016


1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8.

RULES

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up is open to all Canadian Juniors under the age of 25 as of January 1, 2016. Entry fees are $40 per person plus $10 per confirmation class. The $40 flat fee includes entry to all competitions (excluding conformation), show clothing and scheduled meals. Compulsory events are judging class with oral reasons, team grooming, cook off and Round Up Agri Challange. 2016 calves are eligible to be entered in cow calf pair and calf classes. Entry fee for pair is $10 and calf class is $10. All cattle must be halter broke and manageable or will be asked to leave. CCIA tags are required A junior who does not have cattle may use another participants animal in grooming and showmanship. AS THIS IS A JUNIOR EVENT, ALL ENTRIES MUST BE SHOWN AND LOOKED AFTER BY THE JUNIORS. ABSOLUTELY NO ADULT or nonentrant participation will be tolerated. Pee Wees may be assisted by a parent or guardian for safety reasons only. Mentors will be around to provide help for the participants and answer any questions. Alcohol and drugs are prohibited in the barns and at the Roundup functions for the duration of the show. Tampering with and any unethical fitting is prohibited. Show apparel is to be worn for all the showmanship and confirmation classes.

OUTLINES FOR CLASSES

Team Judging • Juniors will judge a class of four animals. • One of the team members will act as the ring person and the other one will act as the judge. • The participant acting as the judge must give oral reasons over the microphone in front of the audience. • All other teams must be out of the judging area and unable to hear the reasons. • Score: 55% teamwork ability; 20% clarity of reasons; 20% logic of reasons 5% appearance. Team Grooming - Compulsory Event • Teams have 15 minutes to groom with power. • Animals must have no fitting prior to competition. • Once at the chute area you are not allowed to leave so bring all the equipment with you. • Score: 35% knowledge and skill; 25% teamwork; 20% use of equipment; 15% final appearance; 5% presentation of animal Cook Off - THE ULTIMATE BURGER - Compulsory Event • Team event, teams will be announced at Round-Up. • Teams will be provided with two Hamburgers and a barbecue • Participants are encouraged to bring their own utensils and ingredients for marinades and garnishes and to provide a recipe to the judges. • Costumes and themes are encouraged. • Participants are encouraged to add fixings to the burger and add one side dish and dessert. • Score: 50% taste; 25% appearance; 15% presentation and 10% creativity. Stall Card • Pee Wees & Juniors create a stall card to be displayed with their animals in the stalls. • Stall cards must be made Saturday at Round-Up only • Scoring: 35% clarity; 35% originality and 30% neatness Photography • The photo must be taken by the junior exhibiting it and cannot be digitally enhanced and must be taken within the last year & dated • Photographs must be 4”x 6”, No Frame, Must be of listed theme • 2016 THEMES PW - Landscape/Scenery with cattle JR - Kids & Cattle INT& SR - Picture of cattle from any angle • Please put name and age category on the back. • Scoring: 40% clarity; 35% quality and 25% originality. Graphic Design • All work must be done at home by the junior created using computer technology. • The graphic design must be promoting a breed, industry or an individual herd. • 2016 THEMES - product must be based list theme PW & JR - 1 Page Poster Promoting Round Up INT& SR - 1 Brochure Promoting Your Herd or An Animal • Please put name and age category on the back. Scoring: 30% creativity; 30% originality; 30% clear and concise message; 10% organization

Art • All work must be done at home by the junior in the last year & dated • Art cannot contain photos and should not be larger than 9”x14”. • You can use (pencil, paint, clay, wood, etc.). • All art is judged in the same category. One entry per person. • Please put name and age category on the back. • Score: 40% originality; 40% creativity and 20% skill/quality. Scrapbook • Include photographs, newspaper and magazine clippings, for the 2015-2016 year. • Scrapbooks must be done by the junior exhibiting. • The scrapbook is to encourage junior members to record different cattle functions they have attended over the past years. • Scrapbooks should have a theme and begin with a title page, table of contents and numbered pages. • Score: 25% cover; 25% creativity; 25% originality; 25% neatness and organization. PowerPoint and Video Topic • Pee Wee and JRs minimum of 6 slides INT and SRs minimum of 12 slides • Presentations must have at least two pictures or clip art that support the idea of the presentation. • Presentations may include but do not require music or video clips. • Videos and/or presentations must come on the first day on a USB memory stick, DVD or CD. Videos must be in Quick Time, AVI or MPEG file format. • JR and INT videos must be 30-60 seconds in length, SR videos must be 60-90 seconds in length. • The junior member will produce file and edit the videos them selves, no professional editing allowed. • Animated and or computer generated graphics will not be allowed in the video. • Score: 40% on graphics; 35% originality; 15% technical merit; 10% overall effect of the presentation. Group Herdsman Competition • The purpose of this contest is to encourage cooperation, fellowship and teamwork among juniors in developing and maintaining a display of cattle and stall area. The competition begins on Saturday morning and ends after the confirmation classes. Must have a minimum of two head tied in your display. • Score: 25% aisle and bedding, cleanliness and appearance; 25% animals, cleanliness and well groomed; 25% personnel attending cattle, knowledgeable, friendly and teamwork; 25% equipment, boxes, signs, well arranged and general appearance. Grand Aggregate • One participant from each division will be selected. • Score: 1 point for every animal you bring, no matter where they place. All other non cattle classes will be scored 10 points for first place and down. Ex: 1st - 10pts, 2nd - 9 pts, 3rd - 8pts, etc. • The grand aggregate competition encourages all juniors to participate in all the events.

WORKSHOPS - 40 Minutes Each MORNING WORKSHOPS AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS You must pick 2 out of 3 at registration desk Photography and Videoing Cattle Showmanship

Artificial insemination Money /Farm Management Farm Safety

Please let the registration desk know if you are participating in Team Judging at same time.


Participant Name:__________________________________________________________________ Birth Date:_______/_______/_______ Age Division:_________

MAIL ENTRIES & FEES TO :

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up C/O Lois McRae RR 1 Box 57 Brandon, MB R7A 5Y1 marmac@inetlink.ca

Age Groups (as of Jan 1, 2016): PW: 8 and Under; JR 9-12; INT: 13-16; SR: 17-25

Full Address:______________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________ Email: __________________________________________ Show Apparel Size:

XS

S

M

L

XL

2XL

-

YOUTH

ADULT

Please circle one size and either youth or adult

ENTRIES DUE JULY 10th, 2016

For MYBR Windpants or Jacket ($30 deposit by July 10) CLASS #

BREED

ANIMAL NAME

ANIMAL TATTOO

ANIMAL REG #

SIRE NAME REG #

DAM NAME REG #

Breeds: (If animal doesn’t have a registration number please list as a CO) A: Angus, CH: Charolais, H: Hereford, L:Limousin,

Cattle Classes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

ANIMAL D.O.B.

Heifer Calf Female born in 2015 Female born in 2014 w/ nat calf at foot Female born in 2013 or earlier w/ nat calf at foot Bull Calf Fat Steer Showmanship

S: Simmental, M: Mixed Breeds (Purebred breeds not listed); CO: Commercial, G: Gelbvieh; SH : Shorthorn

If you are showing purebred animals, you must be a member in your respective breed association we require 8 head in each breed or you will show in the mixed breed class.

Meals:

Compulsory Classes:

8. Judging 9. Team Grooming 10. Cook Off 11. Round Up AgriChallange 12. Breed Quizzes for Simmental Exhibitors 13. Workshops & Demonstrations

Adults full weekend of meals $75 ___ Adults: Breakfast $8; Lunch $10; Supper $15 Saturday Night Steak Supper $20 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___ Sunday Night Supper $15 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___

Fees:

Registration Fee: $40.00/participant Cattle Fees: $10.00/class Adult Full Weekend Meal Fees Extra Meal Fees Late Fees: $20.00/person after July 10 Total Fees:

$________ $________ $________ $________ $________ $________

Onsite camping fees - POWER SITE - $25 X ____ nights NON POWER SITE - $20 X ____ nights

Make cheques payable to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up - ENTRIES DUE JULY 10TH, 2016 Waiver Claim: I hereby release the Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up, their organizers, officials, volunteers, as well as the Beautiful Plains Ag Society in case of a loss of or damage property or injury

Participant Signature:_________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature:______________________________________

Accommodations: Bay Hill Inn & Suites - 1-888-476-8802 - Westway Inn - 1-800-448-0994 Camping is also available at the fair grounds for a nominal fee further accommodation info at www.neepawa.ca


May 27, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Manitoba Beef Producers to offer six bursaries in 2016 Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is pleased to announce it will again award six $500 bursaries to deserving Manitoba students in 2016. The bursaries are available to MBP members, or their children, who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or those acquiring a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. “We are proud to offer these bursaries to our members and their children,” said Manitoba Beef Producers President Heinz Reimer. “Investments in education reap strong dividends.

Our past recipients have gone on to careers in the trades and veterinary services, among others with many of them settling in rural Manitoba and making significant contributions to their communities.” Those applying must be at least 17 years old as of Jan. 1, 2016 and be an active beef producer or the child of one. Applicants must use the bursary within two years of receiving it and the program they are attending must be at least one year in duration. Interested students are required to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Manitoba at large. Students are also asked to

include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at www.mbbeef.ca/producers/mbp-bursary/. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 3, 2016. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified on July 31, 2016. The winning essays will also be reprinted in the September issue of Cattle Country.

Deadline to Apply is June 3 Upcoming Events

Find Us Online

June 23 — Manitoba Hay Day Where: MBFI Brookdale location, northeast of Brandon

mbbeef.ca

July 26 — ­ Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives McDonald’s Producer’s Day Where: MBFI Brookdale location, northeast of Brandon August 22 — Holistic Management Open Gate Field Day Where: Dauphin

@ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

CFA Supports Efforts A look at the to Keep the Canadian news and articles of interest Family Farm Intact In the News

to Manitoba’s Beef industry

• CCA Report: The pressing issues of beef and forage research, traceability • Performance technologies help make beef sustainable • Vet Advice: Exploring the ‘hygiene hypothesis’ • FarmTrack hosting technology sessions for livestock producers

OTTAWA - A private member's bill tabled May 19 - Bill C-274 - is taking on the inefficient tax treatment of intergenerational transfers for small businesses, addressing a major issue for family farm and fishing businesses. The Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) is pleased to see MP Guy Caron's bill propose amendments to the Income Tax Act that would ease the tax burden on farmers seeking to transfer their businesses to the next generation. "Over $50 billion in farm assets are set to change hands over the next 10 years as farmers age and future plans are made. In order to ensure the continuation of family farms in Canada, urgent efforts are needed to address the barriers hindering farm transfers to family members. We are pleased to see this issue move forward in Parliament and are hopeful it receives the political profile and priority it deserves," said CFA President Ron Bonnett. CFA regularly hears from farmers across the country encountering significant and costly obstacles when attempting to pass their businesses on to family members. Specific tax rules pose disincentives to keeping farms within the family and actually incent sales to non-family members. In many instances, farmers find it markedly less costly to sell their farms to outside buyers. "Simply put, if taxation barriers aren't addressed, we will see fewer and fewer family farms in Canada. We support Mr. Caron and his colleague's commitment to addressing these tax burdens that could cause significant administrative burden, cost, and ultimately disruption to what looks to be the most significant period of farm transfers in the history of Canadian agriculture," added Bonnett. At this point, 98% of Canadian farms continue to be family-owned and operated and CFA is committed to working with government, and all parties, to ensure the Income Tax Act supports the continuation of this successful and valued farming tradition.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

Deadline to purchase WLPIP calf policies May 31; WLPIP can now be used as security under APP The deadline for producers to purchase a policy through the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program is May 31. Policies are also available year-round for the WLPIP fed and feeder cattle program. If you have any questions regarding the programcontact Manitoba WLPIP coordinator Jason Dobbin at (204)239-3084. In other WLPIP news, it was recently announced that WLPIP can be used as security under the Advance Payment Program (APP). Under the APP, cattle producers can access an advance on calves, feeders, fed animals and breeding stock intended for sale using the animals as the primary form of security, with a program as a secondary form of security. Prior to the 2016 program year, cattle pro-

ducers could only use AgriStability as the secondary form of security. With this change, producers can now choose between AgriStability or WLPIP as secondary security. The new option is being implemented on a trial basis for the 2016 program year following consultations with the industry. The APP provides cash advances of up to $400,000 based on the value of a producer's agricultural production, with the federal government paying the interest on the first $100,000. Visit the Advance Payments Program web site to learn about the program: www.agr. gc.ca/app. For more information, Manitoba producers contact the Manitoba Livestock Cash Advance at 1-866-869-4008.


Tractor Roll-over A Manitoban was recently killed while operating an "open-cab style" farm tractor on a provincial roadway. This tragic incident reminds us of the many hazards present in the agricultural industry. Roll-overs are among the leading causes of injury and death for farm tractor operators. To avoid similar incidents, SAFE Work Manitoba reminds employers and equipment operators to ensure roll over protective structures (ROPS) and seatbelts are properly designed, manufactured and installed. (see: Part 22 of the Workplace Safety and Health Regulation) In addition, SAFE Work Manitoba reminds motorists to slow down when approaching agricultural equipment on the roadway. Prevention measures The following are additional measures that employers and equipment operators can take to help prevent similar incidents:    

equip machinery with proper lighting, signage and reflectors when traveling on roadways ensure lights, signage and reflectors are visible and clean whenever possible, move equipment during the day on secondary roads map out your route before transporting equipment and get appropriate permits from Manitoba Hydro and Manitoba Infrastructure when applicable.

For more information, review: Safety Risk to Farm Tractor Operators bulletin, Operating Older and Vintage Tractors bulletin, Share the Road this Spring tip card, Agricultural Equipment Safety Guide, and Rollover Protective Structures video

ALERT 03-16 (May)


Next Agricultural Policy Framework – Share Your Experience and Ideas Growing Forward 2 (GF2) is the current federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) agricultural policy framework and will be in place until 2018. Now at the midway point of GF2, FPT governments are working in partnership to develop the next framework and are seeking feedback to better understand where GF2 is working well, and where challenges could be addressed. We want to hear about your experience as we work with provincial and territorial governments to develop the next framework. Your feedback is important and will help shape the direction of future policy and programs for the agriculture and agri-food sector. There will be more opportunities to share your ideas and priorities in the coming months. Learn more about Growing Forward 2. Contributing Your Comments • mail to Next Policy Framework You can provide your comments by: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada 1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7 • completing this Questionnaire Floor 5, Room 300 Ottawa ON • e-mail to aafc.npf-pcs.aac@canada.ca K1A 0C5 Next Steps We will summarize input received and post it on our website. Check back again for upcoming opportunities to share your views on the development of the next agriculture policy framework.

Have 15 minutes? BCRC wants you to make an impact on the future of research As someone receiving this newsletter, you’re almost guaranteed to be what we call a ‘Canadian beef industry stakeholder’, meaning you: • own or manage beef cattle, • conduct research on beef, cattle or forages, • are a large animal veterinarian, • own or work for an abattoir/beef processor, • are a government employee in a beef-related role, • work or volunteer for an organization that actively supports the beef industry, or • have another valuable role that supports and relies on Canadian beef production. You hold a stake in the beef industry, so the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) and the Beef Value Chain Roundtable (BVCRT) rely on your input on research issues. Please consider answering our 15-20 minute questionnaire by May 31st. Your feedback will inform the next five-year National Beef Research Strategy and impact the long term competitiveness of the Canadian beef industry.



Friday, JULy 29, 2016 12:00 - 3:00 PM Registration & Cattle Arrival 3:00-5:00 PM Clipping & Grooming Workshop 5:00-6:00 PM Supper 6:30-8:30 PM Welcome & Agri Challange SatUrday, JULy 30, 2016 8:00-9:00 AM Breakfast & Cattle Tie In 9:00 AM-5:00 PM Pee Wee & Junior Stall Card Comp. 9:00-10:30 AM Judging (JR & SR) Workshops (PW & INT) 10:30-11:45 AM Judging (PW & INT) Workshops (JR & SR) 11:45 AM-1:00 PM Lunch 1:00-2:00 PM Team Grooming 2:00-4:00 PM JR, INT, SR Team Judging JR, INT, SR Demonstrations PW Learning Clinic & Stall Card Comp. 4:00-5:00 PM Cattle Tie Out & Chores 5:00-6:00 PM Steak Supper 6:30-8:00 PM Cook Off followed by Karaoke SUnday, JULy 31 8:00-9:00 PM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 10:00AM-12:00PM Showmanship - Both Rings 12:00 NOON GROUP PHOTO 12:00-1:00 PM Lunch 1:00-5:00 PM Conformation Show - Both Rings 5:00-6:00 PM Supper & Awards Ceremony

WHO:

Any young cattle producers under the age of 25 years of age as of January 1, 2016. Whether you are a commercial, purebred, 4-H or new junior, you are all welcome to attend.

WHAT:

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up All Breeds Junior Cattle Weekend

WHERE:

Beautiful Plains Ag Society, Neepawa, Manitoba

WHEN:

Friday - Saturday, July 29-31, 2016

WHY:

To bring juniors of all ages, breeds and locations together for a fun, educational weekend for cattle and non cattle events.

FEATURES: • • • • •

Chance to be on the MYBR Agribition Judging Team ALUMNI SHOWMANSHIP - Open to past Round Up Participants and committee members (Costumes encouraged) MYBR Scholarship check out the MYBR Facebook Page for more information or email jrkristjansson@live.ca GRAND AGGREGATE AWARDS Educational Workshops

FOR DETAILS:

Chairperson - Lois McRae - 204-728-3058 - marmac@inetlink.ca Treasurer - Rilla Hunter - 204-838-2019 Secretary - Wenda Best - 204-838-2236

Angus: Naomi Best - 838-2236 Ken Williams - 855-2275 Nanette Glover - 534-2552 Charolais: Jackie & Keegan Cavers - 242-3467 Hereford: Albert & Samantha Rimke - 855-2534 Limousin: Travis & Dillion Hunter - 838-2019

Simmental: Andrea Bertholet - 483-0319 Carson Rodgers - 871-0261 Shorthorn: Adrianne Vandersluis - 436-3122 Justin Kristjansson - 720-7196 Committee Members Blair McRae - 728-3058 Candace Johnston - 720-3986 Laura Horner - 868-5335 Melissa Falconer - 576-0154

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up #MYBR2016


1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8.

RULES

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up is open to all Canadian Juniors under the age of 25 as of January 1, 2016. Entry fees are $40 per person plus $10 per confirmation class. The $40 flat fee includes entry to all competitions (excluding conformation), show clothing and scheduled meals. Compulsory events are judging class with oral reasons, team grooming, cook off and Round Up Agri Challange. 2016 calves are eligible to be entered in cow calf pair and calf classes. Entry fee for pair is $10 and calf class is $10. All cattle must be halter broke and manageable or will be asked to leave. CCIA tags are required A junior who does not have cattle may use another participants animal in grooming and showmanship. AS THIS IS A JUNIOR EVENT, ALL ENTRIES MUST BE SHOWN AND LOOKED AFTER BY THE JUNIORS. ABSOLUTELY NO ADULT or nonentrant participation will be tolerated. Pee Wees may be assisted by a parent or guardian for safety reasons only. Mentors will be around to provide help for the participants and answer any questions. Alcohol and drugs are prohibited in the barns and at the Roundup functions for the duration of the show. Tampering with and any unethical fitting is prohibited. Show apparel is to be worn for all the showmanship and confirmation classes.

OUTLINES FOR CLASSES

Team Judging • Juniors will judge a class of four animals. • One of the team members will act as the ring person and the other one will act as the judge. • The participant acting as the judge must give oral reasons over the microphone in front of the audience. • All other teams must be out of the judging area and unable to hear the reasons. • Score: 55% teamwork ability; 20% clarity of reasons; 20% logic of reasons 5% appearance. Team Grooming - Compulsory Event • Teams have 15 minutes to groom with power. • Animals must have no fitting prior to competition. • Once at the chute area you are not allowed to leave so bring all the equipment with you. • Score: 35% knowledge and skill; 25% teamwork; 20% use of equipment; 15% final appearance; 5% presentation of animal Cook Off - THE ULTIMATE BURGER - Compulsory Event • Team event, teams will be announced at Round-Up. • Teams will be provided with two Hamburgers and a barbecue • Participants are encouraged to bring their own utensils and ingredients for marinades and garnishes and to provide a recipe to the judges. • Costumes and themes are encouraged. • Participants are encouraged to add fixings to the burger and add one side dish and dessert. • Score: 50% taste; 25% appearance; 15% presentation and 10% creativity. Stall Card • Pee Wees & Juniors create a stall card to be displayed with their animals in the stalls. • Stall cards must be made Saturday at Round-Up only • Scoring: 35% clarity; 35% originality and 30% neatness Photography • The photo must be taken by the junior exhibiting it and cannot be digitally enhanced and must be taken within the last year & dated • Photographs must be 4”x 6”, No Frame, Must be of listed theme • 2016 THEMES PW - Landscape/Scenery with cattle JR - Kids & Cattle INT& SR - Picture of cattle from any angle • Please put name and age category on the back. • Scoring: 40% clarity; 35% quality and 25% originality. Graphic Design • All work must be done at home by the junior created using computer technology. • The graphic design must be promoting a breed, industry or an individual herd. • 2016 THEMES - product must be based list theme PW & JR - 1 Page Poster Promoting Round Up INT& SR - 1 Brochure Promoting Your Herd or An Animal • Please put name and age category on the back. Scoring: 30% creativity; 30% originality; 30% clear and concise message; 10% organization

Art • All work must be done at home by the junior in the last year & dated • Art cannot contain photos and should not be larger than 9”x14”. • You can use (pencil, paint, clay, wood, etc.). • All art is judged in the same category. One entry per person. • Please put name and age category on the back. • Score: 40% originality; 40% creativity and 20% skill/quality. Scrapbook • Include photographs, newspaper and magazine clippings, for the 2015-2016 year. • Scrapbooks must be done by the junior exhibiting. • The scrapbook is to encourage junior members to record different cattle functions they have attended over the past years. • Scrapbooks should have a theme and begin with a title page, table of contents and numbered pages. • Score: 25% cover; 25% creativity; 25% originality; 25% neatness and organization. PowerPoint and Video Topic • Pee Wee and JRs minimum of 6 slides INT and SRs minimum of 12 slides • Presentations must have at least two pictures or clip art that support the idea of the presentation. • Presentations may include but do not require music or video clips. • Videos and/or presentations must come on the first day on a USB memory stick, DVD or CD. Videos must be in Quick Time, AVI or MPEG file format. • JR and INT videos must be 30-60 seconds in length, SR videos must be 60-90 seconds in length. • The junior member will produce file and edit the videos them selves, no professional editing allowed. • Animated and or computer generated graphics will not be allowed in the video. • Score: 40% on graphics; 35% originality; 15% technical merit; 10% overall effect of the presentation. Group Herdsman Competition • The purpose of this contest is to encourage cooperation, fellowship and teamwork among juniors in developing and maintaining a display of cattle and stall area. The competition begins on Saturday morning and ends after the confirmation classes. Must have a minimum of two head tied in your display. • Score: 25% aisle and bedding, cleanliness and appearance; 25% animals, cleanliness and well groomed; 25% personnel attending cattle, knowledgeable, friendly and teamwork; 25% equipment, boxes, signs, well arranged and general appearance. Grand Aggregate • One participant from each division will be selected. • Score: 1 point for every animal you bring, no matter where they place. All other non cattle classes will be scored 10 points for first place and down. Ex: 1st - 10pts, 2nd - 9 pts, 3rd - 8pts, etc. • The grand aggregate competition encourages all juniors to participate in all the events.

