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Joni Greene c o n c e r t

b a n d

Net Luck �oarin�

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c


Recording Credits for Net Luck Soaring: Reading by the University of Kansas Wind Ensemble, Paul W. Popiel, conductor


NET LUCK SOARING F O R

C O N C E R T

B A N D

JON I G RE EN E I N S T R U M E N T A T I O N 1 Full Score

2 Eb Alto Saxophone 1

3 Trombone 2

1 Piccolo

2 Eb Alto Saxophone 2

3 Euphonium (B.C.)

4 Flute 1

1 Bb Tenor Saxophone

4 Flute 2

1 Eb Baritone Saxophone

2 Euphonium (T.C.) 4 Tuba 2 Timpani

2 Oboe

3 Bb Trumpet 1

2 Percussion 1 Glockenspiel, Chimes

4 Bb Clarinet 1

3 Bb Trumpet 2

4 Bb Clarinet 2

3 Bb Trumpet 3

4 Bb Clarinet 3

2 F Horn 1

2 Percussion 2 Vibraphone (requires contrabass bow for arco sections), Suspended Cymbal (large)

2 Percussion 3 Wind Chimes, Marimba, Tam-tam

3 Bb Bass Clarinet

2 F Horn 2

2 Bassoon

3 Trombone 1

2 Percussion 4 2 Suspended Cymbals (medium & large), Chimes, Triangle, Bass Drum

P R I N T E D O N A RC H I VA L PA P E R

Gg Manhattan Beach Music 1595 East 46th Street Brooklyn, New York 11234 Web: www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com E-mail: customerservice@manhattanbeachmusic.com Voicemail: 718/338-4137

M A N H AT TA N B E AC H M U S I C


F O R N O P P A N U T

N E T

L U C K

—

L U C K S A N A W I C H I E N

october 29, 1993 – june 10, 2011

2


P R O g R A M

N O T E

is a work inspired by love and friendship. It celebrates the life of a caring and considerate young man, Net Luck — a clarinet and percussion player whose love of life has touched many. Commissioned by Laura Cross and the band parents of Leander High School (Leander, Texas), N E T L U C K S O A R I N g was a gift to the band honoring Net and his family. I was deeply moved by the love and support surrounding Net at the work’s premiere where I was privileged to sit next to him. NET LUCK SOARINg

The journey of this composition is in many ways a reflection of my own experience of Net himself. Through early interviews with his friends and directors, I sensed a kindred spirit. At this point, I had yet to meet him, but I knew him to be a compassionate and thoughtful young man, intelligent and funny, a lover of math, traveling, amusement parks, and his family and friends. I began to form a vision of him loving life itself, and this vision took on a musical form. I pictured him soaring through the sky like a carefree bird, dipping and diving with exhilaration, and bringing happiness to those around him. Based on this image, I developed the descending sixteenth motive which occurs most often in the flutes. I then needed a melody which was worthy of Net and his character that would reach a peak from which he could soar. Like many of my works, I began developing it slowly, beginning with a fragment that builds upon itself. After a sensitive opening, the full statement highlighted with triplet quarter-notes is presented by the French horn and clarinet sections. This melody occurs at key points in the work, which is often interrupted by intimate solos. Having completed the main sections of the piece, I still felt something was missing. I needed more of Net. Recognizing the special relationship with his family, I decided to write a trio section for Net and his sister based on their instruments. Over a steady mallet passage, the flute and clarinet sing to each other in a flowing mood meant to feel almost improvisational. As these two souls finish their song, the soaring motive in the piccolo sparks a return to the main thematic material. At this point in the composing process, two-thirds of the work was complete; but as the work itself ascended, Net himself was nearing the end of his life. The ending of the work took shape as a reverse of Net's descent, an ascent of repeated sixteenth-notes. Following several ascending statements, solos in the flute and clarinet occur as the work concludes in a textural decrescendo. As described by Net, this work strives to capture the journey of life, both calm and perilous, among our friends and family who love us most. Noppanut Lucksanawichien (his friends called him Net Luck) is behind every sound in this piece. To me, he is this piece, and he is always Net Luck Soaring. o J O N I J U Ly

g R EEN E 4 , 2 0 1 1


F O R M Measure

Section

Key Areas

1–14 15 – 26 27 – 36 37 – 47 48 – 56 57 – 68 69 – 84 85 – 93 94 – 98 99 – 115

Introductory motive Transition, mini climax, ascent motive Primary theme fragment Primary theme Soaring motive, transition Trio Soaring motive, primary theme Ascent motive, transition Primary theme Climax, ascent motive

