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December 18, 2015

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter End of COOL is in sight After many years of seeing little to no progress, it looks as though the US Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) legislation is nearing its end. This morning the U.S. House of Representatives passed a $1.1 trillion omnibus spending bill that included a provision to repeal the controversial legislation. A couple of hours after the House vote, the Senate also passed the bill. The dense bill will now go to President Barack Obama who must sign it into law for it to become official. That had not happened as of the writing of this article and the general attitude in the cattle industry was one of

cautious optimism. The sudden movement by the United States to potentially repeal COOL comes on the heels of a Dec. 7 decision by the World Trade Organization that authorized Canada and Mexico to impose tariffs of $1.01 Billion on US imports. In a joint statement issued Dec. 7 by the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA), Canada Meat Council, National Cattle Feeder’s Association and Canadian Pork Council the organizations said they were pleased with the WTO decision and again called on the US to repeal COOL or face tariffs. “US mandatory Country

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of Origin Labeling has been in effect since 2008. As the arbitrator’s finding shows, in these seven years the cumulative losses for the Canadian beef and pork sectors have been staggering,” the statement said. “At every step of the process, the WTO has repeatedly found that the U.S. is in breach of its WTO obligations. The only revision the U.S. has made, in 2013, increased the negative impact on Canadian farmers and meat processors. “Our patience is exhausted. There is no further negotiation to be done and no compromise is acceptable. Canadian livestock producers and

meat processors expect the U.S. to do nothing less than repeal COOL or face the immediate imposition of retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods to the same extent as the damage we have endured.” The WTO decision and renewed threats of retaliation from Canada and Mexico had the desired effect of spurring the US government into action. On Dec. 16 it was announced that language to repeal COOL was included in the massive omnibus bill, which was needed to fund the US government’s activities and avoid a shutdown. In a statement from the Continued to Page 2

Upcoming Events Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting The 37th Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting will be held Feb. 4-5 at the Victoria Inn in Brandon. The theme for this year’s AGM is From Our Gate to Your Plate, Understanding the Evolving Customer. For more information on the AGM and how to register, please see page 4


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • Consider all the costs of backgrounding calves • Cattail harvesting shows promise to aid province’s water woes • Why we can’t afford to drag our feet on BSE testing • Manitoba producers welcome good prices, say they feed expansion hopes • Performance improving product approvals

CCA that day they expressed optimism the bill would pass but were aware that it was not a slam dunk by any means. “While this is an encouraging sign, there is much work to do before the omnibus bill becomes law,” the statement read. “The CCA will continue to work with its US allies over the coming days as Congressmen and Senators consider this legislation to advocate that we expect nothing less than full repeal of COOL to avoid imposition of retaliatory tariffs on US products.” The flurry of activity led up to a number of important events today. Along with the two anticipated votes by the House of Representatives and Senate, Canada is officially in a position to impose tariffs as of today. Although they remained hopeful of a complete repeal, the Canadian government said retaliation was likely should the bill not receive final approval from Obama. For more on COOL as it happens follow Manitoba Beef Producers on Facebook and Twitter as updates will be posted as they become available. A complete recap of all COOL news can be found in the February issue of Cattle Country.

Have an article you would like to see in the E-Newsletter? Contact Chad Saxon for more information. csaxon@mbbeef.ca Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


BCRC unveils new video on what beef producers need to know about pain control and prevention

Injuries, ailments and surgery hurt. On days you slam your hand in a gate, wake up with a knee that’s more sore than usual, or are admitted to a hospital for an operation, anti-inflammatory painkillers (analgesics) and drugs that block all nerve sensation (anesthetics) are things to be grateful for. Pain is expected in life, but the ability to avoid or diminish it at times not only makes our days more pleasant, pain mitigation helps to keep us productive and able to look after ourselves. Common sense and scientific evidence tells us that the same

goes for cattle. There’s no doubt that cattle experience pain but as a prey species, they have evolved to hide the signs. Researching pain and pain-control in stoic animals is difficult but scientific knowledge is building. At the same time, consumers’ understanding and expectations of animal welfare have changed. Pain control drugs are now available for cattle and on the occasions they’re needed, those products have both costs and benefits to producers. So as a beef producer, what do you need to know about the

science, Beef Code requirements, incentives, and practical options for preventing and controlling pain in your animals? Watch this short video, then visit www.beefresearch.ca/ pain and talk to your veterinarian. The webpage includes information on the pain control products licensed and available for beef cattle in Canada, as well as the recommendations and requirements listed in the Code of Practice for the Care and Handling of Beef Cattle when performing painful procedures like castration and dehorning.


bales will continue to be stored in Mother Nature’s full view. To that end, let’s focus on best practices for outdoor storage. Storage losses accumulate pretty quickly when you consider that the outer 4 inches of a 5-foot diameter bale account for at least 25 percent of the bale’s dry matter and close to half in the outer 8 inches. Research studies have documented dry matter

savings. · Make dense bales — it’s a no-brainer that they shed water better. Perhaps more importantly, they sag less so that there is reduced bale-to-soil contact (if stored on bare ground). Much of the storage loss often comes on the bottom of the bale. · As with real estate, location is important for outdoor bale storage. A rock base is ideal, but if

that’s not practical then select an area that is well drained and subject to good air movement. Never store bales under or along a tree line. · Tightly stack bales end–to-end. This reduces end spoilage. Reducing end spoilage by 2 inches

per end per bale saves about a 5-foot wide bale of hay for every 16 bales in the line. · Leave about a 3-foot space between bale rows to enhance air movement and drying. · Run bale rows parallel with the slope. Rows

stacked across the slope act as a barrier to water movement. Actual forage dry matter and quality losses will depend largely on weather and length of storage. Nevertheless, if storing bales outside, a little

bit of planning to preserve harvested yield and quality will pay big dividends over the long haul. This article originally appeared in the Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Oct. 8 eBulletin. To receive the eBulletin go to mfga.net.

37th Annual General Meeting

& President’s Banquet February 4 - 5, 2016 | Victoria Inn, Brandon, MB

REGISTER AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR CALL 1-800-772-0458.

REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR MAIL OR FAX YOUR REGISTRATION TODAY! EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION $75 PER PERSON

PERSON 1: q EARLY BIRD $75 q GENERAL $90

• Must be purchased by January 5, 2016 at 4 p.m.

NAME: _______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50).

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• Non-refundable.

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________

Book early to get your best value!

MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 PER PERSON GENERAL REGISTRATION $90 PER PERSON - AFTER JAN. 5 • Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). • Non-refundable.

q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________ PHONE: ______________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ PERSON 2 (IF REQUIRED): q EARLY BIRD $75 q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 q GENERAL $90 q YOUNG PRODUCER *Complimentary with mentor’s registration NAME: _______________________________________________

NEW! YOUNG PRODUCER MENTORSHIP OFFER

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• MBP members are encouraged to mentor and register a young producer (ages 18 to 39).

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________

• The young producer receives a complimentary registration with a mentor’s registration.

PHONE: ______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). MAKE CHEQUE PAYABLE TO: Manitoba Beef Producers 220 - 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 PHONE: 1-800-772-0458 FAX: 204-774-3264

RESERVE A ROOM: Call the Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre toll free: 1-800-852-2710 Quote booking number: 268463

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ EXTRA BANQUET TICKET NAME: _______________________________________________ q BANQUET $50 *Banquet tickets are non-refundable.

www.mbbeef.ca

AGM DETAILS TO COME IN THE DECEMBER CATTLE COUNTRY AND WILL BE AVAILABLE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA UNDER THE NEWS TAB.

CALL 1-800-772-0458 FOR REMOVAL FROM MAILING LIST OR ADDRESS CHANGE.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS 37TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING


Deconstructed Beef Wellies By Canada Beef Serves: 6-8 servings Ingredients 2 ½ lb (1.3 kg) Centre-cut Beef Tenderloin Premium Oven Roast, cut into six 1” – 1.5” thick medallions 2 Tbsp canola oil, divided Coarsely ground salt and pepper 2 Tbsp butter, divided 2 shallots, finely sliced 1 green onion, finely sliced 2 cups finely chopped mushrooms 1 pkg (397 g) puff-pastry dough, thawed 2-1/2 oz chicken or duck liver paté (foie gras), thinly sliced 1 egg + 1 Tbsp water, beaten to make an egg wash Madeira Mushroom Sauce, recipe follows Instructions To make Puff Pastry (Wellies): Preheat oven to 425ºF. Roll out the package puff pastry dough on lightly floured board to a thickness of ½-inch. Using a sharp knife or cookie cutter, cut pastry into 3-inch circles. Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Pierce each pastry piece several times with a fork. Brush with egg wash and bake 10 to 12 minutes until golden brown. Set aside. To make Beef: Preheat oven to 375ºF. Rub and season both sides of beef medallions with 1 Tbsp of the oil, salt and pepper. Heat 1 Tbsp butter with remaining oil in a heavy skillet over medium-high heat; brown meat on both sides, about 1 to 2 minutes per side. Transfer to a baking sheet. In same skillet, melt remaining butter; add shallots and onion and cook over medium-high heat, stirring, until softened for about 1 minute. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally, until there is no liquid from the mushrooms remaining, about 5 to 10 minutes. Season to taste. Set pan aside to use for Madeira Mushroom Sauce. Top each medallion with paté slices and mushroom mixture. Bake in oven for 8 to10 minutes to finish. Serve with Madeira Mushroom Sauce and 1 to 2 Wellies. Madeira Mushroom Sauce: Place skillet used to make mushrooms over medium-high heat; stir in 4 cups beef broth, stirring up brown bits from bottom of pan. Bring to boil and cook for 15 to 20 minutes to reduce to 1-2/3 cups. Stir in ⅔ cup Madeira and continue to boil until liquid is reduced again to 1-2/3 cups about 5 minutes. Stir in a generous splash of whipping cream to finish. If desired, thicken by stirring in a mixture of 1 tsp corn starch with 1 tsp cold water; cook 3 to 4 minutes until slightly thickened. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Pour onto gravy boat to serve. Wilted Spinach: Place skillet used to make sauce over medium-high heat; stir in1 Tbsp butter and 1 tsp chopped garlic. Sauté for 1 minute. Add 4 cups baby spinach, stir to cover with butter for 30 seconds. Turn off heat, cover and allow spinach to wilt.


The Manitoba Moose presents: Manitoba Beef Producers Member’s Night January 3, 2016 Moose vs. Grand Rapids Griffins Mini Bobblehead Night (For the first 3000 fans) Price Level Regular Price SEA Price (after taxes/fees) P1 (DARK BLUE) $35.50ea $25.00ea P2 (LIGHT BLUE) $30.50ea $20.00ea P3 (GREY) $25.50ea $15.00ea

Savings $10.50/ticket $10.50/ticket $10.50/ticket

To reserve your tickets, please contact Kevin Hosein at 204.926.5635 or khosein@moosehockey.com


Managing your risk The Western Livestock Price Insurance Program (WLPIP) was first offered in Manitoba in 2014 by the Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC). WLPIP provides an insurable floor price on cattle and hogs, which allows producers to manage market risks that are beyond their control. In its first year, the markets remained high and no WLPIP claims were necessary, but in the latter half of 2015, markets softened and some producers are finding themselves in a claim position. Rob Graham is one long-time producer who, at the time of writing, is nearing his WLPIP claim settlement window. Graham raises about 300 cow/calf pairs on his farm north of Holland, and uses WLPIP as a risk management strategy for financial protection when market prices become significantly depressed. “I was around for BSE,” said Graham, referring to the events of 2003, which caused nearly 40 countries to close their borders to Canadian beef and cattle. “The market went south and there was no protection.” This is Graham’s second year with WLPIP coverage. He first heard of WLPIP through the Victoria Norfolk Grazing Association, when MASC’s Livestock Price Insurance Coordinator, Jason Dobbin, came to speak about the program. “My first thought was that the program was flexible and unobtrusive,” said Graham. “Nobody’s coming out to count your cows and the program lets you do what you want with your own stock.” Once he was enrolled, Graham was quick to familiarize himself with how the program works. WLPIP contract holders have access to the program’s coverage and settlement tables, and can choose to receive this

MASC MB Coop Advertorial 2015.indd 1

ADVERTORIAL

Affordable insurance coverage protects cattle and hog farms from fluctuating market prices

information by email. WLPIP coverage tables are made available every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, with settlement tables available every Monday. In Graham’s first year with WLPIP, the market remained high throughout his contract, and Graham was never in a claim position.

“ I’m glad I didn’t have to use it, but it was nice to know I had the coverage if I needed it.” Rob Graham, beef producer, Holland

Having a WLPIP policy that doesn’t pay out may seem unnecessary, but Graham sees WLPIP as ‘disaster insurance’ – a strategy that minimizes his risk if the market reaches low levels, like the levels experienced during the BSE crisis. Graham doesn’t purchase the highest level of coverage. Instead, he purchases a policy with a coverage level that sufficiently covers his risk and reduces his loss if the market declines. Graham believes the highest coverage level isn’t always the best for smaller farms or certain market conditions.

“It may seem like guys left money on the table, but they got it back in the market,” said Graham. “WLPIP claims are only applicable when markets are soft. Otherwise, a producer is able to sell livestock at higher prices.” Two years into the program, Graham can also attest to some of WLPIP’s lesser known, but beneficial features. “I can use it as a market indicator in spring,” he said, explaining how WLPIP uses CanFax data to formulate its future coverage and settlement tables for fed cattle. “I know one guy who pays for just that, and I get it at no extra charge, being a WLPIP contract holder.” Now, as his policy settlement window approaches, Graham is actively monitoring his WLPIP policy and settlement prices closely by email. Producers with WLPIP cattle policies can make a claim anytime during the last four weeks of the contract. If the settlement price falls below his contract’s ‘floor price’ in this period, Graham can initiate a claim within the four-week claim window. For more information about the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program, contact your local MASC Insurance office or the MASC Livestock Price Insurance Coordinator at 204-239-3084, or visit wlpip.ca

“A lot can happen over the summer, and in May, I saw that I could spend just $11 per head for a premium and that would guarantee $1,596 per head, and that sold me,” said Graham. “A lot of guys think it will be a big payout every couple of years, so they insure at the [highest coverage level], when you really should use a strategy that fits your farm.” Graham also realizes that not receiving a claim is not the same as lost money.

PO# 4500958568 Manitoba Co-operator Run Date - Thursday January 7, 2016 5 col x 108 lines 2015-12-02 12:37 PM


CFIA Releases Final Report on BSE Case #19

From CCA Action News CFIA Releases Final Report on BSE Case #19 Investigation The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has released its final report on the investigation into bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) case #19 that was discovered in Alberta in February 2015. The investigation found no significant events could be linked with this case and contamination by specified risk materials at either a slaughter establishment or a rendering facility was not considered probable. As a result, the report suggests that the most likely cause of case #19 was the presence of a very small level of residual contaminated feed at the farm. This conclusion has been reached by other countries who have investigated BSE cases born after enhanced feed bans were implemented. The CFIA investigation confirms that Canada has very strong and robust

controls and surveillance programs in place to prevent the spread of BSE and detect the small and declining number of cases that are expected to occur from time to time. BSE case #19 was born shortly after Canada’s enhanced feed ban was implemented. The point of the enhanced feed ban was to accelerate Canada’s progress toward the eradication of BSE. As demonstrated by the Alberta case, and the experience elsewhere, a limited number of cases born after enhanced feed ban measures can occur. However, it’s important to remember that BSE is on the decline in Canada and globally following the implementation of feed control measures globally. The release of the CFIA final report will enable countries who temporarily suspended imports of Canadian beef to begin their political processes towards resuming trade. For instance, under the

protocol between Canada and South Korea (to restore access for Canadian beef in 2012), South Korea can temporarily suspend importation of Canadian beef, pending further information on the confirmed BSE find. The CCA will work with the Government of Canada to monitor the South Korean process, and also those in other countries such as Taiwan that have restricted access for Canadian beef, now that the report is in hand. As a controlled risk country for BSE, as recognized by the World Organisation of Animal Health (OIE), Canada is permitted to export beef from any age of animal given the established human and animal health controls it has in place. The few markets that have not resumed trade with Canada are not following these internationally recognized guidelines.

Beef and Forage Week Seminars The Manitoba Beef Producers, Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association and Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development (MAFRD) are hosting beef and forage seminars in your local community. Register today to hear a wide variety of speakers provide information on how to maximize forage fertility and productivity, extensive wintering of livestock, beef market outlook for 2016 and updates on the Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiative and the McDonalds Canada sustainable beef pilot*. Seminar times are 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Monday, January 11 Tuesday, January 12 Wednesday, January 13 Thursday, January 14 Friday, January 15

Vita* Ste. Rose du Lac* Holland* Brandon Eriksdale

Vita GO Office Ste. Rose GO Office Portage GO Office Brandon GO Office Arborg GO Office

204-425-5050 204-447-4032 204-239-3352 204-726-6482 204-376-3300

*Includes an update on the McDonalds Canada sustainable beef pilot

For more information and to register, contact the MAFRD GO Office listed above. Beef and Forage Week Seminars Print Ad Ad size: 8.5”w x 5.5”h


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting Manitoba Beef Producers appreciates the support of all sponsors and look forward to seeing everyone at the Victoria Inn in Brandon Feb. 4-5

DIAMOND SPONSORS

Banquet Cocktail Sponsors

PRESIDENT’S BANQUET SPONSORS

EVENT SPONSORS Lunch Sponsors

The Environmental Stewardship Award Sponsor Breakout Session Sponsors Banquet Beef Sponsor


Thank You to AGM sponsors Coffee Sponsors

SILVER SPONSORS Dairy Farmers of Manitoba Ducks Unlimited Canada Prairie Livestock The Hartford BRONZE SPONSORS Aikins Law Austin Credit Union CattleMax Software CIBC Paddock Drilling Ltd. Sunrise Credit Union Tuff Equipment

GOLD SPONSORS Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd. BIXSco Inc. / Viewtrak Technologies Inc. BMO Bank of Montreal Canadian Cattle Identification Agency DNA Insurance Farm Business Consultants (FBC) Hibrix Liquid Soil Supplement Hi-Pro Feeds Kane Veterinary Supplies / Allflex Landmark Feeds MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Agriculture Services Corporation Manitoba Charolais Association Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Livestock Marketing Association Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association Mazergroup Merck Animal Health NDE Canada The Victoria Inn Westoba Credit Union Ltd. 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ

Tradeshow Participants BIXSco Inc. / Viewtrak Technologies Inc. BMO Bank of Montreal C & C Rentals / Bobcat of Brandon Canadian Cattle Identification Agency Central Testing Laboratory DNA Insurance EMF Nutrition Enns Brothers Farm Business Consultants (FBC) Hibrix Liquid Soil Supplement Hi-Pro Feeds Kane Veterinary Supplies / Allflex Landmark Feeds MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Co-operator Manitoba Agriculture Services Corporation Manitoba Charolais Association Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Manitoba Grass Fed Beef Association Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Hereford Association Manitoba Livestock Cash Advance Masterfeeds Mazergroup Merck Animal Health MNP NDE Canada Sterling Truck & Trailer Sales Ltd. True North Foods Verified Beef Production Westoba Credit Union Ltd.


Verified Beef Production Workshops

Find out the latest information on how to prevent and control food safety risks in your farm operation at a Verified Beef Production (VBP) workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Workshops will take place at select Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development GO Offices throughout the province on the following dates: January 21, 2016 Video Conferencing ­ 1 – 4 p.m. February 18, 2016 Video Conferencing 1 – 4 p.m. March 17, 2016 Video Conferencing 1 – 4 p.m. Along with the video workshops, an in-person workshop will be held February 5, 2016 at the Victoria Inn, Brandon from 1 – 4 p.m.

These workshops are funded by the Canada and Manitoba governments, through Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincial territorial initiative.

To register or for more details contact Jo-Lene Gardiner at 204-825-3512 one week prior to the workshop. Growing Forward 2 funding for beef producers: Are you a beef producer who has successfully completed the Verified Beef Production Program training and an audit of your facilities? Growing Assurance may be able to help fund equipment to improve food safety, biosecurity and traceability on your farm. • A combined total of $2,000 is available for the first VBP audit and approved safety equipment for audited producers. • A combined total of $5,000 is available for the beef biosecurity herd assessment and biosecurity good agricultural practices (GAP) measures. • An additional $5,000 is now available for funding traceability equipment and software. For more information, call Manitoba Beef Producers at 1-800-772-0458.


The Agricultural Institute of Canada (AIC)’s next conference, AIC 2016 Disseminating Agricultural Research: Bridging the gap between idea and adoption is taking place April 13-14, 2016 in Ottawa!

When: Wednesday, April 13 and Thursday April 14, 2016 Where: Ottawa Marriott Hotel – Ottawa, ON Who should attend? Individuals involved in or affected by agricultural research and research dissemination, federal and provincial governments, private groups involved in research and/or agriculture, academia, and industry organizations.

In July 2015, agricultural stakeholders gathered in Ottawa to help develop a national agricultural research policy for the 21st century (read our conference report here). Broad consensus among participants identified building strong networks for research dissemination as a key area in the policy released September 2015. Excellent research is conducted in Canada but to achieve our full agricultural potential, it must be successfully communicated not only with other researchers but also with farmers and producers on the ground. In order to further inform this area of the policy, AIC is bringing together stakeholders involved in, or who make use of agricultural research to discuss topics including:    

Intellectual property protection Modern research extension strategies Maximizing technology transfer to industry stakeholders … and many more!

Join us in Ottawa April 13-14, 2016 for AIC 2016, a conference that promises to engage participants and stimulate lively debate, with opportunities to learn from industry experts and contribute input on these important policy issues.

VisitVisit thethe conference conferencewebsite website Register for AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Register AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Be part of AICfor2016 as conference sponsor - register online Be part of AIC 2016 as a Conference Sponsor – register online



mbbeef.ca

December 4, 2015

E-Newsletter

Canadian Beef Industry Conference announced Media Release

its kind in Canada and we are very excited to bring Canada’s beef industry together,” said beef producer Rob Smith, also Canadian Angus Association Chief Canada’s beef cattle industry has joined forces Executive Officer and co-chair of the 2016 CBIC. “The to create a one-of-a-kind recently-established National Beef Strategy has four pillars, one of which is connectivity. This conference industry experience for will allow everyone from industry leaders to smallparticipants from across all regions and sectors of er-scale producers to come together and help grow the national value chain: the Canadian Beef Industry Conference (CBIC). The first beef industry event of its kind in Canada, the CBIC will be held August 9 – 11, 2016 at the Grey Eagle Resort and Casino in Calgary, Alberta. The CBIC is a joint collaboration by the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC), Canada Beef, the Canadian Beef Breeds Council (CBBC) and the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). “This is the first event of

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our industry.” This conference will combine semi-annual and annual meetings of several stakeholder groups, along with learning and networking opportunities to create a one-of-a-kind experience for participants from across all the various regions and sectors of the Canadian beef industry. The CBIC 2016 program will include: • Keynote speakers on each of the National Beef Strategy’s four pillars: connectivity, productivity, beef demand and competitiveness; • Educational presentations for producers and interactive workContinued to Page 2

Upcoming Events Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting The 37th Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting will be held Feb. 4-5 at the Victoria Inn in Brandon. The theme for this year’s AGM is From Our Gate to Your Plate, Understanding the Evolving Customer. For more information on the AGM and how to register, please see page 4


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • Feed was ‘most plausible’ source of BSE in Case 19 • The Speckle Park story • TB testing contained to the Core area • Industry updated in research efforts in forage and grassland sector • Increase needed to beef checkoff • Good reputation nets price premium

Inaugural beef conference set for August

Continued from Page 1 shops on applicable production innovations; • Networking with stakeholders in all stages of the beef supply chain, including the Canadian Cattlemen’s Foundation Classic Golf Tournament; • Market outlook and brand opportunities with the Canfax and Canada Beef forums; • BCRC, Canada Beef, CCA and Young Cattlemen’s Council board meetings; • Cattlemen’s Young Leaders selections and graduation. Organizers are planning a unique lineup of events to draw industry stakeholders from across Canada, with the intention to rotate the CBIC’s location in subsequent years. “We are excited to bring Canada’s beef industry together under one roof,” said Virgil Lowe, co-chair of the 2016 CBIC, a beef producer and an Associate with Dentons Canada LLP. “No matter where you live or what your role is in our industry, this one-of-akind national event will be worth the trip.” Additional details including specific session topics will be available closer to the event date. Registration is expected to commence March 1st, 2016. Those interested are encouraged to watch www.canadianbeefindustryconference.com and to follow the CBIC on Twitter and Facebook for updates.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Former MBP president Armbruster named recipient of Carl Block Award Media Release The Canadian Animal Health Coalition (CAHC) is honoured to name Mr. Ray Armbruster of Rossburn, Manitoba as this year’s recipient of the Carl Block Award. Ray presents similar qualities as Carl Block in his dedication to beef cattle production, animal health and welfare issues in the sector, love for the land, the environment and strong family roots. Ray, like Carl, embodies the true cowboy spirit that epitomizes the beef cattle industry in western Canada. Ray and his wife, Susan, raise commercial cattle and purebred Shorthorn cattle on a multigenerational ranch along the south-western border of Riding Mountain National Park. Along with support from Susan, his son, daughter and son-in-law, Ray runs a large operation, yet still finds the time to give back to his industry and his community through his volunteer activities. He was and is a steward of the land, producing beef in an environmentally sound fashion. Ray has sacrificed his time for the last 17 years in the pursuit of eradicating bovine Tuberculosis disease within both livestock and wildlife in the Riding Mountain Eradication Area in Manitoba. His tireless dedication

Former Manitoba Beef Producers’ President Ray Armbruster was recently named winner of the Carl Block Award. (MBP File Photo) has not only protected Manitoba’s cattle industry, but also the larger Canadian industry through a diligent focus on protecting animal health and export markets. Ray served on the Manitoba Cattle Producers Association (MCPA) from 2007 on and became president of the Manitoba Beef Producers (formerly MCPA) in 2012. The Carl Block Award is named

in honour of the late Carl Block, a cattleman whose dedication to Canadian agriculture and commitment to animal health will long be remembered. Carl was the first chair of the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency as well as a Director of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association, the inaugural Chair of CAHC, and former President of the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association.


bales will continue to be stored in Mother Nature’s full view. To that end, let’s focus on best practices for outdoor storage. Storage losses accumulate pretty quickly when you consider that the outer 4 inches of a 5-foot diameter bale account for at least 25 percent of the bale’s dry matter and close to half in the outer 8 inches. Research studies have documented dry matter

savings. · Make dense bales — it’s a no-brainer that they shed water better. Perhaps more importantly, they sag less so that there is reduced bale-to-soil contact (if stored on bare ground). Much of the storage loss often comes on the bottom of the bale. · As with real estate, location is important for outdoor bale storage. A rock base is ideal, but if

that’s not practical then select an area that is well drained and subject to good air movement. Never store bales under or along a tree line. · Tightly stack bales end–to-end. This reduces end spoilage. Reducing end spoilage by 2 inches

per end per bale saves about a 5-foot wide bale of hay for every 16 bales in the line. · Leave about a 3-foot space between bale rows to enhance air movement and drying. · Run bale rows parallel with the slope. Rows

stacked across the slope act as a barrier to water movement. Actual forage dry matter and quality losses will depend largely on weather and length of storage. Nevertheless, if storing bales outside, a little

bit of planning to preserve harvested yield and quality will pay big dividends over the long haul. This article originally appeared in the Manitoba Forage and Grassland Association Oct. 8 eBulletin. To receive the eBulletin go to mfga.net.

37th Annual General Meeting

& President’s Banquet February 4 - 5, 2016 | Victoria Inn, Brandon, MB

REGISTER AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR CALL 1-800-772-0458.

REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR MAIL OR FAX YOUR REGISTRATION TODAY! EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION $75 PER PERSON

PERSON 1: q EARLY BIRD $75 q GENERAL $90

• Must be purchased by January 5, 2016 at 4 p.m.

NAME: _______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50).

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• Non-refundable.

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________

Book early to get your best value!

MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 PER PERSON GENERAL REGISTRATION $90 PER PERSON - AFTER JAN. 5 • Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). • Non-refundable.

q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________ PHONE: ______________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ PERSON 2 (IF REQUIRED): q EARLY BIRD $75 q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 q GENERAL $90 q YOUNG PRODUCER *Complimentary with mentor’s registration NAME: _______________________________________________

NEW! YOUNG PRODUCER MENTORSHIP OFFER

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• MBP members are encouraged to mentor and register a young producer (ages 18 to 39).

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________

• The young producer receives a complimentary registration with a mentor’s registration.

PHONE: ______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 4, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). MAKE CHEQUE PAYABLE TO: Manitoba Beef Producers 220 - 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 PHONE: 1-800-772-0458 FAX: 204-774-3264

RESERVE A ROOM: Call the Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre toll free: 1-800-852-2710 Quote booking number: 268463

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ EXTRA BANQUET TICKET NAME: _______________________________________________ q BANQUET $50 *Banquet tickets are non-refundable.

www.mbbeef.ca

AGM DETAILS TO COME IN THE DECEMBER CATTLE COUNTRY AND WILL BE AVAILABLE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA UNDER THE NEWS TAB.

CALL 1-800-772-0458 FOR REMOVAL FROM MAILING LIST OR ADDRESS CHANGE.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS 37TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING


What does sustainable beef mean in Canada? By the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef

Consumers are increasingly asking questions about where their food comes from and how it is produced. The Canadian beef industry has come together to enhance transparency and build the industry’s social license by forming the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB) in 2014. The CRSB is comprised of over 80 members and observers dedicated to advancing existing and new sustainability efforts within the industry through leadership, science, multi-stakeholder engagement and collaboration. Members of the Roundtable include producer organizations, processors, retail and food service providers, agriculture businesses, non-governmental organizations, governments, researchers and academics. They represent a variety of perspectives and work together to move sustainability discussions forward. The CRSB is currently focusing its efforts in two areas. The first is sustainability benchmarking. This involves defining what sustainable beef means and giving further depth to that definition through the National Beef Sustainability Assessment. The CRSB defines sustainable beef as ‘a socially responsible, environmentally sound and economically viable product that prioritizes Planet, People, Animals and Progress’. This definition is fairly broad, so the CRSB is undertaking the National Beef Sustainability Assessment—an innovative and science-based project that will evaluate and document the social, economic and environmental impacts of Canada’s beef industry, using 2013 as the baseline. This assessment will provide an important starting point for industry to

track its progress at the national level. It will also highlight where industry is currently doing well and where there is room for further improvement. The assessment will be completed at the end of 2016. Indicators and verification are the second area of focus. Consumers are demanding sustainable beef, and so the CRSB is developing the framework for stakeholders in the value chain to produce and source verified sustainable beef. The CRSB is developing indicators that will determine what will be measured in terms of sustainability on individual operations (cow-calf, backgrounding, feedlot, dairy beef, processors). These indicators will be outcome-based, which means the CRSB will not be prescribing specific practices, because it recognizes operations differ across Canada and there are many different paths to achieving desirable, sustainable outcomes. In many cases, industry has already adopted practices that contribute to sustainability. McDonald’s chose Canada as the test site for its Verified Sustainable Beef Pilot Project, in part, for this very reason (www.vsbpilot.ca). However, these practices need to be documented and verified in order to be credible from the point of view of consumers and retail and food service providers. Producers are busy managing multiple aspects of their operations on a daily basis, and therefore, wherever possible, existing tools and programs will be incorporated into the framework for verified sustainable beef (e.g. systems to share information along the value chain, riparian health assessments, Environmental Farm Plans, on-farm food safety programs, Codes of Practice for the Care and Handling of Beef Cattle, Dairy Beef and Veal Calves).

A multi-stakeholder committee has come to a consensus on the indicators for individual operations (cow-calf, backgrounding, feedlot, dairy beef). The indicators have been refined many times and will be released for a 60-day public comment period in late 2015 or early 2016. “We have worked very diligently on the indicators, and are always looking to improve, “ said Cherie Copithorne-Barnes, Chair of the Council and a producer from west of Calgary, Alberta. “This public consultation is a great opportunity for producers to have their voices heard. We need producers to understand what we are doing and be involved in the process whenever possible. Consumers are demanding a sustainable product and we are in a great position as an industry to supply that demand.” The CRSB encourages all stakeholders, especially producers, to review the indicators and provide constructive feedback in order to ensure they are meaningful, comprehensive and practical. The CRSB will be developing indicators for processing plants shortly, and the process for verifying the indicators on individual operations is currently being established. The Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB) is a national, multi-stakeholder initiative developed to advance existing and new sustainability efforts within the industry. The CRSB is the go-to forum on sustainable beef in Canada. It has already answered the question ‘what is sustainable beef?’, and it is rapidly setting parameters around what sustainable beef will look. For more information on the CRSB, please visit the website at www.crsb.ca.


Hormone use in beef cattle: facts, feats, fantasies - webinar Dec. 16 By the Beef Cattle Research Council Transfer project funded by the National Check-off and Canada’s Beef A quick Google search of “horScience Cluster. mones in beef cattle” brings up nu- Speakers merous articles with many differTom-Lynch-Staunton – Issues Manent fears, fantasies and opinions. ager for the Canadian Cattlemen’s Join this free webinar to hear some Association of the facts on hormone use, and Tom works with all staff in develophow we as beef producers can use ing the tools and outputs for issues this information to dispel myths. facing the industry. He also works The free webinar is scheduled for with industry partners, governDecember 16 at 8 p.m. ment, academia and other stakeWatching on a tablet or mobile holders in the value chain. Tom’s device? experience in ranching, research If you plan to join the webinar and the social licensing of beef using your tablet or mobile device, production along with his knowlyou will need to download the ap- edge of the beef cattle industry propriate receiver. We recommend and communications provide a that you join the webinar 15 mintremendous benefit in addressing utes early as you will be prompted a variety of issues from primary to download the receiver once beef production to the consumer’s you log in, which may take several interests in and perceptions of minutes to complete. To download food production. The newly created the receiver ahead of time, visit: position of Issues Manager is enhttp://www.citrix.com/go/receiver. visioned under the larger National html Beef Strategy. Interested but aren’t available Reynold Bergen, Ph.D. – Beef that evening? Cattle Research Council Science Register anyway! This webinar will Director be recorded and posted online Dr. Bergen provides scientific and at a later date. All registrants will industry expertise to the BCRC, receive a link to the recording and Beef Science Cluster and Canadiadditional learning resources. By an Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). He works with industry to idenattending the live event, you’ll tify research priorities, reviews have the opportunity to interact research proposals and scientific and ask questions too. reports, and engages with industry Cost? and research experts on an ongoing BCRC webinars are available and basis. To ensure producers have free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time access to current research inforand expertise to support advance- mation, he develops factsheets ments in the Canadian beef indus- for projects funded through the BCRC, and writes articles that are try, and through the Knowledge available through the CCA, provinDissemination and Technology

cial beef organizations, various ag media outlets and BeefResearch.ca. Reynold also works to gather and provide relevant research-based information for industry, public and government communications on specific issues. What is a webinar?
 Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar. Don’t have high-speed internet? 
 Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible.


The Manitoba Moose presents: Manitoba Beef Producers Member’s Night January 3, 2016 Moose vs. Grand Rapids Griffins Mini Bobblehead Night (For the first 3000 fans) Price Level Regular Price SEA Price (after taxes/fees) P1 (DARK BLUE) $35.50ea $25.00ea P2 (LIGHT BLUE) $30.50ea $20.00ea P3 (GREY) $25.50ea $15.00ea

Savings $10.50/ticket $10.50/ticket $10.50/ticket

To reserve your tickets, please contact Kevin Hosein at 204.926.5635 or khosein@moosehockey.com


Thank You To Our District Meeting Sponsors

Manitoba Beef Producers would like to thank all of the individuals and businesses that supported our district meetings by sponsoring the beef on a bun supper

District 1 The Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation; Steads Farm Supply District 2 FeedMax Corporation

District 3 Penco Meats – Robert Penner; Little Morden Service; Penner Stock Farms – Peter & Edna Penner District 4 Grunthal Auction Mart – Harold Unrau; Masterfeeds – Peter Kraynyk; Mazergroup – Corey Plett

District 5 Rosehill Cattle Co Ltd. – Harold & Ramona Blyth District 6 Heartland Livestock Virden

District 9 Winnipeg Livestock; Dianne Riding

District 7 Strathclair Consumers Co-op

District 11 Noventis Credit Union

District 8 Enns Brothers, John Deere (Neepawa – Justin Pollock & Portage la Prairie – Allan Ryrie); Neepawa-Gladstone Coop – Brian Hedley; New Holland, Mazer Group – Denys Usunier; A-8 Ranch – Tom Teichroeb

District 12 Dauphin/Ste. Rose Vet Clinic

District 10 Arborg Livestock Supplies

District 13 Roblin Veterinary Services District 14 Swan Valley Consumers Co-op – Ag division

Thank You To Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation For Sponsoring Our 2015 District Meetings

Beef and Forage Week Seminars The Manitoba Beef Producers, Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association and Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development (MAFRD) are hosting beef and forage seminars in your local community. Register today to hear a wide variety of speakers provide information on how to maximize forage fertility and productivity, extensive wintering of livestock, beef market outlook for 2016 and updates on the Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiative and the McDonalds Canada sustainable beef pilot*. Seminar times are 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Monday, January 11 Tuesday, January 12 Wednesday, January 13 Thursday, January 14 Friday, January 15

Vita* Ste. Rose du Lac* Holland* Brandon Eriksdale

Vita GO Office Ste. Rose GO Office Portage GO Office Brandon GO Office Arborg GO Office

204-425-5050 204-447-4032 204-239-3352 204-726-6482 204-376-3300

*Includes an update on the McDonalds Canada sustainable beef pilot

For more information and to register, contact the MAFRD GO Office listed above. Beef and Forage Week Seminars Print Ad Ad size: 8.5”w x 5.5”h


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting Manitoba Beef Producers appreciates the support of all sponsors and look forward to seeing everyone at the Victoria Inn in Brandon Feb. 4-5

DIAMOND SPONSORS PRESIDENT’S BANQUET SPONSORS The Environmental Stewardship Award Sponsor

Banquet Beef Sponsor

Banquet Cocktail Sponsors

EVENT SPONSORS Breakout Session Sponsors


Thank You to the sponsors of our 37th Annual General Meeting Coffee Sponsors

SILVER SPONSORS Dairy Farmers of Manitoba Ducks Unlimited Canada Prairie Livestock The Hartford BRONZE SPONSORS Aikins Law Austin Credit Union CattleMax Software CIBC Sunrise Credit Union Tuff Equipment

GOLD SPONSORS Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd. Canadian Cattle Identification Agency DNA Insurance Manitoba Agriculture Services Corporation Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation NDE Canada The Victoria Inn 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ

Tradeshow Participants C & C Rentals / Bobcat of Brandon Canadian Cattle Identification Agency Central Testing Laboratory DNA Insurance EMF Nutrition Enns Brothers Manitoba Hereford Association Manitoba Agriculture Services Corporation Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Livestock Cash Advance MNP NDE Canada Sterling Truck & Trailer Sales Ltd. Verified Beef Production


The Agricultural Institute of Canada (AIC)’s next conference, AIC 2016 Disseminating Agricultural Research: Bridging the gap between idea and adoption is taking place April 13-14, 2016 in Ottawa!

When: Wednesday, April 13 and Thursday April 14, 2016 Where: Ottawa Marriott Hotel – Ottawa, ON Who should attend? Individuals involved in or affected by agricultural research and research dissemination, federal and provincial governments, private groups involved in research and/or agriculture, academia, and industry organizations.

In July 2015, agricultural stakeholders gathered in Ottawa to help develop a national agricultural research policy for the 21st century (read our conference report here). Broad consensus among participants identified building strong networks for research dissemination as a key area in the policy released September 2015. Excellent research is conducted in Canada but to achieve our full agricultural potential, it must be successfully communicated not only with other researchers but also with farmers and producers on the ground. In order to further inform this area of the policy, AIC is bringing together stakeholders involved in, or who make use of agricultural research to discuss topics including:    

Intellectual property protection Modern research extension strategies Maximizing technology transfer to industry stakeholders … and many more!

Join us in Ottawa April 13-14, 2016 for AIC 2016, a conference that promises to engage participants and stimulate lively debate, with opportunities to learn from industry experts and contribute input on these important policy issues.

VisitVisit thethe conference conferencewebsite website Register for AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Register AIC 2016: Disseminating Agricultural Research Be part of AICfor2016 as conference sponsor - register online Be part of AIC 2016 as a Conference Sponsor – register online


Verified Beef Production Workshops

Find out the latest information on how to prevent and control food safety risks in your farm operation at a Verified Beef Production (VBP) workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

These workshops are funded by the Canada and Manitoba governments, through Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincial territorial initiative.

Workshops will take place at select Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development GO Offices throughout the province on the following dates: December 17, 2015 Video Conferencing 1 – 4 p.m. January 21, 2016 Video Conferencing ­ 1 – 4 p.m. February 18, 2016 Video Conferencing 1 – 4 p.m. March 17, 2016 Video Conferencing 1 – 4 p.m. Along with the video workshops, an in-person workshop will be held February 5, 2016 at the Victoria Inn, Brandon from 1 – 4 p.m. To register or for more details contact Jo-Lene Gardiner at 204-825-3512 one week prior to the workshop. Growing Forward 2 funding for beef producers:

Are you a beef producer who has successfully completed the Verified Beef Production Program training and an audit of your facilities? Growing Assurance may be able to help fund equipment to improve food safety, biosecurity and traceability on your farm. • A combined total of $2,000 is available for the first VBP audit and approved safety equipment for audited producers. • A combined total of $5,000 is available for the beef biosecurity herd assessment and biosecurity good agricultural practices (GAP) measures. • An additional $5,000 is now available for funding traceability equipment and software. For more information, call Manitoba Beef Producers at 1-800-772-0458.


mbbeef.ca

November 6, 2015

E-Newsletter

2015 MBP district meeting schedule rumbles on Strong attendance and good discussion have been the highlights of the first few Manitoba Beef Producers’ district meetings. The slate of 14 meetings kicked off October 26 in Eriksdale and will continue through November 18 with the final meeting in Neepawa. With eight meetings in the books after the District 7 gathering tonight in Stratchlair, MBP staff and directors have been pleased with the attendance and engagement from members. A number of important

topics are on the agenda including a discussion of the proposed National Checkoff increase. At the Canada Beef annual meeting in September, a resolution was passed to increase the checkoff from $1 to $2.50. “We strongly encourage all of our members to attend their district meetings,” said MBP President Heinz Reimer. “The presentation on the National Beef Strategy and potential National Check Off increase will be of particular interest to members. Representatives from national

industry groups will be in attendance at some of the meetings to discuss this further.” Members will also have an opportunity to provide input on the future of the organization by submitting resolutions that will be voted on at the Annual General Meeting which is scheduled for Feb. 4 and 5 in Brandon. A short survey will be distributed asking producers to indicate whether or not they support the creation of a dealer assurance fund, a matter put forth in a resolution

at the 36th MBP AGM. Elections for directors will also be held in even numbered districts this year. A new director will be selected for District 10 as current director Theresa Zuk has reached her term limit and will be retiring. Each meeting is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. An advertisement with all of the dates and locations can be found on page 14 of this month’s issue. There is no cost for members to attend the meetings and a beef on a bun supper will also be served at each venue.

CCA welcomes new Liberal Cabinet CCA Media Release The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) congratulates Justin Trudeau, sworn in today as Canada’s 23rd Prime Minister, and his new Cabinet. The CCA looks forward to working with the new Federal Government to develop and implement

policies and actions favourable to Canadian beef producers. The CCA is particularly eager to embark on a collaborative working relationship with Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay and International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland to ensure the momentum of opening

international markets for Canadian beef exports continues. The CCA will also work closely with Environment Minister Catherine McKenna, Health Minister Jane Philpott, Employment Minister MaryAnn Mihychuk and Immigration Minister John McCallum. Priority areas for the CCA

include repeal of the discriminatory U.S. Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) legislation, improving access to the Japanese and other international markets through the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), bolstering agriculture research and increasing the agricultural workforce, said CCA Continued to page 2


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • Who is Lawrence MacAulay? An Introduction to the New Ag Minister • Satisfy the protein needs of pregnant cows • The ins and outs of grazing stubble • Warmer winter forecast for Manitoba • New pain control medication for livestock hits the market

MacAulay named new Ag Minister Continued from page 1 President Dave Solverson. “The Liberal Party of Canada (LPC) information communicated to CCA indicates that their objectives align with ours in many of these priority areas, including trade, research and workforce issues,” he said. “That’s a great starting point for industry. The CCA looks forward to working with the new Ministers to advocate on the issues and policies that are important to the Canadian beef sector.” With respect to the U.S. COOL file, the CCA urges Ministers MacAulay and Freeland to confirm their intention to swiftly impose retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports the moment Canada is authorized to do so by the World Trade Organization (WTO), if the U.S. has not eliminated the incentive to segregate imported livestock by that time. The LPC has characterized COOL as a trade infringement on a long established bilateral trade arrangement and has promised to follow through with an aggressive response to ensure that the U.S. adheres to the ruling of the WTO. Ensuring the TPP is ratified by the Government of Canada is another priority area for CCA. Exports are the lifeblood of Canada’s beef industry and forward-thinking trade pacts like the TPP will ensure Canadian beef producers can compete fairly in a global marketplace. The LPC has stated it sup-

ports free trade agreements like the TPP because they create jobs for Canadians and contribute to economic growth and long-term prosperity across the country. Research is also essential to ensure that Canada’s beef industry is globally competitive and able to take advantage of current and emerging trade opportunities. Properly funded and supported research will result in further productivity improvements that enhance the beef industry’s ability to operate in a sustainable manner that supports consumer confidence. Chronic workforce issues remain a concern in the beef industry. Shortages of workers in Canadian packing plants result in decreased value for cattle producers and a loss to the Canadian economy. The CCA appreciates the LPC’s focus on job creation, reforming pathways to citizenship for foreign workers and for recognizing the unique labour needs of the agricultural sector. The CCA looks forward to engaging Environment Minister McKenna on sustainable beef production and the positive role of producers as stewards of the land and with Health Minister Philpott on veterinary drug regulatory issues and food safety matters. Producers can find the positions that the LPC communicated to the CCA during the election campaign here.


