MBM Times Issue #7 - Contest Winners

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A Manhattan Beach Media Interactive Publication

ANNOUNCING THE WINNERS OF THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL FRANK TICHELI COMPOSITION CONTEST

ial

ISSUE #7

NEW METHODS MAKING MUSIC MATTER BEGINNING BAND METHOD INTERMEDIATE BAND METHOD BY FRANK TICHELI and GREGORY B. RUDGERS

ROGER ZARE LIFT-OFF

BEN HJERTMANN CATCLAW MIMOSA

JEFFREY HAYMAN LUDVIK

JOSEPH EIDSON FRENETICO

MATTHEW PETERSON REFLECTIONS ON THE DEATH OF THE BELOVED

BENJAMIN DEAN TAYLOR WHIZ-BANG

JEFFREY HASS

IVAN BOŽIČEVIĆ

ALL THE BELLS AND WHISTLES

JONI GREENE

FRANK TICHELI

SPIRALING

CAMERON’S DREAM

ANDREW MELTON GAME TIME

M a n h a t t a n

PEACE KOREAN FOLKSONGS FROM JEJU ISLAND

B e a c h

M u s i c

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BASH by Frank Ticheli Commissioned by the Midwest Band & Orchestra Clinic in Celebration of their 75th Anniversary

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FOR SYMPHONIC WINDS AND PERCUSSION

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FRANK TICHELI

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www.FrankTicheli.com to view the conductor score, & to hear the performance


Lux Perpetua by Frank Ticheli Winner of the 2021 NBA/William D. Revelli Composition Prize

LUX P E R P E T UA FOR SYMPHONIC WINDS AND PERCUSSION

FRANK TICHELI

Manhattan Beach Music M A N H AT TA N

B E AC H

M U S I C

www.FrankTicheli.com to view the conductor score, & to hear the performance

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M a n h at ta n B e a c h M u s i c Raising The Standards of the American Concert Band and Bands All Over The World

To Hear Complete Recordings and to View Complete Virtual Scores Please Visit

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SECOND PRIZE WINNER

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VIEW C O M P L E Band T E V I RT UA L S C O R E S : Raising The Standards of the A merican Concert And Bands All Over theWWorld W W > M A N H AT TA N B E A C H M U S I C . C O M

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TO H E A R A C O M P L E T E R E C O R D I N G

A N D TO V I E W C O M P L E T E V I R T U A L S C O R E S

RAISING THE STANDARDS OF THE AMERICAN CONCERT BAND

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Korean Folksongs From Jeju Island

Second Prize Win rd , Prize Winner, Tn h ei r

Reflections on The Death of The Beloved

All The Bells and Whistles

all theBells and Third Prize Winner,

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Whistles

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Lift-Off J E F F R E Y H AY M A N

Ludvik JOSEPH EIDSON

Frenetico B E N J A M I N D E A N TAY L O R

Whiz-Bang I VA N B O Ž I Č E V I Ć

Spiraling JONI GREENE

Cameron’s Dream A N D R E W M E LTO N

Game Time B E N H J E RT M A N N

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THIRD PRIZE WINNER

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RAISING THE STANDARDS OF THE AMERICAN CONCERT BAND AND BANDS ALL OVER THE WORLD

M A N H A T T A N

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Second Prize Winner,

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www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

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CONTENTS

www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

P

Reflections on The Death of The Beloved

Jeffrey Hass

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Reflections on The Death of The Beloved

Matthew Peterson Matthew Peterson Hear Complete Recordings & V i e w C o m p l e t e V i rt u a l S c o r e s : w w w. M a n h at ta n Be a c h M u si c . c o m

M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

Hear Complete Recordings & V iaerwd sC o R a i s i n g t h e S ta n d om f ptlhe et e V i rt u a l S c o r e s : t at n ad n sB e a c h M u s i c . c o m A m e r i c a n C o n c ew r twBwa.nMda annhda B All Over the World.

M a n hwa w t w t a. M n

a Bn eh aa ct ht a M n B c h M u s i c . c o m u e s a i c

Raising The Standards of the A merican Concert Band And Bands All Over the World

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c

JEFFREY HASS

All The Bells and Whistles

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E D I T O R ’ S

V I E W

Editor-in-Chief, Neil Ruddy

Reviewing the Winners of the Third International Frank Ticheli Composition Contest

And this brings us to the MBM Times issue you are currently holding in your hand. Or, digitally viewing online. Yes, I do once again believe that this is the most important issue we have done to date, and in part because this issue is more of a celebration. It celebrates fantastic new beginning and intermediate band methods that are the talk of the town, written by the most influential composer in the industry. Also in this issue is a wonderful interview by Bob Margolis that first appeared in a recent issue of SBO magazine. Bob interviews both Frank Ticheli and Gregory B. Rudgers about their groundbreaking new band method, Making Music Matter, and how it came to be.

So a special thanks go out to our friends at SBO magazine for their support, and we also

MBM 6

TIMES

Photo by Robert Bennett

I like to believe that every issue of MBM Times is going to be the best thing since sliced bread, what with the colorful graphics and shiny paper ­— and let's not forget the feel of the magazine itself, like no other magazine out there. And yet, after all the joy of seeing it printed, looking all spiffy, I begin to analyze, rethink and doubt, and before you know it, a Monday morning quarterback thinking sets in. ‘We should have done this, we should have done that, we should focus more on beginning band, let's make the music examples larger next time’ ... all of these things begin to take hold and that's when I start to shape the next issue. Through the doubt, and the Monday morning quarterbacking, one thing remains constant, which is the effort we put into every issue, to find, to publish and to bring to the forefront the best music out there.


Lastly, we are celebrating the Winners of the Third International Frank Ticheli Composition Contest, presenting here for the first time analysis and reviews and score examples of the 10 winning pieces. With over 300 submissions from all over the world, we were not only impressed by the number of entries, we were also impressed by the quality and originality of compositions, making this a very difficult and important task for Frank Ticheli and the judges. Especially important, both Bob and I give our warm thanks and appreciation to Frank Ticheli for everything he does for us and everything he does for this industry.

These are the signal goals of Manhattan Beach Music:

To make excellence commonplace.

To make excellence the rule rather than the exception.

To publish the best music. Neil Ruddy

Sailing the S ky C O N C E R T

F R A N K

M a n h a t t a n

B A N D

T I C H E L I

B e a c h

M u s i c

M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

thank them for all the important work they do throughout the year.

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Making Music Matter

Bob Margolis interviews Frank Ticheli and Gregory B. Rudgers

Teacher’s Edition

���in� ��sic �a�e� Beginning Band Method Book 1

Frank Ticheli a n d

Gregory B. Rudgers

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Richard L. Floyd

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www.MakingMusicMatterBook1.com

M B M

T I M E S

A Manhattan Beach Media Publication NEIL RUDDY Publisher & Editor-in-Chief Managing and Copy Editor BOB MARGOLIS Administrative Editor ANNETTE PALAZZO Contributing Writers DR. JOHN A. DARLING DR. MARC R. DICKEY DR. JEFFREY D. GERSHMAN DR. ALAN LOURENS GREGORY B. RUDGERS DR. LAWRENCE F. STOFFEL Additional Graphics and Art Direction ROBERT BENNETT

Copyright © 2017, 2022 Manhattan Beach Media. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written permission of Manhattan Beach Media. Music examples by permission of Manhattan Beach Music. Pictured on the front cover, Frank Ticheli Photo by Charlie Grosso

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harmonic vocabulary in Peace, Frank Ticheli’s Peace is a gift to beginning all within the confines of the Bb band students, and perhaps even more concert key signature, plus this one c h e l i .so c oto m beginning band teachers. Ticheli e a c h M wrote u s i c .this c o m piece in response to a by M A R C DIC K E Y addition. Peace also contains a range of dynamic levels from piano to challenge from a friend who is a middle d a r d s o f t h e F R A N K T I C H E L I forte, with crescendos and diminuendos. And, there are a few director in Texas, the challenge being to write a B a n d a nschool d B a nband d s e W o r l d ritardandos and at tempos that seem natural to the music, piece for beginning band students who have completed just yet give you an additional opportunity to engender true one semester of study on their instruments. The result: a very musicality in your young ensemble. In regard to percussion, satisfying, aesthetically pleasing piece of music that will wear M a n h a t t a n B e a cutilizes h M u s i c chimes, triangle, small tom tom, Ticheli glockenspiel, well over weeks of rehearsal, and over years of one’s career. bass drum, and optional timpani (two drums). Ticheli’s program note reveals that the largest range required in any instrument is an octave, and that most of the instruments use less than that to play Peace. Rhythmically, the piece consists of quarter notes, half notes, dotted half notes, and whole notes, with some ties. And, there are quarter rests, half rests, and whole rests. Peace is written in a legato style, mostly requiring legato tonguing, with occasional slurs. Teaching the legato style to your young students will be worth the effort! (See the sidebar at the end of this article for some suggestions as to how to teach legato tonguing to beginners.) Beyond these spare materials, Ticheli uses an Ab (concert) here and there in this piece that is otherwise written in the key of Bb concert, adding a mixolydian flavor. Given the relatively limited resources, there is a surprisingly rich

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M a n h a t t a n

Peace begins with an elegantly simple four-measure melody [Ex. 1, quarter note theme, mm. 1-9] consisting of conjunct motion, mostly in quarter notes. This melody appears only in the flutes at first, with harmony in contrary motion in the clarinets, this all over an Eb pedal in the alto saxophones, glockenspiel, and chimes. Very similar materials are utilized at m. 5, this time with the melody in the trumpets, and the contrary motion in the low brass and woodwinds, while the tenor saxes and horns add to the drone. In this second phrase, the original four-bar phrase is elongated to five, ending in a V-I cadence to Bb Major, and with a slight rit. The low brass need to perform a lip slur from F to Bb at the

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players to listen to who has their part in the winds, and to match and balance what they hear. The V-I cadence in mm. 26-27 contains quarter note passing tones in the tenor saxophone and horn parts that should be “brought out,” perhaps by rehearsing these two measures slowly so all can hear the dissonance and resolution.

cadence. From mm. 10-18 these same materials are reworked so that the rate of motion in moving from one instrument grouping to another is now every two measures rather than four.

P E A C E

A series of ascending tones functioning as pick-up notes leads to a second theme, A third theme that focuses more on half this one consisting largely of gently notes, marked mp, begins at the end of tongued repeated eighth notes that add m. 27 with a quarter note pick-up [See rhythmic vitality, while at the same time Ex. 3, half note theme, mm. 27-37]. This suggesting a chant-like quality [See Ex. melody, five measures long, is first heard in 2., eighth note theme, mm. 19-27.] There just the flute, clarinet, and alto saxophone is also a richer harmonic palette here. The parts, in thirds and tenths. The triangle part eighth-note theme at m. 20 appears in a duplicates the rhythm of the melody, while trio of parts assigned amongst the flute, a Bb is struck and allowed to “let ring” in oboe, clarinet, tenor saxophone, and horn . Fr a n k T i c h e l i . .in M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c . the chimes on the static second beat of ascending lines, while the low brass each half note. While the sustained style is and woodwind parts have rhythmically F R A N K T IC H E L I important throughout Peace, it is perhaps most important identical lines, once again in contrary motion. At first the of all here, as the rhythms are relatively passive in this brief percussion are at rest. Then, in answer to this four-bar phrase, M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c As this melody comes back at m. 33, the center section. Ticheli adds the trumpets, and brings in the timpani, small Dickey for Ticheli Peacefrom sweet to firm as it is now marked character of it changes tom, and bass2 drum in accompaniment roles. This- Music is a Examples forte. Trumpets and horns are added here, while the low brass welcome early opportunity to teach your timpani and tom C

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and woodwinds play a new counter-line, again borrowing the contrary motion device from the first theme. At the beginning of this phrase, the low brass and most of the low reeds enter with their pick-up note on beat 3, while the instruments with the melody come in on beat 4, creating an aurally interesting sequence of events from the chime on beat 2. To reinforce this forte sustained phrase, the percussion parts are fuller herePthan E anywhere A C Eelse in the piece.

The whole note diminuendo at m. 37 leads to the return of the eighth note theme from m. 20. Here, at m. 38, the melody and its contrary motion partner are fully orchestrated, including tympani, all at a friendly mf level. The small tom and bass drum are added in the four-measure answer, which ends in another whole note with diminuendo. But this one is a little tricky: the upper instruments take a breath as they did eight measures before, but the lower instruments tie their pitch over for four more beats to create a striking elision in which the elongated pitches facilitate a V-I transition (from Bb to Eb Major). The flutes, clarinets, and glockenspiel bring us back to the quarter note theme T IC H E L I first heard at the very beginning of Peace. There is also a rit. and an A Tempo here, to call a little more attention to this very musical moment.

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This sustained section ends on a whole note F Major chord that calls for a diminuendo. You may want to isolate and practice diminuendos with your students. Have them say “FOUR–THREE–Two– One” out loud, starting with “FOUR” F R A N K loudly and speaking progressively softer with each beat. Then try the diminuendo again with instruments. This is also an opportunity for students to watch and listen to end the whole note together, and to then breathe together to prepare for the next entrance. M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

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In this return of the first theme (m. 46), the original nineteen measures are neatly truncated into just ten. Much as before, a series of ascending pitches leads to the Speaking of breathing, when you play the source recording at second theme (m. 56), the chanting repeated eighth notes. www.frankticheli.com for your students, you’ll want to point The ritard here is a bit more important, because at m. 56 out the first thing that they will hear on the recording: You Ticheli marks “Slightly Slower” rather than “A Tempo.” This can hear the entire group inhale together, one Dickey beat before the Examples - Music for Ticheli Peace 3 tells your students and your audience that Peace is coming first note. Just like you have been teaching them to do! towards its end.

Fl. Cl. Alto Sax. Ten. Sax. Low Br. & Low Ww's. Tba. Chi.

Tri.

+ Ob., Tpt., Hn., Glock. (sounds 8va) Ex. 3 m. 27, beat 4 - m. 37 half-note theme (in concert) ˙ œ œ œ œ ˙ œœ ˙ œœ œœ œœ œ ˙ œœ œ ˙ œœ ˙ b Œœ b œ Œ & ˙ œ œœœ ˙ œ œœ œ œ ˙ œ œœ ˙˙ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ ˙˙ œœ œœ b ˙˙ œ ˙ œ œœ ˙˙ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ f P ? b ∑ ˙ œœ ˙ œœ œœ œœ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó ˙ b ˙ œœ ˙ œœ œœ œœ ˙ f b ∑ Œ œletÓring Œ œ Ó Œ œ Ó Œ œ Ó œ Ó b ŒœÓ ŒœÓ Œœ Ó Œ & P Timp. ? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ b˙ œ œ ˙ ˙ bœ œ œ œ F ˙ œœ ˙ ˙ œœ œœ ∑ ˙ œ œ ˙ ˙ œ œ œ œ w ∑ ã F P Sm. Tom œ˙ Œ œ˙ œ œ˙ Œ œ˙ œ œ˙ œ œ œœ œœ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ã

F

Bs. Dr.

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˙ œœ w ˙˙ œ˙ œ w nw b˙ œ œ w b˙ œ œ w ŒœÓ

b˙ Ó w

œœ Œ Ó

œ Œ ˙ ∑

∑ ∑

M u s i c


To reach that end, Ticheli simply repurposes the eight measures from this theme’s first appearance (mm. 2027), with one unexpected difference: between the sixth and seventh measure, he has inserted a 2-beat tutti rest. Once your students get used to this, they will agree: this rest feels just right. It puts our performance of Peace at peace. Peace is assuredly a Grade 1 composition. Although Peace was written with students who have completed one semester of study on their instruments in mind, you’ll have to decide for yourself when your students are ready to encounter this very engaging composition. Not all programs are created equal from district-to-district and state-to-state when it comes to rehearsal time and other resources. You’ll want to teach Peace when it is right for your students and for you. When you do, you’ll find the experience to be musically rewarding, and the piece brimming with musical concepts to share with your young instrumentalists. Can you remember the excitement and curiosity you felt back when you were in beginning band, and your teacher passed out the group’s first separate sheet of music apart from your method book for the very first time? It’s exciting to know that our students’ first “separate sheet experience” can be a deeply musical one, playing music by one of America’s greatest living composers.

An EXTREME Method for Teaching Legato to Young Wind Musicians

Young wind students are quite capable of learning that there are two styles of

articulation, one smooth and connected

(“du”), and the other separated (“tu”). “Hot

Cross Buns” and “Mary Had a Little Lamb” are truly songs, and they should sound

legato (smooth) style or articulation, a long tone is as smooth as smooth can be! As smooth as a frozen lake on a windless day in the deep of winter (or insert your own metaphor here). 3. Next, briefly explain to the students that one way to achieve legato style is

like songs when we play them, thus calling

to play that long tone, and then lightly

articulation.

the mouth or the tip of the reed to lightly

But how can we get younger students to

and quickly interrupt the air, and KEEP

for the smooth and connected style of

play this way? One very efficient, effective

way is to play in this style for our students

on your instrument, and have them imitate. Model short phrases of the songs on your instrument, and have the students play

them back. Students will be much more

likely to match the style they hear than if

you try to describe what you want in words that may at first seem terribly abstract to your players.

Beyond that, it will help to break down the

touch the tip of the tongue to the roof of

THE AIR GOING; KEEP THE LONG TONE GOING while you do so. If necessary, remind the students not to use the tongue like a hammer, but just as a brief, gentle interruption to the air flow. You might go back to the one student you have confidence in and have him or her try this while the others observe. Then set everyone loose to try this on their own,

technique of legato playing in a manner

“du–du–du–du.” Thirty seconds of long-

something like this:

tone-chaos — time well spent!

1. Review the difference between the “du”

4. Now have everyone play one long tone

and “tu” tonguing styles. Without their instruments, ask students to say “du-

du-du” and notice where the tips of their

tongues touch the rooves of their mouths.

on a single concert pitch, to bring back that concept of “as legato as legato can be.” And finally, ask students to practice

Now have them do the same for “tu-tu-

“du” tonguing all together, following your

the difference? Remind reed students that

notes, then in quarter notes, and then in

tu,” and ask them to compare. What is

when they use their instruments they will be doing this at the tips of their reeds.

2. Now comes the EXTREME part: Ask

gentle conducting gestures, first in half eighth notes as called for in “Peace’s” second theme.

one student you have confidence in to

Using this approach in incrementally

one can, a long tone, on his or her favorite

will lead to a more legato legato in your

play one note and to hold it for as long as note. Or, have a little contest to see who

can hold the longest long tone. The point

is to get students playing long tones…and

smaller doses over a few rehearsals ensemble in general, and especially in their approach to “Peace.” Marc Dickey

then: Point out that when it comes to the

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11


FRANK TICHELI

KOREAN FOLKSONGS FROM JEJU ISLAND FOR CONCERT BAND

by M A R C DIC K E Y Holst’s Second Suite; Vaughn Williams’ English Folk Song Suite; Grainger’s Lincolnshire Posy; John Barnes Chance’s Variations on a Korean Folk Song; Alfred Reed’s Armenian Dances; Ticheli’s own Cajun Folk Songs. Folk songs resonate deeply within us. They are an undeniably robust and infectious presence in our wind band repertoire. And when we and our students learn these works, we carry the tunes they are based on within us forever.

movements (translated into English), with footnotes for each that help clarify meaning and geographical and legendary context. A little internet research on your part will yield a great deal more information about the fascinating history of this island and the people who inhabit it.

As the first movement, “Country Song (‘Iyahong’),” begins, in a brisk 9/8 meter, the very first texture transports you from your rehearsal room to a faraway and exotic place. A very brief Frank Ticheli’s new three-movement two-measure introduction yields to the work, Korean Folksongs from Jeju Island, first entrance of the tune [ex. 1], the first contains these qualities from its first two notes of which are marked staccato. ethereal moments to its final joyful While the tune is simple, there is an outburst some ten minutes later. industriousness about it, and Ticheli Jeju Province is South Korea’s largest treats it with joy and respect. Nearly island, situated in the Korean Strait Frank Ticheli everyone gets to play it over the course southwest of the mainland. Because the Photo by Charlie Grosso of the movement, which is marked island is geographically and historically “Bouncy, somewhat detached.” isolated from the Korean mainland, Jeju Island has its own In order to maintain interest given this simple melodic language and culture, and a rich history of local legends and material, Ticheli employs a number of techniques: the customs. Ticheli provides a brief note in his score regarding length of time that any instrument has the melody before the island and its folksong tradition. He notes that the beat another voice takes it over is constantly shifting, the in almost all Jeju folksongs is divided into threes, and that accompaniments are greatly varied, utilizing major seconds the pentatonic scale is predominant. You can already imagine at one point, and open fifths moments later. Question and that these songs will make us feel like dancing. He also answer is employed, as at m. 10 [ex. 2]. With all of these thoughtfully provides us with the text for each of the three

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Dickey - Music Examples for Ticheli Korean Folksongs

1 Flute

.œ œ b 9 œ. Jœ . . b & 8 F

mm. 3-10 Iyahong tune in flute

œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ. œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ ˙ . J J J

œ. œ œ œ œ œ ˙. J

œ ‰

are played as squarely as they look, and with a good degree of punched separation (note the accents) so that they are heard clearly. These duplets recur several times in the movement, so take heed.

devices aligned to present the tune in this initial section, Ticheli is comfortable keeping the tune in one key, the tune consistently beginning on F throughout.

Ticheli’s scoring is quite light until the second iteration All that the Folksongs fortes and accents should all of Question and Answer; the “Answer” at Dickey m. 37 is- subito Music Examples for being Tichelisaid, Korean 2

2 Picc. (8va) Tpt. Alto Sax. Ten. Sax. Bsn.

Picc. (8va) Tpt.

Ob. Alto Sax. Ten. Sax. Bsn.

mm. 10-21 Q & A with Iyahong tune

b & b 98

∑

∑

∑

j œ . œ œj œ . œ œj j b 9 b œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ. & 8 œ œ œ. œ. œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . P b ˙. & b ˙. b &b œ œ. P

œ ‰ œ

∑

∑

P

œ œ >œ œ >œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ œ ‰ œ . œ Jœ œ œ œ

˙. ˙.

Œ.

∑

œ . œ œ >œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ ‰ œ. œ œ œ œ œ ˙. J J ˙.

j j œ . œ œj œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. ˙. . œ. œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . ˙ .

forte, unexpectedly bringing in nearly the entire band. M. 43 brings a brief dramatic departure in that eighth note duplets interrupt the constant triplet feel of the piece for the first time, amidst shifting accents in the trombones eighth note triplets, and abrupt crescendos in the saxophones and

>œ . œ.

Œ.

∑

œ ‰ œ ∑

be played in the stylistic context of this lovely, lilting movement. Please don’t hurt the folk tune!

Several things change all at once as the middle section begins (m. 60). The little tune, now beginning on Eb, is expanded both vertically and horizontally at once. Dickey - Music Examples for Ticheli Korean Folksongs 3 Vertically, the tune is written in fifths (and 3 mm. 43-45 brief dramatic departure in accompaniment 2 twelfths), starting on Eb in some instruments >œ . 2 2 Bass Cl. . > b œ œ ? œ bœ and Ab in others. You’ve heard this timbre Bsns. bb b œ œ œ >œ œ Bari. Sax. > > > 2 before, in Ravel’s Bolero and Hindemith’s > > F Symphonic Metamorphosis. And horizontally, œœ œœ .. œœ œœ .. .. .. œ œ b œ œ ? bb the tune is presented canonically. This happens ‰ ‰ Hns. again at m. 68, this time in three voices, one of F which is in augmentation [ex. 4, overleaf ]. Keep œœœ. œœœ. œœœ. œœ̆œ œœœ. œœœ. œœœ. œœœ. œœœ. œœ̆œ œœœ. œœœ. b œœœ. œœœ. œœœ. œœ. œœ. œœ. b ? bb an ear out for these contrapuntal entrances, Tbns. and be sure all the voices are equally balanced. F Through this contrasting middle section, the battery is nearly silent. horns [ex. 3]. You’ll want to make sure that these duplets

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13


4 Picc. Fls. Obs. Cl. 1 Cls. 2,3 Alto Sax. Hns. Tbns. Euph. Tba. St. Bass

œ. œ. œ . œ . bb œ œ œ . œ . & J f

4

Dickey - Music Examples for Ticheli Korean Folksongs

œ. œ œ œ œ œ ˙. œ. œ œ œ œ œ ˙. J

mm. 68-70 canon in three voices

b & b Œ.

? b Œ. b

Œ.

j œ. œ. œ . œ . œ . f ˙. œ. œ. œ. b œœ .. ˙ .. ˙ œ. œ. f

œ œ ‰

j œ œ œœœœ . > œ .. œœ .. œ. œœ . œ . b œœ ..

from it) is on nearly every beat. You will likely need to ask your players to “get out of the way” for the next entrance just after they’ve started; be sure that each entrance (each of which is still marked staccato by the way) is clearly audible. A clave ostinato begins, mp, in the midst of these canonic entrances. As the canonic voices dissipate, the clave is the only sound left. Effervescent woodwinds take over in an eighth-note line that ascends in pitch and descends in volume, leading to a colorful sustained Bb chord in muted horns and trombone, and then a satisfying final staccato eighth note on a low Bb.

Another series of duplets and a crescendo Musical composition is by definition a type of problem signal a grand statement of the melody at solving, and in creating a three-movement work all with m. 80 — once again beginning on F — accompanied by meters containing triple divisions, Ticheli created a problem woodwind flourishes, while percussionists occupy themselves for himself: how to keep them from with broad gestures in the vibes, sounding too much the same. glockenspiel, and chimes. The tune is marched (if one can march in 9/8 The second movement, “The time) through renditions beginning KOREAN Forest Nymph and the Woodcutter on C (signaled by a lone bar of 12/8), FOLKSONGS (‘Kyehwa’)” is notated in 6/4 meter. It FROM JEJU ISL AND then G, and back to F as things could have just as easily been notated descrescendo to a moment of repose of in 6/8 time, but Ticheli notated it in open Bb and F’s in the lower clarinets 6/4 to make it look slower, to make F R A N K T I C H E L I and bassoons. sure that we perform it that way. And C O N C E R T

At m. 112, the tune reappears in the piccolo and oboe, while the tune from the upcoming second movement, “Kyehwa,” is foreshadowed as a countermelody in the horn. Both of these melodies should be played M A N H A T T A N gently and sweetly here. “Kyehwa” subsequently appears in the lower clarinets and then low brass in this role. Ticheli has the appearances of this melody clearly marked, so be sure to treat this tune as a melody of equal importance to “Iyahong.” Ticheli leaves the second movement behind (or ahead?) for the time being, and uses now familiar first-movement materials in familiar ways as the first movement begins to wind down. At m. 157, counterpoint returns with a vengeance, at the rate of a new entrance of the tune (or at least a motive

14

M a n h a t t a n

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that is the bottom line: the second movement needs to be slower than the first. This is also one of those wonderful pieces of music that presents a special conducting challenge in that B E A C H M U S I C it seems just a bit too slow to conduct in two, and a bit too fast to conduct in six. In his rehearsal notes Ticheli makes some suggestions about this based on his experience conducting the work. I would emphasize that it makes sense to go back and forth between conducting in 2 and in 6 as you feel it is called for. And I would add that, in all likelihood, you won’t need or want to conduct this movement the same way in the week of the concert as you may need to in the first few rehearsals. You and your group will find a tempo that is slower than the first movement, and serves to express the lovely music of this movement. This is an unhurried, wistful

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Dickey - Music Examples for Ticheli Korean Folksongs

5 Flute

mm. 1-5 Kychwa melody in flute

Solo œ œ œ œ b 6 &bb 4 Œ œ P

œ œ œ œ ten. œ œ

ten.