WORKSHOPS - 40 Minutes Each MORNING WORKSHOPS AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS You must pick 2 out of 3 at registration desk Photography and Videoing Cattle Showmanship

Artificial insemination Money /Farm Management Farm Safety

Please let the registration desk know if you are participating in Team Judging at same time.


Participant Name:__________________________________________________________________ Birth Date:_______/_______/_______ Age Division:_________

MAIL ENTRIES & FEES TO :

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up C/O Lois McRae RR 1 Box 57 Brandon, MB R7A 5Y1 marmac@inetlink.ca

Age Groups (as of Jan 1, 2016): PW: 8 and Under; JR 9-12; INT: 13-16; SR: 17-25

Full Address:______________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________ Email: __________________________________________ Show Apparel Size:

XS

S

M

L

XL

2XL

-

YOUTH

ADULT

Please circle one size and either youth or adult

ENTRIES DUE JULY 10th, 2016

For MYBR Windpants or Jacket ($30 deposit by July 10) CLASS #

BREED

ANIMAL NAME

ANIMAL TATTOO

ANIMAL REG #

SIRE NAME REG #

DAM NAME REG #

Breeds: (If animal doesn’t have a registration number please list as a CO) A: Angus, CH: Charolais, H: Hereford, L:Limousin,

Cattle Classes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

ANIMAL D.O.B.

Heifer Calf Female born in 2015 Female born in 2014 w/ nat calf at foot Female born in 2013 or earlier w/ nat calf at foot Bull Calf Fat Steer Showmanship

S: Simmental, M: Mixed Breeds (Purebred breeds not listed); CO: Commercial, G: Gelbvieh; SH : Shorthorn

If you are showing purebred animals, you must be a member in your respective breed association we require 8 head in each breed or you will show in the mixed breed class.

Meals:

Compulsory Classes:

8. Judging 9. Team Grooming 10. Cook Off 11. Round Up AgriChallange 12. Breed Quizzes for Simmental Exhibitors 13. Workshops & Demonstrations

Adults full weekend of meals $75 ___ Adults: Breakfast $8; Lunch $10; Supper $15 Saturday Night Steak Supper $20 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___ Sunday Night Supper $15 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___

Fees:

Registration Fee: $40.00/participant Cattle Fees: $10.00/class Adult Full Weekend Meal Fees Extra Meal Fees Late Fees: $20.00/person after July 10 Total Fees:

$________ $________ $________ $________ $________ $________

Onsite camping fees - POWER SITE - $25 X ____ nights NON POWER SITE - $20 X ____ nights

Make cheques payable to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up - ENTRIES DUE JULY 10TH, 2016 Waiver Claim: I hereby release the Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up, their organizers, officials, volunteers, as well as the Beautiful Plains Ag Society in case of a loss of or damage property or injury

Participant Signature:_________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature:______________________________________

Accommodations: Bay Hill Inn & Suites - 1-888-476-8802 - Westway Inn - 1-800-448-0994 Camping is also available at the fair grounds for a nominal fee further accommodation info at www.neepawa.ca


May 13, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

National Beef Antimicrobial Research Strategy developed to drive solutions By the Beef Cattle Research Council

“There’s no doubt antimicrobial resistance, use and their alternatives are a high priority As concerns grow about the in terms of policy, research, and continued effectiveness of antiregulations,” said Tim Oleksyn, microbials in human health and a cow-calf producer from Shellquestions arise about the contribrook, Saskatchewan and Chair of bution of modern beef producthe Beef Cattle Research Council tion to antimicrobial resistance in (BCRC). “It is important for the human medicine, the beef indus- industry to have a comprehentry is increasingly pressured to sive strategy with clearly defined reconsider its methods of comoutcomes to ensure every rebatting harmful bacteria in cattle. search dollar helps make progress Research will play a critical role in addressing human health and in the industry’s ability to reduce public confidence concerns, while medically-important antimicrobial also ensuring animal welfare and use and to develop, identify and industry sustainability are mainimplement effective, responsible tained.” alternatives to antimicrobials. Due to the importance and prior-

ity placed on antimicrobial resistance and use, funding of antimicrobial-related livestock research is increasing both federally and provincially. To make the best use of this funding, a National Beef Antimicrobial Research Strategy was developed by the BCRC and the National Beef Value Chain Roundtable (BVCRT). The Strategy is a result of extensive consultation with all major stakeholder groups, including cattle producers and industry representatives, veterinarians, pharmaceutical experts, scientists, academics, human medical professionals, government continued to page 2

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June 23 — Manitoba Hay Day Where: MBFI Brookdale location, northeast of Brandon

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July 26 — ­ Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives McDonald’s Producer’s Day Where: MBFI Brookdale location, northeast of Brandon August 22 — Holistic Management Open Gate Field Day Where: Dauphin

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Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News National Beef Antimicro-

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Knocking on the door of food companies like Earls • Grazing management: The essence of ranching

• New options for livestock price insurance coverage • Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef happy with Earls’ reversal • The latest MFGA ebulletin is online

bial Research Strategy ... continued from page 1 regulators, policy makers, and research funders. It identifies priority research outcomes for the Canadian beef industry and has gained commitment from Canada’s major beef research funders to focus on achieving these outcomes. Strategy development began with a comprehensive analysis of the antimicrobial research situation relevant to the Canadian beef sector with internationally recognized experts in antimicrobial issues, research and technology. Research priorities and outcomes defined in the Strategy include: • Antimicrobial Resistance - focused on ensuring evidence-based decision making and communication to the veterinary, producer and medical communities, expanding surveillance within the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS), and pilot projects to monitor antimicrobial resistance in different cattle production systems. • Antimicrobial Use - focused on ensuring that Canada’s beef industry continues to have access to antimicrobials to protect animal health and welfare by developing a database to quantify, monitor and defend responsible antimicrobial use practices in cow-calf, feedlot, dairy and veal production. • Antibiotic Alternatives – focused on developing a broader set of tools for disease management including cost-effective alternative production practices, diagnostic tests, nutritional management strategies and vaccines that reduce the need for treating production limiting diseases in beef cattle. “The beef industry has a responsibility and an opportunity to help guide and direct valuable investments intended to help protect the effectiveness of antimicrobials,” added Oleksyn. “By collaborating with research funders and other major stakeholder groups, we can achieve the most meaningful outcomes relevant to both the beef industry and the Canadian public.” The Strategy is intended to evolve based on stakeholder feedback and ongoing review as research outcomes are achieved and new outcomes arise. It can be found on the BCRC website at www.beefresearch.ca/AMR The National Beef Antimicrobial Research Strategy was developed as part but ahead of the renewal of the National Beef Research Strategy, which is set to begin in mid-2016, because of the large focus on antimicrobial resistance and use.


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

Manitoba Beef Producers to offer six bursaries in 2016 Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is pleased to announce it will again award six $500 bursaries to deserving Manitoba students in 2016. The bursaries are available to MBP members, or their children, who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or those acquiring a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. “We are proud to offer these bursaries to our members and their children,” said Manitoba Beef Producers President Heinz Reimer. “Investments in education reap strong dividends.

Our past recipients have gone on to careers in the trades and veterinary services, among others with many of them settling in rural Manitoba and making significant contributions to their communities.” Those applying must be at least 17 years old as of Jan. 1, 2016 and be an active beef producer or the child of one. Applicants must use the bursary within two years of receiving it and the program they are attending must be at least one year in duration. Interested students are required to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Manitoba at large. Students are also asked to

include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at www.mbbeef.ca/producers/mbp-bursary/. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 3, 2016. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified on July 31, 2016. The winning essays will also be reprinted in the September issue of Cattle Country.


2016 Census of Agriculture benefits farmers The Census of Agriculture is now on the horizon. In early May, you will receive a letter with easy to follow instructions on how to complete your questionnaire. Census of Agriculture data are the definitive source of community-level data. By drawing on these data, decision-makers will be assured that they are acting in the interest of farmers, farm communities and agricultural operations. Farm organizations are heavy users of census data and draw on this information to formulate policy recommendations, produce communications and outreach work, and conduct market development. Regional, provincial and federal government policy advisors use Census of Agriculture data to help develop programs related to farm support and to evaluate the impact of natural disasters (such as floods, droughts and storms) on agriculture. This allows for a quick reaction when a natural disaster does occur. The Census of Agriculture has other benefits: • It identifies trends and provides factual information on emerging issues, opportunities and challenges within the agricultural community. • Its questions cover a wide

range of topics, such as land use, crops, livestock, agricultural labour, machinery and equipment, land management practices, and farm finances. Support your community and complete your Census of Agriculture questionnaire in May 2016!It can be completed by anyone who is responsible for, or knowledgeable about, the day-to-day management decisions of your farming operation. As required by the Statistics Act, the information you provide will be kept confidential and used only for statistical purposes. Important changes made to the online questionnaire for 2016: • Streamlined and easy to complete; • Shorter and 30% faster to complete than in 2011; • Respondents are no longer required to provide detailed farm expenses; • Automatically adds totals and skips questions that don’t apply to your operation. Completing your questionnaire online is quick and easy: • Go to Statistics Canada’s

website at www.statcan.gc.ca and select the online questionnaire Use the secure access code you will receive in the mail in May and conveniently complete your questionnaire. As a farm operator, you are legally required to participate under the Statistics Act. Shorter but still comprehensive This time, operators are no longer required to provide detailed farm expenses and other information, such as place of residence, details on irrigated land and the source and use of manure. Most of the other questions are the same as last time with a few new ones on the adoption of technologies, direct marketing, succession planning and renewable energy production. By law, farmers are required to complete the Census of Agriculture. By the same law, Statistics Canada is required to protect the information provided. More information on the Census of Agriculture can be found at www. census.gc.ca.


CANADIAN CATTLE IDENTIFICATION AGENCY BOOSTS ANIMAL IMPORT, MOVEMENT AND BIRTH DATE REPORTING PROCESSES FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 10, 2016 Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA) is pleased to reveal new process enhancements within the Canadian Livestock Tracking System (CLTS) database – a robust and scalable, trace-back system designed for the containment and eradication of animal disease with a cost-effective, timely and national approach to livestock traceability event reporting. Expanding on the improvements released at the end of 2015 to support 840-series USDA tag identification (ID) numbers, CCIA has enabled system users to submit an Import event for any foreign country tag ID numbers. The supported format is 15 digits in length, starting with the country code (e.g., 554002123456789 for New Zealand). CCIA Information Technology Manager Waseem Rehman confirms, “After a foreign ID tag number has had an Import event applied to it, the tag number may also be reported using Move In, Move Out, Temporary Export, Export and Retire events. Users will also be able to use a variety of database functions for foreign country tag ID numbers – like Canadian tags.” “Another change supports final owners. Since an animal can be moved through various owners and locations before its life cycle is complete, and current regulations permit the farm of origin only to age verify an animal, a final owner may receive less than market value for an incorrectly age-verified animal at the terminal site if the farm of origin does not correct the birth-date data entry error within the CLTS,” asserts CCIA General Manager Anne Brunet-Burgess. “Further to the date selection tool we released last year, we have now added a digital alert designed to prevent duplicate birth-date data entry reporting on the same tags. This update protects the financial returns of an animal’s final owner while maximizing data integrity.” QUICK FACTS: • CLTS users may now verify their data entry by opting to receive a single, daily email notification showing the previous day’s transaction submission summary. • CCIA-approved tag dealers may now issue approved tags to abattoirs with CLTS accounts. • CLTS users may now submit movement events for Quebec-born animals. • CLTS users that are dead stock operators, pathology labs and veterinary hospitals, may now report a secondary Retire event to the CLTS database. “Event reporting is time-sensitive and until now, had to occur in sequence. Tag dealers Issue the tag, then livestock operators may report Move In and Move Out, depending on provincial/territorial and federal regulations or herd management practices. Previously, if a user reported an event outside of the sequence, a database error would occur, and no other event could be associated with the tag until the error was corrected. Effective immediately, the CLTS will now accept animal movement event dates that occur before a tag number’s Retire event date. This change allows users to report movement data at any time, which can be critical to trace-backs that occur after an animal’s life cycle is complete,” states CCIA Chair Mark Elford. “With steady technical advancements, CCIA is continuing to reduce data reporting complexities while increasing ease of compliance.” – 30 –

7646 – 8 Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta T2E 8X4 Tel: (403) 275-2083 Fax: (403) 275-1668 Toll-free: 1-877-909-2333 canadaid.ca


Next Agricultural Policy Framework – Share Your Experience and Ideas Growing Forward 2 (GF2) is the current federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) agricultural policy framework and will be in place until 2018. Now at the midway point of GF2, FPT governments are working in partnership to develop the next framework and are seeking feedback to better understand where GF2 is working well, and where challenges could be addressed. We want to hear about your experience as we work with provincial and territorial governments to develop the next framework. Your feedback is important and will help shape the direction of future policy and programs for the agriculture and agri-food sector. There will be more opportunities to share your ideas and priorities in the coming months. Learn more about Growing Forward 2. Contributing Your Comments • mail to Next Policy Framework You can provide your comments by: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada 1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7 • completing this Questionnaire Floor 5, Room 300 Ottawa ON • e-mail to aafc.npf-pcs.aac@canada.ca K1A 0C5 Next Steps We will summarize input received and post it on our website. Check back again for upcoming opportunities to share your views on the development of the next agriculture policy framework.

Have 15 minutes? BCRC wants you to make an impact on the future of research As someone receiving this newsletter, you’re almost guaranteed to be what we call a ‘Canadian beef industry stakeholder’, meaning you: • own or manage beef cattle, • conduct research on beef, cattle or forages, • are a large animal veterinarian, • own or work for an abattoir/beef processor, • are a government employee in a beef-related role, • work or volunteer for an organization that actively supports the beef industry, or • have another valuable role that supports and relies on Canadian beef production. You hold a stake in the beef industry, so the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) and the Beef Value Chain Roundtable (BVCRT) rely on your input on research issues. Please consider answering our 15-20 minute questionnaire by May 31st. Your feedback will inform the next five-year National Beef Research Strategy and impact the long term competitiveness of the Canadian beef industry.


Agricultural Youth Green Jobs Initiative Creating jobs and better opportunities for young Canadians The Agricultural Youth Green Jobs Initiative will help fund internships for post-secondary graduates, who are 30 years or younger and are Canadian Citizens or permanent residents, interested in working in the agriculture industry. Internships must incorporate activities that are environmentally beneficial and must be at least four months in length and be completed by March 31, 2017. Applications are now being accepted and considered on a first-come, first-served basis until all funds have been allocated.

Funding is available through the following two streams: Stream A – Green Farms: Farm Operators can apply for matching funding, to a maximum of $10,000, to hire a Canadian post-secondary graduate to implement projects that are environmentally beneficial. Stream B – Green Internships: Employers (for profit and non-profit groups) who work in the agricultural sector but not directly on farm. These employers can apply for matching funding, to a maximum of $16,000, to hire a Canadian post-secondary graduate to undertake environmental activities, services or research that will benefit the agriculture sector.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada is one of 11 federal departments committed to providing opportunities for Canada’s youth under the Government of Canada’s Youth Employment Strategy (YES). YES is the Government of Canada's commitment to help young people, particularly those facing barriers to employment, get the information and gain the skills, work experience and abilities they need to make a successful transition into the labour market. For detailed information on the program including how to apply, please refer to our Program Applicant Guide available at: www.canada.ca/agriculture-green-jobs. Further information can also be obtained by calling 1-866-452-5558, or by e-mail at AAFC.Green.jobs-Stage.en.agroenvironnement.AAC@agr.gc.ca.


Tractor Run-over A Manitoban recently died when a tractor ran over him. This tragic incident reminds us of the many hazards present in the agricultural industry. To avoid being struck by farm equipment, SAFE Work Manitoba reminds employers that they must: 

conduct a visual inspection of the equipment and surrounding area to ensure no one, including the operator, will be endangered when powered mobile equipment is started.

In addition, Part 22 of the Workplace Safety and Health Regulation outlines other safety requirements related to powered mobile equipment. Prevention measures Following are measures that employers can take to help prevent similar incidents:     

Develop and implement safe work procedures. Train workers, family members and visitors on the farm in the safe work procedures. Follow a Tractor Safety Checklist before anyone gets into the operator's seat. Don't allow extra riders on the equipment. Ensure no one approaches the equipment until it has stopped and the operator has indicated that the person has been seen.

Review the Blind Spots and Agricultural Equipment bulletin

Sample blind areas

ALERT 02-16 (May)



You can’t tell by looking...

But you can tell with Green Gold You might have a strong hunch but you really can’t tell the RFV just by looking at an alfalfa crop. That’s why you should sign up with the Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association’s Green Gold program. As this year’s alfalfa crop is maturing, Green Gold collects twiceweekly samples from fields throughout eastern, central and western/ interlake Manitoba and sends them into Central Testing Laboratories to pinpoint the best day for your first alfalfa cut. MFGA will then share our results with you via direct email and on the MFGA Green Gold web page. To sign up, email John McGregor, MFGA Green Gold Coordinator, john@mfga.net. We are seeking volunteers for the Green Gold program by clipping samples from your field. Contact John if you are able to participate.

Manitoba Association


April 29, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Manitoba Beef Producers to offer six bursaries in 2016 Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is pleased to announce it will again award six $500 bursaries to deserving Manitoba students in 2016. The bursaries are available to MBP members, or their children, who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or those acquiring a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. “We are proud to offer these bursaries to our members and their children,” said Manitoba Beef Producers President Heinz Reimer. “Investments in education reap

strong dividends. Our past recipients have gone on to careers in the trades and veterinary services, among others with many of them settling in rural Manitoba and making significant contributions to their communities.” Those applying must be at least 17 years old as of Jan. 1, 2016 and be an active beef producer or the child of one. Applicants must use the bursary within two years of receiving it and the program they are attending must be at least one year in duration. Interested students are required to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Man-

itoba at large. Students are also asked to include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at www.mbbeef.ca/producers/ mbp-bursary/. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 3, 2016. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified on July 31, 2016. The winning essays will also be reprinted in the September issue of Cattle Country.

Find Us Online

mbbeef.ca @ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • A producer perspective on Earls decision to stop serving Canadian beef • Studies show late day feeding may encourage more daylight calving • What perennial forage should you seed at this time of year • Canada may delay foreign worker limits as packers, farms face squeeze

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

Stakeholders meet to set the future direction of the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef Over 85 stakeholders met last Thursday to develop key performance indicators, targets and a strategy for the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB). The CRSB held its semi-annual meeting in Winnipeg, Manitoba on April 21st, where it released the preliminary results of the National Beef Sustainability Assessment to its membership. The topics in the assessment include: climate change, land, biodiversity, water and animal care. The results informed discussions around the future direction of the CRSB. Participants represented a wide range of perspectives and included producers, processors, food and agriculture organizations, retail and food service companies, non-governmental organizations, academia and government. To-

gether, they identified indicators and set targets for the CRSB, which will be used to measure and track the industry’s sustainability progress in the coming years. “We had an incredible turnout at the meeting, which demonstrates the importance of these topics to our industry, and the commitment of our industry to actively participate in building the frame-

work needed for defining sustainable beef in Canada”, said Cherie Copithorne-Barnes, Chair of the CRSB and a producer from west of Calgary. She noted that people had constructive discussions during the five-hour breakout session and were aligned on many of the CRSB’s immediate priorities, such as the importance of communication with consumers and the public. The National Beef Sustainability Assessment is a scientific project that will benchmark the industry’s social, economic and environmental impact. It has been through a third-party review and covers new life cycle assessment topics. The baseline year for the study is 2013; the results from the assessment will be released this Summer.


Agriculture Census responses help direct research priorities and funding By the Beef CattleResearch Council In early May, all beef producers will be receiving their Census of Agriculture questionnaire. This is your chance to influence future government policy and funding. The Canadian government uses the results of the census to inform the direction of and evaluate agriculture policy. The results obtained from the census are very valuable to the Canadian beef industry because they identify emerging trends, issues, opportunities and weaknesses within the industry. The results are also used by universities, agribusinesses, and funding agencies to direct investment decisions, re-

search programs, conduct market research, and inform other decision making processes. This year the Census questionnaire is shorter and available online, streamlining the process and reducing the amount of time it takes to complete. The information you provide is very valuable to direct future poli-

cy and research in the beef industry and the Agriculture industry as a whole. This May, please take the time to accurately fill out your Census of Agriculture questionnaire to help provide an accurate snapshot of what is going on within the Canadian agriculture industry. Click for more information on the 2016 census.