Thank You To Our District Meeting Sponsors Manitoba Beef Producers would like to thank all of the individuals and businesses that supported our district meetings by sponsoring the beef on a bun supper

District 1 The Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation; Steads Farm Supply District 2 FeedMax Corporation

District 3 Penco Meats – Robert Penner; Little Morden Service; Penner Stock Farms – Peter & Edna Penner District 4 Grunthal Auction Mart – Harold Unrau; Masterfeeds – Peter Kraynyk; Mazergroup – Corey Plett

District 5 Rosehill Cattle Co Ltd. – Harold & Ramona Blyth District 6 Heartland Livestock Virden

District 9 Winnipeg Livestock; Dianne Riding

District 7 Strathclair Consumers Co-op

District 11 Noventis Credit Union

District 8 Enns Brothers, John Deere (Neepawa – Justin Pollock & Portage la Prairie – Allan Ryrie); Neepawa-Gladstone Coop – Brian Hedley; New Holland, Mazer Group – Denys Usunier; A-8 Ranch – Tom Teichroeb

District 12 Dauphin/Ste. Rose Vet Clinic

District 10 Arborg Livestock Supplies

District 13 Roblin Veterinary Services District 14 Swan Valley Consumers Co-op – Ag division

Thank You To Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation For Sponsoring Our 2015 District Meetings


Deadline to win VIP Grey Cup tickets is Saturday Manitoba Beef Producers is about to embark on a campaign to promote the province’s beef industry and would like its members to be the stars. Tentatively titled “We Are Proud,” the campaign will serve as an opportunity for MBP members to shine a light on the industry through their own words. The campaign will be built around three areas – Pride in Our People, Pride in our Practices and Pride in Our Product. Each of the areas will comprise the overall campaign and allow MBP to show consumers and the public at large the work being done by producers in areas such

as animal care and environmental stewardship. In 500 words or less, MBP is asking members to explain why they are proud to be Manitoba beef producers. Those making submissions are asked to choose one of the three areas – people, product and practices – to focus on in their essays. The top essays will be used to form the “We are Proud” campaign. As well, all entries will be entered into a contest to win a VIP package for two to the 2015 Grey Cup which will be held in Winnipeg on Nov. 29. The package includes two tickets to the big game and exclusive access to areas of

Investor’s Group Field. “We are excited to launch this campaign and look forward to seeing the submissions of our members,” said MBP General Manager Melinda German. “In this day of heightened customer awareness and social media, we feel it is very important for producers to tell their story. Having Manitoba producers explain the lengths they go to to produce a safe and healthy product and also in their care of the environment and their animals will serve to build and maintain our relationship with our customer. “We also feel this campaign can serve as a rallying point

for producers. As we know beef producers are humble people who chose this line of work because it is something they genuinely love; this campaign gives them a chance to let consumers know they are professionals and highlights the pride and care that go into beef production.” Entries can be submitted via email to csaxon@mbbeef.ca. They can also be mailed to the Manitoba Beef Producers office at: 220-530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 The deadline for submissions is Nov. 7.

Beef and Forage Week Seminars The Manitoba Beef Producers, Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association and Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development (MAFRD) are hosting free beef and forage seminars in your local community. Register today to hear a wide variety of speakers provide information on how to maximize forage fertility and productivity, extensive wintering of livestock, beef market outlook for 2016 and updates on the Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiative and the McDonalds Canada sustainable beef pilot*. Seminar times are 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Monday, January 11 Tuesday, January 12 Wednesday, January 13 Thursday, January 14 Friday, January 15

Vita* Ste. Rose du Lac* Holland* Brandon Eriksdale

Vita GO Office Ste. Rose GO Office Portage GO Office Brandon GO Office Arborg GO Office

204-425-5050 204-447-4032 204-239-3352 204-726-6482 204-376-3300

*Includes an update on the McDonalds Canada sustainable beef pilot

For more information and to register, contact the MAFRD GO Office listed above. Beef and Forage Week Seminars Print Ad Ad size: 8.5”w x 5.5”h


Eat Like An Athlete Presented By Manitoba Beef Producers

Featuring Chef Darryl Crumb

Warm Orange Beef Salad

Here’s a recipe for an incredible salad. This is a nice and light meal that still contains all the nutrients an active body needs. Experience Asian flavours at home with little effort and time. Top sirloin is a lean cut of beef and turns this salad into a satisfying meal.

1 tbsp (15 mL) canola oil 1 lb (500 g) Beef Top Sirloin Grilling Steak, sliced into thin strips 1 cup (250 mL) sliced mushrooms Dried chili pepper flakes (optional) ½ cup (125 mL) EACH julienned carrot, thinly sliced sweet red or yellow pepper and red onion Sauce: Recipe Summary 1 tsp (5 mL) grated orange rind ¼ cup (50 mL) orange juice 2 tbsp (30 mL) EACH sodium reduced soy sauce and rice vinegar Difficulty: Intermediate Makes: 5 servings 1 tbsp (15 mL) EACH minced ginger root and liquid honey 2 tsp (10 mL) cornstarch 2 cloves garlic, minced Nutritional Information 1 tsp (5 mL) EACH sesame oil and Asian chili sauce Per Serving (208 Calories, 22 g protein, 7 g fat, 14 g Sauce: Whisk together orange rind, orange juice, soy sauce, vinegar, ginger root, honey, cornstarch, garlic, carbohydrate, 2 g fibre, 324 mg sodium. Good source sesame oil and chili sauce in small bowl; set aside. of iron (20% DV) and excellent source of zinc (76% Heat canola oil in large skillet or wok over high heat. Stir-fry beef for 3 to 4 minutes or until brown; transfer to a DV)) bowl. Add mushrooms, carrot, peppers, onion and 1-1/2 tbsp (22 mL) water to pan and bring to boil; reduce heat, cover and cook for 2 minutes or until tender-crisp. Recipe Courtesy of Canada Beef Return beef and any juices to pan. Stir in reserved sauce mixture and return to boil; cook, stirring for 1 to 2 minutes or until thickened. Sprinkle with chili pepper flakes (if using). Spoon over individual servings of baby lettuce.

Zinc… For All That You Are

Zinc is a part of every cell in your body; it’s essential for optimal growth and development, strong immune systems, better brains and healthy pregnancies. Enjoying zinc-rich foods, like Canadian beef, can help your body be the best it can be! One of the best ways to make sure you are getting enough zinc is to enjoy 2-3 servings of Meat and Alternatives each day. That’s because zinc, although found in many foods, is best absorbed from animal sources, like Canadian beef, poultry or fish.

If You Can’t Play Like An Athlete You Can Still Eat Like One!


Coordinate, Collaborate, Act Leading the way to water solutions with a basin wide strategy The Assiniboine River Basin Initiative is holding its second annual conference in Brandon’s Victoria Inn, on November 12 and 13. The two day conference will feature keynote speakers, multiple panel discussions, and a breakout group session identifying and prioritizing issues that will provide input and direction in the development of the Assiniboine River Basin - Coordinated Action Plan (ARBCAP). Registration has been extended to November 10. For more information or to register for the conference please visit www.prairienetwork.ca or email info@arb-int.com.

Take care of your land and it will take care of you Register today for an Environmental Farm Plan Workshop

Environmental farm plans help you protect your land and preserve it for generations to come. Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development is holding workshops in November and December to help you develop or renew your plan. With a valid statement of completion, you could be eligible to receive funding through Growing Assurance to: • Improve manure storage and manage phosphorous • Protect and enhance habitat • Manage runoff from livestock sites • Reduce soil erosion • Increase water storage • Upgrade fuel storage Complete workshop dates and locations are available at manitoba.ca/agriculture. Contact your local MAFRD GO Office to register for November workshops by Friday, November 6 and for December workshops before Friday, December 4.

Apply for funding

Applications for Growing Assurance will be accepted starting at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, February 8, 2016 until midnight Friday, February 12, 2016.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 7

Methods of deadstock disposal to reduce predation; webinar Nov. 17 Disposal of cattle mortalities needs to be done soon after death to prevent the spread of disease, prevent contamination of air or ground water, and to help reduce the chance of predation. There are many methods to dispose of deadstock, each with pros and cons. Join this free, one hour webinar to learn more about deadstock disposal, including composting, burial, and incineration. When Tuesday, November 17 at 7pm MST 6:00pm in BC 7:00pm in AB 8:00pm in SK and MB 9:00pm in ON and QC 10:00pm in NS, NB and PEI

Interested but aren’t available that evening? Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and all registrants will be emailed a link to the recording. Speakers Kim Stanford, PhD – Beef Research Scientist for Alberta Agriculture and Forestry Dr. Kim Stanford was raised on her family farm in the hills of Spring Coulee, Alberta. She has been employed with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry since 1990 and has been a senior research scientist since 2009. Her work with mortality composting started first with sheep and then moved to cattle after the advent of BSE.

Mark Boyce, PhD – Professor and Research Scientist at the University of Alberta Dr. Mark Boyce is a world leader in wildlife ecology and conservation biology. His career has taken him around the world, from the US to New Zealand and India to Canada. Presently, he holds the Alberta Conservation Association (ACA) Chair in Fisheries and Wildlife—the longest-running position of its kind in the Department of Biological Sciences.

Lock-in Market Price Protection


Slow Cooker Mongolian Beef Courtesy of Canada Beef Perfect for smaller households, easy and delicious - this recipe can also be braised in the oven in a heavy cast-iron roaster, slowly simmered at 325F for 1 to 2 hours until beef is tender. If you want to serve more folks, just increase the amount of beef - there's plenty of sauce! Ingredients 1-1/2 lb (750 g) Beef Simmering Steak (Blade or Cross Rib), cut into strips ¼ cup cornstarch 2 tbsp canola oil 1 tbsp garlic, minced ¾ cup low-sodium soy sauce ¾ cup water ¾ cup packed brown sugar 1 cup slivered carrot (about 2 large carrots) sliced green onion for garnish

Prep time 5 mins Cook time 2 hours Total time 2 hours 5 mins

Instructions In a large resealable bag, add steak along with cornstarch. Shake to coat steak well. To a slow cooker add oil, garlic, soy sauce, water, brown sugar and carrots. Stir to combine. Add steak strips and stir again to coat with sauce. Slow cook on high for 2-3 hours or on low for 4-5 hours, stirring once. Serve over steamed rice with a sprinkle of sliced green onion.


Verified Beef Production Workshops Find out the latest information on how to prevent and control food safety risks in your farm operation at a Verified Beef Production (VBP) workshop.

Upcoming Workshops Workshops will take place at select Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development GO Offices throughout the province on the following dates:

Thursday, November 19,2015 (1 to 4 p.m.) Thursday, December 17, 2015 (1 to 4 p.m.) These workshops are funded by the Canada and Manitoba governments, through Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincial territorial initiative.

To register or for more details contact your local GO Office one week prior to the workshop. Growing Forward 2 funding for beef producers: Are you a beef producer who has successfully completed the Verified Beef Production Program training and an audit of your facilities? Growing Assurance may be able to help fund equipment to improve food safety, biosecurity and traceability on your farm. • A combined total of $2,000 is available for the first VBP audit and approved safety equipment for audited producers. • A combined total of $5,000 is available for the beef biosecurity herd assessment and biosecurity good agricultural practices (GAP) measures. • An additional $5,000 is now available for funding traceability equipment and software. For more information, call Manitoba Beef Producers at 1-800-772-0458.


mbbeef.ca

October 23, 2015

E-Newsletter 2015 MBP district meeting schedule kicks off on Monday Manitoba Beef Producers’ 2015 district meeting schedule kicks off Monday. The first of 14 meetings will be held Oct. 26 in Eriksdale, which is located in District 11. Although MBP encourages members to attend their district meetings each year, this year’s meetings will be of particular interest as they will include a discussion of the proposed National Checkoff increase. At the Canada Beef annual meeting in September, a resolution was passed

to increase the checkoff from $1 to $2.50. “We strongly encourage all of our members to attend their district meetings,” said MBP President Heinz Reimer. “This is a member-driven association and their input will help shape our focus and direction over the next year. It is important for members to attend their district meeting and have a say in the future of their industry. “The presentation on the National Beef Strategy and potential National Check Off increase will

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be of particular interest to members. Representatives from national industry groups will be in attendance at some of the meetings to discuss this further.” A variety of other topics will be covered at the meetings. They include a review of MBP’s finances, its advocacy work on behalf of Manitoba’s beef producers, and updates on key industry developments and trends. In districts 7, 12 and 13 where bovine TB is a concern there will also be an update on current initiatives

related to that. There will be a presentation on Canada’s National Beef Strategy and the future vision it outlines for the Canadian cattle industry. Members will also have an opportunity to provide input on the future of the organization by submitting resolutions that will be voted on at the Annual General Meeting which is scheduled for Feb. 4 and 5 in Brandon. A short survey will be distributed asking producers to indicate whether or not they support the Continued to page 2

Harvest can be a time of intense excitement as well as stress. If you need to talk, contact Manitoba Farm, Rural & Northern Support Services. They understand and are there to help. Toll free Support Line: 1-866-367-3276 E-mail and Instant Messaging (chat): www.supportline.ca Free and completely confidential.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • Does it pay to precondition calves? • What does a Liberal majority government mean for agriculture? • Livestock insurance payments triggered for some producers • Tracking resistance to bugs in cattle drugs • CanFax looks to future growth and excitement in the beef industry

District meetings ... Continued from page 1 creation of a dealer assurance fund, a matter put forth in a resolution at the 36th MBP AGM. Elections for directors will also be held in even numbered districts this year. A new director will be selected for District 10 as current director Theresa Zuk has reached her term limit and will be retiring. “We strongly encourage our members to attend their district meeting,” said MBP general manager Melinda German. “This year’s meetings will be of particular interest to members as there are a number of important issues to discuss and inform our members of.” Each meeting is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. An advertisement with all of the dates and locations can be found on page 14 of this month’s issue. There is no cost for members to attend the meetings and a beef on a bun supper will also be served at each venue.

Have an article you would like to see in the E-Newsletter? Contact Chad Saxon for more information. csaxon@mbbeef.ca Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Tell us why you’re proud to be a Manitoba beef producer Manitoba Beef Producers is about to embark on a campaign to promote the province’s beef industry and would like its members to be the stars. Tentatively titled “We Are Proud,” the campaign will serve as an opportunity for MBP members to shine a light on the industry through their own words. The campaign will be built around three areas – Pride in Our People, Pride in our Practices and Pride in Our Product. Each of the areas will comprise the overall campaign and allow MBP to show consumers and the public at large the work being done by producers in areas such

as animal care and environmental stewardship. In 500 words or less, MBP is asking members to explain why they are proud to be Manitoba beef producers. Those making submissions are asked to choose one of the three areas – people, product and practices – to focus on in their essays. The top essays will be used to form the “We are Proud” campaign. As well, all entries will be entered into a contest to win a VIP package for two to the 2015 Grey Cup which will be held in Winnipeg on Nov. 29. The package includes two tickets to the big game and exclusive access to areas of

Investor’s Group Field. “We are excited to launch this campaign and look forward to seeing the submissions of our members,” said MBP General Manager Melinda German. “In this day of heightened customer awareness and social media, we feel it is very important for producers to tell their story. Having Manitoba producers explain the lengths they go to to produce a safe and healthy product and also in their care of the environment and their animals will serve to build and maintain our relationship with our customer. “We also feel this campaign can serve as a rallying point

for producers. As we know beef producers are humble people who chose this line of work because it is something they genuinely love; this campaign gives them a chance to let consumers know they are professionals and highlights the pride and care that go into beef production.” Entries can be submitted via email to csaxon@mbbeef.ca. They can also be mailed to the Manitoba Beef Producers office at: 220-530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 The deadline for submissions is Nov. 7.

Lock-in Market Price Protection


Update Your Environmental Farm Plan to Be Eligible for BMP Funding Producers, are you interested in applying for funding for beneficial management practices (BMPs) through Growing Forward 2 – Growing Assurance – Environment? If so, you need to have a valid Statement of Completion (SOC) certificate for an Environmental Farm Plan (EFP). There will be another intake on Growing Assurance -- Environment in February 2016. Applications will be accepted starting at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, February 8, 2016 until midnight

Friday, February 12, 2016. Producers who need to complete their first EFP or to renew their SOC should attend an EFP workshops being hosted by Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development in November and December. You are asked to pre-register for them through your local MAFRD GO Office, for the November workshops by Friday, Nov. 6 and for the December workshops by Friday, Dec. 4. To see the list of workshop locations and times go to:

https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/environment/eventsand-deadlines/ Examples of BMPs for which producers may be eligible to apply include: farmyard runoff control, relocation of livestock confinement, extensive wintering of livestock, and on-farm fuel storage, among others. For more details, eligibility requirements and funding levels see: https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/environment/environmental-farm-plan/growing-assurance-environment.html

Take care of your land and it will take care of you Register today for an Environmental Farm Plan Workshop

Environmental farm plans help you protect your land and preserve it for generations to come. Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development is holding workshops in November and December to help you develop or renew your plan. With a valid statement of completion, you could be eligible to receive funding through Growing Assurance to: • Improve manure storage and manage phosphorous • Protect and enhance habitat • Manage runoff from livestock sites • Reduce soil erosion • Increase water storage • Upgrade fuel storage Complete workshop dates and locations are available at manitoba.ca/agriculture. Contact your local MAFRD GO Office to register for November workshops by Friday, November 6 and for December workshops before Friday, December 4.

Apply for funding

Applications for Growing Assurance will be accepted starting at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, February 8, 2016 until midnight Friday, February 12, 2016.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 5

CCA comments on federal election results The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) congratulates Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party of Canada (LPC) for its majority victory in Canada’s 42nd general election. Canadian beef farmers have enjoyed much needed profitability in recent years and are poised to expand with the right operating conditions. Despite the positive revenue side of farmers’ operations, much improvement is needed on the cost and availability of inputs to ensure beef producers remain competitive. The availability of labour, competitive market access, financing and funding for research are all

top priorities that the CCA hopes to work with Ottawa to address. We are pleased that the LPC has told the CCA that it supports growth of the beef herd in Canada and will work with us to expand export opportunities and strengthen the competitiveness of Canadian cattle producers. The LPC’s full comments on the beef sector’s policy priorities are posted on the CCA website here. Now that the long election campaign is over, we look forward to Prime Minister-elect Trudeau forming his Cabinet and undertaking the work on issues that matter

to Canada’s beef producers. First out of the gate will be the need to deliver a strong message to Washington that Canada’s new Government will follow through on the intention to block imports of U.S. goods with prohibitive tariffs if the discriminatory Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) legislation is not repealed. Resolution of this longstanding issue is expected to immediately put money lost due to unnecessary regulatory burden back into the pockets of Canadian farmers and support the expansion of the Canadian beef herd. CCA Media Release

COOL dispute continues grind towards resolution Canada may have to wait a little longer than expected for the World Trade Organization (WTO) arbitration panel decision regarding U.S. Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) retaliation. Although the panel’s final report was expected on November 27, 2015, that date has now been pushed back to allow for translation of the report into multiple languages – a normal step in the process. We expect the arbitration panel to announce a new date shortly. In the meantime, the CCA will continue to work with the Canadian team to provide written answers to the follow up questions arising out of the panel hearing last month in Geneva. Once the written answers have been received and considered, the panel is expected to release its decision on an authorized amount for retaliation – likely later this fall. That decision will be final and not subject to appeal, enabling Canada and Mexico to proceed to implement the tariffs. Canada has requested authorization to impose tariffs on more than C$3.1 billion per year of U.S. exports. Mexico requested authorization for over US$713 million in retaliatory tariffs. The U.S. has estimated the costs related to COOL arbitration at US$91 million – an amount that disregards any valuation related to segregation of cattle, transportation issues or price suppression in the Canadian market. As the WTO has already found these issues to be at the core of the COOL violation, the CCA is confident that Canada’s calculations will be strongly considered by the arbitrators. From CCA Action News Resolving the WTO dispute with the U.S. over COOL is the CCA’s highest priority.


Time running out for MB plastic film and twine collection pilot This year, CleanFARMS will be operating a pilot program aimed at keeping plastic film and twine out of select municipal landfills in Manitoba. This pilot is part of the agricultural industry’s commitment to the responsible management of its products throughout their entire lifecycle and will help determine the feasibility of a permanent program. When? Spring and Fall collection blitz’: Spring 2015 - March 23rd to 28th.

Fall 2015 - October 26th to 31st. What is included? Clean and dry materials only. Materials must be kept seperate: Bale and silage wrap, Grain bags, Plastic (polypropylene) twine. What’s out? No nylon twine/rope, netting, or feed/seed bags. No excessively dirty materials. Preparation steps: Ensure material is as clean and dry as possible.

Grain bags: roll grain bags and tie securely with twine OR roll with a grain bag roller (where available). Contact your local RM to find out if a grain bag roller is available for use. Bale/silage wrap: bag in a CleanFARMS collection bag. Twine: bag in a CleanFARMS collection bag and drop off at the collection site. Collection bags are available for free at the participating collection sites. Drop off prepared materials at your local collection site.


Participating film and twine collection sites - hours and locations:


October 9, 2015

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter Beef producers applaud TPP agreement CCA Media Release The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) strongly supports the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement reached today in Atlanta. A TPP agreement ensures Canadian beef producers can improve access to Japan and other growing markets in Asia. Under the deal reached today, Canada could double or triple its annual beef exports to Japan to nearly $300 million. CCA President Dave Solverson called the agreement a game-changer for Canada’s beef industry -- and Canadian agriculture as a whole. “This is really fantastic news for Canada’s beef producers,” he said “Canada’s beef producers have long needed to have equal access to these important markets in order to compete with Australian and U.S. beef. Now, through this agreement, Canada will receive the same preferential access to these markets as its competitors, leveling the playing field for Canadian beef producers once and for all.” CCA Vice President and Foreign Trade Chairman Dan

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Darling said it was a major priority for Canadian beef producers to ensure that the TPP would result in a level playing field for all beef competitors in the TPP region. “I am pleased to say we have achieved that. The TPP agreement ensures Canadian beef producers will enjoy significantly improved access to Japan and other growing markets in Asia,” he said. The TPP is an agreement amongst 12 countries from both sides of the Pacific Ocean. Canada already has duty free access for beef with many of them, including the U.S. and Mexico, and now the TPP will gradually reduce a 38.5 per cent tariff on Canadian beef in Japan down to 9 per cent in 15 years, including an immediate cut to 27.5 per cent on day one of the agreement coming into force that will restore our competitive position with Australian beef. Solverson and Darling thanked Prime Minister Stephen Harper and International Trade Minister Ed Fast for making a strong effort for Canadian beef producers at the TPP negotiating table. The CCA has provided Continued to Page 2

Harvest can be a time of intense excitement as well as stress. If you need to talk, contact Manitoba Farm, Rural & Northern Support Services. They understand and are there to help. Toll free Support Line: 1-866-367-3276 E-mail and Instant Messaging (chat): www.supportline.ca Free and completely confidential.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News

TPP agreement

A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry •TPP - Resetting the trade table • Skill, painkillers all part of castration process • Ag technology investment soars • Proving the potential of probiotics in cattle • McDonald’s feeds consumer understanding •Community pastures in process of changing hands

Continued from Page 1 support to the Minister throughout the Ministerial meetings, including in Atlanta last week, and appreciates his resolve to get a deal following a meeting in Hawaii in July that despite gaining much momentum, ended without an agreement due to the complexities of the negotiations. The CCA also thanks Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Minister Gerry Ritz for his leadership to ensure the TPP is a net positive for Canadian farmers. Other wins for Canadian beef producers in the TPP include achieving elimination of beef tariffs in Vietnam and Malaysia, two countries that have not traditionally been significant beef consumers, but have been identified as potentially important markets in the future as their level of economic development increases. The TPP also addresses the exclusion of some beef access from previous agreements with Peru and Chile. The CCA is also very pleased that Canada has secured its place as one of the founding members of the TPP. This is extremely important it gives Canada a say in the terms of entry for additional countries that may want to join the TPP in the future. Already Korea and Taiwan have indicated they wish to join and the CCA will want to ensure they are removing all barriers to Canadian beef as part of their entry requirements to the TPP.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Tell us why you’re proud to be a Manitoba beef producer Manitoba Beef Producers is about to embark on a campaign to promote the province’s beef industry and would like its members to be the stars. Tentatively titled “We Are Proud,” the campaign will serve as an opportunity for MBP members to shine a light on the industry through their own words. The campaign will be built around three areas – Pride in Our People, Pride in our Practices and Pride in Our Product. Each of the areas will comprise the overall campaign and allow MBP to show consumers and the public at large the work being done by producers in areas such

as animal care and environmental stewardship. In 500 words or less, MBP is asking members to explain why they are proud to be Manitoba beef producers. Those making submissions are asked to choose one of the three areas – people, product and practices – to focus on in their essays. The top essays will be used to form the “We are Proud” campaign. As well, all entries will be entered into a contest to win a VIP package for two to the 2015 Grey Cup which will be held in Winnipeg on Nov. 29. The package includes two tickets to the big game and exclusive access to areas of

Investor’s Group Field. “We are excited to launch this campaign and look forward to seeing the submissions of our members,” said MBP General Manager Melinda German. “In this day of heightened customer awareness and social media, we feel it is very important for producers to tell their story. Having Manitoba producers explain the lengths they go to to produce a safe and healthy product and also in their care of the environment and their animals will serve to build and maintain our relationship with our customer. “We also feel this campaign can serve as a rallying point

for producers. As we know beef producers are humble people who chose this line of work because it is something they genuinely love; this campaign gives them a chance to let consumers know they are professionals and highlights the pride and care that go into beef production.” Entries can be submitted via email to csaxon@mbbeef.ca. They can also be mailed to the Manitoba Beef Producers office at: 220-530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 The deadline for submissions is Nov. 7.


Break with tradition this thanksgiving holiday Courtesy Canada Beef Some of us break with tradition, serving Roast Beef for Thanksgiving. Are you going to be a rebel this year or is Roast Beef for Thanksgiving your family tradition? You can go with a classic: Roast Beef with Peppercorn Wine Sauce (recipe featured here), or shake things up a bit with a Pot Roast for a slow-cooker simmer. And if cranberries are the star of your Thanksgiving tradition, we have 4 cranberry & beef pairings featured in our October Make it Beef e-blast. Whether your a first-time or a seasoned roaster, there are always some tips or tricks to help you do roasting better. We did the work of testing LOTS of Oven Roasts to come up with the perfect method. Then, we let folks try it at home and give us their feedback. All that work (with trained taste-testers, home-testers and shearforce analysis) got us to THE ULTIMATE ROAST BEEF cooking instruction. We use it on every Oven Roast recipe so you get the most tender and juicy roast beef. Roast Beef with Peppercorn Wine Sauce and Make-ahead Glazed Beets Make this recipe with your favourite Oven Roast: Strip Loin, Eye of Round, Tenderloin, Prime Rib, Rib, Top Sirloin, Outside or Inside Round, Rib Eye, Rump or Tri-tip. You can cook beets ahead and glaze just before serving. Ingredients 4 lb (2 kg) Beef Oven Roast (e.g. Strip Loin, Rib and Top Sirloin) 5 cloves garlic, cut into slivers Sea salt and coarsely ground pepper Peppercorn Wine Sauce (recipe follows) Glazed Beets (recipe follows) Instructions 1. Cut shallow slits all over roast; insert garlic slivers into slits. Rub all over with coarse salt and pepper. Place, fat side up, on rack in shallow roasting pan (no water is necessary). Insert oven-safe meat thermometer into centre of roast, avoiding fat or bone. 2. Oven-sear by placing uncovered roast in preheated 450°F (230°C) oven for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 275°F (140°C). Cook until thermometer reads 145ºF (63ºC) for medium-rare, about 2 to 2-1/2 hours. Remove from oven. 3. Place roast on cutting board; cover with foil and let stand for at least 15 minutes. Meanwhile, make Peppercorn Wine Sauce. 4. Carve roast into thin slices and serve with hot sauce and Glazed Beets. Peppercorn Wine Sauce: Drain off all but 2 tbsp (30 mL) fat from roasting pan. Heat pan drippings in roasting pan over medium-high heat. Stir in 2 tbsp (30 mL) all-purpose flour; cook, stirring constantly, for 1 minute. Gradually stir in 1 cup (250 mL) EACH sodium-reduced beef broth and red wine or Madeira and 2 tsp (10 mL) cracked mixed peppercorns. Cook, stirring up any browned bits from bottom of pan. Whisk until sauce boils and thickens, about 4 minutes. Makes 1-1/4 cups (300 mL). Glazed Beets: Place ten 3-inch whole beets in pot with enough water to just cover; bring to boil over high heat. Reduce heat and simmer covered for 30 minutes. Turn heat off and let stand covered for 1 hour or more. Use a paper towel to slip skins off. Cut into slices; sauté in 2 tbsp butter to heat through. Toss with 2 tbsp EACH chopped chives, green onion or fresh dill and a splash of vinegar or lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper to taste.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 5

Dates and locations for district meetings set The schedule for Manitoba Beef Producers’ annual tour of the province has been set. Beginning Oct. 26 MBP staff and directors will embark on 14 district meetings. The district meetings are an excellent opportunity for members to learn about MBP’s work on their behalf

and to also provide input on the future of the organization by submitting resolutions that will eventually be voted on at the annual general meeting which is scheduled for Feb. 4 and 5 in Brandon. Elections for directors will also be held in even numbered districts this year. A

new director will be selected for District 10 as current director Theresa Zuk has reached her term limit and will be retiring. “We strongly encourage our members to attend their district meeting,” said MBP general manager Melinda German. “This year’s meet-

ings will be of particular interest to members as there are a number of important issues to discuss and inform our members of.” Each meeting is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. in the locations listed below. A beef on a bun supper will also be served at each meeting.

ATTEND YOUR MBP DISTRICT MEETING

Meet with MBP representatives and fellow beef producers to discuss the timely beef issues affecting your district and industry. Elections will be held in even numbered districts. All Meetings will begin at 6 p.m. with beef on a bun being served. DISTRICT

DIRECTOR

DATE

LOCATION

ADDRESS

District 11

Caron Clarke

Oct-26

Eriksdale Rec Centre

1st Ave., Eriksdale

District 9

Dianne Riding

Oct-27

South Interlake Rockwood Ag Society

PR #236 & Rockwood Road, Stonewall

District 3

Peter Penner

Oct-28

Elm Creek Community Hall

70 Arena Rd., Elm Creek

District 4

Heinz Reimer

Oct-29

Grunthal Auction Mart

Provincial Road 205

District 12

Bill Murray

Nov-03

Westlake Community Hall

Hwy. 68, Eddystone

District 13

Ben Fox

Nov-04

Chicken Chef

131 1st Ave., Roblin

District 14

Stan Foster

Nov-05

Legion Hall

206 2nd St., Bowsman

District 7

Larry Gerelus

Nov-06

Strathclair Hall

120 Veterans Way, Strathclair

District 1

Gord Adams

Nov-09

Deloraine Curling Rink

119 Lake St., Deloraine

District 2

Dave Koslowsky

Nov-10

Memorial Hall

142 First St., Baldur

District 6

Larry Wegner

Nov-12

Oak Lake Community Hall

474 North Railway St. West, Oaklake

District 5

Ramona Blyth

Nov-13

Cypress Planning Office(Old Town Hall)

122 Main St., Carberry

District 10

Theresa Zuk*

Nov-16

Bifrost Community Centre

337 River Rd., Arborg

District 8

Tom Teichroeb

Nov-18

Royal Canadian Legion

425 Brown Ave., Neepawa

*Director Retiring

CALL 1-800-772-0458 OR EMAIL INFO@MBBEEF.CA FOR FULL DETAILS


MB plastic film and twine collection pilot This year, CleanFARMS will be operating a pilot program aimed at keeping plastic film and twine out of select municipal landfills in Manitoba. This pilot is part of the agricultural industry’s commitment to the responsible management of its products throughout their entire lifecycle and will help determine the feasibility of a permanent program. When? Spring and Fall collection blitz’: Spring 2015 - March 23rd to 28th.

Fall 2015 - October 26th to 31st. What is included? Clean and dry materials only. Materials must be kept seperate: Bale and silage wrap, Grain bags, Plastic (polypropylene) twine. What’s out? No nylon twine/rope, netting, or feed/seed bags. No excessively dirty materials. Preparation steps: Ensure material is as clean and dry as possible.

Amazing Agriculture Adventure

Grain bags: roll grain bags and tie securely with twine OR roll with a grain bag roller (where available). Contact your local RM to find out if a grain bag roller is available for use. Bale/silage wrap: bag in a CleanFARMS collection bag. Twine: bag in a CleanFARMS collection bag and drop off at the collection site. Collection bags are available for free at the participating collection sites. Drop off prepared materials at your local collection site.

The annual Amazing Agriculture Adventure, which is organized by Ag In the Classroom Manitoba, was held in September at the University of Manitoba’s Glenlea Research Farm. Manitoba Beef Producers was among the groups that hosted a station during the event, which helps to educate children about agriculture and the food production system in Canada.Above, MBP Director Dianne Riding, at left, speaks with a group of students during the three day event. (Photo courtesy of AITC Manitoba)


Participating film and twine collection sites - hours and locations:


Rural Veterinary Task Force public consultations The Rural Veterinary Task Force will hold stakeholder meetings, focus groups and public consultations over the summer, fall and early winter of 2015 in several regions of the province. The task force will review the current veterinary structure in rural Manitoba, people’s needs regarding veterinary care - with an emphasis on animal health and welfare - biosecurity, food safety on farms and the needs for maintaining a stable veterinary infrastructure. ________________________________________ In-person sessions The public is invited to take part in three consultations at the following locations: • October 20, 2015 in Dauphin at Canway Inn & Suites, 1601 Main Street • October 21, 2015 in Brandon at Riverbank Discovery Centre, 1-545 Conservation Drive • October 22, 2015 in Stonewall at the South Interlake-Rockwood Agricultural Society’s Red Barn, south of Stonewall on Hwy 236 (French translation services will be available) All sessions will run from 1:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. No registration is required. ________________________________________ Online questionnaire You can provide feedback by completing the online questionnaire. Select the questionnaire that best describes you: • User of veterinarian services - PDF 80KB MS Word 33KB • Clinic owner, associate or clinic employee PDF 82KB MS Word 32KB • Veterinary services district board member PDF 74KB MS Word 28 KB • Veterinary student or animal health technology student PDF 70KB MS Word 27KB Interested stakeholders can also provide written submissions to: Dr. Paul Schneider, Chair Rural Veterinary Task Force 75 Christie Road Winnipeg, MB, R2N 4A4 Provide your feedback before November 6, 2015. ________________________________________ For more information Dr. Paul Schneider, Chair Rural Veterinary Task Force 75 Christie Road Winnipeg, MB, R2N 4A4 204-371-2573


Preparation: 30 min Makes: 8 servings Nutritional Information Per Serving (Calories 173, Protein 15 g, Fat 6 g, Carbohydrates 15 g, Source of iron (13% DV) and excellent source of zinc (39% DV))

Difficulty: Easy Cooking: 2 hr

If You Can’t Play Like An Athlete You Can Still Eat Like One!

(Information courtesy of Canada Beef) Although rarely discussed at dinner parties, zinc is an essential mineral that plays many vital roles. It’s one of those micro-nutrients you body’s just got to have. Here’s how it contributes to your good health and how to get enough. Zinc is found in every living cell in the body and luckily, it’s easy to get by choosing zinc-rich foods to eat. What Does Zinc Do? • Your immune system depends on zinc to help fight infections. • Zinc promotes optimal mental development and performance • Infants, children and teens rely on zinc for healthy growth • Expectant mothers need more zinc for healthy pregnancies

Zinc ... One of Life’s Little Wonders

1. Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat; brown beef cubes. Stir in vegetables, barley, broth, thyme, dillweed, pepper and bay leaf. 2. Add 4 cups (1 L) water; bring to boil. Reduce heat to simmer; cover and cook for about 2 hours or until beef and barley are tender. 3. Discard bay leaf before serving.

1 tbsp (15 mL) vegetable oil 1 lb (500 g) Beef Stewing Cubes, trimmed 6 cup (1.5 L) vegetables, cut in small pieces (i.e. onions, carrots, celery, rutabaga and/or potatoes) ¼ cup (50 mL) pot or pearl barley 1 can (10 oz/284 mL) beef broth 1 bay leaf ¼ tsp (1 mL) EACH dried thyme, dillweed and pepper

Recipe Courtesy of Canada Beef

Beef and Barley Soup

A great soup recipe is something everyone needs to have in their kitchen. This Beef and Barley soup recipe is packed with incredible flavour and is also loaded with the protein and iron active bodies need. This is a soup everyone is certain to enjoy.

Featuring Chef Darryl Crumb

Presented By Manitoba Beef Producers

Eat Like An Athlete


mbbeef.ca

September 25, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Tell us why you’re proud to be a Manitoba beef producer Grey Cup VIP package to the winner Manitoba Beef Producers is about to embark on a campaign to promote the province’s beef industry and would like its members to be the stars. Tentatively titled “We Are Proud,” the campaign will serve as an opportunity for MBP members to shine a light on the industry through their own words. The campaign will be built around three areas – Pride in Our People, Pride in our Practices and Pride in Our Product. Each of the areas will comprise the overall campaign and allow MBP to show consumers and the public at large the work being done by producers in areas such

as animal care and environmental stewardship. In 500 words or less, MBP is asking members to explain why they are proud to be Manitoba beef producers. Those making submissions are asked to choose one of the three areas – people, product and practices – to focus on in their essays. The top essays will be used to form the “We are Proud” campaign. As well, all entries will be entered into a contest to win a VIP package for two to the 2015 Grey Cup which will be held in Winnipeg on Nov. 29. The package includes two tickets to the big game and exclusive access to areas of

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Investor’s Group Field. “We are excited to launch this campaign and look forward to seeing the submissions of our members,” said MBP General Manager Melinda German. “In this day of heightened customer awareness and social media, we feel it is very important for producers to tell their story. Having Manitoba producers explain the lengths they go to to produce a safe and healthy product and also in their care of the environment and their animals will serve to build and maintain our relationship with our customer. “We also feel this campaign can serve as a rallying point

for producers. As we know beef producers are humble people who chose this line of work because it is something they genuinely love; this campaign gives them a chance to let consumers know they are professionals and highlights the pride and care that go into beef production.” Entries can be submitted via email to csaxon@mbbeef.ca. They can also be mailed to the Manitoba Beef Producers office at: 220-530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 The deadline for submissions is Nov. 7.

Harvest can be a time of intense excitement as well as stress. If you need to talk, contact Manitoba Farm, Rural & Northern Support Services. They understand and are there to help. Toll free Support Line: 1-866-367-3276 E-mail and Instant Messaging (chat): www. supportline.ca Free and completely confidential.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • Canadian producers stand firm on COOL • Prepping for the politicians • COOL decision down to the fine points • Putting grazing theory into practice • Back to school is what for lunch season • The September hay situation and price update from MFGA


Dates and locations for district meetings set The schedule for Manitoba Beef Producers’ annual tour of the province has been set. Beginning Oct. 26 MBP staff and directors will embark on 14 district meetings. The district meetings are an excellent opportunity for members to learn about MBP’s work on their behalf

and to also provide input on the future of the organization by submitting resolutions that will eventually be voted on at the annual general meeting which is scheduled for Feb. 4 and 5 in Brandon. Elections for directors will also be held in even numbered districts this year. A

new director will be selected for District 10 as current director Theresa Zuk has reached her term limit and will be retiring. “We strongly encourage our members to attend their district meeting,” said MBP general manager Melinda German. “This year’s meet-

ings will be of particular interest to members as there are a number of important issues to discuss and inform our members of.” Each meeting is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. in the locations listed below. A beef on a bun supper will also be served at each meeting.

ATTEND YOUR MBP DISTRICT MEETING

Meet with MBP representatives and fellow beef producers to discuss the timely beef issues affecting your district and industry. Elections will be held in even numbered districts. All Meetings will begin at 6 p.m. with beef on a bun being served. DISTRICT

DIRECTOR

DATE

LOCATION

ADDRESS

District 11

Caron Clarke

Oct-26

Eriksdale Rec Centre

1st Ave., Eriksdale

District 9

Dianne Riding

Oct-27

South Interlake Rockwood Ag Society

PR #236 & Rockwood Road, Stonewall

District 3

Peter Penner

Oct-28

Elm Creek Community Hall

70 Arena Rd., Elm Creek

District 4

Heinz Reimer

Oct-29

Grunthal Auction Mart

Provincial Road 205

District 12

Bill Murray

Nov-03

Westlake Community Hall

Hwy. 68, Eddystone

District 13

Ben Fox

Nov-04

Chicken Chef

131 1st Ave., Roblin

District 14

Stan Foster

Nov-05

Legion Hall

206 2nd St., Bowsman

District 7

Larry Gerelus

Nov-06

Strathclair Hall

120 Veterans Way, Strathclair

District 1

Gord Adams

Nov-09

Deloraine Curling Rink

119 Lake St., Deloraine

District 2

Dave Koslowsky

Nov-10

Memorial Hall

142 First St., Baldur

District 6

Larry Wegner

Nov-12

Oak Lake Community Hall

474 North Railway St. West, Oaklake

District 5

Ramona Blyth

Nov-13

Cypress Planning Office(Old Town Hall)

122 Main St., Carberry

District 10

Theresa Zuk*

Nov-16

Bifrost Community Centre

337 River Rd., Arborg

District 8

Tom Teichroeb

Nov-18

Royal Canadian Legion

425 Brown Ave., Neepawa

*Director Retiring

CALL 1-800-772-0458 OR EMAIL INFO@MBBEEF.CA FOR FULL DETAILS


Manitoba’s Controlled Crop Residue Burning Program

Always Call Before You Burn

1-800-265-1233 Stubble burning restrictions

Manitoba’s crop residue burning regulation restricts daytime burning between August 1 and November 15. Burning at night is illegal. Burning within Burning Permit Areas requires a permit issued by Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship. If you do not comply, you may be fined as much as $50,000.

If you must burn, be responsible Before you burn straw, stubble or chaff this fall, call 1-800-265-1233 or visit manitoba.ca to find out whether burning is allowed in your area that day. Burning is permitted only on days when the weather conditions allow for effective smoke dispersion. It is essential that you make sure appropriate fireguards are in place during a burn and you must supervise your fires at all times.

Consider the alternatives In most years, crop residue management practices can reduce or eliminate the need to burn. For more information, contact your local Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development Growing Opportunities Centre or visit manitoba.ca.

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Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 5

Managing Calves for Improved Productivity and Reduced Antimicrobial Use: BCRC Webinar BCRC Press Release The ways cow-calf producers manage their calves can have a big impact on how well they’ll perform on feed and whether they end up in the feedlot’s sick pen. On Sept. 28 join this free webinar for practical tips and strategies to increase fed calves’ productivity by lowering their stress and disease susceptibility. This session will also walk through the economics to help producers better understand how and when the extra efforts improve their own profitability. The webinar begins at 8 p.m. Manitoba time. To register click here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1869880420996086018 Speakers Dr. Cody Creelman – Veterinarian, Veterinary Agri-Health Services Ltd. Dr. Cody Creelman grew up near Beaverlodge, Alberta on a commercial cow-calf operation and raised purebred Simmental cattle. Dr. Creelman joined Veterinary Agri-Health Services in May 2011 as an associate veterinarian, and as of 2013, is a managing partner. His professional interests include pathology, large animal surgery, cow-calf and feedlot production medicine. Since becoming a veterinarian, Dr. Creelman has discovered a new passion revolving around the use of mobile technology in the field. This includes consulting on veterinary application design projects as well as using social media to market veterinary services. Reynold Bergen, Ph.D. – Beef Cattle Research Council Science Director Dr. Bergen provides scientific and industry expertise to the BCRC, Beef Science Cluster and Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). He works with industry to identify research priorities, reviews research proposals and scientific reports, and engages with industry and research experts on an ongoing basis. To ensure producers have access to current research information, he develops factsheets for projects funded through the BCRC, and writes articles that are available through the CCA, provincial beef organizations, various ag media outlets and BeefResearch.ca. Reynold also works to gather and provide relevant research-based information for industry, public and government communications on specific issues. Brenna Grant – Manager at Canfax Research Servicesbrenna-grant As Manager of Canfax Research Services, Brenna provides industry with statistical information and economic analysis, focusing on both the Canadian and global beef markets. Brenna is originally from a cow-calf operation at Val Marie, Saskatchewan. What is a webinar? Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar.


MB plastic film and twine collection pilot This year, CleanFARMS will be operating a pilot program aimed at keeping plastic film and twine out of select municipal landfills in Manitoba. This pilot is part of the agricultural industry’s commitment to the responsible management of its products throughout their entire lifecycle and will help determine the feasibility of a permanent program. When? Spring and Fall collection blitz’: Spring 2015 - March 23rd to 28th.

Fall 2015 - October 26th to 31st. What is included? Clean and dry materials only. Materials must be kept seperate: Bale and silage wrap, Grain bags, Plastic (polypropylene) twine. What’s out? No nylon twine/rope, netting, or feed/seed bags. No excessively dirty materials. Preparation steps: Ensure material is as clean and dry as possible.

Grain bags: roll grain bags and tie securely with twine OR roll with a grain bag roller (where available). Contact your local RM to find out if a grain bag roller is available for use. Bale/silage wrap: bag in a CleanFARMS collection bag. Twine: bag in a CleanFARMS collection bag and drop off at the collection site. Collection bags are available for free at the participating collection sites. Drop off prepared materials at your local collection site.

Call for Proposals Growing Innovation is accepting applications for innovative agriculture research on the farm and in the lab. Application deadline is October 1, 2015. Learn more. Apply today.


Participating film and twine collection sites - hours and locations:


Presented By Manitoba Beef Producers

Preparation: 10 min Makes: Makes 12 servings. servings Nutritional Information Per Serving (276 calories, 33 g protein, 14 g fat, 3 g carbohydrate, 259 mg sodium, 3.5 mg iron (25% DV), 8 mg zinc (89% DV)

Difficulty: Easy Cooking: 6 hr

Recipe Courtesy of Canada Beef

If You Can’t Play Like An Athlete You Can Still Eat Like One!

Current dietary guidelines tell us that adults can safely consume 10 to 35% of their daily energy (calories) from protein. This translates to a range of about 50 to 175 grams of protein for an adult who eats 2,000 calories a day. Most Canadians eat well within this range. In fact, average adult protein intakes are at the lower end of the range, at about 17% of energy. This suggests most people can enjoy more protein-rich foods, which may benefit their health.

Did You Know?

4 lb (1.81 kg) Beef Pot Roast (e.g. Cross Rib, Blade or Brisket) Coarsely ground sea salt or kosher salt and pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2 tbsp (30 mL) vegetable oil ¼ cup (50 mL) red wine or beef broth 1 cooking onion, cut into wedges lengthwise ½ cup (125 mL) dried mushrooms (optional) 1can, (284 mL) condensed mushroom soup, undiluted 1 cup (250 mL) diced green beans (optional) 1 cup (250 mL) quartered button mushrooms 1. Pat roast dry; season with salt and pepper. Heat oil in Dutch oven on medium-high heat. Add roast; brown well on all sides, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove roast from pan. 2. Add garlic and onion to pan. Reduce heat to medium; cook until lightly browned, about 3 to 4 minutes (NOTE: add splash of water to prevent scorching if needed). Stir in wine, scraping up browned bits from bottom of pan. Stir in soup. Soak dried mushrooms (if using) in 1/2 cup (125 mL) hot water. Strain, reserving liquid; add soaked mushrooms and reserved liquid to pan. 3. *Transfer roast and liquid from pan to slow cooker insert. Add fresh mushrooms; cover and cook on LOW for 6 to 8 hours until roast is fork-tender. 4. Remove roast to cutting board; cover with foil and towel to keep warm. Add green beans (if using) to sauce; cover and cook on HIGH for 30 minutes or until veggies are tender. Season sauce to taste. Serve roast with the vegetables and sauce.