œ œ œ œ œ œ

5

œ œ œ œ œ œ

˙.

˙.

waltz; in Ticheli’s words, it should be played with “a gentle, quiet lyricism.” Do what you need to do to keep the tempo under control!

married to the “Kyehwa” folk melody. The folk tune is first heard in an alto saxophone solo at m. 6 [ex. 6 below, left], with a simple waltz-like accompaniment. This is followed by a secondary melody in the clarinets Beyond tempo, there is another important reason that (m. 14) that evolves into impressionistic cascading layers this movement works in clear contrast to the first: in the of ascending and accelerating woodwinds [ex. 7 below]. first movement, Ticheli took a simple tune and worked As the woodwinds begin to descend and decelerate, a with it and around it in myriad complex and interesting gentle yet mysterious Ab Major chord is revealed in ways. In this movement, he takes a very lyrical melody the lowFolksongs brass. Rehearse this section slowly so that your Dickey - Music Examples for Ticheli Korean 6 ensemble can get its ears 6 mm. 6-10 Kychwa melody with simple, waltz-like accompaniment gentle, heartfelt Solo around it! Alto Sax.

Cls. Bsns.

B. Cl. St. Bass

b & b b ˙. P

˙.

b & b b Œ ˙ œj ‰ ˙ ˙ œ ˙ p ? bb ˙ . b p

˙.

œ. œ œ œ ˙.

œ œ œ œ ˙

j j œœ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ˙ œ ˙ . ˙ œ ˙. J ˙.

˙.

˙.

œ œ œ œ . œj œ œ ˙ ˙ .

The introduction returns somewhat truncated as a clarinet solo to introduce œ ˙. ˙. œ œ˙ the second verse of the Œ œ œ ˙. folk tune, which sounds handsomely this time ˙. ˙. ˙. from the horn and euphonium (m. 28). A meandering countermelody in the flute is added this time, reminiscent but not identical to the introductory materials. The secondary melody returns in all of the upper woodwinds, at m. 36. It is soon taken over by ascending chromatic triads in the trumpets, and everyone crescendos to the climax of the movement. A pentatonic hunting horn call enters at m. 42, in the clarinets as well as the horns, and though this tune seems to fit here perfectly, it doesn’t belong there at all; although the audience won’t know it until later, Ticheli has cleverly and effectively borrowed the melody from the upcoming third movement to create the grandest point of the second. Madness!

˙ œ ˙ ˙. ˙. ˙.

˙.

that is not quite so simple, and treats it ever so simply by comparison. This movement provides welcome opportunities for expressive playing in sections and in several solo passages. And it contains what may be some of the loveliest countermelodies Ticheli has written. Notated tempo fluctuations (tenutos, accelerandos, ritardandi) are fairly frequent to the extent that the ensemble that performs it must be confident and comfortable enough with itself to play in essence rubato with some ease.

The second movement begins with a flute solo [ex. 5, above] that serves as an introduction, and in a sense foreshadows the countermelody that will- Music soon be Dickey Examples for Ticheli Korean Folksongs Fls. Obs. Cls. Alto Sax. B. Cl. Bsns. Ten. Sax. Bari. Sax.

7

mm. 20-24 Impressionistic cascading layers of woodwinds

b & b b 42

46 œ œ œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œ œ

? bb 42 œ œ 46 œ œ œ œ œ œ b π

œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ œ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

œ œ œ œ œ œ

M a n h a t t a n

P

œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ

B e a c h

7

œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

˙

˙. p

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Dickey - Music Examples for Ticheli Korean Folksongs

8

8 Bb Tpt.

mm. 1-8 Nuhyoung melody in trumpet

St. mute j 9 & 8 œ œ ˙. F

j j j j j j œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œJ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ‰ œ œj œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. ˙. œ

From this climactic point the ensemble devolves to a point of repose in f minor. A variation of the opening flute line returns, but this time the flute continues in countermelody as the folk tune comes in at m. 49. Halfway through this third iteration of the folk tune, it moves back to the alto saxophone and the simple waltz-like accompaniment. The work seems to come to be coming to a final cadence in b-flat minor as the cascading layers of ascending and descending, accelerating and decelerating woodwinds return to assure us that we have indeed ever so graciously and sweetly ended in that key.

is, make sure you balance your ensemble to give us the fun of hearing all three entrances! The low brass fifths return, but this time they signal an episode (m. 25) that begins with a pastoral clarinet line crafted from the pentatonic scale [ex. 10, recto]. After the alto saxophones join in it is taken over by a series of fanfarelike brass entrances (plus flute and piccolo) that crescendo into a bravado statement of the tune [ex. 11]. In this fourth verse (m. 33) the tune is invigorated by its use of harmonized thirds, still accompanied by drones in fifths and octaves.

Things quiet down a bit as the low brass fifths again assist There is a quiet genius to this three and a half minute gem, as in eliding from verse to verse. In the - Music Examples Ticheli Korean Folksongs 9 fifth iteration of the the materials Ticheli has found Dickey and created come and go,for and tune (m. 41) it appears in 9 mm. 17-21 Melody in three voices accompanied by drone the clarinets, and the alto œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œJ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ >œ œ œ . œ . b >œ Jœ ˙ . Fl. 2 ‰ b J J J J & Obs. saxophones imitate at the P unison one beat later, quite literally this time. A charming b j Œ. Alto Sax. & b Œ . œ œj œ . œ . œ œj œ . œ . œ œj œ œJ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ . œ countermelody with hints of > P> hemiola sings in the flute and ˙. ˙ > œ œ˙. . B. Cl. oboe. The sixth verse (m. 49) ? bb Ó . œ. ˙ œ .. ˙œ. . œ J Bsns. . ˙. . œ. œ ˙ . Bari. Sax Œ. sets up a canon in three voices P a beat apart, flute, followed by muted trumpet, and then return in ever evolving yet seemingly familiar ways. bassoon, with long tone open fifths in the brass coming and “Celebration on Halla Mountain (‘Nuhyoung going as accompaniment. Nahyoung’),” the third and final movement, has no The episode returns at m. 57, a little fuller and higher in introduction at all. This is the most overtly strophic of the tessitura this time. The fanfare figure returns as well, leading three movements. The tempo is set the same as the second to a seventh verse in which the alto saxophones and horns movement, but the affect could not be more different. Ticheli have the melody, forte for the first time [ex. 12, overleaf ]. marks the movement “Bouncy and cheerful.” Ticheli is beginning to pull out all of the wind band’s This energetic folk tune is (re-)introduced in the muted stops, a few at a time. The melody is imitated vigorously a trumpet, and we are off [ex. 8, above]. In its first statement it beat later by the clarinets. Here the tune is harmonized for is simply accompanied by alternating long tone octaves in the the first time. Duplets are utilized in a new countermelody flutes and vibraphone. In the second verse (m. 9), the melody is to create a new, square rhythmic tension–bring these out! taken over by the clarinets and horns, and the accompaniment The eighth time this rollicking melody occurs (m. 72) we take is expanded slightly into droning fifths. The third verse (m. things down a notch. Back to basics: a straight-ahead forte 17) is announced by vibrant yet soft open fifths in the low presentation of the tune in the lower saxophones, horns, and brass. The melody is in the flutes and oboe, in nearly but not euphonium, with long-tone alternations between the fifth quite literal canonic imitation at the unison one beat later in and the root in the brass, and woodwind flourishes leading the alto saxophones, while a witty third entrance on beat three us to every new downbeat. Many of the lowest voices are tacit in the low reeds turns out to be a false start [ex. 9]. The point

16

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Dickey - Music Examples for Ticheli Korean Folksongs

10

10 Bb Cls.

> œ œ. j œ œ œ œ ‰ j œ œ œœ œ œ œ >œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > F

mm. 25-30 pastoral clarinet episode

9 &8

here. The ninth verse (m. 80) continues in this vein, but with the addition of the melody in the lower octave, the tuba and string bass bringing gravitas while the trumpets fill in with passing tones.

œ œ œ . >œ . J

œœœœœœ œ œ œ œ. Œ. Œ. >

towards each other into one unified composition.

By now we’ve heard 11 different versions of “Nuhyoung Nahyoung,” and here Ticheli inserts the episodic material once again, the pastorale pentatonic woodwind lines and fanfare figures, more thickly scored this time. It is The tenth verse (m. 88) continues to build. The trumpets a welcome break from the tenacious melody, but what toot the melody in close position triads, while the low could Ticheli possibly do now with this melody that he brass explode in a fuller harmonic accompaniment. hasn’t already done? While the bass drum and cymbal notfor Ticheli Dickeycrashes - Musicshould Examples Korean Folksongs 11

11 Picc. Fls.

Tpt. 1

. œœœ œ

mm. 31-33 fanfare-like brass episode

b & b Œ.

Œ.

b & b œ œ œ ˙. P

Tpt. 2

b & b Œ.

Tpt. 3

b & b Œ.

Euph.

? bb Π.

P

œ œ œ œ. P

P

œ >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ > œ J‰‰

œ œ œ ˙.

> >œ >œ œ >œ >œ >œ œ >œ œ > >

œ.

‰œœœœœœœœ >>>>>>>>

œ œ œ ˙. P œ. œ. œœœ

Œ.

. œœœœ

œ œ œ œ.

> œ œ œ œ.

. œœœœ

œœœœœœ >>>>>>

What he does is genius, but be careful here. Be sure to play what he wrote! As the woodwinds start their cascading sixteenths again, he has notated the tune in augmentation, in 4/4–2/4 time (m. 112). But the tempo does not change. And after hearing the tune whipped around so many times, hearing it in augmentation is extremely dramatic. Ticheli makes it clear in his Rehearsal Notes that the augmentation is enough, there is no need to slow down any further.

> > >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ ‰œœ

predominate here, you’ll want to hear and feel them. In the eleventh verse (m. 96), Ticheli gives the trumpets a well deserved rest. The horns take over the melody, reinforced by the low brass. And the woodwinds? … after three verses of being held back at the starting line with their occasional flourishes, the woodwinds explode onto the scene, spilling cascades of 16th note scales in their wake. They flow down and climb up again, and morph into a little bit of the tune “Iyahong” from the first movement as a countermelody to “Nuhyoung Nahyoung.” The transition from four verses of woodwind flurrying about to hearing “Iyahong” suddenly partnered with “Nuhyoung Nahyoung” is an unexpectedly powerful musical moment that serves to pull the three movements

M a n h a t t a n

As the brass state the melody for the twelfth time in this dramatic augmentation, the chime player is instructed to “Strike any notes in wild, random fashion, evoking the sound of celebratory church bells.” The overall effect is euphoric. The euphoria melts away into nostalgia at the end of this verse, as the horns reiterate the last few measures softly (m. 128). After a brief breath, the piece ends briskly, with a few measures of the fanfare figure, one last flourish, and one final bravado reminder of the tune. (Marked 132+, how brisk your tempo is should be informed by how cleanly your brass players can articulate the fanfare figure!) There is a sincerity about Korean Folksongs from Jeju Island that emanates from the integrity of the folk tunes themselves, and Ticheli has guardedly and loyally preserved that integrity. Make no mistake, this is a

B e a c h

M u s i c

17


Dickey - Music Examples for Ticheli Korean Folksongs

12 Fls. Obs. Cls. Alto Sax. Alto Sax. Hns.

Tbns.

œ . œ . ˙˙ .. . . œ œ œ b œ œ œ. œ. œ. œ. & b Œ. œ J f

œ. œ.

œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .. œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙. œœ

œœ œ œ ˙. ˙.

mm. 64-71 Nuhyoung Nahyoung melody, harmonized and forte

12

j j œj œ œ . j œœ œœ œ . œ . œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ .œ œ ‰ œ. œ. œ œ œœ J J œ ˙. ˙˙ .. œœ .. œœ . œœ .. œœ œœ ˙. œ . œ .. œ . œ Œ . ˙˙ ..

b &b

j œœ œœ ˙˙ .. f ? b Œ . ˙˙˙ ... b f

In this work there are opportunities for both learning and for great musical pleasure, through the overall lightness of the work, through extensive opportunities to play music with beats that divide into threes, and

FOR CONCERT BAND I. Country Song ("Iyahong")

q. = c. 144 Bouncy, somewhat detached

Flute 2

       

mf



       

   

Bb Clarinet 1

 

Bb Clarinet 2

 

Bb Clarinet 3

 

˙˙ .. ˙.

   

      

 

  

1 2

   

Eb Alto Saxophone 2

Bb Tenor Saxophone

       

 Eb Baritone Saxophone    Bb Trumpet 1

Bb Trumpet

2 3

F Horn 1

F Horn 2

Trombone 1

Trombone

2 3

Euphonium

Tuba

String Bass

                       

       

p

   Percussion 4   

(mf)

     



mp















  mf

Ob. 1



p

mf



Ob. 2



p



Bsn. 1



p

1.



p

  mf

  mf

  mf

 

   



 

 

   

 

                   

CHIMES



 

p









 







 

     

mp







 





    











    

  



 









   

  

(sm.)

Fl. 2

  

 

 

          mf

    

Bb Cl. 2

Bb Cl. 3

Bb Bass Cl.

p

  

Copyright © 2013 Manhattan Beach Music - All Rights Reserved - Printed and engraved in the United States of America ISBN 1-59913-158-7 (complete set) ISBN 1-59913-159-5 (conductor score) Visit www.Frank Ticheli.com for the latest information on the music of Frank Ticheli Purchase music, download free MP3s, view virtual scores and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

M a n h a t t a n

1 2

Eb Alto Sax. 1

 

mf

p

mf

p

Bb Ten. Sax.

Eb Bari. Sax.



œœ .. œ.

˙˙ .. ˙.

 

  

p

  







œœ .. ˙˙ .. œ. ˙.

F Hn. 2

Trb. 1

 

  p

 



  

 







    

               

st. mute

mp



  

  

 



  

  

 

                   

  

                   

mp



  



  

  



  

  

   

2 3

 

Euph.

 

Tba.

  

Trb.

Str. Bass

  

 

Timp.

Perc. 1

 

  

   

         (MAR.)

Perc. 2

  

(CHIMES)

Perc. 3

Perc. 4











 





   

mp

  

  



 







mp



  



(VIBES)

 mp





 

 

 







                 



p mute

  





 

mp



 

                   

1.



mute



 

   







   

 





p

   

F Hn. 1



2 3

   

 

                          

mp

mp

mp

               

 



 Bb Tpt. 1  Bb Tpt.

  mp

                       p mp                   

mf



 



  

Eb Alto Sax. 2

 

 

p

    

(1.)

Bsn.

mf

p

p

Bb Cl. 1

    

Fl. 1



    

10

 

p



     

1 Ob. 2

    

œœ .. œ.

Yes, it does.



     

TRIANGLE (med. lg.) l.v. mp



            

      

   Initial tunings         VIBRAPHONE         Percussion 1   

Percussion 3

tutti

p MARIMBA

˙˙ .. ˙.

In the last line of his program note in the score, Ticheli writes how he was “delighted and galvanized by these buoyant, optimistic folksongs. I hope the joy I felt comes through to all who perform and hear this work.”

9

Timpani

Percussion 2

p

 

  

p



   

p



 

 

Eb Alto Saxophone 1

œœ ... œ

j j œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ J œ. œ

through percussion writing in which boom and bang are less important than tinkle and ring. With all of the melodies and counterpoint, I have never studied a piece and had “I would love to play that part!” go through my head so many times.

Picc.

FRANK TICHELI

Bb Bass Clarinet

Bassoon

18

   

Solo

1 2

Oboe

j œœ .œ œ . œ . œ. œ.

j œœ œœ œœ .. œœ ..

Commissioned by the Organizing Committee of the Jeju International Wind Ensemble Festival

KOREAN FOLKSONGS FROM JEJU ISLAND

Flute 1

2

2

2

significant contribution to the Grade 4 repertoire. In it we have a highly unified work of significant length that moves us even further along our evolution from our history of loud heavy military music in duple meter. We don’t have enough Grade 4 pieces that are filled with grace and light.

  Piccolo   

2

2

2

œ œ œ œ. œ. œ œ œ œ. œ.









   





 

 



  

     



2

B e a c h

M u s i c


II. The Forest Nymph and the Woodcutter ("Kyehwa")     

h. = c. 44 (q = c. 132)

Picc.



rit.



A Tempo

ten. ten.                               Solo

Fl. 1

Fl. 2

mp

    

1 2

    

Bb Cl. 1

  

Bb Cl. 2

   

Ob.

Bb Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 2

      





pp

Eb Alto Sax. 1

 

Eb Alto Sax. 2

 

Bb Ten. Sax.

  

Eb Bari. Sax.

  











  

F Hn. 2

Trb. 1

   

2 3

   

Euph.

   

   

Trb.

Tba.

Str. Bass

Timp.

   

    





   



























 







F Hn. 1

  





   

mp



2 3



   

Ob. 1 ten. ten.



  Bb Tpt. 1    Bb Tpt.

p ten. ten. 1.

 

   

 





 









  

  











  





  





mp

              

p Solo gentle, heartfelt





    

Perc. 4











p





1 2

Eb Alto Sax. 1

Bb Ten. Sax.

Eb Bari. Sax.



  







   

Bb Tpt.

2 3



  





      

        

tutti

 p

    

Fl. 1

         





 





  



 

  





 

 

  



Bb Cl. 1

 

Bb Cl. 2

 

Bb Cl. 3

 

Bb Bass Cl.

 

1 2

   

Bb Ten. Sax.

Bb Tpt. 1





Eb Bari. Sax.

Eb Alto Sax. 2



  

 

 

  

  St. mute     

2 3

 

F Hn. 1

mf

 







                    

    



 





  

F Hn. 2

  

Trb. 1

  

2 3

  

Euph.

   

Tba.

   

   

Perc. 1

Perc. 2

Perc. 3

             



  Perc. 4   





TRI. (sm.)

p

  p



 









 31



 

 

 



 

 

 





 

 

  

 

  

  

  

  

  





















  

a2

 

 





      

  

  

  

     

    

  

mp

mp

 

p

tutti

    



 

 

 

      

 

      

 

p

p

Ob. 1 (st. mute)



p



  



 

  

     

Euph.

Tba.

  

2 3











Fl. 1



 

   



mute out           























 

 

1 2

 

Bb Cl. 1

Bb Cl. 2

Bb Cl. 3

Bb Bass Cl.

1 2

Eb Alto Sax. 2

Bb Ten. Sax.

Eb Bari. Sax.





 







    

   







   

     

 

 

  

 











 

 









 

 







 

 





 



 



 



 



    

                   

    

    

F Hn. 2



 

Trb. 1 2 3

 

Euph.

 

Tba.

  

Str. Bass

 

Timp.



Perc. 1

Trb.

Perc. 2

Perc. 3

Perc. 4

             







MAR.





 

mp



(TRI.)



 

















32

 







 

         

F Hn. 1

mp



p

  







  

                              

 

 

     



 

     

 

   

  



                   







                 



 

     

     

   p

   

mp



mp

 Bb Tpt. 1  2 3

 

   

     

Eb Alto Sax. 1

Bb Tpt.

     

mute

mf

  

Fl. 2

mute out

VIBES

  

            

Timp.

mp

p

  p

Str. Bass

 

Bsn.

p

  

 

Ob.

 



Trb.



 

Bb Tpt.

 

 

    Str. Bass    Timp.   Perc. 1   

    

 

 

9

Eb Alto Sax. 1



Picc.

  

p

24

Bsn.

Perc. 4

  p

   



 



1.

 

Perc. 3

   

Ob.

F Hn. 2

Perc. 2

1 2

Fl. 2

  p

 

Trb.

III. Celebration on Halla Mountain ("Nuhyoung Nahyoung") Picc.

23

q. = 132 Bouncy and cheerful



14

         

F Hn. 1

Trb. 1



 

 Bb Tpt. 1  

Bsn.

Eb Alto Sax. 2

pizz.

    

Bb Cl. 3

Bb Bass Cl.

 





Bb Cl. 2

  

Bb Cl. 1

Ob.









 



    



  

 

Perc. 3





1 2

Perc. 2

VIBES







          

p

  

  

Fl. 2

 

p

Fl. 1

  p

       p      

Perc. 1





  





    9

Picc.

   





      

mp

mp



mp

Bb Cl. 3



6





  





 

p div.





p

 











 



 





 



p

       

p



l.v.

p



 

19


Bb TRUMPET AND PIANO

S

MAKING MUSIC MATTER SERIES

FRANK TICHELI 13 ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS FOR Bb TRUMPET AND PIANO EASY TO INTERMEDIATE

O

Flute

B e a c h

Bb Clarinet

FLUTE AND PIANO

Bb CLARINET AND PIANO

L

M a n h a t t a n

M u s i c

Eb Alto Sax Eb ALTO SAX. AND PIANO

MAKING MUSIC MATTER SERIES

MAKING MUSIC MATTER SERIES

MAKING MUSIC MATTER SERIES

FRANK TICHELI

FRANK TICHELI

FRANK TICHELI

14 ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS FOR FLUTE AND PIANO

15 ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS FOR Bb CLARINET AND PIANO

13 ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS FOR Eb ALTO SAXOPHONE AND PIANO

EASY TO INTERMEDIATE

EASY TO INTERMEDIATE

EASY TO INTERMEDIATE

B e a c h

M u s i c

M a n h a t t a n

M u s i c

F Horn

Bb Trumpet Bb TRUMPET AND PIANO

B e a c h

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c

Trombone TROMBONE AND PIANO

F HORN AND PIANO

MAKING MUSIC MATTER SERIES

MAKING MUSIC MATTER SERIES

MAKING MUSIC MATTER SERIES

FRANK TICHELI

FRANK TICHELI

FRANK TICHELI

13 ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS FOR F HORN AND PIANO

13 ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS FOR TROMBONE AND PIANO

EASY TO INTERMEDIATE

EASY TO INTERMEDIATE

13 ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS FOR Bb TRUMPET AND PIANO EASY TO INTERMEDIATE

B e a c h

M u s i c

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c

S

M a n h a t t a n

O

M a n h a t t a n


Composition Contest Winners t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

I va n Božičević

T H E

T H I R D

I N T E R N AT I O N A L

C o n c e r t

C

O

N

C

E

R

T

B

A

N

J O S E P H

C O N T E S T

B A N D

D

B e a c h

M u s i c

M a n h a t t a n

Jodie Blackshaw Terpsichorean Dances

Jodie Blackshaw Whirlwind

B e a c h

M u s i c

Ivan Božičević Spiraling

R A I S I N G

Third Prize Winner t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

CAMERON’S DREAM C O N C E R T

N

H

A

S TA N D A R D S

T

B A N D S

T

A

O F

T H E

A L L

N

O V E R

B

E

A M E R I C A N T H E

A

C O N C E R T

B A N D

W O R L D

C

H

M

U

S

I

C

All The Bells and Whistles

all theBells and

t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

Whistles

B A N D

c o n c e r t

b a n d

Jeffrey Hass

JONI GREENE

JONI GREENE

HEAR COMPLETE RECORDINGS & V I E W C O M P L E T E V I RT UA L S C O R E S : W W W. M A N H AT TA N B E A C H M U S I C . C O M

RAISING THE STANDARDS OF THE AMERICAN CONCERT BAND AND BANDS ALL OVER THE WORLD

M A N H A T T A N

John Frantzen Euphoria

B E A C H

Raising The Standards of the A merican Concert Band And Bands All Over the World

M U S I C

M a n h a t t a n

Joni Greene Cameron’s Dream

SECOND PRIZE WINNER

SECOND PRIZE WINNER

T H E 3 R D I N T E R N AT I O N A L F R A N K T I C H E L I C O M P O S I T I O N C O N T E S T

T H E 3 R D I N T E R N AT I O N A L F R A N K T I C H E L I C O M P O S I T I O N C O N T E S T First Prize Winner, t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

Joni Greene Moonscape Awakening

Fi rs t P r i z e W i n n er , t h e 3 r d In t er n at i on a l Fr a n k T i c h el i C o m p o si t i on C on t e s t

Catclaw Mimosa C O N C E R T

J oy (mostly!)

B A N D

Third Prize Winner — The Frank Ticheli Composition Contest

C O N C E R T

J E F F R E Y

B A N D

�ica� Lev�

H AY M A N

C o n c

R a i s i n g t h e S t a n d a r d s o f A m e r i c a n C o n c e r t B a n d a n d a l l o v e r t h e W o r l d

R A I S I N G

T H E

S TA N D A R D S A N D

B E A C H

M U S I C

B A N D S

O F A L L

M A N H A T T A N

T H E O V E R

A M E R I C A N T H E

r t

B a

n d

t h e B a n d s

C O N C E R T

Manhattan Beach M�sic

B A N D

W O R L D

B E A C H

e

Ben Hjertm ann

M a n h at ta n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

M A N H A T T A N

M u s i c

M U S I C

M A N H A T T A N

B E A C H

M U S I C

Jeffrey Hayman Ludvik

Ben Hjertmann Catclaw Mimosa

Micah Levy Joy (mostly!)

FIRST PRIZE WINNER - THE FRANK TICHELI COMPOSITION CONTEST

T H E 3 r d I N T E R N AT I O N A L F R A N K T I C H E L I C O M P O S I T I O N C O N T E S T

Leonard Mark Lewis Short Stories

THIRD PRIZE WINNER

Shadow Rituals THIRD PRIZE WINNER

T H E 3 r d I N T E R N AT I O N A L F R A N K T I C H E L I C O M P O S I T I O N C O N T E S T

Shadow Rituals

N

C

E R

T

B A

N

D

TIIM M MEE T M A A C

A

O

ERT BA NC N

D

E W M E LTO NDR

E

C O

G

www.ShadowRituals.com

Timothy

N

TIIM MEE T MEE AM G GA Michael Markowski

PLEASE VISIT

www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

Michael Markowski Shadow Rituals Second Prize Winner

H H W W G G N N A A BB M a n h a t t a n

M A N H A T T A N

B E A C H

M U S I C

Andrew Melton Game Time

C O N C E R T

B A N D

ern

ati

ona

on n C

tes

t

GG BBAANNOORR

a l Fr

nk

Tic

hel

m i Co

i pos

tio

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c

Matthew Peterson Reflections on the Death of the Beloved

ze

Int

B e a c h

M u s i c

First Prize Winner t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

Third Prize Winner — The Frank Ticheli Composition Contest

Benjamin Dean Taylor Whiz-Bang

Lift-Off C

O

N

C

E

R

T

B

A

N

D

Lift-Off

Travis J. Weller

Roger Zare

C o n c

e

r t

B a

M

a

n h

a t

t a

n

B e

a

c

h

M

u

R o g e r Za r e

n d

Hear Complete Recordings & V i e w C o m p l e t e V i rt u a l S c o r e s : w w w. M a n h at t a n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

To Hear A Complete Recording Please Visit

w w w . M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

Clint Needham Legacies

First Prize Winner

Journey To The Prairie

SSIICC MMUU C HH EEAA C N BB T AA N AATT T NNHH MMAA

R a i s i n g t h e S ta n d a r d s o f t h e A m er ic a n C onc ert Ba n d a n d Ba n d s All Over the World.