Have 15 minutes? BCRC wants you to make an impact on the future of research

As someone receiving this newsletter, you’re almost guaranteed to be what we call a ‘Canadian beef industry stakeholder’, meaning you: • own or manage beef cattle, • conduct research on beef, cattle or forages, • are a large animal veterinarian, • own or work for an abattoir/beef processor, • are a government employee in a beef-related role, • work or volunteer for an organization that actively supports the beef industry, or • have another valuable role that supports and relies on Canadian beef production. You hold a stake in the beef industry, so the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) and the Beef Value Chain Roundtable (BVCRT) rely on your input on research issues. Please consider answering our 15-20 minute questionnaire by May 31st. Your feedback will inform the next five-year National Beef Research Strategy and impact the long term competitiveness of the Canadian beef industry.


Agricultural Youth Green Jobs Initiative Creating jobs and better opportunities for young Canadians The Agricultural Youth Green Jobs Initiative will help fund internships for post-secondary graduates, who are 30 years or younger and are Canadian Citizens or permanent residents, interested in working in the agriculture industry. Internships must incorporate activities that are environmentally beneficial and must be at least four months in length and be completed by March 31, 2017. Applications are now being accepted and considered on a first-come, first-served basis until all funds have been allocated.

Funding is available through the following two streams: Stream A – Green Farms: Farm Operators can apply for matching funding, to a maximum of $10,000, to hire a Canadian post-secondary graduate to implement projects that are environmentally beneficial. Stream B – Green Internships: Employers (for profit and non-profit groups) who work in the agricultural sector but not directly on farm. These employers can apply for matching funding, to a maximum of $16,000, to hire a Canadian post-secondary graduate to undertake environmental activities, services or research that will benefit the agriculture sector.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada is one of 11 federal departments committed to providing opportunities for Canada’s youth under the Government of Canada’s Youth Employment Strategy (YES). YES is the Government of Canada's commitment to help young people, particularly those facing barriers to employment, get the information and gain the skills, work experience and abilities they need to make a successful transition into the labour market. For detailed information on the program including how to apply, please refer to our Program Applicant Guide available at: www.canada.ca/agriculture-green-jobs. Further information can also be obtained by calling 1-866-452-5558, or by e-mail at AAFC.Green.jobs-Stage.en.agroenvironnement.AAC@agr.gc.ca.



You can’t tell by looking...

But you can tell with Green Gold You might have a strong hunch but you really can’t tell the RFV just by looking at an alfalfa crop. That’s why you should sign up with the Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association’s Green Gold program. As this year’s alfalfa crop is maturing, Green Gold collects twiceweekly samples from fields throughout eastern, central and western/ interlake Manitoba and sends them into Central Testing Laboratories to pinpoint the best day for your first alfalfa cut. MFGA will then share our results with you via direct email and on the MFGA Green Gold web page. To sign up, email John McGregor, MFGA Green Gold Coordinator, john@mfga.net. We are seeking volunteers for the Green Gold program by clipping samples from your field. Contact John if you are able to participate.

Manitoba Association


April 15, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Manitoba Beef Producers announces new general manager The Board of Directors of Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is pleased to announce the hiring of Brian Lemon to the position of general manager. Lemon comes to MBP with an extensive background in the agriculture industry, having worked with Agriculture and AgriFood Canada, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and, most recently, with the Canadian Grain Commission where he was the Director of Industry Services.

MBP President Heinz Reimer says Lemon was chosen from a strong field of candidates and the board is excited to have someone with his qualifications working on behalf of the province’s beef industry. “Brian’s past experience will be beneficial to MBP and its membership,” Reimer said. “He has experience with important files such as bovine tuberculosis and will be able to hit the ground running. “Our industry has taken important steps over the past couple of years

Brian Lemon and with Brian’s leadership we will continue to push forward.” Lemon, who began work with MBP on April 11, said he would like to thank the board of

directors for this opportunity and is eager to get to work. “This is an exciting time to be involved in the beef industry with new markets available to producers and the recent end of COOL,” he said. “There will certainly be some challenges to overcome but I look forward to working hard to create a climate in which our members can thrive. I am excited to get to work and meet with as many of our members and industry officials as possible over the next few months.”

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Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

In the News

A look at the news and articles of interest to Manitoba’s Beef industry • Manitoba farmland values increase by 12.5 per cent in 2015 • Safety reminders when working around cattle • Fine-tuning heifer replacement savings • Canadian Cattlemen’s Assocation wants voice on climate change policy • Grazing the grasslands good for environment study finds

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers to offer six bursaries in 2016 Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is pleased to announce it will again award six $500 bursaries to deserving Manitoba students in 2016. The bursaries are available to MBP members, or their children, who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or those acquiring a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. “We are proud to offer these bursaries to our members and their children,” said Manitoba Beef Producers President Heinz Reimer. “Investments in education reap

strong dividends. Our past recipients have gone on to careers in the trades and veterinary services, among others with many of them settling in rural Manitoba and making significant contributions to their communities.” Those applying must be at least 17 years old as of Jan. 1, 2016 and be an active beef producer or the child of one. Applicants must use the bursary within two years of receiving it and the program they are attending must be at least one year in duration. Interested students are required to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Man-

itoba at large. Students are also asked to include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at www.mbbeef.ca/producers/ mbp-bursary/. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 3, 2016. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified on July 31, 2016. The winning essays will also be reprinted in the September issue of Cattle Country.

Have 15 minutes? BCRC wants you to make an impact on the future of research

As someone receiving this newsletter, you’re almost guaranteed to be what we call a ‘Canadian beef industry stakeholder’, meaning you: • own or manage beef cattle, • conduct research on beef, cattle or forages, • are a large animal veterinarian, • own or work for an abattoir/beef processor, • are a government employee in a beef-related role, • work or volunteer for an organization that actively supports the beef industry, or • have another valuable role that supports and relies on Canadian beef production. You hold a stake in the beef industry, so the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) and the Beef Value Chain Roundtable (BVCRT) rely on your input on research issues. Please consider answering our 15-20 minute questionnaire by May 31st. Your feedback will inform the next five-year National Beef Research Strategy and impact the long term competitiveness of the Canadian beef industry.


Manitoba Beef Producers E-Newsletter

NDP and Green Party reply to election questionnaire With voters heading to the polls on April 19, Manitoba Beef Producers has submitted a questionnaire to the province’s four main political parties to get their views on issues of importance to members. The questionnaire, which was forwarded to the Progressive Conservatives, NDP, Liberals and Green Party in late March, touches on a variety of topics including water management, herd protection and Crown land management. “Beef production is one of Manitoba’s leading industries and plays a critical role in the province’s economic vitality. The industry’s demand-creation power of $635 million annually means not only rural communities continue to survive but also that major urban

centres receive the extensive economic derivatives of our industry’s wealth creation,” MBP President Heinz Reimer said in a letter accompanying the questionnaire. “Manitoba’s beef industry has faced some significant challenges in recent years due to weather-related events such as excess moisture conditions, flooding and drought. This has led to reduced herd sizes in some of the hardest hit areas of the province. Producers have also faced trade-related challenges like mandatory Country of Origin Labeling. “Despite these challenges, MBP believes there are tremendous opportunities to grow the province’s beef herd if the business, regulatory and infrastructure conditions are

right.” The results of the questionnaire will be posted on MBP’s website, E-Newsletter and social media channels. “Manitoba’s beef producers look forward to learning more about your party’s positions on issues and opportunities affecting Manitoba’s beef industry. MBP believes the impact of public policy decisions on this important industry should also matter to all members of the Legislature,” Reimer noted in the letter. As of press time for the E-Newsletter the Manitoba NDP Party and Green Party of Manitoba were the only two parties to repsond to the questionnaire. Their replies can be found in the E-Newsletter and at mbbeef.ca










Green Party answers to Manitoba Beef Producers’ Political Party Questionnaire – Election 2016 The following questions are posed based on a scenario whereby your party has formed government following the April 19, 2016 provincial election. Please indicate how your party would act in each of these policy areas from the perspective of the governing party. Water Management 1. Will you complete the Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels Project? If so, what is your deadline for seeing these needed works completed? Yes. We will complete the outlet channels within 5 years. In addition we would immediately decrease Mb Hydro’s target low water level of Lake Manitoba, St Martin and Winnipeg by 1 foot to significantly decrease the chronic high water problems. 2. Will you provide producer and stakeholder representation on any boards, committees or similar entities that oversee the operation of flood protection works so local knowledge is gleaned, e.g. outlet channels, Portage Diversion, Shellmouth Dam, etc.? Yes. Representation by the affected residents is a core Green principle. 3. Are you committed to implementing the recommendations of the Assiniboine River and Lake Manitoba Basins Flood Mitigation Study? If so, how will the recommendations be priorized for action? Yes. The key priority will be to restore water retention capacity of upland Manitoba to reduce the speed of water run-off during spring snow melt and early summer heavy rain events. 4. What other investments in water management infrastructure will you make to reduce the risks caused by too much or too little water and to build resiliency? Which lakes and watersheds will be included in your government’s infrastructure investment plans? Greens take a big picture view and would consider the entire system in Manitoba. 5. Will you support the continued work of the Assiniboine River Basin Initiative and similar collaborative efforts with other jurisdictions to address water management issues and concerns? Yes. Working with Saskatchewan, North Dakota and Minnesota are key. Crown Land Management 1. Do you support the principle of “informed consent” before the public accesses Crown Land, that being that agricultural producers should be notified before the public intends to enter Crown lands being used by producers? No. Crown land is public land. Agricultural users of public lands do not have exclusive rights. However there must be better public education and strict regulation to ensure the safety of cattle from hunters. 1


2. Will your government work to reduce red tape to expedite the process for producers who wish to purchase the Crown land they currently lease? No. The Green Party believes that crown lands must stay public. Animal Health 1. Will you ensure there are sufficient staff and monetary resources in departments such as Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship and Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development to conduct needed disease surveillance activities, wildlife population counts and enforcement activities with the aim of reducing the threat of diseases being transferred from wildlife to livestock, e.g. bovine tuberculosis (TB)? Yes. The Green Party will also ensure that producers are compensated for animal testing. 2. Will you provide support to research initiatives aimed at eradicating bovine TB and achieving a state whereby surveillance of live cattle in the Riding Mountain Eradication Area (RMEA) will end with a shift instead to slaughter surveillance? Yes. 3. Will you provide funding for risk mitigation activities such as feed storage fences, feeding area fences, guardian dogs and traceability, along with the data collection and analysis required to monitor and maintain bovine TB freedom in the RMEA? Yes. 4. Recognizing the importance of producers having access to veterinary services, are you in favour of the continuation of the Veterinary Service District (VSD) program or do you wish to explore a different model? Greens will continue the VSD program but initiate consultations with stakeholders to identify improvements or potential alternate systems. Herd Protection Initiatives 1. Will you support the continuation of the Livestock Predation Protection Working Group? The LPPWG is a multi-stakeholder group co-chaired by MBP and Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship whose aim is to find more effective strategies and tools to deal with the threat of predation to livestock. Yes 2. Would you provide support for a pilot project around predation challenges that would include components such as: on-farm mitigation strategies, financial assistance/compensation, and problem predator management strategies? Yes 3. Do you support compensating producers for 100% of predation losses? If so, when would you implement this policy? Yes. 100% compensation should be implemented immediately. 2


4. Will you commit to consult with MBP and other stakeholders on whether changes may be needed to the trapping season regulations to help reduce the threat of predation? No. Extending trapping to the spring creates more problems than it solves. 5. Describe those areas of rural Manitoba in which your government would deem hunting at night with lights to be an acceptable and safe hunting practice. Night hunting is never acceptable in any part of Manitoba. Growing Forward 3/Business Risk Management (BRM) Initiatives 1. What are your top three priorities under Growing Forward 3 that could provide benefits to the beef sector, e.g. investments in research and innovation, BRM programs, etc.? 1) Design an AgriRecovery program which can help producers who suffer from chronic flooding. 2) Improve MASC insurance programs for forage, pasture and animals 3) Use the Manitoba Beef and Forage Sustainable Platform Initiative to invest in research on techniques for holistic grazing, forage finishing beef and increasing carbon sequestration of pastures. 2. Will you work with MBP to ensure that BRM tools, as well as disaster assistance and recovery programs are modernized to meet the current needs of beef producers? Yes 3. Will you ensure beef producers have access to future iterations of BRM programs that place them on a level playing field with other commodities? Yes 4. Do you support the continuation of the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program once the pilot stage for this initiative is completed? Yes 5. Do you support the continuation of the Verified Beef Production Program and the Environmental Farm Plan, as well as their associated beneficial management programs? Yes 6. As recommended in the Agriculture Risk Management in Manitoba Task Force Report, do you support providing predictable compensation for producer’s losses in designated areas due to mitigation measures? Yes 3


Future of Community Pastures 1. There is currently a three-year pilot project underway that has seen the Association of Manitoba Community Pastures take over the operation of the community pastures. Will you engage in thorough consultations with MBP and the larger Manitoba beef industry before any final decision is made as to which organization(s) will be managing any or all elements of the community pasture system when the pilot project is completed? Yes Provision of Public Goods 1. Do you support compensating producers for the costs they incur in the provision of public goods, like ecosystem services, which benefit the province and society as a whole? The producer benefits the most from ecosystem services. We would provide education on production methods which benefit the producer and society alike. 2. Will you work with MBP to help ensure that public good programs are designed in cooperation with the industry and delivered by producers? Yes Environmental Policies and Initiatives 1. Do you commit to ensuring that all environmental and other legislation, regulations and policies are based on strong, peer-reviewed science and that you will consult with agricultural groups and producers as new policies and legislation are being developed? Yes. Strong science is peer-reviewed and independent of conflict of interest. 2. Do you commit to ensuring Manitoba’s beef producers have equitable access to funding for environmental initiatives? Yes 3. Will you commit to working with MBP to ensure producers retain control for the delivery of environmental stewardship programs? Yes

4



You can’t tell by looking...

But you can tell with Green Gold You might have a strong hunch but you really can’t tell the RFV just by looking at an alfalfa crop. That’s why you should sign up with the Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association’s Green Gold program. As this year’s alfalfa crop is maturing, Green Gold collects twiceweekly samples from fields throughout eastern, central and western/ interlake Manitoba and sends them into Central Testing Laboratories to pinpoint the best day for your first alfalfa cut. MFGA will then share our results with you via direct email and on the MFGA Green Gold web page. To sign up, email John McGregor, MFGA Green Gold Coordinator, john@mfga.net. We are seeking volunteers for the Green Gold program by clipping samples from your field. Contact John if you are able to participate.

Manitoba Association


April 4, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP attends Winter Fair

Manitoba Beef Producers enjoyed a terrific week at the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair in Brandon. The MBP booth was located in the Thru The Farmgate area and included fun events for kids like colouring and roping stations as well as information for consumers and producers. The stars of our exhibit were Adele and Rumor, a cow-calf pair from Up the Creek Cattle Co. The fair was a great opportunity to visit with the public and continue to promote beef and the Manitoba cattle industry. Thank you to all who stopped by our booth and to Up the Creek Cattle Co. for bringing Adele and Rumor to Brandon.

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@ManitobaBeef

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Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

MBP submits questionnaire to political parties With voters heading to the polls on April 19, Manitoba Beef Producers has submitted a questionnaire to the province’s four main political parties to get their views on issues of importance to members. The questionnaire, which was forwarded to the Progressive Conservatives, NDP, Liberals and Green Party in late March, touches on a variety of topics including water management, herd protection and Crown land management. “Beef production is one of Manitoba’s leading industries and plays a critical role in the province’s economic vitality. The industry’s demand-creation power of $635 million annually means not only rural communities continue to

survive but also that major urban centres receive the extensive economic derivatives of our industry’s wealth creation,” MBP President Heinz Reimer said in a letter accompanying the questionnaire. “Manitoba’s beef industry has faced some significant challenges in recent years due to weather-related events such as excess moisture conditions, flooding and drought. This has led to reduced herd sizes in some of the hardest hit areas of the province. Producers have also faced trade-related challenges like mandatory Country of Origin Labeling. “Despite these challenges, MBP believes there are tremendous opportunities to grow the province’s

beef herd if the business, regulatory and infrastructure conditions are right.” The results of the questionnaire will be posted on MBP’s website, E-Newsletter and social media channels. “Manitoba’s beef producers look forward to learning more about your party’s positions on issues and opportunities affecting Manitoba’s beef industry. MBP believes the impact of public policy decisions on this important industry should also matter to all members of the Legislature,” Reimer noted in the letter. The full letter and questionnaire can be seen in this week’s E-Newsletter. It will also be posted on mbbeef.ca


info@greenparty.mb.ca Re: Manitoba Beef Producers’ 2016 Provincial Election Party Questionnaire Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is writing to respectfully request your party’s position on policy and regulatory matters affecting Manitoba’s beef industry. A questionnaire is included. MBP is a non-profit organization with a producer-elected board consisting of 14 directors representing cattle producers in a specific region or district. MBP represents approximately 7,000 individual cattle producers involved in various aspects of the industry, including the cow-calf, backgrounding and finishing sectors. This is the single largest livestock sector in Manitoba in terms of the number of individual producers involved. By way of background, Statistics Canada reports there were 1,122,100 beef cattle on Manitoba farms in mid-2015. Of these 76.4% were on cow-calf operations, 17.6% on feeder/stocker operations and 6.0% on feeding operations. Manitoba is home to Canada’s third largest beef cow herd, with approximately 12% of the national herd. Production is widespread throughout the province, reaching as far north as The Pas. Beef production is one of Manitoba’s leading industries and plays a critical role in the province’s economic vitality. The industry’s demand-creation power of $635 million annually means not only rural communities continue to survive but also that major urban centres receive the extensive economic derivatives of our industry’s wealth creation. Manitoba’s beef industry has faced some significant challenges in recent years due to weather-related events such as excess moisture conditions, flooding and drought. This has led to reduced herd sizes in some of the hardest hit areas of the province. Producers have also faced trade-related challenges like mandatory Country of Origin Labeling. Despite these challenges, MBP believes there are tremendous opportunities to grow the province’s beef herd if the business, regulatory and infrastructure conditions are right. To that end MBP is posing a series of questions to each of the provincial parties to ascertain your respective positions on matters of importance to Manitoba’s beef producers. MBP believes movement on these policy areas will help drive investment into Manitoba and ensure the economic health of one of our province’s most important sectors.

Results of this questionnaire will be shared with MBP’s membership in advance of the election via our bi-weekly newsletter, our social media channels and on our website www.mbbeef.ca. The deadline to submit the completed questionnaire is 1 p.m., Tuesday, April 12. Please submit your comments to mcousins@mbbeef.ca . Manitoba’s beef producers look forward to learning more about your party’s positions on issues and opportunities affecting Manitoba’s beef industry. MBP believes the impact of public policy decisions on this important industry should also matter to all members of the Legislature. Thank you in advance for your participation in this questionnaire. Yours truly,

Heinz Reimer President Manitoba Beef Producers

Enclosure


Manitoba Beef Producers’ Political Party Questionnaire The following questions are posed based on a scenario whereby your party has formed government following the April 19, 2016 provincial election. Please indicate how your party would act in each of these policy areas from the perspective of the governing party. Water Management 1. Will you complete the Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels Project? If so, what is your deadline for seeing these needed works completed? 2. Will you provide producer and stakeholder representation on any boards, committees or similar entities that oversee the operation of flood protection works so local knowledge is gleaned, e.g. outlet channels, Portage Diversion, Shellmouth Dam, etc.? 3. Are you committed to implementing the recommendations of the Assiniboine River and Lake Manitoba Basins Flood Mitigation Study? If so, how will the recommendations be priorized for action? 4. What other investments in water management infrastructure will you make to reduce the risks caused by too much or too little water and to build resiliency? Which lakes and watersheds will be included in your government’s infrastructure investment plans? 5. Will you support the continued work of the Assiniboine River Basin Initiative and similar collaborative efforts with other jurisdictions to address water management issues and concerns? Crown Land Management 1. Do you support the principle of “informed consent” before the public accesses Crown Land, that being that agricultural producers should be notified before the public intends to enter Crown lands being used by producers? 2. Will your government work to reduce red tape to expedite the process for producers who wish to purchase the Crown land they currently lease? Animal Health 1. Will you ensure there are sufficient staff and monetary resources in departments such as Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship and Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development to conduct needed disease surveillance activities, wildlife population counts and enforcement activities with the aim of reducing the threat of diseases being transferred from wildlife to livestock, e.g. bovine tuberculosis (TB)?


2. Will you provide support to research initiatives aimed at eradicating bovine TB and achieving a state whereby surveillance of live cattle in the Riding Mountain Eradication Area (RMEA) will end with a shift instead to slaughter surveillance? 3. Will you provide funding for risk mitigation activities such as feed storage fences, feeding area fences, guardian dogs and traceability, along with the data collection and analysis required to monitor and maintain bovine TB freedom in the RMEA? 4. Recognizing the importance of producers having access to veterinary services, are you in favour of the continuation of the Veterinary Service District (VSD) program or do you wish to explore a different model? Herd Protection Initiatives 1. Will you support the continuation of the Livestock Predation Protection Working Group? The LPPWG is a multi-stakeholder group co-chaired by MBP and Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship whose aim is to find more effective strategies and tools to deal with the threat of predation to livestock. 2. Would you provide support for a pilot project around predation challenges that would include components such as: on-farm mitigation strategies, financial assistance/compensation, and problem predator management strategies? 3. Do you support compensating producers for 100% of predation losses? If so, when would you implement this policy? 4. Will you commit to consult with MBP and other stakeholders on whether changes may be needed to the trapping season regulations to help reduce the threat of predation? 5. Describe those areas of rural Manitoba in which your government would deem hunting at night with lights to be an acceptable and safe hunting practice. Growing Forward 3/Business Risk Management (BRM) Initiatives 1. What are your top three priorities under Growing Forward 3 that could provide benefits to the beef sector, e.g. investments in research and innovation, BRM programs, etc.? 2. Will you work with MBP to ensure that BRM tools, as well as disaster assistance and recovery programs are modernized to meet the current needs of beef producers?