Pot roasts make the most comforting one-pot meals. And bonus – they’re so simple to make: Just brown meat and flavourings, add a liquid for cooking, cover and slow-simmer - that’s all there is to it! This recipe is low in calories and packs an incredible 31 grams of protein per serving.

Slow Cooker Marvellous Mushroom Pot Roast

Featuring Chef Darryl Crumb

Eat Like An Athlete


September 11, 2015

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Manitoba Producer’s Day August 29 was a perfect night for beef and football as Manitoba’s beef producers were in the spotlight when the Winnipeg Blue Bombers took on the Calgary Stampeders. As part of a CFL - Canada Beef sponsorship, Manitoba Beef Producers were the host sponsor for the CFL clash. MBP had a station in Tailgate Plaza where fans were able to sign up for a free meal for 10 with two members of the Bombers and to also try their hand at roping.

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Harvest can be a time of intense excitement as well as stress. If you need to talk, contact Manitoba Farm, Rural & Northern Support Services. They understand and are there to help. Toll free Support Line: 1-866-367-3276 E-mail and Instant Messaging (chat): www. supportline.ca Free and completely confidential.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry

• Manitoba family balances between raising kids and healing sick animals • The September issue of Cattle Country is online • The latest beef market update from Real Agriculture • Manage your grazing lands in time of drought • Check out our Eat Like An Athlete recipe archive


Dates and locations for district meetings set The schedule for Manitoba Beef Producers’ annual tour of the province has been set. Beginning Oct. 26 MBP staff and directors will embark on 14 district meetings. The district meetings are an excellent opportunity for members to learn about MBP’s work on their behalf

and to also provide input on the future of the organization by submitting resolutions that will eventually be voted on at the annual general meeting which is scheduled for Feb. 4 and 5 in Brandon. Elections for directors will also be held in even numbered districts this year. A

new director will be selected for District 10 as current director Theresa Zuk has reached her term limit and will be retiring. “We strongly encourage our members to attend their district meeting,” said MBP general manager Melinda German. “This year’s meet-

ings will be of particular interest to members as there are a number of important issues to discuss and inform our members of.” Each meeting is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. in the locations listed below. A beef on a bun supper will also be served at each meeting.

ATTEND YOUR MBP DISTRICT MEETING

Meet with MBP representatives and fellow beef producers to discuss the timely beef issues affecting your district and industry. Elections will be held in even numbered districts. All Meetings will begin at 6 p.m. with beef on a bun being served. DISTRICT

DIRECTOR

DATE

LOCATION

ADDRESS

District 11

Caron Clarke

Oct-26

Eriksdale Rec Centre

1st Ave., Eriksdale

District 9

Dianne Riding

Oct-27

South Interlake Rockwood Ag Society

PR #236 & Rockwood Road, Stonewall

District 3

Peter Penner

Oct-28

Elm Creek Community Hall

70 Arena Rd., Elm Creek

District 4

Heinz Reimer

Oct-29

Grunthal Auction Mart

Provincial Road 205

District 12

Bill Murray

Nov-03

Westlake Community Hall

Hwy. 68, Eddystone

District 13

Ben Fox

Nov-04

Chicken Chef

131 1st Ave., Roblin

District 14

Stan Foster

Nov-05

Legion Hall

206 2nd St., Bowsman

District 7

Larry Gerelus

Nov-06

Strathclair Hall

120 Veterans Way, Strathclair

District 1

Gord Adams

Nov-09

Deloraine Curling Rink

119 Lake St., Deloraine

District 2

Dave Koslowsky

Nov-10

Memorial Hall

142 First St., Baldur

District 6

Larry Wegner

Nov-12

Oak Lake Community Hall

474 North Railway St. West, Oaklake

District 5

Ramona Blyth

Nov-13

Cypress Planning Office(Old Town Hall)

122 Main St., Carberry

District 10

Theresa Zuk*

Nov-16

Bifrost Community Centre

337 River Rd., Arborg

District 8

Tom Teichroeb

Nov-18

Royal Canadian Legion

425 Brown Ave., Neepawa

*Director Retiring

CALL 1-800-772-0458 OR EMAIL INFO@MBBEEF.CA FOR FULL DETAILS


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Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 4

Consumer Misreports By the Beef Cattle Research Council Consumer Reports Food Safety and Sustainability Center released its “Beef Report” on August 25. A number of questions, concerns and criticisms have been raised by the North American Meat Institute, the International Food Information Council, Business Insider, and others. Rather than answer the specific questions raised, Consumer Reports has encouraged people to read the report more closely. Unfortunately, reading the report more closely simply raises more questions about the expertise and/or integrity of Consumer Reports and its “policy and action arm,” Consumers Union. Here’s one example. “The Danger of Superbugs” heads a section on Page 10 and 11 detailing the health hazards posed by Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STECs, like E. coli O157). This directly implies that antimicrobial resistance will make STEC infections more difficult to treat. This is not true. Antibiotics are not used to treat STEC infections in people. Instead, treatments for STEC infections focus on replacing fluids due to diarrhea. In fact, antibiotic use is strongly discouraged in both Canada and the US because they could make the situation worse. The Public Health Agency of Canada says: “Generally, the dis-

ease must run its course. Treatment for those infected with E. coli includes drinking plenty of liquids to replace the body fluids lost through diarrhea and vomiting, and to avoid dehydration… Antibiotics are not used to treat the illness, as they may increase the risk of developing hemolytic uremic syndrome.” The Center for Disease Control in Atlanta says: “Non-specific supportive therapy, including hydration, is important. Antibiotics should not be used to treat this infection. There is no evidence that treatment with antibiotics is helpful, and taking antibiotics may increase the risk of HUS. Antidiarrheal agents like Imodium® may also increase that risk.” Antibiotics are not used to treat STEC infections in people, so antibiotic resistance will not make STEC infections more difficult to treat. If antibiotics are not used to treat STEC infections in people, why is E. coli used in antimicrobial resistance surveillance programs? Antimicrobial resistance surveillance programs in Canada and the US use E. coli as an indicator organism for several reasons. First, E. coli is found in all warm blooded animals and birds, and survives to some extent in the environment. Although some E. coli (like the STEC’s) are dangerous, the vast majority of E. coli are perfectly harmless (and some are even beneficial).

Because E. coli is found almost everywhere, E. coli-based surveillance programs can always find it, and it is easy to grow and identify in the lab. Second, although antibiotics are not used to combat STEC infections in humans, E. coli is exposed to antibiotics that are used to treat other bacterial infections. This makes E. coli a valuable indicator of how antimicrobial use can affect the overall bacterial population. Third, bacteria can trade antimicrobial resistance genes with each other, so rates of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli can indicate the degree to which antimicrobial resistance rates may be changing in the overall bacterial population. What are the actual rates of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli in Canadian beef? The Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS) has collected E. coli samples from retail beef since 2002. The 2013 CIPARS report indicates that 74% of E. coli isolates from retail beef could be killed by every antimicrobial tested, while 4% were resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes. Canada’s beef industry remains focused on ensuring the safety of Canadian beef. Research funded through the Canadian Beef Cattle Industry Science Cluster has clearly demonstrated that large Canadian beef processors do an excellent job of producing dressed carcassContinued to next page


Continued from previous page es that are essentially free of microbial contamination. Finding ways to further reduce the risk of microbial contamination during carcass fabrication is the subject of ongoing research. Research, development and effective implementation of improved food safety practices should contribute to ongoing declines in the incidence of E. coli O157 in Canada. Canada’s beef industry has supported antimicrobial use and resistance research for nearly two decades. This research gives strong evidence that Canada’s beef producers are using antimicrobials responsibly. They have good reasons for doing so. The beef industry needs to ensure

that these veterinary products remain effective to prevent or treat illness in cattle for economic and ethical reasons. Like everyone else, beef producers also need to ensure that medical antimicrobials continue to work when they or their family need to use them. We need cattle to remain healthy so that they can produce safe, high quality beef. We also need to ensure that consumers can have confidence that they are buying safe, affordable, high quality beef that was raised in a responsible and sustainable manner. The numerous misleading statements in the “Beef Report” are no reason for consumers to lose confidence in the safety of

Canadian beef, or the Canadian beef industry’s ongoing commitments to keep it safe. Provided consumers continue to cook ground beef to 71oC, science says that the beef for sale in Canadian (and American) grocers is a safe, nutritious, responsible and sustainable food choice. The Beef Science Cluster is funded by the National Check-Off and Agriculture and Agri -Food Canada with additional contributions from provincial beef industry groups and governments to advance research and technology transfer supporting the Canadian beef industry’s vision to be recognized as a preferred supplier of healthy, high quality beef, cattle and genetics.

Call for Proposals Growing Innovation is accepting applications for innovative agriculture research on the farm and in the lab. Application deadline is October 1, 2015. Learn more. Apply today.


Beef imports to Peru resume From CCA Action News The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) welcomes news that Canadian beef can be exported to Peru again as of August 21. Peru was among a handful of countries to temporarily suspend imports of Canadian beef in February 2015, following the detection of Case # 19 of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in Alberta. Canadian beef has been safe all along and while there was never any justification for any country to suspend imports, the CCA commends Peru for removing

its temporary suspension and resuming imports of Canadian beef. China had earlier resumed trade back in April. The CCA hopes that Korea, Taiwan and Indonesia will be inspired to also resume importing safe and nutritious Canadian beef. Peru’s imports of Canadian beef had been rising dramatically in 2013-14 from almost no trade before that. In 2014 Peru imported 2,437 tonnes of beef valued at $4.65 million representing 0.77 per cent of Canadian beef export volume. Peru was becom-

ing a significant importer of beef livers – an important outlet for this product following Russia’s politically motivated bans on food from Canada. About a third of the volume and half of the value of Canada’s 2014 beef exports to Peru was beef liver. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said it will commence the issuance of export certificates to Peru as of August 21. Peruvian officials have confirmed that existing export conditions and certificates will continue to be used.

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New Great Tastes Of Manitoba season underway Media Release

Great Tastes of Manitoba, the province’s longest running locally-made TV show, will air the first episode of its 26th season on September 5. The season is unveiling with new vision and direction, including a stunning new website, social media engagement, and even some outdoor grilling episodes. The fresh look and feel comes courtesy of the show’s new owner and Executive Producer, Chris McIvor of FRANK Digital. “We’ve been working with Great Tastes for many years, providing production and post services for its long-time producer Don Hornby. Don’s dedication to the show helped build a loyal fan base and a recognizable Manitoba brand. So when he wanted to retire and approached me about taking over the show, it just seemed like the natural

progression,” said McIvor. For 25 years Great Tastes has continued to showcase food produced and grown in Manitoba, with more than 20,000 viewers tuning into the show each week. The 26th season brings back familiar faces – the food experts presenting new meal ideas, and the Manitoba Liquor Marts beverage experts pairing each dish with wine, beer or spirits – but viewers tuning in on September 5 will also notice a new face. “We’re thrilled to have Winnipeg radio personality Dez Daniels hosting the show,” said McIvor. In addition to being a fixture in Winnipeg media for the past 20 years Dez is a mom, a published writer and a blogger. She’s excited to get into the kitchen with the Great Tastes food and beverage experts to prepare

and enjoy local foods. Great Tastes continues to offer entertaining episodes with great new recipes and timely cooking tips. McIvor adds, “We’re also really excited about reaching a new slightly younger audience. Today’s thirty-something cook is in the kitchen with the iPad on the counter, following a recipe off the web.” Each week, Great Tastes segments and recipes will be added to the hundreds of recipes found at GreatTastesMB.ca, and viewers can follow the show on Twitter and Facebook. The 26th season of Great Tastes of Manitoba airs on CTV, Saturday evenings from 6:30 to 7:00 p.m., until December 12 and again February 6 through May 14, 2016.

Manitoba’s Controlled Crop Residue Burning Program

Always Call Before You Burn

1-800-265-1233 Stubble burning restrictions

Manitoba’s crop residue burning regulation restricts daytime burning between August 1 and November 15. Burning at night is illegal. Burning within Burning Permit Areas requires a permit issued by Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship. If you do not comply, you may be fined as much as $50,000.

If you must burn, be responsible Before you burn straw, stubble or chaff this fall, call 1-800-265-1233 or visit manitoba.ca to find out whether burning is allowed in your area that day. Burning is permitted only on days when the weather conditions allow for effective smoke dispersion. It is essential that you make sure appropriate fireguards are in place during a burn and you must supervise your fires at all times.

Consider the alternatives In most years, crop residue management practices can reduce or eliminate the need to burn. For more information, contact your local Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development Growing Opportunities Centre or visit manitoba.ca.

MB Beef Producers 1/2 Page Ad


mbbeef.ca

August 28, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Dates and locations for district meetings set and to also provide input on new director will be selected ings will be of particular The schedule for Manitoba the future of the organization for District 10 as current interest to members as there Beef Producers’ annual tour director Theresa Zuk has are a number of important of the province has been set. by submitting resolutions that will eventually be voted reached her term limit and issues to discuss and inform Beginning Oct. 26 MBP staff on at the annual general will be retiring. our members of.” and directors will embark on meeting which is scheduled “We strongly encourage our Each meeting is scheduled 14 district meetings. for Feb. 4 and 5 in Brandon. members to attend their to begin at 6 p.m. in the The district meetings are Elections for directors will district meeting,” said MBP locations below. A beef an excellent Meet opportunity with MBP representatives and fellow beef producers to discuss the listed timely beef also be held in even numgeneral manager Melinda on a bun supper will also be for members learn about your issuestoaffecting district and industry. German. Elections will be held inserved even numbered bered districts this year. A “This year’s meetat each meeting. MBP’s work on their behalf

ATTEND YOUR MBP DISTRICT MEETING districts. All Meetings will begin at 6 p.m. with beef on a bun being served.

DISTRICT

DIRECTOR

DATE

LOCATION

ADDRESS

District 11

Caron Clarke

Oct-26

Eriksdale Rec Centre

1st Ave., Eriksdale

District 9

Dianne Riding

Oct-27

South Interlake Rockwood Ag Society

PR #236 & Rockwood Road, Stonewall

District 3

Peter Penner

Oct-28

Elm Creek Community Hall

70 Arena Rd., Elm Creek

District 4

Heinz Reimer

Oct-29

Grunthal Auction Mart

Provincial Road 205

District 12

Bill Murray

Nov-03

Westlake Community Hall

Hwy. 68, Eddystone

District 13

Ben Fox

Nov-04

Chicken Chef

131 1st Ave., Roblin

District 14

Stan Foster

Nov-05

Legion Hall

206 2nd St., Bowsman

District 7

Larry Gerelus

Nov-06

Strathclair Hall

120 Veterans Way, Strathclair

District 1

Gord Adams

Nov-09

Deloraine Curling Rink

119 Lake St., Deloraine

District 2

Dave Koslowsky

Nov-10

Memorial Hall

142 First St., Baldur

District 6

Larry Wegner

Nov-12

Oak Lake Community Hall

474 North Railway St. West, Oaklake

District 5

Ramona Blyth

Nov-13

Cypress Planning Office(Old Town Hall)

122 Main St., Carberry

District 10

Theresa Zuk*

Nov-16

Bifrost Community Centre

337 River Rd., Arborg

District 8

Tom Teichroeb

Nov-18

Royal Canadian Legion

425 Brown Ave., Neepawa

*Director Retiring

Find Us Online Last OR chance to purchase CALL 1-800-772-0458 EMAIL discounted Winnipeg Blue INFO@MBBEEF.CA FOR FULL DETAILS Facebook.com Bombers tickets for the Aug. 29 game. Click Here and use the @ManitobaBeef code CATTLE to receive the discount. mbbeef.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 2

CCA outlines election priorities In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry

• COOL meeting scheduled for Septmeber • Using the sun to open gates • Ready to hire a marketing specialist for your calves? • Is creep feeding the answer to your pasture woes? • Beef Market Update with Anne Wasko

The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) has released its Federal Election Priorities document with information for all candidates running for Parliament in the upcoming 42nd General Election on October 19. Generating $9.7 billion in farm cash receipts, the sale of cattle and calves was the largest single sector in Canadian agriculture in 2014. With 68,500 beef farms in the 2011 census, beef producers are both major drivers of the rural economy and can have a significant influence on the outcome on the election of Members to the 42nd Parliament. “Cattle producers continue to receive excellent prices for their cattle due to a tight global beef supplies and open markets,” said CCA President Dave Solverson. “As much as producers would like to respond to this clear market signal and expand their herds and take advantage of these current market opportunities, other factors can negatively impact their ability to do so. This underscores the importance of a competitive industry supported by a science-based regulatory environment for Canada’s beef cattle sector.” The election priorities document outlines a number of issues that can help create the operating environment for beef cattle herd expansion in Canada, such as fully funding programs that help producers manage risk and investing in infrastructure. Once expansion takes place, secure access to high value and growing markets and policies that ensure the competitiveness of Canadian producers are the key to keeping the good times rolling. Investment in research and sustainable practices are major priorities for the Canadian beef sector. Access to sufficient labour to work on farms and to process the meat is a critical issue that needs to be alleviated. With insufficient numbers of Canadians willing to take these jobs and insufficient access to immigration, increasing numbers of live cattle will leave for processing in the U.S. and Canada will need to import more food. The CCA will be sending its election priorities to all the national parties along with a questionnaire seeking feedback on how they intend to address the various challenges for beef producers. As the responses are received, the CCA will post them, verbatim, on its website, www.cattle.ca, for cattle producers to assess for themselves. - CCA Media Release


MBP to host Bombers game August 29 Manitoba Beef Producers is proud to be the host sponsor when the Winnipeg Blue Bombers meet the Calgary Stampeders tomorrow night. As part of an agreement signed in 2014, MBP will be the host sponsor for the Bombers’ game that evening when they host the defending Grey Cup champion Stampeders. Prior to the game MBP will have a booth located in the Tailgate Plaza at Investor’s Group Field where anyone attending the game can stop by and learn more about Manitoba’s cattle industry. MBP members will also have the opportunity to enter a draw where someone will win a steak dinner for 10 people in the Blue and Gold Club at IGF where they will be joined by two members of the Bombers for the meal. The supper will take place on Sept. 23. The agreement also provides the opportunity for MBP to highlight a Manitoba family for their contributions to the industry. The 2015 winners of The Environmental Sustainability Award (TESA), Kristine Blair and Graham Tapley, will be the featured family in recognition for capturing the award. Also, MBP members interested in attending the game can do so at a discounted price through an agreement between the Bombers and MBP. To receive the discount go to the Winnipeg Blue Bombers website and enter the code CATTLE in the offer code area. The three-year agreement between Canada Beef and the CFL was signed in 2014. According to a Canada Beef press release, the partnership is in conjunction with five provincial beef producer organizations from across the country, who will represent the Canadian beef farmers and ranchers to thousands of fans at CFL games across the country.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 4

Two Manitoba researchers among research mentorship program participants BCRC media release The Beef Cattle Research Council has announced the participants in the 2015-16 Beef Researcher Mentorship program. Following an open application process, four researchers have been selected. Each has been paired with notable leaders in the Canadian beef industry and given a travel budget for the coming year, which will provide valuable opportunities for greater engagement with Canada’s beef industry. Two of the researchers are based out of the University of Manitoba. Argenis Rodas-González, PhD is an Assistant Professor in Meat Science and Food Safety at the University of Manitoba. He was raised on a grass feeding dual-purpose cattle operation in Venezuela. His research has been in evaluation of meat composition and quality of domesticated livestock (beef and pork) and exotic species (water buffalo and bison), with special interest in the factors that determine meat shelf life and palatability, and application of novel technologies in order to improve them. Mentoring Rodas-Gonazalez will be Betty Green and Trevor Atchison. Green is the provincial coordinator of the Verified Beef Production program in Manitoba and has over 30 years of involvement in leadership roles in areas of education, agriculture and rural development including serving as president of the Manitoba Cattle Producers’ Association in 2003. Atchison is a fourth generation rancher. Together with his wife and parents, he owns and operates Poplarview Stock Farm near Pipestone, MB. Atchison has also been a director on Canada Beef Inc. for three years and currently sits as Vice Chair. Until February 2014, he served six years as a director of the Manitoba Beef Producers, and served as MBP president for one year. Claudia Narvaez Bravo, PhD is an Assistant Professor at the University of Manitoba, Food Science Department. Dr. Narvaez has a degree in Veterinary Medicine, and a Master of Science in Microbiology from Zulia State University. During her career, she has been working with food microbiology, specifically shelf life, quality, food-borne prevalence at the pre- and post-harvest levels, antimicrobial resistance in livestock animals (poultry, swine and beef cattle) and bacterial genetic characterization. Dr. Narvaez’s current research focuses on the development of suitable pre-harvest and post-harvest interventions to reduce the presence of pathogenic organisms within the meat production system. Mentoring Dr. Narvaez will be Mauricio Arcila and Tom Teichroeb. Arcila currently serves as the Food Safety Quality and Regulatory Superintendent for Cargill Meat Solutions in High River, AB. He was born and raised on a coffee plantation in Columbia before coming to Canada. He has been a director with the Canadian Meat Science Association in addition to working for beef producer groups (Beef Export Federation and the Canadian Beef Breeds Council) and private industry (XL Foods, Identigen, Cargill). Teichroeb, with his wife and daughters, own and operate a 350 cow-calf operation near Langruth, Manitoba. They purchased the ranch in 2000 and have been able to expand their cowherd and grow most of their feedstuffs. The ranch consists of approximately 4000 acres of native pasture and approximately 550 acres of tame forage production. Their goal is to expand their herd to 500 cow-calf pairs in the future. They background their calves in conjunction with a neighbor to reduce overhead costs and maximize marketing opportunities. Along with ranch duties, He is a school trustee, and a director for both for Manitoba Beef Producers and the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association.


Information for Federal Candidates in Canada’s 42nd General Election August 17, 2015

This document is available at www.cattle.ca


The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased to provide information on current issues in the Canadian cattle and beef industry. This information is available to all Federal candidates in Canada’s 42nd General Election.

The Beef Cattle Sector is a Major Driver of Canada’s Rural Economy Farm cash receipts from cattle and calves totaled $9.7 billion in 2014 representing 17 per cent of total farm cash receipts. Over the period 2010-14, cattle and calves have been the second largest revenue maker for farms after canola. The cattle industry contributed $18.7 billion to Canadian GDP in 2014. The 2011 Ag Census identified 68,500 farms in Canada that derive more than half their income from beef production.

Canadian Farm Cash Receipts by commodity, 2014 4% 17%

Wheat

8% 13%

Canola Other Crops

Cattle & Calves

11%

Dairy 17%

30%

Other Livestock Payments

Source: Statistics Canada

In 2011, the beef sector supported 228,811 full-time equivalent jobs either directly or indirectly. Every job in the beef sector yields another 3.56 jobs elsewhere in the economy. For every $1 of income received by workers and farm owners, another $2.08 is created elsewhere1.

Canada’s Beef Cattle Sector is Ready to Expand The last dozen years have presented both unprecedented challenges and amazing growth opportunities for Canada’s beef cattle industry. With the worst of the challenges well in the rear view mirror, tight cattle supply coupled with recovering demand and restoration of most access to export markets has produced strong selling prices for Canadian cattle producers.

“Economic Impacts of Livestock Production in Canada – A Regional Multiplier Analysis” Suren Kulshreshtha, University of Saskatchewan, September 2012 http://www.albertabeef.org/uploads/TheMultiplierEffectfortheCanadianCattleIndustry0011025-4.pdf

1


The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased to provide information on current issues in the Canadian cattle and beef industry. This information is available to all Federal candidates in Canada’s 42nd General Election.

Based on the historical cattle cycle, the last three to four years of strong prices should be heralding herd expansion. However, very dry conditions in Western Canada this spring and early summer have caused cattle producers to worry about the availability of feed to make it through next winter. Consequently, many Western Canada beef producers have been forced to reduce the size of their herds rather than expand. In the meantime, the Southern U.S. has finally emerged from several years of drought and is likely to add more than three million head of cattle this year - some imported from Canada. While we are pleased to have access to sell young breeding cattle at excellent prices as relief from dry conditions in Western Canada, we may be missing an opportunity for expansion in Canada that the U.S. is capitalizing on. Meanwhile in Eastern Canada, beef farmers compete with growing cities and suburban development for pastureland. Furthermore, the high returns per acre of grain and cash crops and the deep pockets of supplymanaged producers are squeezing beef cattle production (particularly cow-calf operators) out of Southern Ontario. Ontario beef farmers are looking to Northern Ontario where affordable land and ample water provide conditions well suited for beef farming. Beef farming can provide stable long-term economic activity for northern communities and should be facilitated by government. In Manitoba, expansion is affected by uncertain water conditions that go beyond weather. Significant infrastructure solutions are required to avoid flooding that can take pastures years to recover.

Working Together with Government Even producers that carefully manage their operations and adjust to market conditions can be squeezed by uncontrollable factors such as unnecessary government regulation, disastrous weather events, a volatile currency or an outbreak of animal disease. Despite the challenges, there is enormous optimism for the future of raising cattle in Canada. Much of that optimism comes from the knowledge that the recent revenue increases can be extended by creating new access to high value markets through trade agreements and by regaining markets that are currently restricted or closed to Canadian beef. Cattle producers need Government to work cooperatively with the sector when making policy changes and to ensure that producers have reliable programs to help manage their business risk. This document outlines a number of recommendations for Government that the CCA has identified to realize its vision of the future. A positive combination of these suggested market access improvements, a competitive regulatory environment, effective risk management and financing programs, continued research discoveries and adoption of innovative practices will enable existing producers as well as new and young entrants to grow the industry and its contribution to Canada’s economic success.

Access for Canadian Beef to Foreign Markets Canada is one of the largest exporters of red meat and livestock in the world. More than 40 per cent of Canadian cattle and beef production must be exported. There are many high value markets that maintain high tariffs and other non-tariff barriers on Canadian beef. These tariffs either prevent Canadian beef exports or significantly erode the economic value of exporting. Comprehensive trade agreements with these countries could be very beneficial for Canadian beef cattle producers. The Federal Government has placed a high priority on market access in recent years by forming the Agricultural Market Access Secretariat, pursuing new free trade negotiations, challenging barriers through formal dispute


The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased to provide information on current issues in the Canadian cattle and beef industry. This information is available to all Federal candidates in Canada’s 42nd General Election.

resolution processes at the World Trade Organization and engaging Ministers and the Prime Minister with their foreign counterparts. The CCA applauds such activities and encourages them to continue in the 42nd Parliament, but observes that resources are still too limited to engage simultaneously on all necessary fronts. The load is shouldered by a small team of Federal Government trade negotiators and technical officials struggling to undertake multiple trade negotiations simultaneously.

The CCA recommends utilizing resources in a targeted manner to achieve the following highest priorities: 1) Resolve the WTO dispute with the United States over Country of Origin Labelling; 2) Successfully negotiate and implement the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement to address the 38.5 per cent tariff imposed by Japan on Canadian beef; 3) Establish technical conditions that enable commercially meaningful beef exports to the European Union and implement the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA); 4) Remove the “temporary restrictions” imposed by Korea, Taiwan, Indonesia and Peru on Canadian beef products since February 2015; 5) Restore access for over 30 month beef to Mexico; 6) Secure full access for Canadian beef exports to China; 7) Ensure expeditious procedures and resources exist to facilitate importation to Canada of live breeding stock and genetics.

Country of Origin Labelling in the United States The CCA supports the idea of country of origin labeling and believes we have good requirements in Canada that allow producers to promote Canadian products if they choose to do so without disrupting trade. The U.S., however, implemented a mandatory country of origin labeling (COOL) requirement in late 2008 for beef, pork and other products that is more onerous than the Canadian approach to origin labelling. While COOL does not outright deny access to the U.S., the requirement to label meat with the country where the animal was born necessitates keeping Canadian livestock segregated from U.S. born animals. This measure easily devalues Canadian cattle by over $100 per animal. Fortunately, resolution is in sight. The World Trade Organization (WTO) Dispute Settlement Body has reached the end of its process in declaring the U.S. in non-compliance. This fall, the WTO will authorize Canada and Mexico to place retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports. This looming threat is causing the U.S. Congress to contemplate a resolution via repeal of the offending COOL legislation. However, Congress will only follow through with repeal if they feel retaliation by Canada and Mexico is imminent.

The CCA requests all Parties seeking to form the Government of Canada in the 42nd Parliament to declare their intention to swiftly impose retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports the moment Canada is authorized to do so by the WTO if the U.S. has not eliminated the incentive to segregate imported livestock by that time. Competitiveness Issues The objective of increasing market access must go hand-in-hand with ensuring the Canadian livestock industry retains its ability to compete in all markets, domestic and international. Unfortunately governments frequently propose policies that are not scientifically justified or do not consider the ability of cattle and other agricultural producers to compete. Even well considered policies can be counterproductive if they take the Canadian industry in an independent direction from competitors in other nations.


The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased to provide information on current issues in the Canadian cattle and beef industry. This information is available to all Federal candidates in Canada’s 42nd General Election.

The CCA would encourage Members of the 42nd Parliament to pursue the adoption of policies that are essentially equivalent in their outcome to the policies of other countries with which we compete. For this reason, as an industry, we are pursuing international partnerships such as the Five Nations Beef Alliance and the Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef. We recommend that Government also strive to develop regulations in partnership with its international counterparts. In this regard, we believe that the Regulatory Cooperation Council initiative commenced in 2011 holds great, although yet unrealized potential for the competitiveness of the Canadian livestock and red meat sector.

Traceability The CCA encourages the Government in the 42nd Parliament to implement traceability of cattle through the Cattle Implementation Plan (CIP). The CIP is a sustainable, effective and efficient cattle traceability system for Canada. It was developed through a collaborative process between industry and provincial and federal governments and was officially recognized by all industry sectors as industry’s roadmap to traceability at the National Cattle Traceability Summit in August 2011.

Research The Government has made several announcements related to agricultural research funding in the past few years. These announcements are very positive and the CCA supports further increased funding for agriculture research beyond the levels in Federal Budget 2015. Research is integral to support consumer confidence and to ensure that Canada’s beef industry is globally competitive and able to take advantage of current and emerging trade opportunities. Productivity improvements are critical as agriculture is challenged to produce more with less land, water, and labour resources. Research is also integral to providing science-based information to address growing public and consumer questions around agricultural production and social license issues such as animal welfare, environmental sustainability, and various production practices. Independent peer reviewed science provides an important voice to regulatory, policy, trade, and public debate which can ultimately have a significant impact on the beef industry’s ability to operate in a sustainable and competitive manner. Significant investment is needed to renew and reinvigorate agriculture research to a more meaningful level with investments focusing not only on research outcomes that address industry’s priorities but also on developing critical research capacity. This includes having skilled people working both within industry and in research institutions. This will support industry advancement as access to a sound and comprehensive knowledge base is particularly critical in times of competitive challenges. Enhanced long-term funding for applied agricultural production research is needed to rebuild research infrastructure and expertise to a level that can support innovation within the Canadian agriculture sector. In addition, a clear commitment from the Federal Government to maintain and strengthen Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s internal research capacity to perform long-term, high-risk discovery research is also needed. The benefits of basic scientific research (particularly in the areas of food safety and quality, animal health, and environment) extend beyond agriculture. Science-based production, policy and regulation benefit industry, government and society as a whole.

Workforce Availability Availability of full time permanent agricultural and processing labour has become a serious issue threatening the viability of food production in Canada. The two largest beef processing facilities in Alberta currently have hundreds of vacancies that they are unable to fill with Canadians despite non-stop recruiting efforts across Canada.


The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased to provide information on current issues in the Canadian cattle and beef industry. This information is available to all Federal candidates in Canada’s 42nd General Election.

Canadian packing plants are deferring high value export orders to their U.S. affliates because we do not have the labour to process the product. This means lost value for cattle producers. The alternative is to sell more live cattle to U.S. packers and a loss to the Canadian economy. Clearly the choices are to import more labour or ultimately import more food into Canada. Canadians are better served with a comprehensive labour strategy incorporating dedicated pathways for agriculture and primary processing companies to hire willing workers from abroad when needed and for viable pathways to residency for those successful workers. The CCA stands with every other segment of Canadian agriculture and primary processing in supporting the recommendations of the Labour Task Force’s Canadian Agricultural and Agri-Food Workforce Action Plan2. Highlights of the recommendations include: improving pathways to permanent residency for foreign workers; a dedicated agriculture workforce program; and facilitating and expediting the processing of agricultural worker applications. The CCA encourages all parties and candidates to declare their support for implementation of the Canadian Agricultural and Agri-Food Workforce Action Plan early in the 42nd Parliament.

Environmental Sustainability Increasingly agriculture is being asked by different stakeholders to account for the environmental performance of its management practices. Agri-food companies have increased their focus on sustainable development and corporate social responsibility. The challenge of the need to increase the food supply means increasing productivity and that means increasing efficiencies. Canadian beef cattle producers are already among the most efficient in the world. They are utilizing tools like managed grazing and raising feed-efficient cattle to maintain that trend. Thanks to these improvements, comparing beef production in Canada over the past three decades, in 2011 we required 22 per cent less land and 28 per cent fewer cattle to produce an equivalent amount of beef as in 1981. Furthermore, we produced 17 per cent less methane, 19 per cent less nitrous oxide, and 15 per cent less CO2. The GHG intensity per kg of beef produced has decreased by 16 per cent during this time period.3 Grasslands that are managed by Canadian cattle producers do more than produce beef. They support ecosystem services such as wildlife habitat, biodiversity conservation, water quality and carbon storage. Nearly one-third (31.2%) of Canada’s agricultural lands are covered in grasses and forages (20 million hectares). The majority of those lands are in natural grasses (14.7 million hectares)4. Those grasslands are particularly important areas for Canada’s migratory birds. Cattle producers want to be part of the development of a new and effective approach to the management of incidental take of species at risk and migratory birds. The CCA’s objective is to come up with a solution where these species become an asset to all Canadians, including the land managers that provide the habitat. The CCA encourages the Government of Canada to continue to look for ways that ranchers can partner in conservation for the supply of public goods. Examples of this might be shared costs for conservation actions, ensuring funds are available for continuation and expansion of agri-environmental programs and the development of market-based instruments. More effort is needed to promote and reward beneficial management practices that further enhance conservation on agriculture landscapes. Collaborative research on beneficial management practices and an adaptive management approach to implementing and incentivizing them is more effective than an expensive regulatory framework. http://www.cahrc-ccrha.ca/sites/default/files/PPWG-Update-April15-FINAL-ENG.pdf Legesse et al. unpublished data 4 2011 Agriculture Census of Canada 2 3


The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased to provide information on current issues in the Canadian cattle and beef industry. This information is available to all Federal candidates in Canada’s 42nd General Election.

Working cooperatively with Environment Canada, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada and other stakeholders, the agriculture community can enhance conservation, contribute to food security and support rural community health. Balancing the demand for natural resources, an increased food supply and enhancing conservation values requires wise and adaptable management to support Canadian needs in a sustainable way. Past solutions to protecting the environment have centered primarily on government legislation and regulation. New and innovative thinking is needed to develop creative approaches to managing landscape change. The CCA supports market growth and environmental sustainability by recommending that the Government direct resources into innovative land management tools and conservation programming. This increases the resilience of the grassland ecosystem, improving biodiversity conservation and wildlife habitat. This meets the public’s demand for environmentally sustainable food production. The CCA also supports the development of domestic and international markets and trade agreements with investment into innovative research in managed grazing and conservation and providing technical assistance to sustainably increase agricultural productivity and use of conservation management.

Social License On-farm food safety, animal care and environmental stewardship are part of every cattle producer's daily routine. Canadian cattle producers deliver a safe product from well cared for healthy animals raised on a land base that producers work to ensure remains healthy and productive for the next generation. Despite all the good work being done on these issues by producers, there is constant movement to increase requirements and regulation of agriculture. The CCA led the development of the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB). The CRSB aims to be a national, multi-stakeholder initiative developed to advance existing and new sustainability efforts within the industry. The CRSB focuses on three pillars of sustainability: environment, social and economic. Through leadership, science, multi-stakeholder engagement and collaboration continuous improvement of sustainability of the Canadian beef value chain will be achieved and recognized. We know that government regulations have many purposes. Advocates of such regulations often promote them as a means of differentiating our product in the marketplace. However, the reality is often that the added cost burden exceeds the value consumers are willing to pay for the benefits. The CCA believes government regulations must be based on appropriate management of real risks and an accurate analysis of the costs and benefits of these regulations. The CCA will call upon the Government of Canada to continue to cooperate with the CRSB in the 42nd Parliament to develop policies that help to maintain Canada’s position as a global leader in sustainable food production.

Business Risk Management for Cattle Producers The CCA’s first preference is that there be sufficiently funded national agriculture programs that are delivered consistently across all jurisdictions. Programs should minimize the risk of adverse impacts on international and interprovincial trade, minimize distortion of market forces and minimize influence on business decisions. Programs must not disrupt the competitive imbalance between agriculture sectors or regions.


The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased to provide information on current issues in the Canadian cattle and beef industry. This information is available to all Federal candidates in Canada’s 42nd General Election.

The CCA believes that the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program (WLPIP) is a forward-looking, market-based, insurance-style program that allows producers to manage price risk. The WLPIP should be made permanent. Cattle producers in Eastern provinces have chosen to support alternate programs in their provinces. In the absence of a single sufficiently funded national program, the CCA encourages the Government to contribute to each jurisdiction’s existing livestock insurance program. Various feeder and breeding cattle financing programs have operated efficiently under provincial jurisdiction for many years. With the recent surge in cattle prices, the loan guarantee limits of these programs are no longer sufficient to cover the capital investments required to acquire cattle in today’s market. The CCA encourages the Federal Government to participate and enhance the loan guarantees of feeder and breeding cattle financing programs.

For further information, please contact: John Masswohl, Director of Government & International Relations Canadian Cattlemen's Association 1207 – 350 Sparks Street Ottawa, ON K1R 7S8 Tel (613) 233-9375 Fax (613) 233-2860 masswohlj@cattle.ca

Dennis Laycraft, Executive Vice-President Canadian Cattlemen's Association 180-6815, 8th Street N.E. Calgary, AB T2E 7H7 Tel (403) 275-8558 Fax (403) 274-5686 laycraftd@cattle.ca

The CCA is the national voice for Canada’s beef cattle industry representing 68,500 beef farms and feedlots. Visit www.cattle.ca


mbbeef.ca

August 14, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

CCA holds semi-annual meeting in Manitoba It has been a busy week for many within Canada’s cattle industry. The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association held their semi-annual meeting and convention throughout the week in Winnipeg with delegates from throughout the country and guests from

the U.S. and Mexico gathering in Manitoba for a number of meetings and other events. Shortly after many of them arrived in Winnipeg Tuesday, the delegates jumped on a bus for a tour. The group first visited the Bruce D. Campbell Continued to Page 2

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Hardened Criminal? Manitoba Beef Producers’ director Tom Teichroeb was “arrested” on the way to Thursday’s CCA semi-annual 4-H fundraiser and entertainment evening. (At Left) Dr. Kim Ominski of the University of Manitoba provides CCA delegates with a rundown of the research being done at the Glenlea Research Farm south of Winnipeg.


Page 2

Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry

• WTO to discuss COOL retaliation in September • BCRC takes a look at ruminal acidosis

continued from page 1 Farm and Food Discovery Centre and Glenlea Research Farm before travelling to Hylife Ltd.’s JV Ranch to learn about their innovative manure management program. The evening wrapped up with a supper at the ranch. The business portion of the meeting kicked off Wednesday at the Holiday Inn Polo Park. Among the sessions on Wednesday and Thursday were domestic agriculture, animal health and animal care and foreign trade. Wednesday also included the annual President’s Banquet and presentation of The Environmental Stability Award (TESA). B.C.’s Squaw Valley Ranch captured the award this year for their work which included being one of the first operations in their

area to complete an Environmental Farm Plan. Among the highlights on Thursday was the 4-H Fundraiser and entertainment evening at Anderson’s Hitch ‘n Post. Similar to a traditional Manitoba social, the evening included a number of raffles and other fundraisers, all of which went towards the 4-H Canada and the Manitoba 4-H Council. Thanks to the generosity of numerous businesses and groups who donated items such as an electric guitar and skid of feed, the evening was a success raising over $2,000 to be split by the two organizations. The meetings wrapped up on Friday with the board of directors meeting and a Canfax Outlook Presentation.

• Canadian ranchers look to triple trade with Japan • Tips to help cattle cope with summertime heat stress • A look at the ongoing TPP negotiations

MFGA Hay Survey Manitoba Forage & Grassland is conducting a six question survey on the Manitoba hay situation. Due to the extreme variations in Manitoba this year, the survey is intended to help them get a handle on our province’s overall hay scene. To take part in the survey click the link below:

MFGA Hay Survey


Manitoba Beef Producers’ President Heinz Reimer speaks during a tour Tuesday that was part of the Canadian Cattlemen Association’s semi-annual meeting in Winnipeg. The tour took a stop at the Bruce D. Campbell Farm and Food Discovery Centre and the Hylife JV Ranch where a barbecue was held for attendees.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 4

MBP to host Bombers game Aug. 29 The countdown continues towards the Winnipeg Blue Bombers home game Aug. 29 against the Calgary Stampeders. As part of an agreement signed in 2014, MBP will be the host sponsor for the Bombers’ game that evening when they host the defending Grey Cup champion Stampeders. Prior to the game MBP will have a booth located in the Tailgate Plaza at Investor’s Group Field where anyone attending the game can stop by and learn more about Manitoba’s cattle industry. MBP members will also have the opportunity to enter a draw where someone will win a steak dinner for 10 people in the Blue and Gold Club at IGF where they will be joined by two members of the Bombers for the meal. The date of the supper will be determined once the winner is selected. The agreement also provides the opportunity for MBP to highlight a Manitoba family for their contributions to the industry. The 2015 winners of

The Environmental Sustainability Award (TESA), Kristine Blair and Graham Tapley, will be the featured family in recognition for capturing the award. Also, MBP members interested in attending the game can do so at a discounted price through an agreement between the Bombers and MBP. To receive the discount go to the Winnipeg Blue Bombers website and enter the code CATTLE in the offer code area. The three-year agreement between Canada Beef and the CFL was signed in 2014. According to a Canada Beef press release, the partnership is in conjunction with five provincial beef producer organizations from across the country, who will represent the Canadian beef farmers and ranchers to thousands of fans at CFL games across the country. This will give consumers the opportunity to meet the people who raise beef, and bring beef to their tables. "We're really excited to involve our provincial partners in this

unique opportunity. It will allow us to leverage these partnerships with boots on the ground, highlighting local beef farmers and ranchers at their games. This will build brand loyalty and allow grassroots producers to interact with consumers, while sharing their passion and the benefits of enjoying Canadian beef," said Rob Meijer, President, Canada Beef. MBP is also the sponsor of the Family of the Game promotion throughout the 2015 season. Bombers fans can enter a draw on the club’s website for four tickets to a home game. The winning family will also get a sideline experience prior to the game and will be announced as the Manitoba Beef Producers Family of the Game on the video board during the pre-game program. “We are very excited to sponsor the Family of the Game promotion and support the Manitoba families that purchase the beef produced by our members,” said MBP General Manager Melinda German.

To purchase a discounted ticket to the August 29 Winnipeg Blue Bombers game use the the code: CATTLE


Job Opening (Last Day to Apply) Farm Hand– Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc. Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives Inc. (MBFII), a not for profit organization developing a new and exciting opportunity for someone interested in participating in leading edge beef and forage research and extension. MBFII is collaborating with multiple stakeholders to develop a made-in-Manitoba beef and forage research and extension farm in the Brandon area. MBFII is seeking a full-time, term

Farm Hand. Reporting to the General Manager, the Farm Hand is responsible for the overall well-being and management of the resident cow/calf herd. The Farm Hand will be responsible for the yearround feeding and maintenance of the herd, fencing, watering and treating of sick animals. The Farm Hand will operate and maintain all livestock handling and farm equipment, and maintain the farm

yard and its facilities. This position is based out of the Brandon area. For a detailed job description and list of qualifications, visit www. mbbeef.ca. Please submit your resumĂŠ and cover letter by August 14, 2015 to Ms. Melinda German, General Manager, mgerman@ mbbeef.ca. Thank-you to all interested applicants, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Farm Hand - Duties and Responsibilities Overall Position Description

Provides labour support and takes responsibility for implementing a variety of activities associated with caring for the beef herd associated with the Initiative in a pasture and overwintering environment involving the dexterous use of hands, hand tools, specialized procedures and techniques, and equipment. Primary Activities: Monitors the health and cares for the beef herd in a pasture and overwintering environment by daily monitoring and feeding, and routine treatment of sick animals requiring vaccinations or common medications. Identifies abnormalities and consults with the Site Manager to determine course of action. Operates, calibrates and maintains equipment such as, but not limited to tractors, field equipment (seeding, haying, etc), cattle handling chutes, scales and augers. Maintains clean facilities, yards and equipment, replacing bedding, cleaning pens/stalls/corrals and spraying for weeds and insects as necessary and when agreed upon by supervisor or their designate. Selects, collects and labels samples, recording data and keeping records of activities and supplies associated with animal care (e.g. food, age, health, inventory of animals in care, samples). Provides services associated with experimental or extension procedures, including selecting animals, and assisting in calving and maintaining related records. Herds animals between various barns, pens or pastures, including transportation to other locations. Operates tractors, feed trucks, haying equipment and builds and repairs cattle handling equipment, including fences, corrals, sheds, and water supply systems. Knowledge and Skill: The work requires knowledge of animal care and handling within a pasture and overwintering environment and procedures requiring judgment that contributes to the development of a herd; and monitors the health and the comfort of beef cattle. Continued to Next Page


The work requires knowledge of the use of tools, associated equipment, their repair and maintenance. Knowledge of techniques and practices associated with animal husbandry such as feeding, breeding, handling, behaviour assessment and vaccination of livestock. Verbal and listening skills are required to understand and follow instructions from supervisors and coordinate work with others. Reading skills are required to interpret detailed instructions, manufacturers’ directions and sketches. Knowledge and skill are required to use standard workplace equipment and processes, which are acquired through experience, apprenticeship, on the job and/or vocational training. The work requires analytical skill to select and mix ingredients for feed and to select methods and techniques required to maintain the environment for animals (e.g. bedding, cleanliness, and sanitation). Physical skill, dexterity and coordination are required when handling animals for various procedures, including but not limited to, vaccinations, providing assistance at birth, collecting various samples. They are also required when operating vehicles such as trucks, front-end loaders, and building and repairing fences and remote water supply systems. Experience in a scientific environment and performing artificial insemination is an asset. Effort: Various physical activities require sustained focus and some versatility in switching from one task to the other. Concentration is required for estimating or measuring precise quantities when mixing rations, and assisting during breeding/birthing operations to prevent damage to the herd and project or activity outputs. Physical effort is required daily to stand and walk, frequently carry/lift/move heavy materials, to help in restraining beef cattle and when occasionally working in awkward positions. Responsibility: There is responsibility for animal welfare, and extra attention is expected during extreme weather conditions/fire in the extensive and intensive housing areas. There is responsibility for the application of appropriate procedures and techniques, keeping records, mixing or applying materials, performing precise measurements and compiling accurate records. The work contributes to the success of experiments/extension and the health and well being of the animals. There is responsibility for reporting abnormalities (e.g. cow disease) to the supervisor. There is responsibility to ensure the safety of others through proper handling of the animals and maintaining their environment (due diligence). There is also responsibility for the identification, basic evaluation of problems and recommending courses of action. An error in judgment could result in damage or loss of animals and/or data and/or ineffective use of resources. Working Conditions: There is frequent exposure to odours, dust, dirt, noise, animals and body fluids. Protective gear is required and safe work procedures are followed. There is regular exposure to injury due to working with hydraulic equipment and handling animals. Reporting: This position reports to the General Manager of Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc. or their designate. Term Position: The term expires March 31, 2018 and is subject to renewal based on funding for the Initiative.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Potential Hazards:

Bale Handling

S.F. No. 12 September 2012

Farmers in Manitoba have been seriously and fatally injured while working with large round hay bales. As they can weigh up to 900 kilograms, handling bales presents several risks including: risk of worker entanglement in balers (while trying to unplug the machine), risk of bales falling onto operators (from forklifts and tractors), and risk of serious injury to children (falls from hay piles, becoming pinned between bales, etc.).