OORR

Pri

(

A NNDD E RRTT BB A CCOONNCC E

A YYLL Matthew Peterson NN TT A DDEEAA N N I I M JJAAM BBEENN

rd

er

3rd

A

t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

IIZZD-D-EEAANN TTAAYYLL H H W JJAAMMIINN NNGG W A A BB EE NN B B IIZZ-W WHH Thi

n Win

the ) of Tie

D

B A N D

Timothy Miles Lauda

t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

Reflections on The Death of The Beloved

A U

C O N C E R T

RAISING THE STANDARDS OF THE AMERICAN CONCERT BAND A N D BA N D S A L L OV E R T H E W O R L D

w w w. M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c , c o m

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Roger Zare Lift-Off

C O N T E S T

Z Z II L

TO H E A R A C O M P L E T E R E C O R D I N G A N D TO V I E W C O M P L E T E V I R T U A L S C O R E S

Miles

Second Prize Winner — The Frank Ticheli Composition Contest

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Jeffrey Hass All the Bells and Whistles

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SECOND PRIZE WINNER T H E 3 r d I N T E R N AT I O N A L F R A N K T I C H E L I C O M P O S I T I O N C O N T E S T

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SECOND PRIZE WINNER

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Joseph Eidson Frenetico

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C O N C E R T

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E I D S O N

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B a n d

Raising The Standards of the A merican Concert Band And Bands All Over the World

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I va n Božičević Jodie Blackshaw

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F R A N K

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First Prize Winner,

t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

SECOND PRIZE WINNER - THE FRANK TICHELI COMPOSITION CONTEST

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����a��n� First Prize Winner,

Terpsichorean Dances


PRESENTING First Prize Winner t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t C at e g o r y T w o : C o n c e r t B a n d M u s i c G r a d e 3 - 4 . 5

R o g e r Za r e (USA)

Lift-Off by A L A N LO U R E N S Roger Zare’s Lift-Off is a kind of moto perpetuto, with sixteenth notes in just about every single bar. Far from a frantic note grab, however, Zare constructs a thoughtful and melodic work of some whimsy. With excellent instrumentation skills (this is a score that demands a full ensemble), Zare conjures up an episodic delight full of color.

7 we add triplets; the percussion, present in the woodblocks at the opening, begin to layer in more lines. Zare introduces the lower voices, producing a canonic effect between the upper brass and the lower WW and brass, and adding xylophone, suspended cymbals, and ultimately harp. From 17 the main theme moves to the woodwinds. We begin to see Zare’s interesting instrumentation here. Here the 3rd and 4th horns (playing half notes) snarl though a stopped crescendo. Zare cleverly appropriates parts of his theme and the 16th notes into melodic material for the low brass and woodwind.

The opening feels almost minimalist. We begin with travelling sixteenth notes in the woodwinds, follow by an insistent if somewhat unsettled brass interjection in the horns and trumpets. [See Ex. 1, recto.]

The work reaches a climax at measure 26, The score has a strong feeling of D coming to rest on a giant E Minor chord, (concert pitch) as the tonal center. though with the 16ths still chirping However, from the beginning Zare ROGER ZARE along in the upper WW, and marked at keeps the tonality unsettled, offering Photo by Alexandra Dee a brief fortissimo before falling to mezzous simultaneous D and E in both the piano. upper woodwinds (here written at the octave, but in the original in the same octave), and in the Zare gives us the second theme here — ­­ a contrasting world high, long notes of the bassoons. of long pitches and careful harmonies. The theme slides from

22

If tonal music is the expression of tension and relief, Zare from the very start offers great tension in the dissonance, though he resolves much of the tension in the main theme in thirds and fifths.

C to B Flat, though a surprising D Major chord to peak at F, before coming back to D minor. This movement through (sometime distantly) related chords is made more unstable by the use of 6/4, as well as root position chords.

As we move forward, Zare increases the complexity. From bar

The parallel movement of the chords gives this work a further

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c


Lift Off: Opening (Concert Pitch)

Ex. 1

Vivace q = 132

Fl, Cl, Sax

Woodwind

Brass

Bassoon

2 œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ & 4 œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ 2 &4

j œœ ‰ fl

Hn, Tpt,

Œ

2 & 4 ˙˙

˙˙

œœ œœ œœ Œ . ..

˙˙

Œ

˙˙

‰ œœ œœœœ‰ œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ.

˙˙

˙˙

A

œœ œœ œ. œ.

dimension, projecting motion in both a vertical as well as horizontal manner. Of course accompanying this theme in the Clarinets are 16th notes, two slurred two tongued. In the manner of the opening theme, Zare works this material by adding voices and layering-in complexity in the accompaniment. This second theme [Ex. 2, below] is a warm and attractive one, in great contrast to the angular opening idea. The harmonic Lift Off: Bar 29 Second Theme (Transposed)

Ex. 2 Horns (in F)

# & 42 Œ œœœ

plus bssn

Low Brass

? 42 Œ œœ œ

j œœ .. ≈ œœœ œ.

n ˙˙˙

# œœ b œœ n œœ œ

j œœ .. ≈ œœœ œ.

b ˙˙˙

œœœ n œœ bœ

œœœ b n œœ b œœ bœ œ

# œœœ œ œ b œ bœ

œœœ œ œœ

N œœœ b b œœœ

œœœ b n œœ b œœ b œb œ

œœœ œ œœ

˙˙ ˙ ˙˙ ˙

˙˙ ˙

D

˙˙ ˙

Lift Off: Bar 64 (Transposed)

˙˙ ˙˙ œ b œ œ œ r œ œ œ œN œR œœ œœœR œ œœœ œœ ≈‰ ∑ œ & 42 œ # œ œœ ≈‰ ≈‰ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ r ## 2 œ Œ œ ≈ ‰ ≈ ‰ ≈ ‰ R≈‰ & 4 R œ œœ R œ œ œœ œ r r j ‰ n œœœ œ œ œœ ≈œ œ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈‰ ## 2 ˙˙ œ œœ œœ R R & # 4 Œ œ œ œœ Rœ ≈œ ‰œ œ œ ≈‰ ≈‰ Œ

Ex. 3, bar 64, “woodwind cascade” Oboe/Flute

Clarinet (B Flat)

A. Sax (E Flat)

Bassoon

Low Brass

? ?

r 2 œ œ œ œ ≈‰ 4 bœ œ bœ œ œ œ

∑ b ˙œ˙˙ ˙

Hn, Trom, Euph, Tuba

2 b œ˙ 4b˙

œœ

j œ œ ˙œ˙ œ . ˙ ˙

M a n h a t t a n

˙ b ˙˙˙ ˙

b ˙˙ p ˙ ˙˙˙ ˙

B e a c h

œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ R

œœ. ≈ ‰ Œ R sff œœ ≈ ‰ Œ R sff œ œœ œ ‰ Œ J sff

M u s i c

23


This episode is short. At 128 we are very quickly into Theme A again, this time at its most insistent, pushing through all the woodwind, the horns and the trumpets, with Lift-Off only the alto saxophones providing The transition from second theme the 16th note accompanying motif, back to theme A is via a “woodwind and by bar 147 we are into the cascade,” [Ex. 3, verso] supported coda having provided room for Lift-Off by the low brass. This passage at bar expansiveness by moving from the R o together g e r Z a r e the harmony of 64 brings 2/4 time signature we have been Roger Zare the second theme with the growing in for most of the piece (a few 3/4 moto perpetuo of the (mostly) upper measures provide “hops” as the work woodwinds. develops) into 2/2. Here we have The recapitulation that follows is an expansive return of our second cleverly not a triumphant return of theme, in almost all of the ensemble. the theme, but rather a statement Only the saxes and piccolo are still of quiet confidence, appearing as it providing the flourishes that run does in the Bassoon and a muted throughout this work. A return trombone. Ensembles with great to 2/4 at bar 157 brings us to an bass clarinet players will love this theme, with that instrument emphatic close, finishing with our ambiguity in D Major. plus the percussion providing the moving 16th and 8th notes The compositional use of the sixteenth notes throughout the [Ex. 4, below]. work provide the listener with a rhythmic “hook” upon to to Lift Off: Bar 75 (Transposed) movement, though somewhat in lockstep, is very attractive, particularly in the environment of a somewhat opaque harmony created by the motion of the sixteenth notes. First Prize Winner,

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C

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Ex. 4, bar 75 Bass Clarinet

& 42

O

N

C

E

R

T

B

A

N

D

R a i s i n g t h e S t a n d a r d s o f A m e r i c a n C o n c e r t B a n d a n d a l l o v e r t h e W o r l d .

M

a

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a t

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a

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s

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Lift Off: Bar 109 L Ex. 5, bar 109 Flutes

Oboe

2 &4

& 42 Œ

œœ œœ b œœ œœ b œœ œœ .. b œœ œœ œœ .. œœ ˙˙ J ∑ ‰ J ‰ P œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ bœ J f

We build again into bar 102, arriving again at a fortissimo chord, this time a big E Flat major chord. Theme C is a robust oboe solo, [Ex. 5, above] marked by the composer to be played “boldly”. There is a dancing flute response that throws these two colors into a delightful juxtaposition.

24

M a n h a t t a n

˙˙

œœ N œœ

œ œ

œ œ

base the ideas. It gives the work a sense of direction. Unlike many other works employing this idea, the 16th notes rarely come to the forefront, being truly an accompaniment idea. Whilst Zare gives them a few moments in the sun, or hooks

B e a c h

M u s i c


them to a melodic idea, they are generally background figures.

LIFT-OFF FOR CONCERT BAND

° 2 Piccolo & 4

Vivace q = 132

Ensembles performing this work will face the normal difficulty of keep these notes going. However the rich harmonies and strong rondo-esque structure give the listener a great deal to hold on. The percussion requirements of this score are significant, and Zare uses percussion to great effect, though the parts never become virtuosic, and on very few occasions are all five of the percussion parts playing together. In working through the score, the effect is of a composer who knows the colors he is looking for, and who is writing for all the instruments in a very characteristic way.

Flute 3 1 2

p

2 &4 j ‰ Œ ¿. f > tongue slap 2 &4 j ‰ Œ f ¿. > ˙˙ ? 42 a2 tongue slap

2 3

Bb Bass Clarinet

¢ p ° 2 #œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. ‰™ &4 R

1 2

Eb Alto Saxophone 1 Eb Alto Saxophone 2

∑

1 2 3 4

1 2 Bb Trumpet 3

3

2

° & 10

Picc.

1 2 Fl. 3

Ob.

2

3

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1

13

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16

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© 2016 Manhattan Beach Music

17

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Copyright © 2015 Manhattan Beach Music – All Rights Reserved – Printed and engraved in the United States of America Purchase music, download free MP3’s, view scores and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

& nœœr ‰™ R

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3

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ff

Zare’s harmonic language is extended, but in this work never jarring. At less than three minutes, it is an excellent opener or addition to a program, without being brash. Zare is clearly a master of instrumentation, and his choices throughput this work make Lift-Off a worthy contest first-prize winner.

4

2.

. . . . . 2 >. & 4 œJ ‰ #œ œ œ œ #Rœ ‰™ mf

1 2

Lift-Off is an attractive work. From an audience point of view it has vigor and energy. The structure is clear and concise. The nature of the work creates a great sense of energy.

∑

2 & 4 #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œr ‰™

1 Bb Clarinet

Bassoon

3

2 ‰™ Œ ‰™ Œ & 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œr œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œr œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœœœœ œœ œœœœœœœœ œœ bœœ œœ œœ œœœœœœœœœœ ∑ R ‰™ Œ R ‰™ Œ p 2 r ‰™ r‰™ Œ Œ ∑ ∑ &4 œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ p 1. r ‰™ Œ 2 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ œbœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ &4

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25


P R E S E N T I N G

SECOND PRIZE WINNER THE 3RD INTERNATIONAL FRANK TICHELI COMPOSITION CONTEST CATEGORY 2: CONCERT BAND MUSIC GRADE 3 - 4.5

J E F F R E Y

H AY M A N

( U S A )

L U D V I K by A L A N LO U R E N S To call Ludvig a “cheeky romp” is to sell it far too short. And yet this description fits this work to a tee. There is an adage that “Dying is easy; comedy is hard”. While this work can, I think, be described as humorous, it is neither comedy, nor easy. Ludvig's creation is fun, energetic (sometimes frantic), and wonderfully scored. Ludvig grows from a simple idea presented first in the clarinet to a straightforward accompaniment of wonderful (mostly) woody sounds [Ex. 1]. (The composer marks this, “With energy, quarter = 152.”)

All the way through this piece it is this change of rhythmic and harmonic pace that gives the work its charm. In the music of Mozart, many of his most famous phrases have a similar pattern, starting very seriously, and then galloping towards the end of the phrase. In this way the energy moves forward. Take for example his famous clarinet concerto. This first four bars are very pleasant and simple melody, featuring long notes [Ex. 3a, recto overleaf ]. The second half of the phrase, however, picks up energy and vitality with the addition of sixteenth notes [Ex 3b].

The central idea here is the opening Hayman does exactly the same thing, intervals: Major second, minor third, on the micro level, and on the macro leading to a major seventh, with the level, as the work progresses. Even instability emphasized by a trill to as he repeats and re-scores the same the octave. The underlaying simple J E F F R E Y H AY M A N idea from the beginning of the work accompaniment is jovial and regular, onwards, we begin to add complexity Photo by Jeff Hayman a clear juxtaposition to the fractured and movement. Still playing with these melody heard above. Hayman gives us four bar phrases, expanding intervals, he scores the woodwinds with increasing always with this anacrusis feel leaning forward, and finishing sections of sixteenth notes, with mostly stepwise movement with a strong but unstable feel, before adding a codetta to the and with leaps to open the idea. melody that abruptly finishes the tune with increased energy, Underneath, he continues to lie out the beat, with the low and (with the addition of the low brass) a much fuller change brass at bar 28 playing on 1 & 3, and then later in a standard of color [Ex.2].

26

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c


Opening bars. B Flat Clarinet, Bassoon, Bass Clarinet and Contrabass Clarinet, Horn

Ex. 1 Clarinet in B b

Tutti (Concert pitch)

Bouyant h=66

& 44 Ó ? 44 Œ

& ˙ ‰ ? bœ J

œ b œœ ‰

œœ œœ ‰ œ œ Œ œ J

Ex. 2, bar 13 Upper WW

& 44

Low Brass and WW

? 44

3

3

Œ

‰ œœ œœ œœ ‰ bœ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ J J p 2nd Ÿ ≈ œ œ #w œ f ß œœ œœ œœ ‰ #b œœœ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ ‰ J

Bar 14. Picc, Ob, Cl, B Cl, Tn Sax Trom, Tuba

Solo

œœ œ ‰

œœ ‰ œœ œ œ ‰ bœ ‰ J

Œ

bœ bœ. R

r œ œœ œ

‰ b n œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œ œ nœ ‰ œ ‰ œ J

1+2+3+4+ pattern building to a climax to bar 36. But in measure 36 we have a contrasting section, rich with a strong horn line, and with rhythmically complex woodwind lines with 3 against 4. The horn writing in this work is sublime, stringlike and having a rich melodic vein — though written in only 2 parts. The approach is

M a n h a t t a n

j œ

‰ bœ f

Œ

‰ b œœœ œœœ œœœ ‰ œœœ œœœ œœœ Œ œ œ ‰ Œ J

œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ Œ bœ ‰ Œ J

f

‰ œœ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ ‰ Œ J J

œœ œœ œ œ Œ

œ

b œ . n œ# œ . n œ œ . b œ .. œ bb œœ .. œ . & œ ‰ b œ ‰ œœ ‰ ? # œœ œ b œ ‰ b œ ‰ b œJ

‰ j œ ˙ F

bœ œ.

bœ œ. b b œœœ ‰

‰ œ

œœœ ‰ œœ ‰ bœ ‰

œ œ œ # ˙˙ œ # œ œ b # ˙˙

œœ ‰ œœ œ œ œ ‰ 3

œ

œ bœ. ‰ œ œ œœ

œ b œœ ‰ Œ

r œ ‰ ≈ œ. #œ œ j ‰ œ. œ Ó œ ‰ Œ J t. sax

very orchestral, with flowing melodies in the horn punctured by woodwind interjections. [Ex. 4, overleaf ]. Hayman reinforces this idea with his terrific scoring. Not only is he frequently emphasising the wonderful sound of the low woodwind, he carefully scores compound sounds across the ensemble: We have solos from Clarinet,

B e a c h

M u s i c

27


4 ˙ &4 Ex. 3a 4 ˙ &4

œ.

œ.

œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ J

œ œœœœœœœœ œ œ ˙ œ numerous ˙ œ from Soprano Sax, ˙Alto Sax,œTrombone œ œ œ œ œ and œ œ from & œ tuned percussion lines. In between we have a light hand

œ

Œ

Œ

Ex. 3b

&˙

with the scoring for brass, again almost orchestral in nature. There is frequent use of mutes, and the articulations are well considered and appropriate. In short, there is a wealth of considered sounds here.

œ

Flute

& 44

Clarinet in B b 1

& 44

Clarinet in B b 2/3 2

& 44

Horn in F (also in Bssn)

& 44

œ ‰ Œ J

œ ‰ ˙ J

œ ‰ Œ J

œ œ œ Œ Ó

œ œ # œ œ the œ œ slow œ œ œlasts Œa mere œ œHowever œ section Ó

6 bars before our frantic tempo re-emerges, again defying our ability to put this work into a box. A kind of recapitulation, this time featuring the horns, greets us at m. 111, though this time with increased vehemence, with sixteenth notes appearing in the score mostly in the woodwind lines, to add decoration to this melody. When the climax arrives after 111 we have a kind of raucous

œ b œœ b œœ œ n œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ J P 3 3 b œ œ j ‰ # œ œ œ œj ‰ œ bœ p 3 ‰ œbœ j ‰ j œ œ œœœ b œœ œ#œ œ œ œ œœœ œ J p j b œœ œ œ œœ .. b œœ œœ .. J F Œ

œ ‰ ˙ J

œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ

Hayman plays with his material, almost episodically, building through numerous closely related sections. Ex. 4 Bar 38 All in written pitch

œ ‰ œ J œ ‰ œ J

œ œ œ b œœ ‰ œœ b œœ œ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ n œœ œ œœ ‰ œœ b œœ œ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œ œœ J J J J bœ œ j ‰ œ œ œ j ‰ œœ #œ

œ œ j ‰ b œ œ œ œj ‰ bœ œ Œ j ‰ Œ œ œ ‰ j b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ ‰ œ #œ œ œ œ J ‰ bœ œ œ œ œ b œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ J J 3

œœ . .

3

œœ b œœ œ b œœ œ J

3

œœ b ˙˙

3

œœ ‰ Œ J

party. The low brass supply the basis of a straightforward rhythm as the trumpets play the end of the phrase; the woodwinds firing through the sixteenth notes, often in hocket, with similar instruments until after m. 148 he almost magical show, calm, deconstructs the rhythm, moving us across one beat and debonair on the surface — destabilizing the piece before a very brief coda. and always moving

Always we have this unbalanced phrase idea ­­ — ­ a gentle opening followed by an almost frantic ending. It is like a great magical show, calm, almost debonair on the surface — and always moving and ticking “It is like a great away in the background.

almost

There ­ is multi-metre here too, but well placed and infrequent. Hayman extends the meter into 3/2, as well and ticking away as contracting it to 3/4. The slower section — which feels like it will settle into a friendly and all too predictable ABA form, occurs at m. 86, and features a beautiful clarinet line.

28

M a n h a t t a n

in the background.”

The work finishes with as much humour as it started, but this time emphatically returning us to opening idea.

Hayman’s Ludvik is extremely good craft. He demonstrates

B e a c h

M u s i c


vitality. This music is easy to love.

to us the qualities of a man in control of his scoring, in that he has the confidence not to score every instrument in every bar. The colors of this work are delicious, and extremely well considered. The first entry of (for example) the Tuba, occurring in bar 14, is a moment of great note for its absence before that point (and because we won’t hear it again until bar 28).

There are only so many ways to work melodic material. Jeffrey Hayman has a unique voice, and an important understanding of structure, even as he seeks to subvert the nature of band works. We have an standard ABA form, when actually we do not. We have significant areas of contrast, but I K an episodic and well considered structure.

SECOND PRIZE WINNER

T H E 3 R D I N T E R N AT I O N A L F R A N K T I C H E L I C O M P O S I T I O N C O N T E S T

The thematic material is memorable, because of its simplicity. It holds the work together precisely because it is easy to hear. It is also the kind of material that can be well worked. Inverted, made retrograde, it is material with which one can craft excellent music.

L U D V C O N C E R T

J E F F R E Y

It is also profoundly good natured. This is a work that will make the musicians work, and make an audience smile. Though not easy, the music is well designed to be both complex and accessible. Audiences will enjoy its energy, and the quirks of phrasing and instrumentation give it a life and

M A N H A T T A N

Piccolo 1 Flute 2 1 2

Oboe

4 &4

1

4 &4 Ó

2 3

& 44

B b Clarinet

B b Bass Clarinet B b Contrabass Clarinet

1 2

Bassoon

Contrabassoon B b Soprano Saxophone

E b Alto Saxophone

B b Tenor Saxophone

E b Baritone Saxophone

1

B b Trumpet 2 3 Horn in F

1 2

1 Trombone 2 3 Tuba Timpani

1. Xylophone 2. Drum Set 3. Percussion

4 &4

Œ

solo

K‰ Œ œ. K‰ Œ œ.

∑ Œ

K‰ Œ œ.

‰ K œ

K‰ Œ œ.

K‰ Œ œ.

K‰ Œ œ.

? 44 ‰ b œœ. œœ. œœ. ‰ œœ. œœ. œœ. ‰ b œœ. œœ. œœ. ‰ œœ. œœ. œœ. Ô Ô Ô Ô p ? 44 K ‰ Œ Ó ∑ œ p. ∑ ∑ & 44 ∑

& 44

& 44

& 44

& 44

∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

Hn. 1 K K K K & 44 ‰ œ. œ. œ. ‰ œ. œ. œ. ‰ œ. œ. œ. ‰ œ. œ. œ. p ? 44 ∑ ∑

? 44

? 44

? 44 w p & 44 ã 44

ã 44 w p

Bass Drum

∑ ∑

JEFFREY HAYMAN 4

b œ-

Œ

K‰ Œ b œ.

K‰ Œ œ.

. . . . . . ‰ b Ôœœ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ Ô ∑

>

≈ œ œ # œÔ ‰ Œ Ó œ ß Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Cl. 2 > #w ∑ brash and unrefined ß Œ Œ Œ œœb œŒ

5

‰ K œ -̇ brash and unrefined f ∑

& 44

4 &4 K ‰ Œ œ p. 4 & 4 œK ‰ Œ p.

3

K‰ Œ œ.

K‰ Œ b œ.

∑ Ó œƒ

œ F-

‰ n Ôœ f

Œ

Ó

Œ

K‰ Œ œ.

‰ œ. K œ. œ. ‰ œ. K œ. œ.

‰ b œ. œ. œ. ‰ œ. œ. œ.

‰ b Ôœ. œ. œ. ‰ Ôœ. œ. œ.

∑ ∑

B E A C H

Ô

Ô

F

Picc. Fl.

1 2

Ob.

1 2 1

Œ

K‰ Œ K‰ Œ œ œ. F. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. ‰ # œÔ œ œ ‰ Ôœ œ œ ‰ œÔ œ œ ‰ Ôœ œ œ F ∑ ∑

H AY M A N

∑ ∑ ∑

B b Cl.

2 3

B b Bs. Cl. B b Cbs. Cl.

Bsn.

1 2

Cbsn. B b Sop. Sax.

F Hn.

2 3 1 2 1

Tbn.

2 3

Tuba

Timp.

1. Xylo.

2. Dr. Set

M a n h a t t a n

&

1

Copyright © 2017 Manhattan Beach Music - All Rights Reserved - Printed and engraved in the United States of America ISBN 1-59913-202-8 (complete set) ISBN 1-59913-203-6 (conductor score) Purchase music, download free MP3s, view virtual scores and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

K‰ Œ & K‰ Œ œ œ. p. K‰ Œ & K‰ Œ œ œ. p. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. ? ‰ œÔ œ œ ‰ œÔ œ œ p ? ∑

&

B b Tpt.

3. Perc.

‰ œÔ b ˙-

&

. . . . . . & ‰ b œÔ œ œ ‰ œÔ œ œ ? ? ? ?

(Hn. 1)

p

∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

&

ã

ã

K ‰ Œ œ.

K‰ Œ œ. K‰ Œ œ.

œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. ‰ b œÔ œ œ ‰ œÔ œ œ ∑ ∑

K K‰ Œ n œ # œ. > Œ Œ œœF ‰ Œ K‰ Œ K‰ Œ K K œ. œ b œ. œ. F œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. b œ. œ. ‰ b œÔ œ œ ‰ œÔ œ œ ‰ œÔ œ F ∑ œ.

‰ b œ. œ. œ. ‰ œ. œ. œ. ∑

Ó

Ô

∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

B e a c h

K K ‰ œ. œ. œ. ‰ œ. œ. œ. ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

∑ Œ

a2

Ô

K‰ Œ Ó #œ > Ÿ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Cl. 2

# ˙> f ‰ Œ K K œ b œ.

∑ ≈œœ œ ß

10

Œ

K ‰ Œ œ.

9

&

8

∑ ∑

Œ

&

(solo)

&

E b Bari. Sax. &

&

7

&

B b Ten. Sax.

∑ ∑

∑ ∑

&

&

E b Al. Sax.

∑ ∑

M U S I C

6

FOR CONCERT BAND

2

In short this is a work that is not like many others in the band world. Although it feels fun and humorous, Hayman has delivered a work that is also serious and considered. It is well crafted, but more than that it is excellent art, bringing together disparate ideas into a well crafted whole, and creating an outstanding work in the process.

2

LUDVIK With energy q = 152 4 ∑ &4

B A N D

Ó

‰ K n œ -̇ f

K‰ œ. p K‰ K‰ Œ b œ. œ p. . œœ. œœ. œœ. œœ. ‰ b œœ ‰ Ô Ô p ∑

b œ-

∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

Œ

Œ

∑ Œ Œ

œœœ Z

K‰ Œ œ. K‰ Œ œ.