F (Lydian) Bb…Eb Bb Bb Ab…Db Db Ab…Db Db…P5s…Bb…P5s Bb Ab…Db…P5s…C

REH E A RS A L

N OT ES

Net Luck Soaring is a work built upon expressivity; therefore, it is important for players to gain an understanding of the work’s overall emotional development. Moments of rest and lyrical playing are as important as sections requiring higher technical demands. Additionally, players should give careful attention to delicate entrances and exits while listening for interlocking instrument lines that create composite phrases. In order to achieve the emotional demands of the work, the following technical areas should be addressed: good intonation, sound quality, dynamic balance, clarity of independent lines, and precision of entrances. M OT I V ES

While there are specific key motives and melodies in Net Luck Soaring, the work as a whole features progressive motivic development. To move the work forward, melodic ideas spin out from previous phrases. Often, these motives first appear as fragments of longer and more prominent melodies which occur later in the work. In order to achieve the intended melodic balance between sections, players should listen carefully across the ensemble when moving lines are present. Many cross melodies occur throughout the work creating a composite melody between several instruments. Furthermore, it is common for moving melodic lines to fade into harmonic roles of slower moving notes. Players should be sensitive to when moving lines dissipate and their role as a featured part switches to accompaniment. Melodic ideas which are short and fragmented are considered motives. These ideas often use repetition and transposition to develop. A longer developed melodic idea which contains multiple phrases is considered a theme, such as the primary theme first presented at measure 37. Note: all examples are transposed.


INTRODUCTORy MOTIVIC A T La E R Ier u A L : ed i meas 6 RY MOTIVIC MATERIAL  ( M ‐8)    f –ag8 Later used in fragments and developed into additional motives.  additional mot ves

6

     

Eb Alto Saxophone

      

7

  

3

8

 

 



p

P R I M AE:  Ry 7 T  73 H E  95) M E : meas. 37, 73, 95  THE

37

 

 Bb Clarinet 1

38

39

40



    

41

f

3

                                 3

3

F Hns.

mf

f

42

    3

43

    

        

 (

Piccolo

,  )

  70       71                                                 69

68

mf

mp

A S C E N T M O T I V E : meas. 22, 85, 99

Should always  be lightly.  MOTIVE 22played  85  99) 

 

(condensed orchestration) cor )

 Flute 

99

Bb Clarinet

Bassoon

 mp

 

 

 

                   100

f

         

  f         

 

 

f

N O TAT I O N

A N D

p

3

S O A R I N g M O T I V E : meas. 48, 69

 

EF F E C T S

Notes which enter at a soft dynamic yet contain an accented articulation, should be played with a distinct “sting” sufficient to create a precise attack to the front of the note, followed immediately by a soft sustain.

p


Arco: bow vibraphone with contrabass bow; Cymbal scrape: player should quickly scrape cymbal from top outward using a triangle beater; Cymbals: should always l.v. (let vibrate) unless dampen is indicated. I N S T R U M EN TAT I O N

In order to preserve ensemble balance, the vibraphone and marimba should blend evenly. While more than one player may play each part, it is requested that only one oboe is used. CO M M I S S I O N

P REM I ERE

A N D

I N F O R M AT I O N

was commissioned in dedication to Noppanut Lucksanawichien (Net Luck) by assistant band director Laura Cross and the band parents of the Leander High School Band (Leander, Texas). Students of the Leander High School Band fundraised money throughout the community calling the project, The Net Luck Project. N E T

LU C K

S OA R I N g

A special concert was dedicated to Net Luck on May 19, 2011 at Leander High School where the work received its premiere. Net Luck was in attendance where he was supported by a full house of family and friends. o

J O N I

g REEN E


Commissioned by the Leander (Texas) High School Symphonic Winds for their beloved friend, Noppanut Lucksanawichien

NET LUCK SOARING FOR CONCERT BAND Delicately

JONI GREENE

= 56 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Piccolo solo Oboe 1 Flutes 2 solo Oboe tutti

solo 1

3

B Clarinets

3

2

sub. 3

3 sub. B Bass Clarinet

Bassoon

1 player 1

3

E Alto Saxophones

1st F Hns. 2

B Tenor Saxophone E Baritone Saxophone

1

B Trumpets 2

3

1 F Horns 2

1 Trombones 2 1 player Euphonium

3

Tuba

Timpani Glockenspiel 1 Vibraphone—motor off always (medium yarn mallets)

arco *

ord.

