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D E T N A H C N E D N A L I S

E V E S T

T R E C C O N

E S U O R

D N B A

m o c . c s i u M h c e a B n a t t a h n a M . w w w


Recording Credits for Enchanted Island: Performance by University of Louisville Symphonic Band, Amy I. Acklin, conductor

This virtual conductor score and recording are designated “private,� and any publication or distribution beyond the web sites of Manhattan Beach Music is prohibited


S T E V E RO U S E

ENCHANTED ISLAND F

O

R

C

O

N

C

E

R T

B A

N

D

I N S T R U M E N T A T I O N

1 Full Score

3 Bb Tenor Saxophone

2 Timpani

4 Flute 1

2 Eb Baritone Saxophone

2 Percussion 1

4 Flute 2

4 Bb Trumpet 1

2 Oboe

4 Bb Trumpet 2

6 Bb Clarinet 1 6 Bb Clarinet 2 3 Bb Bass Clarinet

3 F Horn 4 Trombone

2 Bassoon

3 Euphonium/Baritone B.C.

4 Eb Alto Saxophone 1

2 Euphonium/Baritone T.C.

4 Eb Alto Saxophone 2

4 Tuba

P R I N T E D

O N

A RC H I VA L

Glockenspiel

2 Percussion 2 Triangle

2 Percussion 3 Suspended Cymbal (with optional Tam-Tam)

2 Percussion 4 Snare Drum

2 Percussion 5 Bass Drum

PA P E R

 M A N H AT TA N B E A C H M U S I C 1595 East 46th Street Brooklyn, NY 11234 Fax: 718/338-1151 Voicemail: 718/338-4137 www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com mbmband@aol.com


PROGRAM NOTE

by Bob Margolis When you hear the music of Enchanted Island, it sounds like a place you might want to visit. Strange. Mysterious. Something is happening on Enchanted Island... There are clues in the music – a slow procession, a soulful melody in the trumpets, the clamor of a ceremonial tam-tam ... a sense of darkness, of respect, of an important moment. On Enchanted Island, clouds cover the sky, a new light is born.

SCOR E A ND PER FOR M A NCE NOTES

by John Darling Steve Rouse’s Enchanted Island presents excellent teaching opportunities for the beginning band through its use of modern compositional techniques and concepts; these lend the work a more mature sound and add to the mysterious character of the mood. An ABA' ternary form provides a solid structure to the work. Introduction (measures 1–4)

The percussion section dominates the introduction. Double pedal points at the extreme range of the section (in orchestra bells and timpani) establish the basic rhythmic motive that unifies the piece. The rest of the percussion instruments establish a quasi percussion ostinato that carries the piece to its first major climax.


In measure 3, the low reeds introduce a harmonic language that adds a darker character to the mood. The addednote technique in the saxophones is combined with the continuation of the double pedal points that are now enhanced by the inclusion of the P5 in the bass clarinet. Proper balance of the alto saxophones to the tenor saxophones will help bring out the more complex harmonic dissonance. The rhythmic pattern established by the triangle is used throughout the composition. Entrances on beat two, the weak beat of the measure, offer a welcome change from traditional rhythmic schema for pieces at this level. Section 1 (measure 5–13)

The trumpets present the main theme in measure 5. Balance of the divisi parts will be essential. The ability to change from staccato to legato articulation in the matter of two beats will need to be stressed. Full duration of note values will be another issue that will need to be monitored carefully. The snare drum starting in measure 6 should not be too loud. Section 2 (measure 13–20)

Section 2 begins with the introduction of a new texture: the high woodwinds. The percussion ostinato and the harmonic progression in the low reeds continue uninterrupted. A new melodic idea begins in measure 15 in the high woodwinds. A four-measure phrase beginning with the horns and tenor saxophone in measure 17 is completed by the trumpets. Attention to the gradual crescendo will help carry this section to the upcoming climax. Section 3 (measure 21–34)