œ. œ. ‰ œ. œ. œ. œ œ œ œ œ Ô ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

K ‰ b œ. œ. œ. ‰ œK œ œ ‰ n Ôœ. œ. œ. ‰ œÔ. œ. œ. . . . p F ∑ ∑ ∑

∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

M u s i c

29


P R E S E N T I N G

THIRD PRIZE WINNER (TIE) THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL FRANK TICHELI COMPOSITION CONTEST CATEGORY 2: CONCERT BAND MUSIC GRADE 3 - 4.5

J O S E P H

E I D S O N

( U S A )

FRENETICO by M A R C DIC K E Y clarinet, bassoon, and baritone saxophone play a quarter note hemiola figure that leads back to Ab Major, and a lovely oscillation of crossed voices of eighth notes in the flutes and quarter notes in the clarinets [Ex. 3, mm. 3436]. As the harmony shifts to a-flat minor, the trumpets come in (m. 38) with a melody that seems similar to the woodwind tune from m. 19, but they trick us by leading us back into fanfarish figures at m. 40. Shifting from G Major to g minor, the staccato euphonium and tuba and pizFrenetico is in 6/8 and 9/8 meters zicato string bass emphatically press throughout, with a designated tempo their hemiola eighth notes against of 112 per dotted quarter, and marked the cylindrical brass’s driving 6/8 “Bristling with energy” for its six and patterns. These materials rub against one half minute duration. Hang on each other through a return to C Matight! JOSEPH EIDSON jor at m. 55, as a horn rip propels the The piece is fanfarish at the beginning, phrase from C Major to a shocking Photo by Julia Gallagher moving from trombones to trumpets F# Major (as you recall, the timpani with a brief woodwind flourish eliding the two. The trumpets foreshadowed this at the beginning of the piece). From the F# vacillate between parallel 2nd inversion C Major and D Major Major chord, the score rapidly and unpredictably cycles through triads briefly, while the low brass punctuate the fanfare with the D, Bb, Eb, and then back to C Major and a change of affect at first of many-to-come eighth note hemiola figures, descending m. 61. in rich sustained bell tones in this case (Ex. 2, mm. 8-13). The Structurally, Frenetico has certain allusions to minimalism, with trumpets ascend to Eb Major for a bit, and then land squarely its ever changing ostinato figures, ongoing parallel harmonback in C Major. The crack of a whip and a low brass section ic shifts, and hemiola figures fighting for but never achieving signals a brief legato upper woodwind tune (m. 19), moving dominance. Aesthetically, the piece is a rapid fire conversation from C Major to Ab Major, and answered by the horns who amongst a group of friends, the kind in which frequent interassist a shift to Bb Major. ruptions are expected and understood. At m. 27 the upper woodwinds take over the fanfarish figures, This is a challenging piece, and there is a lot that players who are now piano and shifting between d minor and f minor. The bass

Even before you look at the first measure, you’ll know something is up; a glance at the bottom of the score shows the initial timpani tuning as  — from the bottom up — G, Bb, C, and F#. Frenetico seems harmless enough for about three seconds, with a pedal C in the bass clarinet, bassoons, xylophone, and timpani [Ex. 1, mm. 1-2]. The pedal C keeps going, but the tympani shifts to the G below and then to the F# above before anything else can happen. Expect the unexpected.

30

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c


Dickey - Music Examples for Eidson Frenetico Bass Cl. Bsns.

Timpani

Xylo.

1 (mm. 1-2) ? 6 ˙. 8 ˙. p ? 6 œ. œ œ œ œ œ 8 P & 68 œ . œ œ œ œ œ p 2

Tpts.

Tbns.

Euph. Tuba

(mm. 8-13)

phone trio, a brief trumpet solo, and especially two more extended euphonium solos.

˙. ˙.

œ

? 68 ˙ . ˙ .. ˙ >f

˙. ˙ .. ˙

œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ

The conversation shifts beginning at m. 61. The texture is Dickey - Music Exampleslighter, for Eidson Frenetico and more elongated thoughts are expressed, begin-

>œœ . œœ œœ. œœ. œœ. œœ. >œœ # œœ œœ œ .. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ f œ^ ? 68 œœ ‰ ‰ Œ . ∑ J f & 68

Stylistically, Eidson marks some of the fanfarish patterns legato, while others are very carefully marked with staccato, tenuto, and accent symbols. Depending on your ensemble and the acoustic you are rehearsing and performing in, you may end up interpreting the passages marked legato as non staccato, with just a bit of space to assure clarity.

. . # >œ . ‰ œœœ œœœ œœ ..

œœ œœ. 9 œœ. œœ. # >œœ .. œ œ 8 ‰ œ œ œ.

∑ ˙. ˙ .. ˙ >

98 Œ . 98 ˙ . ˙ .. ˙

Œ.

œœ œœ. œœ

>œœ . œœ œœ. 6 œœ. œœ. # >œœ .. œ .. œ œ 8 ‰ œ œ œ .

ß-p ^œ . ^ œ

v2 v ÍÍ œ. œ .. œ

œœ œœ. b >œœ ... œœ œœ. œœ. œœœ. œœœ. œœ b œ œœ œ

˙. 68 ˙˙ .. ß-p Í ß-p ^ 2> 68 œ œ œ . œ. œ œ œ. v2 v

F

^ b b œœœ ‰ ‰ Œ . J ˙. ˙. b b ˙. > f

ready for it can learn from it. There are myriad variations on 6/8 rhythmic patterns to be learned here, as well as lots of accidentals to maneuver in the harmonically active, key signatureless work. The recurring use of hemiola will strengthen players rhythmic independence. (Resist the temptation to “help” players by conducting the hemiola passages; the whole idea is to learn to revel in 2 against 3.)

ning with the piccolo, bass clarinet, and alto saxophone soli accompanied by muted horn and piccolo snare drum at m. 64 [Ex. 4, mm. 64-70, overleaf.]. Following a brief chromatic interlude in hemiola in the trombones and euphonium, a similar (but always evolving) line comes from the solo euphonium in m. 83, this time accompanied by straight-muted trumpets. (Harmon mutes are required a few measures With respect to range, the first trumpet part hoversExamples around for Eidson Frenetico Dickey - Music later, with adequate time for the tran3 (mm. 34-36) sition.) Consensus in the conversation seems to take hold at m. 104, as a b œœ b œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ b œœ b œœ œœ b œœ œœ œœ b œœ b œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ third similar melodic line is played by 6 Fls. 1,2 &8 the entire clarinet and alto saxophone sections, this time accompanied by unmuted horns. The melodies themCls. 1,2 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ b œœ b œœ b œœ & 68 b œœ selves have a clever demonic quality about them, fun to play and to hear. The harmonic language of shifting parallel chords, the fanfarish figures A above the staff from time to time, with two trips to Bb (now used as accompaniment and transition), and the ocand one to B-natural. The trumpet solo goes up to Bb. The casional bouts of hemiola create cohesion between this and clarinet range extends to the Eb above the staff. Speaking of the first section of Frenetico. Be sure that the instrumentalsolos, there are a number of opportunities here, pleasantly ists serving as accompanists are playing the articulations that virtuosic within the context of the piece. You’ll want to have Eidson wrote, and doing so precisely together. assertive soloists for a piccolo, bass clarinet, and alto saxo-

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c

31


T H I R D T H E

T H I R D

I N T E R N AT I O N A L

P R I Z E F R A N K

W I N N E R .

T H I R D

T I C H E L I

C O M P O S I T I O N

C O N T E S T

T H E

T H I R D

I N T E R N AT I O N A L

P R I Z E F R A N K

W I N N E R . T I C H E L I

C O M P O S I T I O N

C O N T E S T

The trumpets wrest the melody from the the rhythmic material from the very first measure clarinets and saxophones at m. 111, and of the piece–originally in the tympani and xyloF R E N E T I C O F R E N E T I C O aim the conversation toward a climatphone–returns in stretto, strewn about the band ic point at m. 119, once again cycling to snap us out of legato melody and back to the through rapidly and unexpectedly shifting previous staccato melodic material. At m. 183, harmonies. The band lands squarely in the tune appears in the piccolo, flutes, oboes, and Bb Major at m. 119 and then ominously xylophone, countered with an ostinato of opposand explosively in E Major one beat later. ing rhythms in the horns and piccolo snare drum. J O S E P H E I D S O N In mm. 120-122 the upper woodwinds, The same tune is extended in a rendition in the trumpets, and horns fanfare away on Bb clarinets and xylophone, with the ostinato in the triads while the low brass and reeds pile saxophones and maracas (m. 188). through E, F, G, and Ab to meet at Bb. An ascending line of stabby eighth notes roller This tri-tone conflict foreshadows a creepy, coasters from the very bottom to the very top of w w w . M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m jagged tune that now appears in the low the band in just three measures, reaching a second reeds, euphonium and tuba, and string highly climactic point at m. 198. Here, C Major bass [Ex. 5, mm. 124-132 recto]. (If Tim and Gb Major duke it out in big sustained fortissimo chords Burton is looking for the score for his next Dickey movie, here it is.) Examples heretofore unheard in Frenetico, along with some swashbuck- Music for Eidson Frenetico JOSEPH EIDSON C O N C E R T

B A N D

C O N C E R T

HEAR COMPLETE RECORDINGS & VIEW COMPLETE VIRTUAL SCORES: www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

R A I S I N G

& 68

Bass Cl.

? 68

Hns.

6 &8

Picc. Sn.

A

N

H

A

T

B A N D S

T

A

N

O F

A L L

T H E

O V E R

B

E

A M E R I C A N T H E

A

C

... œ . œ œ œ# œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ# œ . œ . œ . œ œ# œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ# œ . . ... b œ. œ. œ. # œ . œ œ. œ œ # œ œ œ. œ

œœ œ. œœ- .. œœœ œœœ. œœœ. œœ. œœ.

œœœ b b œœœ n œœœ

ã 68 œ . œ œ œ œ œ

j œ

‰ œœ œœ œ. œ.

œ. œœ- .. œœœ œœœ.

œ œ œ ‰œ œ œ.œ œ

‰ œœ œœ œ. œ.

C O N C E R T

B A N D

W O R L D

. .... œ ‰ œ ## œœ œ œ œœ œ œ . .... .. . ‰ œ. # œ œ œ. œ

(mm. 64-70) Picc. (sounds 8va)

Picc. Alto Sax.

S TA N D A R D S

A N D

M

4

T H E

B A N D

H

M

U

S

I

C

. œ 98 ‰ œ . . 98 ‰ œ

.. . ... . . . . œ. bœ œ# œ œ œ b œ œ œ 6 b œ œ œ b œ œ œ b œ . œ# œ œ œ b œ œ 8 œ œ b œ œ œ b œ . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . b œ . œ œ. # œ œ. œ. b œ œ 6 œ. œ. b œ œ. œ. b œ . 8

œœ ... œœ œœ 98 œœ ... œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ- œ œ. œ- œ œ. œ. œ. œ.

bœ. bœ. bœ.

‰ œœ œœ 68 b œœœ ... œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ œœ ‰ b œœ œœ œœœ ... œœœ œœœ œ. œ. b b œ- . œ œ. œ. œœ. œœ. b b œœ. œœ. œ- . œ œ.

‰ œ œ œ . œ œ 98 œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ 68 œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ

A chromatic transition that appeared in the trombones and euling chromatic contrary motion. The kerfuffle ends in a welphonium at m. 77 appears in diminution in m. 132, as four come compromise, in Eb Major at m. 204, where the original measures later the trumpets join in contrary motion. Pedal tones rhythmic fanfare material is re-set, and then punched up a bit in the bass instruments add tension, as maracas eerily punctuby accompanying light hemiola eighth notes. ate (in a part that requires independence of hands). A second Familiar but always evolving staccato melodic material returns, version of the creepy, jagged tune from m. 124 appears in the first as a solo trumpet upper woodwinds and xylophone at “The melodies themselves have a clever demonic line at m. 208, and then m. 141. in the flutes, oboes, and Back in Ab Major at m. 155, the quality about them, pace of the conversation tightens as a more legato melody with a more optimistic intervallic set appears in the horn and euphonium, and is then taken by the tenor saxophone and solo trumpet at m. 161. A third rendition sounds in the piccolo, flutes, and oboes at m. 172, with an augmented outline of the tune in the bells, and this time with the addition of a very nice contrapuntal line in the clarinets and saxophones [Ex. 6, mm. 172-178, recto]. Beginning at m. 178

32

M a n h a t t a n

fun to play and to hear.”

xylophone at m. 214. An energetic interlude of stretto alternates between fanfare rhythms and chromatic bits (m. 221), and then the jagged, creepy tune from m. 124 makes a comeback, this time in the clarinets and alto saxophones (m. 234). At m. 240 the bass instruments get their crack at a form of the tune, temporally augmented, and including the now familiar raised fourth and chromatic alterations.

B e a c h

M u s i c


measure-by-measure as a crescendo drives into the higher At m. 254, the horn rip from m. 55 returns, this time exDickey - Music for Eidson Frenetico instruments walloping out the fanfare rhythms, while the tended and more sparsely accompanied by open F’s andExamples C’s

5 (mm. 124-132) ? 6 jœ œ œ 8 bœ J F j ? 6 jœ œ œ 8 bœ bœ œ œ œ F ?6 8 j ‰ ‰ œ œj bœ F

Bass Cl. Bsns. Ten. Sax. Bari. Sax. Euph. Tuba

Str. Bs.

b œ œ b œ j œ œ n œ b œ œ b œ j œ b œ b œ >œ b œ b œ jn œ œ n œ 9 œ œ b œ b >œ œ 6 b ˙ . J bœ bœ bœ b œ 8 b b ˙˙ .. J 8 J > ß-P j j b œ œ b œ j œ œ n œ b œ œ b œ j œ b œ b œj œ b œ b œ jn œ œ n œ 9 œ œ b œ b >œ œ 6 bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ nœ bœ œ bœ bœ œ bœ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ nœ œ nœ 8 œ œ bœ bœ œ œ 8 b˙. bœ bœ bœ bœ > b˙. ß> - P j 6 j j9 b ˙ b œ j ‰‰ œ n œ b ˙ b œ j ‰‰b œ b œj œ b œ b œ j ‰‰ œ n œ 8 œ b œ b >œ œ 8 bœ bœ bœ bœ > b˙. > ß-P

bass instruments wallow in low Bb’s and F’s (m. 288). While in the baritone and bass instruments. Be sure to have your these players wale away in glorious Bb Major (spoiler alert: players put a little space between these low syncopated gesthis is the key the piece ends in), the horn rip of m. 55 tures so that articulations are audible. The trumpets pick up returns (m. 293) and moves the hara melody first dropped by the horns in m. 155, more mar- “If Tim Burton is looking for the score mony to the this-is-not-the-dominant Gb Major (m. 296). So much for the cato this time, and the picfor his next movie, here it is.” V-I relationship; this variation on it is colo, flutes, oboes, and xyloshockingly fresh! phone take it over at m. 264, accompanied now by repetitive martial down beats in the Four measures later, the fanfarish waling on Bb Major relow reeds, brass, and tympani. A transition of woodwinds, turns, and remains steadfast to the end but for the pesky xylophone and triangle utilizing fanfare rhythms escalates in e minor (tri-tone) chord set over the Bb in mm. 306-309. harmonic energy from Eb Major to FDickey Major to- Gb Major at TheEidson saxophones and horns glissando exuberantly from Bb to Music Examples for Frenetico which point a euphonium solo enters (m. 276), very similar

6

Picc. Fls. Obs. Cls. Alto Sax. Ten. Sax.

œ. œ œ œ œ. 6 & 8 œ. œ œ œ œ. F œ. & 68 Œ . œœ .. œ. F (mm. 172-178)

œ œ œ œ. œ. œ. œ œœœ œœœœ œ. œ.

œ. œ.

œ b œ . œ b œ œ œ . œ b œ œ b œ. b œ. œ œ œ b œ œ b œ . œ b œ œ œ . œ b œ œ 98 b œ b œ œ œ œ b œ J

œœœ œœœ

œ. œ. œ. œ.

to the melody first heard in m. 64, and previously in the euphonium solo at m. 83. Here, it is first accompanied by sighing clarinets and syncopated horns, and then by syncopated saxophones as lighter textures prevail for a bit, and as the harmony shifts upward another step to Ab Major. Ratcheting up through all of these keys signals that we are going to land on one of them and make an ending worthy of Frenetico, one not unlike the coda of your favorite Beethoven symphony–but with tri-tones! A brief episode in Ab Major borrows a familiar motive of eighth notes played by upper woodwinds (m. 284), a motive that literally shrinks

M a n h a t t a n

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98 œ . œ.

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the octave above to reassure us we are home, but just in case the piece hasn’t been frenetic enough for you Eidson cycles at the rate of one beat per chord from Bb Major to Eb, C, Ab, and Db in mm. 314-315 before returning to Bb for the final five measures. Even so, the raised fourth appears one last time, melodically, in a powerful ascending line of quarter notes in the trumpets. The final Bb Major tutti eighth note dissipates away as a simultaneous strike of the tam-tam rings on. Frenetically! See score excerpts on page 47

B e a c h

M u s i c

33


WH BB AA NN

WHIZ-BANG P R E S E N T I N G

Third P r i z e W i n n e r ( T ie ) o f the Third I nt ent iona l Fra nk Ticheli Com position Contest C ate g o r y 2 : Concer t Ba nd Mu s ic Gra d e 3 - 4.5

B E N J A M I N D E A N T AY L O R

WHIZ-BANG

Third Prize Winner of the 3rd International Frank Ticheli Composition Contest

(USA)

M UUSSIICC T A NN BBEEAACCHH M M M UUSSIICC MAANNHHAATT T A T A NN BBEEAACCHH M M MAANNHHAATT T A

C ONC E R T B A N DC O N C E R B T AND

B E N J A M I N D E A N T AY L O R by A L A N LO U R E N S

Fire and light. Taylor says that when he was first approached about the work he was awked for “…. a ‘short, flashy, whizbang opener.’” Taylor continues: “From this prompt, I decided to draw influence from fireworks; specifically the large, professional kind that fly high in the sky and explode in a variety of dazzling colors and shapes. This musical structure of this work follows the procedure of striking a match, waiting for the fuze to burn, seeing the ‘whiz’ of the fireworks launch upward, experiencing the sudden explosions of color, hearing the thunderous ‘bang’ of the grand finale, and lastly, seeing the wispy sparks falling slowly to the ground.” The work is strong on rhythm, and in using the ensemble in batteries of color. As you would expect from a work modeled after

fireworks, there is drama, affect, and moments of quiet between charges.

The development of fireworks shows is itself a fine art. Shows need to pace themselves, to have moments of climax and order, even as explosions are being corralled into a controlled event. Taylor has similarly gathering a series of dramatic events into this composition. The opening idea is one of displaced and driving rhythm, presented in the upper woodwinds, and tuned and untuned percussion. The chord is a cluster, including as it does E Flat, F, G Flat, G#, A and C# [Ex. 1].

Benjamin Dean Taylor Photo by Christine Brandel

Ex. 1

Bar 1: Upper WW In concert pitch

# # œœœ œœœ # # œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ # # œœœ œœœ œœœ # # œœœ œœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ 4 Œ Œ ‰J Œ ‰‰ Œ ‰ JŒ Œ ‰ ‰ JŒ ‰ &4 3

& 44

34

b b œœœ Œ Œ ‰ œœœ Œ b b œœœ œœœ ‰ ‰ œœœ œœœ Œ ‰ b b œœœ Œ Œ œœœ œœœ ‰ b b œœœ œœœ ‰ œœœ Œ œœœ œœœ ‰ J J J 3

M a n h a t t a n

The nature of the rhythm is to hide the bar line; but in contrast to the quick and changing nature of the rhythm, Taylor keeps the harmony relatively stable, changing the chords only every few bars. Thus we have the juxtaposition between the slow change of color, and the quick change of rhythm. The effect is to see the sparkling points of light exploding through the ensemble, reaching a climax, for this section, with an entry by the brass

B e a c h

M u s i c


C O N C E R T B A N D

H H W W G G N N A A BB

subtle touches that abound. The percussion

WHIZ-BANG

in before bar 20.

B E N J A M I N D E A N T AY L O R

Z II Z

“However the beauty of this work lies in the

slowly hamonically, even as the rhythm drives us forward.

This entry is dramatic - cluster chord with numbers dis- can be a battery, or a broad sweep of sounds sonance; in the Trombones F This builds to a climax at that match the colors of the band.” against E flat and G Flat, in 57, with the memorable the horns a tone, and in the trumpets note for the two percussions playing a diminished octave [Ex. 2]. suspended cymbals, (complete with explanation marks) “cymbals should In the next episode, starting at m. 22, bury the entire band!” the rhythm becomes more constant, n

the

3rd

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At 64 we begin a new episode with a sweeping upward inflection. There is no better way to envision this that with an image of the composer’s original score (it is in C; the published score is transposed). [See Ex. 4, overleaf.] The upward sweep of both the pitch and the timbre is quite evident in this almost “onomatopoeia” version of the score.

Bar 20 & 21: First Brass Entry

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B

M UUSSIICC T A NN BBEEAACCHH M M MAANNHHAATT T A

This is an idea that finds an echo from the horns. Taylor lays in increasing com## Trumpet in B b & plexity, finally adding Tuba in it’s very bottom register at , whilst simultaneously adding an upward sweep in the Eupho? Trombone nium Baritone Saxophone and Bassoons that will become the basis for the next episode. Before that arrives, however, Taylor reminds us of the insistent rhythm by returning it in the low brass. Repeated sixteenth notes in the flutes, and complex though rhythms in the bass, both moving very Ex. 3

Saxes

ww w ww w

# œ>œ ‰ Œ J ƒ > b b œœœ ‰ Œ J ƒ b b >œœ œ ‰ Œ J ƒ

Ó

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Lest we believe that this score will be relentlessly loud, Taylor produces some wonderfully interact, driven yet soft sounds in this episode, feature the Tuned percussion Bar 22, Soprano and Alto Saxophone and upper woodwind, before returnIn E Flat pitch ing us to a trio of Flute, Clarinet and b ˘œ b œ. œ . œ. . .œ .œ b œ. b œ b œ Horn giving us their versions of the œ œ bœ & 44 J ‰ Œ Ó ∑ Ó Œ œJ ‰ b Jœ ‰ Œ Ó Ó Œ œJ ‰ Œ b Jœ ‰ Ó Ó Œ b œJ ‰ Jœ ‰ Œ Ó Ó J ‰ opening idea, now transformed into π f ƒ F 3/4 time [Ex. 5]. tongue slap

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M a n h a t t a n

b œ. œ‰Œ Ó J

Again this grows, in the woodwinds, adding complexity and multi-metre to keep the listener unsettled for the

B e a c h

M u s i c

35


17

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unfolding light show, before the low brass finally add a note of ! woodwinds unsettled !above — sixstability Perc. 2 atã 134, with the teenth sextuplets in the flutes, trills in the oboes and tremolo ! ! Perc. 3 ã in the clarinets, all creating instability against the long sounds in thePerc. low brass, and all !roaring at fortissimo. ! 4 & Just as quickly the show !winds down, collapsing !onto a single ? Pno.

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M a n h a t t a n

36 Cb.

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line of sand blocks, and a tremendous bass drum at the close that salivating. ! ! will have the percussionists ! The work is about 4 minutes of intensity, !flashes and color ! ! and movement. Taylor has composed a work that pops and ! ! ! fizzles, asking much of the musicians. Rhythmic assurance and complex unisons abound, but the effect is to create a !

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This music is — as it title may suggest — a brash opener. However it is so much more. It offers the ensemble a work that is both brash and reflective, inward and œ œ. œ. outward. Like a good fireworks show it â paces itself, offering up both shattering explosions and wonderful moments to reflect and say “ahhhh.”

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blaze of colours. Like any fireworks display it has a range of noise, and much of the work is “in your face”. However the beauty of this work lies in the subtle touches that abound. The percussion can be a battery, or a broad sweep of sounds that match the colors of the band. There are solos at pianissimo to complement the hectic brashness of the loud sections. For a work depicting fireworks, much of piece sees the brass playing a secondary role to the beautiful palette of the woodwinds, with streams of notes from the woodwinds.

Moreover, as the concert opener it was designed to be, the work offers us an alternative. Confident, strong and in many ways brash, it also offers subtlety. As well as the flash of beautiful colors, it gives us the muted pastels and shades that will grab your interest and hold it. In a world in which the subtle is often missed, Whiz-Bang offers us both sides of the coin. It’s a wonderful challenge to the musicians, and another outstanding addition to the works dedicated to fire and light.

Harmonically too, the work has some brutal cluster chords. But light touches abound, and the wonderful upward sweep 2

Commissioned by Kenneth Thompson and the Detroit Symphony Orchestra Civic Wind Symphony

WHIZ-BANG

1

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M UUSSIICC T A NN BBEEAACCHH M M MAANNHHAATT T A Flute 2

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Copyright © 2016 Manhattan Beach Music - All Rights Reserved - Printed and engraved in the United States of America Purchase music, download free MP3s, view virtual scores and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

M a n h a t t a n

WHIZ-BANG

Ex. 5

B E N J A M I N D E A N T AY L O R

Bar 100, solo Flute, Clarinet and Horn

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M u s i c

37


B O U N D L E S S

R I V E R

BOUNDLESS RIVER

FRANK TICHELI

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FRANK TICHELI

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MIDNIGHT

UNDER THE BIG TOP

MIDNIGHT for Concert Band #1 in a series of works developed from the Making Music Matter band methods

FRANK TICHELI C O N C E R T

B A N D

FRANK

TICHeLI

#2 IN A SERIES OF WORKS DEVELOPED FROM THE M A K I N G M U S I C M AT T E R B A N D M E T H O D S

M A N H A T T A N

B E A C H

M U S I C M A N H A T T A N

Terpsichorean Dances

Jodie Blackshaw

C

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M a n h a t t a n

E

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B E A C H

M U S I C


P R E S E N T I N G First Prize Winner The Third International Frank Ticheli Composition Contest Category 1 Concert Band Music Grade 1 - 2.5

I va n B o ž i č e v i ć (Croatia)

SPIRALING by A L A N LO U R E N S Ivan Božičević’s Spiraling brings an Eastern European sensibility to concert band in this Tarantella for band. The dance rhythms defy the audience to sit still, whilst the gently rocking harmonies owe something to the folk-like nature of the work. Written in 12/8 throughout, the compound rhythm, emphasised in the opening bars by the composer, are what make this work feel like a Mediterranean dance. The main theme, presented in the clarinets, immediately lifts us through the medium of accents and rests at the beginning of each of the phrases, and is immediately followed by a flute answer [Ex. 1].

5 and 6 above only every two bars, giving us a lovely sense of phrase. Each phrase is formed from the main tune, and a consequent response, giving us well balanced 8 bar phrases that have line and direction.
 In any dance-like piece we would expect great repetition. The form here meets our expectations, with a a short and bright theme (16 bars at with the pulse at 130). It is the handling of these repetitions in which Božičević reveals his great craft.