2 Percussion

Wind Chimes run fingers gently through chimes 3 4

* Arco indicates to bow instrument with contrabass bow.

Copyright © 2011 Manhattan Beach Music — All Rights Reserved — Printed and Engraved in the U.S.A. ISBN 1-59913-146-3 (complete set) ISBN 1-59913-147-1 (conductor’s score) Purchase music, download free MP3s, view scores, and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

arco


10

9

11

12 13

14

15

16

17

Picc. solo tutti 1 Fls. 2 end solo Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn. 1st F Hns.

1 2nd F Hns.

E Alto Saxs. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

str. mute

open

1 open

str. mute B Tpts. 2 str. mute 3 2nd F Hns. 1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2 tutti Euph.

Tuba

Timp. (Glock.) 1 (Vib.)

ord.

2 Perc. 3 Large Suspended Cymbal 4

2


19

= 84

20

21

18

22

23

Picc. sub.

1 sub.

Fls. 2

sub. Ob. sub. 1 div.

B Cls.

sub. unis.

2 3 sub. B Bass Cl.

Bsn. 1st F Hns.

tutti 1 E Alto Saxs.

2nd F Hns. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax. str. mute 1 str. mute

sub.

str. mute

sub.

B Tpts. 2 (open) 3 sub. +

+

+

+

1 F Hns. 2 str. mute 1 Tbns.

str. mute 2

Euph.

Tuba

Timp. (Glock.) 1 Marimba med. yarn mallets Perc.

3

Bass Drum

Med. Susp. Cym.

4

3

Lg. Susp. Cym.


poco rit.

a tempo ( = 84)

poco rit.

25

27 a tempo ( = 84) 28

24

26

27

29

Picc.

1 3

Fls. 2

Ob.

1

Oboe B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Saxs. 2

B Tenor Sax. E Bar. Sax.

1 sub. B Tpts. 2

3 str. mute

(open) 1 F Hns.

str. mute 2

1 Tbns. 2

Euph.

Tuba

Timp. (Glock.) 1 (Vib.) 2 Perc. (Mar.) 3

Med. Susp. Cym. 4

4

30


31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

Picc.

1 Fls. 2 solo Ob. Oboe 1 3

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 3 3

E Alto Saxs.

1st F Hn. 2nd F Hn. 3

2 3

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax. Oboe solo (str. mute) 1

B Tpts. 2

3 open

3

1 F Hns.

open

3

2 open 1 open

Tbns. 1st F Hns.

open

2 2nd F Hns. Euph.

Tuba

Timp. (Glock.) 1 (Vib.) 2 Perc.

(Mar.) 3

4

5


39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

Picc.

1 3

Fls. 2

3

end solo Ob. 3

1

B Cls.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn. 1st F Hn. 3

1 E Alto Saxs. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

open 1 3

open B Tpts. 2 open 3

1 F Hns.

3

3

3

3

3

2

1 3

sub.

3

Tbns. 2 3

Euph. sub.

3

Tuba

Timp.

1

2 Perc.

(Mar.) 3 Med. Susp. Cym.

B.D.

4

6


48 47

49

Picc. 3

1

50

51

52

3

3

Fls. 2 solo end solo Ob.

3

Oboe (1 player) 3

(tutti)

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Saxs. 2 2nd F Hn. B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax. 1st F Hn. (open) 1

B Tpts. 2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 lightly

Tbns. 2

Euph.

Tuba

Timp. (Glock.) 1 3

(Vib.)

arco

2 Perc. 3

4

7


54 53

55

Picc.

56

3

1 Fls. 2

3

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2 3

3 3

B Bass Cl. 3

sub.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Saxs. 2

B Tenor Sax.