3. Will you ensure beef producers have access to future iterations of BRM programs that place them on a level playing field with other commodities? 4. Do you support the continuation of the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program once the pilot stage for this initiative is completed? 5. Do you support the continuation of the Verified Beef Production Program and the Environmental Farm Plan, as well as their associated beneficial management programs? 6. As recommended in the Agriculture Risk Management in Manitoba Task Force Report, do you support providing predictable compensation for producer’s losses in designated areas due to mitigation measures? Future of Community Pastures 1. There is currently a three-year pilot project underway that has seen the Association of Manitoba Community Pastures take over the operation of the community pastures. Will you engage in thorough consultations with MBP and the larger Manitoba beef industry before any final decision is made as to which organization(s) will be managing any or all elements of the community pasture system when the pilot project is completed? Provision of Public Goods 1. Do you support compensating producers for the costs they incur in the provision of public goods, like ecosystem services, which benefit the province and society as a whole? 2. Will you work with MBP to help ensure that public good programs are designed in cooperation with the industry and delivered by producers? Environmental Policies and Initiatives 1. Do you commit to ensuring that all environmental and other legislation, regulations and policies are based on strong, peer-reviewed science and that you will consult with agricultural groups and producers as new policies and legislation are being developed? 2. Do you commit to ensuring Manitoba’s beef producers have equitable access to funding for environmental initiatives? 3. Will you commit to working with MBP to ensure producers retain control for the delivery of environmental stewardship programs?


Nominate an outstanding researcher by May 1 The Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation is presented by the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) each year to recognize a researcher or scientist whose work has contributed to advancements in the competitiveness and sustainability of the Canadian beef industry. Nominations are welcome from all stakeholders of the Canadian beef industry and will be reviewed by a selection committee comprised of beef producers, industry experts and retired beef-related researchers located across the country. To be eligible, nominees must be Canadian citizens or landed immigrants actively involved in research of benefit to the Canadian beef industry within the past 5 years.

Benefit to the industry must be evident in a strong research program aligned with industry priorities, a demonstrated passion and longterm commitment through leadership, teamwork, and mentorship, involvement in ongoing education and training (where applicable), and active engagement with industry stakeholders. Nominations for the 2016 award will be accepted until May 1, 2016.

The recipient of the inaugural 2015 award was beef cattle nutrition and management expert Dr. John McKinnon. Remaining 2015 nominations and new 2016 submissions will be equally considered for the 2016 award. It will be presented at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference in August. Learn more and find the nomination form at http://www.beefresearch.ca/about/award.cfm


Have 15 minutes? BCRC wants you to make an impact on the future of research As someone receiving this newsletter, you’re almost guaranteed to be what we call a ‘Canadian beef industry stakeholder’, meaning you: • own or manage beef cattle, • conduct research on beef, cattle or forages, • are a large animal veterinarian, • own or work for an abattoir/beef processor, • are a government employee in a beef-related role, • work or volunteer for an organization that actively supports the beef industry, or • have another valuable role that supports and relies on Canadian beef production. You hold a stake in the beef industry, so the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) and the Beef Value Chain Roundtable (BVCRT) rely on your input on research issues. Please consider answering our 15-20 minute questionnaire by May 31st. Your feedback will inform the next five-year National Beef Research Strategy and impact the long term competitiveness of the Canadian beef industry.

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You can’t tell by looking...

But you can tell with Green Gold You might have a strong hunch but you really can’t tell the RFV just by looking at an alfalfa crop. That’s why you should sign up with the Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association’s Green Gold program. As this year’s alfalfa crop is maturing, Green Gold collects twiceweekly samples from fields throughout eastern, central and western/ interlake Manitoba and sends them into Central Testing Laboratories to pinpoint the best day for your first alfalfa cut. MFGA will then share our results with you via direct email and on the MFGA Green Gold web page. To sign up, email John McGregor, MFGA Green Gold Coordinator, john@mfga.net. We are seeking volunteers for the Green Gold program by clipping samples from your field. Contact John if you are able to participate.

Manitoba Association


March 21, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Darling new CCA president CCA Media Release Ottawa, ON – The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) Board of Directors is pleased to welcome Dan Darling and David Haywood-Farmer, who were elected by acclamation as President and Vice President, respectively, on March 12, 2016 at the CCA Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Ottawa, ON. Darling moves to President after serving a two year term as Vice President, a position to which he was acclaimed to on March 7, 2014 at the Continued to Page 3

Ag in the City

The 2016 edition of Discover Ag in the City was held Friday and Saturday at The Forks Market in Winnipeg. (Above) MBP Tradeshow Spokeswoman Karen Emilson speaks with with a visitor to the MBP booth. The event is held annually to promote agriculture awareness to urban consumers and audiences.

Find Us Online

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Facebook.com


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News

A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • CCA Reports: It’s been an honour • Beef producers look at the impact of transportation • 2016 Manitoba Spring Roads Restriction Program information • Achieve cream of the crop through crossbreeding

Deadline for Farmland School Tax Rebate nearing The Farmland School Tax Rebate was implemented in 2004 to support the rural economy by providing farmland owners with school tax relief. The rebate percentage has increased from 33 per cent in 2004 to 80 per cent in 2015. Landowners are required to submit an annual application to Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC). Once you are registered with MASC and receive a rebate, a pre-printed application form for the following year will be mailed to you when they become available. Pre-printed 2015 applications have now been mailed to those who received a rebate in 2014. If this is your first time applying for the rebate, application forms and additional information is available here.

APPLICATION DEADLINE - MARCH 31, 2016

Completed and signed Farmland School Tax Rebate applications for the 2015 property tax year must be received by the MASC by March 31, 2016. Your 2015 property taxes, any penalties or interest charges, and CLPA lease fees must be paid by March 31, 2016. The deadline to apply for the 2014 and earlier year rebates has now passed.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

CCA names new president, vice-president Continued from Page 1 CCA AGM. He replaces Dave Solverson, who moves to the position of Past-President. In his time as President, Solverson achieved the successful conclusion of several key trade files, most significantly the repeal of U.S. mandatory Country of Origin Labeling (COOL). The successful repeal of this legislation marked the end of a seven year trade war. COOL was a long and arduous battle, and a costly one with legal fees nearing $4 million. However, that amount – paid by beef producers through their provincial check-off – is eclipsed by the cost of COOL discrimination inflicted on Canadian and Mexican producers. Solverson was also active in negotiations surrounding the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the successful implementation of the Canada-Korea Free Trade Agreement. Darling, who farms in Ontario, brings a fresh perspective to the CCA. He intends to keep up the focus on trade, with top trade priorities including achieving a bilateral trade agreement with Japan, access for beef from animals over 30 months of age with Mexico, and resolution of the longstanding technical barriers that have prevented the European Union from approving Canada’s main packing plants to export to the EU. As traceability is important to expanding trade, he would like to

CCA President Dan Darling see movement towards having the industry-supported Cattle Implementation Plan accepted as the business plan that best reflects the realities of cattle production. “The CCA is well-respected and has earned its reputation as an organization of influence because of the good work they do,” Darling said. “I am truly honoured to take on the role of CCA President and will continue to focus on achieving excellence in all files and to represent the best interests of beef producers across Canada.” Haywood-Farmer’s family has been ranching in Savona, B.C. for almost 100 years. As a third generation rancher, he has learned from his father and grandfather the dedication it takes to raise

CCA Vice-President David Haywood-Farmer healthy robust cattle on some of the most dry grasslands in the province. A former President of the B.C. Cattlemen’s Association, environment continues to be a key priority for him as he moves into his new role with CCA. He sits on the Foreign Trade committee and chairs the Domestic Agriculture committee. Darling resides in the heart of apple country, in the Township of Cramahe of Northumberland County where he and his brother Van operate a cow-calf operation with 250 cows and background calves on 1,500 acres. He is a past-president of Beef Farmers of Ontario (BFO) and represented Ontario beef farmers provincially on the BFO Cow-Calf and Government Relations Committees.


Nominate an outstanding researcher by May 1 The Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation is presented by the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) each year to recognize a researcher or scientist whose work has contributed to advancements in the competitiveness and sustainability of the Canadian beef industry. Nominations are welcome from all stakeholders of the Canadian beef industry and will be reviewed by a selection committee comprised of beef producers, industry experts and retired beef-related researchers located across the country. To be eligible, nominees must be Canadian citizens or landed immigrants actively involved in research of benefit to the Canadian beef industry within the past 5 years.

Benefit to the industry must be evident in a strong research program aligned with industry priorities, a demonstrated passion and longterm commitment through leadership, teamwork, and mentorship, involvement in ongoing education and training (where applicable), and active engagement with industry stakeholders. Nominations for the 2016 award will be accepted until May 1, 2016.

The recipient of the inaugural 2015 award was beef cattle nutrition and management expert Dr. John McKinnon. Remaining 2015 nominations and new 2016 submissions will be equally considered for the 2016 award. It will be presented at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference in August. Learn more and find the nomination form at http://www.beefresearch.ca/about/award.cfm


Have 15 minutes? BCRC wants you to make an impact on the future of research As someone receiving this newsletter, you’re almost guaranteed to be what we call a ‘Canadian beef industry stakeholder’, meaning you: • own or manage beef cattle, • conduct research on beef, cattle or forages, • are a large animal veterinarian, • own or work for an abattoir/beef processor, • are a government employee in a beef-related role, • work or volunteer for an organization that actively supports the beef industry, or • have another valuable role that supports and relies on Canadian beef production. You hold a stake in the beef industry, so the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) and the Beef Value Chain Roundtable (BVCRT) rely on your input on research issues. Please consider answering our 15-20 minute questionnaire by May 31st. Your feedback will inform the next five-year National Beef Research Strategy and impact the long term competitiveness of the Canadian beef industry.

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Labour gap in Canadian beef sector could quadruple by 2025, study finds CCA Media Release Ottawa, ON – Chronic workforce shortages in Canada’s agricultural sector are expected to continue, with the number of unfilled jobs in the beef sector forecasted to more than quadruple over the next decade. According to the Labour Market Information Study (LMIS), the labour gap is significant, with unfilled vacancies costing the beef industry $141 million is sales (farm gate cash receipts) in 2014. The study, released today by the Canadian Agricultural Human Resources Council (CAHRC) and Conference Board of Canada provides an overview of the current agricultural labour market and a 10-year projection that forecasts the supply and demand of labour to 2025. The LMIS was initiated in early 2014 and includes a 10year national outlook along with a forecast for 10 different provinces and 11 commodity groups, including Canada’s beef cattle industry. A number of methods were used to conduct the study including an industry survey, interviews with agriculture producers and stakeholders, and numerous focus groups and webinars. The study’s findings underscore the need for the Canadian Agricultural and Agri-Food Workforce Action Plan, said Canadian Cattle-

men’s Association (CCA) President Dan Darling. “A dedicated plan for Canadian agriculture is critical to ensure the industry has a sufficient workforce to take advantage of significant opportunities in the future,” he said. Proactively addressing workforce issues in agriculture, in terms of insufficient labour to fill jobs at packing plants and farms and the lost opportunity those chronic job vacancies create, are top priority for the CCA. According to the study, over the next 10 years, the labour gap in the Canadian beef cattle industry could widen to 12,500 workers. The LMIS indicated this future increased labour gap could be partially caused by a spike in labour demand of as many as 2,500 workers. Export dependent and protein-based commodities, such as the Canadian beef cattle industry, are expected to have productivity growth around 2.5 per cent over the next 10 years. Additionally, trade agreements such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership

(TPP) and the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) are likely to generate more beef exports. These factors will create an increased demand for labour as the beef industry works to capture this growth. However, the study suggested that a declining labour supply in beef production is the largest contributor to the projected growing labour gap. Retirement of beef cattle producers is the driving factor behind the decrease in labour supply; the study indicates that one-third of the current workforce will retire over the next decade. Immigration is likely to account for growing share of the future labour force in Canadian agriculture and beef production, but some provinces may benefit more than others due to regional economies and demographics. CAHRC and the Conference Board of Canada are planning to release a 10-page report and 2-page fact sheet on labour supply and demand for beef in late April or early May.


You can’t tell by looking...

But you can tell with Green Gold You might have a strong hunch but you really can’t tell the RFV just by looking at an alfalfa crop. That’s why you should sign up with the Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association’s Green Gold program. As this year’s alfalfa crop is maturing, Green Gold collects twiceweekly samples from fields throughout eastern, central and western/ interlake Manitoba and sends them into Central Testing Laboratories to pinpoint the best day for your first alfalfa cut. MFGA will then share our results with you via direct email and on the MFGA Green Gold web page. To sign up, email John McGregor, MFGA Green Gold Coordinator, john@mfga.net. We are seeking volunteers for the Green Gold program by clipping samples from your field. Contact John if you are able to participate.

Manitoba Association


Deadline extended to March 24 Consultation – Strategic Emergency Management Framework for Agriculture Federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) agriculture ministers have committed to improving Canada’s approach to emergency management in agriculture and want your ideas and feedback. Emergency management is most effective when it reflects the combined thinking of governments and stakeholders. The public consultation will be open until March 24, 2016. Consultation document FPT governments have jointly drafted the Strategic Emergency Management Framework for Agriculture in Canada to encourage discussion. The current approach to emergency management has served Canada well; however, there are areas where improvements would strengthen its effectiveness. The Framework recognizes the evolving and increasingly complex risks faced by the Canadian agriculture sector and proposes a stronger, more cohesive and collaborative approach to preventing, mitigating, preparing for, responding to and recovering from emergencies. FPT governments need your input to ensure that the Framework resonates with the needs and expectations of all stakeholders. When reviewing the draft Framework, please consider the following: What are your suggestions to improve the prevention and mitigation of risks in the Canadian agriculture sector? What are your suggestions to improve collaborative action and cooperation? What are your suggestions to improve sector resilience? Do the proposed strategies outlined in the draft Framework resonate with you? Are there any additional strategies that should be added? Do the proposed strategies reflect stakeholder roles, needs and experience in emergency management? What activities/practices do you or your members currently undertake that you see as contributing to emergency management, now and in the future? How can FPT governments best support you or your organization/association in terms of emergency management? Do the roles and responsibilities outlined in the draft Framework and Annex 1 resonate with you? Are there any additional suggestions you would like to see considered in this Framework? Contributing your comments You can provide your perspective until March 24, 2016 by reviewing the draft Framework and completing the consultation questions. Alternatively, you may send an email to AgEM-GUAg@AGR.GC.CA to request an electronic copy of the draft Framework and consultation questions. Feedback can be: emailed to AgEM-GUAg@AGR.GC.CA, or mailed to: Policy, Planning and Emergency Management Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Floor 5, Room 216 1341 Baseline Road, Tower 5 Ottawa ON K1A 0C5 Canada Comments received will be included in a “What We Heard” report and posted on this website. Please note that all information shall be collected in compliance with the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act. All information shall be treated confidentially and used solely for the purposes of this consultation. All comments will be considered as the Framework is finalized. The revised Framework will be presented during an FPT agriculture ministers’ meeting in summer 2016. It will also be posted online and emailed to stakeholders following the meeting. For more information on the Framework, please visit the questions and answers page.


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting DIAMOND SPONSORS

PRESIDENT’S BANQUET SPONSORS

Banquet Cocktail Sponsors

EVENT SPONSORS Lunch Sponsors

The Environmental Stewardship Award Sponsor Breakout Session Sponsors

Banquet Beef Sponsor


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting PANEL DISCUSSION SPONSOR

COFFEE SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSORS

Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd. Beef Advocacy Canada BIXSco Inc. / Viewtrak Technologies Inc. BMO Bank of Montreal Canadian Cattle Identification Agency DNA Insurance Farm Business Consultants (FBC) Hibrix Liquid Soil Supplement Hi-Pro Feeds Kane Veterinary Supplies / Allflex Landmark Feeds MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Charolais Association Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Manitoba Grass Fed Beef Association Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Livestock Marketing Association Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association Mazergroup Merck Animal Health NDE Canada The AgriPost The Victoria Inn Westoba Credit Union Ltd. 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ

SILVER SPONSORS

Dairy Farmers of Manitoba Ducks Unlimited Canada Hamiota Feedlot Ltd. Man – Sask Gelbvieh Association Manitoba Angus Association Prairie Livestock RBC Royal Bank The Hartford

BRONZE SPONSORS

AgriClear Aikins Law Austin Credit Union bioTrack CattleMax Software CIBC Gem Silage Products Killarney Auction Mart Ltd. Komb Ag Services Marquette Consumers Co-operatives Ltd. Mike Waddell – Murray Chrysler Westman MJ Endeavors Paddock Drilling Ltd. PastureMAP Precision Cam, a brand of Allen Leigh Security + Communications SAIT Polytechnic Sunrise Credit Union Tuff Equipment


The Agricultural Institute of Canada (AIC)’s next conference, AIC 2016 Disseminating Agricultural Research: Bridging the gap between idea and adoption is taking place April 13-14, 2016 in Ottawa!

When: Wednesday, April 13 and Thursday April 14, 2016 Where: Ottawa Marriott Hotel – Ottawa, ON Who should attend? Individuals involved in or affected by agricultural research and research dissemination, federal and provincial governments, private groups involved in research and/or agriculture, academia, and industry organizations.

In July 2015, agricultural stakeholders gathered in Ottawa to help develop a national agricultural research policy for the 21st century (read our conference report here). Broad consensus among participants identified building strong networks for research dissemination as a key area in the policy released September 2015. Excellent research is conducted in Canada but to achieve our full agricultural potential, it must be successfully communicated not only with other researchers but also with farmers and producers on the ground. In order to further inform this area of the policy, AIC is bringing together stakeholders involved in, or who make use of agricultural research to discuss topics including:    

Intellectual property protection Modern research extension strategies Maximizing technology transfer to industry stakeholders … and many more!

Join us in Ottawa April 13-14, 2016 for AIC 2016, a conference that promises to engage participants and stimulate lively debate, with opportunities to learn from industry experts and contribute input on these important policy issues.

Visit the conference website Visit Disseminating the conference website Register for AIC 2016: Agricultural Research Be part of AIC 2016 as conference sponsor - register online Register for AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research

Be part of AIC 2016 as a Conference Sponsor – register online


March 4, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Stats Canada releases livestock estimates Government Media Release

Canadian farmers had 12.0 million cattle on their farms on January 1, up 0.3% from January 1, 2015. The slight rise marks the first yearover-year increase since January 2013. However, the inventory remained 19.9% below the peak

of January 2005. The number of beef heifers held for breeding on Canadian farms was up 4.0% year over year to 547,300 head, the first increase since 2013. The inventory of calves on January 1 increased 0.9% to 3.8 million, while the number of feeder heifers

(-1.2%) and steers (-0.7%) fell from January 1, 2015. Canadian farmers had 1.4 million dairy cows and heifers on their farms, up 0.4% from January 1, 2015. As of January 1, 81,590 farms reported cattle and calves, down 0.8% from January 1, 2015,

and down 1.6% from the same date in 2014. Total disposition of cattle decreased as both slaughter and exports declined during 2015 compared with 2014. Domestic slaughter deContinued to Page 2

Farm type 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 At January 1 On all cattle operations 12,245.0 12,305.0 12,220.0 11,920.0 11,960.0 On dairy operations 1,959.7 1,940.8 1,928.0 1,917.7 1,926.7 On beef operations 10,285.3 10,364.2 10,292.0 10,002.3 10,033.3 On cow calf operations 7,025.5 7,102.5 7,045.2 6,880.5 6,909.1 On feeder and stocker operations 1,779.1 1,825.4 1,798.9 1,724.5 1,724.7 On feeding operations 1,480.7 1,436.3 1,447.9 1,397.3 1,399.5 At July 1 On all cattle operations 13,520.0 13,520.0 13,290.0 13,010.0 .. On dairy operations 1,941.3 1,906.6 1,893.2 1,863.6 .. On beef operations 11,578.7 11,613.4 11,396.8 11,146.4 .. On cow calf operations 7,436.3 7,416.0 7,231.5 7,020.8 .. On feeder and stocker operations 2,632.0 2,627.6 2,590.5 2,587.5 .. On feeding operations 1,510.4 1,569.8 1,574.8 1,538.1 .. Info courtesy of Stats Canada

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mbbeef.ca @ManitobaBeef

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Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News Deadline for Farmland A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry

• Are you a good steward of the land • The February MFGA hay situtation and price update • $2.6 million committed to marketing Canadian beef genetics • Animal vaccinations useful in protecting humans • Protein significant for cattle health

School Tax Rebate nearing The Farmland School Tax Rebate was implemented in 2004 to support the rural economy by providing farmland owners with school tax relief. The rebate percentage has increased from 33 per cent in 2004 to 80 per cent in 2015. Landowners are required to submit an annual application to Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC). Once you are registered with MASC and receive a rebate, a pre-printed application form for the following year will be mailed to you when they become available. Pre-printed 2015 applications have now been mailed to those who received a rebate in 2014. If this is your first time applying for the rebate, application forms and additional information is available here.

APPLICATION DEADLINE - MARCH 31, 2016

Completed and signed Farmland School Tax Rebate applications for the 2015 property tax year must be received by the MASC by March 31, 2016. Your 2015 property taxes, any penalties or interest charges, and CLPA lease fees must be paid by March 31, 2016. The deadline to apply for the 2014 and earlier year rebates has now passed.