Several important changes occur at measure 21: the percussion ostinato stops, the harmonic progression and pedal points end, and a tam-tam is scored in the Percussion 2 part. Probably the most important change is the use of


unequal phrase lengths. The climax is established as a two-measure antecedent phrase followed by a three-measure consequence phrase. The intensity and the dynamics of the climax should be sustained throughout the entire section. It is not until measure 34 that any of the intensity can relax; this long climactic moment provides beginning players with an exciting and dramatic soundscape. A very quick mood change and dynamic shift leads to the middle “B” section. Transitional material (measure 35-41) A variation of the introduction begins the transition. A unique triangle solo provides the downbeat answered by the high woodwinds with the now familiar rhythmic motive. The saxophones again provide the harmonic progression without the pedal point. Measure 37 illustrates another important concept for beginning players: the powerful impact that the use of silence can have within the context of an aural art form. In measure 35, the percussion ostinato resumes while the higher woodwinds enhance the texture with an inverted variation of the melody from Section 2. Return of Section 1 (measure 42–49) This section is almost an exact repeat of Section 1. Return of Section 2, abbreviated (measure 50–53) Only the last four measures from Section 2 are used to set up the final climax. Return of Section 3, abbreviated (measure 54–58) The first five measures of the climax (measures 21–25) are restated, which includes the unequal phrase structure. Coda (measure 59–60) The tam-tam should not be too loud on the downbeat of measure 59. The timpani and the bass drum need to make a dramatic dynamic shift from beat one to beat two in order to accomplish the final crescendo. A very open chord consisting of stacked P5 gives the ending a characteristic modal feeling that is in keeping with the general mood of the entire work.

CONCLUDING THOUGHTS

The more modern techniques highlighted above give this piece a more mature sound and a vastly more interesting soundscape than is usual for this level. Beginning students, introduced to these concepts, will learn that making music is more than just playing the right notes for the correct amount of time and at the proper dynamic level. They will enjoy this piece because it is substantial and extremely musical, but it never places unrealistic expectations on their developing abilities.


ENCHANTED ISLAND ° b4 &b 4 Flute 1 2 b4 Oboe & b 4

FOR CONCERT BAND

Moderato (q = ca. 96)

Bb Clarinet

1 2

Bb Bass Clarinet Bassoon

2

4 & 4 & 44 ? bb 44 #4 & 4

3

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? b4 Tuba ¢ b4

F Horn Trombone Euphonium/ Baritone

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Percussion 3: Suspended Cymbal (with optional Tam-tam) Percussion 4: Snare Drum (snares off) Percussion 5: Bass Drum

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4 / 4

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Percussion 2: Triangle

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beater 4 normal w ¢ / 4 mp

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° 4 & 4

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1 2

Bb Trumpet

6

4 Bb Tenor Saxophone & 4 #4 Eb Baritone Saxophone & 4 ¢

5

1 Eb Alto Saxophone 2

4

STEVE ROUSE

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Copyright © 2005 Manhattan Beach Music 1595 East 46th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11234-3122, U.S.A. Voicemail 718 338-4137 Fax: 718 338-1151 E-mail: mbmband@aol.com All Rights Reserved. This music is made entirely in the United States of America. ISBN 1-59913-012-2 (complete set of score & parts) ISBN 1-59913-013-0 (score only) Hear this composition online at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

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1 2

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Bb Tpt.

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25

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27

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26

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23

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° bb Œ >˙˙ 1 Fl. 2 & b Œ >˙ b Ob. &

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28

Bb Cl.

1 2

Bb Bass Cl.

Bsn.

Eb Alto Sax.

1 2

Bb Ten. Sax.

Eb Bari. Sax.

Bb Tpt.

1 2

F Hn.

Tbn.

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Cym.

S.D. B.D.

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30 div. >

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j œ

> œ Œ Ó > w

34

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f

f

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> œ

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˙ >˙

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(Tam-tam)

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>œ 33>œ > > œ œ œœ ˙˙

> Œ ˙

> >œ > œ ˙

f

f

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> ˙

>œ > œœ

>˙ Œ ˙

32

˙ >˙

> Œ ˙

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Œ ˙ > f > ˙™

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> Œ ˙

f

>˙ Œ ˙

31

œœ Œ > œ >œ > >˙ > > œ ˙ œ> >œ œ Œ

div.

˙˙ > ˙ >

5

Œ

∑ ∑

35 Œ ˙˙ Œ

mp

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w > > w

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mp

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p

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p

p

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p

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w >

f

w > f

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> w

w

mp

f

(dampen tam-tam)

> w

f

(quickly back to Cymbal)

∑ ∑ ∑


6

° bb Œ ˙ ˙ & 36

Fl. 1 2 Ob.