How to Control the Hazard: Prevention is the key to a safe and efficient large round hay bale system. Baler operators must be aware of hazards at all times, and remain alert to situations which may cause injury to the operator or to others – this includes employees and family members. Baler Pre-check and Operator Training: DO: • Ensure only responsible and trained persons operate balers or bale handling equipment. Operators must be familiar with machinery maintenance and operation procedures. •

Ensure baler parts are properly adjusted and functioning according to the manufacturer’s recommendations before operating the baler (pre-inspect for: loose or missing nuts, guards or bent pickup teeth; replace: missing guards, belts, chains, hydraulic hoses, twine feeding, cutting mechanisms, slip clutch, roll scraper, rear gate latch, etc.).

Ensure all lights / signage / reflectors / emblems are in place and meet Manitoba’s Highway Traffic Act requirements.

During Baling: DO: • Only use tractors equipped with a Roll Over Protection System (ROPS). • Ensure all tractor attachments are secure and the baler is properly connected to the tractor. • Be cautious while operating a baler on uneven or hilly terrain – round balers are top heavy and may tip sideways if a wheel drops in a hole or ditch. • Discharge bales on level ground to prevent out-of-control rolling bales. • Ensure no one is near the rear gate (blind spot) when it is being raised or lowered. • Before servicing, cleaning, or adjusting a baler: disengage the tractor power takeoff (PTO), shut off the engine and remove the key. • Ensure children and bystanders are out of harm’s way. DO NOT: • Never attempt to hand feed or remove twine from a running baler. • Never allow anyone to ride along on the baler or tractor. Workplace Safety and Health Contact Information: Winnipeg: (204) 945-3446 Brandon: (204) 726-6361 Toll-Free: 1-866-888-8186 (Manitoba only) 24-Hour Emergency Line: (204) 945-0581 Publications/resources available at: www.safemanitoba.com

(see over)


Page 2

Bale Handling

S.F. No. 12

Unplugging the Baler DO: • To prevent and reduce plugging: begin with a properly formed windrow to form a good bale core, and vary tractor speed to match crop conditions and windrow size. • Once plug is clean, spread the bunched material in a windrow for pickup. DO NOT: • Never attempt to unplug a machine while it is running. • Never attempt to feed material into the baler by hand or foot. Moving Bales Failure to follow safe operating procedures for moving bales may result in serious crushing injuries or death for the tractor operator. DO: • Ensure handling unit has enough power to handle the bale and is using approved attachments (Refer to owner’s manual). • When moving bales, keep loads as low as possible and avoid jerky movements. • Match travel speed to conditions and ensure there is adequate ballast on the front and rear to counter-balance the load. • Avoid steep hillsides where possible. When it is necessary to pick up a bale on a steep hillside, work from the downhill side. DO NOT: • Never lift round bales using a standard loader without the proper restraining devices (Bales may roll out of the bucket, down the loader arms and onto the operator). ROPS systems do not protect against falling bales. Stacking DO: • Locate stacks on flat, even ground. • Stacked round bales must be chocked. • Stack bales tightly and at a stable height. • Ensure stacks are clear of power lines. DO NOT: • Never stack bales higher than the safe operating height of the handling unit. • Never allow children to play on bale stacks. Transporting Bales by Trailer DO: • Ensure the proper restraining frames are in place. • Use fitted hooks to accommodate load securing ropes. • Avoid rough terrain whenever possible. • Match travel speed to meet conditions. • Ensure the load being pulled is no heavier than the pulling unit. • Use the same gear for downhill as is used for uphill. • Refer to Manitoba’s Highway Traffic Act to ensure the load’s width meets safety requirements. • Ensure trailer lights / signage / emblems / reflectors are in working order and meet Manitoba’s Highway Traffic Act requirements. DO NOT: • Never allow anyone to ride on the trailer. Bulletin content adapted from Agricultural Guide, University of Missouri. Reference to legal requirements under workplace safety and health legislation: Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Act, W210 Additional workplace safety and health information available at: www.safemanitoba.com SAFE Farms Bulletin No. 6 – Safety Risk to Farm Tractor Operators: ROPS Certification This information is available in alternate formats upon request. Ces renseignements sont offerts dans de multiples formats sur demande.


Per Serving (251 calories, 21 g protein, 6 g fat (2 saturated fat, 0.1 g

If You Can’t Play Like An Athlete You Can Still Eat Like One!

As the basic building block for your body, protein is an important part of every cell. Canadian beef is naturally rich in this muscle-making nutrient that is essential for your health. Scientists are increasingly interested in the role of protein in health beyond the basics of growth and repair. Also, studies show that our bodies naturally burn a few more calories when we eat protein-rich meals. Eating plenty of protein-rich foods may also help to reduce fat around the middle during weight loss and help you maintain a healthy weight. Click here for more on protein.

Protein: Get the Power!

Big Batch Beef: Cook 4 lb (2 kg) Extra Lean Ground Beef in Dutch oven over medium-high heat for trans fat, 31 mg cholesterol), 31 g carbohydrate (11 g fibre), 504 mg sodium, 4 mg iron (28% DV), 4 mg zinc (40% DV)) 10 minutes, breaking into small chunks with back of spoon, until browned. Drain and return to pot. Add 4 EACH onion and cloves of garlic, minced, simmer for 15 minutes until vegetables are softened. Spread in a single layer on several foil or parchment paper-lined baking trays; freeze until meat is firm, about 1 hour. Loosen into chunks, scoop meal-sized portions into freezer bags. Freeze for up to 3 months.

Combine ingredients in saucepan. Simmer over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes or until heated through.

1 cup (250 mL) frozen corn 1 can (28 oz/796 mL) diced tomatoes, drained 2 cups (500 mL) frozen Big Batch Ground Beef (recipe follows) 1 tsp (5 mL) ground cumin 2 cans (19 oz/540 mL) kidney or black beans, drained and rinsed 1 sweet green pepper, diced 2 tbsp (30 mL) chili powder Nutritional Information

Mexicali Ground Beef Chili

Chili is an all-time favorite that is low in fat, packed with protein and loaded with flavour. Take a look at this delicious and easy to make chili recipe which is sure to be a hit.

Featuring Chef Darryl Crumb

Presented By Manitoba Beef Producers

Eat Like An Athlete


mbbeef.ca

July 31, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP to host Bombers game Aug. 29 The countdown continues towards the Winnipeg Blue Bombers home game Aug. 29 against the Calgary Stampeders. As part of an agreement signed in 2014, MBP will be the host sponsor for the Bombers’ game that evening when they host the defending Grey Cup champion Stampeders. Prior to the game MBP will have a booth located in the Tailgate Plaza at Investor’s Group Field where anyone attending

the game can stop by and learn more about Manitoba’s cattle industry. MBP members will also have the opportunity to enter a draw where someone will win a steak dinner for 10 people in the Blue and Gold Club at IGF where they will be joined by two members of the Bombers for the meal. The date of the supper will be determined once the winner is selected. The agreement also Continued to Page 2

Find Us Online Bombers Visit Centre of Excellence

Winnipeg Blue Bombers offensive lineman Sukh Chungh shows off the massive tomahawk steaks he won during the club’s visit to the Canada Beef Centre of Excellence July 17. The visit was part of Canada Beef’s three year sponsnorship with the Canadian Football League. The players and coaching staff were treated to an incredible lunch courtesy of the Canada Beef staff just one day before they took on the hometown Stampeders. (Photo by Chad Saxon)

Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry

• Thinking about cattle price insurance • Beef 911: Rectal palpation versus ultrasound for pregnant cows • Drought management strategies • The new world of sustainable beef • Canada threatens tarriffs over not so COOL proposal

Page 2

MBP members to get discounted tickets provides the opportunity for MBP to highlight a Manitoba family for their contributions to the industry. The 2015 winners of The Environmental Sustainability Award (TESA), Kristine Blair and Graham Tapley, will be the featured family in recognition for capturing the award. Also, MBP members interested in attending the game can do so at a discounted price through an agreement between the Bombers and MBP. To receive the discount go to the Winnipeg Blue Bombers website and enter the code CATTLE in the offer code area. The three-year agreement between Canada Beef and the CFL was signed in 2014. According to a Canada Beef press release, the partnership is in conjunction with five provincial beef producer organizations from across the country, who will represent the Canadian beef farmers and ranchers to thousands of fans at CFL games across the country. This will give consumers the opportunity to meet the people who raise beef, and bring beef to their tables. "We're really excited to involve

our provincial partners in this unique opportunity. It will allow us to leverage these partnerships with boots on the ground, highlighting local beef farmers and ranchers at their games. This will build brand loyalty and allow grassroots producers to interact with consumers, while sharing their passion and the benefits of enjoying Canadian beef," said Rob Meijer, President, Canada Beef. MBP is also the sponsor of the Family of the Game promotion throughout the 2015 season. Bombers fans can enter a draw on the club’s website for four tickets to a home game. The winning family will also get a sideline experience prior to the game and will be announced as the Manitoba Beef Producers Family of the Game on the video board during the pre-game program. “We are very excited to sponsor the Family of the Game promotion and support the Manitoba families that purchase the beef produced by our members,” said MBP General Manager Melinda German.

To purchase a discounted ticket to the August 29 Winnipeg Blue Bombers game use the the code: CATTLE


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

Manitoba to host CCA semi-annual meeting in August The eyes of Canada’s cattle industry will be on Winnipeg in August. The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) along with Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is holding its 2015 semi-annual meeting in Winnipeg from August 11-14. The convention will bring together producers and industry affiliates for networking, information sessions and policy setting. Along with the business portion of the meeting, those attending will have the chance to tour a local beef operation and the Bruce D. Campbell Farm & Food Discovery Centre. The event will also feature a uniquely Manitoban evening of entertainment as guests

will be treated to a twist on a local tradition, a Manitoba Social. Scheduled for Aug. 13 at Anderson’s Hitch’N Post, the evening will feature a banquet/social and fundraising raffle, with the proceeds being donated equally to the Canadian 4-H Council & 4-H Manitoba. At last year’s event, the most popular items included local artwork and items of local interest, which resulted in significant funds being

raised. The fundraising raffle and social is open for producers, industry and government to attend. Tickets can be purchased by contacting Manitoba Beef Producers at 1-800-772-0458 or info@mbbeef.ca. The event will include a full course meal, a short program, cash bar, and an amazing selection of prizes to be won. Tickets are $40 and must be purchased in advance by July 31.

If you would like to contribute to this event through a social prize, financial donation or a food/drink donation for the tour please contact Esther Reimer at MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or ereimer@mbbeef.ca. All donations will be recognized in the CCA semi-annual publication and on the CCA’s website, and through MBP’s publication Cattle Country and on the MBP Website.

The deadline to purchase tickets for the CCA 4-H Fundraiser and entertainment evening is today! Call 1-800-772-0458 for tickets


Job Opening Farm Hand– Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc. Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives Inc. (MBFII), a not for profit organization developing a new and exciting opportunity for someone interested in participating in leading edge beef and forage research and extension. MBFII is collaborating with multiple stakeholders to develop a made-in-Manitoba beef and forage research and extension farm in the Brandon area. MBFII is seeking a full-time, term

Farm Hand. Reporting to the General Manager, the Farm Hand is responsible for the overall well-being and management of the resident cow/calf herd. The Farm Hand will be responsible for the yearround feeding and maintenance of the herd, fencing, watering and treating of sick animals. The Farm Hand will operate and maintain all livestock handling and farm equipment, and maintain the farm

yard and its facilities. This position is based out of the Brandon area. For a detailed job description and list of qualifications, visit www. mbbeef.ca. Please submit your resumĂŠ and cover letter by August 14, 2015 to Ms. Melinda German, General Manager, mgerman@ mbbeef.ca. Thank-you to all interested applicants, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Farm Hand - Duties and Responsibilities Overall Position Description

Provides labour support and takes responsibility for implementing a variety of activities associated with caring for the beef herd associated with the Initiative in a pasture and overwintering environment involving the dexterous use of hands, hand tools, specialized procedures and techniques, and equipment. Primary Activities: Monitors the health and cares for the beef herd in a pasture and overwintering environment by daily monitoring and feeding, and routine treatment of sick animals requiring vaccinations or common medications. Identifies abnormalities and consults with the Site Manager to determine course of action. Operates, calibrates and maintains equipment such as, but not limited to tractors, field equipment (seeding, haying, etc), cattle handling chutes, scales and augers. Maintains clean facilities, yards and equipment, replacing bedding, cleaning pens/stalls/corrals and spraying for weeds and insects as necessary and when agreed upon by supervisor or their designate. Selects, collects and labels samples, recording data and keeping records of activities and supplies associated with animal care (e.g. food, age, health, inventory of animals in care, samples). Provides services associated with experimental or extension procedures, including selecting animals, and assisting in calving and maintaining related records. Herds animals between various barns, pens or pastures, including transportation to other locations. Operates tractors, feed trucks, haying equipment and builds and repairs cattle handling equipment, including fences, corrals, sheds, and water supply systems. Knowledge and Skill: The work requires knowledge of animal care and handling within a pasture and overwintering environment and procedures requiring judgment that contributes to the development of a herd; and monitors the health and the comfort of beef cattle. Continued to Next Page


The work requires knowledge of the use of tools, associated equipment, their repair and maintenance. Knowledge of techniques and practices associated with animal husbandry such as feeding, breeding, handling, behaviour assessment and vaccination of livestock. Verbal and listening skills are required to understand and follow instructions from supervisors and coordinate work with others. Reading skills are required to interpret detailed instructions, manufacturers’ directions and sketches. Knowledge and skill are required to use standard workplace equipment and processes, which are acquired through experience, apprenticeship, on the job and/or vocational training. The work requires analytical skill to select and mix ingredients for feed and to select methods and techniques required to maintain the environment for animals (e.g. bedding, cleanliness, and sanitation). Physical skill, dexterity and coordination are required when handling animals for various procedures, including but not limited to, vaccinations, providing assistance at birth, collecting various samples. They are also required when operating vehicles such as trucks, front-end loaders, and building and repairing fences and remote water supply systems. Experience in a scientific environment and performing artificial insemination is an asset. Effort: Various physical activities require sustained focus and some versatility in switching from one task to the other. Concentration is required for estimating or measuring precise quantities when mixing rations, and assisting during breeding/birthing operations to prevent damage to the herd and project or activity outputs. Physical effort is required daily to stand and walk, frequently carry/lift/move heavy materials, to help in restraining beef cattle and when occasionally working in awkward positions. Responsibility: There is responsibility for animal welfare, and extra attention is expected during extreme weather conditions/fire in the extensive and intensive housing areas. There is responsibility for the application of appropriate procedures and techniques, keeping records, mixing or applying materials, performing precise measurements and compiling accurate records. The work contributes to the success of experiments/extension and the health and well being of the animals. There is responsibility for reporting abnormalities (e.g. cow disease) to the supervisor. There is responsibility to ensure the safety of others through proper handling of the animals and maintaining their environment (due diligence). There is also responsibility for the identification, basic evaluation of problems and recommending courses of action. An error in judgment could result in damage or loss of animals and/or data and/or ineffective use of resources. Working Conditions: There is frequent exposure to odours, dust, dirt, noise, animals and body fluids. Protective gear is required and safe work procedures are followed. There is regular exposure to injury due to working with hydraulic equipment and handling animals. Reporting: This position reports to the General Manager of Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc. or their designate. Term Position: The term expires March 31, 2018 and is subject to renewal based on funding for the Initiative.


Tax deferrals announced for producers dealing with drought Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz has released a list of designated regions in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba where tax deferrals have been authorized for 2015. The designation allows livestock producers in prescribed drought regions who are facing feed shortages to defer a portion of their 2015 sale proceeds • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

of breeding livestock for one year in order to help replenish that stock in the following year. Proceeds from deferred sales are then included as part of the producer’s income in the next tax year, when those proceeds may be at least partially offset by the cost of replacing their breeding animals. To defer income, the breeding herd

must have been reduced by at least 15%. If this is the case, 30% of income from net sales can then be deferred. In cases where the herd declines by 30 per cent or more, 90% of income from net sales can be deferred. Eligible producers can request the tax deferral when filing their 2015 income tax returns.

Eligible Manitoba Municipalities

Division No. 18, Unorganized, East Part Division No. 19, Unorganized Division No. 20, Unorganized, North Part Division No. 20, Unorganized, South Part Division No. 21, Unorganized Gilbert Plains Municipality Grandview Municipality Municipality of Ethelbert Municipality of Hillbsurg-Roblin-Shell-River Municipality of Minitonas-Bowsman Municipality of Swan Valley West Rural Municipality of Alonsa Rural Municipality of Dauphin Rural Municipality of Grahamdale Rural Municipality of Lawrence Rural Municipality of Mossey River Rural Municipality of Mountain (North) Rural Municipality of Mountain (South) Rural Municipality of Ochre River Rural Municipality of Siglunes First Nations Valley River 63A


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Stay Safe During Harvest As days get shorter, it means only one thing on farms: harvest is here. With harvest comes added pressure and stress to get this year’s crop in the bin. Harvest is a farmer’s busiest time of the year and unfortunately one of the most dangerous. Fatigue and stress often lead to shortcuts and unsafe practices during this time, but it is essential to take breaks, slow down, follow safe practices and ensure everyone on the farm is trained to do the task at hand.

Being proactive before harvest will help prepare the farm for a safe and healthy season! • Develop a “safety first” approach with family members and workers. Follow safe practices and set good examples for others. • Provide an orientation to new workers. Orientations go a long way in ensuring workers are familiar with the farm’s safety and health expectations. • Train workers/family members on the safe operation of harvesting equipment and related tasks. Getting workers trained and familiar with tasks before harvest begins will ensure they have time to prepare, ask questions and be comfortable performing the tasks safely. • Collect operator manuals for harvesting equipment and review these with equipment operators. • Operational checks should be performed on harvesting equipment including augers, aeration fans, conveyors, augers, etc. • Ensure proper inventories of personal protective equipment (PPE), tools and resources are available and accessible for workers and family members. • This is a great time to review the farm’s emergency plan with family members and workers. Ensure somebody trained and certified in first aid is present at all times. • Make sure everyone knows the legal land descriptions to farmyards and fields in case of an emergency situation.

Working safely through harvest • Before moving machinery, all operators should be trained to perform a walk-around check to ensure no one is near the equipment and warn anyone in the immediate area that the machinery will be moving. Request your SAFE Farms All Clear sticker by contacting SAFE Work Manitoba. • Keep bystanders away from high traffic areas in the farmyard. • Stay alert and take breaks when working long hours. Getting out of the cab, taking meal breaks and rotating jobs every few hours will help stretch muscles and keep you alert. • Remember to eat, drink lots of water and get some rest during harvest season. • Do not allow extra riders on equipment. One seat, one rider! • Ensure farmyards and off-farm sites have adequate lighting. • Slips and trips can result in serious injury. Reduce the risk by always using three-point contact when climbing up or down ladders.

safemanitoba.com/farms


• Never mount or dismount moving equipment. The small amount of time saved is not worth the risk! • Before unclogging a plugged feeder on a combine, ensure the engine is turned off. • Never trust hydraulic systems when working under a machine. Always use a safety prop if working under a header or other heavy machinery. • Electrical contact with overhead power lines can be fatal. Before moving any piece of equipment on roads or fields, be aware of power lines and ensure everyone on the farm knows the locations. Do not forget that night time brings even more risk! • When working alone, let someone know where you are working and have scheduled check-in times. Always carry a means of communication, such as a cell phone or two-way radio. • Avoid being entangled in farm equipment, particularly power take-offs (PTOs) and augers. Train workers on the hazards of this equipment and ensure workers are practising safety habits such as wearing tight-fitting clothing and walking around PTOs, not over. • Take safety precautions around grain. See SAFE Farm bulletin #18 – Flowing grain entrapment. • Be seen! Wear high visibility gear when working in high traffic areas and in fields during harvest.

Working safely through harvest • Inspect harvest equipment regularly to ensure equipment remains in good working condition. • Ensure PTO shields and guards are in place. • Ensure all guards, shields and access panels are in place on equipment. • Ensure emergency stop buttons on conveyors are in good working condition and easily accessible by workers. • Equipment platforms are often 8-feet high. Keep equipment platforms clean and free of tools and objects to avoid slips or falls. • Check and fix any poor platforms, ladders, handrails, stepson farm equipment, storage facilities and buildings. • Be prepared for emergency situations. Ensure first aid kits, fire extinguishers are stocked and in good working condition. This equipment must be readily accessible no matter where the work is being performed. • Be sure to eliminate or put away trip hazards such as shovels, pails, cords and tools. • Check roads and fields for potential erosion or washout locations. If you do find such a hazard, communicate this to all workers on the farm and take corrective actions.

Preventing fires at harvest • Have operational fire extinguishers mounted on equipment and ensure everyone is trained to use them. Fire extinguishers need to meet the requirements of the Manitoba Fire Code, and as a safe practice, ensure you have one in the cab and one that is accessible from the ground. • Ensure bearings and drives are lubricated and adjust tension as needed. • Check exposed wiring for damage, wear and deterioration. • Remove crop residue, dust, debris, dirt and excess lubricant around all heat sources regularly.

safemanitoba.com/farms


• Before refueling farm equipment, allow engine to cool. • During the day, walk around machinery and watch, listen and smell to check everything is in good working order. • Carry a shovel on harvesting equipment for potential fires. Take precautionary measures when using low clearance vehicles in fields, as exhaust pipes and catalytic converters can ignite dry grass or stubble.

Children on the farm at harvest • Supervise children at all times and have a designated play area. • Keep children away from busy areas of the farm, particularly grain bins, grain carts and farm machinery.

Keeping everyone safe on roadways • Ensure all machinery is equipped with proper lighting, signage and reflectors when travelling on roadways (as required by the Highway Traffic Act). • Display the SMV (slow moving vehicle) sign. • Ensure lights, signage and reflectors are visible and clean. • Use a pilot vehicle when transporting oversized agricultural equipment. • Whenever possible, move equipment during the day on secondary roads. • Make sure your equipment will fit under power lines along the road and in your yard and on bridge structures along your route (check width and height). • Map out your route before transporting equipment and get appropriate permits from Manitoba Hydro and Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation, when applicable.

As a motorist • Slow down when approaching farm equipment; it’s often travelling at reduced speeds and taking up considerable amount of room on the roadway. • Pay attention to turn signals and possible lane changes. • Only pass when the operator of the equipment knows your intentions or it is clearly safe to do so. • BE PATIENT!!! Remember: these farmers are working to put food on our tables, let’s do everything we can to keep them safe.

SW7043E-29/07/15

safemanitoba.com/farms


mbbeef.ca

July 17, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Manitoba to host CCA semi-annual meeting in August The eyes of Canada’s cattle industry will be on Winnipeg in August. The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) along with Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is holding its 2015 semi-annual meeting in Winnipeg from August 11-14. The convention will bring together producers and industry affiliates for networking, information sessions and policy setting. Along with the business portion of the meeting, those attending will have the chance to tour a local beef operation and

the Bruce D. Campbell Farm & Food Discovery Centre. The event will also feature a uniquely Manitoban evening of entertainment as guests will be treated to a twist on a local tradition, a Manitoba Social. Scheduled for Aug. 13 at Anderson’s Hitch’N Post, the evening will feature a banquet/social and fundraising raffle, with the proceeds being donated equally to the Canadian 4-H Council & 4-H

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Manitoba. At last year’s event, the most popular items included local artwork and items of local interest, which resulted in significant funds being raised. The fundraising raffle and social is open for producers, industry and government to attend. Tickets can be purchased by contacting Manitoba Beef Producers at 1-800-7720458 or info@mbbeef.ca. The event will include a full course meal, a short program, cash bar, and

an amazing selection of prizes to be won. Tickets are $40 and must be purchased in advance by July 31. If you would like to contribute to this event through a social prize, financial donation or a food/drink donation for the tour please contact Esther Reimer at MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or ereimer@mbbeef.ca. All donations will be recognized in the CCA semi-annual publication and on the CCA’s website, and through MBP’s publication Cattle Country and on the MBP Website.

To purchase a ticket to the CCA Semi-Annual 4-H Fundraiser and Entertainment Evening please call the MBP office at 1-800-772-0458


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • Cattle Producers implement new grazing options • Applications are being accepted for new onfarm fuel storage BMP • The rewards of mentorship and six grazing tips • Five foot hay crop near Altamont • BeefTalk: Pounds of calfs weaned per acre

Page 2

MBP receives funding for research project Government Press Release The governments of Canada and Manitoba are investing more than $2 million over three years to support 24 research and development projects in Manitoba’s agriculture and agri-food sector, Federal Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz and Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development Minister Ron Kostyshyn announced today. “Research and development continue to be key to driving innovation in Canada’s agriculture and agrifood industry,” said Minister Ritz. “Investments in new research such as these will help create further economic opportunities for our producers and processors.” The funded projects cover a range of agricultural issues including animal and human health, on-farm production technologies and opportunities for value-added industries. Manitoba Beef Producers has been approved for $261,234 to study the long-term market effects of feeding and vaccination strategies for beef cattle, “By strategically investing in research and development, we can encourage new opportunities and a more diverse economy in rural areas,” said Minister Kostyshyn. “Manitoba’s agriculture and agri-

food sector will certainly benefit from the findings of these projects. Adopting the new ideas generated from this work will lead to further economic growth in the province.” In addition to the federal and provincial funding, applicants and funding partners are providing cash and in-kind contributions of approximately $3.6 million. Partners include agricultural businesses, commodity groups, the Western Grains Research Foundation and university and government researchers. These projects are funded through Growing Innovation – Agri-Food Research and Development Initiative (GI-ARDI) under Growing Forward 2. For more information about GI-ARDI, visit www.gov. mb.ca/agricultureunder Growing Forward 2. The federal and provincial governments are investing $176 million in Manitoba under Growing Forward 2, a five-year, federal-provincial-territorial policy framework to advance the agriculture industry, helping producers and processors become more innovative and competitive in world markets. For more information on Manitoba’s agricultural programs and services, follow the Twitter account at www.twitter.com/MBGovAg.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

MBP to host Bombers game in August; sponsoring Family of the Game promotion Manitoba Beef Producers and Canada Beef will continue to fuel the Canadian Football League in 2015. As part of an agreement signed in 2014, MBP will be the host sponsor for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers game Aug. 29 when they host the defending Grey Cup champion Calgary Stampeders. Prior to the game MBP will have a booth located in the Tailgate Plaza at Investor’s Group Field where anyone attending the game can stop by and learn more about Manitoba’s cattle industry. MBP members will also have the opportunity to enter a draw where someone will win a steak dinner for 10 people in the Blue and Gold Club at IGF where they will be joined by two members of the Bombers for the meal. The date of the supper will be determined once the winner is selected. The agreement also provides the opportunity for MBP to highlight a Manitoba family for their contributions to the industry. The winners of 2015 The Environmental Sustainability Award

(TESA), Kristine Blair and Graham Tapley, will be the featured family in recognition for capturing the award. Also, MBP members interested in attending the game can do so at a discounted price through an agreement between the Bombers and MBP. A code for the discounted seats, which are located in the two end zones, will be announced at a later date on the MBP website - mbbeef.ca - and Twitter and Facebook feeds. The three-year agreement between Canada Beef and the CFL was signed in 2014. According to a Canada Beef press release, the partnership is in conjunction with five provincial beef producer organizations from across the country, who will represent the Canadian beef farmers and ranchers to thousands of fans at CFL games across the country. This will give consumers the opportunity to meet the people who raise beef, and bring beef to their tables. "We're really excited to involve

our provincial partners in this unique opportunity. It will allow us to leverage these partnerships with boots on the ground, highlighting local beef farmers and ranchers at their games. This will build brand loyalty and allow grassroots producers to interact with consumers, while sharing their passion and the benefits of enjoying Canadian beef," said Rob Meijer, President, Canada Beef. MBP is also pleased to announce it will be the sponsor of the Family of the Game promotion throughout the 2015 season. Bombers fans will be able to enter a draw on the club’s website for four tickets to a home. The winning family will also get a sideline experience prior to the game and will be announced as the Manitoba Beef Producers Family of the Game on the video board during the pre-game program. “We are very excited to sponsor the Family of the Game promotion and support the Manitoba families that purchase the beef produced by our members,” said MBP General Manager Melinda German.

Click Here to Become The Manitoba Beef Producers Family of the Game At An Upcoming Winnipeg Blue Bombers Game


Recipe Courtesy of Canada Beef Per Serving (4 meatballs): Calories 170, Protein 14g Fat 10g, Carbohydrates 6g

If You Can’t Play Like An Athlete You Can Still Eat Like One!

Manitoba’s beef producers care about their animals — for a number of reasons. Financially, it is in their best interest to ensure cattle are healthy, safe, well-managed and not stressed. However, beef cattle producers are in this line of work because they care about their animals and treat them well because it is the right thing to do. Animal Care is not just a buzzword, in the livestock sector it is everything!

Animal Care Is Not Just A Buzzword

Variations try adding the following to the basic recipe for a flavour kick: Italian: 2 tbsp (30 mL) pizza sauce and 1 tsp (5 mL) dried oregano. Serve with extra pizza sauce or spaghetti sauce. Asian: 2 tbsp (30 mL) hoisin sauce and 1/2 tsp (2 mL) ground ginger. Serve with peanut sauce or sweet and sour sauce. Mexican: 1 tbsp (15 mL) chili powder and 2 garlic cloves (minced). Serve with salsa.

Lightly combine all ingredients; form into about thirty 1” (2.5 cm) balls. Bake on lightly oiled foil-lined baking tray in 400°F (200°C) oven for 15 min, until digital rapid-read thermometer inserted into centre of several meatballs reads 160°F (71°C).

1 lb (500 g) Lean Ground Beef Sirloin or Lean Ground Beef 1 egg, lightly beaten ½ cup (125 mL) dry bread crumbs ⅓ cup (75 mL) EACH finely grated carrot and shredded onion 1 tbsp (15 mL) Worcestershire sauce ½ tsp (2 mL) EACH salt and pepper

Nutritional Information

All Kinds of Beef Meatballs

Meatballs are a versatile and healthy way to eat delicious ground beef. This recipe provides some great flavour options and is a perfect way to get that boost of protein before, or after, your workout.

Featuring Chef Darryl Crumb

Presented By Manitoba Beef Producers

Eat Like An Athlete


Page 5

Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Province announces consultation schedule for risk management task force Government press release Manitoba farmers and other agricultural stakeholders are invited to provide their input about agricultural risk management programs at a series of upcoming public consultations or through an online questionnaire, Agriculture, Food and Rural Development Minister Ron Kostyshyn announced today. “The task force appointed earlier this year is making good progress and we now want to hear directly from those most affected by agricultural risk management programs and climate-related challenges,” said Minister Kostyshyn. “This is important work that will guide our government’s direction in the years to come and the task force provides the best platform to hold discussions with industry stakeholders and the public.” The minister noted Manitoba farmers have said existing business risk management programs do not adequately address the risks that arise from climate-related challenges such as spring flooding and excess rainfall. “We are following through on our commitment to review existing programs and consider options that

will be more predictable, comprehensive and sustainable for farmers and governments,” the minister said. “I look forward to hearing from Manitobans as part of the task force’s work.” The Agriculture Risk Management Review Task Force will focus its consultations on the ability of current programs to protect and provide a foundation for Manitoba’s agriculture industry as it deals with a changing climate, Minister Kostyshyn said. Seven public consultations have been scheduled: • Melita, Town Hall, July 9, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; • Swan River, Westwood Inn, July 13, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.; • Dauphin, St. Viator’s Roman Catholic Church, July 14, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; • Arborg, Arborg Bifrost Community Centre, July 20, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; • Portage la Prairie, Canad Inns Destination Centre, July 21, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; • Beausejour, Sandy-Salteaux Spiritual Centre, July 27, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; and • Morris, Morris United Church,

If you have an E-Newsletter article that would be of interest to MBP members, please email Chad Saxon at: csaxon@mbbeef.ca

July 28, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Written submissions will be accepted until Sept. 30 and should focus on gaps or challenges with current risk management programs and any adjustments or alternatives to current programs that could be considered, the minister said. An online questionnaire will also be available. The questionnaire and additional information on how to send written comments will be posted online shortly in the Quick Links section at www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture. The task force has been asked to review the ability of current tools to effectively manage risk and identify gaps. They have also been asked to identify new policy and program opportunities that may advance the ability of the agriculture sector and government to manage risk issues and the economic effects of a changing climate. The task force’s members are Bill Uruski (chair), Derek Brewin, Doug Chorney, John DeVos, Frieda Krpan and Goldwyn Jones. A final report with recommendations will be submitted to government by the end of the year, the minister said.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for moreinformation. info@mbbeef.ca


mbbeef.ca

July 3, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP to meet with northwest MB producers Manitoba Beef Producers will be on the road later this month. A member outreach meeting has been scheduled for July 14 in The Pas to meet with MBP members in that region of the province. MBP general manager Melinda German said producers in that area are typically unable to attend district meetings due to their location. Because of that she felt it was important that MBP staff and directors make the trip to see them and hear their questions and concerns. German added the meeting will also include an update on MBP activities and a discussion on the opportunities and challenges facing producers. The meeting will run from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the Carrot Valley Community Centre in The Pas. Breakfast will be provided for attendees. If you are interested in attending, please pre-register at 1-800-772-0458. Walk-ins are also welcome.

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Cattle Tales The Red River Ex was held in mid-June in Winnipeg and Manitoba Beef Producers was among the exhibitors in the Touch The Farm area. The Cattle Tales exhibit allowed the public to walk through the various stages of the beef production cycle and learn more about the industry and its importance to Manitoba. Thank you to Up the Creek Cattle Co. for supplying the cattle for the Ex, the Lakeland Group for providing the various pieces of equipment and Superior Technologies for bringing a scale. Also, thank you to the staff at Red River Exhibition Park for providing the Cattle Tales area and their co-operation before, during and after the event.


Page 2

Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry

• Gov’t to fund two new BMPs for producers

Spread the MOOs...

LAKELAND FIELD DAYS ARE COMING! Thursday, July 9th and Friday, July 10th

• Tips to keep your farm safe for visitors • Developing a scoring system to test a newborns ability to suckle • Tips to keep horn flies off your cattle

10:00am - 3:00pm

#1 Limestone Drive | Stonewall, MB

** Free BBQ Beef Lunch ** • See our new 2015 Squeeze Chute in action • Live cattle and sheep handling demos • On-site product specialists • Exclusive field day specials

Please RSVP to receive Lakeland Cash!

• Management key to tapping pasture potential

1-866-443-7444 For more information, visit

LakelandFieldEvent.com Equipment | Electric Fencing | Scale & RFID Readers | Nutrition

Premium Products, Premium Service... Direct to Your Door.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

MBP to host Bombers game in August; sponsoring Family of the Game promotion Manitoba Beef Producers and Canada Beef will continue to fuel the Canadian Football League in 2015. As part of an agreement signed in 2014, MBP will be the host sponsor for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers game Aug. 29 when they host the defending Grey Cup champion Calgary Stampeders. Prior to the game MBP will have a booth located in the Tailgate Plaza at Investor’s Group Field where anyone attending the game can stop by and learn more about Manitoba’s cattle industry. MBP members will also have the opportunity to enter a draw where someone will win a steak dinner for 10 people in the Blue and Gold Club at IGF where they will be joined by two members of the Bombers for the meal. The date of the supper will be determined once the winner is selected. The agreement also provides the opportunity for MBP to highlight a Manitoba family for their contributions to the industry. The winners of 2015 The Environmental Sustainability Award

(TESA), Kristine Blair and Graham Tapley, will be the featured family in recognition for capturing the award. Also, MBP members interested in attending the game can do so at a discounted price through an agreement between the Bombers and MBP. A code for the discounted seats, which are located in the two end zones, will be announced at a later date on the MBP website - mbbeef.ca - and Twitter and Facebook feeds. The three-year agreement between Canada Beef and the CFL was signed in 2014. According to a Canada Beef press release, the partnership is in conjunction with five provincial beef producer organizations from across the country, who will represent the Canadian beef farmers and ranchers to thousands of fans at CFL games across the country. This will give consumers the opportunity to meet the people who raise beef, and bring beef to their tables. "We're really excited to involve

our provincial partners in this unique opportunity. It will allow us to leverage these partnerships with boots on the ground, highlighting local beef farmers and ranchers at their games. This will build brand loyalty and allow grassroots producers to interact with consumers, while sharing their passion and the benefits of enjoying Canadian beef," said Rob Meijer, President, Canada Beef. MBP is also pleased to announce it will be the sponsor of the Family of the Game promotion throughout the 2015 season. Bombers fans will be able to enter a draw on the club’s website for four tickets to a home. The winning family will also get a sideline experience prior to the game and will be announced as the Manitoba Beef Producers Family of the Game on the video board during the pre-game program. “We are very excited to sponsor the Family of the Game promotion and support the Manitoba families that purchase the beef produced by our members,” said MBP General Manager Melinda German.

Click Here to Become The Manitoba Beef Producers Family of the Game At An Upcoming Winnipeg Blue Bombers Game


Manitoba to host CCA semi-annual meeting in August The eyes of Canada’s cattle industry will be on Winnipeg in August. The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) along with Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is holding its 2015 semi-annual meeting in Winnipeg from August 11-14. The convention will bring together producers and industry affiliates for networking, information sessions and policy setting. Along with the business portion of the meeting, those attending the meeting will have the chance to tour a local beef operation and the Bruce D. Campbell Farm & Food Discovery Centre. The event will also feature a uniquely Manitoban evening of entertainment as guests will be treated to a twist on a local tradi-

tion, a Manitoba Social. Scheduled for Aug. 13 At Anderson’s Hitch’N Post, the evening will feature a banquet/social and fundraising raffle, with the proceeds being donated equally to the Canadian 4-H Council & 4-H Manitoba. At last year’s event, the most popular items included local artwork and items of local interest, which resulted in significant funds being raised. The fundraising raffle and social is open for producers, industry and government to attend. Tickets can be purchased by contacting Manitoba Beef Producers at 1-800-7720458 or info@mbbeef.ca. The event will include a full course meal, a

short program, cash bar, and an amazing selection of prizes to be won. Tickets are $40 and must be purchased in advance by July 31. If you would like to contribute to this event through a social prize, financial donation or a food/ drink donation for the tour please contact Esther Reimer at MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or ereimer@ mbbeef.ca. All donations will be recognized in the CCA semi-annual publication and on the CCA’s website, and through MBP’s publication Cattle Country and on the MBP Website.

WLPIP in your living room Hello,

willing to visit you on your terms. Whether it is on the tailgate of Western Livestock Price Insura pick up, in the shop or at the ance (WLPIP) is available to kitchen table, I will come to you. manage price risk on finished Consider my offer, maybe you cattle, feeders and calves. I feel would like to invite a few neighthere are many advantages of bours over in which I would prohaving price insurance even when vide coffee and donuts. In an inthe market is strong like it is now. formal setting I will provide you There are strategies that can be with the information necessary used to purchase WLPIP policies. to maximize the benefits of this You may be one of the many pro- program. A few people hashing ducers who may want to use these things out always seems to work strategies to your advantage. well. As a producer myself I As the Livestock Price Insurance understand that there is spraying, Coordinator for the province I am haying, summertime activities but

drop me a line and let’s see if we can’t make something work. Thanks, Jason Dobbin, Livestock Price Insurance Coordinator Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation 400-50 24th Street N.W. Portage la Prairie, Manitoba Phone: 204-239-3084 Cell: 204-856-9587 Fax: 204-239-3401 email: JDobbin@masc.mb.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 5

CYL program announces mentors for 2015-16 youth mentorship program The Cattlemen’s Young Leaders (CYL) Program is pleased to announce the mentors selected for the 2015-16 program. Now in its fifth year, the CYL program continues to offer participants an unparalleled mentorship experience within the Canadian beef industry with an eye to shaping future industry leaders. The 2015 CYL Mentors and Mentees are: • Aaron and Adrienne Ivey (Ituna, SK) and Angela Kumlin (Duchess, AB) • Andrea Brocklebank (Calgary, AB) and Breanna Anderson (Swan River, MB) • Annemarie Pedersen (Calgary, AB) and Bethany Storey (Guelph, ON) • Ben Thorlakson (Airdrie, AB) and Breeanna Kelln (Duval, SK) • Brian Perillat (Airdrie, AB) and Brittany Wiese (Bentley, AB) • Cathy Sharp (Lacombe, AB) and Penny Patton (Athabasca, AB) • Dennis Laycraft (Calgary, AB) and

Byron Whitford (Lethbridge, AB) • Dylan and Colleen Biggs (Hanna, AB) and Benjamin Campbell (Black Diamond, AB) • Edward, Stuart and Bryan Thiessen (Strathmore, AB) and Jodi Flaig (Two Hills, AB) • John Baker (Erin, ON) and Ellen Crane (Truro, NS) • Martin Unrau (MacGregor, MB) and Shane Klepak (Melfort, SK) • Mike Pollard (High River, AB) and Brett Hassard (Medicine Hat, AB) • PJ Budler (Fort Worth, TX) and Brandon Sparrow (Vanscoy, SK) • Robert Bielak (Toronto, ON) and Brendan Zettler (Teeswater, ON) • Trish Jordan (Winnipeg, MB) and Robert Dixon (Vermilion, AB) • Tom Lynch-Staunton (Edmonton, AB) and Elizabeth Homerosky (Calgary, AB) The CYL program appreciates the work of the 2015 CYL Mentor Selection Committee and thanks members Dennis Laycraft, Kevin

Boon, Sandy Russell, Dan Ferguson, Deborah Wilson, Michael Latimer and Jill Harvie for their efforts. The mentors and CYLs will soon be participating in orientation conference calls to brief them on the CYL program and expectations for the year. Mentors and CYLs are beginning their mentorship journey by constructing their road map that will outline their activities and learning objectives for the year. Biographies on CYL mentors and mentees will be posted soon to www.cattlemensyoungleaders.com. Started by the CCA in 2010, the CYL Program provides industry-specific training and mentorship opportunities to young producers. CYL participants have the opportunity to explore a potential career choice or involvement with a provincial/national producer organization, while gaining the expertise and business acumen necessary to sustain the cattle industry into the future.

SAFE Work Manitoba partners with CCOHS to provide online WHMIS courses SAFE Work Manitoba now provides online Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) education. In order to make the e-learning courses accessible to all workers in the province, SAFE Work Manitoba is covering the cost. The courses, offered in partnership with the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS), are available at http://safemanitoba.com/ training. This year, WHMIS legislation is chang-

ing to align with the Global Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). GHS will bring together rules and regulations on chemicals at the national, regional and worldwide levels – an important factor for trade facilitation. Two courses – WHMIS 2015 for Workers and WHMIS 1988 for Workers –are available online, each taking about one hour to complete. Certificates will be issued to those who complete the courses and write the online

test. To register, visit http://safemanitoba.com/training. Online WHMIS education is one tool to facilitate WHMIS education in Manitoba. To be compliant, workplaces must always provide workers with training that is specific to the chemicals, safe work procedures and emergency plans in their workplaces. Education and training are important parts of understanding hazards and both are required to be compliant with WHMIS legislation.


TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

Friday, July 31 11:00 AM Move Cattle In 3:00-5:00 PM Registration 5:00-6:00 PM Supper 6:30-8:30 PM Welcome & Educational Workshops Simmental & AgriChallenge Industry Quizzes Saturday, auguSt 1 8:00-9:00 AM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 9:00-11:30 PM Pee Wee & Junior Stall Card Competition Judging Classes Sales Talk/Impromptu Speeches 11:30-12:00 PM Workshop 1:30-2:30 PM Team Grooming 3:00-5:00 PM Team Judging or Team Marketing Pee Wee Learning Clinic 5:00-6:00 PM Saturday Awards with steak supper 6:30-8:00 PM Cook Off 8:00 PM Quiz bowl Sunday, auguSt 2 8:00-9:00 PM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 9:00 AM -12:00 PM Showmanship - Ring 1 & 2 12:00-1:00PM Lunch Break 1:00-5:00 PM Conformation Show - Ring 1 & 2 5:00 PM Supper & Awards Ceremony

WHO:

Any young cattle producers under the age of 25 years of age as of January 1, 2015. Whether you are a commercial, purebred, 4-H or new junior, you are all welcome to attend!

WHAT:

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up All Breeds Junior Cattle Weekend

WHERE:

Beautiful Plains Ag Society, Neepawa, Manitoba

WHEN:

Friday-Sunday, July 31 - August 2, 2015

WHY:

ElonW N nd g a frie a ng e

bri am t your n w. and ge ra d a in entered

To bring juniors of all ages, breeds and locations together for a fun, educational weekend of cattle and non cattle events.