Livestock estimates ... Continued from Page 1 creased 8.2% in 2015 to 2.9 million head. However, carcass weights increased in 2015, tempering the decline in beef production. Exports declined 33.2% to 831,100 head in 2015. Canadian cattle prices were strong in the first half of 2015, but moderated in the second half of the year. Relatively strong prices reduced the incentive for Canadian producers to send their cattle south. Demand for Canadian cattle was also dampened by growth in the US cattle herd. The United States Department of Agriculture reported that the American cattle inventory grew 3% in 2015. In Manitoba as of January 1, 2016 there were 1,120 million head of cattle, compared to 1,095.0 million on January 1, 2015, an increase of 2.3 per cent year over year.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

This year, be an AgSafe Family by keeping kids safe Canadian Agricultural Safety Week 2016 runs from March 13–19. CASA MEDIA RELEASE This March, the Canadian Agricultural Safety Association (CASA), the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) and presenting sponsor Farm Credit Canada (FCC) are encouraging farmers and their families to “Be an AgSafe Family” by “Keeping Kids Safe.” Canadian Agricultural Safety Week (CASW) is an annual public awareness campaign focusing on the importance of safe agriculture. In 2016 organizers want to empower farm families with the information they need to help keep kids safe on the farm while preserving the farming lifestyle. The campaign lasts for a week, but Keeping Kids Safe is important all year long. “We believe that we can teach the love of agriculture to our children in a safe and healthy way,”, says Marcel Hacault, Executive Director of CASA. “This year we are providing tools and safety advice on agsafetyweek.ca that can help make farms a safe place for children to grow up.” “At CFA, we recognize the importance of teaching our next generation of producers about safety measures on the family farm,” says CFA President Ron Bonnett. “That is why we are proud to once again be a part of Canadian Agricultural Safety Week in order to highlight the significance of safety

as a priority on Canada’s farms.” Farm Credit Canada is a long-time supporter of CASW and of many farm safety programs. In 2016, FCC has once again committed to support Safety Days in local communities. Coordinators can apply for up to $1,500 to help offset some costs associated with hosting a safety day. FCC, through the Coordinator Funding, along with the support for CASW, is “Keeping Kids Safe.” “Safety on the farm doesn’t just happen; it’s a result of hard work by industry associations, government, industry advocates and of course farmers,” said Michael Hoffort, FCC president and CEO. “That’s why we’re proud to support Canadian Agriculture Safety Week and to partner with CASA. It provides the information and resources producers need to make farms safer for everyone, including children.” As a part of CASW, organizers are working with Workplace Safety & Prevention Services to host launch activities in Vineland Station, Ontario on March 15, 2016. Activities include a morning session on building a farm safety plan, a luncheon featuring farm safety advocates, a half-day of training sessions including a tractor refresher, women in ag and orienting young workers, and a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day® for children. “Workplace Safety & Prevention

Services is proud to be part of Canadian Ag Safety Week, and this year’s theme really hits home,” says Elizabeth Mills, President and CEO of WSPS. “On average, 13 children die on Canadian farms each year. We are looking forward to connecting with farmers, agricultural employers and partners to share the latest practices and tools to Keep Kids Safe and ensure that Ag families enjoy a rich, exciting and safe experience on the farm.” Canadian Agricultural Safety Week takes place every year during the third week of March. For more information about CASW, media kits or Ontario launch activities, please visit agsafetyweek.ca. Media kits include press releases, feature farmer stories, safety advice articles, public service announcements, graphics and more. CASW 2016 is presented by Farm Credit Canada and brought to you by the Canadian Agricultural Safety Association and the Canadian Federation of Agriculture with assistance from the Government of Canada through Growing Forward 2, a federal, provincial and territorial initiative. In 2016, CASW sponsors include long-time corporate sponsor Farm Credit Canada, Esso and their Esso Branded Resellers, Fertilizer Canada, Dow AgroSciences, WSPS and Princess Auto.


Feeding hay to cows ss qq uu aa rr ee bb aa ll ee ss

Adult responsibilities ADULTS NEED TO MAKE SURE:

• • • •

Work area has no hazards Climbing structure is safe and stable Child has been fitted for a respirator and shown how to use it Animals have no disease

Can your child do this job? ABILITY Can the child climb a ladder safely?

Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children must be able to climb a ladder correctly to do this job safely.

Main Hazards

Working up high can lead to falls

Can the child lift safely? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children must be able to lift correctly to do this job safely. Is the child comfortable around cows? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children who are uncomfortable around cows are more likely to be injured. Does the bale the child will lift weigh less than 10-15% of his or her body weight? Yes. No. ! CAUTION! The child should carry the hay in smaller sections an or adult should carry the bale.

Weight of bales can strain muscles

Animal movement can cause injury

Does the child have to carry the hay less than 10-15 yards? Yes. No. ! CAUTION! An adult should carry the hay to the feeding area. Can the child react quickly? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Because cows behave unpredictably, children need quick reactions to avoid injury.

TRAINING Has the child been trained on animal behavior?

Yes. No.

ST O P

STOP! Children who don’t understand animal behavior are more likely to be injured.

Remember

If the child is 12 or older, has he or she been trained to use cutting tools?

Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Training is needed to prevent injury.

Non-skid soles

Has an adult demonstrated feeding hay to cows on site?

Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children learn best when shown how to do the job at the work site. Has the child shown he or she can do the job safely 4 to 5 times under close supervision?

Yes. No.

!

Respirator as needed

CAUTION! An adult must watch constantly until the child shows he or she can do the job. Leather gloves

SUPERVISION Can an adult supervise as recommended?

Yes. No. ST O P STOP! The right level of supervision is key to preventing injuries.

Supervision What’s the right amount? Here are suggestions– but remember, it depends on the child.

Hay mow jobs and carrying bales in feed alley: Age 16+: CHECK every few minutes at first. When the child shows he or she can do the job, LEAVE for 15 to 30 minutes.

agsafetyweek.ca

Cut twine or wire:

Distribute hay to cows:

Age 12-13: WATCH nearly constantly.

Age 10-11: LIMIT job to 20 minutes. WATCH nearly constantly. When the child shows he or she can do the job, CHECK every few minutes.

Age 14-15: CHECK every few minutes. Age 16+: When the child shows he or she can do the job, LEAVE for 15 to 30 minutes.

Age 12-13: CHECK every few minutes. Age 14-15: When the child shows he or she can do the job, LEAVE for 15 to 30 minutes.

This North American Guideline for Children’s Agricultural Tasks has been reproduced with permission from National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety. For more information visit http://cultivatesafety.org/work-guidelines.


Leading/grooming animals bb ee ee ff oo rr dd aa ii rr yy

Adult responsibilities ADULTS NEED TO MAKE SURE:

• Work area has no hazards • Child knows an escape route • Animals have no disease

Can your child do this job? ABILITY

TRAINING

Is the child comfortable around animals?

Main Hazards

Has the child been trained on animal behavior?

Yes.

Yes.

No. ST O P STOP! Children who are uncomfortable around animals are more likely to be injured.

No. ST O P STOP! Children who don’t understand animal behavior are more likely to be injured.

Is the child strong enough to control a dairy or beef animal?

Has an adult demonstrated leading and grooming animals on site?

Yes. No.

Yes. ST O P

STOP! Children who can’t control an animal are more likely to be injured.

No. ST O P STOP! Children learn best when shown how to do the job at the work site.

Does the child have good peripheral vision? For example, while looking straight ahead, can the child see your finger entering his or her field of vision at shoulder level? Slippery surface can lead to slips and falls

Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children with limited vision may not see dangers in the work area.

Yes.

Animal kicks, step-ons and head butts can cause injury

Has the child shown he or she can do the job safely 4 to 5 times under close supervision?

Yes. No.

!

CAUTION! An adult must watch constantly until the child shows he or she can do the job.

Good handwashing

SUPERVISION

Can the child react quickly?

No.

Remember

Can an adult supervise as recommended? ST O P

STOP! Because animals behave unpredictably, children need quick reactions to avoid injury.

Yes. No.

ST O P

STOP! The right level of supervision is key to preventing injuries.

Supervision

Steel-toed shoes with non-skid soles

Leather gloves

What’s the right amount? Here are suggestions– but remember, it depends on the child. Age 12-13: WATCH during the whole job.

Age 14-15: WATCH nearly constant ly at first. When the child shows he or she can do the job, CHECK every few minutes.

agsafetyweek.ca

Age 16+: CHECK every few minutes at first. When the child shows he or she can do the job, LEAVE for 15 to 30 minutes.

This North American Guideline for Children’s Agricultural Tasks has been reproduced with permission from National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety. For more information visit http://cultivatesafety.org/work-guidelines.


Working with large animals hh oo rr ss ee ss ,, cc aa tt tt ll ee ,, ee m m uu ,, ll ll aa m m aa ,, oo ss tt rr ii cc hh ,, ee tt cc ..

Adult responsibilities ADULTS NEED TO MAKE SURE:

• • • • • • •

Ventilation system is working before the child enters a closed building All guards and shields are in place on feed conveyor system Work area has no hazards Child knows an escape route Animals have no disease Child has been fitted for a respiratorand shown how to use it Child changes outer clothing and washes hands after job

Can your child do this job? ABILITY Is the child comfortable around large animals? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children who are uncomfortable around animals are more likely to be injured. Does the feed the child will lift weigh less than 10-15% of the child’s body weight? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children lifting more than 15% of their body weight are more likely to injure their backs.

Main Hazards

Animal movements, kicks and bites can cause injury

Weight of feed can strain muscles

Moving parts of conveyor can entangle fingers, hands, hair and clothing

Can the child easily push up to 10-15% of his or her body weight? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children who have to strain to push heavy objects are more likely to injure their backs. If a cart is used for the conveyor system, can the child maneuver it? For example, can he or she steer a grocery cart through the store? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children who can’t handle the cart are more likely to be injured. Does the child have good peripheral vision? For example, while looking straight ahead, can the child see your finger entering his or her field of vision at shoulder level? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children with limited vision may not see people or obstacles in the work area.

Does the child usually go with his or her “gut” feeling without thinking too much about what could happen next? Yes. ! CAUTION! Children who act on impulse need close supervision. No. Is your child responsible? Do you trust your child to do what’s expected without anyone checking? Yes. No. ! CAUTION! Children who behave irresponsibly need close supervision.

TRAINING Has the child been trained on animal behavior? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children who don’t understand animal behavior are more likely to be injured. Has the child been trained on lifting techniques?

Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Lifting incorrectly can cause back injury.

Good handwashing

Has an adult demonstrated working with large animals on site? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children learn best when shown how to do the job on site.

Can the child react quickly? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Because animals behave unpredictably, children need quick reactions to avoid injury.

Has the child shown he or she can do the job safely 4 to 5 times under close supervision? Yes. No. ! CAUTION! An adult must watch constantly until the child shows he or she can do the job.

Can the child recognize a hazard and solve the problem without getting upset? Yes. No. ST O P STOP! Children must be able to recognize hazards, think about how to respond, and stay calm to prevent injury.

Can an adult supervise as recommended? Yes.

Supervision What’s the right amount? Here are suggestions– but remember, it depends on the child.

Steel-toed shoes with non-skid soles

SUPERVISION

No.

ST O P

Respirator as needed

STOP! The right level of supervision is key to preventing injuries.

Feeding animals Using a feed cart:

Feeding animals Using a feed conveyor system:

Age 12-13: WATCH nearly constantly.

Age 14-15: WATCH nearly constantly.

Age 14-15: CHECK every few minutes at first. When the child shows he or she can do the job, LEAVE for 15 to 30 minutes.

Age 16+: CHECK every few minutes.

agsafetyweek.ca

Remember

Confinement tasks: Age 14-15: WATCH constant ly at first. When the child shows he or she can do the job, CHECK every few minutes.

Age 16+: CHECK every few minutes at first. When the child shows he or she can do the job, LEAVE for 15 to 30 minutes.

This North American Guideline for Children’s Agricultural Tasks has been reproduced with permission from National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety. For more information visit http://cultivatesafety.org/work-guidelines.


Consultation – Strategic Emergency Management Framework for Agriculture Federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) agriculture ministers have committed to improving Canada’s approach to emergency management in agriculture and want your ideas and feedback. Emergency management is most effective when it reflects the combined thinking of governments and stakeholders. The public consultation will be open until March 11, 2016. Consultation document FPT governments have jointly drafted the Strategic Emergency Management Framework for Agriculture in Canada to encourage discussion. The current approach to emergency management has served Canada well; however, there are areas where improvements would strengthen its effectiveness. The Framework recognizes the evolving and increasingly complex risks faced by the Canadian agriculture sector and proposes a stronger, more cohesive and collaborative approach to preventing, mitigating, preparing for, responding to and recovering from emergencies. FPT governments need your input to ensure that the Framework resonates with the needs and expectations of all stakeholders. When reviewing the draft Framework, please consider the following: What are your suggestions to improve the prevention and mitigation of risks in the Canadian agriculture sector? What are your suggestions to improve collaborative action and cooperation? What are your suggestions to improve sector resilience? Do the proposed strategies outlined in the draft Framework resonate with you? Are there any additional strategies that should be added? Do the proposed strategies reflect stakeholder roles, needs and experience in emergency management? What activities/practices do you or your members currently undertake that you see as contributing to emergency management, now and in the future? How can FPT governments best support you or your organization/association in terms of emergency management? Do the roles and responsibilities outlined in the draft Framework and Annex 1 resonate with you? Are there any additional suggestions you would like to see considered in this Framework? Contributing your comments You can provide your perspective until March 11, 2016 by reviewing the draft Framework and completing the consultation questions. Alternatively, you may send an email to AgEM-GUAg@AGR.GC.CA to request an electronic copy of the draft Framework and consultation questions. Feedback can be: emailed to AgEM-GUAg@AGR.GC.CA, or mailed to: Policy, Planning and Emergency Management Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Floor 5, Room 216 1341 Baseline Road, Tower 5 Ottawa ON K1A 0C5 Canada Comments received will be included in a “What We Heard” report and posted on this website. Please note that all information shall be collected in compliance with the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act. All information shall be treated confidentially and used solely for the purposes of this consultation. All comments will be considered as the Framework is finalized. The revised Framework will be presented during an FPT agriculture ministers’ meeting in summer 2016. It will also be posted online and emailed to stakeholders following the meeting. For more information on the Framework, please visit the questions and answers page.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Registration opens for Canadian Beef Industry Conference MEDIA RELEASE CALGARY, AB — Championing a new era of teamwork and success for Canada’s beef industry is the focus of a new national conference set to kick-off this summer in Calgary, Alberta. Registration is now open for the inaugural Canadian Beef Industry Conference (CBIC), August 9 – 11 at the Grey Eagle Resort and Casino, featuring top speakers on important issues and hot topics for the industry. Canadian Beef Industry Conference Registration Open 2016“The Canadian beef industry is among the most dynamic and diverse of its kind in the world,” says beef producer Rob Smith, also Canadian Angus Association Chief Executive Officer and co-chair of the 2016 CBIC. “This poses challenges. But it’s also a major strength. Everyone from industry leaders to individual producers has an important role to play, to strengthen our industry and drive it forward. That’s what this conference is all about.” CBIC is a joint collaboration of the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC), Canada Beef, the Canadian Beef Breeds Council (CBBC) and the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). It will combine semi-annual and annual meetings of several stakeholder groups, along with learning and networking opportunities. “We encourage everyone from across the various regions and industry sectors to participate — to learn, share ideas and help grow

our industry,” says beef producer Virgil Lowe, co-chair of the 2016 CBIC and also an Associate with Dentons Canada LLP. Opening day keynote speaker is entrepreneur, consultant and former Dragon’s Den star Arlene Dickinson. The agenda will also include keynote speakers on each of the National Beef Strategy’s four pillars: connectivity, productivity, beef demand and competitiveness, along with educational presentations and interactive workshops on new developments, market and brand opportunities and production innovations. Related events include BCRC, Canada Beef, and Young Cattlemen’s Council board meetings, including Cattlemen’s Young Leaders selections and graduation. Early bird registration rates are

available until June 15 ($375 early bird, $450 after) and conference special hotel rates are available until July 25 (or sold out). Full registration includes opening night (Tuesday) reception; also Wednesday night banquet and entertainment, featuring the band Ain’t No Rodeo. Extra tickets are available for purchase for both of these evening events. Additional options available by separate ticket purchase include a pre-conference Monday tour hosted by Alberta Beef Producers, the Canadian Cattlemen’s Foundation Classic Golf Tournament on Tuesday, and a Thursday evening Heritage Park supper. Visit www.canadianbeefindustryconference.com for more information and to register. Follow CBIC on Twitter and Facebook for updates.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Have 15 minutes? BCRC wants you to make an impact on the future of research As someone receiving this newsletter, you’re almost guaranteed to be what we call a ‘Canadian beef industry stakeholder’, meaning you: • own or manage beef cattle, • conduct research on beef, cattle or forages, • are a large animal veterinarian, • own or work for an abattoir/beef processor, • are a government employee in a beef-related role, • work or volunteer for an organization that actively supports the beef industry, or • have another valuable role that supports and relies on Canadian beef production. You hold a stake in the beef industry, so the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) and the Beef Value Chain Roundtable (BVCRT) rely on your input on research issues. Please consider answering our 15-20 minute questionnaire by May 31st. Your feedback will inform the next five-year National Beef Research Strategy and impact the long term competitiveness of the Canadian beef industry.

CanaMaize Seed Inc. Box 144, Minto, MB R0K1M0 Toll Free: 1-877-262-4046 Fax: (204) 776-2250 Email: info@canamaize.com

CERTIFIED CONVENTIONAL CM440 GRAZING CORN Early maturing, leafier for increased grazing yield. Small stalks increase palatability and increase utilization rate. Low cost per grazing day. No planter required. Swath or standing grazing cattle, sheep, bison as well as for wildlife food plots. Call 1-877-262-4046 or Email info@canamaize.com


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

CRSB launches public consultation on sustainability indicators for beef operations The Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB) is seeking the public’s comments on the first draft of its sustainability “indicators” for beef operations. The indicators are part of the verified sustainable beef framework the organization is developing, and reflect what will be measured in terms of sustainability on individual operations. The public consultation will take place from February 9 to April 10, 2016; the materials and instructions for comment can be found at: http:// crsb.ca/public-consultation-english/. “The CRSB has developed indicators that are relevant for cow-calf, backgrounding, feedlot and dairy beef operations. We encourage people and organizations to review the work we’ve done and give us constructive feedback,” said Cherie Copithorne-Barnes, Chair of the CRSB and a producer west of Calgary, Alberta. “We realize that the sustainability of the Canadian beef industry reaches many stake-

holders and we want to ensure all perspectives are taken into account.” All comments will be reviewed, and a written response to each comment will be posted on the organization’s website following the consultation. The second draft of the indicators will be released for a 30-day public comment period in mid-2016. Page Stuart, a cattle feeder and the Past Chair of the Alberta Cattle Feeders’ Association, and Tim Hardman, Beef Director with the World Wildlife Fund, co-

chaired the committee that developed the indicators. “The committee members brought a wide range of perspectives to the table. We had very productive discussions and unanimously reached consensus. Our goal was to identify draft indicators that are robust and outcome-based, which I believe we have done,” explained Hardman. “We wanted to have a balance — something realistic for producers that also meets the needs of retailers, food service providers and consumers. I think we have achieved that. I look forward to the feedback we receive over the next 60 days,” added Stuart. The Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB) is a multi-stakeholder initiative developed to advance sustainability efforts within the industry. The CRSB is the go-to forum on sustainable beef in Canada. It has defined “sustainable beef” and is rapidly setting the framework for stakeholders to be able to produce and source verified sustainable beef.


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting DIAMOND SPONSORS

PRESIDENT’S BANQUET SPONSORS

Banquet Cocktail Sponsors

EVENT SPONSORS Lunch Sponsors

The Environmental Stewardship Award Sponsor Breakout Session Sponsors

Banquet Beef Sponsor


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting PANEL DISCUSSION SPONSOR

COFFEE SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSORS

Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd. Beef Advocacy Canada BIXSco Inc. / Viewtrak Technologies Inc. BMO Bank of Montreal Canadian Cattle Identification Agency DNA Insurance Farm Business Consultants (FBC) Hibrix Liquid Soil Supplement Hi-Pro Feeds Kane Veterinary Supplies / Allflex Landmark Feeds MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Charolais Association Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Manitoba Grass Fed Beef Association Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Livestock Marketing Association Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association Mazergroup Merck Animal Health NDE Canada The AgriPost The Victoria Inn Westoba Credit Union Ltd. 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ

SILVER SPONSORS

Dairy Farmers of Manitoba Ducks Unlimited Canada Hamiota Feedlot Ltd. Man – Sask Gelbvieh Association Manitoba Angus Association Prairie Livestock RBC Royal Bank The Hartford

BRONZE SPONSORS

AgriClear Aikins Law Austin Credit Union bioTrack CattleMax Software CIBC Gem Silage Products Killarney Auction Mart Ltd. Komb Ag Services Marquette Consumers Co-operatives Ltd. Mike Waddell – Murray Chrysler Westman MJ Endeavors Paddock Drilling Ltd. PastureMAP Precision Cam, a brand of Allen Leigh Security + Communications SAIT Polytechnic Sunrise Credit Union Tuff Equipment


February 19, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

The three finalists for the Manitoba Outanding Young Farmers award for 2016 have been announced. Jason & Laura Kehler of Carman, Ben & Lisa Heide of Boissevain and Marcus & Paige Dueck of Kleefeld have all been nominated for the award which will be presented Feb. 27 at the Clarion Inn in Winnipeg. The reception is scheduled to begin at 5:30. In a media release it was noted that each couple completed a lengthy nomination form and will appear before a panel of judges before the announcement. Continued to Page 2

Submitted Photo

Finalists for OYF award announced

Three Times The Fun

Jay Sprott, a commercial beef producer from Miami welcomed a set of triplets on Feb. 11, a first at Sprott Farms. All three heifer calves as well as the mother are doing well.

Find Us Online

mbbeef.ca @ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News Deadline for Farmland A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry

•Big on forage brassicas • Get newborn calves breathing and eating • Cypto presents a number of challenges • Shipping unhealthy calves could turn the public against beef • Efficient handling reduces shrink and stress

School Tax Rebate nearing The Farmland School Tax Rebate was implemented in 2004 to support the rural economy by providing farmland owners with school tax relief. The rebate percentage has increased from 33 per cent in 2004 to 80 per cent in 2015. Landowners are required to submit an annual application to Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC). Once you are registered with MASC and receive a rebate, a pre-printed application form for the following year will be mailed to you when they become available. Pre-printed 2015 applications have now been mailed to those who received a rebate in 2014. If this is your first time applying for the rebate, application forms and additional information is available on this web site.

APPLICATION DEADLINE - MARCH 31, 2016

Completed and signed Farmland School Tax Rebate applications for the 2015 property tax year must be received by the MASC by March 31, 2016. Your 2015 property taxes, any penalties or interest charges, and CLPA lease fees must be paid by March 31, 2016. The deadline to apply for the 2014 and earlier year rebates has now passed.

OYF Award ...

Continued from Page 1 The winner will then go on to compete at the National level in November 2016 in Niagra Falls, Ontario. For additional information, and media ticket information, please get in touch with one of the Manitoba contacts below. Celebrating 36 years of identifying great agricultural successes, Canada’s Outstanding Young Farmers’ program is an annual competition to recognize farmers that exemplify excellence in their profession and promote the tremendous contribution of agriculture. Open to participants 18 to 39 years of age, making the majority of income from on-farm sources, participants are selected from seven regions across Canada, with two national winners chosen each year. The program is sponsored nationally by CIBC, John Deere, Bayer CropScience, and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and supported nationally by AdFarm and Farm Management Canada.