3

sub.

E Bar. Sax. str. mute 1 str. mute B Tpts. 2

3 1st & 2nd F Hns.

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Euph.

Tuba

Timp. (Glock.) 1 sub.

3

(Vib.) ord. 2 every two beats

Perc. (Mar.) 3

Chimes 4

8


57

58

59

60

61

Picc. solo 1

3

Fls. 2 solo Ob. solo 1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Saxs. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts. 2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Euph.

Tuba

Timp. (Glock.) 1 (Vib.) 2 Perc.

(Mar.) 3

4

9


62

63

64

65

Picc. tutti 1

3

3

Fls. 2 end solo Ob. 3

tutti 1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Saxs. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts. 2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

1 (Vib.) 2 Perc. (Mar.) 3

4

10


69 66

67

70

68

Picc.

1

3

3

Fls. 2

Ob.

1 3

B Cls.

3

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Saxs. 2 1st F Hns. B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts. 2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns.

2nd F Hns. 2

Euph.

Tuba

Timp. (Glock.) 1 (Vib.) 2 Perc.

(Mar.) 3

4

11


71

72

73

74

75

Picc.

1 3

Fls. 2 3

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2 sub. 3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 3

E Alto Saxs. 2

3

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

cup mute

open

1 cup mute

open

B Tpts. 2 cup mute 3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

1

2 Perc. 3 Triangle 4

12


76

77

78

79

80

81

82

Picc.

1 3

3

Fls. 2 3

Ob.

3 3

3

sub. Oboe 3

3 3

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn. 1st F Hn. 1 E Alto Saxs. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts. 2

3

2nd F Hns. 1 F Hns. 2

1 3

3

Tbns. 2 3

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

1 (Vib.) 2

3

Perc. 3

4

13

Oboe

(Clar 1)


83

84

85

86

87

88

89

Picc.

1 Fls.

Oboe 2 solo

end solo

Ob. (top line solo) solo

lightly

tutti

1 3

3

(section) lightly

Cl. 1 cue 3

B Cls.

3

2 lightly

3

3

B Bass Cl. lightly Bsn. 1st F Hn. 3

1 E Alto Saxs.

3

lightly 2

3

B Tenor Sax. E Bar. Sax. cup mute 1 3

B Tpts. 2

3

3

1 F Hns. 2

2nd F Hns. 1 Tbns. 2

Euph. div.

unis.

Tuba

Timp. Chimes 1 arco (Vib.) 2 Perc.

(Mar.) 3

4

14


90

91

92

93

94

95

96

Picc.

1

3

Fls. 2

Ob.

1 3

B Cls.

2 3

3 3

B Bass Cl. 3

Bsn.

3

1 E Alto Saxs.

3

2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

open 1

B Tpts. 2 open 3 3

1 F Hns.

3

2

1 Tbns. 2

Euph.

Tuba

Timp. Chimes

(Chimes) 1

Lg. Susp. Cym. scrape w. tri. beater 2 Perc.

Tam-tam

Mar.

3 Bass Drum 4

15


97

101

99

98

100

102

Picc.

1 Fls. 2 3

Ob. 3

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 3

E Alto Saxs. 2

3

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts. 2 3

3 3

1 F Hns. 2

1 3

Tbns. 2

3 3

Euph. 3

Tuba

3

Timp. Glock. 1

Vibraphone 2 Perc. (Mar.) 3

Lg. Susp. Cym. 4

16


107 104

103

105

106

Picc. solo

1 sub.

Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Saxs. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts. 2

3 sub. 1 F Hns. 2

1 sub.

Tbns. 2

Euph.

Tuba

Timp. (Glock.) 1

(Vib.) 2 Perc.

(Mar.) 3 (Lg. Susp. Cym.) 4

17


108

109 poco rit. a tempo ( = 84)

114 110

111

112

113

115

rit.

= 56

Picc.

tutti 1 Fls. 2

Ob. solo tutti

solo 3

1

dolce B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Saxs. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts. 2

3 1st F Hns. 1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

1 arco

(Vib.) 2 Perc. 3 (Lg. Susp. Cym.) 4

18

arco


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Net Luck �oarin�

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Net Luck Soaring for concert band by Joni Greene