FEATURES:

• New Alumni Showmanship - open to past Round-Up Participants and committee members (costumes optional) • Chance to be on the MYBR Agribition Judging Team

• MYBR Scholarship check out the MYBR Facebook page or email: adbertholet@hotmail.com • GRAND AGGREGATE AWARDS

FOR DETAILS CONTACT:

Chairperson: Lois McRae - 728-3058 - marmac@inetlink.ca Treasurer: Rilla Hunter - 838-2019 Secretary: Vonda Hopcraft - 824-2115

Committee Members: Blair McRae - 728-3058 Melissa McRae - 573-9903 Michelle Allison - 573-6693 Wenda Best - 838-2236 Candace Johnston - 720-3986 Angus: Naomi Best - 838-2236 Ken Williams - 855-2275 Nanette Glover - 534-2552

Charolais: Vonda Hopcraft - 824-2115 Hereford: Albert & Samantha Rimke - 855-2534 Limousin: Travis & Dillon Hunter - 838-2019 Simmental: Andrea Bertholet - 483-0319 Kolton McIntosh - 280-0359 Shorthorn: Adrianne Vandersluis - 436-3122 Justin Kristjansson - 730-7196

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 7

• Participants are encouraged to bring their own utensils and ingredients for marinades and garnishes and to provide a recipe to the judges. 1. Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up is open to all Canadian Juniors under • Costumes and themes are encouraged. the age of 25 as of January 1, 2015. • Score: 50% taste; 25% appearance; 15% presentation and 10% 2. Entry fees are $40 per person plus $10 per conformation class. The creativity. $40 flat fee includes entry to all competitions (excluding conformation), Stall Card show clothing and scheduled meals. Compulsory events are sales talk • Pee Wees & Juniors create a stall card to be displayed with their animals (PW & JR), Impromptu speeches (INT & SR), judging class with oral in the stalls. reasons, team marketing or team judging, team grooming, cook off and • Stall cards must be made Saturday morning at Round-Up only Round Up Agri Challange. • Scoring: 35% clarity; 35% originality and 30% neatness 3. 2015 calves are eligible to be entered in cow calf pair and calf classes. Photography Entry fee for pair is $10 and calf class is $10. All cattle must be halter • The photo must be taken by the junior exhibiting it and cannot be broke and manageable or will be asked to leave. digitally enhanced and must be taken within the last year & dated 4. A junior who does not have cattle may use another participants animal • Photographs must be 4”x6”. in grooming and showmanship. • All entries must be cattle related e.g.: animal, cattle scenery or cattle and 5. AS THIS IS A JUNIOR EVENT, ALL ENTRIES MUST BE SHOWN AND people. LOOKED AFTER BY THE JUNIORS. ABSOLUTELY NO ADULT or • Please put name and age category on the back. non-entrant participation will be tolerated. Pee Wees may be assisted • Scoring: 40% clarity; 35% quality and 25% originality. by a parent or guardian for safety reasons only. NEW IN 2015 Graphic Design Mentors are the committee, they will be wearing committee shirts • All work must be done at home by the junior created using computer and will be around to provide help the juniors and answer any technology. questions. • The graphic design must be promoting a breed, industry or an individual 6. Alcohol and Drugs are prohibited in the barns and at the Roundup herd. functions for the duration of the show. • E.g.: flyers, posters, newsletters, brochures, etc. 7. Tampering with and any unethical fitting is prohibited. • Please put name and age category on the back. 8. Show apparel is to be worn for all the showmanship and confirmation • Scoring: 30% creativity; 30% originality; 30% clear and concise classes. message; 10% organization Art • All work must be done at home by the junior in the last year & dated Sales Talk - Compulsory Event • Art cannot contain photos and should not be larger than 9”x14”. • For Pee Wee and JR participants • You can use (pencil, paint, clay, wood, etc.). • Item to sell will be given to you morning of the event. • All art is judged in the same category. One entry per person. • A live setting complete with a potential buyer as the judge. • Please put name and age category on the back. • Juniors will first describe the sales situation to the buyer and then • Score: 40% originality; 40% creativity and 20% skill/quality. discuss the strength and weaknesses of the item in a conversation Scrapbook which includes interaction with the buyer. • Include photographs, newspaper and magazine clippings, for the • Score: 30% knowledge; 30% ability to relate information; 20% poise and 2014- 2015 year. delivery; 20% overall effectiveness. • Scrapbooks must be done by the junior exhibiting. Impromptu Speeches - Compulsory Event • The scrapbook is to encourage junior members to record different cattle • For INT and SR participants functions they have attended over the past years. • The contest is designed to develop the ability of all members to express • Scrapbooks should have a theme and begin with a title page, table of themselves on a given subject without having prepared or rehearsed its contents and numbered pages. content in advance. • Score: 25% cover; 25% creativity; 25% originality; 25% neatness and • Contestants will present a speech on a subject pertaining to the livestock organization. industry that is selected the morning of the competition. PowerPoint and Video Topic • Length of speech: 3-5 minutes. They will be asked to answer questions • Pee Wee and JRs minimum of 6 slides INT and SRs minimum of 12 slides relating to their speech following the presentation. • Presentations must have at least two pictures or clip art that support the • Score: 35% presentation; 35% knowledge; 20% originality; idea of the presentation. 10% appearance • Presentations may include but do not require music or video clips. Team Marketing - Compulsory Event • Videos and/or presentations must come on the first day on a USB • Teams of three will be selected by the committee will work together to sell memory stick, DVD or CD. Videos must be in Quick Time, AVI or MPEG an animal. The objective of the contest is to gain a working understanding file format. of performance and pedigree information. Emphasis will be placed on • JR and INT videos must be 30-60 seconds in length, SR videos must be team organization, communication skills and marketing techniques. Teams 60-90 seconds in length. will be given a photo, pedigree some facts on the animal and as a team • The junior member will produce file and edit the videos them selves, no they will have 5 minutes to prepare and then present to the judges their professional editing allowed. sales pitch. • Animated and or computer generated graphics will not be allowed in the • Score: 20% content of sales pitch; 25% ability to communicate; 25% video. team organization 20% total effectiveness; 10% knowledge and • Score: 40% on graphics; 35% originality; 15% technical merit; 10% responses to questions. overall effect of the presentation. Team Judging - Compulsory Event Herdsman Competition (group or individual) • Juniors will judge a class of four animals. • The purpose of this contest is to encourage cooperation, fellowship and • One of the team members will act as the ring person and the other one teamwork among juniors in developing and maintaining a display of will act as the judge. cattle and stall area. The competition begins on Saturday morning and • The participant acting as the judge must give oral reasons over the ends after the conformation classes. Must have a minimum of two head microphone in front of the audience. tied in your display. • All other teams must be out of the judging area and unable to hear the • Score: 25% aisle and bedding, cleanliness and appearance; 25% reasons. animals, cleanliness and well groomed; 25% personnel attending cattle, • Score: 55% teamwork ability; 20% clarity of reasons; 20% logic of knowledgeable, friendly and teamwork; 25% equipment, boxes, signs, reasons 5% appearance. well arranged and general appearance. Team Grooming - Compulsory Event Grand Aggregate • Teams have 15 minutes to groom with power. • One participant from each division will be selected. • Animals must have no fitting prior to competition. • Score: 1 point for every animal you bring, no matter where they • Once at the chute area you are not allowed to leave so bring all the place. All other non cattle classes will be scored 10 points for first equipment with you. place and down. Ex: 1st - 10pts, 2nd - 9 pts, 3rd - 8pts, etc. • Score: 35% knowledge and skill; 25% teamwork; 20% use of equipment; • The grand aggregate competition encourages all juniors to 15% final appearance; 5% presentation of animal participate in all the events. Cook Off - Compulsory Event • Team event, teams will be announced at Round-Up. • Teams will be provided with two steaks and a barbecue • Steaks will be available at the show office the afternoon of the competition if teams wish to marinate them.

RULES

OUTLINES FOR CLASSES


Mail Completed entries and fees to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up C/O Lois McRae RR 1 Box 57, Brandon, MB R7A 5Y1

Entry deadline: July 10, 2015 Participant Name:__________________________________________________________________ Birth Date:_______/_______/_______ Age Division:_________

Age Groups (as of Jan 1, 2015): Pee Wee: 8 and Under; Junior 9-12; Intermediate: 13-16; Senior: 17-25 (Shorthorns 16-21)

Full Address:______________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________ Email: __________________________________________ Show Apparel Size: XS

S

M

L

XL

2XL

-

YOUTH

Please circle one size and either youth or adult

ADULT

For MYBR Windpants or Jacket ($30/each) contact Wenda Best at 838-2236 CLASS BREED #

ANIMAL NAME

ANIMAL D.O.B.

ANIMAL TATTOO

Cattle Classes: Please Complete All Sections

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

ANIMAL REG #

Heifer Calf Female born in 2014 Female born in 2013 w/ nat calf at foot Female born in 2012 or earlier w/ nat calf at foot Bull Calf Fat Steer Showmanship

SIRE NAME & REG #

DAM NAME & REG #

Compulsory Classes:

8. Team Judging or Team Marketing 9. Sales Talk/Impromptu Speeches 10. Team Grooming 11. Cook Off 12. Round Up AgriChallange 13. Breed Quizzes for Simmental & Shorthorn exhibitors

Breeds: (If animal doesn’t have a registration number please list as a commercial) A: Angus, CH: Charolais, H: Hereford, L:Limousin,

S: Simmental, M: Mixed Breeds (Purebred breeds not listed); CO: Commercial, G: Gelbvieh; SH : Shorthorn

If you are showing purebred animals, you must be a member in your respective breed association & have registration papers on the animals

Meals:

Adults full weekend of meals $75 ___ Adults: Breakfast $8; Lunch $10; Supper $15 Saturday Night Steak Supper $20 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___ Sunday Night Supper $15 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___

Fees:

Registration Fee: $40.00/participant $________ Cattle Fees: $10.00/class $________ Adult Full Weekend Meal Fees $________ Extra Meal Fees $________ Late Fees: $20.00/person after July 10 $________ Total Fees: $________

Make cheques payable to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up Waiver Claim: I hereby release the Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up, their organizers, officials, volunteers, as well as the Beautiful Plains Ag Society in case of a loss of or damage property or injury

Participant Signature:_________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature:______________________________________

Accommodations: Bay Hill Inn & Suites - 1-888-476-8802 - Westway Inn - 1-800-448-0994 Camping is also available at the fair grounds for a nominal fee further accommodation info at www.neepawa.ca


Province announces consultation schedule for risk management task force Government press release Manitoba farmers and other agricultural stakeholders are invited to provide their input about agricultural risk management programs at a series of upcoming public consultations or through an online questionnaire, Agriculture, Food and Rural Development Minister Ron Kostyshyn announced today. “The task force appointed earlier this year is making good progress and we now want to hear directly from those most affected by agricultural risk management programs and climate-related challenges,” said Minister Kostyshyn. “This is important work that will guide our government’s direction in the years to come and the task force provides the best platform to hold discussions with industry stakeholders and the public.” The minister noted Manitoba farmers have said existing business risk management programs do not adequately address the risks that arise from climate-related challenges such as spring flooding and excess rainfall. “We are following through on our commitment to review existing programs and consider options that

will be more predictable, comprehensive and sustainable for farmers and governments,” the minister said. “I look forward to hearing from Manitobans as part of the task force’s work.” The Agriculture Risk Management Review Task Force will focus its consultations on the ability of current programs to protect and provide a foundation for Manitoba’s agriculture industry as it deals with a changing climate, Minister Kostyshyn said. Seven public consultations have been scheduled: • Melita, Town Hall, July 9, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; • Swan River, Westwood Inn, July 13, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.; • Dauphin, St. Viator’s Roman Catholic Church, July 14, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; • Arborg, Arborg Bifrost Community Centre, July 20, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; • Portage la Prairie, Canad Inns Destination Centre, July 21, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; • Beausejour, Sandy-Salteaux Spiritual Centre, July 27, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; and • Morris, Morris United Church,

If you have an E-Newsletter article that would be of interest to MBP members, please email Chad Saxon at: csaxon@mbbeef.ca

July 28, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Written submissions will be accepted until Sept. 30 and should focus on gaps or challenges with current risk management programs and any adjustments or alternatives to current programs that could be considered, the minister said. An online questionnaire will also be available. The questionnaire and additional information on how to send written comments will be posted online shortly in the Quick Links section at www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture. The task force has been asked to review the ability of current tools to effectively manage risk and identify gaps. They have also been asked to identify new policy and program opportunities that may advance the ability of the agriculture sector and government to manage risk issues and the economic effects of a changing climate. The task force’s members are Bill Uruski (chair), Derek Brewin, Doug Chorney, John DeVos, Frieda Krpan and Goldwyn Jones. A final report with recommendations will be submitted to government by the end of the year, the minister said.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for moreinformation. info@mbbeef.ca


mbbeef.ca

June 19, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Results of the WCCCS: production benchmarks From Beefresearch.ca Herd productivity is closely linked to herd profitability. The calculation for breakeven price on calves clearly demonstrates this: The break-even price can be lowered by decreasing total cow herd costs or by increasing the total pounds of calves weaned. Increasing the total weight (lbs) of weaned calves can be achieved by improving herd productivity, such as: a) INCREASING – conception rates, weaning rate, etc. b) DECREASING – calf death loss, calving span, etc.

While it is good management to track and calculate one’s herd production performance indicators on

an annual basis, it can be helpful to have benchmarks to compare to. Benchmarks help a producer know if they are on the right track. They can help a producer identify if they excel in a certain area and/or could improve in another. They can also help to show what production and management practices other producers are following. Benchmark productivity measures for the cow-calf sector can also help guide research and extension efforts. For these reasons, a group of individuals from British Columbia to Manitoba, representing provincial beef producer groups, provincial Ministry of Agriculture

Cattle Tales

Although it sat quiet for a moment, traffic was brisk through the Cattle Tales exhibit at the Red River Ex. The annual event runs through Sunday.

Continued to Page 3

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Verified Beef Workshop A Verified Beef Production workshop will be held at 1 p.m., on June 23 in the boardroom at the Steinbach Superstore location. Find out the latest information on how to prevent and control food safety risks in your farm operation at a Verified Beef Production workshop. To register, call the MBP office at 1-800-772-0458.


Page 2

Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • U.S. seeks arbitration over possible COOL sanctions

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Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

Survey looks at production benchmarks continued from page 1 specialists, the Beef Cattle Research Council, Canfax and the Western Beef Development Centre have revived, expanded and conducted a survey last conducted in Alberta in 1998. The Western Canadian Cow-Calf Survey (WCCCS) was distributed to producers from November 2014 until the end of February 2015. A total of 411 survey responses were received (representing just over 76,000 cows). Response rates varied by province with the greatest percentage of respondents being from Alberta (49%), followed by Saskatchewan (24%), Manitoba (18%) and British Columbia (8%). The average age of survey respondents was 50 with an average of 28 years in the cattle business. Survey respondents provided details on their 2014 calf crop starting with the 2013 breeding season and ending with weaning. Cow:bull ratio averaged 25:1 and breeding season length averaged 93 days, which was nearly unchanged from the results of the ’98 Alberta survey. A breeding season no longer than 63 days is recommended to maintain a 365 day calving interval and improve calf crop uniformity, but only 24% of respondents achieved this recommended target. Breeding heifers 4 to 6 weeks before the cows is recommended so that heifers have more time to recoup (i.e. longer post partum interval) after their first calf is born. Only 26% of survey respondents bred their heifers earlier than the rest of the herd, averaging 2 weeks earlier. The average open rate was 7% in cows and 10% in heifers. The conception rate for all females was 92.8%, compared to 95.6% in AB in 1998. Work is underway within the industry to gain a better understanding of recent years’ lower conception rates. The most popular month for calving start was March, with 18% starting

calving in the first half of the month and 18% starting in the second half of March (see Figure 1). This is a change from 1998, where the majority of respondents were calving in February. This shift in calving start date suggests the research and extension about calving later to avoid the high cost of calving during winter months was heard and adopted. Calving distribution is an important indicator for a herd. Ideally, 60% or more of females should be calving in the first 21 days of the calving season. A little more than 40% of question respondents achieved this target. On average 55% of females calved in the first 21 days (see Figure 2), which is an improvement from 48% reported in the 1998 AB survey. Western Canadian Cow-Calf Survey 2014 results Calving Distribution Nearly 80% of respondents provided details on their 2014 weaning dates. Most respondents weaned in October (41%), followed by November (32%). The most common method for weaning was traditional separation (70%), with others using low-stress fenceline (22%), two-stage/nose paddle (6%) or natural (3%) weaning methods. The average wean percentage was 86%, with 533 lbs weaned per cow exposed, 28 lbs higher than in 1998. Only 24% of survey respondents implanted their 2014 calves.

More than 69% of respondents report having more than 90% polled calves. 94% of producers castrate calves before 6 months of age, indicating the vast majority of producers are already in alignment with the beef care Code of Practice requirement (to be effective Jan. 1, 2018) of using pain control when castrating bulls older than six months of age. Over 70% of respondents sold a portion of their calves at weaning, with 9% preconditioning and 35% backgrounding. Some producers used multiple calf marketing strategies. Most respondents (80%) marketed calves via live auction, 12% sold calves direct/private treaty, 9% used electronic auction and 7% used an order buyer. The top four bull selection criteria were breed, conformation, birth weight and EPDs, respectively. Genetic test results ranked #9 in bull selection. Few respondents test their bulls for trich (12%) and vibrio (10%). 19% of respondents regularly body condition score their females and 91% vaccinate. 47% lab test their winter feed for quality, and 80% of those use the results to balance rations. If you are interested in learning about more WCCC survey findings please visit: www.wbdc.sk.ca/wcccs.htm. Ideally this survey will be conducted every 5 years.


• 1/4 cup (50 mL) dry bread crumbs • 1 small onion, finely chopped

ADD-IN: 2 tsp (10mL) Lea & Perrins®Worcestershire sauce, 1 celery stalk,minced, 1 tsp (5mL) EACH celery salt and hot pepper sauce TOPPER: Tomato slice sprinkled with celery salt and pickle garnish

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Fuel your body with a healthy helping of “energizing” nutrients. Beef is naturally rich in eight key nutrients your body needs to release and use energy from the foods you eat. • Iron • Protein • Vitamin B12 • Vitamin B6 • Thiamine • Riboflavin • Niacin • Pantothenate

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Per pattie: 273 Calories, 25 g protein, 16 g fat, 8 g carbohydrate. Good source of iron (21% DV) and excellent source of zinc (59% DV) and vitamin B12 (70% DV), 10% DV sodium.

1. Lightly combine beef, bread crumbs, HP® sauce, onion and egg. 2. Gently form into four 3/4-inch (2 cm) thick patties. 3. Grill over medium-high heat on lightly oiled grill for 5 to 7 minutes per side or until digital instant read thermometer inserted sideways into centre of each patty reads 160°F (71°C). Makes 4 patties.

*Other options: Extra Lean or Lean Ground Round, Sirloin or Lean/Extra Lean Ground Beef

• 1 lb (500 g) Lean Ground Beef Sirloin or Chuck* • 2 tbsp (30 mL) HP® Sauce, Original • 1 egg, lightly beaten

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Featuring Chef Darryl Crumb

Presented By Manitoba Beef Producers

Eat Like An Athlete


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 5

Try some BIG Barbecued Beef Ribs for Father’s Day Recipe by Canada Beef Prep time 5 mins Cook time 2 hours 15 mins Total time 2 hours 20 mins Not for sissy’s, this gooey beef rib recipe offers rib-eating satisfaction from ear to ear and are great for dramatic presentation. Recipe type: Entree Cuisine: American Serves: 3-4 servings Ingredients Salt and pepper 1 rack Beef Grilling Back Ribs (about 7 ribs long), approx 3 lb (1.5 kg) ½ cup barbecue sauce 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 onion, diced 1 can (14 oz/398 ml) tomato sauce 1/2 cup EACH maple syrup and red wine vinegar ¼ cup tomato paste 2 tbsp. EACH minced canned chipolte peppers and Worcestershire sauce Instructions • Season ribs with salt and pepper and grill over medium-high heat for 5 to 10 minutes, turning occasionally until browned all over. Place on a thick sheet of foil on a baking sheet. Thin barbecue sauce with 2 to 3 tbsp water; pour over ribs. Over-wrap with another sheet of foil and crimp up edges to make a foil pouch. • Roast in 250°F (120°C) oven for 1 to 2 hours or until meat is fork tender. Meanwhile sauté garlic and onion in a bit of vegetable oil until softened. Stir in remaining ingredients and bring to a simmer. Remove from heat. Reserve approximately 1 cup (250 mL) of sauce for dipping. • Brush ribs all over with the remaining sauce. If desired, grill briefly to set the sauce. Serve ribs with reserved sauce for dipping.


TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

Friday, July 31 11:00 AM Move Cattle In 3:00-5:00 PM Registration 5:00-6:00 PM Supper 6:30-8:30 PM Welcome & Educational Workshops Simmental & AgriChallenge Industry Quizzes Saturday, auguSt 1 8:00-9:00 AM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 9:00-11:30 PM Pee Wee & Junior Stall Card Competition Judging Classes Sales Talk/Impromptu Speeches 11:30-12:00 PM Workshop 1:30-2:30 PM Team Grooming 3:00-5:00 PM Team Judging or Team Marketing Pee Wee Learning Clinic 5:00-6:00 PM Saturday Awards with steak supper 6:30-8:00 PM Cook Off 8:00 PM Quiz bowl Sunday, auguSt 2 8:00-9:00 PM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 9:00 AM -12:00 PM Showmanship - Ring 1 & 2 12:00-1:00PM Lunch Break 1:00-5:00 PM Conformation Show - Ring 1 & 2 5:00 PM Supper & Awards Ceremony

WHO:

Any young cattle producers under the age of 25 years of age as of January 1, 2015. Whether you are a commercial, purebred, 4-H or new junior, you are all welcome to attend!

WHAT:

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up All Breeds Junior Cattle Weekend

WHERE:

Beautiful Plains Ag Society, Neepawa, Manitoba

WHEN:

Friday-Sunday, July 31 - August 2, 2015

WHY:

ElonW N nd g a frie a ng e

bri am t your n w. and ge ra d a in entered

To bring juniors of all ages, breeds and locations together for a fun, educational weekend of cattle and non cattle events.

FEATURES:

• New Alumni Showmanship - open to past Round-Up Participants and committee members (costumes optional) • Chance to be on the MYBR Agribition Judging Team

• MYBR Scholarship check out the MYBR Facebook page or email: adbertholet@hotmail.com • GRAND AGGREGATE AWARDS

FOR DETAILS CONTACT:

Chairperson: Lois McRae - 728-3058 - marmac@inetlink.ca Treasurer: Rilla Hunter - 838-2019 Secretary: Vonda Hopcraft - 824-2115

Committee Members: Blair McRae - 728-3058 Melissa McRae - 573-9903 Michelle Allison - 573-6693 Wenda Best - 838-2236 Candace Johnston - 720-3986 Angus: Naomi Best - 838-2236 Ken Williams - 855-2275 Nanette Glover - 534-2552

Charolais: Vonda Hopcraft - 824-2115 Hereford: Albert & Samantha Rimke - 855-2534 Limousin: Travis & Dillon Hunter - 838-2019 Simmental: Andrea Bertholet - 483-0319 Kolton McIntosh - 280-0359 Shorthorn: Adrianne Vandersluis - 436-3122 Justin Kristjansson - 730-7196

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 7

• Participants are encouraged to bring their own utensils and ingredients for marinades and garnishes and to provide a recipe to the judges. 1. Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up is open to all Canadian Juniors under • Costumes and themes are encouraged. the age of 25 as of January 1, 2015. • Score: 50% taste; 25% appearance; 15% presentation and 10% 2. Entry fees are $40 per person plus $10 per conformation class. The creativity. $40 flat fee includes entry to all competitions (excluding conformation), Stall Card show clothing and scheduled meals. Compulsory events are sales talk • Pee Wees & Juniors create a stall card to be displayed with their animals (PW & JR), Impromptu speeches (INT & SR), judging class with oral in the stalls. reasons, team marketing or team judging, team grooming, cook off and • Stall cards must be made Saturday morning at Round-Up only Round Up Agri Challange. • Scoring: 35% clarity; 35% originality and 30% neatness 3. 2015 calves are eligible to be entered in cow calf pair and calf classes. Photography Entry fee for pair is $10 and calf class is $10. All cattle must be halter • The photo must be taken by the junior exhibiting it and cannot be broke and manageable or will be asked to leave. digitally enhanced and must be taken within the last year & dated 4. A junior who does not have cattle may use another participants animal • Photographs must be 4”x6”. in grooming and showmanship. • All entries must be cattle related e.g.: animal, cattle scenery or cattle and 5. AS THIS IS A JUNIOR EVENT, ALL ENTRIES MUST BE SHOWN AND people. LOOKED AFTER BY THE JUNIORS. ABSOLUTELY NO ADULT or • Please put name and age category on the back. non-entrant participation will be tolerated. Pee Wees may be assisted • Scoring: 40% clarity; 35% quality and 25% originality. by a parent or guardian for safety reasons only. NEW IN 2015 Graphic Design Mentors are the committee, they will be wearing committee shirts • All work must be done at home by the junior created using computer and will be around to provide help the juniors and answer any technology. questions. • The graphic design must be promoting a breed, industry or an individual 6. Alcohol and Drugs are prohibited in the barns and at the Roundup herd. functions for the duration of the show. • E.g.: flyers, posters, newsletters, brochures, etc. 7. Tampering with and any unethical fitting is prohibited. • Please put name and age category on the back. 8. Show apparel is to be worn for all the showmanship and confirmation • Scoring: 30% creativity; 30% originality; 30% clear and concise classes. message; 10% organization Art • All work must be done at home by the junior in the last year & dated Sales Talk - Compulsory Event • Art cannot contain photos and should not be larger than 9”x14”. • For Pee Wee and JR participants • You can use (pencil, paint, clay, wood, etc.). • Item to sell will be given to you morning of the event. • All art is judged in the same category. One entry per person. • A live setting complete with a potential buyer as the judge. • Please put name and age category on the back. • Juniors will first describe the sales situation to the buyer and then • Score: 40% originality; 40% creativity and 20% skill/quality. discuss the strength and weaknesses of the item in a conversation Scrapbook which includes interaction with the buyer. • Include photographs, newspaper and magazine clippings, for the • Score: 30% knowledge; 30% ability to relate information; 20% poise and 2014- 2015 year. delivery; 20% overall effectiveness. • Scrapbooks must be done by the junior exhibiting. Impromptu Speeches - Compulsory Event • The scrapbook is to encourage junior members to record different cattle • For INT and SR participants functions they have attended over the past years. • The contest is designed to develop the ability of all members to express • Scrapbooks should have a theme and begin with a title page, table of themselves on a given subject without having prepared or rehearsed its contents and numbered pages. content in advance. • Score: 25% cover; 25% creativity; 25% originality; 25% neatness and • Contestants will present a speech on a subject pertaining to the livestock organization. industry that is selected the morning of the competition. PowerPoint and Video Topic • Length of speech: 3-5 minutes. They will be asked to answer questions • Pee Wee and JRs minimum of 6 slides INT and SRs minimum of 12 slides relating to their speech following the presentation. • Presentations must have at least two pictures or clip art that support the • Score: 35% presentation; 35% knowledge; 20% originality; idea of the presentation. 10% appearance • Presentations may include but do not require music or video clips. Team Marketing - Compulsory Event • Videos and/or presentations must come on the first day on a USB • Teams of three will be selected by the committee will work together to sell memory stick, DVD or CD. Videos must be in Quick Time, AVI or MPEG an animal. The objective of the contest is to gain a working understanding file format. of performance and pedigree information. Emphasis will be placed on • JR and INT videos must be 30-60 seconds in length, SR videos must be team organization, communication skills and marketing techniques. Teams 60-90 seconds in length. will be given a photo, pedigree some facts on the animal and as a team • The junior member will produce file and edit the videos them selves, no they will have 5 minutes to prepare and then present to the judges their professional editing allowed. sales pitch. • Animated and or computer generated graphics will not be allowed in the • Score: 20% content of sales pitch; 25% ability to communicate; 25% video. team organization 20% total effectiveness; 10% knowledge and • Score: 40% on graphics; 35% originality; 15% technical merit; 10% responses to questions. overall effect of the presentation. Team Judging - Compulsory Event Herdsman Competition (group or individual) • Juniors will judge a class of four animals. • The purpose of this contest is to encourage cooperation, fellowship and • One of the team members will act as the ring person and the other one teamwork among juniors in developing and maintaining a display of will act as the judge. cattle and stall area. The competition begins on Saturday morning and • The participant acting as the judge must give oral reasons over the ends after the conformation classes. Must have a minimum of two head microphone in front of the audience. tied in your display. • All other teams must be out of the judging area and unable to hear the • Score: 25% aisle and bedding, cleanliness and appearance; 25% reasons. animals, cleanliness and well groomed; 25% personnel attending cattle, • Score: 55% teamwork ability; 20% clarity of reasons; 20% logic of knowledgeable, friendly and teamwork; 25% equipment, boxes, signs, reasons 5% appearance. well arranged and general appearance. Team Grooming - Compulsory Event Grand Aggregate • Teams have 15 minutes to groom with power. • One participant from each division will be selected. • Animals must have no fitting prior to competition. • Score: 1 point for every animal you bring, no matter where they • Once at the chute area you are not allowed to leave so bring all the place. All other non cattle classes will be scored 10 points for first equipment with you. place and down. Ex: 1st - 10pts, 2nd - 9 pts, 3rd - 8pts, etc. • Score: 35% knowledge and skill; 25% teamwork; 20% use of equipment; • The grand aggregate competition encourages all juniors to 15% final appearance; 5% presentation of animal participate in all the events. Cook Off - Compulsory Event • Team event, teams will be announced at Round-Up. • Teams will be provided with two steaks and a barbecue • Steaks will be available at the show office the afternoon of the competition if teams wish to marinate them.

RULES

OUTLINES FOR CLASSES


Mail Completed entries and fees to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up C/O Lois McRae RR 1 Box 57, Brandon, MB R7A 5Y1

Entry deadline: July 10, 2015 Participant Name:__________________________________________________________________ Birth Date:_______/_______/_______ Age Division:_________

Age Groups (as of Jan 1, 2015): Pee Wee: 8 and Under; Junior 9-12; Intermediate: 13-16; Senior: 17-25 (Shorthorns 16-21)

Full Address:______________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________ Email: __________________________________________ Show Apparel Size: XS

S

M

L

XL

2XL

-

YOUTH

Please circle one size and either youth or adult

ADULT

For MYBR Windpants or Jacket ($30/each) contact Wenda Best at 838-2236 CLASS BREED #

ANIMAL NAME

ANIMAL D.O.B.

ANIMAL TATTOO

Cattle Classes: Please Complete All Sections

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

ANIMAL REG #

Heifer Calf Female born in 2014 Female born in 2013 w/ nat calf at foot Female born in 2012 or earlier w/ nat calf at foot Bull Calf Fat Steer Showmanship

SIRE NAME & REG #

DAM NAME & REG #

Compulsory Classes:

8. Team Judging or Team Marketing 9. Sales Talk/Impromptu Speeches 10. Team Grooming 11. Cook Off 12. Round Up AgriChallange 13. Breed Quizzes for Simmental & Shorthorn exhibitors

Breeds: (If animal doesn’t have a registration number please list as a commercial) A: Angus, CH: Charolais, H: Hereford, L:Limousin,

S: Simmental, M: Mixed Breeds (Purebred breeds not listed); CO: Commercial, G: Gelbvieh; SH : Shorthorn

If you are showing purebred animals, you must be a member in your respective breed association & have registration papers on the animals

Meals:

Adults full weekend of meals $75 ___ Adults: Breakfast $8; Lunch $10; Supper $15 Saturday Night Steak Supper $20 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___ Sunday Night Supper $15 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___

Fees:

Registration Fee: $40.00/participant $________ Cattle Fees: $10.00/class $________ Adult Full Weekend Meal Fees $________ Extra Meal Fees $________ Late Fees: $20.00/person after July 10 $________ Total Fees: $________

Make cheques payable to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up Waiver Claim: I hereby release the Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up, their organizers, officials, volunteers, as well as the Beautiful Plains Ag Society in case of a loss of or damage property or injury

Participant Signature:_________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature:______________________________________

Accommodations: Bay Hill Inn & Suites - 1-888-476-8802 - Westway Inn - 1-800-448-0994 Camping is also available at the fair grounds for a nominal fee further accommodation info at www.neepawa.ca


Province announces consultation schedule for risk management task force Government press release Manitoba farmers and other agricultural stakeholders are invited to provide their input about agricultural risk management programs at a series of upcoming public consultations or through an online questionnaire, Agriculture, Food and Rural Development Minister Ron Kostyshyn announced today. “The task force appointed earlier this year is making good progress and we now want to hear directly from those most affected by agricultural risk management programs and climate-related challenges,” said Minister Kostyshyn. “This is important work that will guide our government’s direction in the years to come and the task force provides the best platform to hold discussions with industry stakeholders and the public.” The minister noted Manitoba farmers have said existing business risk management programs do not adequately address the risks that arise from climate-related challenges such as spring flooding and excess rainfall. “We are following through on our commitment to review existing programs and consider options that

will be more predictable, comprehensive and sustainable for farmers and governments,” the minister said. “I look forward to hearing from Manitobans as part of the task force’s work.” The Agriculture Risk Management Review Task Force will focus its consultations on the ability of current programs to protect and provide a foundation for Manitoba’s agriculture industry as it deals with a changing climate, Minister Kostyshyn said. Seven public consultations have been scheduled: • Melita, Town Hall, July 9, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; • Swan River, Westwood Inn, July 13, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.; • Dauphin, St. Viator’s Roman Catholic Church, July 14, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; • Arborg, Arborg Bifrost Community Centre, July 20, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; • Portage la Prairie, Canad Inns Destination Centre, July 21, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; • Beausejour, Sandy-Salteaux Spiritual Centre, July 27, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.; and • Morris, Morris United Church,

If you have an E-Newsletter article that would be of interest to MBP members, please email Chad Saxon at: csaxon@mbbeef.ca

July 28, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Written submissions will be accepted until Sept. 30 and should focus on gaps or challenges with current risk management programs and any adjustments or alternatives to current programs that could be considered, the minister said. An online questionnaire will also be available. The questionnaire and additional information on how to send written comments will be posted online shortly in the Quick Links section at www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture. The task force has been asked to review the ability of current tools to effectively manage risk and identify gaps. They have also been asked to identify new policy and program opportunities that may advance the ability of the agriculture sector and government to manage risk issues and the economic effects of a changing climate. The task force’s members are Bill Uruski (chair), Derek Brewin, Doug Chorney, John DeVos, Frieda Krpan and Goldwyn Jones. A final report with recommendations will be submitted to government by the end of the year, the minister said.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for moreinformation. info@mbbeef.ca


mbbeef.ca

June 5, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Heartland Virden captures award at LMAC convention A Manitoba auction mart was among the big winners at the 2015 Livestock Markets Association of Canada national convention. Heartland Livestock Services Virden was named the winner of the Canadian Angus Association Stockyards of the Year Award during the LMAC awards ceremony on May 30. The award was one of many handed out over the course of the three-day event which was highlighted by the Canadian Livestock Auctioneer Championship, held May

29 at Winnipeg Livestock Sales. A field of 30 auctioneers from Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta competed in the event. One year after placing fourth, Calvin Kuepfer of Waterloo, Ontario jumped up the standings and captured the championship. Fellow Ontarian Kevin McArter captured second while Ryan Hurlburt of Yorkton was third overall. Manitoba was well represented with a number of auctioneers from throughout the province competing. continued on page 2

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

The Champ

The Livestock Markets Association of Canada held their 36th annual convention in Winnipeg from May 28-30. The event included the Canadian Livestock Auctioneer Championship which was won by Calvin Kuepfer (above) of Waterloo, Ont.

Eat Like An Athlete Manitoba Beef Producers is proud to present Eat Like An Athlete, a new feature that will be broadcast on TSN 1290 each week. With a focus on nutritious, protein packed recipes featuring beef, Eat like An Athlete is perfect for everyone. Listen to TSN1290 from Thursday through Sunday. The recipes will also be featured on the Manitoba Beef Producers site. CLICK HERE FOR MORE


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 2

Winnipeg hosts LMAC In the News national convention A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry

• MB producer groups support tariffs against the U.S. • Transporting animals in hot and humid weather • Self auditing your farm’s procedures

continued from page 1

Tyler Slawinski, a McCreary native who was representing the Gladstone Auction Mart was the top Manitoban with a fifth place finish. Scott Campbell of Brandon joined Slawinski as one of the finalists. Other Mantioba award winners were Allan Munroe of the Killarney Auction Mart who was named the Most Congenial Auctioneer. Morris Olafson of Morden captured the Manitoba/Saskatchewan Rookie of the Year Award. The overall Rookie of the Year Award went to Albert Carroll of Onomee, Ontario. Larry Witzel of Waterloo was the 2015 Hall of Fame Inductee while Yorkton’s Hurlburt was the Manitoba/Saskatchewan Champion. The competition for first place was a lenghty process as each of the 30 auctioneers had their chance to sell cattle and a “black box” item. Once they were finished the field was wittled down to a final 13 who had another chance to get before the microphone. While the competition was the highlight, the event also included banquets and a business meeting Saturday morning that focused on sustainability. Ryder Lee of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association, Stirling Fox of JBS Foods Canada and Jerry Klassen, a market analyst for the Canadian Cattlemen magazine were the three speakers for the meeting.

• Why do some animals spread disease more than others? •WTO booked to hear Canada’s COOL case • More western producers are eligible for tax relief

Dave Nickel (left) of the Gladstone Auction Mart, was one of the nine Manitoba competitiors in the 2015 Canadian Livestock Auctioneer Championship, which was held May 29 at Winnipeg Livestock Sales.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Canada to Seek WTO Authorization in Response to COOL Government of Canada media release The Honourable Ed Fast, Minister of International Trade, and the Honourable Ritz, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, today announced Thursday that Canada will seek World Trade Organization (WTO) authorization to impose over $3 billion in retaliatory measures against U.S. exports to Canada. Canada’s request for authorization to retaliate, filed today with the WTO, will be considered by the WTO Dispute Settlement Body on June 17. On May 18, the WTO ruled for the fourth time against the U.S. country of original labelling (COOL) requirements, reaffirming Canada’s long-standing position that these measures violate the U.S.’s international trade obligations and discriminate against Canadian cattle and hogs. The decision was final and without the possibility of further appeal. With the final WTO decision, the Canadian government once again called on the United States to immediately repeal the COOL measures on beef and pork to meet its trade obligations or face retaliation. Since the implementation of the U.S. COOL requirements in 2008, producers and processors on both sides of the border have been harmed by this unnecessary trade barrier. Damages to the Canadian livestock industry are estimated to be more than $3 billion annually, and Canada will ask the WTO for authority to impose retaliation measures up to that amount. Once WTO authorization is received, Canada will choose how and when to retaliate.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information.

info@mbbeef.ca

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Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 4

Protect Your Livestock. Protect Your Livelihood. Register today for the Livestock Predation Protection Workshop.

If you are a livestock producer, trapper, hunter or landowner, you are invited to attend a Livestock Predation Protection Workshop in your area. The workshops are taking place at the following locations: Time 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Alonsa, Manitoba Alonsa Community Hall Date: June 11, 2015 Pre-register at: 1-800-772-0458 Outdoor How-to Demonstrations (4 p.m. – 6 p.m. on day of workshop) • Trap preparation (clean, dip and store) • Trap sets (dirt hole, drags)

Free Admission. Expert Advice. Admission to the workshop is free. The evening will include information from Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship, Manitoba Agriculture Food and Rural Development (MAFRD) and Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation. An overview of the Wildlife Damage Compensation Regulation and Program will be provided along with information on animal husbandry tools. Professional trappers will also be in attendance to provide advice on: • Humane Trapping and Snaring • Predator Hunting and Calling • Mortality Management

Register Today Pre-register to attend the workshop. Space is limited.


Lots to think about when harvesting forages From the Beef Cattle Research Council It is essential to harvest forage at the best time, from the point of view of nutritional quality, quantity available and climatic conditions, and then to store it properly to reduce losses. The objective of harvesting forage for storage is to preserve forage produced in the summer months in order to ensure winter feed for livestock when grazing is not feasible or accessible. Hay uses desiccation or dry storage containing less than 15% water to prevent spoilage. Silage or wet storage uses the acidifying power of lactic bacteria, which reduces the pH to around 4, below which all chemical reaction and fermentation ceases. Haylage usually refers to a crop that is wilted to 60% moisture and is stored in oxygen limited structures or plastic bags. Limited haylage is produced in North America due to material handling problems, however it is very popular in Europe. Hay baled at a high moisture content will spoil and mold. Silage must be firmly packed to minimize the oxygen content or it will spoil. Silage can be successfully made from any green crop that has sufficient water-soluble carbohydrates and appropriate moisture content. In regions where frequent rain has a high risk of reducing hay quality, silage is a

better option for storing forage nutrients. In regions that are dry and have challenges with targeting 68-70% moisture in silage after wilting due to high evapotranspiration, hay is preferred assuming the same forage is used with comparable quality and yield. Advantages of Silage Silage is harvested at relatively high moisture content and is wilted in the field for short periods of time, reducing field losses compared to hay production. Preservative: During fermentation, the silage bacteria act on the cellulose and carbohydrates in the forage to produce volatile fatty acids (VFAs), such as acetic, propionic, lactic, and butyric acids. By lowering pH, these create a hostile environment for competing bacteria that might cause spoilage. The VFAs thus act as natural preservative, during winter in temperate regions, when green forage is unavailable. The fermentation process that produces VFA also yields energy that the bacteria use: some of the energy is released as heat. Silage is thus modestly lower in caloric content than the original forage. However, this loss of energy is offset by the preservation characteristics and improved digestibility of silage. Palatability: When silage is

prepared under optimal conditions, the modest acidity also has the effect of improving palatability and provides a dietary contrast for the animal. It should be noted that excessive production of acetic and butyric acids can reduce palatability. Several of the fermenting organisms produce vitamins (e.g. lactobacillus species produce folic acid and vitamin B12). Consistency: Feedlot rations need to be consistent. Erratic ingredient quality can affect feed intake and animal performance. Alfalfa silage tends to be more consistent than alfalfa hay in cattle rations when wilted to 68-70% moisture, then packed properly. However, the highly variable energy content of corn silage makes it challenging to maintain animal growth rate when cattle are fed high forage diets. The choice of how forages are stored will depend on the region and climate but a producer must also consider that while silaging may have higher input costs, the per unit cost of production (COP) may be lower when taking into account that yield loss after wilting is only about 5% compared to hay, which can be 15-30% depending on weather. Further losses occur during storage, around 15% for silage and 20-35% for hay.3 Differences in feed quality must also be considered.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Last day to apply for MBP bursary Six Manitoba students will receive a little extra help paying for their education this year thanks to the 2015 Manitoba Beef Producers’ bursaries. The six bursaries are offered annually to MBP members or their children who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are in a field of study related to agriculture or those working to acquire a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. Those applying must be at least 17-years-old as of Jan. 1, 2015 and be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of one. Applicants are required to use the bursary within two years of receipt and the program they are attending must be at least one years in duration. Interested students are asked to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Manitoba at large. Students are also asked to include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at mbbeef.ca or by clicking this link. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 5, 2015. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified on July 31, 2015. Applications can be sent to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee, 220 – 530 Century Street, R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca

Page 6


MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS

BURSARY

Manitoba Beef Producers is pleased to make available (6) six $500 bursaries annually for MBP members or their children attending a university, college, other post-secondary institution or pursuing trades training. Preference will be given to those students pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or to those acquiring a skilled trade that would be beneficial to the rural economy. Completed applications must be submitted by Friday, June 5, 2015. A selection committee will review the submissions. Winners will be notified by July 31, 2015. The bursary criteria are as follows: Eligibility: • Must be at least 17 years of age as of January 1, 2015. • Must be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of an active Manitoba beef producer. • Must use the bursary within (2) two years. • Post-secondary program or trades training must be a minimum of one year in duration. Items to Submit: • Must submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay discussing “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture.* • Must submit a transcript (either High School or Post-Secondary Institute). • Must submit a proof of enrolment in a recognized institution (current transcript or if in high school include a letter of intent to attend or a letter of acceptance). • Must submit a list of community involvement (e.g. 4-H, community clubs, volunteer work, etc.). • Provide the names of three references, including their addresses and telephone numbers. Submissions must be sent to MBP no later than 4:30 p.m. on Friday, June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg MB R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact the MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca *The winning essays will be published in the MBP newspaper Cattle Country.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


MBP 2015

BURSARY APPLICATION FORM PLEASE PRINT Name: _______________________________________________________________________________ Mailing address: _______________________________________________________________________ Telephone: _____________________________ Email: _____________________________

Fax (if available): _______________________

Date of Birth: _____________________________ Parents’ names if you are under 18: _______________________________________________________ Are you a beef producer? _____________________________ Are you the child of a beef producer? _____________________________ Institute of current enrolment*: ______________________________________________________________ Current or intended program of study or skilled trades training*: ____________________________________ Duration of post-secondary program or skill trades training: _________ year (s) Essay: Please submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay on “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture. *Note: Bursary winners will be published in MBP’s newspaper Cattle Country. Please return: the completed application form; transcript; proof of enrolment in a post-secondary institution or an apprenticeship program, or a letter of intent to pursue further studies; a list of your community involvement; a typed essay; and, your references no later than 4:30 p.m., Friday June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 Fax (204) 774-3264 Email: info@mbbeef.ca

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

Friday, July 31 11:00 AM Move Cattle In 3:00-5:00 PM Registration 5:00-6:00 PM Supper 6:30-8:30 PM Welcome & Educational Workshops Simmental & AgriChallenge Industry Quizzes Saturday, auguSt 1 8:00-9:00 AM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 9:00-11:30 PM Pee Wee & Junior Stall Card Competition Judging Classes Sales Talk/Impromptu Speeches 11:30-12:00 PM Workshop 1:30-2:30 PM Team Grooming 3:00-5:00 PM Team Judging or Team Marketing Pee Wee Learning Clinic 5:00-6:00 PM Saturday Awards with steak supper 6:30-8:00 PM Cook Off 8:00 PM Quiz bowl Sunday, auguSt 2 8:00-9:00 PM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 9:00 AM -12:00 PM Showmanship - Ring 1 & 2 12:00-1:00PM Lunch Break 1:00-5:00 PM Conformation Show - Ring 1 & 2 5:00 PM Supper & Awards Ceremony

WHO:

Any young cattle producers under the age of 25 years of age as of January 1, 2015. Whether you are a commercial, purebred, 4-H or new junior, you are all welcome to attend!

WHAT:

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up All Breeds Junior Cattle Weekend

WHERE:

Beautiful Plains Ag Society, Neepawa, Manitoba

WHEN:

Friday-Sunday, July 31 - August 2, 2015

WHY:

ElonW N nd g a frie a ng e

bri am t your n w. and ge ra d a in entered

To bring juniors of all ages, breeds and locations together for a fun, educational weekend of cattle and non cattle events.