As mentioned above, the first iteration of the melody is quite sparse: Clarinet 1 with long notes in the low brass and two bar responses in the saxes. The second iteration leads to I va n B o ž i č e v i ć a further harmonised version of all clarinets Photo by Irma Sotirova and added trumpets (though written at mp) Harmonically, we start in a fairly solid F mato emphasize the beginning of each phrase. The flutes again jor, with the addition of the seventh (E). The second part of add a codetta to the phrase. the theme moves us abruptly to A major. The third relationship (from F-A) is of course not uncommon in many styles The third iteration of the melody features the clarinet up an of music, but is particularly prevalent in the folk styles of octave, and we now add rhythm through the tune. Before the Europe. Those familiar with the Aegean Festival Dances of Anfourth, Božičević riffs on the codetta theme at fortissimo, usdreas Makris would have heard similar twists in his meditering it as a way back into the large statement of theme [Ex. 2]. ranean melodies. The abrupt change of chord lifts the meloHere at 47 we have a grand statement. The entire ensemdy, much as the rhythmic emphasis of the accents accentuate ble is involved. Shape has been added by the use of dynamthe downbeat. ics — fortissimo in the first bar with a crescendo from mf in the Božičević keeps the rhythm constant in the the percussion second bar. It is as if the dancers have risen to a crescendo and (Bass Drum and Snare), but scores the rhythmic figure in bars throw themselves into the dance. By measure 55 the dancers

40

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c


Ex. 1

Spiraling: Opening (Concert Pitch)

>œœ 12 œœ & 8 œJ ‰ f 12 & 8 œ ‰ œ f ? 12 8 œœœ ‰ f

Allegro Scherzoso q=130

Woodwind

‰ Ó.

Œ.

j œœ ‰ ‰ Ó . œœ œ > F

Œ.

j‰ ‰ . œ œ F> Cl

œ œ œ œ.

∑ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ F w. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ w . Low Brass/WW œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ‰ ‰ J J J J F p Fl 4 œ œ J #œ ‰ #œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ #œ ‰ ‰ ‰ j j j & œ. œ œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # >œ p Saxes ∑ & ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ # œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ # j 4 . p Œ. ? œœ ‰ ‰ Ó # œœ ‰ œ œœ ‰ œ œœ ‰ œ œœ œœ œœ # œœ ‰ œ œœ ‰ œ œœ ‰ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ # œ œ‰ œ œ‰ œ œ‰ œ ‰ ‰ # œ œ‰ œ œ‰ œ ‰œ œ ‰ ‰ J J J J J J J J J J J J Brass

tire again, and a gentle iteration of our main tune again emerges as we return to a more controlled dance.

Coming as they do in a short burst, Božičević is using the melodic material to provide a fascinating example of instrumentation and harmonic variation. The dancelike nature of the idea is maintained, but the composer gives us interest and variation through the codetta and use of accent and dynamics. It is a excellent example of a long single theme passage that is interesting and well developed. (Another example of the lie that interesting music needs much melodic material; the best example of

Ex. 2

which is the first movement of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5). At measure 73, we finally get another theme [Ex. 3, overleaf ]. Or do we? This second more expansive idea has already appeared a number times in the link passages and codettas of the main melody. So Božičević cleverly introduces to us as a new idea some material that is actually recycled from the transitions of previous phrases. This level of familiarity, allied with the remaining rhythmic imperative offered by the support in passages, gives the work a strong structure around which the listener can find a way into the work.

Spiraling: Bar 11 (Transposed) Flute

Clarinets (B Flat)

Saxes (E Flat)

Trumpets (B Flat)

Low Brass

&

12 8

# & # 12 8 n œœj ‰ ‰ œœ . œ˙ œ œ œ . œ œ .. ˙ .. J F # # # 12 ∑ & 8 # & # 12 8 n œœj ‰ ‰ œœ . œ˙ œ œ œ . œ œ .. ˙ .. J P ? 12 8 w. P

j j‰ ‰ ‰ œ œœœ. . œ˙˙ . œ œ œœœ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n # œœœ . . J p F F ∑ nœ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ b œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ p . Œ. j‰ ‰ ‰ œœœ ‰ ‰ Ó œœœ .. œ˙˙ . œ œ n # œœœ . . J J p P j‰ ‰ Ó . j j j j Œ. œ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰

M a n h a t t a n

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

B e a c h

œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ Jœ # œ ‰ œ œ ‰ P F Œ. j ‰ ‰ Ó. œœœ J p F

n œœœ ‰ œ F j‰ œœœ J p j œ ‰

œœœ œœœ ‰ œœœ œœœ ‰ œœœ œœœ ‰ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ p Œ. ‰ Ó. ‰ œj ‰ ‰ œj ‰ ‰ œj ‰ ‰

M u s i c

M u s i c

41


Around measure 97 we arrive at the climax of the work. Built into by the rhythmic instance of the work, and a link between the main theme and our secondary idea,����a��n� theI va work builds to no n Božičević less than fff, and giant chord that final settles the insistent rhythm, at least for a few bars [Ex. 4, recto].

tent but not overly demanding. Spiraling requires great rhythm to carry that dance forward, but Božičević has also used many differential dynamics to create great color. Works of this nature can descend very quickly into bombast, but this work, notwithstanding an impressive climax, is much more restrained. Though folk-like and modal, there is a great deal of elegance with the writing for this work.

����a��n�

First Prize Winner,

First Prize Winner,

t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

Returning to a quieter statement, the work leads back to the first theme in a gentler, though still very rhythmic coda, leading to a relaxed close.

I va n Božičević C o n c e r t

This work is a terrific piece for band. Included in the score are parts for Flugel Horn and Soprano Sax, and the percussion parts are insisHear Complete Recordings & V i e w C o m p l e t e V i rt u a l S c o r e s : w w w. M a n h at t a n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

Spiraling will offer great return on effort. It is colorful and rhythmical; it is tonal and melodic; but above all it is well constructed and an excellent example of original and inspiring music.

B a n d

Raising The Standards of the A merican Concert Band And Bands All Over the World

M a n h a t t a n

w w w . M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

B e a c h

M u s i c

Spiraling: Bar 73 (Transposed)

Ex. 3 Flute

Clarinets (B Flat)

Bass Clarinet (B Flat)

Horn (F)

w. w. 12 & 8 p # # 12 & 8

# & # 12 8

&

# 12 8

œ œ J ‰ ‰ Ó. π

Œ.

# œœœ ‰ œœ œœœ ‰ œœ œœœ ‰ œœ œœœ ‰ œœ # œœœ ‰ œœ œœœ ‰ œœ œœœ ‰ œœ œœœ ‰ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

f

∑ Nœ. œ. #œ. p

Œ.

SPIRALING

Piccolo 1 Flutes 2 1 2

Oboes

E b Clarinet B b Clarinets

1 2 3

B b Bass Clarinet Soprano Saxophone Alto Saxophones

1 2

Tenor Saxophones

1 2

Baritone Saxophone

Flugelhorns

B b Trumpets

Horns in F

1 2 1 2 3 1 2 3 4

1 2 Trombones Bass Euphonium Tuba Bass Guitar

(or String Bass)

Piano

Cymbals Snare Drum Bass Drum

œ Ô & 12 8 ‰ f >œœ Ô 12 & 8 ‰ f >œ œ & 12 8 Ô ‰ f> # # # 12 œÔ ‰ & 8 f >œ # Ô & # 12 8 ‰ f # # 12 >œœ ‰ & 8 Ô f # & # 12 8 K‰ f >œ >œ # & # 12 8 Ô ‰ # # f K‰ & # 12 8 œœ > # f œK ‰ & # 12 8 œ > f # # & # 12 8 œK ‰ f> # # 12 >œœ ‰ & 8 Ô f> # œ & # 12 8 Ô ‰ f # # 12 ‰ & 8 œœ f> # & 12 8 œœ ‰ > # 12f K ‰ & 8 œœ f> ? 12 >œœ ‰ 8 f ? 12 K ‰ 8 œ f ? ? ? &

? ã

‰ Œ. ‰ Œ. ‰ Œ. ‰ Œ. ‰ Œ. ‰ Œ.

Ó. Ó. Ó. Ó. Ó. Ó.

‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ. ‰ Œ. ‰ Œ.

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‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ. ‰ Œ.

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>œ Ô ‰ F >œœ ‰ Ô F K œœ ‰ > F >œ Ô ‰ F > œ ‰ Ô F K œ ‰ >œ F ‰ K‰ œ F K œ ‰ F >K œœ ‰ F >K œœ ‰ F> ‰ K‰ œ F K œœ ‰ F >> œ ‰ Ô F ‰ œœ œœ F œœ œœ ‰ F K‰ œ F >œ œœ œœ ‰

‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ œ œ

œ > >œ 12 8 Ô ‰ ‰ Œ.

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‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ. ‰ Œ. ‰ Œ.

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œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ

œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ . ww . p ‰ Œ. Ó. ww .. p œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ

F K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ F

>œ

K‰ ‰ œ. >œ F marcato

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Ó. Ô ‰ ‰ Œ. w. f F p 12 8 œK ‰ ‰ œK ‰ ‰ œK ‰ ‰ œK ‰ ‰ œK ‰ ‰ œK ‰ ‰ œK ‰ ‰ œK ‰ ‰ w . f> p F arco > pizz. > œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ 12 œ ‰ ‰ Œ . K ‰ ‰ Œ. Ó. Ó. 8 Ô Ô Ô Ô Ô p >œ f >œ F œœ >œœ >œœ œ 12 Ó. Ó. Ó. œ ‰ ‰ Œ. 8 Ô ‰ ‰ Œ. œœ ‰ ‰ Œ . p ÔK f FÔ œ ‰ ‰ Œ. 12 >œ ‰ ‰ Œ . Ó. K ‰ ‰ Œ. Ó. Ó. 8 Ô œ > >œ K K x x 12 ‰ ‰ Œ . . Ó. Ó. œœ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ Œ 8 œ œ fÔ FÔ pÔ

K ‰ ‰ Œ. œœ K ‰ ‰ Œ. œœ

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1 2

1 2

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Flghns.

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A. Sxs.

2 3

1 2 Hns. 3 4 1 2 Tbns.

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œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ Ô Ô Ô Ô ∑

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Bass

Piano

Cyms. Sn. Dr. Bs. Dr.

&

1 Fls. 2

Copyright © 2016 Manhattan Beach Music - All Rights Reserved - Printed and engraved in the United States of America ISBN 1-59913-198-6 (complete set) ISBN Beach 1-59913-199-4 © 2016 Manhattan Music(conductor score) Purchase music, download free MP3s, view virtual scores and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

42

j #œ ˙.

∑ ∑

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5 IVAN BOŽIČEVIĆ

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FOR CONCERT BAND

Allegro scherzoso q . = 130 >

# & #

#

# & # # œK ‰ ‰ œ . >

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K ‰ ‰ Œ. œ p

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#

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∑ ∑

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# & # # & #

∑ K œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ

∑ œœ # œœ ‰ P œœ # œœ ‰ P

# & # # œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ p # & # # œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ p ### ∑ &

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Ô © 2016 Manhattan Beach Music


Spiraling: Climax from 97 (Transposed)

Ex. 4

12 œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Ó . & 8 ƒ Ï # # 12 & 8 œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ b œœœ ‰ Ó . œ œ œ ƒ Ï

Flute

Clarinets (B Flat)

## & # 12 8 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ Ó . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ Ï ƒ # 12 b œœœ ‰ œœ .. ∑ & # 8 œ. Ï

Saxes (E Flat)

Trumpets (B Flat)

?

Low Brass

12 8

œ. œ.

&

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ƒ n œœœ œœœ œœœ n œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ ƒ

# & #

# # n œœ œœ œœ n œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ & # ƒ # # n n œœœ ... œœ .. œ. œœ .. & n œœœ ... œ. f b ˙˙ . œœ . œ. . . ? œ. f

9 Picc. Fls.

1 2

Obs.

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& & & &

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&

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K . œ ‰ ‰ Œ K . œ ‰ ‰ Œ

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K‰ ‰ œ. œ œ œ œ. >œ P marcato K‰ ‰ n œœ ˙˙ .. œœ .. > P n ww .. P n ww .. P ∑ w.

œ

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∑ K‰ ‰ # >œ œ.

K‰ ‰ nœ œœ .. F >œ

n œœ ‰ p b œœ ‰ p # # K‰ & # œ p

# & # # & # & & &

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?

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Œ.

K ‰ ‰ Œ. œ p K ‰ ‰ Œ. œœ p

œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ

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n œœ ‰ F b œœ ‰ F K‰ œ F

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∑ ∑ ∑

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œ ‰œ œ ‰œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œ

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K œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

K‰ K œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ p F œ. œ. Œ. nœ. p œ. œ. œ. Œ. P œ. œ. n œ. œ. œ. œ. Œ. P œœ .. . œœ . Œ . n œœ .. p K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ P unis.

K . œ ‰ ‰ Œ

K ‰ ‰ Œ. œœ p K œœ ‰ ‰ Œ .

Ó. Ó. Ó.

K Ó. œœ ‰ ‰ Œ . œ. unis. b œ . œ. Œ. p K K K K œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ P K ‰ ‰ Œ. Ó. œ

∑ ∑

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K bœ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ bœ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ bœ ‰ ‰ Œ. b >œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ b œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ n >œœ K K œ ‰ ‰ Œ. œ ‰ ‰ Œ. Ó. ∑ œ > >œ œœ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ Ô

‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ œ œ œ

K K K K œ ‰‰ œ ‰‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ F ∑

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K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ K‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ p> ∑ ∑

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Œ.

œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ

K ‰ ‰ Œ. œ p K ‰ ‰ Œ. œœ p

Œ.

œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ

K‰ ‰ # >œ œ. P K‰ ‰ n œœ œœ .. > P

? ?

œ

###

# & #

?

Cyms. Sn. Dr. Bs. Dr.

#

# & #

Tuba

Piano

##

# & #

&

∑ œœ œœ œ ‰ ‰ Ôœ # œ ‰ œ ‰ P F œœ œœ œ œ ‰ ‰ Ô #œ ‰ œ ‰ P F ∑

## E b Cl. &

K œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œœ J ‰ ‰ œœ œ œ œ n œœ œœ œ œ

4 Picc.

œ œ œœ œ œ œœ n œ œ ‰ ‰ œœ œœ n œœ œœ # œ œ J

Ï

˙˙ ..

b w˙ . .

œ œ œ œ œ b œ œœ œ œ J ‰ ‰ bœ œ œ

Ï a n www ...

n œœ ‰ ‰ n œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ n œœ œœ œœ J f Ï n œœ .. n œœœ .. œ. œœ .. . œ. n n œœœ ...

P Ó. w. P > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Ôœ ‰ ‰ Ôœ ‰ ‰ Ôœ ‰ ‰ # Ôœ ‰ ‰ Ôœ ‰ ‰ Ôœ ‰ ‰ Ôœ ‰ ‰ Ô ‰ ‰ Ô‰ ‰ Ô ‰ ‰ Ô‰ ‰ Ô ‰ ‰ Ô ‰ ‰ Ô ‰ ‰ Ô ‰ ‰ P K ∑ Ó. œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ n b œœœ ‰ ‰ Œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > PK œ . . . . ‰ Œ Ó ∑ ‰ ‰ Œ Ó ∑ œ ∑

j œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J ‰ ‰ f Ï j n œœ œœ n n œœœ ‰ ‰ b œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ œ Ï f

##

##

œ j‰ ‰ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ

Œ.

Œ.

13

Ó.

# & #

?

Cyms. Sn. Dr. Bs. Dr.

œ. # œ ‰ ‰ Ôœ ‰ ‰ Ô P K œ. K #œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ P ∑

‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ # œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ # œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ P p ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ & # œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ # œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ P p ### ∑ ∑ &

Tuba

Piano

##

Œ.

# & # &

1 T. Sxs. 2

###

# & #

S. Sx. A. Sxs.

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&

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œœœ .. œœ .. . œ.

3

11

Ó.

Œ.

bœ ‰ Ó.

Œ.

b˙.

œ.

œ œ œ

Œ.

Ó. Ó.

∑ ∑

œœ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ Ô

43


PRESENTING

S ECOND P RIZE WINNER THE T H I R D INTERNATIONA L FRA NK TICHELI COM P OSITION CONT E ST C ATEG O RY 1 : CONCERT BA ND M USIC GRA D E 1 - 2.5

J ON I G R E E N E (USA)

CAMERON’S DREAM by J E F F R E Y D . G E R S H M A N Since the composition of her first band piece in 2007, the award-winning Moonscape Awakening, Joni Greene has established herself as one of the most compelling composers writing for band today. While the majority of her past works have been composed for advanced ensembles, this new piece demonstrates Greene’s interest in composing for developing bands. Written at a very approachable Grade 3 level of difficulty, Cameron’s Dream has significantly less technical and metric demands, but retains all of the hallmarks of Greene’s signature harmonic language and colorful orchestration.

interludes serve as the formal framework for the three-minute piece. Sailing to Dreamland

Sailing to Dreamland serves as the work’s introduction and represents the child as he begins to drift off to sleep. Its music creates a slow, gentle rocking motion in the Flute 1 and Clarinets 1 and 2, lightly punctuated by the Glockenspiel and Suspended Cymbal, which evoke a quiet music box-like texture. Measures 6-9 introduce a considerably faster tempo (quarter note=104) and serve as a transition, introducing fragments of what will be the main Inspired by the innocence and imaginatheme in Clarinet 1. When considering tion of her young son, Cameron, Greene this opening material, carefully observe sought to compose a piece that captured the dynamics to best achieve this rocking the playfulness and adventure of her motion. When the Clarinet 3, Alto SaxoJONI GREENE son’s imagination, in particular, his love phone 1, Horn, Trombone 1, and VibraPhoto by David Neuse of pirates. Using that as a musical impephone enter in measure 4, these players tus, she envisioned the types of dreams her son might have should inherit, but not overwhelm, the dynamic established of a pirate’s adventures, and then created a gentle, evocative by the Flute 1 and Clarinets 1 and 2. The key center of Bb soundtrack for those dreams. Lydian is established in measure 10, as a full statement of the Subtitled “Interludes for Concert Band,” Greene, in her own playful first theme is presented in Clarinet 1 [see Ex. 1]. The words, draws “from the practice of intermedi or interludes theme then slowly develops in call-and-response fashion in th of the late 16 century…[which introduced] various themes measures 16-25, as it is passed back and forth between the Oboe and Clarinets, Alto Saxophone 1, Trumpet 1, and the and styles presented in between the acts of a play.” The five

44

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Ex. 1

into silence.

The second part of the interlude begins in measure 40 and features a return of the Tambourine and open-fifth drones as well as the addition of a new “gypsy” theme, initially stated in full by the Alto Saxophone 1, and douFlutes. Evoking the rocking of a pirate ship, the passage bled by a composite of Trumpet 1, Horns, and Trombone gradually builds in texture and rhythmic intensity, lead1 [Ex. 2]. This new theme is interrupted by the Flutes, ing to the piece’s first apex in measure 26. Throughout Oboe, Clarinet 1, Glockenspiel, and Vibraphone in meathis section, the thematic material must always be clearly sure 44, as they quietly interject a short passage of new in the foreground and must maintain the jaunty style iniinstrumental timbre that evokes the rocking motion of tially established by the Clarinet 1 in measure 10. the introduction. Following this interruption, the theme Gypsies vs. Pirates returns in measure 48 with Flute 1, before building This second section, Gypsies vs. Pirates, is the longest quickly to the work’s second apex in measure 54, achieved interlude of the piece and captures, in through the addition of the full brass the composer’s mind, “the carefree feelsection. The interlude concludes with ing of childhood,” as the music evokes transitional material based on the a playful battle between the pirates of “gypsy” theme as it is passed initially the opening and some newly discovCAMERON’S DREAM from a solo trio of Flute 1, Clarinet 1, ered gypsies. The pirates are representand Alto Saxophone 1 to the full Clared initially through a restatement of inet section, and finally to the Flutes the first theme, now harmonized in JONI GREENE and Oboe. In approaching this second G minor, and stated by the full Clarpart of Gypsies vs. Pirates, make sure inet section, the Alto Saxophones, and to create an effective arrival in measure the Vibraphone in measures 26-29. 54, as the piece moves from its most Greene slightly develops the theme as transparent scoring in measures 44-46 it is passed first to the Flutes, Oboe, to its fullest texture in the span of only Clarinet 1, and Glockenspiel in mea10 measures. In addition, address the sures 30-32, and then to the Tenor intonation in the solo trio octaves in Saxophone, Horns, and Vibraphone in measures 56-58 and the unison Flute measures 33-34. The gypsies are sugand Oboe writing in measures 65-68. Strive to insure the gested through the introduction of a Tambourine and accurate alignment of the composite ascending arpeggios open-fifth drones in the Trumpet 2, Horn, and the Low in measures 63-66, divided among the Bass Clarinet, BasBrass, which move from G, F, Eb, and C. Measures 35soon, Alto Saxophone 1, Tenor Saxophone, Horn, Low 39 conclude the first part of the interlude with a cascade Brass, and Vibraphone. Particularly challenging will be of descending timbres that ultimately dissolve into tutti the pickup entrances in the Bass Clarinet and Tuba. It silence on beat 2 of measure 39. When approaching this is recommended that the players think of the first note material, focus on the accurate vertical alignment of the pirate melody, particularly between the winds Ex. 2 and mallet instruments. Care should also be given to insure that the “gypsy” drones do not overshadow the melodic material above it. Finally, measures 3539 should create an effect of the music evaporating SECOND PRIZE WINNER

T H E 3 r d I N T E R N AT I O N A L F R A N K T I C H E L I C O M P O S I T I O N C O N T E S T

C O N C E R T

B A N D

HEAR COMPLETE RECORDINGS & V I E W C O M P L E T E V I RT UA L S C O R E S : W W W. M A N H AT TA N B E A C H M U S I C . C O M

W W W. M A N H AT TA N B E A C H M U S I C . C O M

M a n h a t t a n

RAISING THE STANDARDS OF THE AMERICAN CONCERT BAND AND BANDS ALL OVER THE WORLD

M A N H A T T A N

B e a c h

B E A C H

M U S I C

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as a pickup into the following measure and that, perhaps as a transitional step, the tie be temporarily removed to better help the players internalize the entrance. Man Overboard Man Overboard, the work’s third interlude, was inspired by her son’s particular love of the Peter Pan adventures. In this section, Greene creates a funeral march for “one of the pirates walking the plank as his comrades stand by, heads bowed lamenting his fate.” The section’s somber mood is created through a slower tempo (now dotted quarter note=82) and dirge-like ostinato in G minor, which begins in measure 69 and utilizes a composite of the Horn, Trombones, Euphonium, and Tuba. [Ex. 3.] To establish the appropriate style, the

Ex. 3

moving to the Clarinets 2 and 3, Bass Clarinet, and Bassoon in measures 76-80. After a short fragment reminiscent of the earlier “gypsy” theme is stated in the Flutes in measures 8081, Greene creates a transition that moves from the lowest to the highest tessituras in the ensemble in order to achieve the piece’s final, and loudest, apex in measure 89. When rehearsing this section, care should be taken to insure that the call and response melody of measures 72-80 is always in the foreground, while still maintaining good vertical alignment with the dirge-like accompaniment below it. Additionally, it should be noted that the response portion of the melody is a half dynamic lower (mezzo piano) than the mezzo forte call that precedes it. Finally, all dynamics and articulation markings must be very carefully observed during measures 82-89 so that the subtle timbral and register shifts may be heard during this extended ensemble crescendo. Heroic Measures The piece reaches its narrative culmination in the fourth interlude, Heroic Measures, as the “man overboard” is rescued, having been pulled from the water just before meeting his demise. After the section opens with two strong cadences in F major in measures 89-93, thematic material derived from the work’s opening melody is introduced by the Flutes, Oboes, and Clarinet 1. [Ex. 4.] Greene then interweaves motives of this theme in kaleidoscopic fashion, fragmenting the melody between the Flutes, Oboe, Clarinets 1 and 2, Bass Clarinet,

Ex. 4 Tuba and Bass Drum (which often fills in the Tuba’s rests) should play with equal weight on each note. As the Trombone 2 and Euphonium and the Horns and Trombone 1 alternate, each should strive to play with the exact same style and dynamics to achieve the effect of a consistent ostinato of subtly changing timbres. The addition of the Chimes and Vibraphone add to the timbral soundscape and should be reminiscent of a Ship’s Bell. The principal melody of the section is presented in call and response fashion, beginning with the Flutes, Oboe, and Clarinet 1 in measures 72-76, before

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Alto Saxophone 1, Trumpets 1 and 2, and Euphonium. The interlude concludes with a short transition in measures 109110, which marks a return to the calmer, more dreamlike music of the introduction. To better create the heroic character of the music, strive to make sure that measures 89-92 remain full and lush, reinforcing that there should be no dynamic decay on the dotted quarter notes. It is also important that the return of the opening thematic material be clearly heard, which can be easily achieved by strictly following the independent dynamics that Greene has indicated in the individual parts. When considering the fragmentation of theme in measures 101-108, strive to make the composite melody sound seamless by insuring that the speed of the eighth notes remain consistent and that each part performs at the same mezzo piano (and then later, mezzo forte) dynamic. Teddy’s Lullaby In the final interlude of the piece, Teddy’s Lullaby, the child reminisces about his adventures, as his dream slips away and his imagination begins to quiet. Greene achieves this musically by reintroducing fragments from throughout the piece. The section begins in measure 111 with a return to the earlier tempo of dotted quarter note=104. A calm, reflective mood is established by arpeggiated Eb major chords in the Bass Clarinet, Bassoon, Saxophones, Horns, Trombones, Euphonium, and Tuba. As the chords continue, Greene modulates though several key areas as she begins to revisit previous material. In measure 113, the Flutes and Oboe restate music first heard in measures 6-7, which is followed by the Flute 1, Clarinet 1, and Trumpet 1 presenting material loosely based on measures 33-34. In measure 117, the music moves to Db major, as Oboe and Clarinets reference material from 84-85. The earlier “gypsy” music of measures 65-68 then returns in the Flutes, Oboe, Clarinets, Trombone 1, and Euphonium. As the work shifts to Ab major in measure 125, the fragments begin to grow shorter, first with the Alto Saxophone 2 and Horns reintroducing material from measures 59-60 and then, finally, with the Flutes, Oboe, Clarinet 1, and Trumpets returning to the music of measures 6-9. In measure 132, the piece reestablishes its original key, Bb Lydian, as the

M a n h a t t a n

Clarinet 1 revisits its own dreamlike material presented in measure 10. Cameron’s Dream concludes with a slowing of the tempo to dotted quarter note=144, as the Vibraphone and Glockenspiel play dissipating fragments of the previous Clarinet melody. Throughout this final section, Greene uses harmony as a developmental tool, with pyramid-like additive chords adding textural depth and timbral warmth as a contrast to the more active melodic material. Because of this, great care should be shown in balancing this shifting melodic material so that it can always clearly be heard. The arpeggiated chords in measures 111126 must always remain in the background after their initial mezzo piano statement. The players presenting the melodic fragments should always try to recreate the style in which the music was initially presented earlier in the piece. From measure 132 to the conclusion, the vertical alignment must be accurate between the winds and mallet instruments, especially during the molto ritard in the final four measures. In order to create the music box effect intended during this section, insist that the Glockenspiel and Vibraphone play at their indicated dynamics so that the balance will be equal. Finally, it is important to note that the last Glockenspiel note be played five beats after the downbeat of the last measure. In order to achieve the intended effect of adding a very slight shimmer to the final chord, the player must inherit the dynamic produced at the end of the decrescendo in the Clarinets, Bass Clarinet, Alto Saxophone 1, Trombones, Euphonium, Tuba, and Vibraphone. Joni Greene’s Cameron’s Dream is an important new addition to the Grade 3 repertoire. Skillfully crafted and beautifully orchestrated, her self-described “whimsical fantasy for young players to express” offers a chance to expose students to a high level of instrumental independence and a sophisticated harmonic palette, all while creating a vivid musical soundtrack that will appeal to their own sense of imagination.