CRSB launches public consultation on sustainability indicators for beef operations The Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB) is seeking the public’s comments on the first draft of its sustainability “indicators” for beef operations. The indicators are part of the verified sustainable beef framework the organization is developing, and reflect what will be measured in terms of sustainability on individual operations. The public consultation will take place from February 9 to April 10, 2016; the materials and instructions for comment can be found at: http:// crsb.ca/public-consultation-english/. “The CRSB has developed indicators that are relevant for cow-calf, backgrounding, feedlot and dairy beef operations. We encourage people and organizations to review the work we’ve done and give us constructive feedback,” said Cherie Copithorne-Barnes, Chair of the CRSB and a producer west of Calgary, Alberta. “We realize that the sustainability of the Canadian beef industry reaches many stake-

holders and we want to ensure all perspectives are taken into account.” All comments will be reviewed, and a written response to each comment will be posted on the organization’s website following the consultation. The second draft of the indicators will be released for a 30-day public comment period in mid-2016. Page Stuart, a cattle feeder and the Past Chair of the Alberta Cattle Feeders’ Association, and Tim Hardman, Beef Director with the World Wildlife Fund, co-

chaired the committee that developed the indicators. “The committee members brought a wide range of perspectives to the table. We had very productive discussions and unanimously reached consensus. Our goal was to identify draft indicators that are robust and outcome-based, which I believe we have done,” explained Hardman. “We wanted to have a balance — something realistic for producers that also meets the needs of retailers, food service providers and consumers. I think we have achieved that. I look forward to the feedback we receive over the next 60 days,” added Stuart. The Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB) is a multi-stakeholder initiative developed to advance sustainability efforts within the industry. The CRSB is the go-to forum on sustainable beef in Canada. It has defined “sustainable beef” and is rapidly setting the framework for stakeholders to be able to produce and source verified sustainable beef.


BIXSco and Cargill Limited sign deal enabling flow of carcass data through supply chain Media Release BIXSco Inc. (BIXSco) and Cargill Limited (Cargill) have released further details of a signed master agreement through which Cargill will provide the past three years of beef carcass data, and all future data, to BIXSco. This agreement is a tremendous step forward in enabling the tracking of cattle production information through the supply chain—allowing everyone from producers, packers, and retailers to unlock the value of their data and reflect the pride of the Canadian cattle industry by allowing it to verify the quality of its beef. “Access to carcass data has long been identified as the major roadblock to industry-wide data sharing as it relates to cattle production information throughout the supply chain. With this agreement, that roadblock has been removed,” said Hubert Lau, President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of BIXSco. “In partnership with Cargill, we look forward to helping the industry unlock value by sharing data through the Beef InfoXChange System (BIXS), which now includes more detailed carcass data to help beef producers improve management and profitability.” Lau added that BIXS’ data management system is currently being rebuilt to accommodate the anticipated high volume of data. The more robust system will also allow the supply chain to buy and sell data up-and downstream. The

enhanced BIXS data management system will continue to ensure no personal information is shared through the system; users will remain anonymous until they choose to contact a source of information. ”Cargill has worked with BIXS since its inception in 2009. We look forward to continuing on this journey and embracing the potential of this data management system,” said Chantelle Donahue, Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Cargill. “This agreement is a crucial step in ensuring information flows up and down the cattle value chain,” said Dennis Laycraft, Executive Vice President of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association.“ Background

What does the Cargill agreement enable? The agreement provides for the last three years of carcass data for cattle processed and all future carcass data to be provided to BIXS, in trust, as available. At present, fifteen fields of data will be provided. Initial data transfer will start with their Alberta asset, but will work towards including Ontario when the time is right. When will the data be accessible? The data will be provided to BIXS following an audit by Cargill of BIXS’ privacy functions. The audit is partially complete. Additionally, BIXS’ data management system is currently being rebuilt to ac-

commodate the anticipated high volume of data, and providing a better system that will allow for robust data trading up-and downstream. Who pays for what? BIXS is similar to a stock market by allowing buyers and sellers to exchange data for a price. In addition to purchasing carcass data (which will help producers improve their operating efficiency and profitability), producers will also be able to sell their management data to others, allowing them to be compensated for their work in capturing data. Much data lies dormant in desktops across the country. BIXS allows all parts of the supply chain to unlock the value of data by sharing it and determining fair value for based on market factors. The end result is a supply chain that is more knowledgeable, productive, profitable, and responsive to increasing demand by domestic and foreign consumers for more information about the quality of Canadian beef. About BIXS BIXS was established in 2009 as a platform for information sharing. The BIXS database includes information about individual animal and carcass data, management protocols, and health treatments. No personal information is shared through the system; users remain anonymous until they choose to contact a source of information.


Being a Beef Advocate

Courtesy Canada Beef There’s nobody who can tell the Canadian Beef Story better than those who live and breathe it every day. It’s our job as beef producers to be able to communicate that story to the people who purchase the beef that we spend years handcrafting. To best communicate that story, we need to tell different parts of the same story in a consistent way. Included below are some resources that can help you become a well-rounded beef advocate, and communicate with confidence and passion. This list is by no means definitive, but it gives our producers a great basis to start the conversations. 1. Join BeefAdvocacy.ca – A two level program brings beef

producers, lovers and industry members together with a base level of knowledge to be able to tell the story consistently. This short, two-level program both educates and highlights advocates in the industry. 2. CanadaBeef.ca – Our new Canada Beef website encourages and integrates digital conversations between producers, consumers, and industry members to talk about what we all know and love: BEEF! 3. Download The Roundup App – Whether you’re using it for recipes yourself, or as a tool to help someone in the grocery store select the right cut of beef to ensure an exceptional eating experience, this mobile tool can create conversations across the board.

4. Get on social media – From the Canada Beef Twitter handles (like @cdnbeef_ag) and YouTube channels, to the Cattlemen’s Young Leaders (CYL) Facebook page, the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) webinars and everything in between provide resources for our industry to communicate our story. 5. Get involved with your provincial beef cattle organization – These groups are the teams in the Canadian beef league. They can help connect you with resources, government, and policy and advocacy opportunities. Being an advocate is easy. All it requires is sharing positive, educated messages and telling your story. Connections are powerful, and we invite you to join the conversation!

CanaMaize Seed Inc. Box 144, Minto, MB R0K1M0 Toll Free: 1-877-262-4046 Fax: (204) 776-2250 Email: info@canamaize.com

CERTIFIED CONVENTIONAL CM440 GRAZING CORN Early maturing, leafier for increased grazing yield. Small stalks increase palatability and increase utilization rate. Low cost per grazing day. No planter required. Swath or standing grazing cattle, sheep, bison as well as for wildlife food plots. Call 1-877-262-4046 or Email info@canamaize.com


Webinar on Emergency Management Framework As part of the current consultation on emergency management for agriculture, federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) governments will host a number of webinar discussion sessions. These sessions will provide participants an overview of the draft Strategic Emergency Management Framework for Agriculture in Canada. Participants will also be able to engage in discussion and share their input to ensure that the Framework resonates with their needs and expectations. Sessions will be held on the following dates. Please use the links provided for each session to register to attend. After clicking on the link, click “Register”. On the registration form, enter your information and then click “Submit”. You will then receive a confirmation email message with instructions on how to join the event. Thursday, February 25, 2016 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. (Eastern Standard Time) Language: English To register, go to: https://gts-ee.webex.com/gts-ee/onstage/g.php?MTID=e4c2c3231db7b1e04ad4f9f57566bda46 Tuesday, March 1, 2016 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. (Eastern Standard Time) Language: French To register, go to: https://gts-ee.webex.com/gts-ee-fr/onstage/g.php?MTID=e8d83ddc27ca784782d298036225d0aec Wednesday, March 2, 2016 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. (Eastern Standard Time) Language: English To register, go to: https://gts-ee.webex.com/gts-ee/onstage/g.php?MTID=e30068ba6262575db1d564eeb78fe4ccd


Antimicrobial use and resistance in beef cattle: what producers need to know; Webinar March 2 By the Beef Cattle Research Council In Canada, surveillance indicates that antimicrobial resistance levels in cattle and beef are extremely low and have not increased over time. Join this free webinar to learn more about why resistance is low, and what precautions beef producer can take to continue this trend. When Wednesday March 2 at 8 p.m. Watching on a tablet or mobile device? If you plan to join the webinar using your tablet or mobile device, you will need to download the appropriate receiver. We recommend that you join the webinar 15 minutes early as you will be prompted to download the receiver once you log in, which may take several minutes to complete. To download the receiver ahead of time, visit: http:// www.citrix.com/go/receiver.html Interested but aren’t available that evening? Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live event, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too. Cost BCRC webinars are available and free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time

and expertise to support advancements in the Canadian beef industry, and through the Knowledge Dissemination and Technology Transfer project funded by the National Check-off and Canada’s Beef Science Cluster. Speakers Dr. Craig Dorin – Veterinarian at Veterinary Agri-Health Services Ltd Dr. Dorin received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in 1985. His career started with 11 years in large animal practice in Kamloops, British Columbia and two additional years as Technical Services Veterinarian with Hoechst Roussel Vet. In 1998 he joined Veterinary Agri-Health Services where he has been a managing partner for the past 13 years. Reynold Bergen, Ph.D. – Beef Cattle Research Council Science Director Dr. Bergen provides scientific and industry expertise to the BCRC, Beef Science Cluster and Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). He works with industry to identify re-

search priorities, reviews research proposals and scientific reports, and engages with industry and research experts on an ongoing basis. What is a webinar?
 Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
 Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible. Visit our Webinars page to find other upcoming BCRC webinars and the recordings of our past sessions.


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting DIAMOND SPONSORS

PRESIDENT’S BANQUET SPONSORS

Banquet Cocktail Sponsors

EVENT SPONSORS Lunch Sponsors

The Environmental Stewardship Award Sponsor Breakout Session Sponsors

Banquet Beef Sponsor


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting PANEL DISCUSSION SPONSOR

COFFEE SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSORS

Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd. Beef Advocacy Canada BIXSco Inc. / Viewtrak Technologies Inc. BMO Bank of Montreal Canadian Cattle Identification Agency DNA Insurance Farm Business Consultants (FBC) Hibrix Liquid Soil Supplement Hi-Pro Feeds Kane Veterinary Supplies / Allflex Landmark Feeds MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Charolais Association Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Manitoba Grass Fed Beef Association Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Livestock Marketing Association Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association Mazergroup Merck Animal Health NDE Canada The AgriPost The Victoria Inn Westoba Credit Union Ltd. 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ

SILVER SPONSORS

Dairy Farmers of Manitoba Ducks Unlimited Canada Hamiota Feedlot Ltd. Man – Sask Gelbvieh Association Manitoba Angus Association Prairie Livestock RBC Royal Bank The Hartford

BRONZE SPONSORS

AgriClear Aikins Law Austin Credit Union bioTrack CattleMax Software CIBC Gem Silage Products Killarney Auction Mart Ltd. Komb Ag Services Marquette Consumers Co-operatives Ltd. Mike Waddell – Murray Chrysler Westman MJ Endeavors Paddock Drilling Ltd. PastureMAP Precision Cam, a brand of Allen Leigh Security + Communications SAIT Polytechnic Sunrise Credit Union Tuff Equipment


Manitoba Wildlife Federation calls for ban on spotlighting in agro-Manitoba Manitoba Wildlife Federation Media Release On September 10, 2015, 4:00 AM, seniors Victor and Doreen Sliworsky of Winnipegosis, Manitoba were fast-asleep in their bed. Both were abruptly awakened by a violent ‘BANG’ with a rifle bullet flying through their window frame missing Mrs. Sliworsky’s head by a mere two-feet. The Sliworsky’s were victims of spotlighting – the practice of hunters using a spotlight at night to shoot wild game. The Sliworsky’s son-in-law and family spokesperson, Wayne Lytwyn, says the incident has adversely affected everyone in the family. “Spotlighting, or night hunting, is an all too common occurrence in rural Manitoba,” said Lytwyn. “Not only does it pose a significant risk to public safety, the damage done by poachers and night hunters is costly and disturbing.” The Manitoba Wildlife Federation (MWF) is taking the lead in calling for an outright ban on spotlighting in the populated portions of Manitoba to protect people, pets, farm animals and private property. At a news conference today, the MWF used a dramatic re-enactment to illustrate the dangers of spotlighting by demonstrating how hunters are unable to see what’s behind their target – or exactly what their target really is. Along with the risk to people, numerous livestock have been killed or maimed by hunters using spotlights at night. The tragic death in January 2010 of a hunter from Sagkeeng First Nation was pre-

ventable and MWF Board Member & Hunter Education Instructor, Fred Tait, says it’s time for the Manitoba Government to stop spotlighting once and for all before someone else is killed. “Allowing anyone to hunt at night in the built-up areas of the Province flies in the face of universally accepted safe hunting practices and puts people in danger,” said Tait. “How many more tragic incidents have to happen before government will act?” Joining the MWF in the call to ban spotlighting are the Association of Manitoba Municipalities, Manitoba Beef Producers and Manitoba Natural Resource Officers’ Association, who have passed resolutions supporting the ban. Nineteen individual Rural Municipalities have passed anti-spotlighting resolutions. Enhanced enforcement by Manitoba Conservation is badly needed. According to the Manitoba Natural Resource Officers Association, there are currently at least 13 vacancies on the Conservation Officer roster of approximately 120 officers. The MWF is calling for a strong commitment from the Province to adequately and properly support Conservation Officers so that they can provide effective enforcement. Providing knowledge and background on enforcement issues at today’s news conference was Dwayne Strate, who shared his experience and knowledge as a long-time Conservation Officer in Manitoba. The MWF conducts Hunter Safety Training on behalf of the Province of Manitoba. When safe practices

are followed, hunting is one of the safest outdoor activities, with accident rates lower than cycling, boating and fishing. MWF Managing Director, Rob Olson, says following safe practices and training is the key to safe hunting. “One of the fundamental principles of safe hunting is knowing your target. But how can you possibly be sure of your target at night,” said Olson. Current Manitoba hunting regulations state night hunting is legal for Aboriginal hunters only, however, they are not permitted to discharge a firearm in areas ‘where it is dangerous to do so.’ Night hunting/ spotlighting is banned for non-Aboriginals. The MWF emphasized the spotlighting ban is critical in agro-Manitoba, near people, farms and livestock. Fred Tait said,” from our early discussions, we strongly believe that the aboriginal community understands the problems with spotlighting. We are calling on the Province to seriously commit to conducting the necessary consultations with indigenous hunters so that we can make rural communities safe.” There are other issues surrounding spotlighting which are outlined on a new MWF webpage – NightWatch. The NightWatch campaign clearly states the case for the ban on spotlighting and provides an opportunity for rural residents to come forward with their spotlighting stories and for all Manitobans to register their concerns regarding spotlighting in their communities. Visit mwf. mb.ca/nightwatch to learn more and join the discussion.


The Agricultural Institute of Canada (AIC)’s next conference, AIC 2016 Disseminating Agricultural Research: Bridging the gap between idea and adoption is taking place April 13-14, 2016 in Ottawa!

When: Wednesday, April 13 and Thursday April 14, 2016 Where: Ottawa Marriott Hotel – Ottawa, ON Who should attend? Individuals involved in or affected by agricultural research and research dissemination, federal and provincial governments, private groups involved in research and/or agriculture, academia, and industry organizations.

In July 2015, agricultural stakeholders gathered in Ottawa to help develop a national agricultural research policy for the 21st century (read our conference report here). Broad consensus among participants identified building strong networks for research dissemination as a key area in the policy released September 2015. Excellent research is conducted in Canada but to achieve our full agricultural potential, it must be successfully communicated not only with other researchers but also with farmers and producers on the ground. In order to further inform this area of the policy, AIC is bringing together stakeholders involved in, or who make use of agricultural research to discuss topics including:    

Intellectual property protection Modern research extension strategies Maximizing technology transfer to industry stakeholders … and many more!

Join us in Ottawa April 13-14, 2016 for AIC 2016, a conference that promises to engage participants and stimulate lively debate, with opportunities to learn from industry experts and contribute input on these important policy issues.

VisitVisit thethe conference conferencewebsite website Register for AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Register AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Be part of AICfor2016 as conference sponsor - register online Be part of AIC 2016 as a Conference Sponsor – register online


February 8, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Producer, industry support help make MBP’s 37th AGM a success Photo by Angela Lovell

The 37th Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General meeting is in the books. Held at the Victoria Inn and Convention Centre in Brandon, the AGM was highlighted by terrific attendance, interesting and engaging panels and a sold out tradeshow. MBP President Heinz Reimer said the association was pleased with the AGM on a lot of levels, noting the interest among members was very strong, as was the support from industry. “I saw a lot of familiar faces in Brandon and

A number of MBP members raise their red voting cards during the resolutions portion of the 37th Annual General Meeting Thursday.

it’s always great to see everyone and hear their thoughts about MBP and the state of the industry,” Reimer said.

“We were also really happy to see lots of younger producers which bodes well for future expansion in Manitoba.

“Also, our trade show was a complete sellout and support from our sponsors was up significantly. Continued to Page 2

Find Us Online

mbbeef.ca @ManitobaBeef

Facebook.com


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

NCO resolution passed at AGM Continued from Page 1 All photos by Angela Lovell

We thank our members and the various businesses for their incredible support. It’s because of them the AGM was such a success.” The event began Feb. 4 with a knowledge industry session entitled Moving Cattle - Your Questions and Concerns Answered. Officials from the CCIA, MBP CFIA and Manitoba Livestock Marketing Association were on hand to speak about everything from animal welfare regulations to transporation research to what order buyers are looking for when they purchase cattle at an auction mart. The business portion of the meeting went Thursday afternoon and included a report on MBP’s activities from 2015 and a review of the financial report for the year. The afternoon agenda also included voting on the various resolu-

National Beef Strategy Chairman Martin Unrau

Manitoba Beef Producers President Heinz Reimer

tions that were brought forward at the 14 district meetings that were held in the fall. The most notable resolution was one on whether or not MBP members support the proposed increase of the National Check-off from the current $1 to $2.50. In a report from National Beef Strategy Chairman Martin Unrau, it was noted the increase is needed to support the various component

of the strategy which was created to develop a blueprint to ensure the Canadian beef industry has a sustainable and profitable future. Following a lengthy debate, MBP members voted overwhelmingly in favour of the the check-off increase. Day 2 of the AGM was highlighted by the panel discussion centred on the AGM theme From Our Gate to Your Plate: The Evolving Consumer. Jeff Fitzpatrick-Stilwell of McDonald’s Canada, Lauren Stone of Cargill and Manitoba beef producer and provincial Verified Beef Program Co-ordinator Betty Green came together for an interesting discussion that centred on the need for producers to combat the negative perceptions of the beef industry by telling their story and all the work that goes into caring for their animals and the environment. For a complete review of the AGM please see the March edition of Cattle Country.

An annoucement regarding the partnership between Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives and McDonald’s Canada was made during the MBP AGM. From left to right are: Jeff Fitzpatrick-Stilwell of McDonald’s Canada, Ramona Blyth of MBP, Charlotte Crawley of Ducks Unlimited and Duncan Morrison of the Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association. See release on Page 3 for more.


For Immediate Release, Feb. 4, 2016

MBFI, McDonald’s Partner on exciting project

Manitoba beef and forage producers to benefit from McDonald’s Canada sustainable beef industry focus BRANDON ‐ Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc. (MBFI) has kick‐started their official first year of operations by announcing an exciting $25,000 program partnership agreement with McDonald’s Restaurants of Canada to provide outreach and tours for Manitoba beef producers. “MBFI is committed to improving the public’s knowledge of the critical role the beef industry plays in sustaining both the Manitoba economy and in managing valuable ecosystems,” says Ramona Blyth, MBFI President and beef producer from MacGregor, Man. “Advancing and understanding the long‐term profitability and sustainability connections for Manitoba’s beef producers will be enhanced via this partnership with McDonald’s Canada. We are thrilled to welcome McDonald`s Canada into our MBFI fold.” MBFI is a collaboration between Manitoba Beef Producers, Manitoba Agriculture and Food Rural Development, Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association and Ducks Unlimited Canada collaborating for the advancement of the industry. The partnership made perfect sense and timing from McDonald’s perspective as the global restaurant leader has embarked on a verified sustainable beef pilot project in Canada. “McDonald’s Canada sources 100% Canadian beef from farms and ranches across the country for our hamburger patties, and we’re proud to continue our support for producers as part of the MBFI initiative,” said Jeffrey Fitzpatrick‐Stilwell Senior Manager of Sustainability, McDonald’s Restaurants of Canada Limited. “We have a vision for sourcing all our food from sustainable sources and partnerships with the MBFI help us on our journey as we learn from important research happening on the farm.” The McDonald’s support will develop and grow the McDonald’s Production Day Tour, a one to two‐day annual event to engage stakeholders. Already in high demand, this model of extension and outreach will benefit agricultural producers across Manitoba and Canada. While the exact dates of the tours are in early planning stages, MBFI will hold their grand opening later this year for the three research sites in the Brandon area: Brookdale, Johnson and First Street. “Cultivating partnerships between beef producers, governments and private stakeholders interested in advancing the industry is a key foundation of our MBFI objectives,” says Melinda German, MBP General Manager. “McDonald’s Canada has shown a great deal of interest in our commitment toward enhancing the profitability of beef and forage production by evaluating foundational research to the ranch level and transferring the knowledge gained to producers. This program partnership will be a very important component of communicating the exact values of what we are doing to numerous audiences.” ‐30‐ For More Information: Duncan Morrison, MBFI Communications, 204.770.3548


Manitoba Sustainable Energy Association Conference and AGM “Sustainable Energy in Manitoba – What’s Cooking?” When: February 10, 2016 9:30 am – 4:00 pm Where: Agricultural Extension Centre, 1129 Queen’s Ave., Brandon, MB Learn About and Provide Input On:  Southwest Regional Development Corporation’s Gasification Initiative – is this the answer to landfill challenges”  The Futuristic Manitoba Farm – Adapting to a Zero Carbon Economy  Residential Off‐Grid System Optimization  How to design an Energy Efficient Residential Building  Renewable Energy Initiatives On‐going with Manitoba Hydro  Alternate Energy and First Nation Communities  Pathways to Sustainable Energy  For more information and to register please visit the ManSEA website at www.mansea.org or email/phone wdigby@mymts.net (204) 727‐1394. Please register in advance. $25.00 Registration fee (which includes lunch) will be charged at the door.