FEATURES:

• New Alumni Showmanship - open to past Round-Up Participants and committee members (costumes optional) • Chance to be on the MYBR Agribition Judging Team

• MYBR Scholarship check out the MYBR Facebook page or email: adbertholet@hotmail.com • GRAND AGGREGATE AWARDS

FOR DETAILS CONTACT:

Chairperson: Lois McRae - 728-3058 - marmac@inetlink.ca Treasurer: Rilla Hunter - 838-2019 Secretary: Vonda Hopcraft - 824-2115

Committee Members: Blair McRae - 728-3058 Melissa McRae - 573-9903 Michelle Allison - 573-6693 Wenda Best - 838-2236 Candace Johnston - 720-3986 Angus: Naomi Best - 838-2236 Ken Williams - 855-2275 Nanette Glover - 534-2552

Charolais: Vonda Hopcraft - 824-2115 Hereford: Albert & Samantha Rimke - 855-2534 Limousin: Travis & Dillon Hunter - 838-2019 Simmental: Andrea Bertholet - 483-0319 Kolton McIntosh - 280-0359 Shorthorn: Adrianne Vandersluis - 436-3122 Justin Kristjansson - 730-7196

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up


• Participants are encouraged to bring their own utensils and ingredients for marinades and garnishes and to provide a recipe to the judges. 1. Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up is open to all Canadian Juniors under • Costumes and themes are encouraged. the age of 25 as of January 1, 2015. • Score: 50% taste; 25% appearance; 15% presentation and 10% 2. Entry fees are $40 per person plus $10 per conformation class. The creativity. $40 flat fee includes entry to all competitions (excluding conformation), Stall Card show clothing and scheduled meals. Compulsory events are sales talk • Pee Wees & Juniors create a stall card to be displayed with their animals (PW & JR), Impromptu speeches (INT & SR), judging class with oral in the stalls. reasons, team marketing or team judging, team grooming, cook off and • Stall cards must be made Saturday morning at Round-Up only Round Up Agri Challange. • Scoring: 35% clarity; 35% originality and 30% neatness 3. 2015 calves are eligible to be entered in cow calf pair and calf classes. Photography Entry fee for pair is $10 and calf class is $10. All cattle must be halter • The photo must be taken by the junior exhibiting it and cannot be broke and manageable or will be asked to leave. digitally enhanced and must be taken within the last year & dated 4. A junior who does not have cattle may use another participants animal • Photographs must be 4”x6”. in grooming and showmanship. • All entries must be cattle related e.g.: animal, cattle scenery or cattle and 5. AS THIS IS A JUNIOR EVENT, ALL ENTRIES MUST BE SHOWN AND people. LOOKED AFTER BY THE JUNIORS. ABSOLUTELY NO ADULT or • Please put name and age category on the back. non-entrant participation will be tolerated. Pee Wees may be assisted • Scoring: 40% clarity; 35% quality and 25% originality. by a parent or guardian for safety reasons only. NEW IN 2015 Graphic Design Mentors are the committee, they will be wearing committee shirts • All work must be done at home by the junior created using computer and will be around to provide help the juniors and answer any technology. questions. • The graphic design must be promoting a breed, industry or an individual 6. Alcohol and Drugs are prohibited in the barns and at the Roundup herd. functions for the duration of the show. • E.g.: flyers, posters, newsletters, brochures, etc. 7. Tampering with and any unethical fitting is prohibited. • Please put name and age category on the back. 8. Show apparel is to be worn for all the showmanship and confirmation • Scoring: 30% creativity; 30% originality; 30% clear and concise classes. message; 10% organization Art • All work must be done at home by the junior in the last year & dated Sales Talk - Compulsory Event • Art cannot contain photos and should not be larger than 9”x14”. • For Pee Wee and JR participants • You can use (pencil, paint, clay, wood, etc.). • Item to sell will be given to you morning of the event. • All art is judged in the same category. One entry per person. • A live setting complete with a potential buyer as the judge. • Please put name and age category on the back. • Juniors will first describe the sales situation to the buyer and then • Score: 40% originality; 40% creativity and 20% skill/quality. discuss the strength and weaknesses of the item in a conversation Scrapbook which includes interaction with the buyer. • Include photographs, newspaper and magazine clippings, for the • Score: 30% knowledge; 30% ability to relate information; 20% poise and 2014- 2015 year. delivery; 20% overall effectiveness. • Scrapbooks must be done by the junior exhibiting. Impromptu Speeches - Compulsory Event • The scrapbook is to encourage junior members to record different cattle • For INT and SR participants functions they have attended over the past years. • The contest is designed to develop the ability of all members to express • Scrapbooks should have a theme and begin with a title page, table of themselves on a given subject without having prepared or rehearsed its contents and numbered pages. content in advance. • Score: 25% cover; 25% creativity; 25% originality; 25% neatness and • Contestants will present a speech on a subject pertaining to the livestock organization. industry that is selected the morning of the competition. PowerPoint and Video Topic • Length of speech: 3-5 minutes. They will be asked to answer questions • Pee Wee and JRs minimum of 6 slides INT and SRs minimum of 12 slides relating to their speech following the presentation. • Presentations must have at least two pictures or clip art that support the • Score: 35% presentation; 35% knowledge; 20% originality; idea of the presentation. 10% appearance • Presentations may include but do not require music or video clips. Team Marketing - Compulsory Event • Videos and/or presentations must come on the first day on a USB • Teams of three will be selected by the committee will work together to sell memory stick, DVD or CD. Videos must be in Quick Time, AVI or MPEG an animal. The objective of the contest is to gain a working understanding file format. of performance and pedigree information. Emphasis will be placed on • JR and INT videos must be 30-60 seconds in length, SR videos must be team organization, communication skills and marketing techniques. Teams 60-90 seconds in length. will be given a photo, pedigree some facts on the animal and as a team • The junior member will produce file and edit the videos them selves, no they will have 5 minutes to prepare and then present to the judges their professional editing allowed. sales pitch. • Animated and or computer generated graphics will not be allowed in the • Score: 20% content of sales pitch; 25% ability to communicate; 25% video. team organization 20% total effectiveness; 10% knowledge and • Score: 40% on graphics; 35% originality; 15% technical merit; 10% responses to questions. overall effect of the presentation. Team Judging - Compulsory Event Herdsman Competition (group or individual) • Juniors will judge a class of four animals. • The purpose of this contest is to encourage cooperation, fellowship and • One of the team members will act as the ring person and the other one teamwork among juniors in developing and maintaining a display of will act as the judge. cattle and stall area. The competition begins on Saturday morning and • The participant acting as the judge must give oral reasons over the ends after the conformation classes. Must have a minimum of two head microphone in front of the audience. tied in your display. • All other teams must be out of the judging area and unable to hear the • Score: 25% aisle and bedding, cleanliness and appearance; 25% reasons. animals, cleanliness and well groomed; 25% personnel attending cattle, • Score: 55% teamwork ability; 20% clarity of reasons; 20% logic of knowledgeable, friendly and teamwork; 25% equipment, boxes, signs, reasons 5% appearance. well arranged and general appearance. Team Grooming - Compulsory Event Grand Aggregate • Teams have 15 minutes to groom with power. • One participant from each division will be selected. • Animals must have no fitting prior to competition. • Score: 1 point for every animal you bring, no matter where they • Once at the chute area you are not allowed to leave so bring all the place. All other non cattle classes will be scored 10 points for first equipment with you. place and down. Ex: 1st - 10pts, 2nd - 9 pts, 3rd - 8pts, etc. • Score: 35% knowledge and skill; 25% teamwork; 20% use of equipment; • The grand aggregate competition encourages all juniors to 15% final appearance; 5% presentation of animal participate in all the events. Cook Off - Compulsory Event • Team event, teams will be announced at Round-Up. • Teams will be provided with two steaks and a barbecue • Steaks will be available at the show office the afternoon of the competition if teams wish to marinate them.

RULES

OUTLINES FOR CLASSES


Mail Completed entries and fees to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up C/O Lois McRae RR 1 Box 57, Brandon, MB R7A 5Y1

Entry deadline: July 10, 2015 Participant Name:__________________________________________________________________ Birth Date:_______/_______/_______ Age Division:_________

Age Groups (as of Jan 1, 2015): Pee Wee: 8 and Under; Junior 9-12; Intermediate: 13-16; Senior: 17-25 (Shorthorns 16-21)

Full Address:______________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________ Email: __________________________________________ Show Apparel Size: XS

S

M

L

XL

2XL

-

YOUTH

Please circle one size and either youth or adult

ADULT

For MYBR Windpants or Jacket ($30/each) contact Wenda Best at 838-2236 CLASS BREED #

ANIMAL NAME

ANIMAL D.O.B.

ANIMAL TATTOO

Cattle Classes: Please Complete All Sections

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

ANIMAL REG #

Heifer Calf Female born in 2014 Female born in 2013 w/ nat calf at foot Female born in 2012 or earlier w/ nat calf at foot Bull Calf Fat Steer Showmanship

SIRE NAME & REG #

DAM NAME & REG #

Compulsory Classes:

8. Team Judging or Team Marketing 9. Sales Talk/Impromptu Speeches 10. Team Grooming 11. Cook Off 12. Round Up AgriChallange 13. Breed Quizzes for Simmental & Shorthorn exhibitors

Breeds: (If animal doesn’t have a registration number please list as a commercial) A: Angus, CH: Charolais, H: Hereford, L:Limousin,

S: Simmental, M: Mixed Breeds (Purebred breeds not listed); CO: Commercial, G: Gelbvieh; SH : Shorthorn

If you are showing purebred animals, you must be a member in your respective breed association & have registration papers on the animals

Meals:

Adults full weekend of meals $75 ___ Adults: Breakfast $8; Lunch $10; Supper $15 Saturday Night Steak Supper $20 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___ Sunday Night Supper $15 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___

Fees:

Registration Fee: $40.00/participant $________ Cattle Fees: $10.00/class $________ Adult Full Weekend Meal Fees $________ Extra Meal Fees $________ Late Fees: $20.00/person after July 10 $________ Total Fees: $________

Make cheques payable to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up Waiver Claim: I hereby release the Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up, their organizers, officials, volunteers, as well as the Beautiful Plains Ag Society in case of a loss of or damage property or injury

Participant Signature:_________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature:______________________________________

Accommodations: Bay Hill Inn & Suites - 1-888-476-8802 - Westway Inn - 1-800-448-0994 Camping is also available at the fair grounds for a nominal fee further accommodation info at www.neepawa.ca


mbbeef.ca

May 22, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Busy week on the COOL front Whether or not the controversial U.S. Country of Origin Labeling legislation is repealed remains anyone’s guess, but for the first time in years there is a light at the end of the tunnel. In what turned out to be a busy week on the COOL front, the World Trade Organization ruled once and for all that COOL does in fact discriminate against live imports of Canadian cattle and pork when it denied an appeal by the U.S government. In a ruling that was announced Monday, the WTO delivered the final blow as the U.S. has no more avenues to appeal.

News of the WTO’s ruling was met with joy by the Canadian Cattle Industry which has been locked in a battle with the U.S. over COOL for close to a decade. “Although not unexpected, we are very pleased with the WTO’s ruling,” said MBP President Heinz Reimer in a media release. “We have long maintained that COOL is a discriminatory practice and the WTO’s decision makes that clear. If the U.S. were to repeal COOL there would be immediate positive effects for producers in Manitoba and across Canada.” “Today is an incredibly

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mbbeef.ca

important and historic day for Canada’s cattle industry,” said CCA President Dave Solverson in a March 18 release. “With a final ruling from the WTO affirming the Canadian beef industry’s right to fair market access firmly in hand, the CCA urges the U.S. Congress to finally repeal COOL on red meat,” he said. Reimer added that MBP would like to thank the CCA and federal government for their efforts to battle COOL. He also thanked the Manitoba government for throwing their support behind the efforts against COOL. Faced with the WTO

ruling and renewed calls from Canada to either repeal COOL or face retaliatory tariffs, the U.S. government began to stir Tuesday as Texas Congressman Mike Conaway, the chairman of the House Committee on Agriculture announced he would introduce a bill to repeal COOL. One day later that bill went before the Ag Committee and passed 38-6. Now that the committee has passed the bill it will be forwarded to the U.S. House of Representatives. It’s estimated that COOL has cost the Canadian cattle industry roughly $600 million a year.

Eat Like An Athlete Manitoba Beef Producers is proud to present Eat Like An Athlete, a new feature that will be broadcast on TSN 1290 each week. With a focus on nutritious, protein packed recipes featuring beef, Eat like An Athlete is perfect for everyone. Listen to TSN1290 from Thursday through Sunday. The recipes will also be featured on the Manitoba Beef Producers site. CLICK HERE FOR MORE


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • Manitoba Beef Producers pleased with WTO COOL ruling • House leaders say COOL repeal will barrel through house • Steaks for Soldiers holds final event at CFB Shilo • Industry leaders create Canadian Cattlemen’s Foundation • Breeders will benefit from carcass data • A look into weed control from BCRC

Page 2

CCIA announces new board CCIA Media Release

Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA) has announced its board of directors and executive committee for 2015/2016. The board was elected at CCIA’s Annual General Meeting and board meeting March 26-27 in Calgary. Canadian Cattle Identification Agency’s Board of Directors consists of 19 individuals appointed by member organizations as outlined in CCIA’s bylaws. The board oversees the planning process and provides input, guidance and validation, and evaluates plans and financial performance. The board supports strategic initiatives through direct leadership of these initiatives, which are reviewed throughout the year. The board members elect an executive committee at the first meeting following the annual general meeting each year. The executive committee includes the chair, vice chair, finance and audit committee chair, and two directors at large. Along with CCIA’s general manager, the executive committee assists the board in carrying out the policies established by the board of directors. The roles and responsibilities of the chair, board members, general manager and committees are set out in written profiles and charters. The corporation has a risk management process designed to identify potential events that may affect business operations. The board ensures appropriate authorities and controls are in place, and risks are properly managed to ensure the board is fully aware of CCIA affairs. The board meets a minimum of quarterly. CCIA management meets with the board at these meetings; although, time is reserved for the board to meet without management present. The board assesses its performance regularly with the goal to improve and maintain sound governance practices. Gaps in skills are addressed through new board member appointments, training and hiring outside experts as required. This year, Canadian Veterinary Medical Association representative Pat Burrage, BSc., DVM, will continue as Board Chair. Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association representative Mark Elford was re-elected as Vice Chair. Maritime Beef Council representative John Tilley was re-elected as Finance and Audit Committee Chair. Canadian Cattlemen’s Association representative Pat Hayes was re-elected as Director at Large; and Livestock Markets Association of Canada representative Rick Wright was re-elected in the second role of Director at Large. Manitoba Beef Producers Director Theresa Zuk will continue to sit as MBP’s representative on the board. Canadian Cattle Identification Agency and its board of directors congratulate Canadian Cattlemen’s Association representative Martin Rossmann, Beef Farmers of Ontario representative Steve Eby and Alberta Beef Producer representative Mark Francis for their combined years of dedication and service to CCIA, and wish them well in their future endeavours. CCIA welcomes new Canadian Cattlemen’s Association representative Doug Sawyer, Beef Farmers of Ontario representative Tim Fugard and Alberta Beef Producer representative Howard Bekkering to CCIA’s board of directors, and looks forward to working together with a new board to advance traceability in 2015 and beyond.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

Participation in Livestock Price Insurance positive In April 2014, the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program (WLPIP) was made available to Manitoba cattle and hog producers through Growing Forward 2. A shared venture between the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia, WLPIP allows producers to manage their financial risk in the event of declining livestock markets. In Manitoba, WLPIP is delivered by the Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC). WLPIP protects livestock producers by accounting for the risks associated with future livestock market

prices, fluctuations in the Canadian dollar, the basis that reflects the impact of trade issues, cost of feed and transportation. Producers pay a premium and receive price protection; if the market price falls below their coverage price in the stated timeframe, an indemnity is paid. In its first year, 728 producers signed up for WLPIP policies. This provided $74.5 million in coverage on roughly 50,500 head of livestock (cow-calf pairs, feeder cattle, fed cattle and hogs). “Early figures show about the same uptake this year as in the first year,” says Jason Dobbin, MASC Live-

stock Price Insurance Coordinator, “But I expect more policies to be purchased this year, given the increased awareness of the program.” The trend this year so far is an increase in the number of livestock per policy. The last day to purchase price protection for spring-born calves to be marketed in the fall is May 28, 2015. WLPIP’s other components (feeder cattle, fed cattle and hogs) are offered year-round. For more information, please contact your local MASC Insurance office, visit wlpip.ca, or call 1-844782-5747.

Get the protection you need to help manage price risk.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 4

On-line farm safety training available CASA Media Release

The Canadian Agricultural Safety Association (CASA) is offering three online farm safety training courses free of charge until May 31, 2015 courtesy of Farm Credit Canada (FCC) and the Canadian Fertilizer Institute (CFI). Each year, CASA and the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) partner to present Canadian Agricultural Safety Week (CASW). CASW is an annual public education campaign focusing on the importance of safe agriculture. The 2015 theme “Be the Difference” encourages all Canadians to make a difference for farm safety. However, CASA acknowledges that farm safety isn’t just about one week. Farm safety is important 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. That’s why CASA continues to “Be the Difference” and has developed three different on-line farm training courses. “Farmers and farm workers can access this training directly from their home computers,” says Marcel Hacault, Executive Director of CASA. “We know that removing barriers to training is an import-

ant part of improving the safety of Canadian farmers.” Additionally, CASA has teamed up with FCC and CFI to make all three training courses available at no cost until May 31, 2015. “We are committed to helping producers and the agriculture industry achieve success, and that includes keeping people safe when doing farm work,” says Brenda Stasuik, FCC Director of Corporate Social Responsibility. “We’re pleased to offer these training courses to empower farmers and their families to stay safe on the farm.” “The safe and responsible storage, distribution and use of fertilizer products supports global food production. Our industry is proud to work with organizations including CASA to raise the profile of safe agriculture practices, and fertilizer safety year-round,” says Clyde Graham, Acting President of the Canadian Fertilizer Institute. The three training courses available are: - Agricultural Machinery Safeguarding - Seasonal Agricultural Workers

Health and Safety Orientation - Working in Confined Spaces on the Farm. Once registered, participants have the option of taking one or all of the courses offered. Each course takes approximately 45-60 minutes to complete and offers a quiz at the end of the learning experience. Currently, the on-line training is available in English. After May 31, 2015, the courses will still be available, but at a charge. To access the new on-line training courses, click here. CASW 2015 was presented by Farm Credit Canada and brought to you by the Canadian Agricultural Safety Association and the Canadian Federation of Agriculture with assistance from the Government of Canada through Growing Forward 2, a federal, provincial and territorial initiative. In 2015, CASW sponsors include long-time corporate sponsor Farm Credit Canada, Imperial Oil and its Esso Branded Resellers, Ag for Life, Canadian Fertilizer Institute, Dupont Pioneer, Viterra and Brandt. For more information about CASW please visit agsafetyweek.ca.

Consultations on multi-species traceability The Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Agriculture and AgriFood Canada are consulting with stakeholders on proposed amendments to the Health of Animals Regulations. The proposed amendments will enhance existing livestock traceability requirements in Canada. Stakeholders are invited to com-

ment on a consultation document outlining the proposed amendments. To request a copy of the consultation document, please email trace@inspection.gc.ca. Feedback is welcomed until June 26, 2015. Web presentations are being held on the proposed regulatory amendments. Stakeholders are encouraged

to register for the date/time of their choice. All of the presentations will feature the same core information, however, a portion of each presentation (with the exception of the first one) will focus on a particular species or type of site. Once registered, an e-mail will be sent to you with instructions for joining the web session.


Easy Beef Fajitas

.

If You Can’t Play Like An Athlete You Can Still Eat Like One!

• Trim the fat from beef before or after cooking; this will significantly reduce the fat content. • Use low fat cooking methods such as broiling, barbecuing, roasting or stir-fry in non-stick pans. • Use lean or extra-lean ground beef; add shredded vegetables for added moisture, fibre and nutrients e.g.: onions, carrots, and zucchini. • When making stir-fry dishes and minute steaks, use non-stick pans with a splash of broth. • Pair lean beef with colourful vegetables. • Limit the amount of salt by cooking meals from scratch.

Manitoba Beef — Heart Healthy!

PER SERVING: 278 Calories, 28 g protein, 8.6 g total fat, 2.2 g saturated fat, 56 mg cholesterol, 22 g carbohydrates, 3.3 g fibre, 224 mg sodium, 403 mg potassium

• 2 tbsp (30 mL) Worcestershire sauce • 2 garlic cloves, minced • 1 lb (500 g) Beef Marinating Steak (Sirloin Tip, Flank, Inside Round), 3/4 inch (2 cm) thick 1 each onion and sweet red pepper, cut into strips • 1 tbsp (15 mL) olive oil • 1/2 tsp (2 mL) ground cumin • 1 tsp (5 mL) chili powder • 2 whole-grain or whole-wheat pitas, cut in half • 1 lime, cut into wedges 1. Combine Worcestershire sauce and half the garlic in a large, sealable freezer bag. Pierce beef all over with a fork and add to bag; refrigerate 8 to 12 hours. 2. Discard marinade; grill or cook steak in a non-stick skillet using medium-high heat, 3 to 4 minutes per side for mediumrare. Let stand for 5 minutes; slice thinly across grain. 3. Meanwhile, toss vegetables with oil, remaining garlic and seasonings; grill or cook in a skillet using medium-high heat for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. 4.Tuck steak and vegetables into warm pitas; top off with a squeeze of lime juice. Serve along with salsa and a tossed salad or your favourite vegetable.

Curb your hunger and fuel your body by eating some protein-rich foods at each meal. Made with healthy everyday basics, these beef fajitas are sure to become a favourite for anyone seeking a protein packed meal before, or after, a workout or game. Recipe Courtesy of Canada Beef.

Featuring Chef Darryl Crumb

Presented By Manitoba Beef Producers

Eat Like An Athlete


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

MBP to offer six bursaries in 2015 Six Manitoba students will receive a little extra help paying for their education this year thanks to the 2015 Manitoba Beef Producers’ bursaries. The six bursaries are offered annually to MBP members or their children who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are in a field of study related to agriculture or those working to acquire a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. Those applying must be at least 17-years-old as of Jan. 1, 2015 and be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of one. Applicants are required to use the bursary within two years of receipt and the program they are attending must be at least one years in duration. Interested students are asked to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Manitoba at large. Students are also asked to include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at mbbeef.ca or by clicking this link. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 5, 2015. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified on July 31, 2015. Applications can be sent to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee, 220 – 530 Century Street, R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca

Page 6


MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS

BURSARY

Manitoba Beef Producers is pleased to make available (6) six $500 bursaries annually for MBP members or their children attending a university, college, other post-secondary institution or pursuing trades training. Preference will be given to those students pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or to those acquiring a skilled trade that would be beneficial to the rural economy. Completed applications must be submitted by Friday, June 5, 2015. A selection committee will review the submissions. Winners will be notified by July 31, 2015. The bursary criteria are as follows: Eligibility: • Must be at least 17 years of age as of January 1, 2015. • Must be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of an active Manitoba beef producer. • Must use the bursary within (2) two years. • Post-secondary program or trades training must be a minimum of one year in duration. Items to Submit: • Must submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay discussing “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture.* • Must submit a transcript (either High School or Post-Secondary Institute). • Must submit a proof of enrolment in a recognized institution (current transcript or if in high school include a letter of intent to attend or a letter of acceptance). • Must submit a list of community involvement (e.g. 4-H, community clubs, volunteer work, etc.). • Provide the names of three references, including their addresses and telephone numbers. Submissions must be sent to MBP no later than 4:30 p.m. on Friday, June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg MB R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact the MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca *The winning essays will be published in the MBP newspaper Cattle Country.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


MBP 2015

BURSARY APPLICATION FORM PLEASE PRINT Name: _______________________________________________________________________________ Mailing address: _______________________________________________________________________ Telephone: _____________________________ Email: _____________________________

Fax (if available): _______________________

Date of Birth: _____________________________ Parents’ names if you are under 18: _______________________________________________________ Are you a beef producer? _____________________________ Are you the child of a beef producer? _____________________________ Institute of current enrolment*: ______________________________________________________________ Current or intended program of study or skilled trades training*: ____________________________________ Duration of post-secondary program or skill trades training: _________ year (s) Essay: Please submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay on “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture. *Note: Bursary winners will be published in MBP’s newspaper Cattle Country. Please return: the completed application form; transcript; proof of enrolment in a post-secondary institution or an apprenticeship program, or a letter of intent to pursue further studies; a list of your community involvement; a typed essay; and, your references no later than 4:30 p.m., Friday June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 Fax (204) 774-3264 Email: info@mbbeef.ca

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

Friday, July 31 11:00 AM Move Cattle In 3:00-5:00 PM Registration 5:00-6:00 PM Supper 6:30-8:30 PM Welcome & Educational Workshops Simmental & AgriChallenge Industry Quizzes Saturday, auguSt 1 8:00-9:00 AM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 9:00-11:30 PM Pee Wee & Junior Stall Card Competition Judging Classes Sales Talk/Impromptu Speeches 11:30-12:00 PM Workshop 1:30-2:30 PM Team Grooming 3:00-5:00 PM Team Judging or Team Marketing Pee Wee Learning Clinic 5:00-6:00 PM Saturday Awards with steak supper 6:30-8:00 PM Cook Off 8:00 PM Quiz bowl Sunday, auguSt 2 8:00-9:00 PM Breakfast & Cattle In Barns 9:00 AM -12:00 PM Showmanship - Ring 1 & 2 12:00-1:00PM Lunch Break 1:00-5:00 PM Conformation Show - Ring 1 & 2 5:00 PM Supper & Awards Ceremony

WHO:

Any young cattle producers under the age of 25 years of age as of January 1, 2015. Whether you are a commercial, purebred, 4-H or new junior, you are all welcome to attend!

WHAT:

Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up All Breeds Junior Cattle Weekend

WHERE:

Beautiful Plains Ag Society, Neepawa, Manitoba

WHEN:

Friday-Sunday, July 31 - August 2, 2015

WHY:

ElonW N nd g a frie a ng e

bri am t your n w. and ge ra d a in entered

To bring juniors of all ages, breeds and locations together for a fun, educational weekend of cattle and non cattle events.

FEATURES:

• New Alumni Showmanship - open to past Round-Up Participants and committee members (costumes optional) • Chance to be on the MYBR Agribition Judging Team

• MYBR Scholarship check out the MYBR Facebook page or email: adbertholet@hotmail.com • GRAND AGGREGATE AWARDS

FOR DETAILS CONTACT:

Chairperson: Lois McRae - 728-3058 - marmac@inetlink.ca Treasurer: Rilla Hunter - 838-2019 Secretary: Vonda Hopcraft - 824-2115

Committee Members: Blair McRae - 728-3058 Melissa McRae - 573-9903 Michelle Allison - 573-6693 Wenda Best - 838-2236 Candace Johnston - 720-3986 Angus: Naomi Best - 838-2236 Ken Williams - 855-2275 Nanette Glover - 534-2552

Charolais: Vonda Hopcraft - 824-2115 Hereford: Albert & Samantha Rimke - 855-2534 Limousin: Travis & Dillon Hunter - 838-2019 Simmental: Andrea Bertholet - 483-0319 Kolton McIntosh - 280-0359 Shorthorn: Adrianne Vandersluis - 436-3122 Justin Kristjansson - 730-7196

Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up


• Participants are encouraged to bring their own utensils and ingredients for marinades and garnishes and to provide a recipe to the judges. 1. Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up is open to all Canadian Juniors under • Costumes and themes are encouraged. the age of 25 as of January 1, 2015. • Score: 50% taste; 25% appearance; 15% presentation and 10% 2. Entry fees are $40 per person plus $10 per conformation class. The creativity. $40 flat fee includes entry to all competitions (excluding conformation), Stall Card show clothing and scheduled meals. Compulsory events are sales talk • Pee Wees & Juniors create a stall card to be displayed with their animals (PW & JR), Impromptu speeches (INT & SR), judging class with oral in the stalls. reasons, team marketing or team judging, team grooming, cook off and • Stall cards must be made Saturday morning at Round-Up only Round Up Agri Challange. • Scoring: 35% clarity; 35% originality and 30% neatness 3. 2015 calves are eligible to be entered in cow calf pair and calf classes. Photography Entry fee for pair is $10 and calf class is $10. All cattle must be halter • The photo must be taken by the junior exhibiting it and cannot be broke and manageable or will be asked to leave. digitally enhanced and must be taken within the last year & dated 4. A junior who does not have cattle may use another participants animal • Photographs must be 4”x6”. in grooming and showmanship. • All entries must be cattle related e.g.: animal, cattle scenery or cattle and 5. AS THIS IS A JUNIOR EVENT, ALL ENTRIES MUST BE SHOWN AND people. LOOKED AFTER BY THE JUNIORS. ABSOLUTELY NO ADULT or • Please put name and age category on the back. non-entrant participation will be tolerated. Pee Wees may be assisted • Scoring: 40% clarity; 35% quality and 25% originality. by a parent or guardian for safety reasons only. NEW IN 2015 Graphic Design Mentors are the committee, they will be wearing committee shirts • All work must be done at home by the junior created using computer and will be around to provide help the juniors and answer any technology. questions. • The graphic design must be promoting a breed, industry or an individual 6. Alcohol and Drugs are prohibited in the barns and at the Roundup herd. functions for the duration of the show. • E.g.: flyers, posters, newsletters, brochures, etc. 7. Tampering with and any unethical fitting is prohibited. • Please put name and age category on the back. 8. Show apparel is to be worn for all the showmanship and confirmation • Scoring: 30% creativity; 30% originality; 30% clear and concise classes. message; 10% organization Art • All work must be done at home by the junior in the last year & dated Sales Talk - Compulsory Event • Art cannot contain photos and should not be larger than 9”x14”. • For Pee Wee and JR participants • You can use (pencil, paint, clay, wood, etc.). • Item to sell will be given to you morning of the event. • All art is judged in the same category. One entry per person. • A live setting complete with a potential buyer as the judge. • Please put name and age category on the back. • Juniors will first describe the sales situation to the buyer and then • Score: 40% originality; 40% creativity and 20% skill/quality. discuss the strength and weaknesses of the item in a conversation Scrapbook which includes interaction with the buyer. • Include photographs, newspaper and magazine clippings, for the • Score: 30% knowledge; 30% ability to relate information; 20% poise and 2014- 2015 year. delivery; 20% overall effectiveness. • Scrapbooks must be done by the junior exhibiting. Impromptu Speeches - Compulsory Event • The scrapbook is to encourage junior members to record different cattle • For INT and SR participants functions they have attended over the past years. • The contest is designed to develop the ability of all members to express • Scrapbooks should have a theme and begin with a title page, table of themselves on a given subject without having prepared or rehearsed its contents and numbered pages. content in advance. • Score: 25% cover; 25% creativity; 25% originality; 25% neatness and • Contestants will present a speech on a subject pertaining to the livestock organization. industry that is selected the morning of the competition. PowerPoint and Video Topic • Length of speech: 3-5 minutes. They will be asked to answer questions • Pee Wee and JRs minimum of 6 slides INT and SRs minimum of 12 slides relating to their speech following the presentation. • Presentations must have at least two pictures or clip art that support the • Score: 35% presentation; 35% knowledge; 20% originality; idea of the presentation. 10% appearance • Presentations may include but do not require music or video clips. Team Marketing - Compulsory Event • Videos and/or presentations must come on the first day on a USB • Teams of three will be selected by the committee will work together to sell memory stick, DVD or CD. Videos must be in Quick Time, AVI or MPEG an animal. The objective of the contest is to gain a working understanding file format. of performance and pedigree information. Emphasis will be placed on • JR and INT videos must be 30-60 seconds in length, SR videos must be team organization, communication skills and marketing techniques. Teams 60-90 seconds in length. will be given a photo, pedigree some facts on the animal and as a team • The junior member will produce file and edit the videos them selves, no they will have 5 minutes to prepare and then present to the judges their professional editing allowed. sales pitch. • Animated and or computer generated graphics will not be allowed in the • Score: 20% content of sales pitch; 25% ability to communicate; 25% video. team organization 20% total effectiveness; 10% knowledge and • Score: 40% on graphics; 35% originality; 15% technical merit; 10% responses to questions. overall effect of the presentation. Team Judging - Compulsory Event Herdsman Competition (group or individual) • Juniors will judge a class of four animals. • The purpose of this contest is to encourage cooperation, fellowship and • One of the team members will act as the ring person and the other one teamwork among juniors in developing and maintaining a display of will act as the judge. cattle and stall area. The competition begins on Saturday morning and • The participant acting as the judge must give oral reasons over the ends after the conformation classes. Must have a minimum of two head microphone in front of the audience. tied in your display. • All other teams must be out of the judging area and unable to hear the • Score: 25% aisle and bedding, cleanliness and appearance; 25% reasons. animals, cleanliness and well groomed; 25% personnel attending cattle, • Score: 55% teamwork ability; 20% clarity of reasons; 20% logic of knowledgeable, friendly and teamwork; 25% equipment, boxes, signs, reasons 5% appearance. well arranged and general appearance. Team Grooming - Compulsory Event Grand Aggregate • Teams have 15 minutes to groom with power. • One participant from each division will be selected. • Animals must have no fitting prior to competition. • Score: 1 point for every animal you bring, no matter where they • Once at the chute area you are not allowed to leave so bring all the place. All other non cattle classes will be scored 10 points for first equipment with you. place and down. Ex: 1st - 10pts, 2nd - 9 pts, 3rd - 8pts, etc. • Score: 35% knowledge and skill; 25% teamwork; 20% use of equipment; • The grand aggregate competition encourages all juniors to 15% final appearance; 5% presentation of animal participate in all the events. Cook Off - Compulsory Event • Team event, teams will be announced at Round-Up. • Teams will be provided with two steaks and a barbecue • Steaks will be available at the show office the afternoon of the competition if teams wish to marinate them.

RULES

OUTLINES FOR CLASSES


Mail Completed entries and fees to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up C/O Lois McRae RR 1 Box 57, Brandon, MB R7A 5Y1

Entry deadline: July 10, 2015 Participant Name:__________________________________________________________________ Birth Date:_______/_______/_______ Age Division:_________

Age Groups (as of Jan 1, 2015): Pee Wee: 8 and Under; Junior 9-12; Intermediate: 13-16; Senior: 17-25 (Shorthorns 16-21)

Full Address:______________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________ Email: __________________________________________ Show Apparel Size: XS

S

M

L

XL

2XL

-

YOUTH

Please circle one size and either youth or adult

ADULT

For MYBR Windpants or Jacket ($30/each) contact Wenda Best at 838-2236 CLASS BREED #

ANIMAL NAME

ANIMAL D.O.B.

ANIMAL TATTOO

Cattle Classes: Please Complete All Sections

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

ANIMAL REG #

Heifer Calf Female born in 2014 Female born in 2013 w/ nat calf at foot Female born in 2012 or earlier w/ nat calf at foot Bull Calf Fat Steer Showmanship

SIRE NAME & REG #

DAM NAME & REG #

Compulsory Classes:

8. Team Judging or Team Marketing 9. Sales Talk/Impromptu Speeches 10. Team Grooming 11. Cook Off 12. Round Up AgriChallange 13. Breed Quizzes for Simmental & Shorthorn exhibitors

Breeds: (If animal doesn’t have a registration number please list as a commercial) A: Angus, CH: Charolais, H: Hereford, L:Limousin,

S: Simmental, M: Mixed Breeds (Purebred breeds not listed); CO: Commercial, G: Gelbvieh; SH : Shorthorn

If you are showing purebred animals, you must be a member in your respective breed association & have registration papers on the animals

Meals:

Adults full weekend of meals $75 ___ Adults: Breakfast $8; Lunch $10; Supper $15 Saturday Night Steak Supper $20 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___ Sunday Night Supper $15 # of adults/guests (excluding junior) ___

Fees:

Registration Fee: $40.00/participant $________ Cattle Fees: $10.00/class $________ Adult Full Weekend Meal Fees $________ Extra Meal Fees $________ Late Fees: $20.00/person after July 10 $________ Total Fees: $________

Make cheques payable to: Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up Waiver Claim: I hereby release the Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up, their organizers, officials, volunteers, as well as the Beautiful Plains Ag Society in case of a loss of or damage property or injury

Participant Signature:_________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature:______________________________________

Accommodations: Bay Hill Inn & Suites - 1-888-476-8802 - Westway Inn - 1-800-448-0994 Camping is also available at the fair grounds for a nominal fee further accommodation info at www.neepawa.ca


mbbeef.ca

May 8, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Two Livestock Predation Protection Workshops remaining in May One down, two to go. The first of three Livestock Predation Protection Workshops set for May was held Thursday night in Vassar. Two more workshops – Monday night in Moosehorn and Tuesday in Arborg – are scheduled for next week. The free workshops are open to livestock producers, trappers, hunters and landowners who are interested in learning more about predation and some of the programs available to them. Officials from Conservation and Water Stewardship, Manitoba Food and Rural

Development (MAFRD) and Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MBP) will be on hand to give an overview of Wildlife Damage Compensation Regulation and Program along with other topics including animal husbandry tools. Professional trappers will also be in attendance to give advice on humane trapping and snaring, predator hunting and calling and mortality management. Anyone interested in attending a workshop is asked to pre-register as space is limited. Call Manitoba Beef Producers at 1-800-772-0458 to register.

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Meeting Dates and Locations Moosehorn, Manitoba Moosehorn Community Hall, Railway Avenue Date: May 11, 2015 Arborg, Manitoba Arborg Heritage Hall, Arborg Heritage Village Date: May 12, 2015 Outdoor How-to Demonstrations (4 p.m. – 6Time p.m.6 on day of p.m. workshops) p.m. to 10 • Trap preparation (clean, dip and store) • Trap sets (dirt hole, drags)

Call Manitoba Beef Producers to Register 1-800-772-0458 Upcoming Events May 28-30 2015 Livestock Markets Association of Canada Convention and Annual General Meeting. Hilton Suites - Winnipeg Airport Click here for more information


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • Award established for Canadian beef research • Canadian beef again moving to China • Portable Pasture systems • Beef 911: The last thing you want to see in a prized bull • Spring management critical for healthy cows and pastures • USDA finds little, if any positive impact from Country Of Origin Labeling laws

Page 2

Job Opening

Manitoba Beef Producers

Tradeshow/Event Spokesperson Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is seeking to fill the position of a contract Tradeshow/Event Spokesperson immediately. MBP is the exclusive voice of cattle producers throughout Manitoba and engages both members and the public in a variety of manners including attendance at a number of fairs, tradeshows and agricultural events such as Royal Manitoba Winter Fair and Ag in the Classroom. The spokesperson is an important link in MBP’s community outreach, serving as a public face for the organization. The ideal candidate must have a passion for agriculture, the beef industry and Manitoba Beef Producers’ members. Candidates must be comfortable conversing with the public and answering questions in a polite and respectful manner. Interested parties may submit a resume and cover letter to MBP Communications Coordinator Chad Saxon at: csaxon@ mbbeef.ca We thank all who express interest in the position but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

CCIA announces new GM Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA) is pleased to announce Anne Brunet-Burgess as the new general manager. Anne will start with the agency on June 1, 2015. “We welcome Anne Brunet-Burgess as CCIA’s new general manager. Drawing on more than six years as general manager for a Canadian beef breed association and a decade of experience in livestock operations as an Alberta cattle owner, Anne will provide leadership to CCIA’s team and reinforce the strong relationships with key stakeholders to support the next steps

in developing a fully-functional traceability system in Canada,” said Dr. Pat Burrage, CCIA Chair. “I am pleased to join Canadian Cattle Identification Agency’s highly-specialized team. Being born and raised on a purebred beef farm in Quebec and working within the beef industry ever since has prepared me for this role,” Brunet-Burgess said. “To maximize success, I intend to work closely with CCIA’s highly-specialized field, administration and technical teams as well as its board of directors representing all sectors of industry.”


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

Applications open for Beef Researcher Mentorship Program From the Beef Cattle Research Council Applications for the 2015-16 term of the BCRC Beef Researcher Mentorship Program are now being accepted. The deadline to apply is June 1, 2015. The program launched in August 2014 to facilitate greater engagement of upcoming and new applied researchers with Canada’s beef industry. Three inaugural participants were selected for a pilot phase. Each researcher was given a travel budget and paired with mentors – innovative producers and industry experts – for a one year term (ending July 31, 2015). The pilot participants have helped shape the program, and each of them report having a very

successful and valuable experience through the opportunities provided. Their feedback has noted highlights including: • meeting several producers and industry leaders with whom they ask questions and have meaningful discussions about cattle and forage production, • attending industry events and touring farms and ranches to better understand the impacts, practicalities and economics of adopting research results, and • observing and learning more about ongoing production challenges. With such a successful pilot phase, the BCRC is excited to continue

the program and invite applications from upcoming and new applied researchers in Canada whose studies are of value to the beef industry, such as cattle health and welfare, beef quality, food safety, genetics, feed efficiency, or forages. A new group of participants will begin their mentorships on August 1. Funding of the BCRC Beef Researcher Mentorship Program is made available through the technology transfer initiative within the second Beef Cattle Industry Science Cluster. Learn more about the program and download an application form at: http://www.beefresearch.ca/about/ mentorship-program.cfm

Get the protection you need to help manage price risk.


Job Openings Project Coordinator – Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc. Posted May 1, 2015

Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives Inc. (MBFII), under the leadership of Manitoba Beef Producers is developing a new and exciting opportunity for anyone interested in participating in leading edge beef and forage research and extension. MBFII is collaborating with multiple stakeholders to develop a made-in-Manitoba beef and forage research and extension farm in the Brandon area. MBFII is seeking a part-time, term Project Coordinator. Under the direction of the General Manager, the Project Coordinator is responsible for the coordination and delivery of beef and forage research and extension projects varying in size and complexity. The Project Coordinator is responsible for the overall planning of projects, coordinating partners to implement the projects, and ensuring the projects meet defined objectives, and produce expected deliverables. The Project Coordinator will participate in extension project planning meetings, help draft project proposals, prepare budgets, collect field data, compile project reports, and communicate project results with all stakeholders. The Project Coordinator will be expected to work in the Brandon area from time to time. For a detailed job description and list of qualifications click here: Project Coordinator Duties and Responsibilities MBFII. Please submit your resumé, cover letter and at least two writing samples by May 11, 2015 to Ms. Melinda German, General Manager, mgerman@mbbeef.ca Thank-you to all interested applicants, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Now Hiring: Herd Manager – Manitoba Beef & Forage Initiatives Inc. Posted May 1, 2015

Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives Inc. (MBFII), under the leadership of Manitoba Beef Producers is developing a new and exciting opportunity for someone interested in participating in leading edge beef and forage research and extension. MBFII is collaborating with multiple stakeholders to develop a made-in-Manitoba beef and forage research and extension farm in the Brandon area. MBFII is seeking a full-time, term Herd Manager. Reporting to the General Manager, the Herd Manager is responsible for the overall well-being and management of the resident cow/calf herd. The Herd Manager will be responsible for the year-round feeding and maintenance of the herd, including developing rations and treating of sick animals. The Herd Manager will operate and maintain all livestock handling and farm equipment, and maintain the farm yard and its facilities. The Herd Manager will also assist in the setup and running of research experiments and extension activities, and maintain detailed records of all farm activities and research programs. This position is based out of the Brandon area. For a detailed job description and list of qualifications click here: Herds Person Duties and Responsibilities MBFII . Please submit your resumé and cover letter by May 11, 2015 to Ms. Melinda German, General Manager, mgerman@mbbeef.ca. Thank-you to all interested applicants, however only those under consideration will be contacted.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

MBP to offer six bursaries in 2015 Six Manitoba students will receive a little extra help paying for their education this year thanks to the 2015 Manitoba Beef Producers’ bursaries. The six bursaries are offered annually to MBP members or their children who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are in a field of study related to agriculture or those working to acquire a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. Those applying must be at least 17-years-old as of Jan. 1, 2015 and be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of one. Applicants are required to use the bursary within two years of receipt and the program they are attending must be at least one years in duration. Interested students are asked to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Manitoba at large. Students are also asked to include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at mbbeef.ca or by clicking this link. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 5, 2015. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified on July 31, 2015. Applications can be sent to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee, 220 – 530 Century Street, R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca

Page 4

Farmers Premium Equipment

Econo Mills • Low priced for small users • Magnet, Stand & Drive pulley • 50 bu./ hr cap (barley) • Requires 1 1/2 hp motor • Optional motor • 110/220 volt power

Portable PTO Mills w/hyd. up auger

Call your Manitoba distributor direct: FARMERS PREMIUM EQUIPMENT Brandon, MB 204-726-4481 or 204-729-5162 Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS

BURSARY

Manitoba Beef Producers is pleased to make available (6) six $500 bursaries annually for MBP members or their children attending a university, college, other post-secondary institution or pursuing trades training. Preference will be given to those students pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or to those acquiring a skilled trade that would be beneficial to the rural economy. Completed applications must be submitted by Friday, June 5, 2015. A selection committee will review the submissions. Winners will be notified by July 31, 2015. The bursary criteria are as follows: Eligibility: • Must be at least 17 years of age as of January 1, 2015. • Must be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of an active Manitoba beef producer. • Must use the bursary within (2) two years. • Post-secondary program or trades training must be a minimum of one year in duration. Items to Submit: • Must submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay discussing “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture.* • Must submit a transcript (either High School or Post-Secondary Institute). • Must submit a proof of enrolment in a recognized institution (current transcript or if in high school include a letter of intent to attend or a letter of acceptance). • Must submit a list of community involvement (e.g. 4-H, community clubs, volunteer work, etc.). • Provide the names of three references, including their addresses and telephone numbers. Submissions must be sent to MBP no later than 4:30 p.m. on Friday, June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg MB R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact the MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca *The winning essays will be published in the MBP newspaper Cattle Country.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


MBP 2015

BURSARY APPLICATION FORM PLEASE PRINT Name: _______________________________________________________________________________ Mailing address: _______________________________________________________________________ Telephone: _____________________________ Email: _____________________________

Fax (if available): _______________________

Date of Birth: _____________________________ Parents’ names if you are under 18: _______________________________________________________ Are you a beef producer? _____________________________ Are you the child of a beef producer? _____________________________ Institute of current enrolment*: ______________________________________________________________ Current or intended program of study or skilled trades training*: ____________________________________ Duration of post-secondary program or skill trades training: _________ year (s) Essay: Please submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay on “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture. *Note: Bursary winners will be published in MBP’s newspaper Cattle Country. Please return: the completed application form; transcript; proof of enrolment in a post-secondary institution or an apprenticeship program, or a letter of intent to pursue further studies; a list of your community involvement; a typed essay; and, your references no later than 4:30 p.m., Friday June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 Fax (204) 774-3264 Email: info@mbbeef.ca

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 6

How about a burger for Mother’s Day? Courtesy Canada Beef Grill up some burgers for Mom this Mother’s Day. Try out this delicious grilled Canadian beef burger that’s topped with ingredients that scream FRESH! Try going to your farmer’s market for inspiration. THIS mom is especially attracted to grilling when my significant other ‘man’s the grill’ so I get a night off from cooking — TGIMD!!