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THIRD PRIZE WINNER

P R E S E N T I N G

T E IM M A ERT BA C N N O D C

E

G

T H E 3 r d I N T E R N AT I O N A L F R A N K T I C H E L I C O M P O S I T I O N C O N T E S T C AT E G O R Y O N E C O N C E R T B A N D M U S I C G R A D E 1 - 2 . 5

R E W M E LTO N D N A (PERÚ)

by G R E G ORY B . R U D G E R S Game Time by Andrew Melton is a clever and quirky work for Grade 2 band which will capture the imaginative interest of both performers and audiences. Young players will be especially enchanted in that the piece comes very close to the type of music that is so prevalent in computer games and social media. The work provides the opportunity to demonstrate to young musicians that music for band is not always as they have heard and experienced. This is an original departure from much of the literature for this level.

lenged technically with difficult passages, all of the parts are quite approachable. Still, there will have to be some very careful and attentive counting for these simple figures, as they are not what many of the players might have encountered before. There are many instances where figures begin on the “and” of the beat and there are times when the entire section becomes nearly pointillistic with brief fragments of rhythm. All wind parts are technically available to young players, though the rhythms, while simple and completely understandable, will require some independence from the players. Ranges are well with the abilities of the average Grade 2 Band.

Instrumentation is for a traditional Grade A N D R E W M E LTON 2 work for band. One part each for Flute, Photo by Gabriel Barretto Oboe, Bassoon, Bass Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone SaxThe piece begins with a brief introduction ophone, French Horn, Trombone, Euphonium and Tuba. that foreshadows many of the elements, both rhythmic and Trumpets and Clarinets are divided into first and second melodic, that will be fully developed in the body of the work. parts. There are fully 11 difference percussion parts here, all This clever device allows the director to show how small muinterestingly scored and an integral part of the work. Ansical ideas can be developed into larger ideas, a concept that drew Melton employs Timpani, Bells, Claves, Snare Drum, is never to early to introduce. Triangle, Bass Drum, Suspended Cymbal, Tambourine, XyThe introduction is then followed by an A section that passes lophone and optional piano. Percussionists will not be chal-

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B e a c h

M u s i c


Picc.

b &b Ó

1 Fl. 2

b &b Ó

Ob.

b &b Ó

25

24 (Opt.)

1

&

2

&

B b Bs. Cl.

&

B b Cl.

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The piece then proceeds to alternate back and forth between the A and B sections much as the melodies œ œ œ rhythms alternate from section to section within œ œ œ œ œ and b œ. œ. N œ. A and B. This clever and quite sophisticated demonœ stration of unity within a Grade 2 work for band is Ó Œ œ œ intriguing to say the least. While it might be diffiÓ Œ œ œ cult to explain and demonstrate to a young band, the b œ. œ N œ. œ . players will definitely have an intuitive response to œ œ œ œ œ œ œ the interweaving of ideas. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

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Contemporary harmonies then accompany lyrical B sec? b Ó Œ œ Œ œ Œ œ Ó Œ œ Œ Ó Œ œ Œ œ Ó Œ œ. œ. œ. œ. . . being legato . . . . main> P P tion,b which, while and œtuneful, still f b œœ œ Ó Ó Œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ Œ ∑ & b the tains idea of∑ passing∑ musical∑ ideas around Ô Ôthe band F ^ ^ œ^ œ œ Œinstrumentation ∑ Œ œ Œ 2, Œone ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó Œ ã from to another [see Ex. mm. æ P f Ó Œ >œ Œ œ. Œ œ. Ó Œ œ. Œ œ. œ. œ. œ. Œ œ. Œ œ. Ó Œ 35-39]. ∑ ã P

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35

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THIRD PRIZE WINNER T H E 3 r d I N T E R N AT I O N A L F R A N K T I C H E L I C O M P O S I T I O N C O N T E S T C AT E G O R Y O N E C O N C E R T B A N D M U S I C G R A D E 1 - 2 . 5

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A N D BA N D S A L L OV E R T H E W O R L D

M A N H A T T A N

B E A C H

M U S I C

The development that ensues in which Melton declares the two principal ideas in fragmented form is a delightful exploration into all of the possibilities that the two themes offer. It maintains a high level of energy and it will be important for the band to maintain an active and urgent sense of pulse as the fragments chase each other around the score and the band. The various transitions that link the sections of this work are logical and musically interesting in themselves and keep the momentum going throughout

a2

Œ Œ œ Œ œ- ˙ n b ˙ hN œ a M Œ Pa tF- ˙t #a˙ nn œ > œ-

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31

Œ ‰ Ôœ. œ. ‰ Ôœ. œ. ‰ œK ‰ K œ œ . œ œ. œ œ œ- œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

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Ex. 1

4

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B e a c h

M u s i c

49


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One this# ˙work>œwill become a favorite of any young band that Klearn and perform b œ . accepts Œ it. œ œ œ- the œ œchallenge œ œK ‰ œ to œ ∑

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œ œ œ œK ‰ œ œ . K ˙ œ œ can easily imagine that

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^

Œ

Kœ œ œ-

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This rhythm appears as a frequent unifying element throughout the work.

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^

‰ K >œ œ N œ œ ff > > > Ó

Œ

œ Œ ff > > > œ^ ‰ Ôœ œ œ œ Œ > ff

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F study and perform this work will develop There is one thing for certain. Bands that œœ keen abilities ∑to understand ∑ ∑ and perform Ó Œ melodic fragments that do not begin on the F beat. The primary motive for much of the work, and the one that will stay in the ears ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó Œ œ and minds of the young players is both œcatchy and energetic [see Ex. 3, at left, mm F 34-35]. > œ- ˙

Œ

œ Œ ff

Ó

Œ

ff

Œ

œ Œ œ ff

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Ó

Ó

Œ

Ó

Œ

35

Ó

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36 with rhythms that are38closely related to the other more weighty elements. 37 39 œœ

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4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ^ Œ 4 P f 4 4 ∑ >œ Œ f on dome with sticks œ 4 Œ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ P f > 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ

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Copyright © 2016 Manhattan Beach Music - All Rights Reserved - Printed and engraved in the United States of America ISBN 1-59913-196-X (complete set) ISBN 1-59913-197-8 (conductor score) Purchase music, download free MP3s, view virtual scores and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

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∑

68 68

∑

bœ ™

œ œ

∑

œ bœ œ

Ϫ

œ nœ œ

Ϫ

mf

œ œ

œ œ

œ œ

œ œ

mp

bœ ™ bœ ™ mf

mf

œ nœ œ

Ϫ

œ nœ œ

Ϫ

98

∑ œ

3 68

Ϊ

Ϊ

68

Ϊ

œ œœ 98 œ™

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Ϊ

Ϊ

Ϊ

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68 68 68 68 68

∑

68

∑

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

∑

>™ . ^ . . ^ . . > 98 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 68 œ œ œ

. . . . . 98 #>œœ ™™ œœ œœ œœ^ œœ œœ œœ^ œœ œœ 68 #>œœ œœ œœ

∑

68

∑

œ^ J ‰ ‰ Œ™

ff

∑

f

^ œœ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ J

∑

f

98

∑

68

∑

? ¢ ˙˙ ™™

98

∑

68

∑

? ˙™

98

∑

68

98

∑

68

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

f unis.

^ j ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ f ^j œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ f

™ >œ

∑

∑

>œ ™ œ œ. œ. œ. œ.

Ϊ

f Xylo. (hard acrylic mallets)

Œ

Whip

^ Ϫ

ff

œ œ

mp

Ϊ

98 Œ ™ 98 Œ ™

68 68 68

. . . . > . > . . . . . . bbœœ ™™ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ bbœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ 98 œœbbœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ™™ œœ œœ 68 mp

œ

?

f

Timp.

4

Fl.

Ob.

∑

#œ. œ. #>œ ™ œ œ. 9 ‰ #œ. œ. #>œ ™ œ œ. >œ ™ œ œ. 6 #œ. œ. #>œ ™ 8 8‰

∑

98

∑

∑

98

∑

∑

98 Œ ™

Ϊ

∑

∑

98 Œ ™

Ϊ

∑

œœ

∑

Ϫ >

™ >œ

∑

25

∑

∑

26

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

3

& 68

∑

∑

∑

Bb Bass Cl.

6 ¢& 8

∑

∑

∑

°? 6 Œ ™ ¢ 8

œ™ bœ ™

Eb Alto Sax.

1 2

1 2

1 Bb Tpt. 2 3

3 4

1 Tbn. 2 3

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

98

∑

68

Timp.

∑

∑

∑

98

∑

68

1

Str. Bs.

∑

™ 68 ˙

Ϫ

v v

™ œœ ™

68 œœ ™™

fp

2

sfz - p unis.

^ œ

68

2

68

∑

∑

68 ˙ææ™

∑

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p

-œ ™ œ œ. œ. œ. œ. 9 8

p

9 ™ -œ œ œ. œ. œ. œ. 8

p

∑ ∑

98

œœ

Ϊ

f

29

. . -™ . . . ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ 68

∑

œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ

68

∑

. . - . . . ‰ œ œ œ ™ œ œ ‰ œ œ 68 ‰ bœ. œ. œ- ™ œ œ. ‰ nœ. œ. 68 ‰ œ œ œ ™ œ œ ‰ œ œ 68 . . - . . .

œ œ œ

31

∑ . . - . b œœ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œœ

. . -™ . ‰ œ œ œ œœ

∑

∑ . . - . ‰ œ œ œ™ œ œ

œ œ œ

‰ bœ. œ. œ- ™ œ œ.

œ œ œ

‰ œ œ œ™ œ œ . . - .

68

∑

30

∑

68

∑

p

œ

œ œ

œ œ

œ œ œ œ

p

∑

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

Ϫ

mf

˙™

˙™

j œfi

∑

∑

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Ϊ

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68 ∑ . . - . . . b œœ œœ œœ ™™ œœ œœ n œœ œœ 68 ‰ ‰

∑

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p

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98

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bœœ^ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ J

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p

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28

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^j mf bœ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ œ

f

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fp 2 fp

œ. œ. > . ‰ œ œ œœ ™™ œœ œœ

mf

∑

b ˙˙ ™™

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™ >œ

∑

∑

∑

∑

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∑

b œœ ™™ b œœ ™™ œ ™ bœ ™

b˙ ™ mp

bb˙˙ ™™

™ bœœ ™ bbœœ ™™

b˙ ™

mp

œ™ bœ ™

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œ ™ œ™

b˙™

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mp

mp

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mp

b˙ ™ b˙ ™ mp

-œ ™ œ œ. œ. œ. œ. œ™ œ œ œ œ œ

mf

œ ™ bœ ™ œ™ bœ ™

98 98 98 98 98 98 98 98 98

œœ œœ œœ 9 8

b-œ ™ œ œ. œ. œ. œ. bœ œ œ 98 mf

˙™

mp

Ϫ Ϫ

98

° 6 &8

∑

∑

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

∑

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98

6 ¢& 8

∑

∑

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

∑

∑

98

6 >˙ ™ ¢& 8 ˙™

. . . °? 6 œ œ œ œ œ œ 8 mf

¢

. . . ? 68 bœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

¢

? 68

°? 6 8

? 68

2

& 68

3

6 ¢/ 8

∑

∑

98

∑

68

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∑

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98

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68

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98

∑

68

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∑

∑

98

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∑

∑

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∑

98

œ œ. œ. >œ™ œ œ. >œ œ œ œœ bœœ. œœ. >œœ ™™ œœ œœ. b>œœ œœ œœ

f

f

mf

9 ™ bb-œœ ™ œœ œœ. œœ. œœ. œœ. bbœœ œœ œœ 8 mf

∑

∑

∑

∑

98

∑

68

∑

∑

∑

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∑

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∑

98

∑

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98

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68

∑

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98

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98

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∑

∑

98

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98

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98

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? 68 b˙ ™

° / 68

b-œ ™™ œ œ. œ. œ. œ. bœ œ œ 9 œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ 8

∑

mf

soft felt mallets

Perc.

^ 2^ œ œ

sfz - p

∑ œ. œ. >œ™ œ œ.

f

98

27

˙™ ˙™

œ^ ™

∑

∑

>œ ™ œ œ. œ. œ. œ. >œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ

& 68

mf

>˙ ™ ° 1 &6 8 ˙™ 2 F Hn.

œ œ. œœ œœ.

∑

^ ∑ j ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ f ^ ∑ j ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ f >œ ™ œ œ. œ. œ. œ. >œ œ œ

° 6 &8

Bb Ten. Sax.

Eb Bar Sax.

˙™ ˙™

∑

68

∑

98

∑

& 68

Bsn.

68

∑

j œ ‰ ‰ 98

∑

° 6 &8

1

98

∑

∑

° 6 &8

98 ˙˙ ™™

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∑

˙™

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2

Bb Cl.

68

68

j œfi

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f

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œœ œœ

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f

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˙ ™™ >˙

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∑

mf

∑

6 ¢& 8

98

∑

¢/

œ™ ™ >œ

∑

f

98

™ ˙˙ ™

f (Susp. Cym.)

∑

f

mf

∑

1 2

Tuba

98

™ >œ

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œœ^ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ J

œ J ‰ ‰ Œ™

f

j ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ nœ

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68

œœ

f (Xylo.)

œ bœ œ œ j ‰ ‰ Œ™ #œ œ b œ

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mf

∑

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68 Œ ™

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#œ #œ œ œœœ

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> ˙™

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∑

∑

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mf

68

˙™

Deep Shell Snare

68 Œ ™

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#œ #œ œ œœœ

68 Œ ™

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∑ œ^ bœ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ J

mf

68 Œ ™

∑

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∑

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68 Œ ™

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∑

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98

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∑

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∑ ∑

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6 &8

98

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& 68

∑

œ bœ œ 9 œ ™ 8æ

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mf

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j œ‰ ‰

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f

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24

Picc.

∑

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∑

(Deep Shell Sn.) œœ

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∑

bœ œ >œ b>œ >œ œ f bœ œ >œ ∑ b>œ >œ œ f œ. œ. œ œ œ. œ 9 œ œ. œ œ œ. œ. >œ ™ œ œ. 8 ∑

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mp

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∑

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f

∑

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98 >œœ ™™ œœ œœ. œœ^ œœ. œœ. œœ^ œœ. œœ. 68 >œœ œœ œœ

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mf

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13

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div.

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j ˙™ œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ > f . . . . > > #œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ #œ #œ œ f

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23

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98

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bœ ™ bœ ™

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∑

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f

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mp

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mp

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mf

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19

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mf

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F Hn.

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°? ™ ¢ Œ

Bb Ten. Sax. Eb Bar Sax.

Ϊ

17

bœ ˙™ œ œ#œ œ œ 98

3 4

Tbn.

æ ˙æ™

∑

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11

∑

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f

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10

∑ œ œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ J

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2 F Hn.

Susp. Cym. (hard yarn mallets)

∑

∑

f

° 1 &

(hard wooden mallets)

Copyright © 2016 Manhattan Beach Music – All Rights Reserved – Printed and engraved in the United States of America ISBN 1-59913-172-2 (complete set of score & parts) ISBN 1-59913-173-0 (score only) Purchase music, download free MP3’s, view scores and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

Picc.

Eb Bar Sax.

1

Timpani

p

&

œ J ‰ ‰ Œ™ œœ J ‰ ‰ Œ™

œ^ 1 ° Eb Alto Sax. & #œJ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ 2 f ^j œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ Bb Ten. Sax. &

∑

? #œœ ? 6 œ™ œ œ œ œ œ #œ 9 6 #œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 8 b œœ œ œ 8 œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 8 œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > > > mf mp ° 6 98 68 1 / 8 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Xylophone (hard yarn mallets) 6 98 68 Percussion 2 & 8 œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Tuning

>˙ ™ ˙™

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1 2

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Bb Bass Cl.

∑

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Ϫ

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∑

mf

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mp

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mf

68 ˙™

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Bb Cl.

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° 6 &8

1 2

9

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° 1 &

mf

∑

1

Ob.

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Bb Trumpet

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1 2

Fl.

mf

∑

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Picc.

œ bœ œ œ#œ œ

∑

Eb Alto Saxophone

8

JOSEPH EIDSON

FOR CONCERT BAND

mf

∑ œ™

bœ ™

b˙ ™

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

∑

Ϫ

Ϫ

Small Triangle p

98 98

98 œ œ ˙ ™

68

∑ ∑

Ϫ

68

68 œ œ ˙ ™

Ϫ

Ϫ

b˙ ™

bœ ™ bœ ™

Bells (hard brass mallets) mp œœ

mp

˙™

98

51


PRESENTING

First Prize Winner The Third International Frank Ticheli Composition Contest Category Three: Concert Band Music Grade 5-6

BEN HJERTMANN (USA)

Catclaw Mimosa by A L A N LO U R E N S In the life of a reviewer, as in any role, there are easy days and more difficult days. Ben Hjertmann, in Catclaw Mimosa seems determined to make a reviewer work. This highly original work, his first for band, is not easy to pigeonhole. On the one hand it is semi-tonal and motivic; on the other very pointillistic and well scored. It is complex and requires great musicians, but also groovy and funky. Hjertmann uses the full range of the colors of the band, including a few advanced techniques, to present a work that uses a language not often heard amongst works for winds. It is quite possible to see the pedigree from the masterworks from the Pulitzer Prize winning composer Joseph Schwantner, though far more overtly rhythmic.

The work is bound together by the percussion, and specifically the drum kit. The feeling is of a disembodied “funk” beat, a deconstructed version of popular music. The driving rhythm of the kit is offset by dissonant interjections. The lower pedal points build the tension, and their changes (the first change of pitch is bar 7) come as a minor shock, giving the work its forward momentum and providing a kind of tonal centre for the work.

Even in this, Hjertmann keeps us off balance ­— the pitch moves from A Flat to D, the dreaded “devil in music” of a tritone, before moving straight back to A flat. In metre too, we are kept somewhat off balance. The addition of a kit BE N H J E RTM A N N should give the impression of a regular rhythm — a “groove” into which Photo by Jamille Wallick This is a work that sprouts from a kernel we can all sit. Instead we are offered a planted in the second bar in the woodcontinuously variable landscape moving from our opening winds and saxes. and is answered in the same bar by the low “groove” of 3/4 through 2/4 and 4/4, with the occasional brass and woodwind, in an almost honking fashion [Ex 1]. hop of a 3/8 bar of keep us from regaining our balance too This two note cluster, two sets of rising semi-tones scored a quickly. tone apart, will become the motive upon which this work is These interjections are spread across the range of the ensembased. They appear never more than 6 beats apart in the first ble. Openeing in woodwind and low brass, we soon have in15 bars, and thereafter at regular intervals in the first section.

52

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c


Ex 1: Bars 1-3 (Concert Pitch)

Ex. 1 Upper WW

3 &4

Lower WW & Brass

? 43 34 x x x x ã

‰ j ‰ Œ # # œœ# œ œœ j b œœ ∫ œœ # # œœ ‰ Œ ‰ b Jœ ≈ Rœ ‰ Œ ‰

4

j j œ ≈ œ .

teractions, never more than a few beats long, from the Upper Brass, some notes in the double reeds, until 17 when the flutes enter. By that point all instruments have spoken.

Œ

‰ j ‰ Œ # # œœ# œ œœ j b œœ ∫ œœ # # œœ ‰ Œ ‰ b Jœ ≈ œR ‰ Œ ‰

j j œ ≈ œ .

Œ

The development of this motif is the reason for the work. In his program notes, Hjertmann writes “the piece shares its name with an invasive species of shrub which has infested areas in American Southwest. It is mostly spiky but deceptively beautiful in parts. In approaching such a large ensemble, I decided to begin with a small amount

Of particular interest is the Percussion writing. As well as the Drum Set, Hjertmann offers us complex tuned per-

Ex. 2 Mimosa: Bar 36 (Transposed) Catsclaw Oboe

t/Sax (B Flat)

Low WW

&

Solo

44 # ˙ f

3 œ œ œ œ . œ # œ . œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ 38 # >œ ‰ >œ # œ 44 œ . J 3

# & # 44

∑

∑

?

∑

∑

44

>j 38 # œ ‰ œœ J v f^ ^ 38 œ bœ f

cussion parts for Marimba and Vibraphone, and strong (and rhythmically challenging) Timpani parts. Later we will hear Tubular Bells and Crotales. In bar 35, the rollicking is interrupted. A long and flowing, and for two bars at least unaccompanied oboe solo gives us a sudden change [Ex. 2]. Even here, though, Hjertman keeps us on our toes, with off balance interjections from the low WW that grow across the ensemble, nor can we escape the rising motif, as it appears in the 3/8 bar. The motif now starts to grow, becoming first a repeated figure and within a few bars a kind of insistent groove figure.

M a n h a t t a n

Solo > > œ œœ 44 œ . >œ œ œ J v

44

‰ Ó

Œ

5 ‰ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ P f

Solo

3

. > >œ œ œ œ > . > > œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ p 6 ∑

∑

of material. The piece begins with short groove  — slowly expanding outward.” The motif does indeed grow and begin to consume the work. By measure 85 the new larger version of the theme is appearing in almost every bar. Perhaps because the motif is now larger, the time signature is also settling into larger patterns: 4/4 and 3/4 rather than the previously seen 3/8 and other asymmetrical time signatures [see Ex. 3, “motivic development,” overleaf ]. At 82, the work is almost weeping, We have ascending glissandi in the saxes, and a return to a rhythmically complex environment: 9/16, 2/4, 3/8, 2/4, 3/4 that keeps the music unbalanced [Ex. 4, overleaf ].

B e a c h

M u s i c

53


Ex. 3

Catslaw Mimosa: Motivic Development Bar 50, Saxes (B Flat Pitch)

Brass, Bar 70 (B Flat pitch)

œ œ & 42 œœ # # œœ ‰ ‰ n n œœ # # œœ 38 œ œ œ # œœ ‰

First Prize Winner, t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

There is in this work a unique kernel of color and rhythm. take some assembling. Most instru-

Fi rs t P r i z e W i n n er , t h e 3 r d In t er n at i on a l Fr a n k T i c h el i C o m p o si t i on C on t e s t

M a n h at ta n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

ments are asked to play in extreme registers and in a few extended techCatclaw Mimosa C O N C E R T

niques. It is rhythmically dense and the management of the time will take

B A N D

some effort for the conductor. It does, however, offer a new voice in the band world. Confident and self assured, the work does ask us to

Ben Hjertm ann

engage with dissonance, while sup-

t h e B a n d s

Hjertmann’s work is united by its rhythmic drive. The only real constant is a kid of off-kilter dance, mov-

Ex. 4

porting us with a flowing structure and excellent color. There are very M A N H A T T A N

˙. ˙. & 43 Í #œ. & 43 ƒ

B E A C H

M U S I C

few tutti sections; players must stand confidently on their own. That color, however, is what makes the work

˙. ˙.

Catslaw Mimosa: Bars 82-84 (Transposed)

Flutes

Saxes (E Flat Pitch)

ing through the work in a disjunct manner, but nevertheless always moving. His motivic development is clear. And while it is possible to assign a kind of episodic structure to the work, it is more helpful to define the structure in terms of the flow

54

of ideas, and in this we see constant growth.

Hjertmann offers a score that will

So the structure of the work, driven my motivic development, grows around ideas that are presented at the beginning and that, by the end of the work, come to dominate the landscape. R a i s i n g t h e S t a n d a r d s o f A m e r i c a n C o n c e r t B a n d a n d a l l o v e r t h e W o r l d

œœ b œœ ≈ œœ ≈ œœ ≈ œœ ≈ # œœ n œœ ≈

43 n # œœ# œœ ≈ œœ ≈ œœj.≈ œ œ≈ œ . J

By 93 the expanded theme has returned, though before this we get the harmonic version in the closed tones. The increasing prevalence of the theme becomes quite insistent. In the words of Hjertmann “…like the invasive species, the motives in my piece begin as tiny seed-motives, interjected in the texture. Slowly they accrue and multiply until the ensemble is overtaken and forced into a sort of temporal wasteland.”

Horns, Bar 75 (F pitch)

M a n h a t t a n

œ.

Í #œ.

œ.

œ. 9 œ. 16 Í #œ. . 9 J J 16

œ. œ. J ƒ œ. J

worth performing. As a step towards complex music it is an excellent tool. But as a work that stands on its own, Catclaw Mimosa is an outstanding example of music that will both challenge and reward us.

B e a c h

M u s i c


2

for the Northshore Concert Band, Mallory Thompson, Conductor

CATCLAW MIMOSA

TRANSPOSED SCORE

Piccolo 1 Flutes 2 3 Oboes 1 2

&

& &

Soprano Saxophone

&

Alto Saxophone

&

Tenor Saxophone

&

Baritone Saxophone

&

Horns in F

1 2 3 4

1 2 Trombones Bass Euphonium (optional)

Tuba Contrabass (optional)

Marimba

&

2 4

1 Fls. 2 3

# # œ>œ J

œœ^ œ^

‰ Œ

^j ‰ ‰ Œ # œœ # # œœ n # œœ f > (+ +denotes slap + tongue) ‰ Œ j ƒ b >œ ≈ >œ ≈ ^ ^ œ bœ ‰ Œ œ œ f >> ^ ^ œ bœ ‰ Œ bœ bœ f> #œ nœ ‰ Œ œ^ œ^ f (+ denotes slap tongue) + + j ‰ Œ œ œ > ≈ > ≈ ƒ

3 4

^j ‰ ‰ Œ # œœ # # œœ n # œœ > + + ‰ Œ j bœ ≈ œ ≈ > > ^ ^ œ bœ ‰ Œ œ œ > ^ ^ > œ bœ ‰ Œ bœ bœ > #œ œ ‰ Œ œ^ œ^

n # œ>œ ‰ . R

Œ

# # œ>œ J

2 4

+ + j ≈ >œ ≈ >œ ‰

E b Cl.

œœ^ œ^

‰ Œ

B b Clars. 1 2

^j ‰ ‰ Œ # œœ # # œœ n # œœ > + + ‰ Œ j bœ ≈ œ ≈ > > ^ ^ œ bœ ‰ Œ œ œ > ^ ^ > œ bœ ‰ Œ bœ bœ > #œ œ ‰ Œ œ^ œ^

+ + j ‰ ≈ bœ ≈ œ > > # >œ . Œ R ‰ n >œ R ‰. Œ

+ + j Œ œ œ > ≈ > ≈

Œ

œœ^ œ^

‰ Œ

Bsns. 1 2

œœ^ ‰ . R ƒ

3 4

Bs. Cl.

2 4

&

? ?

(hard yarn)

K

&

&

Œ

Œ

j bœ Œ >

b >œ ≈ >œ ≈ Œ J f

Œ

b >œ ≈ >œ ≈ Œ J

Œ

P qq

D

x> . x> . x> . x> .

j 5 ≈ 5.

Œ

F (adjust to balance with ensemble)

Œ

Œ

j 5 ≈ 5.

‰ Œ # # œœ n œœ > ^ ‰ Œ j # # œœ

^ ^ # # œœ œ j ≈ b >œ ≈ >œ ‰

Snare

Œ

5

j 5 ‰

5.

j 5 ≈ 5.