Bb Cl.

1 2

Bb Bass Cl.

Bsn.

Eb Alto Sax.

1 2

Bb Ten. Sax.

Eb Bari. Sax.

Bb Tpt.

1 2

F Hn.

Tbn.

Euph./Bar.

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?b b

# & Ó &

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Œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙

Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w

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41

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40

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37

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mp

∑ Œ ˙

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ . . mf Ó

˙

Ó

˙

Ó

mp

˙

mp

Ó

w

œ ∑

Ó

˙˙

˙ ∑

œ Ó

˙

Œ œœ˙ Ó w

˙ ∑


7

° bb &

43

Fl. 1 2 Ob.

44

b &b

45

46

47

48

1 2

&

Bb Bass Cl.

&

Bb Cl.

Bsn.

? bb

1 2

&

Bb Ten. Sax.

&

Eb Alto Sax.

Eb Bari. Sax.

Bb Tpt.

1 2

F Hn.

Tbn.

Euph./Bar.

Tba.

Timp.

Glock.

¢& ° &

#

&b

Ó

˙˙

Ó

˙

/

S.D.

/

¢/

Ó

˙

Ó

Œ

Ó

Ó

˙

Ó

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ . . ∑

˙˙ ˙

˙˙

Ó

˙

Œ œœ. œœ. œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ . .

˙˙

Ó

∑ œœ œœ Œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ . . œ ∑ ∑

˙

Ó

˙

Ó

˙

Ó

˙

Ó

Ó

˙

Ó

˙

Ó

˙

Ó

˙

Ó

˙

Ó

w

w

œ Ó

˙

Ó

Œ œj œ œ œ œj œ w

˙ ∑

w

Ó

Œ œœ˙ ˙

w

˙˙

Ó

mp

˙

Ó

˙

œ

Ó

˙˙

Ó

w

b &b Ó

Cym.

Ó

?b ¢ b ˙

/

˙˙ ∑

œœ œœ œœ ˙˙

?b˙ b

°?

Ó

?b b

Tri.

B.D.

#

œ

œ Ó

˙

Ó

Œ œj œ œ œ œj œ w

˙

w

Ó

œ

Œ œœ˙

∑ Ó

w

w

˙ ∑

œ Ó

Œ œœ˙

∑ Ó Œ w

˙ j œ

˙

Ó

œ œ œ œj œ w

˙ ∑


8

° bb &

49

Fl. 1 2 Ob.

Bb Cl.

1 2

Bb Bass Cl.

Bsn.

Eb Alto Sax.

1 2

Bb Ten. Sax. Eb Bari. Sax.

Bb Tpt.

1 2

F Hn.

Tbn.

Euph./Bar.

b &b &

Œ ˙

Œ

Œ œ Œ œ œœ ˙

?b b # & Ó

Ó

˙

&

¢&

#

° & &b

˙˙ ∑

œœ œœ ˙˙ ∑

?b b

?b˙ b

Ó

°? Timp.

Tri.

Œ

&

?b Tba. ¢ b ˙

Glock.

50 div. Œ ˙˙

w

b &b Ó /

Ó

œ œ

mp cresc.

˙

mp cresc.

Ó

Ó Ó

/

Œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ

Œ œ œ Œ

Œ

œ œ Œ

Œ œ Œ œ œœ

Œ

Œ

œœ œœ Œ

Œ ˙ f >

˙

˙

Œ

Œ ˙

Œ

Ó Ó

˙

˙˙

Œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ cresc.

mf cresc.

˙

mp cresc.

Ó

w Œ

Ó

˙

unis.

mf cresc.

Œ œ œ œ ˙ ˙

mf cresc.

˙

Œ œœ œœ Ó Ó

˙

˙ ˙

œœ œœ Ó

Ó

Ó

Ó

˙

œœ œœ Ó

œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ

div.

mp cresc.

Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑

Ó

Ó

Ó

˙

cresc.

Ó

˙ cresc.

˙

Œ œœ˙

Œ œj œ œ œ œj œ w

˙

œ œ Ó ∑

cresc.