CanaMaize Seed Inc. Box 144, Minto, MB R0K1M0 Toll Free: 1-877-262-4046 Fax: (204) 776-2250 Email: info@canamaize.com

CERTIFIED CONVENTIONAL CM440 GRAZING CORN Early maturing, leafier for increased grazing yield. Small stalks increase palatability and increase utilization rate. Low cost per grazing day. No planter required. Swath or standing grazing cattle, sheep, bison as well as for wildlife food plots. Call 1-877-262-4046 or Email info@canamaize.com


Denbie Ranch and Guests

BULL SALE Saturday, Feb 13th, 2016 1:00 P.M. @ Ste. Rose Auction Mart Selling:

Denbie Ranch 18 Two Year Old and 28 Long Yearling Red Angus and Red Angus X Simmental Hybrid Bulls

Bar J Myhre Land Myhre & CattleLand and Cattle 9 Yearling Charolais 12 Two Year Old Bulls 12Charolais Two Year Old Charolais Bulls & 5 Black Angus X Simmental

Denbie Ranch

Myhre Land and Cattle

Bar J

Denis and Debbie Guillas

Hans Myhre

Jack Robertson

204-447-2473

204-638-5664

204-843-2246

Cell: 204-447-7608

Cell: 204-648-6416

Justin Robertson 204-871-3086

View Catalogue @ srauction.ca


Antimicrobial use and resistance in beef cattle: what producers need to know; Webinar March 2 By the Beef Cattle Research Council In Canada, surveillance indicates that antimicrobial resistance levels in cattle and beef are extremely low and have not increased over time. Join this free webinar to learn more about why resistance is low, and what precautions beef producer can take to continue this trend. When Wednesday March 2 at 8 p.m. Watching on a tablet or mobile device? If you plan to join the webinar using your tablet or mobile device, you will need to download the appropriate receiver. We recommend that you join the webinar 15 minutes early as you will be prompted to download the receiver once you log in, which may take several minutes to complete. To download the receiver ahead of time, visit: http:// www.citrix.com/go/receiver.html Interested but aren’t available that evening? Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live event, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too. Cost BCRC webinars are available and free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time

and expertise to support advancements in the Canadian beef industry, and through the Knowledge Dissemination and Technology Transfer project funded by the National Check-off and Canada’s Beef Science Cluster. Speakers Dr. Craig Dorin – Veterinarian at Veterinary Agri-Health Services Ltd Dr. Dorin received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in 1985. His career started with 11 years in large animal practice in Kamloops, British Columbia and two additional years as Technical Services Veterinarian with Hoechst Roussel Vet. In 1998 he joined Veterinary Agri-Health Services where he has been a managing partner for the past 13 years. Reynold Bergen, Ph.D. – Beef Cattle Research Council Science Director Dr. Bergen provides scientific and industry expertise to the BCRC, Beef Science Cluster and Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). He works with industry to identify re-

search priorities, reviews research proposals and scientific reports, and engages with industry and research experts on an ongoing basis. What is a webinar?
 Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
 Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible. Visit our Webinars page to find other upcoming BCRC webinars and the recordings of our past sessions.


Government of Canada improves access to Cash Advances for producers February 5, 2016 – Ottawa, Ontario – Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Amendments to Advance Payments Program receive green light, beneficial changes are in place for 2016 Agriculture and Agri-Food Minister Lawrence MacAulay confirmed today that new regulations are now in place that simplify access to cash advances under the Advance Payments Program (APP) and make the program more flexible for farmers. The regulatory changes were made possible as a result of amendments made to the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act in February 2015. The regulatory changes, in place for the 2016 program year, allow for several new improvements, which include: • New commodities now qualify for advances under the program, including specific classes of breeding cattle, hog, sheep, and goats intended for market. • Producers can now use more types of security to obtain an advance such as private or other types of insurance. • A new streamlined application process reduces paper burden for returning clients. • Simplified access for companies with multiple shareholders. Quick Facts • The Advance Payments Program is a federal loan guarantee initiative that helps agricultural producers benefit from the best

market conditions by improving their cash flow throughout the year. • Farmers can access advances of up to $400,000 from more than 45 commodity groups across Canada. • Across Canada, approximately $2 billion in advances are provided to over 20,000 producers each year.

Improvements to the Advance Payments Program On February 27th, 2015, the Government of Canada announced the coming into force of the Agricultural Growth Actwhich makes improvements to the Advance Payments Program (APP). Many of the changes to the APP will be in place for April 1st, 2015. However, a number of the changes cannot be implemented until amendments to the related regulations are completed. How the changes for 2015 will affect you • Receive advances for all your commodities through one application with a single administrator; • To be eligible for an advance, you will no longer need to be principally occupied in farming; • New repayment schedule in line with the perishable date of non-storable products thereby avoiding the need for proof of sale; • Repay your advances without penalty if you decide to wait to market the commodity until condi-

tions are more favourable; • Repay your advance without penalty if the agricultural product becomes unmarketable through no fault of your own. The Agricultural Growth Act also allows for future improvements to be made through regulations • New commodities to be eligible for advances; • Improvements to be made to the application process to treat farmers more like returning clients; • More options for producers to secure an APP advance thereby potentially increasing amounts available under the program; • Additional flexibility for allowable repayment methods. • Specific classes of breeding animals intended for market may be eligible for advances; • Third-party guarantors for large corporations, co-operatives or subsidiary companies in lieu of each individual in the organization providing a guarantee. Changes are also being made to the Farm Debt Mediation Act to allow the Minister to participate in mediation under the Farm Debt Mediation Act as a guarantor of the APP advance for better service delivery. For producers this means the right people at the table to negotiate repayment arrangements, making it easier for producers to resolve their situation. For more information on the changes to the program, please contact an Advance Payments Program Administrator for your region.


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting DIAMOND SPONSORS

PRESIDENT’S BANQUET SPONSORS

Banquet Cocktail Sponsors

EVENT SPONSORS Lunch Sponsors

The Environmental Stewardship Award Sponsor Breakout Session Sponsors

Banquet Beef Sponsor


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting COFFEE SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSORS

Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd. Beef Advocacy Canada BIXSco Inc. / Viewtrak Technologies Inc. BMO Bank of Montreal Canadian Cattle Identification Agency DNA Insurance Farm Business Consultants (FBC) Hibrix Liquid Soil Supplement Hi-Pro Feeds Kane Veterinary Supplies / Allflex Landmark Feeds MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Charolais Association Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Manitoba Grass Fed Beef Association Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Livestock Marketing Association Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association Mazergroup Merck Animal Health NDE Canada The AgriPost The Victoria Inn Westoba Credit Union Ltd. 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ

SILVER SPONSORS

Dairy Farmers of Manitoba Ducks Unlimited Canada Hamiota Feedlot Ltd. Man – Sask Gelbvieh Association Manitoba Angus Association Prairie Livestock RBC Royal Bank The Hartford

BRONZE SPONSORS

AgriClear Aikins Law Austin Credit Union bioTrack CattleMax Software CIBC Gem Silage Products Killarney Auction Mart Ltd. Komb Ag Services Marquette Consumers Co-operatives Ltd. Mike Waddell – Murray Chrysler Westman MJ Endeavors Paddock Drilling Ltd. PastureMAP Precision Cam, a brand of Allen Leigh Security + Communications SAIT Polytechnic Sunrise Credit Union Tuff Equipment


The Agricultural Institute of Canada (AIC)’s next conference, AIC 2016 Disseminating Agricultural Research: Bridging the gap between idea and adoption is taking place April 13-14, 2016 in Ottawa!

When: Wednesday, April 13 and Thursday April 14, 2016 Where: Ottawa Marriott Hotel – Ottawa, ON Who should attend? Individuals involved in or affected by agricultural research and research dissemination, federal and provincial governments, private groups involved in research and/or agriculture, academia, and industry organizations.

In July 2015, agricultural stakeholders gathered in Ottawa to help develop a national agricultural research policy for the 21st century (read our conference report here). Broad consensus among participants identified building strong networks for research dissemination as a key area in the policy released September 2015. Excellent research is conducted in Canada but to achieve our full agricultural potential, it must be successfully communicated not only with other researchers but also with farmers and producers on the ground. In order to further inform this area of the policy, AIC is bringing together stakeholders involved in, or who make use of agricultural research to discuss topics including:    

Intellectual property protection Modern research extension strategies Maximizing technology transfer to industry stakeholders … and many more!

Join us in Ottawa April 13-14, 2016 for AIC 2016, a conference that promises to engage participants and stimulate lively debate, with opportunities to learn from industry experts and contribute input on these important policy issues.

VisitVisit thethe conference conferencewebsite website Register for AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Register AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Be part of AICfor2016 as conference sponsor - register online Be part of AIC 2016 as a Conference Sponsor – register online


Prairie Organics: Think Whole Farm Feb 18-19 Are you interested in learning how other livestock producers are improving their environmental performance AND their bottom line? Prairie Organics: Think Whole Farm will expose you to new ways of thinking about your livestock operation. Consider a few of the sessions below. *Tom Frantzen runs an integrated organic crop-livestock system in northeastern Iowa. Frantzen employs a five year crop rotation that integrates annual cropping with forages and livestock grazing. Frantzen will share his strategy for building a successful farm enterprise using principles he’s gleaned from Holistic Management and the classic business management text Good to Great by James Collins. *Jay Fuhrer and Todd McPeak Jay is a Conservationist and Todd is a rancher – both based in North Dakota. The team will review how cattle and the carbon cycle are used as tools to regenerate soils. The McPeak Grass and Cattle Ranch is used as a case study to explore Jay’s experiments with soil monitoring data for carbon, respiration, live biology, and nutrient cycling. Beef Producer Panel with Todd McPeak, Brian Harper and Ryan Boyd, moderated by Jay Fuhrer. Producers will provide advice and answer your questions about how to improve your bottom line while reducing the environmental footprint of your beef operation. Joanne Thiessen Martens and Ian Grossart Joanne is a researcher in the Natural Systems Laboratory at the University of Manitoba and Ian is an organic farmer from the Brandon area. Both researcher and practitioner have come to the same conclusion; significant economic and agronomic benefits can be realized by integrating livestock into organic cropping systems. *Chris Boettcher Chris runs a family farm in midwestern Ontario. He sees himself as the conductor of a complex farm business that includes multiple components that work synergistically to create a balanced and resilient farm ecosystem. Chris will explain how integrating a rotational sheep grazing system with field crops and vegetables makes both agronomic and financial sense. Dorothy Marshall Dorothy will help you to explore management practices to prevent disease and natural remedies that can be used in multiple species to treat health problems if they do arise. All are allowed under the Canadian Organic Standard. No “eye of newt or hair of dragon”, but simple readily accessible treatments with good science are included. The full program is available at: http://umanitoba.ca/afs/prairieorganics/program.html Registration Options Full two day pass, including lunch and snacks is $125 One day passes are available for $80, includes lunch and snacks for Thursday or Friday Two day webcast $50 – note that only the sessions in Richardson Auditorium will be live streamed. Talks marked with an asterisk above will be webcasted. For those intending to attend in-person, be sure to register early as we cannot guarantee that tickets will be available at the door.


January 22, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Manitoba Beef Producers’ 37th AGM set for Feb. 4-5 With less than two weeks to go, planning for Manitoba Beef Producers’ (MBP) 37th Annual General Meeting is in the home stretch. Scheduled for Feb. 4-5 at the Victoria Inn in Brandon, the theme for the meeting is From Our Gate to Your Plate: The Evolving Customer. MBP President Heinz Reimer said the theme touches on the need for producers to bridge the information gap between the farm and consumers. “Today people are more interested in knowing where their food comes

Jeffery Fitzpatrick-Stillwell of McDonald’s Canada and Lauren Stone of Cargill are two of the speakers for the panel discussion From Our Gate To Your Plate: The Evolving Customer at the 37th MBP AGM in Brandon.

from and how it’s produced than ever before,” said Reimer. “Throughout the AGM we will talk about the importance of

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

producers telling their story and helping provide the public with the information they are seeking.” Similar to past years, the

agenda for the 37th AGM is a full one. Everything kick offs at 9 a.m. on Feb. 4 when both registration and the sold out trade show begin. At 10 a.m. is an industry knowledge session entitled Moving Cattle – Your Questions and Concerns Answered featuring officials from the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA), Canadian Food Inspection Agency, MBP and the Manitoba Livestock Marketing Association. The business portion of the meeting takes place in the afternoon as Continued on Page 2

Upcoming Events Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting The 37th Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting will be held Feb. 4-5 at the Victoria Inn in Brandon. The theme for this year’s AGM is From Our Gate to Your Plate, Understanding the Evolving Customer. For more information on the AGM and how to register, please see page 4


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • The environmental hoofprint of Canada’s beef industry • Solid gains by the cattle sector • Tips to prepare you for calving season • CCA Report: Government responds to COOL report • A look at many of the Ag Days highlights from the Western Producer blog

Full agenda on tap Continued from Page 1 members will hear reports on MBP’s activities in 2015 and vote on the resolutions brought forward at the fall district meetings. Updates will be provided on the progress of Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives, as well as the proposed increase to the National Check-off. Capping off the evening is the President’s Banquet where the winner of The Environmental Sustainability Award (TESA) will be announced. Popular Manitoba comedian Matt Falk is the featured entertainer for the evening. Day 2’s activities begin at 8:30 a.m. with the panel discussion From Our Gate to Your Plate: The Evolving Customer featuring from Jeffery Fitzpatrick-Stillwell of McDonald’s Canada, Lauren Stone of Cargill and Manitoba producer and Verified Beef Production Program Coordinator Betty Green. Following the panel will be reports from national industry partners the CCIA, Beef Cattle Research Council and CanFax. “The AGM is an excellent opportunity for producers to learn about MBP’s activities on their behalf and help direct its advocacy activities through the resolutions session. The two panel discussions will also be very informative. It is a great time to network with fellow producers and industry officials and we look forward to seeing everyone in Brandon.” A complete agenda and information on how to register can be found at mbbeef.ca/annual-meeting/.


Denbie Ranch and Guests

BULL SALE Saturday, Feb 13th, 2016 1:00 P.M. @ Ste. Rose Auction Mart Selling:

Denbie Ranch 18 Two Year Old and 28 Long Yearling Red Angus and Red Angus X Simmental Hybrid Bulls

Myhre Land and Cattle 12 Two Year Old Charolais Bulls Denbie Ranch

Myhre Land and Cattle

Bar J

Denis and Debbie Guillas

Hans Myhre

Jack Robertson

204-447-2473

204-638-5664

204-843-2246

Cell: 204-447-7608

Cell: 204-648-6416

Justin Robertson 204-871-3086

View Catalogue @ srauction.ca


age are well documented, the reality is that round bales will continue to be stored in Mother Nature’s full view. To that end, let’s focus on best practices for outdoor storage. Storage losses accumulate pretty quickly when you consider that the outer 4 inches of a 5-foot diameter bale account for at least 25 percent of the bale’s dry matter and close to half in the outer 8 inches. Research studies have documented dry matter

recovery when you consider the feed and time savings. · Make dense bales — it’s a no-brainer that they shed water better. Perhaps more importantly, they sag less so that there is reduced bale-to-soil contact (if stored on bare ground). Much of the storage loss often comes on the bottom of the bale. · As with real estate, location is important for outdoor bale storage. A rock base is ideal, but if

that’s not practical then select an area that is well drained and subject to good air movement. Never store bales under or along a tree line. · Tightly stack bales end–to-end. This reduces end spoilage. Reducing end spoilage by 2 inches

per end per bale saves about a 5-foot wide bale of hay for every 16 bales in the line. · Leave about a 3-foot space between bale rows to enhance air movement and drying. · Run bale rows parallel with the slope. Rows

stacked across the slope act as a barrier to water movement. Actual forage dry matter and quality losses will depend largely on weather and length of storage. Nevertheless, if storing bales outside, a little

bit of planning to preserve harvested yield and quality will pay big dividends over the long haul. This article originally appeared in the Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Oct. 8 eBulletin. To receive the eBulletin go to mfga.net.

37th Annual General Meeting

& President’s Banquet February 4 - 5, 2016 | Victoria Inn, Brandon, MB

REGISTER AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR CALL 1-800-772-0458.

REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR MAIL OR FAX YOUR REGISTRATION TODAY! EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION $75 PER PERSON

PERSON 1: q EARLY BIRD $75 q GENERAL $90

• Must be purchased by January 5, 2016 at 4 p.m.

NAME: _______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50).

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• Non-refundable.

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________

Book early to get your best value!

MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 PER PERSON GENERAL REGISTRATION $90 PER PERSON - AFTER JAN. 5 • Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). • Non-refundable.

q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________ PHONE: ______________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ PERSON 2 (IF REQUIRED): q EARLY BIRD $75 q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 q GENERAL $90 q YOUNG PRODUCER *Complimentary with mentor’s registration NAME: _______________________________________________

NEW! YOUNG PRODUCER MENTORSHIP OFFER

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• MBP members are encouraged to mentor and register a young producer (ages 18 to 39).

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________

• The young producer receives a complimentary registration with a mentor’s registration.

PHONE: ______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). MAKE CHEQUE PAYABLE TO: Manitoba Beef Producers 220 - 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 PHONE: 1-800-772-0458 FAX: 204-774-3264

RESERVE A ROOM: Call the Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre toll free: 1-800-852-2710 Quote booking number: 268463

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ EXTRA BANQUET TICKET NAME: _______________________________________________ q BANQUET $50 *Banquet tickets are non-refundable.

www.mbbeef.ca

AGM DETAILS TO COME IN THE DECEMBER CATTLE COUNTRY AND WILL BE AVAILABLE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA UNDER THE NEWS TAB.

CALL 1-800-772-0458 FOR REMOVAL FROM MAILING LIST OR ADDRESS CHANGE.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS 37TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING


37

TH

ANNUAL GENERA E V E N T AG E N D A

Thursday, February 4, 2016 9:00

Registration Begins and Trade Show Opens

10:00 – 12:00 Industry Knowledge Session: Moving Cattle – Your Questions and Concerns Answered i. Canadian Cattle Identification Agency ii. Carollyne Kehler Update on research project re: cattle transportation iii. Canadian Food Inspection Agency: Dr. Max Popp, Animal Health District Veterinarian, Western Area Operations and Rebeka Klassen, Animal Health Programs Inspector and Manitoba Region Animal ID Lead iv. Rick Wright, Manitoba Livestock Marketing Association 12:00 – 12:45 Lunch for registered AGM delegates

Convention Convenes 12:45 – 12:50 Meeting called to order by Co-Chairs Melinda German and Dave Koslowsky 12:50 – 1:30 National Check-off Discussion

Martin Unrau, co-chair of the National Beef Strategic Planning Group

4


THEME:

FROM OUR GATE TO YOUR PLATE: THE EVOLVING CUSTOMER

Thursday (continued)

1:30 – 2:15

Business Portion of the Annual General Meeting

• Approval of Agenda - Heinz Reimer • Approval of Minutes from 2015 36th AGM Heinz Reimer • Report from the President - Heinz Reimer • Report from the GM - Melinda German • Report from the Finance Chair - Theresa Zuk • Approval of MBP’s audited financial statement • Appointment of MBP auditor for the upcoming fiscal year • Introduction and Ratification of MBP Directors - Melinda German

2:15 – 3:15

Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc. Update/Partner Announcement

3:15 – 3:30

Coffee Break

3:30 – 5:00

Resolutions Debate -- Marlin Beever, Parliamentarian

5:30

Cocktail Hour

6:30

President’s Banquet

• Opening Remarks from President Heinz Reimer • Manitoba TESA Award Winner Announcement • Dinner • Dessert • Retiring Directors Speeches

8:00

Entertainment – comedian Matt Falk

5


37

ANNUAL GENERAL

TH

E V E N T AG E N D A Friday, February 5 5, 2016 Thursday, February 8:00 – 8:30

Coffee service, Trade Show opens

8:30 – 10:15 Panel Discussion: From Our Gate to Your Plate: The Evolving Customer

Speakers (Speakers subject to change) Jeffrey Fitzpatrick-Stillwell Manager of Sustainability and Government Relations for McDonald’s Canada Lauren Stone Manager of Corporate Affairs and Sustainability for Cargill Ltd. Betty Green Manitoba Verified Beef Program Coordinator Program and rancher 10:15 – 10:35 Coffee Break 10:35 – 12:00 Reports from National Organizations

6

• Report from the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency – Dr. Pat Burrage • Report from the Beef Cattle Research Council - Dr. Reynold Bergen, Science Director • Report from Canfax - Brian Perillat, Manager and Senior Analyst

12:00

President’s Closing Remarks

12:10

Adjourn


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting DIAMOND SPONSORS

PRESIDENT’S BANQUET SPONSORS

Banquet Cocktail Sponsors

EVENT SPONSORS Lunch Sponsors

The Environmental Stewardship Award Sponsor Breakout Session Sponsors

Banquet Beef Sponsor


Thank You to AGM sponsors COFFEE SPONSORS

RBC Royal Bank The Hartford

BRONZE SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSORS

Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd. Beef Advocacy Canada BIXSco Inc. / Viewtrak Technologies Inc. BMO Bank of Montreal Canadian Cattle Identification Agency DNA Insurance Farm Business Consultants (FBC) Hibrix Liquid Soil Supplement Hi-Pro Feeds Kane Veterinary Supplies / Allflex Landmark Feeds MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Charolais Association Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Livestock Marketing Association Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association Mazergroup Merck Animal Health NDE Canada The AgriPost The Victoria Inn Westoba Credit Union Ltd. 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ

SILVER SPONSORS

Dairy Farmers of Manitoba Ducks Unlimited Canada Hamiota Feedlot Ltd. Man – Sask Gelbvieh Association Manitoba Angus Association Prairie Livestock

AgriClear Aikins Law Austin Credit Union bioTrack CattleMax Software CIBC Gem Silage Products Killarney Auction Mart Ltd. Komb Ag Services Marquette Consumers Co-operatives Ltd. Mike Waddell – Murray Chrysler Westman Paddock Drilling Ltd. Precision Cam, a brand of Allen Leigh Security + Communications SAIT Polytechnic Sunrise Credit Union Tuff Equipment Tradeshow Participants Beef Advocacy Canada BIXSco Inc. / Viewtrak Technologies Inc. BMO Bank of Montreal C & C Rentals / Bobcat of Brandon Canadian Cattle Identification Agency Central Testing Laboratory DNA Insurance EMF Nutrition Enns Brothers Farm Business Consultants (FBC) Hibrix Liquid Soil Supplement Hi-Pro Feeds Kane Veterinary Supplies / Allflex Landmark Feeds Livestock Predation Protection Working Group Manitoba Co-operator Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation Manitoba Charolais Association Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Manitoba Grass Fed Beef Association Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Hereford Association Manitoba Livestock Cash Advance Masterfeeds Mazergroup Merck Animal Health MNP NDE Canada Sterling Truck & Trailer Sales Ltd. The Association of Manitoba Community Pastures True North Foods Verified Beef Production Westoba Credit Union Ltd.