Picc. 1 Fls. 2 3 Obs. 1 2 Bsns. 1 2 E b Cl.

B b Clars. 1 2

Bs. Cl. S. Sx. A. Sx. T. Sx. B. Sx.

1 2 Trpts. 3 4 1 2 Hns. 3 4 1 2 Tbns. Bs. Euph. Tuba Cb.

Mar.

Vib. T. Bells Timp.

D.S.

&

2 4

12

13

3 4

14

2 4

15

3 4

& & &

# # œœ^ ? J

˙.

&

‰ Œ

3 4

# # œœ^ J

# # œœ^ J

‰ Œ

˙

& # # œœ n # œœ ‰ > + ‰ j & bœ > ‰ b œ & œ > > œ bœ ‰ & > #œ œ ‰ & + j ‰ & œ > &

œœ^ œ^

Œ

+

^j # œœ ‰

Œ ≈ œ ≈ > ^ Œ œ ^ Œ bœ Œ

^ œ ^ bœ

œ^ œ^

+ Œ ≈ >œ ≈

2 4

‰ # # œœ n # œœ > + ‰ j bœ > ‰ b œ œ > > œ bœ ‰ > #œ œ ‰ + j ‰ œ >

Œ

n

+

+ ‰ r ‰. œ ≈ œ ≈ > œ œ > > > Œ Œ Œ

+ + ‰ œr ‰ . ≈ >œ ≈ œ œ > > >

? ? ?

‰ ‰

j bœ Œ > j bœ Œ >

? ã

‰ x

Œ

b >œ ≈ >œ ≈ Œ J

& # # œœ n œœ ‰ Œ > ^ ‰ Œ & # # œjœ &

Œ

^ ^ # œœ œ ^ ^ œœ œ

j bœ ≈ œ ≈ Œ > > 5 ≈ 5.

Œ

‰ # # œœ n # œœ > + ‰ j bœ > ‰ b œ œ > > œ bœ ‰ > #œ œ ‰ + j ‰ œ >

Œ

+

^j # œœ ‰

Œ ≈ œ ≈ > ^ Œ œ ^ Œ bœ Œ

‰ ‰

j bœ Œ > j bœ Œ >

>œ >œ Œ

b >œ ≈ >œ ≈ >œ J J

‰ Œ # # œœ n œœ > ^ j ‰ Œ # # œœ ‰

Œ

‰ ‰

r bœ ‰ . > ‰ Œ

+ Œ ≈ >œ ≈

>œ ≈ œ>œ # œ^ # œ œ J >œ > n œ^ ≈ # œœ œ œ J

j ‰ Œ bœ ≈ œ ≈ œ. œ. > > j 5 ≈ 5.

œ œ

b >œ ‰ R ‰.

5

Low Tom

5 5

5

# œ^ ‰ J

+ + r œ œ œ > ≈ >

‰.

2 4

j bœ Œ > j bœ Œ >

b >œ ≈ >œ ≈ Œ J

‰ Œ # # œœ n œœ > ^ j ‰ Œ # # œœ ‰ ‰

Œ

Œ

^ ^ œœ œ

j bœ ≈ œ ≈ Œ > > j 5 ≈ 5.

Œ

‰. ‰. ‰.

^ j ‰ # # œœ ‰.

‰ 5 5 ‰

M a n h a t t a n

‰ ‰

ã

j bœ Œ >

j 5 Œ

Œ + + r œ œ ‰. œ > ≈ >

Œ

Œ

>œ œ ‰ J >œ œ ‰ J

2 4

10

11

5

j bœ ‰ > j bœ ‰ >

Œ

5.

+ & j ‰ >œ &

˙˙

Œ

Œ

3 4

>œ >œ

œ> œ>

2 4

‰ ‰

j ‰ >œ

Œ

Œ

j ‰ œ F> > ? œ ‰ J

Œ

Œ

? ?

Œ

Œ

Œ œ> œ> Œ

j >œ > œ J

&

&

&

? ã

5

retune: A b to F #

Œ j ‰ Œ >œ >x . >x . >x . >x . 5.

œ. œ.

n

#œ R F

‰ ‰.

x J

x

+ r ‰. œ >

+ r œ ‰. >

œ^ J

≈ # œœ ..

r bœ ‰ . > Œ

+

‰ # œœ n œœ > ^ ^ ^ j ‰ œœ œ œœ

5 ≈ 5.

^j œœ

+

r ‰. # >œ ≈ œ œ > ^ Œ ‰ œ J ^ œ Œ ‰ J œ^ Œ ‰ J + + r ‰. # >œ ≈ œ œ >

Œ

œ. œ.

+ ‰ œr ≈ ‰ >

3 8^ ≈ œ # œœ ..

j # œ ≈ >œ ≈ > Œ

5 5

^ ^ œ b b œœ œ F Œ Œ

+

Œ

≈ œ ≈ > ^ Œ œ ^ œ

Œ

^ œ œ^

œ^ b œ^

Œ

+ + j # >œ ≈ >œ

2 4

Œ

b œ^ J œ^ ‰ J

j bœ ‰ > j bœ ‰ >

>. # œœ .

Œ

Œ

^j œœ

r bœ ≈ œ œ ‰ . > >

High Tom

5 5.

5.

5

x J

21

Œ

Œ j # >œ ≈ œ>

‰ b œœ n œœ > + ‰ j # >œ œ œ ‰ > bœ œ ‰ > b >œ œ ‰ ‰

Œ

b >œ ≈ œ> œ ‰ . R

œ>œ ..

‰ b œr ≈ ‰ >

Œ + + r œ œ ‰. œ > ≈ >

f

b >œ ‰ R ≈ ‰

5

f

‰ b œr ≈ ‰ >

>œ . œ. >œ . œ.

^j œœ

˙

Œ

˙.

Œ

‰ b n œœ n œœ > + ‰ j # >œ œ œ ‰ > bœ œ ‰ > b >œ œ ‰

3 4

20

Œ ‰

> œ J

Œ

3 4 ˙.

19

>œ >œ

+ + r ‰. bœ ≈ œ œ > > ^ Œ ‰ # Jœ

+ r ≈ ‰ œ >

‰ b œr ≈ ‰ >

j bœ ≈ œ ≈ Œ > >

Œ

œ J

Ó

‰ Œ # # œœ n œœ > ^ j ‰ Œ # # œœ

Snare (on rim)

˙

Œ

b >œ ≈ >œ ≈ Œ J

^j œœ

j bœ Œ > j bœ Œ >

r ‰. # >œ ≈ œ œ >

&

?

unis.

& & ?

Œ

F

& &

Œ

b >œ ≈ >œ œ ‰ . R

18

Œ

p ^ œ. #œ ≈ #œ . p

˙

&

4 4

Œ

‰ Œ Œ # œœ n œœ ‰ # # œœ n # œœ > > + + Œ ‰ ‰ j bœ ≈ œ ≈ œ œ > > œ > > > > #œ œ ‰ ‰ Œ Œ J ^ ^ > > œ bœ ‰ Œ œ bœ œ œ ‰ > > #œ œ ‰ Œ œ^ œ^ œ œ ‰ + + j Œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ > ≈ > ≈ > >

r bœ ≈ œ œ ‰ . > >

Œ

œ. œ.

b œ^ J œ^ ‰ J ‰

œœ^ œ^

‰ Œ

˙.

Œ

˙

S. Sx.

D.S.

3 8

9

# # œœ^ J

+ + r ‰. bœ ≈ œ œ > > ^ Œ ‰ # Jœ

Œ œ >

> œ J

2 4

17

Œ

Timp.

Œ Œ

x œ œ

Œ

Cb.

>œ

œ^ #œ ‰ J Œ

^j œœ

˙

F

Floor Tom

+ j ‰ >œ

1 2 Trpts. 3 4

œ^ # œ>œ ‰ . J ‰ R F r œ^ œœ ‰ . # œ ‰ > J F >œ Œ œ ‰. R f r œ ‰. Œ œ fn >œ> # œ ‰. Œ R F ‰ Œ œ œ > >

&

B. Sx.

4 4

8

>œ œ

& #˙ π & ˙. p & # ˙˙ .. p &

&

>œ œ . R ‰ f ‰ œ œ> > R ‰. f >œ R ‰. f >œ . R ‰ f ‰ œ >

Bs. Cl.

Vib.

j 5

& ?

Œ

b >œ b œ

Œ

T. Bells

r bœ œ ≈ œ > >

b >œ Œ J

Œ

Mar.

Œ

j bœ Œ > j Œ bœ >

œ J ‰ π

Tuba

> ‰ œœ ..

≈ b œœ .. p . ≈ œ bœ . p

&

Euph.

b >œ œ ≈ >œ R

p ≈ nœ . p ≈ #œ . p Œ

E b Cl.

Bs.

bœ Œ > bœ Œ >

p

≈ #œ .

Bsns. 1 2

1 2 Tbns.

Œ

Œ

?

T. Sx.

3 4

œ ‰ + j œ >

≈ # œœ ..

& # # œœ n œœ ‰ Œ > ^ ‰ Œ & # # œjœ

3 4

A. Sx.

Œ

?

4

1 2 Hns. 3 4

r bœ ‰ . >

Œ + + ‰. r bœ œ ≈ œ > > > #œ ‰ R ≈ Œ n œ> ‰ R ≈ Œ

œ^ œ^

?

B b Clars. 1 2

^j ‰ # # œœ

^ œ ^ bœ

Euph.

Picc.

‰ Œ

?

Obs. 1 2

˙

4 œ^ ≈ # œ>œ n œœ^ J F^ > # œ^ œ j ‰ #œ ≈ #œ œ F

&

?

3

‰ Œ

& & ?

‰.

Œ

˙.

œ R

œœ^ œ^

2 4

?

1 Fls. 2 3

> ‰ œRœ ≈ Œ # # œœ^ J ‰ Œ

&

Bs.

D.S.

16

&

?

Timp.

3

3 4

&

Œ

T. Bells

Copyright © 2016 Manhattan Beach Music - All Rights Reserved - Printed and engraved in the United States of America ISBN 1-59913-170-6 (complete set) ISBN 1-59913-171-4 (conductor score) Purchase music, download free MP3s, view virtual scores and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

> #œ

&

Vib.

Œ

&

Œ

Mar.

j bœ ≈ œ ≈ Œ > >

&

&

Cb.

^ ^ œœ œ

7

Œ

‰ # # œœ n # œœ > + ‰ j b >œ œ bœ ‰ > > bœ œ ‰

1 2

Tuba

Œ

&

&

1 2 Tbns.

Œ

b >œ ≈ >œ ≈ Œ J

˙>˙

Œ

j bœ Œ >

≈ b >œ ≈ >œ J ‰

j bœ ≈ œ ≈ Œ > >

secco

Kick Drum

‰ Œ

Œ

j bœ ≈ œ ≈ Œ > F>

High Hat

# # œœ n œœ >

^ ^ œœ œ

j bœ Œ >

≈ b >œ ≈ Œ Œ ≈ b >œ ≈

deadstick should be used on all notes with short durations, at the performer's discretion

‰ Œ # # œœ n œœ ƒ> ^ ‰ Œ j # # œœ (no pedal) ƒ

(plastic)

H

? AB bb ã

pizz.

j bœ Œ >

Œ

j bœ Œ F>

?

&

F

j bœ Œ >

# >œ ? # œJ

3 4

3 4

?

&

&

Hns.

?

6

&

&

1 2 Trpts.

2 4

&

S. Sx.

T. Sx.

+ + j Œ œ œ > ≈ > ≈

&

A. Sx.

B. Sx.

&

Vibraphone

Timpani

5

&

Tubular Bells

Drum Set

# # œ>œ J f

&

Bass Clarinet

3 4

3 4

4

Obs. 1 2

&

Clarinets in B b 1 2

1 2

2 4

3

& ?

Trumpets in B b

3 q = 108, Crisp and Tight 4 1 2

BEN HJERTMANN

&

Bassoons 1 2

Clarinet in E b

FOR CONCERT BAND

Picc.

Œ

+

≈ œ > Œ

# œ^ ‰ n œJ f Œ Œ

Œ Œ

Œ

# œ^ J b œ^ ‰ J ‰ ‰

+ + j # >œ ≈ >œ

Œ

œ^ J

^j ≈ p œ . f #œ . #œ p f

r bœ ‰ . > ‰ Œ b >œ ‰ R ‰.

>œ œ J >œ œ J

≈ œ>œ .. ≈ # >œœ ..

‰ b œr ‰ . >

h h5

5 5.

r ‰. #œ ≈ œ œ > >

j Œ # >œ ≈ >œ ≈

j # >œ ≈ >œ

r ‰. #œ ≈ œ œ > > > > ≈ #œ œ œ ‰. R

Œ j ≈ ≈ # œ> œ> j Œ #œ ≈ œ ≈ > >

j ≈ # œ> œ> j #œ ≈ œ > >

Œ

^j œœ

r ‰. # >œ ≈ œ œ > x ‰ 5. 5 J

B e a c h

‰ # # œœ n œœ > ^ ‰ j # # œœ ‰ x

Œ

Œ

Œ

^ ^ œ œœ œ

j Œ #œ ≈ œ ≈ > > ‰ 5 ≈ 5.

‰ # # œœ n œœ > ^ ‰ j # # œœ ‰

x J

x

Œ

≈ 5.

Œ Œ Œ

^ ‰ # œœJ

Œ

j #œ ≈ œ > > 5

Œ

Œ ‰

HH (open)

x J

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PRESENTING Second Prize Winner o f t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t C at e g o r y 3 : C o n c e r t B a n d M u s i c G r a d e 5 - 6

M at t he w P e t e r s on

Reflections On The Death of The Beloved Expressing the Inexpressible

by A L A N LO U R E N S carefully, then musicians will rejoice in the rests to be found in this work. It is the use of space in this work that makes it so effective. Peterson writes for an extended ensemble in order to explore a wide range of timbres and combinations, and is not afraid to rest players for extended periods if those colors don’t suit the palette. In such conscious selection, Peterson hits the mark.

Music is at its best when it deals with the human condition. Life, love, and indeed death. Beethoven scrubbing Napoleon’s name from his Third Symphony; Elgar’s melancholic Cello Concerto, or Berlioz’s epic Symphonie Fantasise all focus on the great matters of life, love and death. It is the ability of music to “express the inexpressible” that makes it, well, music. Peterson’s Reflections on the Death of the Beloved wears its emotions on its sleeves. The work is atmospheric and bold. It requires both a large and good ensemble. In addition to a standard instrumentation, the work requires English Horn, Eb Soprano Clarinet, 4 trombones, Contra-alto and Contrabass clarinets, Contrabassoon, Harp, Piano and Celesta, Timpani and five very busy percussionists.

Peterson’s engagement with his subject began when he was planning the work. Peterson states:

M AT T H E W PE T E RS ON Photo credit 2016 Peter Eriksson

Throughout, it is the scoring that creates much of the drama of the work. From the opening flourish to the closing silence, Peterson chooses his colors carefully. Almost all the principal players in the ensemble will find themselves with both solos and challenging passages. If it is the hallmark of a gifted composer to chose their colors

56

M a n h a t t a n

“Reflections on the Death of the Beloved is dedicated to six young people who died before their time. They were lost to accidents, crime, disease, and war. Two passed immediately after work on this piece began.”

The work opens with a dramatic ascending chord, starting in the bass drum and climbing through the whole ensemble to the end of the bar. It’s hard to transcribe into a single example, but here is an outline [see Ex. 1]. It’s a dramatic opening that has parallels to Schwanter’s masterwork And the Mountains Rising Nowhere. As an expression of grief it is dramatic and visceral. It comes out of silence and

B e a c h

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Œ

Œ

U œ œ

sfffz

Œ

Ex. 1 U

Œ

Œ

#U œœ

Œ

U œ

& 44sfffz

Œ

? 44 U

˙

œ , U

sfffz

4 3 4 q =ã6944 ˙æ. 4 Œ

œ

sfffz

ff

n˙˙ ff

˙

ff

Ó œ ≈ œr b œ œœ œœ bœ œ ƒ ˙ Ó Í bœ ∑ œ œœ Ó œœ ˙ œ œ œœ ƒ Í 6 molto rall. 5 œ ˙ ‰ œæj œœ 5œ œ Ó ƒ

sfffz

U , œ

˙˙

∑ ∑

Ó

Œ 1: Entire ensemble (bottom line percussion) Bar ˙ Written œin Concert pitch sfffz

Œ

Ó

˙ ˙

œ œœ œ

œ œœ œ

œ^ œœ ‰ œ

15 seconds

ç ^ œœ œœ ‰ ç ‰ œæ œ ç

œœ œæ

˙

In each case the chords settle into beautiful, yet fleeting sounds, moving quickly onto the next chord and layering ∑ in more parts — trombones, horns, trumpets — wonderful rich, dark brass colors, never quite settling down, al∑ ways moving away from beauty, like memories not quite ∑ recovered, or fleeting glimpses of what was or may have been [Ex. 2, below, left].

3 4

œ back into ˙ silence with a 15 Ósecond bar of nothing. goes u Orsfffzat least, of decay, for Peterson gives us the held note in U œ ˙ Ó the percussion, and a change of speed of the vibraphone motor that is haunting and effective. It is a memory disU œ ˙ Ó appearing slowly into the color, with the vibration speedingU up even as the sound dies away.

This ∑idea of growth continues for more than 40 bars until m.39 (molto rall.), where it finally reaches its zenith when∑ the WW join the brass for a mighty D minor chord marked sfffz. The answer comes in the form of percus∑ an almost chaotic sound of sixes, fives and fours sion —  [Ex.3, bottom, left]. ∑

After the unsettled calm of the opening, we are led into a , nœ n ˙˙ n ˙˙ far more fraught section of the work. The harp and piano œ Ó ∑ (marked cold and clear) lead us to an ff sfffz Bar 4, Euphonium and Tuba U , 2 Ex. atonal oboe solo, accompanied by soft ˙ œ ˙ Œ Ó ˙ ∑ ? 4 3 4 w œ ˙ b˙. œ Œ and gentle percussion. At rehearsal no. Euphonium 4 Ó Œ bœ 4 ˙˙ . œ 4 œ b ˙ . ff u w b˙. sfffz 65, the flute enters in solo (espressivo) , U ˙˙ Œ with reassuringly tonal open fifths œœ Ó ∑ 3 4 ?˙˙ 44 Œ Tuba 4 4 bw . ff sfffz ˙. in the horns and trombones, which bw ˙. ˙ .. ˙ , U b b ww Ó w ˙ ˙˙ ∑ immediately glissando down. These œ ˙ ff œ ˙ beautiful oboe and flute solos slowly sfffz œœ œ The section following this opening is marked, lamentoso, œœ œœ œœ œœdeconstruct into gentling, sobbing gesture of a rising sevœ œ œœœ U œœ œœœ œœ Œ Œ and Œ opens with beautiful and∑evocative low brass chords. œ œ œ œœ enth and a falling semitone or tone. p Staggering the entries, Peterson builds through ffsuspen° Following solos from the Tuba and Contrabassoon, the , U 4-part chords with split tuba and euphonium parts. ˙ sions ∑ ∑ next section is far œ ff Ex. 3 sfffz more angry. Filled q = 69 molto rall. with short sharp in∑ ∑ ∑ jections, moving be>œ Vibes, hard rubber > tween duplets, tripœœœ œœœ >œœ > > > > U > œœ Œ Œ Œ ≈ œ�j j j œ œœ œ™ j œœ œœ œ� œ ™ œ� �j> �jœ œ b œ b œ œ œ œ lets, sixteenth notes > > œ™ >œ sfz sempre ff and sixes, the un° Glockenspiel, brass derlying beat (120), œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ › U œ œ bœ Œ Œ Œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ gains energy until at œ œœ ff m. 94 we have anTubular Bells, rawhide >j >j > > > >> > U > > other climbing, anj j œ� Œ Œ Œ ≈ œ�j j bœ�œ ™™ j˙ œ�œ œ & œ�œ j b˙ œ� œ œ�j œ™™ ™ œ� > >˙ >œ gular theme rising to ff sfz sempre ° a an emphatic brass œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ › Crotales, brass œ U œ œ œ Œ Œ Œ bœœ bœ statement to silence œ œ œ œ & œœ œœ œ œœ œ œ ff [Ex. 4, overleaf ]. Tam ff

7

3 4

3 4

4 4

5

3

5

6

3

3

3

3

Ó

U œ

f

M a n h a t t a n

5

6

B e a c h

?

As the work carries

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Ex.Six4 bars after J. Brass in written pitch Trumpet in B b

Horn in F

Low Brass

œ^ # œ^ 4 œ # œ b œœ^ &4 3 ƒ ^ ^ 4 œœ # # œœ b b œœ^ &4 3 ƒ œ^ # œ^ b œ^ ? 4 œœ # œœ b b œœ 4 3 ƒ

œ^ œ œ^ œ œ^ œ bœ

^3 ^ ^ œ b œ n œ b œœ Í ^3 ^ ^ œ nœ œ bœ œ œ Í ^3 ^ ^ n œœ œ œ œ n œ b œ b œœ Í

U

3 2 4 œœ œœ Œ ç

2 4 œ œ 2 4 œœ œ

U

œ Œ œ ç

3

U

œ Œ œ œ ç 3

part harmony, the voices section (at m. 277) adds a very personal effect to the work, which winds down over the next 20 bars to a quiet and ultimately unresolved silence. As attributed to Martin Mull (among others), “writing about music is like dancing about architecture. “ It is increasingly difficult to do so when faced with a long and profound work:

through the feelings surrounding death, grief, denial, acceptance and of course remembrance, it alternates secA series of episodes on an intensely personal subject, this tions of great beauty with sections of great drama. The is advanced music par excellence. Although it addresses the percussion have much to do here, from bell, and bell-like inevitability of death, it is of course written for the living. sounds (such as cymbals), to the It exists to put into music feelings throb of a heartbeat, to dramatic and thoughts that cannot be well climaxes, the percussion are in the expressed in words. forefront. Reflections on The Death To do that, Matthew Peterson of There is much beauty here too — a brings impressive skill. Refections The Beloved gorgeous Cor Anglais solo is folon the Death of the Beloved demonlowed by flute, and soprano and strates great technical ability. The alto saxophone solos. Even here, score is alive with intelligent and as Peterson establishes beauty, he well considered percussion writing. slowly (and in some case swiftly) Compound colors abound, and the deconstructs the the beauty into use of instrumental choirs within biting harmonies. It is the drama the voicing is impressive. The addiin this work that keeps returnMatthew Peterson tion of the human voice at the close ing, later becoming asymmetrical adds a personal element. Peterson metre (7/8), frequently changing has created a work that offers not multi-metre and high climaxes. just dark, and not just light. This is music in 3 dimensions, as art music And there are choices to be made should be. for the conductor. Bars 215 and 276 are repeated. In his note on In naming a work Reflections on the the score, Peterson says “the conductor should follow the Death of the Beloved, a composer sets themselves a serious indicated minimum repetitions and consider the enertrap. The work is clearly profound, and must grab us emogy of the immediate musical moment to determine the tionally. amount of repetitions, which may vary according to each Peterson succeeds. He does indeed express the inexpressible performance.” and give voice to the unspeakable. For art, there can be no The wooodwinds down from rehearsal m. 271 onwards, higher praise. and the entire ensemble sings a lament. Noted in four Second Prize Winner

t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

C O N C E R T

B A N D

R a i s i n g t h e S ta n d a r d s o f t h e A m er ic a n C onc ert Ba n d a n d Ba n d s All Over the World.

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ABOUT THE AUTHORS OF FEATURED ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE OF MBM TIMES DR. MARC R. DICKEY is Director of the School of Music and oversees the instrumental music teacher training program at California State University, Fullerton, where he has served on the faculty since 1988. He has conducted the CSU Fullerton Symphonic Winds for more than ten years. His research has been published in the Journal of Research in Music Education and the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education. He was a member of a Music Subject Matter Advisory Panel to the Commission of Teacher Credentialing of the State of California, and has provided adjudication and clinics for bands and orchestras throughout the U.S. and Canada. He was one of the youngest conductors to be awarded the NBA’s Citation of Excellence. DR. JEFFREY D. GERSHMAN is the Director of Wind Ensembles and an Associate Professor of Music at the Capital University Conservatory of Music. His responsibilities include conducting the Symphonic Winds, Wind Symphony, and teaching advanced conducting. His past positions include serving as the Associate Director of Bands at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, the Director of Instrumental Activities at Texas A&M University-Commerce, and the Co-Director of Instrumental Music at Monroe-Woodbury High School in Central Valley, New York. Dr. Gershman maintains an active guest conducting schedule with both professional ensembles and high school honor bands throughout the country. He has presented lectures at many state and national conventions and is in high demand as adjudicator, having judged band festivals throughout the United States as well as in Singapore and Australia. In addition, Dr. Gershman has published articles on repertoire, programming, and score study which have been hailed as “groundbreaking.” As an arranger, his transcriptions of works by Eric Whitacre, Frank Zappa, and John Corigliano have received critical acclaim, with performances at Carnegie Hall as well as regional and national conventions. GREGORY B. RUDGERS the co-author with Frank Ticheli of the band methods, Making Music Matter, Books 1 and 2, published by Manhattan Beach Music, has enjoyed a 30 year career in public school music, and now serves on the adjunct faculty of Ithaca College in New York State in the music education department. He has written articles for The Instrumentalist, the Music Educator’s Journal, Teaching Music, and several state journals. He is also a published composer with works for band, wind ensemble, string orchestra, and chamber ensembles produced by several prominent publishers, the most recent of which from Manhattan Beach Music is Cosmos for Elementary band. He has enjoyed success as a clinician/guest conductor, having served in that capacity at both the public school and university levels for over one hundred festivals. He states that collaborating with Frank Ticheli on Making Music Matter ranks as the capstone of his musical career. DR. ALAN LOURENS is Head of the School of Music at the University of Western Australia, where he directs the Orchestra, Wind Ensemble and Brass Ensemble, as well as teaching conducting, pedagogy and courses in music education. He has appears as a guest conductor for orchestras and bands throughout Asia, Australia and the US, and regularly performs internationally on Euphonium. Prof. Lourens holds a Doctorate in Conducting and Masters degree in Euphonium Performance from Indiana University, where he studied conducting with Ray E. Cramer and Euphonium with Daniel Perantoni, M. Dee Stewart and Harvey G. Phillips. He received a coveted Performers Certificate for the quality of his Masters recital. He has many articles, compositions and music publications to his credit, including analysis contributions to the Teaching Music Through Performance in Band series of books, recent contributions to the US-Based MBM Times. In 2010, he co-authored several books on the planning, policy and development of Universities.

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1

& 44

2 3

& 44

1 2

& 44

2 3

& 44

B b Bs. Cl.

& 44

Bsn.

1 2

E b Al. Sx.

?4 4

1 2

Fl.

Ó

43

Œ

f œ œ b œ œœ # Ó Œ # œœ # œœ n n œœ œ 43 Fl. 3: div. f # nœ œ Ó Œ # œœ # œœ n œ œ 43 f Ó Œ b œ œ n œ œ 43 f Ó Œ œ œœ b # œœ # œ 43 œ b œ f Ó Œ œ # œ n œ b œ 43 f 3 ∑ 4

PRESENTING ∑

∑ ∑

# ˙˙˙ ...

>

˙>˙˙ .. .

