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TIMOTHY BROEGE

Manhattan Beach Music


Recording Credits for Sinfonia III: Performance by the University of Northern Colorado Wind Ensemble, Eugene Corporon, conductor.

This virtual conductor score and recording are designated “private,� and any publication or distribution beyond the web sites of Manhattan Beach Music is prohibited


SINFONIA III H

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FOR CONC ERT BA N D

T I M O T H Y B RO E G E I N S T R U M E N T A T I O N 1 Full Score

Trumpets as originally scored:

4 Flute 1 4 Flute 2/Piccolo 1 Oboe 1 1 Oboe 2 5 Bb Clarinet 1 5 Bb Clarinet 2 2 Bb Bass Clarinet 1 Bassoon 1 1 Bassoon 2 Optional saxophone parts:

2 Eb Alto Saxophone 1 2 Eb Alto Saxophone 2 1 Bb Tenor Saxophone 1 Eb Baritone Saxophone

1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Optional Euphonium parts:

C Trumpet 1 C Trumpet 2 C Trumpet 3 C Trumpet 4

3 Euphonium

Alternative trumpet parts:

1 Piano

Bb Trumpet 1 Bb Trumpet 2 Bb Trumpet 3 Bb Trumpet 4 1st Horn in F 2nd Horn in F 1st Trombone 2nd Trombone

1 Bass Trombone

1 Euphonium T.C. 3 Tuba 3 String Bass 1 Timpani 3 Percussion (in score format for three players) Whip, Woodblock, Snare Drum, Maracas, Marimba, Xylophone, Chimes, Cymbal (susp.), Bass Drum, Tom Tom, Bells, Finger Cymbals, Triangle, Tambourine, Cymbals (pr.), Police Whistle

P R I N T E D O N A RC H I VA L PA P E R

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SINFONIA III: HYMNS AND DANCES I N M E M O R Y O F M Y F AT H E R , E D WA R D C . B R O E G E

Commissioned by H. Robert Reynolds for the University of Wisconsin Wind Ensemble, SINFONIA III was premiered at Madison, Wisconsin in April of 1973. The work was composed during the Summer of 1972 at Brielle, New Jersey. Thanks to the advocacy of such distinguished conductors as Bob Reynolds, Eugene Corporon, and Jack Delaney, SINFONIA III has received many performances during the years since its premiere and has indeed become, alongside SINFONIA V , one of my most popular wind ensemble pieces. My father’s death in December of 1970 caused me to produce three works in which I paid tribute to his sweet soul and loving kindness. CHICAGO SONGS for piano and BENEDICTUS for mezzo soprano, tuba, and piano were both composed in 1971. SINFONIA III completes the tribute and, being more playful in nature, balances the seriousness of the previous two pieces. An earlier subtitle for the work was “Quodlibet à 25.” A Quodlibet is usually defined as a succession of several tunes, often humorous, selected at the whim of the composer; and this work, in the form of a Quodlibet, contains both original materials (the opening Chaconne, the Stravinsky-ish Chorale, and the dance tunes, and Ragtime of the Rondeau), and quotations (Dowland’s lute song, “If My Complaints Could Passions Move,” and the 19th-century gospel hymn, “I Love to Tell the Story,” words by Catherine Hankey, tune by William G. Fischer), which represent the kinds of music that appealed to my father. For many years he served as superintendent of the Presbyterian Sunday School in Belmar, New Jersey, and “I Love to Tell the Story” was one of his favorite hymns. There are in SINFONIA III both light and shadow, both humor and seriousness, in an attempt to depict in sound, as much as I was able to do in the summer of 1972, something of the nature of this man who showered so much love upon his wife and four sons and enriched the lives of the many people who knew him.

TIMOTHY BROEGE O C E A N P O R T, N E W J E R S E Y SPRING, 1990


GUIDELINES FOR PERFORMANCE

1. The lid of the piano should be completely opened or removed. Piano and string bass constitute a continuo of sorts, and must be fully equal participants in the ensemble. 2. The singing in the concluding Polonaise need not be overly polished or professional. The desired eect is that of a small church congregation fervently singing a beloved hymn. A small unison chorus of 10–12 voices may be added to supplement the singing of the instrumentalists, if desired. A mix of male and female voices is preferable, but there is no problem if one type of voice predominates. The words should at all times be clearly projected and dynamic balances may be adjusted as necessary. 3. An antiphonal seating plan is recommended: Woodwinds to the left, percussion in the center, piano and string bass in front of the percussion, brasses to the right [all as seen from the perspective of the audience]. If an optional chorus is used, these singers should sit interspersed with the instrumentalists and should remain seated throughout the piece. 4. Although intended for an ensemble of twenty-ďŹ ve players, SINFONIA III may be successfully performed by a larger ensemble with instrumental parts doubled as desired. However, if a larger ensemble is used, it is recommended that the number of string basses be increased to at least three so that proper balances are maintained.


A F E W WO R D S A B O U T T H E O P T I O N A L A N D A LT E R N AT I V E PA RT S F O R S I N F O N I A I I I

When I composed S I N F O N I A I I I during the summer of 1972, I intended that the work be performed by an ensemble of twenty-five players consisting of winds, percussion, string bass and piano, one player to a part, with optional voices ad libitum. During the past twenty years, the piece has been performed many, many times [in its rental edition: Ed.], often by ensembles a good deal larger than what I had originally conceived, and I have often been asked if I would consider revising the work in terms of making it more useful for standard wind ensemble/concert band instrumentations. Accordingly, as Manhattan Beach Music’s director Bob Margolis and I discussed the preparations for the publication of the sale edition (at last!) of SINFONIA III , we agreed that optional parts for saxophones and euphonium should be provided. I want to point out that these optional parts contain no new harmonic, melodic or rhythmic material and are not necessary for successful performances of the piece. These optional parts serve to reinforce certain existing materials in the score and should prove useful when larger ensembles perform the work. However, I hope that from time to time conductors will undertake to perform the piece as I originally intended it, with an ensemble of twenty-five players, one player to a part, and thus without any recourse to the optional parts. Also note that the present edition provides the original C Trumpet parts, which should be used in such twenty-five player performances, and also the same parts transposed for Bb Trumpets, which are provided as the alternative of choice for concert band performances. As for extra singers, I say the more the merrier. As in most performances, the conductor most ultimately be the arbiter of balances and effectiveness of execution. Nothing in the optional parts should be considered necessary, and conductors should feel free to omit such material from the optional parts as they see fit. T I M OT H Y B RO E G E O C E A N P O R T, N E W J E R S E Y SEPTEMBER, 1992

F I R S T P U B L I C AT I O N — M A N H AT TA N B E A C H M U S I C — 2 0 0 9 THIRT Y SEVEN YEARS AFTER ITS COMPOSITION IN 1972


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Sinfonia III for concert band by Timothy Broege  

Sinfonia III: Hymns and Dances (Quodlibet à 25) for concert band (wind ensemble) by Timothy Broege