MBP at AG Days

Much of the province’s agriculture industry was in Brandon this week for the 2016 version of Manitoba Ag Days. MBP was in the thick of the action with a booth in the Kinsmen Arena. A number of MBP directors including (from left to right) Bill Murray, Peter Penner and Tom Teichroeb were on hand to meet with members and answer any questions they had.

Manitoba Sustainable Energy Association Conference and AGM “Sustainable Energy in Manitoba – What’s Cooking?” When: February 10, 2016 9:30 am – 4:00 pm Where: Agricultural Extension Centre, 1129 Queen’s Ave., Brandon, MB Learn About and Provide Input On:  Southwest Regional Development Corporation’s Gasification Initiative – is this the answer to landfill challenges”  The Futuristic Manitoba Farm – Adapting to a Zero Carbon Economy  Residential Off‐Grid System Optimization  How to design an Energy Efficient Residential Building  Renewable Energy Initiatives On‐going with Manitoba Hydro  Alternate Energy and First Nation Communities  Pathways to Sustainable Energy  For more information and to register please visit the ManSEA website at www.mansea.org or email/phone wdigby@mymts.net (204) 727‐1394. Please register in advance. $25.00 Registration fee (which includes lunch) will be charged at the door.


Why use artificial insemination? BCRC Webinar January 28 Using artificial insemination (AI) on commercial cow-calf operations can be both practical and economical. Pregnancy rates using AI can be similar to those using natural service, and depending on the protocol used, can be more economical than using natural service. Join this free webinar to help understand whether AI is a smart choice for your operation. We’ll cover both the economics of AI, as well as some of the basics of AI, heat detection, and heat synchronization. When Thursday January 28th at 8 p.m. in SK and MB Watching on a tablet or mobile device? If you plan to join the webinar using your tablet or mobile device, you will need to download the appropriate receiver. We recommend that you join the webinar 15 minutes early as you will be prompted to download the receiver once you log in, which may take several minutes to complete. To download the receiver ahead of time, visit: http://www.citrix.com/ go/receiver.html Interested but aren’t available that evening? Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By

attending the live event, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too. Duration Approximately 1 hour. Cost BCRC webinars are available and free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time and expertise to support advancements in the Canadian beef industry, and through the Knowledge Dissemination and Technology Transfer project funded by the National Check-off and Canada’s Beef Science Cluster. Speakers Kathy Larson – Research Economist at Western Beef Development Centre Kathy has been the Western Beef Development Centre’s Research Economist since April 2010. Her research program is interested in helping producers to understand the value in measuring – both financial and production records – in order to manage and increase their profit potential. Dr. Colin Palmer. – Associate Professor at the Western College of Veterinary medicine Palmer gained experience in

mixed animal practice in Ontario, British Columbia and Saskatchewan before joining the WCVM in 2000. Dr. Palmer is extensively involved in teaching undergraduate theriogenology and is primarily responsible for the palpation and obstetric labs. What is a Webinar? Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
 Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible.


The Agricultural Institute of Canada (AIC)’s next conference, AIC 2016 Disseminating Agricultural Research: Bridging the gap between idea and adoption is taking place April 13-14, 2016 in Ottawa!

When: Wednesday, April 13 and Thursday April 14, 2016 Where: Ottawa Marriott Hotel – Ottawa, ON Who should attend? Individuals involved in or affected by agricultural research and research dissemination, federal and provincial governments, private groups involved in research and/or agriculture, academia, and industry organizations.

In July 2015, agricultural stakeholders gathered in Ottawa to help develop a national agricultural research policy for the 21st century (read our conference report here). Broad consensus among participants identified building strong networks for research dissemination as a key area in the policy released September 2015. Excellent research is conducted in Canada but to achieve our full agricultural potential, it must be successfully communicated not only with other researchers but also with farmers and producers on the ground. In order to further inform this area of the policy, AIC is bringing together stakeholders involved in, or who make use of agricultural research to discuss topics including:    

Intellectual property protection Modern research extension strategies Maximizing technology transfer to industry stakeholders … and many more!

Join us in Ottawa April 13-14, 2016 for AIC 2016, a conference that promises to engage participants and stimulate lively debate, with opportunities to learn from industry experts and contribute input on these important policy issues.

VisitVisit thethe conference conferencewebsite website Register for AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Register AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Be part of AICfor2016 as conference sponsor - register online Be part of AIC 2016 as a Conference Sponsor – register online


Prairie Organics: Think Whole Farm Feb 18-19 Are you interested in learning how other livestock producers are improving their environmental performance AND their bottom line? Prairie Organics: Think Whole Farm will expose you to new ways of thinking about your livestock operation. Consider a few of the sessions below. *Tom Frantzen runs an integrated organic crop-livestock system in northeastern Iowa. Frantzen employs a five year crop rotation that integrates annual cropping with forages and livestock grazing. Frantzen will share his strategy for building a successful farm enterprise using principles he’s gleaned from Holistic Management and the classic business management text Good to Great by James Collins. *Jay Fuhrer and Todd McPeak Jay is a Conservationist and Todd is a rancher – both based in North Dakota. The team will review how cattle and the carbon cycle are used as tools to regenerate soils. The McPeak Grass and Cattle Ranch is used as a case study to explore Jay’s experiments with soil monitoring data for carbon, respiration, live biology, and nutrient cycling. Beef Producer Panel with Todd McPeak, Brian Harper and Ryan Boyd, moderated by Jay Fuhrer. Producers will provide advice and answer your questions about how to improve your bottom line while reducing the environmental footprint of your beef operation. Joanne Thiessen Martens and Ian Grossart Joanne is a researcher in the Natural Systems Laboratory at the University of Manitoba and Ian is an organic farmer from the Brandon area. Both researcher and practitioner have come to the same conclusion; significant economic and agronomic benefits can be realized by integrating livestock into organic cropping systems. *Chris Boettcher Chris runs a family farm in midwestern Ontario. He sees himself as the conductor of a complex farm business that includes multiple components that work synergistically to create a balanced and resilient farm ecosystem. Chris will explain how integrating a rotational sheep grazing system with field crops and vegetables makes both agronomic and financial sense. Dorothy Marshall Dorothy will help you to explore management practices to prevent disease and natural remedies that can be used in multiple species to treat health problems if they do arise. All are allowed under the Canadian Organic Standard. No “eye of newt or hair of dragon”, but simple readily accessible treatments with good science are included. The full program is available at: http://umanitoba.ca/afs/prairieorganics/program.html Registration Options Full two day pass, including lunch and snacks is $125 One day passes are available for $80, includes lunch and snacks for Thursday or Friday Two day webcast $50 – note that only the sessions in Richardson Auditorium will be live streamed. Talks marked with an asterisk above will be webcasted. For those intending to attend in-person, be sure to register early as we cannot guarantee that tickets will be available at the door.


Beef Noodle Bowl Recipe Courtesy of Canada Beef Prep time: 10 mins, Cook time: 10 mins Total time: 20 mins Made with a simple ginger-infused broth and thinly sliced lean Flank Steak for beef, this delicious meal-soup is low in fat and high in flavour. You can substitute stir-fry strips or other thinly sliced steak. Cooked spaghettini or capellini pasta or two 85 g packages of dried oriental noodles can sub-in for the fresh chow mein noodles (omitting the flavouring sachets). Recipe type: Main Cuisine: Asian Serves: 4 servings Ingredients: - ¼ cup (50 mL) soy sauce (low sodium) - 1 tbsp (15 mL) Asian chili sauce - 12 oz (375 g) Beef Flank or other steak cut in super-thin slices across the grain or Stir-Fry Strips - 5 cups (1.25 L) beef or chicken stock (low sodium) - 3 slices (1/4-inch /5 mm thick) gingerroot - 2 cloves garlic, sliced - 2 cups (500 mL) sliced bok choy or shredded spinach leaves - Half a 350 g pkg refrigerated fresh steamed chow mein noodles - ¼ cup (50 mL) EACH slivered sweet red pepper or carrot, and sliced green beans or snow peas - Chopped green onion and fresh cilantro - Sesame oil, fish sauce and/or oyster/hoisin sauce Instructions • Combine soy sauce and chili sauce in large sealable freezer bag. Add beef strips and set aside. Combine stock, gingerroot and garlic in stock pot; bring to boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes. • Stir in bok choy and noodles; return to simmer and cook for 3 minutes. Add beef and its marinade; return to simmer and cook for 3 minutes or until beef is just pink inside and noodles are tender. • Transfer about 1 cup (250 mL) noodles, meat and bok choy with tongs to each of 4 soup bowls. Top each with sweet red pepper, green beans, and onion and cilantro to taste and about 1 cup (250 mL) hot broth. Finish each with a few drops of sesame oil, fish sauce and oyster or hoisin sauce. Nutrition Information Calories: 276 Fat: 3 g Carbohydrates: 31 g Protein: 30 g


January 8, 2016

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP announces resignation of general manager A familiar face to many in the Manitoba beef industry will soon be heading west. The Board of Directors of Manitoba Beef Producers announced Friday morning they have accepted the resignation of General Manager Melinda German. German’s final day with MBP is Feb. 22. In the same media release it was noted that German has been named as the general manager of the Canadian Beef Cattle Research, Market Development and Promotion Agency in Calgary. MBP President Heinz

Reimer said it linda for her was with regret contributions to Manitoba that the board Beef Producaccepted Gerers and wish man’s resignaher the best tion. in her new “Melinda position.” has been a German said strong general the decision manager for was not an Manitoba Beef easy one, notProducers and Melinda German ing that Manaccomplished itoba has been her home a great deal in her time for a number of years and with us,” Reimer said. while she will miss her “We are sad to be losing friends and colleagues, her but pleased to know she will continue to work she is excited about what lies ahead in Calgary. in the beef industry. “On behalf of the board “This is an excellent opI would like to thank Me- portunity for me to work

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

at a national level and continue to serve beef producers, particularly those I have gotten to know during my time in Manitoba. This is an important time for the beef industry and I’m excited to have the opportunity to be part of it while continuing to work in the best interests of producers.” German added that she would like to thank the MBP board of directors for the opportunity to serve as general manager and their support during her time with MBP. Continued to Page 2

Upcoming Events Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting The 37th Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting will be held Feb. 4-5 at the Victoria Inn in Brandon. The theme for this year’s AGM is From Our Gate to Your Plate, Understanding the Evolving Customer. For more information on the AGM and how to register, please see page 4


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • Operation Ag Careers to launch in 2016 • Do cattle producers still need to treat for warbles? • Take preg-checking beyond face value • Task force completes risk management review recommendations • Dietary energy levels for backgrounding calves

German resigns Continued to Page 2

“I must also thank the staff of Manitoba Beef Producers for their hard work. Our members are fortunate to have this dedicated group working on their behalf.” In a Canada Beef media release, Chairman Jack Hextall said they are excited to have German join their team. “Her industry experience, education and desire to move the industry forward will be invaluable,” Hextall said. The release added that under the direction of the Board of Directors, German’s role will be exciting and challenging, ensuring transparency and accountability around the National Check-Off. She will work closely with funders, including importers, exporters, and cattle producers, as well as with provincial and federal stakeholders, and be accountable for organizational performance and alignment with activities under the purview of the Farm Products Agencies Act. This position is new for the Agency, and begins a period of transition where the three main functions, check-off management, marketing, and research, will be managed by separate divisions. The new structure was developed by the Board of Directors, in consultation with provincial funder groups to ensure continued transparency and prudent management of the National Check-Off. The national check-off is a mandatory levy of $1 per head collected from cattle producers when they market their cattle by provincial organizations, using their existing collection systems involving auction markets, order buyers, brand inspectors and others who handle cattle sales. It is collected across Canada to fund research and marketing activities on behalf of the entire industry.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


South Korea lifts BSE trade restrictions CCA Media Release The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased that Canadian beef and beef products can once again flow to South Korea effective immediately, following that country’s lifting of a temporary suspension imposed in February 2015 in response to the confirmation of a case (#19) of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in Alberta. CCA President Dave Solverson said the resumption of access to South Korea is important for Canada’s beef producers. “South Korea holds huge potential for beef and especially cuts and offals that are underutilized here at home. Korea is a market that will pay more for those select items and that helps to increase the overall value of the animal for producers,” he said. Exports to South Korea were 1 per cent of Canadian beef exports in 2014 -- or 3,200 tonnes for $25.8 million, making it the sixth largest export destination by volume. With the implementation of the Canada-Korea Free Trade Agreement in late 2014, the CCA believes Canadian beef exports to Korea have the potential to exceed $50 million per year. The action by South Korea to lift the restrictions as of December

30 follows the recent release of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) final report on the investigation into BSE case #19. Per the protocol between Canada and South Korea reached in 2012, in the event of confirmed BSE cases in Canada, South Korea can temporarily suspend importation of Canadian beef, pending provision of further information on the case. The CFIA final report on case #19 found that the most likely cause was the presence of a very small level of residual contaminated feed at the farm – a conclusion consistent with investigations conducted by other countries who have had BSE cases born after enhanced feed bans were implemented. The conclusion of the CFIA final report enabled Korean health officials to make their determination that resumption of imports of Canadian beef poses no health

risk to the Korean population. The CFIA investigation confirms that Canada has robust controls and surveillance programs to prevent the spread of BSE and detect the small and declining number of cases that are expected to occur from time to time. It is important to note that Canada, as a controlled risk country for BSE, is permitted to export beef from any age of animal given the established human and animal health controls it has in place. “The remaining few markets that have not resumed trade with Canada are not following these internationally recognized guidelines,” Solverson said. The CCA will continue to work with the Government of Canada to assure international markets of the soundness of the control measures in place in Canada and to continue to encourage other countries to remove their remaining BSE restrictions.


bales will continue to be stored in Mother Nature’s full view. To that end, let’s focus on best practices for outdoor storage. Storage losses accumulate pretty quickly when you consider that the outer 4 inches of a 5-foot diameter bale account for at least 25 percent of the bale’s dry matter and close to half in the outer 8 inches. Research studies have documented dry matter

savings. · Make dense bales — it’s a no-brainer that they shed water better. Perhaps more importantly, they sag less so that there is reduced bale-to-soil contact (if stored on bare ground). Much of the storage loss often comes on the bottom of the bale. · As with real estate, location is important for outdoor bale storage. A rock base is ideal, but if

that’s not practical then select an area that is well drained and subject to good air movement. Never store bales under or along a tree line. · Tightly stack bales end–to-end. This reduces end spoilage. Reducing end spoilage by 2 inches

per end per bale saves about a 5-foot wide bale of hay for every 16 bales in the line. · Leave about a 3-foot space between bale rows to enhance air movement and drying. · Run bale rows parallel with the slope. Rows

stacked across the slope act as a barrier to water movement. Actual forage dry matter and quality losses will depend largely on weather and length of storage. Nevertheless, if storing bales outside, a little

bit of planning to preserve harvested yield and quality will pay big dividends over the long haul. This article originally appeared in the Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Oct. 8 eBulletin. To receive the eBulletin go to mfga.net.

37th Annual General Meeting

& President’s Banquet February 4 - 5, 2016 | Victoria Inn, Brandon, MB

REGISTER AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR CALL 1-800-772-0458.

REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR MAIL OR FAX YOUR REGISTRATION TODAY! EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION $75 PER PERSON

PERSON 1: q EARLY BIRD $75 q GENERAL $90

• Must be purchased by January 5, 2016 at 4 p.m.

NAME: _______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50).

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• Non-refundable.

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________

Book early to get your best value!

MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 PER PERSON GENERAL REGISTRATION $90 PER PERSON - AFTER JAN. 5 • Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). • Non-refundable.

q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________ PHONE: ______________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ PERSON 2 (IF REQUIRED): q EARLY BIRD $75 q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 q GENERAL $90 q YOUNG PRODUCER *Complimentary with mentor’s registration NAME: _______________________________________________

NEW! YOUNG PRODUCER MENTORSHIP OFFER

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• MBP members are encouraged to mentor and register a young producer (ages 18 to 39).

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________

• The young producer receives a complimentary registration with a mentor’s registration.

PHONE: ______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). MAKE CHEQUE PAYABLE TO: Manitoba Beef Producers 220 - 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 PHONE: 1-800-772-0458 FAX: 204-774-3264

RESERVE A ROOM: Call the Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre toll free: 1-800-852-2710 Quote booking number: 268463

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ EXTRA BANQUET TICKET NAME: _______________________________________________ q BANQUET $50 *Banquet tickets are non-refundable.

www.mbbeef.ca

AGM DETAILS TO COME IN THE DECEMBER CATTLE COUNTRY AND WILL BE AVAILABLE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA UNDER THE NEWS TAB.

CALL 1-800-772-0458 FOR REMOVAL FROM MAILING LIST OR ADDRESS CHANGE.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS 37TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING


Beef and Forage Week Seminars The Manitoba Beef Producers, Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association and Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development (MAFRD) are hosting beef and forage seminars in your local community. Register today to hear a wide variety of speakers provide information on how to maximize forage fertility and productivity, extensive wintering of livestock, beef market outlook for 2016 and updates on the Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiative and the McDonalds Canada sustainable beef pilot*. Seminar times are 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Monday, January 11 Tuesday, January 12 Wednesday, January 13 Thursday, January 14 Friday, January 15

Vita* Ste. Rose du Lac* Holland* Brandon Eriksdale

Vita GO Office Ste. Rose GO Office Portage GO Office Brandon GO Office Arborg GO Office

204-425-5050 204-447-4032 204-239-3352 204-726-6482 204-376-3300

*Includes an update on the McDonalds Canada sustainable beef pilot

For more information and to register, contact the MAFRD GO Office listed above. Beef and Forage Week Seminars Print Ad Ad size: 8.5�w x 5.5�h


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting DIAMOND SPONSORS

Banquet Cocktail Sponsors

PRESIDENT’S BANQUET SPONSORS

EVENT SPONSORS Lunch Sponsors

The Environmental Stewardship Award Sponsor

Breakout Session Sponsors Banquet Beef Sponsor


Thank You to AGM sponsors COFFEE SPONSORS

Prairie Livestock RBC Royal Bank The Hartford

BRONZE SPONSORS

AgriClear Aikins Law Austin Credit Union CattleMax Software CIBC Gem Silage Products Killarney Auction Mart Ltd. Marquette Consumers Co-operatives Ltd. Paddock Drilling Ltd. Sunrise Credit Union Tuff Equipment

GOLD SPONSORS

Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd. Beef Advocacy Canada BIXSco Inc. / Viewtrak Technologies Inc. BMO Bank of Montreal Canadian Cattle Identification Agency DNA Insurance Farm Business Consultants (FBC) Hibrix Liquid Soil Supplement Hi-Pro Feeds Kane Veterinary Supplies / Allflex Landmark Feeds MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Agriculture Services Corporation Manitoba Charolais Association Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Livestock Marketing Association Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association Mazergroup Merck Animal Health NDE Canada The AgriPost The Victoria Inn Westoba Credit Union Ltd. 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ

SILVER SPONSORS

Dairy Farmers of Manitoba Ducks Unlimited Canada Manitoba Angus Association

Tradeshow Participants BIXSco Inc. / Viewtrak Technologies Inc. BMO Bank of Montreal C & C Rentals / Bobcat of Brandon Canadian Cattle Identification Agency Central Testing Laboratory DNA Insurance EMF Nutrition Enns Brothers Farm Business Consultants (FBC) Farm Credit Canada Hibrix Liquid Soil Supplement Hi-Pro Feeds Kane Veterinary Supplies / Allflex LandmarK Feeds Manitoba Co-operator Manitoba Agriculture Services Corporation Manitoba Charolais Association Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Manitoba Grass Fed Beef Association Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Hereford Association Manitoba Livestock Cash Advance Masterfeeds Mazergroup Merck Animal Health MNP NDE Canada Sterling Truck & Trailer Sales Ltd. True North Foods Verified Beef Production Westoba Credit Union Ltd.


The Agricultural Institute of Canada (AIC)’s next conference, AIC 2016 Disseminating Agricultural Research: Bridging the gap between idea and adoption is taking place April 13-14, 2016 in Ottawa!

When: Wednesday, April 13 and Thursday April 14, 2016 Where: Ottawa Marriott Hotel – Ottawa, ON Who should attend? Individuals involved in or affected by agricultural research and research dissemination, federal and provincial governments, private groups involved in research and/or agriculture, academia, and industry organizations.

In July 2015, agricultural stakeholders gathered in Ottawa to help develop a national agricultural research policy for the 21st century (read our conference report here). Broad consensus among participants identified building strong networks for research dissemination as a key area in the policy released September 2015. Excellent research is conducted in Canada but to achieve our full agricultural potential, it must be successfully communicated not only with other researchers but also with farmers and producers on the ground. In order to further inform this area of the policy, AIC is bringing together stakeholders involved in, or who make use of agricultural research to discuss topics including:    

Intellectual property protection Modern research extension strategies Maximizing technology transfer to industry stakeholders … and many more!

Join us in Ottawa April 13-14, 2016 for AIC 2016, a conference that promises to engage participants and stimulate lively debate, with opportunities to learn from industry experts and contribute input on these important policy issues.

VisitVisit thethe conference conferencewebsite website Register for AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Register AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Be part of AICfor2016 as conference sponsor - register online Be part of AIC 2016 as a Conference Sponsor – register online


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