# >˙˙ ..

b >˙˙ ..

>˙˙ .. > Third Prize Winner ∑ ∑ b b ˙˙ .. the 3rd International Frank∑ Ticheli ∑ Composition > Contest ∑ b˙. & 44 # >˙ . Category 3: Concert Band Music Grade 5 - 6 b Ob.

1

B Cl.

Jeffrey Hass (USA)

& 44

Ó

b˙.

> >˙ .

b >˙ .

#˙. # >˙ .

˙.

> œœ œœ b # œœ b # œœ 43 ˙˙ .. f b >˙ . Œ œ # œ n œ b œ 43 f 3 >. ∑ 4 b˙

b ˙>˙ ..

Œ

All The Bells And Whistles B b Ten. Sx.

& 44

E b Bari. Sx.

& 44

1

& 44

B b Tpt.

2 3

?4 4

In All the Bells and Whistles Jeffrey Hass explores the sonic palette of the concert ? 44 ∑ band. Euph. The work is for band and digital sound, ?4 ∑ to the 4 which addsTuba a completely new voice ensemble, in a part that is both soloistic and ∑ & 44 to the work, in completely organic a work Piano that is both fascinating and accessible. The ?4 ∑ 4 score is accompanied by a soundtrack to be ?the 44 work; the soundtrack operated during ∑ Timp. is played with the band, and sometimes as ∑ a solo. 1. Vibes & 44

Ex. 1

4. Sn. Dr. (Med.) 5. Sn. Dr. (Lrg.) Soundtrack

60

∑ ∑

∑ ∑ ∑

JEFFREY HASS

Muted Piano & Metal

&4 ã 44 ã 44

Hass has provided a diagram ∑ of the 2. T-Toms ã 44 soundtrack at the 4bottom of the score, be∑ 3. Chimes

Photo by Sandra Jo Hass

∑ ∑

sim. ? 4 bb œœ ! œ! ! b œ! ! # œ! ! # œ! !n œ! !n œ! ! b œ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 4 bœ œ œ #œ #œ nœ nœ bœ

M a n h a t t a n

>

b˙.

>˙ .

>

> ˙ œ Œ #˙ f > # ˙>˙ ∑ Œ # ˙˙ of graphicœœnotalow the percussion. In it, he∑ includes 43a kind f sounds you will tion of the sounds, and an annotation of the 34 Œ b ˙>˙ œœ ∑ ∑ # ˙˙ hear [see Ex. 1, below]. > f a2 > 3 ∑ ∑ Œ ˙ In every other4 respect, the scoreœ is ab >˙ f >˙ >˙ with normal standard work for band, œ 3 ∑ ∑ Œ 4 score order, with normally notated f >˙ > b ˙˙ œœ and transposed parts. ˙ ∑ ∑ 43 Œ f >˙ pensive,œ with > The opening feels quite b˙ 34 Œ ∑ ∑ a pedal A Flat above which we have f > a simple theme43 presented in C in œ theb ˙ ∑ ∑ Œ ˙ trumpets, then echoed f in the wood- > >˙ . >˙ . winds. provides ∑ ∑ Hass immediately ˙˙ .. us 43 ˙˙ .. with polytonality,fthe woodwind # ˙>˙ ..lines 34 b ˙ . ? # ˙. ∑ ∑ & the ˙˙ same .. now presenting melody in D ∑

by A L A N LO U R E N S

∑ century, the music world Since the early23 part & 44 of the twentieth has been questioning the nature of music and ensembles. 1 ∑ & 44 Schoenberg’s 2serialism was a frontal assault on melody. John F Hn. Cage in 4’ 33”3 questioned the boundaries of music. The band ∑ & 44 4 world has, however, been resistant to ex?of4 what sounds can ploring the idea ∑ prop1 4 erly constitute Tbn. a band.

Ó

43

4

∑ ∑

43 3 4

3 4

B e a c h

œ

Œ

Allowing the bottomf A flat to repre- > ˙. ˙˙ .. . sent ∑a key, we43 effectively have ˙three f keys within the3 first few bars. Howev∑ ∑ ∑ 4 er the skill of Hass is to combine this 3 ∑ into quite section andœ calm ˙ 4 Œa soothing ˙

∑ ∑

>

Flat [Ex. 2, recto]. > 3 ˙

Ó Ó

>

f

œœœœ f œœœœ f

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>

œœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ ‘


Ex. 2

All the Bells and Whistles: Opening (Transposed) q=60

Woodwind (in C)

& 46

!

44

Trumpets (B Flat)

& 46

!

œ œ 44 # œœw# œ œœ œœ 45 œœœ# œœw œœ œœ # œ 44 ˙˙˙. . .

Tuba

? 46

Ex. 3

Woodwind (In C)

Brass (In C)

bw. bw.

!

44 w w

45

45 w w

44

!

!

Ó # œœ œ

4 j œ 4 œ œ œ bœ. ˙

bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ ‰ b œ b œ œ œ b œ b œ b b b œœœ J J J

wœœ # œœ œ # œœ œ

œœ # œ˙ . œ œ œ œ

w

w

œ œ

j b œ b œj œ b wb œœ b œ œœ œ œ J J Œ

˙w. ˙.

Œ

w

All the Bells and Whistles: Bar 17 (In C)

˙ . # ˙˙˙ ... 3 & 4 # # ˙˙˙ ... ? 43 3 &4 ? 43

˙. ˙.

Œ ˙˙˙

b ˙˙˙ Œ ˙

˙˙ .. ˙˙ . . # ˙˙˙ .. . #˙. #˙.

˙ œœœ ˙˙

œœœ ˙˙ œ ˙ b˙

˙ b b ˙˙ ... b ˙˙˙ ...

#˙. #˙. œ œœ # ˙˙˙

œœœ b # ˙˙˙ œ ˙

˙ .. b b ˙˙ . ˙˙ .. ˙.

˙. ˙.

œœœ # ˙˙˙

œœœb # ˙˙˙ b ˙ œ

˙ b ˙˙ ... # ˙˙˙ ..

b˙. b˙. œ ˙ œœ b ˙˙

œœœœn # ˙˙˙ b˙

b ˙˙˙˙ ... . # ˙˙˙ ... ˙. ˙.

œœœ n b ˙˙˙

œœœ n b ˙˙˙ œ ˙

˙ b ˙ .. b b ˙˙ .. ˙ b # ˙˙ ... #˙. #˙.

œœœ ˙˙˙

œœœ ˙˙ ˙ œ #˙

˙ .. b # ˙˙˙ .. b ˙˙ .. ˙. ˙. N˙.

œ œœ b ˙˙˙

œœœ b # ˙˙˙ # ˙ œ

Clearly the jarring nature Bar of the keys driving soundtrack keeps the work moving. Ex.opening. 4 All the Bells and Whistles: 33 (In C) is present, but the work has a sense of movement forward, rather b œœ b times b œœ n n œœ bduring # œœ # # œœ n n œœ Several b œœ œœ the œœ b œœwork œœ œaœ bkeyboard. N œœ .. percus# œœ n # œœ # œœTheœœresolu# n œœ the œœsoundtrack n b œœ b b œœ N and than of a random “clump” on œ œ b œ œ œ 4 œ b œ œ œ requirements œœ # œ œ n œ ‰ Œsion #share œ œ an œsolo. œœ œœ # œœ b are b œœ b œœ big œœ inœœ bar b œ The œ œpercussion œœ .. signifiUpper Woodwind (in C) it & 4 Ó withŒ a great # n œœ œœ # n œœBn Flat tion, when comes 11, is J cant, with Hass writing for 5 players, plus timpani. These welcome, tempered though it is with dissonance in the of the work. œœ b b œœ n n œœ emphasize œœ œœ œœ the œœ n œœnature œœ b # œœrhythmic œœ œœ b b œœ œœ b b œœ œœ n œœ b b œœ n n œœ solo episodes Horns and Saxes. b œœ N œœ .. ? 4 J Ó Œ ‰ ŒHass has settled into a solid “groove” of simple time‰here, Lower Woodwind 4 Ó The digital soundtrack, entering at quarter-note equals in three and four, as the rhythmic displacement above 152, provides a driving and tonal release. So far Hass has emphasizes It is the sixteenth note that has become the reversed our expectations. It is the band that is dissonant currency. and “weird” and the recording that is tonal. Here the In bar 32, Hass offers the second idea, built upon the sounds are metallic with piano, a series of sixteenth notes. first. This is a kind of woodwind interjection, with skill Hass reverses the opening, with the woodwinds playing and energy, in thirds, though still very polytonal. The the melody first, now presented in dotted half notes [Ex. syncopated rhythm gives this a witty almost impish mood 3, above]. [Ex. 4]. The polytonality is quite evident here, with dissonance Underneath this theme, the recording bubbles away, acabounding. Hass uses color to ensure that the dissonance companied for most of the time by the percussion. There does not overwhelm the listener. For example the top are trumpet injections (three bars of them beginning at three parts above are on the flute, whilst the bass line m. 37), and a very loud repeated triplet interjection (bar is in the Sax/Bassoon/Bass Clarinet. This color helps to 42) before we return to the second theme. Hass plays separate the half note clashes somewhat. All the time the with this theme, and builds clusters with descending or

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Ex. 5

Piccolo

Flute 1

Flute 2

Flute 3

All the Bells and Whistles: Ascending Cluster bars 56-58

œ œ nœ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ # œ œ n œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ & 44 œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ #œ œ #œ œ œ & 44 œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ ˙ & 44 œ œ œ œ ˙ & 44

ascending lines [Ex. 5].

Third Prize Winner,

t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

Hass works his material in an interesting fashion, with much developAll The Bells and Whistles ment in canon. All the way through the soundtrack keeps bubbling away, leading towards a climax with the winds parts adding sixteenth notes. The recording is designed to lead the listener, with a long ascending passage leading towards a series of climaxes around bar 120, in the middle of which the first part of the recording ends. The tempo stays constant, but the winds finally add some quarter notes, noisily, emphatically and dissoHear Complete Recordings & V i e w C o m p l e t e V i rt u a l S c o r e s : w w w. M a n h at t a n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

w w w . M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

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all theBells and Third Prize Winner,

t h e 3 r d I n t e r n at i o n a l F r a n k T i c h e l i C o m p o s i t i o n C o n t e s t

Whistles

c o n c e r t

b a n d

Jeffrey Hass

Raising The Standards of the A merican Concert Band And Bands All Over the World

M a n h a t t a n

B e a c h

M u s i c

w w w w

Now, Hass develops the inner line from the original, stating it first in the trumpets and horns in another cascading cluster [Ex. 7]. This time it is the lower voices who answer the call, presenting a kind of walking bass line upon which Hass builds this work. This section assembles itself on many more blocks of sound, using sets of instruments to add color to the work. Whereas before we tended to hear the Woodwind or the Brass as a block together, in this section Hass uses the Saxes and Clarinets, or the Trombones as a group, to add layers to different iterations of the melodic material. This all leads us to a tremendous (fff ) triplet figure at 227, and a

Ex. 6 Bells and Whistles: Middle Section, bar 142 All the

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nantly restating our original theme before leading to the quiet middle section. An oboe and flute duet states our theme, now presented slowly and gently. Having lost the persistent sixteenth notes of the soundtrack, this simple statement has a surprisingly touching feel [Ex. 6].

62

M a n h a t t a n

œ b œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ b œJ œ . w

œ.

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loud and triumphant coda. The coda finishes a work that has considerable elan and charm as well as muscle. Controlling a work focused, as is this one, on melodic material rather than harmonic structure does require time and energy. But it’s worth the energy, as All

B e a c h

M u s i c


Ex. 7

q=152

œ˙

4 & 4

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œ˙ .

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œ j œ. ‰ #œ

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The Bells and Whistles offers a different take on ideas about sound and music that are not in themselves new, but are rarely encountered by bands. As conductors, we are well aware of the elements to which we can make considerable contribution: affect; structure; and especially tempo. It is frankly terrifying, and not a little revealing to give up control of tempo to a recording. The ability to stay precisely in time, and to take the ensemble with you, is more difficult than you may imagine. However this can create rewarding and exciting performance. The new color that is now possible makes this a

ALL THE BELLS AND WHISTLES 1 Flute 2 3

q = 60

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JEFFREY HASS

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1. Vibraphone

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8 Picc.

FOR CONCERT BAND WITH SOUNDTRACK

2

The band world is inherently conservative. We œ œ˙ . # ˙ . don’t like to take chances Œ and we don’t like to try experimental ideas. In the w w # w‰ œ ˙ . latter part of the twentieth J century, a mere 50 years after the orchestral world, we have finally started to embrace dissonant repertoire as part of our mainstream output. In All The Bells and Whistles we have a champion for performance with digital sounds. It is mainstream enough to be exciting and interesting for an audience, yet it is innovative. It is an excellent work for your students to play; it is an outstanding work for your audience to hear. But most importantly, it is a work that has something compelling to say, and a new vocabulary with which to say it.

2

Commissioned by John Lynch and the Monroe-Woodbury High School Wind Ensemble

Piccolo

leap one worth taking.

All the Bells and Whistles: Bar 187, Trumpets and Horns (Transposed)

∑ ∑

Copyright © 2016 Manhattan Beach Music - All Rights Reserved - Printed and engraved in the United States of America ISBN 1-59913-194-3 (complete set) ISBN 1-59913-195-1 (conductor score only) Purchase music, download free MP3s, view virtual scores and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

M a n h a t t a n

24 42 42 24 42 2 4 42 24 2 4

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B e a c h

M u s i c

63


Making Music Matter Frank Ticheli’s Beginning & Intermediate Band Methods, Making Music Matter, have just hit the stores. What has the superstar of concert band music come up with? Here is our interview of Frank Ticheli (who wrote the music) and Gregory B. Rudgers (who wrote the exercises and created the pedagogical sequence). BY B OB MA RGOLIS , D IR E CTO R , M ANH ATTAN BE ACH M U SIC

Margolis: When you first started to work on the method, were you determined to make your book different from what is out there? Ticheli: Yes. Through the discussions I had with colleagues, especially in regard to how the book would begin, we were. Other books begin with these unison notes on a B-flat major scale, which allows the teacher to work with the kids in unison exercises, and there’s validity to that. But by doing that the instruments start on notes that are not the most natural notes for them. We went in another direction entirely. Margolis: Did you and Greg select the “First 3 Notes” together?

Teacher’s Edition

���in� ��sic �a�e� Beginning Band Method Book 1

Rudgers: I think it’s a critical factor in the book. Other books that I’ve experienced challenge certain instruments with some really difficult maneuvering on their instrument in order to produce their first three notes. Having taught at this level myself and having observed some teachers and student teachers I know it’s always a stumbling block.

Frank Ticheli a n d

Gregory B. Rudgers

fore word by

Richard L. Floyd

Margolis: I know that the “First 3 Notes” were picked to be easy notes to play — but how important was it to do this?

Bob Margolis e d i t o r

Margolis: Let’s talk about the pedagogy behind the book. The music is Ticheli’s, the pedagogy is Rudgers’. Tell me about how you decided to pick the rhythms you taught first.

Rudgers: Basically the overriding factor in Ticheli: We talked a lot about it together, M a nh at ta n Be a c h M u sic the rhythm of the book is developing the and one of our field testers, Cindi Soberwww.MakingMusicMatterBook1.com sense of subdivision. In Lesson 1, we have ing — I remember she was talking about whole notes and quarter notes, which is the flute — she said, “wouldn’t it be nice quite unusual for beginning lesson books. if you didn’t have the flute crossing the They usually start with one or the other. But I thought if had both a break on the first three notes?” since other books do that. And after whole note and a quarter note in the first lesson the kids would beaddressing that Greg and I began talking about the other instruments. gin to understand the concept of subdivision and feel the four beats For example, why not have the saxes just play only left-hand fingerinside the whole note. And that really drives the entire book. When ings at the beginning? And then, why not have the horns play in a they move on to eighth notes it’s developed in a subdivision format; register where they can actually hear those partials, instead of playing same thing with sixteenths. That was the guiding force in rhythmic the same notes as the trumpets (which puts the horns so high they development. can’t find the notes). So, through discussion it gradually evolved into the note choices that we made. The question we always asked was, Margolis: Had you given any thought to teaching half notes and “what would be the most natural notes for the instrument?” quarter notes at the beginning? Thre were other considerations.We could have gone to just left-handRudgers: No, we wanted to have a four-beat format in the first lesson ed fingerings on the flute. That would have been B, A, and G — but so that the kids would get used to feeling four beats in a measure. B-natural is just too far away from what a beginner would see in band. And when half notes are introduced, they are introduced juxtaposed So we compromised, and did A, G, and F, which is almost as easy. against quarter notes. So they also learn to feel the two beats inside the half-note. Margolis: And in some ways maybe more useful. Ticheli: Yes, I think in a way that’s true: So now, the flutes are not crossing the break; instead, you get to introduce their right hand (with the F). Though they’re not crossing the break, now their right hand is involved.

64

M a n h a t t a n

Margolis: Frank, the other big news for this book is of course your original pieces and I see that the first piece you have written uses just the “First 3 Notes,” and has actual harmony. What were the challenges in writing that one? ‘Cause, what you wrote is fabulous,

B e a c h

M u s i c


Making Music Matter The first six pieces, all of the exercises as well as the compositions, are chordal. By the time you get to Lesson 7 the students have learned Ticheli: [laughs] The challenge is that all the instruments have three enough notes such that they can actually play unison exercises. Thus, notes, but they’re not the same three notes, so you’ve already got the seventh piece,“Dance of the Jack O’Lanterns,” has more of a kind chords to deal with. Also, it’s set up — and this is a challenge for of a two-voice harmony and there’s more reliance on unison writing me — the notes are such that if you just took the most simple route contrasting with chordal writing. So I was able to start varying the you’d have all the players textures more and more. It’s a real playing these first invermilepost in the book — the variFIRST 3 sion chords all the time. NOTES ety of the musical textures starts But there’s a lack of stabilFIRST THREE NOTES to open up from that point on. ity playing first inversion zXASDf|GhjK zXASdf|ghjK zXASDf|ghjK b w Another milestone is Lesson 13, &b w chords. So you can’t just run w where they get to eighth notes. I them all in parallel motion. b w &b w w wrote “A Short Ride on HorseI had to get creative with back” where you have this sound the composing so that I’d b of a horse trotting along with have more root position tri& w b w w woodblocks, and the players with a ads and get greater stability, “trotting” kind of theme. In Lesson which kids at that age need. ? bb w w w 16, I’m excerpting my own piece, The challenge was taking the “Amazing Grace,” and I love that notes that I was given and # b these kids just starting out get to still making the most stable w w & w b experience the simple, pure beauty harmony possible. of the melody and harmony of that b w w & w Margolis: But it’s not just piece. In fact, the topic of my upstable harmony, it’s interestAqq qqq AAq coming talk at the MidWest Clinb & w w ing harmony. w ic is “Beauty from the Beginning.” Www www www &b Likewise, having beautiful music w w w Ticheli: Oh well thanks! It’s right away was an important goal of 1 3 4 partly through having some ? b w w w b this book. And at the end of Book players not move while othAqq qqq AAq ? w 2, I leave the kids with this simple w w er players move, so you get bb and beautiful melody in excerpting Aqq qqq AAq this passing tone thing hap? b b w w w my own setting of “Shenandoah.” pening — and I don’t know how you did it.

Flute

B Tenor Sax.

*

* for better response and intonation.

z SSf|hjj z SSf|hjj

E Alto Sax. E Baritone Sax.

@2#\7*90 fG Hjkl

Bassoon

zADG|HhK zX Sdf|hjl @@3\7890 z SSF|hjj z SSF|hjj fG

zADG|gkk zX sdf|hjl

B Clarinet B Bass Clarinet

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Oboe

B Trumpet Euphonum T.C.

F Horn

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Euphoinum B.C.

Tuba

Margolis: — there you go! Mallets

&b

b

w

w

Ticheli: Just simple tricks to ww ã make it work. I’ve found that any time you’re faced with problems as a composer that’s something to celebrate, because problems lead us down a path that at least in my case I’m often not smart enough to figure out on my own. The problems will lead us down a path to create a solution. So actually I celebrate problems, and this book was filled with those kinds of problems which are challenges. New Instruments: SNARE DRUM

w

Percussion

BASS DRUM

21

Preface - Lesson 1

Margolis: You had 24 problems per book, right? Ticheli: [laughs] Thats right, and this is the tricky part: Each of these 24 pieces gradually adds new elements — different notes, different rhythms — a little at a time so you’re constantly having to keep track. For example, “did clarinet learn that note yet?” You can’t drop the ball and introduce something they’ve not yet learned.

M a n h a t t a n

Margolis: And conversely, some of the original works you wrote just for this book one day are going to make their way into becoming Grade 1 pieces.

Ticheli: Indeed, I estimate at least a third of these works are really good candidates to be expanded into full-blown Grade 1 pieces. Margolis: Well, there’s more than one kind of big news for this book. There’s the method itself, there’s the 24 original ensemble pieces that you composed, there’s the solo pieces for each of the instruments that you composed (plus the percussion ensemble work in the percussion book). This makes this method different in construction, and the whole way you thought about it, right? Ticheli:Yes, and speaking of the construction, this is amazing to me: It seems so obvious, but none of the books out there (if they’re there, we didn’t see them) are constructed into sequential lessons. Why not divide a book into lessons so that kids have a constant stream

B e a c h

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65


Piano Reduction

b & b 44 œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ ? b b 4 œœ œœ œœ 4

œœœ œœ

www ww

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www ww

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www ww

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Making Music Matter FIRST JOURNEY

Flute Oboe Bells

B b Clarinet B b Bass Clarinet B b Trumpet

E b Alto Saxophone E b Baritone Saxophone B b Tenor Saxophone F Horn Bassoon Trombone Euphonium Tuba Snare Drum Bass Drum

Piano Reduction

(for rehearsal only)

b & b 44 œ œ œ œ w & & &

44 œ œ œ œ w

# 4 4 œ œ œ œ w 44 œ œ œ œ w

& b 44

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44 ww

b4 & b 4 œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ ? b b 44 œ œ œœ œœ

COMPOSITION NO. 1

ww w w

FRANK TICHELI

œ œ œ œ w

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w

œ œ œ œ w

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w

œ œ œ œ w œ œ œ œ w

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w

œ œ œ œ w œ œ œ œ w œ œ œ œ w

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w

œœœ œœ

œœ œ œœ

wœ œ œ œ ww ww w ww

œœœ œœ

œœœ œœ

wœ œ œ œ ww

œ œ œœ œœ ww œœ œœ ww

œœ œ œœ

œœ œ œœ

œœ œ œœ

wœ œ œ œ wœ œ œ œ ww œœœ œ

œœœ œ

œœ œœ

œœ œœ

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œœ œ œ

œœ œ œœ

œœ ww œ œœ ww

The first musical composition in the book, “First Journey,” uses just the three notes learned in Lesson 1.

32

Lesson 1 - Page 4

of rewards. Now, here we are with Lesson 13 and now we learn this so that we can play that piece. Next in Lesson 14 we learn that and we can play this piece now. This makes the learning experience more clearsighted to me, and clarity is an important thing to kids when they’re starting out.

students are completely in control of the elements. It’s a critical link between the exact same elements in the exercises and in the Frank Ticheli piece that closes each lesson. First you have to be in control of the physical elements and notes and rhythms and dynamics, and then you get to make some music.

Margolis: And the exercises that you wrote were specifically designed to teach what was needed to play Frank’s pieces?

Ticheli: One other new thing in the book is that we have these creative exercises called “Creative Corner” where I devise these little very simple compositional exercises. What I like about them is that they, for the most part, allow all of the students to be on same plane — on the same playing field. That is, the kid who’s had ten years of piano is on the same playing field as the kid who’s just starting on the trumpet. It’s because these compositional exercises don’t rely upon your knowledge of harmony, form, chord structure, things that a kid who’s played piano would have an advantage over. These exercises bypass that and they get to the heart of what composition is, which is imagination, just sounds unfolding in time, and asking questions like, “what if?” Rather than getting bogged down with,“oh, should I double that note,” or “my teacher told me I shouldn’t double this leading

Rudgers: Actually it went the other way. [laughs] I wrote the exercises and put handcuffs on Frank by saying, “OK. Here’s the new elements. So write a piece with these notes and elements.” But the guy’s a genius. There are times I’d send him something, saying “there, you can’t fix that” but he did. There’s a wonderful synergy at work between the pedagogy and the music, as each is adjusted to fit the other. This book is designed for dedicated teachers who will take the time to be sure that every exercise is mastered. When there are fewer exercises, as for example in Lesson 1, it’s encouraging a master teacher to spend the time on each of those exercises so that the

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Making Music Matter See the both volumes & hear the recordings & download accompaniments: w w w. M a k i n g M u s i c M a t t e r B o o k 1 . c o m tone or move that interval in parallel motion,” the students can just have fun creating.

companiments that the kids haven’t learned yet. So we start to hear these rhythms, and hear this chromaticism they haven’t started to play. It’s kind of cool — they get introduced to musical ideas they’ll learn later down the road.

Margolis: And for anybody who wants to see what you did, they can look at the whole book online.

Margolis: Final question goes to Greg. When somebody decides which band method to use, whether they’re changing over from one they’ve used for a long time, or just starting out, how do they decide which one to adopt? What are they going to see here?

Ticheli: It’s all there online at www.MakingMusicMatterBook1.com where they can look at the entire teacher’s book and a couple of the sample student books as well. Margolis: With respect to the 15 solo pieces, I can remember when I asked you if you’d do these, and that was the three days of silence, right? [laughs] but you decided it was a good idea.

Rudgers: Having been a band director for 35 years, and having worked at all levels, as well as with college students who are studying to be beginning band directors, I’m very well aware of the various stumbling blocks encountered by beginning band students. Knowing that, we’ve included a progressive, developmental approach, so that those stumbling blocks will be easier to handle. For example, one of the hardest times when teaching beginning clarinetists is when they get to go over the break. In our book, our field testers came back and said, “finally, our clarinets are learning to go over the break easily.” There are many of those elements in the book. Long tones and lip slurs starting as early as possible for the brass players so that kids are asked to play fundamentals, but in an entertaining way, each time they pick up the instrument. But the real attraction is going to be the Frank Ticheli music. One of our field testers came to us and said, “Ms. Posegate, we sound like real players now — we sound like a real band.”

Ticheli: Yes, something in the back of each book as a kind of reward for the kids for completing the book, wouldn’t it be great to give them this gift? In three days I surprised you with several pieces with optional piano accompaniments. Margolis: Yes, you wrote 14 to my 2 (which we’re not using—we have yours!) Ticheli:That was even fast for me! Sometimes your best music comes quickly like that. So they’re in the back of the book and there’s a wide expressive range in these. For the solo parts I had to be really careful, after all, this is the end of Book 1 — I couldn’t exceed the ranges and the notes learned, but I could exceed it in the piano accompaniment. Even though they’re really simple, there are aspects in the piano ac-

This interview first appeared in Sept. 2016 SBO Flute

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