Bacon-infused Beef Cheeseburger with Market Fresh Salsa Bacon and Cheddar make these burgers yummy from the inside-out! A great way to make flavour king when using Lean or Extra Lean Ground Beef. Shop the market to make fresh toppings the pop with flavour! Serves: 6 servings Ingredients 1 lb (500 g) Lean Ground Beef 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 clove garlic, minced ½ cup shredded aged Cheddar cheese ¼ cup diced bacon (uncooked) ¼ cup EACH bread crumbs and minced onion 2 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1 tsp minced fresh rosemary Market-fresh Salsa (recipe follows) Instructions Combine beef, egg, garlic, cheese, bacon, bread crumbs, onion, Worcestershire sauce and rosemary in bowl. Divide meat into 6 portions. Form into ¾ inch (2 cm) thick patties. Make thumb-print depression in centre of each patty (to prevent rounding while they grill). Make Ahead: Refrigerate, covered, for 1 hour or up to 1 day. Grill over medium heat on preheated, oiled grill for 5 to 7 minutes per side, testing doneness with a digital instant read thermometer inserted sideways into centre of each patty to ensure patties are cooked to 160°F (71°C). Top with Market-fresh Salsa. Market Fresh Salsa: In a small bowl, mix 2 cups halved grape tomatoes, Half a sweet pepper, diced, Half a shallot, slivered, 1 clove garlic, minced and 2 tbsp. minced chives or parsley. Add 2 Tbsp EACH lemon juice and olive oil and 1 Tbsp liquid honey. Season with salt and pepper; stir gently to combine.


Protect Your Livestock. Protect Your Livelihood. Register today for the Livestock Predation Protection Workshop.

If you are a livestock producer, trapper, hunter or landowner, you are invited to attend a Livestock Predation Protection Workshop in your area. The workshops are taking place at the following locations: Time 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Moosehorn, Manitoba Moosehorn Community Hall Railway Avenue Date: May 11, 2015 Pre-register at: 1-800-772-0458

Arborg, Manitoba Arborg Heritage Hall Arborg Heritage Village Date: May 12, 2015 Pre-register at: 1-800-772-0458

Outdoor How-to Demonstrations (4 p.m. – 6 p.m. on day of workshop) • Trap preparation (clean, dip and store) • Trap sets (dirt hole, drags)

Free Admission. Expert Advice. Admission to the workshop is free. The evening will include information from Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship, Manitoba Agriculture Food and Rural Development (MAFRD) and Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation. An overview of the Wildlife Damage Compensation Regulation and Program will be provided along with information on animal husbandry tools. Professional trappers will also be in attendance to provide advice on: • Humane Trapping and Snaring • Predator Hunting and Calling • Mortality Management

Register Today Pre-register to attend the workshop. Space is limited.


mbbeef.ca

April 24, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Livestock Predation Protection Workshops set for May With livestock predation continuing to be an issue for some Manitoba producers, a series of workshops dealing with the topic have been planned for May. The free workshops are open to livestock producers, trappers, hunters and landowners who are interested in learning more about predation and some of the programs available to them. Officials from Conservation and Water Stewardship, Manitoba Food and Rural Development (MAFRD) and Manitoba Agricultural Services Cor-

poration (MBP) will be on hand to give an overview of Wildlife Damage Compensation Regulation and Program along with other topics including animal husbandry tools. Professional trappers will also be in attendance to give advice on humane trapping and snaring, predator hunting and calling and mortality management. (See accompanying box for meeting dates.) Anyone interested in attending a workshop is asked to pre-register as space is limited. Call Manitoba Beef Producers at 1-800-772-058 to register.

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Meeting Dates and Locations Time 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Vassar, Manitoba Vassar Community Centre, 80 Beaudry Ave Date: May 7, 2015 Moosehorn, Manitoba Moosehorn Community Hall, Railway Avenue Date: May 11, 2015 Arborg, Manitoba Arborg Heritage Hall, Arborg Heritage Village Date: May 12, 2015

Upcoming Events May 28-30 2015 Livestock Markets Association of Canada Convention and Annual General Meeting. Hilton Suites - Winnipeg Airport Click here for more information


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • Big opportunities lie in beef production • Global brand strategy focused on consumers • COOL decision expected in May • Federal budget considered positive for beef industry • Streamlined cash advance program allows for one-stop shopping • Rejuvenate pastures

Page 2

Budget 2015 positive for cattle producers CCA Media Release

The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) is pleased with the investments in the 2015 Federal Budget that support and promote market access and trade opportunities for Canada’s beef cattle producers. Announced today, Economic Action Plan 2015 contains several measures, starting in 2016-17, of direct benefit to beef producers. Key among these measures is an investment of $18.1 million over two years to expand the activities of the Market Access Secretariat (MAS). This includes introducing new agricultural trade commissioners abroad and taking on a more active role in setting international science-based standards. CCA President Dave Solverson noted the association was instrumental in establishing the formation of the MAS, which was tasked in 2009 to work full-time on aggressively and strategically securing access to international markets. The MAS has proven its worth to beef cattle producers many times since then, in the form of market access agreements and trade deals, he said. “The CCA is thrilled with the Government of Canada’s continued commitment to this very important initiative,” Solverson said. “The Market Access Secretariat has real clout in the international arena, and so carrying that influence over to

the newly expanded areas is fantastic news for Canada’s beef producers.” As exports are the lifeblood of Canada’s beef industry, the need for substantive trade and promotion activities is of vital importance. The CCA is pleased to see two important investments in this area. Budget 2015 pledges increased funding of $42 million over five years (starting in 2015-16) and $9.3 million per year thereafter to expand the footprint and resources of the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service. An additional investment of $12 million over two years to the AgriMarketing program will help to promote and differentiate Canadian agriculture and agri-food products to the world. The latter investment builds on the $341 million over five years currently available under Growing Forward 2. The Canadian Beef Advantage is what differentiates Canadian beef in priority markets around the world. Solverson said he looks forward to continued success promoting the brand. The CCA appreciates another measure of practical importance to producers, particularly those wishing to retire or transition from the industry. Under the Capital Gains Tax Exemption Increase, the lifetime capital gains exemption for dispositions of qualified farm (or fishing) property moves up to $1 million from $813,600 for 2015.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

MBP to offer six bursaries in 2015 Six Manitoba students will receive a little extra help paying for their education this year thanks to the 2015 Manitoba Beef Producers’ bursaries. The six bursaries are offered annually to MBP members or their children who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are in a field of study related to agriculture or those working to acquire a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. Those applying must be at least 17-years-old as of Jan. 1, 2015 and be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of one. Applicants are required to use the bursary within two years of receipt and the program they are attending must be at least one years in duration. Interested students are asked to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Manitoba at large. Students are also asked to include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at mbbeef.ca or by clicking this link. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 5, 2015. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified on July 31, 2015. Applications can be sent to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee, 220 – 530 Century Street, R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca

Page 3

Farmers Premium Equipment

Econo Mills • Low priced for small users • Magnet, Stand & Drive pulley • 50 bu./ hr cap (barley) • Requires 1 1/2 hp motor • Optional motor • 110/220 volt power

Portable PTO Mills w/hyd. up auger

Call your Manitoba distributor direct: FARMERS PREMIUM EQUIPMENT Brandon, MB 204-726-4481 or 204-729-5162 Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS

BURSARY

Manitoba Beef Producers is pleased to make available (6) six $500 bursaries annually for MBP members or their children attending a university, college, other post-secondary institution or pursuing trades training. Preference will be given to those students pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or to those acquiring a skilled trade that would be beneficial to the rural economy. Completed applications must be submitted by Friday, June 5, 2015. A selection committee will review the submissions. Winners will be notified by July 31, 2015. The bursary criteria are as follows: Eligibility: • Must be at least 17 years of age as of January 1, 2015. • Must be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of an active Manitoba beef producer. • Must use the bursary within (2) two years. • Post-secondary program or trades training must be a minimum of one year in duration. Items to Submit: • Must submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay discussing “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture.* • Must submit a transcript (either High School or Post-Secondary Institute). • Must submit a proof of enrolment in a recognized institution (current transcript or if in high school include a letter of intent to attend or a letter of acceptance). • Must submit a list of community involvement (e.g. 4-H, community clubs, volunteer work, etc.). • Provide the names of three references, including their addresses and telephone numbers. Submissions must be sent to MBP no later than 4:30 p.m. on Friday, June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg MB R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact the MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca *The winning essays will be published in the MBP newspaper Cattle Country.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


MBP 2015

BURSARY APPLICATION FORM PLEASE PRINT Name: _______________________________________________________________________________ Mailing address: _______________________________________________________________________ Telephone: _____________________________ Email: _____________________________

Fax (if available): _______________________

Date of Birth: _____________________________ Parents’ names if you are under 18: _______________________________________________________ Are you a beef producer? _____________________________ Are you the child of a beef producer? _____________________________ Institute of current enrolment*: ______________________________________________________________ Current or intended program of study or skilled trades training*: ____________________________________ Duration of post-secondary program or skill trades training: _________ year (s) Essay: Please submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay on “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture. *Note: Bursary winners will be published in MBP’s newspaper Cattle Country. Please return: the completed application form; transcript; proof of enrolment in a post-secondary institution or an apprenticeship program, or a letter of intent to pursue further studies; a list of your community involvement; a typed essay; and, your references no later than 4:30 p.m., Friday June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 Fax (204) 774-3264 Email: info@mbbeef.ca

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 6

Celebrate the beef industry’s continual environmental improvements From beefresearch.ca

This post was written in collaboration with Fawn Jackson, Canadian Cattlemen’s Association Manager of Environment and Sustainability. Earth Day, celebrated annually on April 22nd, began in the 1970’s and is often cited as the start of the modern environmental movement. But it isn’t just for the hippie children of the 1970’s anymore. Today Earth Day is recognized globally by people from all walks of life as a way to foster and celebrate environmental respect and behavioural changes that lessen our impact on the earth. Cattle producers across Canada, who chose to make their living as stewards of the land, fully appreciate the value of a healthy environment. For all of us in the Canadian beef industry, Earth Day is a day to celebrate our industry’s environmental achievements, and is an excellent time to foster further discussion about how to make continual improvements in this area. Grasslands for grazing livestock capture and store carbon dioxide from the atmosphereCanadian cattle producers have achieved great feats of environmental improvement since cattle were brought to Canada in the late 19th century by Americans to southern Alberta. Canadian beef production is now globally recognized as some of the most efficiently

produced beef in the world in regards to natural resource use. Several ecological services are provided by beef producers as well. For example, Canadian rangelands capture and store carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and maintain watersheds, wetlands, and habitat to support plant, animal, bird and insect biodiversity. Canadian beef industry's environmental footprint lessened as technologies improve feed efficiencyGiven limited natural resources and a growing population with growing consumer interest in how food is produced, it is imperative that that the beef industry has a comprehensive understanding of its environmental impact. Two research projects are currently underway to do just that. The Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) is funding a project titled ‘Defining the Environmental Footprint of Canadian Beef Production’ led by Dr. Tim McAllister and Dr. Karen Beauchemin at the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada research centre in Lethbridge, Alberta. This project will examine changes between 1980 and today in the amount (and types) of feed, land and water needed to produce a kilogram of beef. Furthermore, the study will look at the changes in the amount of greenhouse gas and manure produced per kilogram of beef, as well

as changes in water quality, carbon sequestration, biodiversity and other ecosystems services. Learn more in the BCRC’s fact sheet: http:// www.beefresearch.ca/factsheet.cfm/ defining-the-environmental-footprint-of-canadian-beef-production-138 While the BCRC-funded project brings the historic perspective, another project led by the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef, will look at the environmental, economic and social impact of the Canadian beef industry today, identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats as well as set key performance indicators for future benchmarking. Together these research projects will help to identify potential areas for improvement as well as help acknowledge the achievements that have been made in improving the footprint of the Canadian beef industry.


Protect Your Livestock. Protect Your Livelihood. Register today for the Livestock Predation Protection Workshop.

If you are a livestock producer, trapper, hunter or landowner, you are invited to attend a Livestock Predation Protection Workshop in your area. The workshops are taking place at the following locations: Time 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Vassar, Manitoba Vassar Community Centre 80 Beaudry Ave Date: May 7, 2015 Pre-register at: 1-800-772-0458

Moosehorn, Manitoba Moosehorn Community Hall Railway Avenue Date: May 11, 2015 Pre-register at: 1-800-772-0458

Arborg, Manitoba Arborg Heritage Hall Arborg Heritage Village Date: May 12, 2015 Pre-register at: 1-800-772-0458

Free Admission. Expert Advice. Admission to the workshop is free. The evening will include information from Conservation and Water Stewardship, Manitoba Food and Rural Development (MAFRD) and Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation. An overview of the Wildlife Damage Compensation Regulation and Program will be provided along with information on animal husbandry tools. Professional trappers will also be in attendance to provide advice on: • Humane Trapping and Snaring • Predator Hunting and Calling • Mortality Management

Register Today Pre-register to attend the workshop. Space is limited.


April 10, 2015

mbbeef.ca

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP to offer six bursaries in 2015

Six Manitoba students will receive a little extra help paying for their education this year thanks to the 2015 Manitoba Beef Producers’ bursaries. The six bursaries are offered annually to MBP members or their children who are attending a university, college or other post-secondary institution. Students pursuing trades training are also eligible. Preference will be given to students who are in a field of study related to agriculture or

those working to acquire a skilled trade that would benefit the rural economy. Those applying must be at least 17-years-old as of Jan. 1, 2015 and be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of one. Applicants are required to use the bursary within two years of receipt and the program they are attending must be at least one years in duration. Interested students are asked to submit an essay no more than 600 words in length discussing what Continued to Page 2

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Roping at the Winter Fair

Kids young and a little bit older, had the chance to practice their roping skills at MBP’s Manitoba Winter Fair Booth.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 2

Continued from Page 1

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • The latest edition of the CCA Action News. • New resources added to bodyconditioningscore.ca help cow-calf producers increase profits. • Getting back to the basics: The fundamentals of good forages • Five steps to improve your approach to cattle handling. • Breaking down barriers for women in agriculture. • Changes announced to Manitoba Livestock Expo.

the beef industry means to them, their family, community and Manitoba at large. Students are also asked to include the reasons they enjoy being involved in agriculture. Applicants must also submit either a high school or post-secondary transcript, proof of enrolment in a recognized institution, a list of their community involvement and three references. The application can be found at mbbeef.ca or by clicking this link. Completed applications must be submitted to MBP by June 5, 2015. All entries will be reviewed by the selection committee and the winners will be notified on July 31, 2015. Applications can be sent to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee, 220 – 530 Century Street, R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact MBP at 1-800-7720458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca

If you have an E-Newsletter article that would be of interest to MBP members, please email Chad Saxon at: csaxon@mbbeef.ca

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

CYL announces 2015 mentorship recipients

The Cattlemen’s Young Leaders (CYL) program has announced its 2015 national mentorship recipients. The 16 recipients were selected following the final selection round at the CYL Spring Forum held in Saskatoon on March 26-28, 2015. A total of 22 semi-finalists vied for a spot in the national youth initiative of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). The 2015 CYL mentorship recipients are: • Alberta: Benjamin Campbell – Black Diamond, Robert Dixon – Vermillion, Jodi Flaig – Two Hills, Brett Hassard – Medicine Hat, Elizabeth Homerosky – Calgary, Angela Kumlin - Duchess, Penny Patton – Athabasca, Byron Whitford – Lethbridge, Brittany Wiese - Bentley • Saskatchewan: Breeanna Kelln – Duval, Shane Klepak – Melfort, Brandon Sparrow – Vanscoy, • Manitoba: Breanna Anderson – Swan River • Ontario: Bethany Storey – Guelph, Brendan Zettler - Teeswater • Nova Scotia: Ellen Crane - Truro The CYL Spring Forum brought together the semi-finalists, current

graduates and industry leaders for a weekend of networking and learning. The forum included an afternoon of industry speakers at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) followed by a networking and leadership panel discussion. The following day featured the selection of the new young leaders as well as the graduation of the current cohort. The final day saw tours of the Western Beef Development Centre, the U of S Beef Research and Teaching Unit and their Rayner Dairy Research and Teaching Facility. CCA Director Brent Griffin was among the Canadian beef cattle industry representatives to take part in the CYL Spring Forum. Griffin, who served as a facilitator for the CYL 2015 selection process, said the CYL program is an outstanding program that the CCA is very proud of and that the industry is in good hands as a result. “The experience, training and mentorship provided by the CYL program is second to none,” Griffin said. “I am confident that these experiences will shape future industry

leaders, and in turn will enable Canada to continue to produce some of the best beef in the world for years to come.” Griffin congratulated the 2015 recipients, who will be paired with a mentor for a ten-month mentorship. The CYL program provides industry-specific training and mentorship opportunities to young producers. CYL participants have the opportunity to explore a potential career choice or involvement with a provincial/national producer organization, while gaining the expertise and business acumen necessary to sustain the cattle industry into the future. Funding for the CYL program is made available through its foundation partners: UFA Co-operative Ltd., the Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency (ALMA), Cargill and MNP. The program also receives support from gold sponsors Farm Credit Canada and New Holland. The CYL Spring Forum was sponsored by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture.


MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS

BURSARY

Manitoba Beef Producers is pleased to make available (6) six $500 bursaries annually for MBP members or their children attending a university, college, other post-secondary institution or pursuing trades training. Preference will be given to those students pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or to those acquiring a skilled trade that would be beneficial to the rural economy. Completed applications must be submitted by Friday, June 5, 2015. A selection committee will review the submissions. Winners will be notified by July 31, 2015. The bursary criteria are as follows: Eligibility: • Must be at least 17 years of age as of January 1, 2015. • Must be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of an active Manitoba beef producer. • Must use the bursary within (2) two years. • Post-secondary program or trades training must be a minimum of one year in duration. Items to Submit: • Must submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay discussing “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture.* • Must submit a transcript (either High School or Post-Secondary Institute). • Must submit a proof of enrolment in a recognized institution (current transcript or if in high school include a letter of intent to attend or a letter of acceptance). • Must submit a list of community involvement (e.g. 4-H, community clubs, volunteer work, etc.). • Provide the names of three references, including their addresses and telephone numbers. Submissions must be sent to MBP no later than 4:30 p.m. on Friday, June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg MB R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact the MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca *The winning essays will be published in the MBP newspaper Cattle Country.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


MBP 2015

BURSARY APPLICATION FORM PLEASE PRINT Name: _______________________________________________________________________________ Mailing address: _______________________________________________________________________ Telephone: _____________________________ Email: _____________________________

Fax (if available): _______________________

Date of Birth: _____________________________ Parents’ names if you are under 18: _______________________________________________________ Are you a beef producer? _____________________________ Are you the child of a beef producer? _____________________________ Institute of current enrolment*: ______________________________________________________________ Current or intended program of study or skilled trades training*: ____________________________________ Duration of post-secondary program or skill trades training: _________ year (s) Essay: Please submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay on “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture. *Note: Bursary winners will be published in MBP’s newspaper Cattle Country. Please return: the completed application form; transcript; proof of enrolment in a post-secondary institution or an apprenticeship program, or a letter of intent to pursue further studies; a list of your community involvement; a typed essay; and, your references no later than 4:30 p.m., Friday June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 Fax (204) 774-3264 Email: info@mbbeef.ca

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 6


mbbeef.ca

March 27, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Video highlights what beef producers need to know about about antimicrobial use and resistance From beefresearch.ca There’s no avoiding the topics of antimicrobial use (AMU) and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) these days. We often see headlines like “Agricultural folly spawns superbugs”, “Antibiotic Resistance Declared A ‘Serious Health Threat’ By CDC As Use In Meat Industry Skyrockets”, and “Doctors call for ban of antibiotic use in farm animals as drug-resistant human infections hit ‘dangerous level’” in the mainstream media. Headlines like that are

alarming for most of us – consumers, government officials, and people who make a living raising livestock. Flip through your favorite industry publication and you’re bound to find stories on the latest release of AMR reports by influential organizations, regulatory moves by the Federal government to restrict the use of various antimicrobial drugs, announcements by grocery and restaurant chains to source meat produced with particular practices, or articles that encourage producers and industry groups to

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

be transparent about why and how antimicrobials are used on farms. At the heart of it all, we know three things: AMR is a real threat. If antimicrobials become less effective, then human health and animal welfare will suffer. AMR is a natural and very complex phenomenon, but improper use of antibiotics favors the development of AMR. AMU is necessary in beef production, and prudent AMU will slow the development of AMR. So as a beef producer, what do you need to

know about using antimicrobials in your cattle, and the potential risk of resistance to those drugs developing? Watch the short video, then visit www.beefresearch.ca/AMR and talk to your veterinarian to learn science-based facts about Canadian beef producers’ impacts and responsibilities related to AMR. The webpage includes a list of tips on how to avoid illness in cattle to reduce the need to use antimicrobials, and how to responsibly treat cattle when antimicrobial use is necessary.

Upcoming Events March 29 - April 4

Royal Manitoba Winter Fair One of the largest agriculture events in Canada, the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair runs from March 29 to April 4 in Brandon’s Keystone Centre. Manitoba Beef Producers will be in attendance at the Thru The Farmgate Area. Stop by our booth for items directed at both producers and consumers.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry

Page 2

If you have an E-Newsletter article that would be of interest to MBP members, please email Chad Saxon at: csaxon@mbbeef.ca

• Restrictions on winter application of nutrients. • New resources added to bodyconditioningscore.ca help cow-calf producers increase profits. • The newest edition of Canada Beef’s newsletter, The Brand. • Year round grazing systems. • Portage Diversion to open to lessen impact of ice jams. • McDonald’s sustainability goals to reach beyond beef. • CleanFarms now accepting ag plastics.

Interested in advertising in the MBP E-Newsletter? Contact Esther Reimer for more information. info@mbbeef.ca

Job Opening University of Manitoba Bruce D. Campbell Farm and Food Discovery Centre Assistant Manager Position

For More Information See: https://umanitoba.hua.hrsmart.com/ ats/js_job_details.php?reqid=9307.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

BCRC to host forage nutrient management webinar April 8

From beefresearch.ca Managing nutrients in forages is more and less sustainable than in annual crops. The permanent cover protects against nutrient losses, leaching and runoff but makes losses to the atmosphere more common. Furthermore, forages often receive nutrients as manure, but there are problems with using this cheap nutrient source effectively for crop production, including nutrient imbalances and uneven distribution. On April 8, the Beef Cattle Research Council and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada are co-hosting a webinar to help producers learn about nutrient management as a global issue and some of the problems and strategic solutions for using nutrients. The webinar is scheduled to begin at 8 p.m. and will be held at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4678193643070793729 BCRC webinars are available and free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time and expertise to support advancements in the Canadian beef industry, and through the Knowledge Dissemination and Technology Transfer project funded by the National Check-off and Canada’s Beef Science Cluster. If you are unable to attend that evening, register anyway. The webinar will be recorded and

Shabtai Bittman posted online at a later date and all registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live event, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too. Speaking at the webinar is Shabtai Bittman, Ph.D, currently one of the longest serving researchers in Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. He began his research studies in the early 1970’s and his career as a lecturer in plant ecology at McGill University, and has since worked and studied forages in Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan and for the past 25 years in B.C. His focus throughout his career has been to develop technology to improve quantity and quality of forages according to ecological principles attending to economy, practicality and environmental health of air

and water. He has worked on several grasses, legumes and silage corn for both the dairy and beef industries. He received a Merit award from the American Forage and Grassland Council. The BCRC webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. The BCRC brings the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required. All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy. As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar. You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar. If you don’t have high-speed internet, consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing of the live event or the recording is possible.


MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS

BURSARY

Manitoba Beef Producers is pleased to make available (6) six $500 bursaries annually for MBP members or their children attending a university, college, other post-secondary institution or pursuing trades training. Preference will be given to those students pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or to those acquiring a skilled trade that would be beneficial to the rural economy. Completed applications must be submitted by Friday, June 5, 2015. A selection committee will review the submissions. Winners will be notified by July 31, 2015. The bursary criteria are as follows: Eligibility: • Must be at least 17 years of age as of January 1, 2015. • Must be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of an active Manitoba beef producer. • Must use the bursary within (2) two years. • Post-secondary program or trades training must be a minimum of one year in duration. Items to Submit: • Must submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay discussing “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture.* • Must submit a transcript (either High School or Post-Secondary Institute). • Must submit a proof of enrolment in a recognized institution (current transcript or if in high school include a letter of intent to attend or a letter of acceptance). • Must submit a list of community involvement (e.g. 4-H, community clubs, volunteer work, etc.). • Provide the names of three references, including their addresses and telephone numbers. Submissions must be sent to MBP no later than 4:30 p.m. on Friday, June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg MB R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact the MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca *The winning essays will be published in the MBP newspaper Cattle Country.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


MBP 2015

BURSARY APPLICATION FORM PLEASE PRINT Name: _______________________________________________________________________________ Mailing address: _______________________________________________________________________ Telephone: _____________________________ Email: _____________________________

Fax (if available): _______________________

Date of Birth: _____________________________ Parents’ names if you are under 18: _______________________________________________________ Are you a beef producer? _____________________________ Are you the child of a beef producer? _____________________________ Institute of current enrolment*: ______________________________________________________________ Current or intended program of study or skilled trades training*: ____________________________________ Duration of post-secondary program or skill trades training: _________ year (s) Essay: Please submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay on “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture. *Note: Bursary winners will be published in MBP’s newspaper Cattle Country. Please return: the completed application form; transcript; proof of enrolment in a post-secondary institution or an apprenticeship program, or a letter of intent to pursue further studies; a list of your community involvement; a typed essay; and, your references no later than 4:30 p.m., Friday June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 Fax (204) 774-3264 Email: info@mbbeef.ca

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 6


y! . da ed to it er lim st s gi g i Re atin Se

Open your mind to the endless possibilities!

H YAT T R E GE NC Y CA L GA RY, A P R I L 6 & 7, 2 015 W E S T I N H A R B OU R CA S T L E , T OR ON T O, O C T 5 & 6 , 2 015

LISTEN

...to women from Ag and related businesses as they reveal the secrets to their success and share what they’ve learned along the way.

...make the connections to women who know the way to success and how to reach your goals.

LEARN

...how to capitalize on your opportunities and reap the benefits of your growth.

GROW

...into the person you have the potential to be!

Here’s just a taste of the presentations you’re going to enjoy. Prepare to be inspired! Kirstine Stewart

Susan Blair

Courtenay Wolfe

Managing Director and Head of Twitter Canada, Toronto, Ontario

Executive Director, Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd, Burlington, Ontario

Venture Capitalist, Chairwomen, Vital Alert & Brilliant Resources, Toronto, Ontario

Transition from Grassroots to Corporate Boardroom

Your Network is Your Network: Building Success One Relationship at a Time

The Role of Women as Leaders Traditional leadership traits almost universally stem from the masculine point of view. But that’s changing very quickly, especially as more women than ever before enter the corporate and political realms. Kirstine Stewart shows us that it has never been a better time to be a driven woman, ready to subvert stereotypes and take your rightful place as a leader.

Lessons learned and critical success factors in a journey from Saskatchewan grain and cattle producer, to the head of Boehringer Ingelheim’s Canadian Animal Health business.

Relationships are the key to greater success, wealth and happiness. Effective networking is a life skill that takes practice. What separates highly successful people from everyone else is their ability to effectively build their networks. Learn how to develop this powerful skill.

Capitalize on your opportunities and reap the benefits of your growth! This conference could change your life. Attend in Calgary or Toronto - or both. Early Bird and Group Rates available now. Register today! Visit advancingwomenconference.ca or phone 403-686-8407.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 9

Survey launched into AAFC Advance Payments Program The Advance Payments Program (APP) of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides producers with cash advances on eligible commodities. These advances provide producers with improved cash flow, therefore increasing the flexibility producers have in marketing their products. Producers can access up to $400,000 in advances, of which the first $100,000 is interest-free and the remaining $300,000 is interest-bearing. The amount of the advance reflects up to 50% of the expected market value of the agricultural product, and must be repaid upon sale of the commodity or at the end of the pro-

duction period, whichever comes first. While approximately 25,000 farmers across Canada participate in the Advance Payment Program, there are a significant number of farmers that have not participated in the program and have not obtained an interest-free loan. The Advance Payment Program is currently being evaluated by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and one evaluation goal is to find out why more Canadian farmers do not participate in the APP. Consequently, if you have not received an APP interest-free

loan, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada would like to know why as well as what changes to APP would increase participation by producers. Your feedback is very important to ensure that the APP benefits as many producers as possible. To provide your feedback, you can either: Use this link: fluidsurveys.com/s/ APP-Producers/ to access a secure Ference & Company website where you can provide your feedback that is kept confidential or contact Don Ference, President, Ference Weicker & Company via email (ference@ shaw.ca) or telephone (604-688-2424 (extension 304). - Submitted

Producers asked to provide insights for new app Submitted Interested in using a mobile app for your cow-calf records? If so, we need your help! Your responses to a short survey will help shape the creation of a herd management app. Please click https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/52XYK3G to learn more and complete the survey before March 31, 2015. The Canadian Hereford, Simmental and Angus Associations have jointly been awarded funding from the Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency (ALMA)

to explore the development of a mobile smartphone application for Canadian cow-calf producers with integration into Canadian breed association performance data. Integrated Traceability Solutions Global (ITS Global) of Okotoks, AB has been contracted to research and summarize the functionalities Canadian cattle breeders desire in a mobile app. This on-line survey is the first step of the process. The questionnaire will take ten to fifteen minutes to complete. Survey results will be analyzed

collectively by ITS Global, and all individual responses will remain confidential. Only those respondents who express an interest in follow-up will be contacted by ITS Global for further feedback, using only the contact information provided in this survey. https://www.surveymonkey. com/s/52XYK3G If you choose not to respond to this survey but would still like to provide input on the development of a mobile cow-calf app, please e-mail appinfo@itslivestock.com.


mbbeef.ca

March 13, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

Deadline for needs survey March 23

CCA Annual Meeting

A group of MBP Directors and staff members have been in Ottawa this week for the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association’s Annual Meeting. The week included a banquet Tuesday night where Director Ramona Blyth (right) had the opportunity to speak with Federal Agriculture Minster Gerry Ritz and Joyce Bateman, MP for Winnipeg South Centre, about the importance of the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program backstopping beef cash advance programs. The CCA semi-annual meeting will be held this coming August in Winnipeg.

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

The deadline for Manitoba Beef Producers members to provide their opinions on the organization’s services and future direction is fast approaching. The Member Needs Survey, which closes on March 23, is seeking the opinion of members on three key areas: MBP’s activities and services; current challenges and risks and opportunities and challenges in the future. “By knowing your needs, we can pursue policies

and programs aimed at making Manitoba’s beef industry more sustainable into the future,” said MBP general manager Melinda German. “Your opinions will help guide Manitoba Beef Producers with our ongoing strategic planning processes on behalf of Manitoba’s beef industry.” MBP would like to reach as many producers as possible and hear from all sectors involved in beef production. All information will be kept confidential by Kel-

Upcoming Events March 17

StockTalk webinar. The MAFRD farm production team produces a free monthly webinar for the livestock industry. To register for the next webinar click here.

March 20 & 21

Ag in the City. The annual event is scheduled for next weekend at The Forks. For more info click here.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • Province, Feds pledge funds for food safety. • Chef inspired ideas with Canadian Beef. • Information is key to fine tuning on-farm breeding program. • March 16-21 is Agriculture Safety Week throughout Canada. • Some tips to keep in mind to ensure this calving season is a safe one for you and your family. • McDonald’s sustainability goals to reach beyond beef.

Page 2

... member needs survey Continued from Page 1

win Consulting, a local firm that has been hired to conduct the survey on MBP’s behalf. Once the survey is complete, MBP will only see the summarized final results so producers are encouraged to speak candidly. The surveys will be destroyed once the results are analysed. More than one member of an operation can complete the survey which can be found online or in the March issue of Cattle Country. The online survey can be found at: www.surveymonkey. com/s/MBP-Needs-Survey At the end of the survey, there is an optional section where participants can fill in their contact information if they wish. MBP is seeking to build a closer relationship with its members and would

like to have the ability to reach out to producers on matters where it’s important to get information to them quickly. To encourage participation, every person who completes the survey will be entered to win a two-night stay for two at the Holiday Inn in Winnipeg or the Canad Inn in Brandon. If anyone has questions regarding the survey they are asked to call the MBP office at 1-800-772-0458. Funding to conduct the needs survey was provided to MBP through Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincial-territorial policy framework to advance the agriculture industry. For more on Growing Forward 2 see: www.manitoba.ca/agriculture/growing-forward-2.

Job Opening University of Manitoba Bruce D. Campbell Farm and Food Discovery Centre Assistant Manager Position

For More Information See: https://umanitoba.hua.hrsmart.com/ ats/js_job_details.php?reqid=9307.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

Survey launched into AAFC Advance Payments Program The Advance Payments Program (APP) of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides producers with cash advances on eligible commodities. These advances provide producers with improved cash flow, therefore increasing the flexibility producers have in marketing their products. Producers can access up to $400,000 in advances, of which the first $100,000 is interest-free and the remaining $300,000 is interest-bearing. The amount of the advance reflects up to 50% of the expected market value of the agricultural product, and must be repaid upon sale of the commodity or at the end of the pro-

duction period, whichever comes first. While approximately 25,000 farmers across Canada participate in the Advance Payment Program, there are a significant number of farmers that have not participated in the program and have not obtained an interest-free loan. The Advance Payment Program is currently being evaluated by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and one evaluation goal is to find out why more Canadian farmers do not participate in the APP. Consequently, if you have not received an APP interest-free

loan, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada would like to know why as well as what changes to APP would increase participation by producers. Your feedback is very important to ensure that the APP benefits as many producers as possible. To provide your feedback, you can either: Use this link: fluidsurveys.com/s/ APP-Producers/ to access a secure Ference & Company website where you can provide your feedback that is kept confidential or contact Don Ference, President, Ference Weicker & Company via email (ference@ shaw.ca) or telephone (604-688-2424 (extension 304). - Submitted

Producers asked to provide insights for new app Submitted Interested in using a mobile app for your cow-calf records? If so, we need your help! Your responses to a short survey will help shape the creation of a herd management app. Please click https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/52XYK3G to learn more and complete the survey before March 31, 2015. The Canadian Hereford, Simmental and Angus Associations have jointly been awarded funding from the Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency (ALMA)

to explore the development of a mobile smartphone application for Canadian cow-calf producers with integration into Canadian breed association performance data. Integrated Traceability Solutions Global (ITS Global) of Okotoks, AB has been contracted to research and summarize the functionalities Canadian cattle breeders desire in a mobile app. This on-line survey is the first step of the process. The questionnaire will take ten to fifteen minutes to complete. Survey results will be analyzed

collectively by ITS Global, and all individual responses will remain confidential. Only those respondents who express an interest in follow-up will be contacted by ITS Global for further feedback, using only the contact information provided in this survey. https://www.surveymonkey. com/s/52XYK3G If you choose not to respond to this survey but would still like to provide input on the development of a mobile cow-calf app, please e-mail appinfo@itslivestock.com.


MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS

BURSARY

Manitoba Beef Producers is pleased to make available (6) six $500 bursaries annually for MBP members or their children attending a university, college, other post-secondary institution or pursuing trades training. Preference will be given to those students pursuing a field of study related to agriculture or to those acquiring a skilled trade that would be beneficial to the rural economy. Completed applications must be submitted by Friday, June 5, 2015. A selection committee will review the submissions. Winners will be notified by July 31, 2015. The bursary criteria are as follows: Eligibility: • Must be at least 17 years of age as of January 1, 2015. • Must be an active Manitoba beef producer or the child of an active Manitoba beef producer. • Must use the bursary within (2) two years. • Post-secondary program or trades training must be a minimum of one year in duration. Items to Submit: • Must submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay discussing “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture.* • Must submit a transcript (either High School or Post-Secondary Institute). • Must submit a proof of enrolment in a recognized institution (current transcript or if in high school include a letter of intent to attend or a letter of acceptance). • Must submit a list of community involvement (e.g. 4-H, community clubs, volunteer work, etc.). • Provide the names of three references, including their addresses and telephone numbers. Submissions must be sent to MBP no later than 4:30 p.m. on Friday, June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg MB R3H 0Y4 Fax: (204) 774-3264 E-mail: info@mbbeef.ca For more information, please contact the MBP at 1-800-772-0458 or email: info@mbbeef.ca *The winning essays will be published in the MBP newspaper Cattle Country.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


MBP 2015

BURSARY APPLICATION FORM PLEASE PRINT Name: _______________________________________________________________________________ Mailing address: _______________________________________________________________________ Telephone: _____________________________ Email: _____________________________

Fax (if available): _______________________

Date of Birth: _____________________________ Parents’ names if you are under 18: _______________________________________________________ Are you a beef producer? _____________________________ Are you the child of a beef producer? _____________________________ Institute of current enrolment*: ______________________________________________________________ Current or intended program of study or skilled trades training*: ____________________________________ Duration of post-secondary program or skill trades training: _________ year (s) Essay: Please submit a typed 600 word (maximum) essay on “What the beef industry means to my family, my community, and Manitoba.” Also include the reasons you enjoy being involved in agriculture. *Note: Bursary winners will be published in MBP’s newspaper Cattle Country. Please return: the completed application form; transcript; proof of enrolment in a post-secondary institution or an apprenticeship program, or a letter of intent to pursue further studies; a list of your community involvement; a typed essay; and, your references no later than 4:30 p.m., Friday June 5, 2015 to: Manitoba Beef Producers Bursary Committee 220 – 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 Fax (204) 774-3264 Email: info@mbbeef.ca

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 5

BeefResearch.ca expands to a more comprehensive resource for beef information BCRC Media Release The Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) is pleased to announce another step toward enhanced knowledge dissemination and technology transfer in the Canadian beef industry. The BCRC’s website, www. beefresearch.ca, now has the capability for other organizations that fund beef, cattle and forage-related research of interest to the Canadian beef industry to create and submit research summaries to the website. “The BCRC has always worked hard to communicate the objectives and results of in-progress and completed research projects funded by the National Check-off and the Beef Cattle Industry Science Clusters,” said Andrea Brocklebank, Executive Director of the BCRC. “Especially since launching BeefResearch.ca in August 2012, we’ve seen huge interest by producers and industry groups in our concise fact sheets, so in the collaborative spirit of the National Beef Research Strategy and the Science Clusters, we have built the capability for other organizations to develop

and share similar fact sheets through the same channel.” Like-minded organizations can acquire login information from the BCRC, then draft fact sheets using customizable templates and indicate where they should appear in the website’s navigation. Before being submitted, a fact sheet author must confirm that the lead researcher has reviewed and approved its content. BCRC staff will moderate submissions to ensure that all posted fact sheets adequately summarize sound science that is valuable to the industry or pertinent to industry stakeholders. The system encourages fact sheets to acknowledge all of a project’s funders and prevents duplicate summaries by multi-

ple authors. “Sharing research results is important. The BCRC’s initiative to co-publish related research allows for greater distribution of results ensuring that targeted audiences are more likely to get up-to-date information,” said Rob Hand of the Alberta Crop Industry Development Fund Ltd. (ACIDF). “ACIDF plans to put the ALMA/ACIDF Livestock Feeding Initiative research results on the BCRC website.” Staff at ACIDF and the Alberta Beef Producers (ABP) assisted the BCRC in the development of the system by testing it and offering user feedback. ABP and ACIDF fact sheets are among the first third party authored fact sheets to be posted on BeefResearch.ca.


y! . da ed to it er lim st s gi g i Re atin Se

Open your mind to the endless possibilities!

H YAT T R E GE NC Y CA L GA RY, A P R I L 6 & 7, 2 015 W E S T I N H A R B OU R CA S T L E , T OR ON T O, O C T 5 & 6 , 2 015

LISTEN

...to women from Ag and related businesses as they reveal the secrets to their success and share what they’ve learned along the way.

...make the connections to women who know the way to success and how to reach your goals.

LEARN

...how to capitalize on your opportunities and reap the benefits of your growth.

GROW

...into the person you have the potential to be!

Here’s just a taste of the presentations you’re going to enjoy. Prepare to be inspired! Kirstine Stewart

Susan Blair

Courtenay Wolfe

Managing Director and Head of Twitter Canada, Toronto, Ontario

Executive Director, Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd, Burlington, Ontario

Venture Capitalist, Chairwomen, Vital Alert & Brilliant Resources, Toronto, Ontario

Transition from Grassroots to Corporate Boardroom

Your Network is Your Network: Building Success One Relationship at a Time

The Role of Women as Leaders Traditional leadership traits almost universally stem from the masculine point of view. But that’s changing very quickly, especially as more women than ever before enter the corporate and political realms. Kirstine Stewart shows us that it has never been a better time to be a driven woman, ready to subvert stereotypes and take your rightful place as a leader.

Lessons learned and critical success factors in a journey from Saskatchewan grain and cattle producer, to the head of Boehringer Ingelheim’s Canadian Animal Health business.

Relationships are the key to greater success, wealth and happiness. Effective networking is a life skill that takes practice. What separates highly successful people from everyone else is their ability to effectively build their networks. Learn how to develop this powerful skill.

Capitalize on your opportunities and reap the benefits of your growth! This conference could change your life. Attend in Calgary or Toronto - or both. Early Bird and Group Rates available now. Register today! Visit advancingwomenconference.ca or phone 403-686-8407.


Thank you to the sponsors of our 36th TH 36 ANNUAL GENERAL Annual General Meeting

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS!

EVENT FUNDING PROVIDED BY

DIAMOND LUNCH SPONSOR

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2015-01-17 11:39 AM


L GENERAL MEE TING DIAMOND SPONSORS

P R E S I D E N T ’S B A N Q U E T SPONSORS

THE ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP AWARD SPONSOR

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2015-01-17 11:39 AM


36 TH ANNUAL GENERAL M BANQUET BEEF SPONSOR

Cargill Meat Solutions and Cargill Animal Nutrition

BANQUET COCKTAIL SPONSOR

BREAKOUT SESSIONS SPONSOR

CO F F E E S P O N S O R S Enns Brothers Sterling Truck and Trailer Sales Ltd. 10 00501.MB_Beef_AGM_Program15.indd 10

2015-01-17 11:39 AM


L GENERAL MEE TING GOLD SPONSORS Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd.

Manitoba Charolais Association

DNA Insurance

Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association

EMF Nutrition Kane Veterinary Supplies & Allflex Canada MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation

Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Hereford Association

Merck Animal Health The AgriPost The Victoria Inn Zoetis 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ LANDMARK FEEDS

Mazergroup

S I LV E R S P O N S O R S Canadian Cattle Identification Agency Cattlex Dairy Farmers of Manitoba

Ducks Unlimited Canada

Prairie Livestock

Hamiota Feedlot Ltd.

TD Canada Trust Agriculture Services

Manitoba Angus Association

The Hartford

BRONZE SPONSORS Aikins Law

Cattle Track Technologies

Paddock Drilling Ltd.

Allen Leigh Security & Communication Ltd.

CIBC

Sunrise Credit Union

CattleMax Software

Murray Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Westman 11

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2015-01-17 11:39 AM


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 10

Verified Beef Production Workshops MAFRD together in partnership with Manitoba Beef Producers will be hosting Verified Beef Production workshops by video conference throughout the winter at a number of MAFRD locations in the province. VBP is Canada's verified on-farm food safety program for beef – a dynamic program to uphold consumer confidence in the products and good practices of this country's beef producers. Grass-roots driven and industry-led, the program is part of a broad effort by Canada's food providers to ensure on-farm food safety. The overall result is stronger competitiveness for Canada's beef industry, as food safety continues to grow as a major factor in consumer buying decisions.

Verified Beef Production Video Conference Workshops All workshops will take place from 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Date

Location

Pre-register by

Thursday, March 19, 2015 Thursday, Nov 20, 2014

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday March 12, 2015 MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Nov 13, 2014

Thursday, 16,2014 2015 Thursday, April Dec 18,

MAFRD conference site Thursday Dec 11,April 20149, 2015 MAFRD VideoVideo conference site Thursday,

Thursday, Jan 15, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Jan 8, 2015

Thursday, Feb 19, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Feb 12, 2015

Thursday, March 19, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, March 12, 2015

For more information on the training, to find your closest video location site or to preregister, call your local MAFRD office.


Date

Time

Price

Loca

Cultivating Safety for For more information call: 204.725. your Farm Business

To register, return registration form by email: lentonj@a

To reduce farm accidents and improve on-farm safety practices and behaviours through awareness, planning, better procedures and improved technology, ACC is celebrating the national Agriculture Safety and Health Week by presenting a one-day workshop called Cultivating Safety for your Farm Business. Join us at ACC and learn about Eye, Hand, Back and Fall Protection, Pesticide Safety, Large Equipment Safety, Electrical Safety and Emergency Planning.

March 18, 2015 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Price: $40 + GST (Please register no later than March 11, 2015) Assiniboine Community College 1430 Victoria Ave. East, Brandon, Manitoba For more information call 204.725.8700 ext 6716 To register, return registration form by email lentonj@assiniboine.net or fax 204.725.8740


STUDENT INFORMATION: (fields marked with * are required) Social Insurance Number

Student Number (if you have attended ACC before) First Name *

Last Name *

Middle Initial * City *

Home Address *

Birth date (year/month/day) * Prov. *

Business Phone

Home Phone *

Gender (M or F) *

Fax

Check Here

Pesticide Applicator School

 PEDV-0999

Learn more to reduce farm accidents and improve on-farm safety practices and behaviours.

Postal Code *

Email*

Date

Location

Address

March 18, 2015

Brandon ACC

Assiniboine Community College 1430 Victoria Ave. E.

8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

$40+ GST *Lunch and coffee included.

Please register no later than March 6, 2015 For more information regarding the Workshop “Cultivating Safety for your Farm Business” please call James at 204.725.8700 x: 7116 or email hoodj@assiniboine.net For registration inquiries, please call Jo-Anne at x: 6716 or email lentonj@assiniboine.net

PAYMENT OPTIONS Card #

Visa

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Expiry Date

Name of Card Holder

Telephone

________

__ Authorized Signature

_________________

 Sponsorship authorization gives the college permission to invoice/provide receipt in the Company name for the above named student. Before final grade reports can be released, payment must be received from the Sponsor. Company Name Company Address Contact Name

Telephone _________________ __________________ City

___ Province

Fax ___

_

_____Postal Code

_______

Authorized Signature

Date *Sponsors please note that if you do not complete the sponsorship section the receipt will be made in the student’s name and mailed directly to the student.


mbbeef.ca

Feb. 27, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP conducting membership needs survey

CCA President Visits

CCA President Dave Solverson (right) was in Winnipeg Thursday for a meeting with the Manitoba Beef Producers directors. Solverson provided the directors with an update on the recent BSE case, the continuing battle with the United States over Country Of Origin Labelling (COOL) and other important industry matters. The visit was part of the monthly MBP directors meeting.

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Manitoba Beef Producers has launched a comprehensive survey of its membership. The survey, which was officially unveiled earlier this month and will conclude on March 23, is asking members to provide their opinion on three main areas: MBP’s activities and services, current challenges and risks and opportunities and challenges in the future. “By knowing your needs, we can pursue policies and programs aimed at making Manitoba’s beef

industry more sustainable into the future,” said MBP general manager Melinda German. “Your opinions will help guide Manitoba Beef Producers with our ongoing strategic planning processes on behalf of Manitoba’s beef industry.” MBP is hoping to reach as many producers as possible and would like to hear from all sectors involved in beef production. All information will be kept confidential by Kelwin Consulting, a local firm that has been hired Continued to Page 2

Upcoming Events March 4

The BCRC is hosting the webinar how to produce and use sweet forages. To register click here.

March 17

StockTalk webinar. The MAFRD farm production team produces a free monthly webinar for the livestock industry. To register for the next webinar click here.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 2

Continued from Page 1

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry • The first flood forecast of 2015 has been issued. • A look at the National Beef Strategy from CCA President Dave Solverson. • Manitoba plastic film and twine collection pilot project. • Some great advice on creating forage stand mixtures. • What producers can learn from wine makers. • Worried about hormones in beef? You don’t need to be.

to conduct the survey on MBP’s behalf. Once the survey is complete, MBP will only see the summarized final results so producers are encouraged to speak candidly. The surveys will be destroyed once the results are analysed. More than one member of an operation can complete the survey which can be found online or in the March issue of Cattle Country. The online survey can be found at: www.surveymonkey.com/s/ MBP-Needs-Survey At the end of the survey, there is an optional section where participants can fill in their contact information if they wish. MBP is seeking to build a closer relationship with its members and would like to have the ability to reach out to producers on matters where it’s important to get information to them quickly. To encourage participation, every person who completes the survey will be entered to win a two-night stay for two at the Holiday Inn in Winnipeg or the Canad Inn in Brandon. If anyone has questions regarding the survey they are asked to call the MBP office at 1-800-772-0458. Funding to conduct the needs survey was provided to MBP through Growing Forward 2.

Groeneveld new CEO of Canadian Gelbvieh Association The Canadian Gelbvieh Association has announced the appointment of Gaylene Groeneveld as its new chief executive officer. Groeneveld took over the reins following the passing of Wendy Belcher in January. “Gaylene has worked with the Canadian Gelbvieh Association for ten years, and she was a natural fit for the job,” says Darcy Hrebeniuk, President of the CGA. “We respect her confidence and knowledge of the beef cattle industry, along with her publishing knowledge and work she does in producing the Canadian Gelbvieh Guide magazine,” he remarks. “A beef breed organization is only as strong as the members in it,” Groeneveld said. “Gelbvieh breeders are passionate about their cattle and their customers.” “Gelbvieh cattle have been in Canada for 43 years, and the future of the breed looks very bright going forward,” Hrebeniuk added.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

Schweitzer named new chairman of National Cattle Feeders’ Association Former Manitoba Beef Producers Preisdent Larry Schweitzer was elected as the new chairman of the National Cattle Feeders’ Association (NCFA) at the organization’s Annual General Meeting held in Red Deer on Feb. 18. The Hamitoa native moves into the position after serving as vice-chairman previously. Schweitzer is well known throughout the province’s beef industry having served on the MBP board from 2001 to 2006. He also served as MBP president in 2005. “MBP would like to congratulate Larry on being elected as NCFA chairman,” said MBP General Manager Melinda German. “Larry has long been a strong advocate for the beef industry and we look forward to working with him as NCFA chairman.” Saskatchewan cattle feeder Ryan Thompson (Vice Chair, Ceylon, SK) and Alberta cattle feeder Herb Groenenboom (Officer-at-Large, Coalhurst, AB) were also elected to the 2015 executive. Jeff Warrack will continue to serve on the board as the past chair, a position vacated by Bill Jameson of JGL Cattle of Moose Jaw. Jameson served as Chair from 2010 to 2012. Schweitzer takes the reins from

Larry Schweitzer

Warrack, a Strathmore area cattle feeder who chaired the NCFA for the past two years. Under Warrack’s leadership, a new five-year strategic plan was approved and implemented. The plan calls for NCFA to strengthen the cattle feeding sector in Canada by focusing on research and programs to promote growth and sustainability of cattle feeding in Canada, improved competitiveness, and strong industry leadership. According to the new NCFA chair, this trio of priorities will continue as a primary focus, as will the concerted effort

against issues like COOL. “We have pushed hard against U.S. mandatory country-of-origin labeling and we will continue to do so,” said Schweitzer. “Last year, NCFA contributed $165,000 to the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association to battle COOL, and we have consistently urged the federal government to remain firm on retaliation.” In October 2014, the WTO issued yet another ruling against COOL. “This is the third WTO ruling in favour of Canada. NCFA expects to see this issue permanently resolved in 2015,” added Schweitzer. The National Cattle Feeders’ Association was established in 2007 to serve as a unified voice for Canadian cattle feeders and to represent the sector on national issues. NCFA will continue to build awareness among government leaders and ensure a strong voice at the table for cattle feeders through strengthened communications with its members, stakeholders, and consumers.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 4

Verified Beef Production Workshops MAFRD together in partnership with Manitoba Beef Producers will be hosting Verified Beef Production workshops by video conference throughout the winter at a number of MAFRD locations in the province. VBP is Canada's verified on-farm food safety program for beef – a dynamic program to uphold consumer confidence in the products and good practices of this country's beef producers. Grass-roots driven and industry-led, the program is part of a broad effort by Canada's food providers to ensure on-farm food safety. The overall result is stronger competitiveness for Canada's beef industry, as food safety continues to grow as a major factor in consumer buying decisions.

Verified Beef Production Video Conference Workshops All workshops will take place from 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Date

Location

Pre-register by

Thursday, March 19, 2014 2015 Thursday, Nov 20,

MAFRDVideo Video conference Thursday Thursday, Nov March 13, 201412, 2015 MAFRD conference site site

Thursday, Dec16, 18,2015 2014 Thursday, April

Thursday, Dec April 11, 2014 MAFRD conference site site MAFRDVideo Video conference Thursday 9, 2015

Thursday, Jan 15, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Jan 8, 2015

Thursday, Feb 19, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Feb 12, 2015

Thursday, March 19, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, March 12, 2015

For more information on the training, to find your closest video location site or to preregister, call your local MAFRD office.


y! . da ed to it er lim st s gi g i Re atin Se

Open your mind to the endless possibilities!

H YAT T R E GE NC Y CA L GA RY, A P R I L 6 & 7, 2 015 W E S T I N H A R B OU R CA S T L E , T OR ON T O, O C T 5 & 6 , 2 015

LISTEN

...to women from Ag and related businesses as they reveal the secrets to their success and share what they’ve learned along the way.

...make the connections to women who know the way to success and how to reach your goals.

LEARN

...how to capitalize on your opportunities and reap the benefits of your growth.

GROW

...into the person you have the potential to be!

Here’s just a taste of the presentations you’re going to enjoy. Prepare to be inspired! Kirstine Stewart

Susan Blair

Courtenay Wolfe

Managing Director and Head of Twitter Canada, Toronto, Ontario

Executive Director, Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd, Burlington, Ontario

Venture Capitalist, Chairwomen, Vital Alert & Brilliant Resources, Toronto, Ontario

Transition from Grassroots to Corporate Boardroom

Your Network is Your Network: Building Success One Relationship at a Time

The Role of Women as Leaders Traditional leadership traits almost universally stem from the masculine point of view. But that’s changing very quickly, especially as more women than ever before enter the corporate and political realms. Kirstine Stewart shows us that it has never been a better time to be a driven woman, ready to subvert stereotypes and take your rightful place as a leader.

Lessons learned and critical success factors in a journey from Saskatchewan grain and cattle producer, to the head of Boehringer Ingelheim’s Canadian Animal Health business.

Relationships are the key to greater success, wealth and happiness. Effective networking is a life skill that takes practice. What separates highly successful people from everyone else is their ability to effectively build their networks. Learn how to develop this powerful skill.

Capitalize on your opportunities and reap the benefits of your growth! This conference could change your life. Attend in Calgary or Toronto - or both. Early Bird and Group Rates available now. Register today! Visit advancingwomenconference.ca or phone 403-686-8407.


Thank you to the sponsors of our 36th TH 36 ANNUAL GENERAL Annual General Meeting

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS!

EVENT FUNDING PROVIDED BY

DIAMOND LUNCH SPONSOR

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2015-01-17 11:39 AM


L GENERAL MEE TING DIAMOND SPONSORS

P R E S I D E N T ’S B A N Q U E T SPONSORS

THE ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP AWARD SPONSOR

9 00501.MB_Beef_AGM_Program15.indd 9

2015-01-17 11:39 AM


36 TH ANNUAL GENERAL M BANQUET BEEF SPONSOR

Cargill Meat Solutions and Cargill Animal Nutrition

BANQUET COCKTAIL SPONSOR

BREAKOUT SESSIONS SPONSOR

CO F F E E S P O N S O R S Enns Brothers Sterling Truck and Trailer Sales Ltd. 10 00501.MB_Beef_AGM_Program15.indd 10

2015-01-17 11:39 AM


L GENERAL MEE TING GOLD SPONSORS Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd.

Manitoba Charolais Association

DNA Insurance

Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association

EMF Nutrition Kane Veterinary Supplies & Allflex Canada MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation

Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Hereford Association

Merck Animal Health The AgriPost The Victoria Inn Zoetis 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ LANDMARK FEEDS

Mazergroup

S I LV E R S P O N S O R S Canadian Cattle Identification Agency Cattlex Dairy Farmers of Manitoba

Ducks Unlimited Canada

Prairie Livestock

Hamiota Feedlot Ltd.

TD Canada Trust Agriculture Services

Manitoba Angus Association

The Hartford

BRONZE SPONSORS Aikins Law

Cattle Track Technologies

Paddock Drilling Ltd.

Allen Leigh Security & Communication Ltd.

CIBC

Sunrise Credit Union

CattleMax Software

Murray Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Westman 11

00501.MB_Beef_AGM_Program15.indd 11

2015-01-17 11:39 AM


mbbeef.ca

Feb. 13, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

The 36th Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting was held Feb. 5-6 in Brandon. The event was a success as a strong and engaged group of producers and industry stakeholders were on hand for two jam packed days of events.

MBP’s 36th AGM a success In what could be called a sign of the current optimism in the industry, one of the largest crowds in years turned out for Manitoba Beef Producers 36th Annu-

al General Meeting in Brandon last week. Held Feb 5-6 at the Victoria Inn Hotel and Convention Centre, the theme of the meeting was Focus on the

Future. To that end, the various events that comprised the two-day affair were centred on the future and what producers can do to take advan-

tage of the opportunities available to them. Over 70 producers were on hand for day 1 of the AGM to learn about emerging markets and what must Continued on Page 2


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 2

Continued from Page 1

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry - CattleFax expects strong prices to continue.

be done to ship cattle to areas such as Europe and China. Attendance was also solid at the breakout session which looked at risk management programs and loans available to help producers mover their operations forward. Among the other highlights of the AGM were the review of MBP’s 2014 business operations, resolutions debate, President’s Banquet and a panel discussion which looked at the changing face of the country’s beef industry and the opportunities those changes present to producers. The directors and staff of Manitoba Beef Producers thank everyone who attended the AGM. Also, thank you to the various sponsors whose generous contributions helped make the event possible. A detailed recap of the AGM will be included in the March edition of Cattle Country.

How much can I afford to pay for that bull? - It’s all about the cattle numbers. - Heifer selection should start when calves hit the ground.

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Upcoming Events February 17

StockTalk webinar. The MAFRD farm production team produces a free monthly webinar for the livestock industry. To register for the next webinar click here.

February 25

The BCRC is hosting the webinar Managing Rumen Health to Improve Productivity. For more information click here.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

Attention Cattle Producers

Find out what MASC’s loan options for cattle mean to you The Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation has been providing financial assistance to producers for over 50 years. If you are a cattle producer looking to grow your operation, you should learn more about how we can help you. Stocker Loans – these loans provide short-term financing for producers who purchase feeder cattle or heifers for breeding. Direct Loans – these loans can be used for purchasing or raising breeding stock with terms up to ten years. Unbred heifers purchased for breeding have a first-year interest-only option. All our loans feature no pre-payment penalties and our low rates are fixed with flexible repayment terms that match your cash flow. To learn more about how MASC’s financing options will help you grow your operation, please contact your local MASC lending office or visit masc.mb.ca

Lending and Insurance Building a strong rural Manitoba

MASC – Lending – Cattle Loans


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 4

Verified Beef Production Workshops MAFRD together in partnership with Manitoba Beef Producers will be hosting Verified Beef Production workshops by video conference throughout the winter at a number of MAFRD locations in the province. VBP is Canada's verified on-farm food safety program for beef – a dynamic program to uphold consumer confidence in the products and good practices of this country's beef producers. Grass-roots driven and industry-led, the program is part of a broad effort by Canada's food providers to ensure on-farm food safety. The overall result is stronger competitiveness for Canada's beef industry, as food safety continues to grow as a major factor in consumer buying decisions.

Verified Beef Production Video Conference Workshops All workshops will take place from 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Date

Location

Pre-register by

Thursday, March 19,2014 2015 Thursday, Nov 20,

MAFRDVideo Video conference Thursday Thursday, Nov March 13, 201412, 2015 MAFRD conference site site

Thursday, Dec16, 18,2015 2014 Thursday, April

Thursday, Dec April 11, 2014 MAFRD conference site site MAFRDVideo Video conference Thursday 9, 2015

Thursday, Jan 15, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Jan 8, 2015

Thursday, Feb 19, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Feb 12, 2015

Thursday, March 19, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, March 12, 2015

For more information on the training, to find your closest video location site or to preregister, call your local MAFRD office.


36 ANNUAL GENERAL Thank you to the THANK YOU sponsors of our TO OUR SPONSORS! 36th Annual General Meeting TH

EVENT FUNDING PROVIDED BY

DIAMOND LUNCH SPONSOR

8 00501.MB_Beef_AGM_Program15.indd 8

2015-01-17 11:39 AM


GENERAL MEE TING DIAMOND SPONSORS

P R E S I D E N T ’S B A N Q U E T SPONSORS

THE ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP AWARD SPONSOR

9 00501.MB_Beef_AGM_Program15.indd 9

2015-01-17 11:39 AM


36

TH

ANNUAL GENERAL

BANQUET BEEF SPONSOR

Cargill Meat Solutions and Cargill Animal Nutrition

BANQUET COCKTAIL SPONSOR

BREAKOUT SESSIONS SPONSOR

CO F F E E S P O N S O R S Enns Brothers Sterling Truck and Trailer Sales Ltd. 10 00501.MB_Beef_AGM_Program15.indd 10

2015-01-17 11:39 AM


GENERAL MEE TING GOLD SPONSORS Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd.

Manitoba Charolais Association

DNA Insurance

Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association

EMF Nutrition Kane Veterinary Supplies & Allflex Canada MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation

Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Hereford Association

Merck Animal Health The AgriPost The Victoria Inn Zoetis 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ

Mazergroup

S I LV E R S P O N S O R S Canadian Cattle Identification Agency Cattlex Dairy Farmers of Manitoba

Ducks Unlimited Canada

Prairie Livestock

Hamiota Feedlot Ltd.

TD Canada Trust Agriculture Services

Manitoba Angus Association

The Hartford

BRONZE SPONSORS Aikins Law

Cattle Track Technologies

Paddock Drilling Ltd.

Allen Leigh Security & Communication Ltd.

CIBC

Sunrise Credit Union

CattleMax Software

Murray Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Westman 11

00501.MB_Beef_AGM_Program15.indd 11

2015-01-17 11:39 AM


y! . da ed to it er im st s l gi g i Re atin Se

Open your mind to the endless possibilities!

H YAT T R E GE NC Y CA L GA RY, A P R I L 6 & 7, 2 015 W E S T I N H A R B OU R CA S T L E , T OR ON T O, O C T 5 & 6 , 2 015

LISTEN

...to women from Ag and related businesses as they reveal the secrets to their success and share what they’ve learned along the way.

...make the connections to women who know the way to success and how to reach your goals.

LEARN

...how to capitalize on your opportunities and reap the benefits of your growth.

GROW

...into the person you have the potential to be!

Here’s just a taste of the presentations you’re going to enjoy. Prepare to be inspired! Kirstine Stewart

Susan Blair

Courtenay Wolfe

Managing Director and Head of Twitter Canada, Toronto, Ontario

Executive Director, Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd, Burlington, Ontario

Venture Capitalist, Chairwomen, Vital Alert & Brilliant Resources, Toronto, Ontario

Transition from Grassroots to Corporate Boardroom

Your Network is Your Network: Building Success One Relationship at a Time

The Role of Women as Leaders Traditional leadership traits almost universally stem from the masculine point of view. But that’s changing very quickly, especially as more women than ever before enter the corporate and political realms. Kirstine Stewart shows us that it has never been a better time to be a driven woman, ready to subvert stereotypes and take your rightful place as a leader.

Lessons learned and critical success factors in a journey from Saskatchewan grain and cattle producer, to the head of Boehringer Ingelheim’s Canadian Animal Health business.

Relationships are the key to greater success, wealth and happiness. Effective networking is a life skill that takes practice. What separates highly successful people from everyone else is their ability to effectively build their networks. Learn how to develop this powerful skill.

Capitalize on your opportunities and reap the benefits of your growth! This conference could change your life. Attend in Calgary or Toronto - or both. Early Bird and Group Rates available now. Register today! Visit advancingwomenconference.ca or phone 403-686-8407.


MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS P. (204) 772‐4542 220‐530 Century Street (800) 772‐0458 Winnipeg, MB R2X 2W3 F. (204) 774‐3264 www.mbbeef.ca _________________________________________________________________________

NEWS RELEASE

For immediate release Feb. 13, 2015

Manitoba Beef Producers comment on confirmed case of BSE WINNIPEG – Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) is continuing to monitor the developments surrounding a

confirmed case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in a beef cow in Alberta. Although any case of BSE is a concern, MBP is encouraged that the various protocols in place led to the discovery and display the strength of Canada’s BSE surveillance program. “That the animal was found through the national BSE surveillance program shows the program is working,” said Manitoba Beef Producers President Heinz Reimer. Thursday’s case is the first since 2011. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is continuing to investigate but has confirmed that no part of the animal’s carcass entered the human food or animal feed systems. With respect to trade, this new case of BSE is not expected to affect Canadian exports of cattle or beef and Canada will continue to be recognized as a controlled BSE risk country by the World Organization for Animal Health.

‐30‐

Manitoba Beef Producers is the exclusive voice of the beef industry in Manitoba. Our role and mission is to represent our beef producers through communication, research, advocacy and education. Manitoba Beef Producers represents 8,000 beef producers across the province.

For more information, please contact: Melinda German, General Manager Office: 204‐772‐4542

Chad Saxon, Communications Coordinator Office: 204‐772‐4542


mbbeef.ca

January 23, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

MBP Takes Part In Ag Days

Brandon was buzzing this week as the province’s largest agriculture show, Ag Days, took centre stage. Manitoba Beef Producers was one of the many exhibitors at the three day event and a number of people stopped by the MBP booth to speak with Project Coordinator Carollyne Kehler and MBP directors.

AGM to focus on the future

The future of the province’s beef industry will be in the spotlight when Manitoba Beef Producers gather for its 36th Annual General Meeting in Brandon. Scheduled for Feb. 5-6 at the Victoria Inn Hotel and Convention Centre, the theme of this year’s event is Focus on the Future. The two day event will include the President’s Banquet, a review of MBP’s business and operations, the review of the audited financial statement and reports from

a number of national organizations. The look to the future will take place on a couple of fronts. On the morning of Feb. 5, two breakout sessions will run concurrently at the Victoria Inn. Producers will be able to choose the session Capitalizing on New Market Opportunities and Programs and Initiatives That Can Move My Operation Forward. The market opportunities sessions will include a rep-

resentative from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada who will speak on new international trade deals and the technical requirements producers need to know to take advantage of the emerging markets. Calvin Vaags, the CEO of True North Foods in Carman, will speak about new opportunities for producers while Todd Wallace, who works in Farm Production Extension – Beef for MAFRD, will speak about changes to production methods to help producers

access the new markets. The programs and initiatives session will also feature three speakers. From the Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC), Jason Dobbin, the Livestock Price Insurance Coordinator and Rheal Bernard, MASC’s Sales and Service Manager North, will speak about business risk management programs and how producers can benefit from them. Kevin Craig, the Vice-President of Lending Operations for MASC will speak about Continued on Page 2


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry - An interesting look at the farmer/consumer relationship. - Producers are reminded to test for Ergot contamination - Rotational grazing for beginners. - Why is she open?

AGM to focus ... Continued from Page 1 what’s new in loan programming while Roy Arnott, a Farm Management Specialist for MAFRD, will talk top producers about land value planning. The business portion of the AGM will proceed on the afternoon of Feb. 5 and Agricultural Food and Rural Development Minister Ron Kostyshyn will be on hand to deliver the opening remarks. The afternoon will also include reports from MBP President Heinz Reimer, General Manager Melinda German, the approval of the financial statement and introduction of new directors. Provincial Bovine TB Coordinator Dr. Allan Preston will also speak at the conclusion of the business portion and will provide an update on the TB eradication efforts in the Riding Mountain area. The remainder of the afternoon will see the debate of the various resolutions that were brought forward at the 14 MBP district meetings which were held throughout the province in October and November of 2014. Former MBP director Marlin Beever will serve as the parliamentarian for the debate. A complete list of the resolutions can be found in the December edition of Cattle Country. Capping off the day will be the annual President’s Banquet. Among the highlights will be an address from Kostyshyn, remarks from Reimer and the presentation of the Manitoba Environmental Stewardship Award. Delivering the keynote address will be Dan Ohler whose presentation will encourage producers to “Think Outside the Barn.” Day two of the AGM will focus on issues of importance to MBP members with a panel discussion entitled The Changing Face of Canada’s Beef Industry and the Opportunities It Presents. Headlining the panel are Manitoba producer Brett McRae, who is a member of the Cattleman’s Young Leader Program, Rob Meijer, President of Canada Beef Inc. and Trish Sahlstrom, the Vice-President of Purchasing and Distribution for A&W Canada. Closing out the AGM will be reports from a number of national organizations including the Beef Cattle Research Council, National Cattle Feeders Association and Canadian Cattleman’s Association. All MBP members are encouraged to attend the AGM and help to shape the future of their organization. To register for the AGM or to get further information people may go to: http://www.mbbeef.ca/annual-meeting/

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Page 2

Upcoming Events February 5-6

Manitoba Beef Producers 36th AGM. One of the premiere events for MBP, the AGM will be held at Brandon’s Victoria Inn and Convention centre. To register click here.

February 17

StockTalk webinar. The MAFRD farm production team produces a free monthly webinar for the livestock industry. To register for the next webinar click here.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

BodyConditionScoring.ca launches with new tools to help producers boost production, profit A new webpage offers a fresh WHAT’S SCORE? look at YOUR the importance of monitoring the nutrition of beef cows A Body Condition Score (BCS) describes the relative amount of fat an animal is carrying based on a 5-point and the role body condition scale. Body condition scoring is a hands-on process and is better than assessing visually because fat cover plays in overall productivity and and long winter hair coats are deceiving. The process is profit. easy and quick. The webpage, www.bodyconFat cover Hide ditionscoring.ca, features an Eye interactive tool which makes the muscle value of maintaining cows at the Short ribs Thumb Spine pressure right body condition abundantly clear in terms of reproductive A score of 1 is extremely thin, and 5 is very fat. Ideally, cows should be managed to have a BCS of 2.5 to 3. performance, calf health, weanFeel for fat cover with your hands at: 1) the short ribs, ing weights and other important 2) over the spine, aspects of production. It also 3) the hook and pins, and 4) either side of the tail head. includes an engaging four minute video that shows examples An animal in optimum condition will have a thin layer of fat in these areas, so it will take some pressure to feel of cows in various condition, the bones. and explains how to quickly and easily measure fat cover. The nutritional information available will help producers decide how to manage their rations once they have an accurate measure of their cows’ condition to get and keep their animals in the right condition. Recognizing that internet access is still a barrier in some regions, all of the webpage’s content will be available on USB data sticks. Producers needing to access the information offline can pick up a USB stick at some industry events or through a direct request to the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) at info@beefresearch. ca or (403) 275-8558 ext 302. The project is a collaborative effort between the BCRC,

BCS IT pAYS TO mAkE bOdY COndITIOn SCORIng A pART Of ROUTInE mAnAgEmEnT.

REPRODUCTION DRIVES PROFIT Did you know? For more information about Body Condition Scoring, explore the training materials and interactive web tools at www.bodyconditionscoring.ca, talk to your veterinarian or consult a beef extension specialist. If Internet access is an issue call 403-275-8558 ext. 302 to receive all the information and interactive tools on a free USB data stick that plugs into your computer.

Western College of Veterinary Medicine

College of Agriculture and Bioresources

Alberta Beef Producers, Farm and Food Care Saskatchewan, the University of Saskatchewan and the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture. Funding was provided by Alberta’s Growing Forward 2 Livestock Welfare Delivery Agent Program. Growing Forward 2 is a federal-provincial-territorial government initiative to drive College of Agriculture and Bioresources

• Reproduction is 5X more important than growth rate, and 10X more important than carcass quality when it comes to profit • Body condition has the greatest impact on reproduction** • Thin cows are only half as productive in those in optimum condition. Thin cows at calving negatively affect: º Calf health up to and beyond weaning º Weaning weights º Breeding potential º Overall herd performance º Profit

College of Agriculture and Bioresources

College of Agriculture and Bioresources

• Reproduction is the most important factor affecting profitability

• Every missed breeding cycle represents a 42 lb loss in weaning weight

www.bodyconditionscoring.ca

an innovative, competitive and profitable Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector. The groups expect that the new, easily accessible and user-friendly resources will not only lead to improved bottom lines for cow-calf producers, but also prevent animal welfare concerns during cold winter months.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 4

Verified Beef Production Workshops MAFRD together in partnership with Manitoba Beef Producers will be hosting Verified Beef Production workshops by video conference throughout the winter at a number of MAFRD locations in the province. VBP is Canada's verified on-farm food safety program for beef – a dynamic program to uphold consumer confidence in the products and good practices of this country's beef producers. Grass-roots driven and industry-led, the program is part of a broad effort by Canada's food providers to ensure on-farm food safety. The overall result is stronger competitiveness for Canada's beef industry, as food safety continues to grow as a major factor in consumer buying decisions.

Verified Beef Production Video Conference Workshops All workshops will take place from 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Date

Location

Pre-register by

Thursday, Nov 20, 2014

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Nov 13, 2014

Thursday, Dec 18, 2014

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Dec 11, 2014

Thursday, Jan 15, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Jan 8, 2015

Thursday, Feb 19, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Feb 12, 2015

Thursday, March 19, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, March 12, 2015

For more information on the training, to find your closest video location site or to preregister, call your local MAFRD office.


REGISTER TODAY!

36TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING & PRESIDENT’S BANQUET February 5-6, 2015 | Victoria Inn, Brandon, MB REGISTER AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR CALL 1-800-772-0458.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS 36TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR MAIL OR FAX YOUR REGISTRATION TODAY! EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION $75 PER PERSON

PERSON 1: q EARLY BIRD $75 q GENERAL $90

• Must be purchased by Monday, January 5, 2015 at 4 p.m.

NAME: _______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 5, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50).

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• Non-refundable.

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________

Book early to get your best value!

MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 PER PERSON GENERAL REGISTRATION $90 PER PERSON - AFTER JAN. 5 • Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 5, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). • Non-refundable.

q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________

ADDITIONAL AGM DETAILS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT MBBEEF.CA UNDER THE NEWS TAB.

PHONE: ______________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ PERSON 2 (IF REQUIRED): q EARLY BIRD $75 q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 q GENERAL $90 q YOUNG PRODUCER *Complimentary with mentor’s registration NAME: _______________________________________________

NEW! YOUNG PRODUCER MENTORSHIP OFFER

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• MBP members are encouraged to mentor and register a young producer (ages 18 to 39).

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________

• The young producer receives a complimentary registration with a mentor’s registration.

PHONE: ______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 5, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). MAKE CHEQUE PAYABLE TO: Manitoba Beef Producers 220 - 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 PHONE: 1-800-772-0458 FAX: 204-774-3264

RESERVE A ROOM: Call the Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre toll free: 1-800-852-2710 Quote booking number: 268463

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ EXTRA BANQUET TICKET NAME: _______________________________________________ q BANQUET $50 *Banquet tickets are non-refundable.

www.mbbeef.ca

Click here to register for the 36th Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting


Attention Cattle Producers

Find out what MASC’s loan options for cattle mean to you The Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation has been providing financial assistance to producers for over 50 years. If you are a cattle producer looking to grow your operation, you should learn more about how we can help you. Stocker Loans – these loans provide short-term financing for producers who purchase feeder cattle or heifers for breeding. Direct Loans – these loans can be used for purchasing or raising breeding stock with terms up to ten years. Unbred heifers purchased for breeding have a first-year interest-only option. All our loans feature no pre-payment penalties and our low rates are fixed with flexible repayment terms that match your cash flow. To learn more about how MASC’s financing options will help you grow your operation, please contact your local MASC lending office or visit masc.mb.ca

Lending and Insurance Building a strong rural Manitoba

MASC – Lending – Cattle Loans


CCA continuing work towards a resolution of COOL dispute Courtesy CCA Action News The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) attended the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) annual convention in mid-January as part of its ongoing lobbying efforts related to U.S. mandatory Country of Origin Labeling (COOL). The CCA is making sure that U.S. farmers, ranchers and legislators understand that Canada is serious about imposing tariffs on a wide variety of U.S. agriculture and processed products if the discrimination against our livestock caused by COOL is not eliminated. At the AFBF convention, the CCA ensured that U.S. farmers and ranchers are aware of what is at stake and actively sought their assistance in bringing the COOL legislation into conformity with the World Trade organization (WTO). AFBF’s policy is to support COOL as long as it is WTO compliant. This policy works for the CCA as long as AFBF staff in Washington have the direction to work actively on making COOL compliant - which it clearly is not. CCA President Dave Solverson noted that CCA met with leadership from many state Farm Bureau organizations that in the past have supported or been split on COOL but now are re-evaluating their positions. Many agree that COOL has not delivered the once anticipated benefits for U.S. cattle and hog producers. CCA

heard many acknowledge that as long as COOL remains intact for fruit, vegetables, nuts and catfish, they would not stand in the way of an amendment or repeal of the red meat portion of the COOL legislation. In terms of resolving COOL, the CCA feels that the simplest solution (and one that the most people seem to agree on) is to repeal COOL for beef and pork. Ultimately, the provisions of the legislation that necessitate imported livestock to be segregated need to be eliminated. The CCA expects that by this coming summer either the U.S. will have to comply or Canada will implement retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports to our market. The CCA reiterated that it is our sincere hope that the U.S. will act soon to prevent Canada from moving to the next phase of retaliation. In addition to attending general session meetings, CCA co-hosted an information breakfast attended by several state Farm Bureau presidents and senior staff. Solverson enjoyed spending the better part of the Saturday and Sunday in the Canada booth in the AFBF tradeshow where he had the opportunity to visit with countless numbers of farmers and ranchers from all across the U.S. and tell them about Canada-U.S. agriculture trade. Solverson also participated in a press conference to discuss Canada-U.S. cattle issues. COOL was a hot topic all around these events and there was excellent

interest from producers and media alike. Solverson’s takeaway from these meetings and events is that there is momentum to get a legislative fix for COOL. The threat of retaliation is clearly a concern for many U.S. legislators and exporters. Earlier in January, at the State Agriculture and Rural Legislators (SARL) meeting, Canada’s Ambassador to the U.S., Gary Doer, indicated that the decision to retaliate if necessary has been considered widely in the Government of Canada and has the backing of Prime Minister Stephen Harper and will be followed through upon if Congress does not eliminate the need for imported cattle to be segregated in the U.S. Following the Ambassador’s remarks, many of the state legislators asked CCA Vice President Dan Darling to elaborate why COOL has Canada so upset and how could it be fixed. Many legislators had only a vague idea about COOL and have neither supported nor opposed it, but now in the face of potential retaliatory tariffs want to know more about it. This was the intention of publishing the retaliation list early. The CCA will continue its lobbying efforts until a resolution that genuinely eliminates the discrimination is achieved. The CCA expects that by this summer either the U.S. will have to comply or Canada will implement retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports to our market.


Manitoba Beef Producers 36 TH ANNUAL GENERAL 36thE AGM V E N T AGAgenda ENDA THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2015 11 A.M.

TRADE SHOW OPENS

10 A.M. - 12 P.M.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS - CONCURRENT SESSIONS I. Capitalizing on New Market Opportunities i. International Trade Deals and Technical Requirements - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada ii. True North Foods – New Opportunities - Calvin Vaags, CEO iii. Changing Production Methods to Access New Markets Tod Wallace, Farm Production Extension – Beef, Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development II. Programs and Initiatives That Can Move My Operation Forward i. Business Risk Management Programs – How Insurance Programs can Benefit my Operations – Jason Dobbin, Livestock Price Insurance Coordinator and Rheal Bernard, Sales and Service Manager North ii. What’s New for Loan Programming – Kevin Craig, Vice President, Lending Operations, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation iii. Land Value Planning – Roy Arnott, Farm Management Specialist – Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development

12 P.M. - 1 P.M.

LUNCH FOR REGISTERED AGM DELEGATES

Convention Convenes 1 P.M. - 1:15 P.M.

OPENING REMARKS BY AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT MINISTER RON KOSTYSHYN

EVENT FUNDING PROVIDED BY:

4 00501.MB_Beef_AGM_Program15.indd 4

2015-01-17 11:39 AM


1:15 P.M. - 2 P.M.

BUSINESS PORTION OF THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING • Approval of Agenda - Heinz Reimer • Approval of Minutes from 2014 35th AGM - Heinz Reimer • Report from the President - Heinz Reimer • Report from the GM - Melinda German • Report from the Finance Chair -Theresa Zuk » Approval of MBP’s audited financial statement » Appointment of MBP auditor for the upcoming fiscal year • Introduction of MBP Directors - Melinda German • Appointments / Ratifications of Directors - Melinda German

2 P.M. - 2:10 P.M.

UPDATE FROM BOVINE TB COORDINATOR – DR. ALLAN PRESTON

2:10 P.M. - 3 P.M.

RESOLUTIONS DEBATE (PART I) – MARLIN BEEVER, PARLIAMENTARIAN

3 P.M. – 3:30 P.M.

COFFEE BREAK

3:30 P.M. – 5 P.M.

RESOLUTIONS DEBATE (PART II)

5:30 P.M.

COCKTAIL HOUR

6:30 P.M.

PRESIDENT’S BANQUET A) Opening Remarks from the President B) Hon. Ron Kostyshyn, Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development C) Manitoba TESA Award D) Dinner E) Dessert F) Retiring Directors Speeches

36 TH ANNUAL GENERAL 8 P.M.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS -- DAN OHLER, THINKIN’ OUTSIDE THE BARN

E V E N T AG E N D A

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2015 8 A.M. - 8:30 A.M.

COFFEE

8:30 A.M. - 9:45 A.M. PANEL DISCUSSION: THE CHANGING FACE OF CANADA’S BEEF INDUSTRY AND THE OPPORTUNITIES IT PRESENTS • Brett McRae, 2014 Cattlemen’s Young Leader Program • Rob Meijer - President, Canada Beef Inc. 5 • Trish Sahlstrom – VP of Purchasing & Distribution, A&W Canada 00501.MB_Beef_AGM_Program15.indd 5

9:45 A.M. - 10 A.M. COFFEE BREAK

2015-01-17 11:39 AM

10 A.M. - 11:30 A.M. REPORTS FROM NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS • Report from the Beef Cattle Research Council - Dr. Reynold Bergen, Science Director • Report from National Cattle Feeders Association – Casey Vander Ploeg, Manager Policy & Research • Report from Brian Perillat, Canfax – Manager and Senior Analyst • Report from Canadian Cattlemen’s Association – Ramona Byth, CCA & MBP Executive 12 P.M.

PRESIDENT’S CLOSING REMARKS

12:15 P.M.

ADJOURNMENT


February 2015 CATTLE COUNTRY

THANK YOU TO OUR GENEROUS AGM SPONSORS EVENT FUNDING PROVIDED BY

DIAMOND LUNCH SPONSOR

PRESIDENT’S BANQUET SPONSORS

DIAMOND SPONSORS

THE ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP AWARD SPONSOR

BANQUET BEEF SPONSOR Cargill Meat Solutions and Cargill Animal Nutrition

BANQUET COCKTAIL SPONSOR

BREAKOUT SESSIONS SPONSOR

COFFEE SPONSORS Enns Brothers Sterling Truck and Trailer Sales Ltd.

GOLD SPONSORS Alert Agri Distributors Inc./P. Quintaine & Sons Ltd. DNA Insurance EMF Nutrition Kane Veterinary Supplies & Allflex Canada MacDon Industries Ltd. Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation Manitoba Charolais Association Manitoba Forage & Grassland Association Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation Manitoba Hereford Association Mazergroup Merck Animal Health

The AgriPost The Victoria Inn Zoetis 730 CKDM 880 CKLQ SILVER SPONSORS Canadian Cattle Identification Agency Cattlex Dairy Farmers of Manitoba Ducks Unlimited Canada Hamiota Feedlot Ltd. Manitoba Angus Association

Prairie Livestock TD Canada Trust Agriculture Services The Hartford BRONZE SPONSORS Aikins Law Allen Leigh Security & Communication Ltd. CattleMax Software Cattle Track Technologies CIBC Murray Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Westman Paddock Drilling Ltd. Sunrise Credit Union

BUY ALL THE BULL YOU CAN BUY

Invest in Manitoba Simmental Bull Power During a Bull Market and Cash in for Years to Come February 13 February 16 February 22 March 11 March 15 March 16

M&J Farms Simmental and Angus Bull Sale Rendezvous Farms Bull & Female Sale Bonchuk Farms Bull Sale Mar Mac Farms & Guests Simmental & Angus Bull Sale Rebels of the West Bull Sale Genetic Source Simmental Bull Sale

Russell, MB Ste. Rose du Lac, MB Virden, MB Brandon, MB Virden, MB Brandon, MB

5


mbbeef.ca

January 9, 2015

E-Newsletter An update from Manitoba Beef Producers

National Beef Strategy officially launched The growing global demand for protein has presented Canada’s beef industry with an unprecedented opportunity to increase demand for its beef products. The ability of industry to fully seize this opportunity is not without significant challenges; tight cattle supplies, reduced marketings, and competition for arable land are among the factors to be overcome. Canada’s beef sector organizations have responded to

Trevor Atchison

the challenge with the creation of the National Beef Strategy. A collaborative effort of national and provincial beef sector organizations, the National Beef

Find Us Online Facebook.com @ManitobaBeef

mbbeef.ca

Strategy provides the framework for how the organizations can work together to best position the Canadian beef industry for greater profitability, growth and continued production of a high quality beef product of choice in the world. Released publicly today, the National Beef Strategy proposes a united path forward to meeting these challenges and opportunities with a goal to benefit all sectors of the beef industry. Mar-

Martin Unrau

tin Unrau and Trevor Atchison, co-chairs of the National Beef Strategic Planning Group and members Continued on Page 2

Upcoming Events February 5-6

Manitoba Beef Producers 36th AGM. One of the premiere events for MBP, the AGM will be held at Brandon’s Victoria Inn and Convention centre. To register click here.

January 13

StockTalk webinar. Topic: Keeping backgrouder calves healthy and health issues in the breeding herd. To register click here.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

In the News A look at the news and other information impacting Manitoba’s Beef industry - Exploring the potential benefits of prebiotic and synbiotic use in cattle - Open houses on the provincial flood control infrastrucutre review start next week - A look at the need for innovation in the cow-calf sector - A new report looks into the issue of animal predation. - An article on the recent tax deferral program announcement by the federal government

Page 2

National Beef Strategy ... Continued from Page 1

of the Canadian Beef Advisors, a group of experienced beef sector professionals leading the implementation of the National Beef Strategy, believe the beef industry needs to adapt and evolve to stay relevant. The Strategy is the way to move the industry forward, together. “The need for industry to push itself is now,” says Unrau. “The National Beef Strategy will build on and strengthen the foundational pieces of existing work that have enabled the beef industry to grow to date but in a manner which will be more responsive to current and future needs. This will enable chronic issues, like infrastructure and capacity, to be addressed more holistically, and lead to programming to help grow beef demand and bridge to where industry wants to be in the future.” Developed by industry for industry, the National Beef Strategy seeks to position the Canadian beef industry as the most trusted and competitive high quality beef cattle producer in the world recognized for its superior quality, safety, value, innovation and sustainable production methods. Atchison said that moving forward with a unified approach will require the same flexibility beef producers demonstrate as they adjust business plans to manage unanticipated challenges thrown in their way. “This strategy is something all stakeholders in the industry can buy into. There’s strength in numbers and by working together we will build a stronger and more robust industry capable of meeting and responding to the opportunities now and into the future,” he said. Learn more about how stakeholders can achieve a dynamic and profitable Canadian cattle and beef industry at www. beefstrategy.com.

If you have an article that may be of interest to E-Newsletter readers please email csaxon@mbbeef.ca


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 3

Survey looking into labour needs on the farm The issue of labour shortages in the agriculture industry is becoming a major concern throughout the country and particularly in Manitoba where a number of people are flocking to Saskatchewan and Alberta for high paying jobs in the oilfield. With that in mind, the Canadian Agricultural Human Resource Council (CAHRC) recently announced a survey to look at the country’s Ag workforce from every commodity and region. In a posting on their website, the CAHRC said they need help from all corners of the agricultural sector to answer a number of important questions including: how much farm work is done by family members and how much is done by employees? What work is done by domestic and or foreign workers? Is there

a growing reliance on hiring employees to support farm operations? What labour challenges are facing producers today? By answering the online survey, which will take about 10 to 15 minutes to complete, producers will be ensure their needs are included in the work that will help “government and educators create policies and programs that will shape future farm labour requirements.� The CAHRD post also noted it is imperative that they learn about producer opinions on the opportunities, challenges and issues that their operation face, as well as their suggestions for improving the agricultural workforce. Participation in the survey is completely confidential and voluntary. To take part in the survey,

click the area that applies to you.

Employer (farm owner/oper-

ators): Please complete this survey if you are a farm business owner, or a farm manager who is completing the survey on behalf of the owner. Worker (farm worker, family or paid): Please complete this survey if you are a family member working in the farm business, paid or unpaid, or a non-family worker hired by the farm business. Stakeholder: This survey will be completed by provincial governments, provincial agricultural sector councils, agricultural associations, commodity groups, labour organizations and researchers interested in labour issues.


Manitoba Beef Producers Newsletter

Page 4

Verified Beef Production Workshops MAFRD together in partnership with Manitoba Beef Producers will be hosting Verified Beef Production workshops by video conference throughout the winter at a number of MAFRD locations in the province. VBP is Canada's verified on-farm food safety program for beef – a dynamic program to uphold consumer confidence in the products and good practices of this country's beef producers. Grass-roots driven and industry-led, the program is part of a broad effort by Canada's food providers to ensure on-farm food safety. The overall result is stronger competitiveness for Canada's beef industry, as food safety continues to grow as a major factor in consumer buying decisions.

Verified Beef Production Video Conference Workshops All workshops will take place from 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm Date

Location

Pre-register by

Thursday, Nov 20, 2014

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Nov 13, 2014

Thursday, Dec 18, 2014

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Dec 11, 2014

Thursday, Jan 15, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Jan 8, 2015

Thursday, Feb 19, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, Feb 12, 2015

Thursday, March 19, 2015

MAFRD Video conference site Thursday, March 12, 2015

For more information on the training, to find your closest video location site or to preregister, call your local MAFRD office.


REGISTER TODAY!

36TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING & PRESIDENT’S BANQUET February 5-6, 2015 | Victoria Inn, Brandon, MB REGISTER AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR CALL 1-800-772-0458.

MANITOBA BEEF PRODUCERS 36TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.MBBEEF.CA OR MAIL OR FAX YOUR REGISTRATION TODAY! EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION $75 PER PERSON

PERSON 1: q EARLY BIRD $75 q GENERAL $90

• Must be purchased by Monday, January 5, 2015 at 4 p.m.

NAME: _______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 5, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50).

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• Non-refundable.

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________

Book early to get your best value!

MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 PER PERSON GENERAL REGISTRATION $90 PER PERSON - AFTER JAN. 5 • Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 5, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). • Non-refundable.

q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________

ADDITIONAL AGM DETAILS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT MBBEEF.CA UNDER THE NEWS TAB.

PHONE: ______________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ PERSON 2 (IF REQUIRED): q EARLY BIRD $75 q MEETING ONLY (NO BANQUET) $40 q GENERAL $90 q YOUNG PRODUCER *Complimentary with mentor’s registration NAME: _______________________________________________

NEW! YOUNG PRODUCER MENTORSHIP OFFER

ADDRESS: ____________________________________________

• MBP members are encouraged to mentor and register a young producer (ages 18 to 39).

CITY/TOWN: __________________________________________

• The young producer receives a complimentary registration with a mentor’s registration.

PHONE: ______________________________________________

• Package includes admission to all MBP meetings, lunch on February 5, coffee breaks, 1 FREE Banquet ticket (value: $50). MAKE CHEQUE PAYABLE TO: Manitoba Beef Producers 220 - 530 Century Street Winnipeg, MB R3H 0Y4 PHONE: 1-800-772-0458 FAX: 204-774-3264

RESERVE A ROOM: Call the Victoria Inn Hotel & Convention Centre toll free: 1-800-852-2710 Quote booking number: 268463

POSTAL CODE: ________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________________________ EMAIL: ______________________________________________ EXTRA BANQUET TICKET NAME: _______________________________________________ q BANQUET $50 *Banquet tickets are non-refundable.

www.mbbeef.ca

Click here to register for the 36th Manitoba Beef Producers Annual General Meeting


Attention Cattle Producers

Find out what MASC’s loan options for cattle mean to you The Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation has been providing financial assistance to producers for over 50 years. If you are a cattle producer looking to grow your operation, you should learn more about how we can help you. Stocker Loans – these loans provide short-term financing for producers who purchase feeder cattle or heifers for breeding. Direct Loans – these loans can be used for purchasing or raising breeding stock with terms up to ten years. Unbred heifers purchased for breeding have a first-year interest-only option. All our loans feature no pre-payment penalties and our low rates are fixed with flexible repayment terms that match your cash flow. To learn more about how MASC’s financing options will help you grow your operation, please contact your local MASC lending office or visit masc.mb.ca

Lending and Insurance Building a strong rural Manitoba

MASC – Lending – Cattle Loans


Southeast Beef & Forage Day th

Thursday, January 15 , 2015 Vita MB Ukrainian National Home of Vita (Hall)


SEMINAR SERIES 2014-2015

Seminar #5 will be presented by:

Dr. Martin Entz

Department of Plant Science

“Conservation agriculture, organic farming and agroecology: The three musketeers of a sustainable food system�

Wednesday, January 21, 2015 Carolyn Sifton Lecture Theatre 130 Agriculture Building

3:30 - 4:30 pm Refreshments at 3:00 pm in the Atrium

All are welcome!


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