˙

w

Ó

w

Œ Œ Ó

Ó ˙ > f Œ ˙˙ Œ > f > Œ ˙ Œ f

Ó

˙ >

f

> Œ ˙˙

> œœ

> Œ ˙

> œ

f

f

Ó

˙ > f >˙

Ó

f

Ó

f

œœœœ w > œ œ

> Œ ˙ f

> œ œ ˙™

œœ˙

Optional: quickly to Tam-tam

Œ ˙ ˙ f >

Œ

f

Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙

f

˙ >

Ó

cresc.

cresc.

˙

Œ

53

w

w

Œ ˙˙

Ó

w

52

Œ

œ ˙ œ œ œ œ

Ó

S.D.

Œ

54 > Œ ˙˙

Œ ˙˙

œœ œœ Ó

˙

Ó w

mp cresc.

/ ¢/

mp cresc. div.

Œ œœ˙

Cym.

B.D.

mp cresc.

Œ

˙˙

51

f

f

> w

(Tam-tam) f

> Œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó f > w w f

> œ > œ


Fl. 1 2

55 ° bb Œ >˙ ˙ &

Œ

b &b Œ ˙ >

Ob. 1 Bb Cl. 2

&

Œ

Bb Bass Cl.

&

˙ >

˙ >˙

Œ Œ Ó

?b ˙ Ó b > # Œ 1 Œ ˙ Eb Alto Sax. & 2 >˙ Œ ˙ Œ Bb Ten. Sax. & > # Ó ˙ Eb Bari. Sax. & ¢ > ° 1 Œ ˙˙ œ Bb Tpt. 2 & > >œ F Hn. & b Œ ˙ œ > > Bsn.

Tbn.

Euph./Bar.

Tba.

¢

?b ˙ b > ? b >˙ b ? bb

°? Timp. Glock.

Tri.

Cym.

S.D.

B.D.

Ó Ó Ó

/ /

¢/

> w

> j œœ Œ Ó > w

> Œ ˙

>œ 57>œ >œ >œ > œ œ œ œ œœ > œ

Œ ˙ >˙ w >

œ œ œ œ >œ >œ >œ >œ >œœ ∑

> Œ ˙˙ >˙ Œ

>œœ >œ >œœ >œ >œ œ œ œ

w >

w >

> Œ ˙˙ > Œ ˙ w > > w

w > œ > > œ

> Œ ˙ > w > w

> j œœ Œ Ó > w

>œ >œœ œ

58

>œ œ

>œœ

> >> >> > œ œ œ œœ œ œœœœœ > > > >> œœ œœ > >

œ >œ ∑

œ >œ

∑ >œ >œœ œ

>œ œ

>œ œ

> œœ

> œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ > > > >œ >œ >œ > > œ œ œ œ œœ œ > > > > >œ > >œ >œ >œ ∑

> œ

Ó

unis.

Ó Ó

Ó

f

>˙ > ˙

>˙ ˙ > > ˙

Ó

œ> >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ >œ f p cresc. >˙ Ó

(Tam-tam)

f f

U > w

> ˙

U w > U w > U w > U > w

f unis.

Ó

U w >

f

> w f

f

p cresc.

f

p cresc.

f

> >>>>>> œ œœœœœœ f

U w > U w > U > w U w

> w

>>>>>> Œ œœœœœœ

U w w > U w > U w > U > w U > w

> ˙

œ >œ >

div.

f

U > w w U > w

> ˙

Ó Ó

div.

f unis.

Ó

Ó

60

> œ œ œ œ > > >

(dampen tam-tam)

unis.

Ó

Ó œ >œ œ >

59

Ó

>œ >œ >œ >œ > > > > > > > > œœ œ œœœœœ

w >

w >

b &b Œ ˙ > > / ˙™

>˙ Œ ˙

56

U > w U > w

9


PRESERVING OUR MUSIC I T I S I M P O R TA N T T O P R E S E R V E O U R M U S I C A L H E R I TA G E F O R F U T U R E G E N E R AT I O N S

Acidic paper has been in widespread use since the turn of the century, and has become the bane of archivists, librarians, and others who seek to preserve knowledge intact, because it literally will self-destruct as it ages. Some paper, only three or four decades old, already has become impossible to handle — so brittle it crumbles to the touch. Surely we do not want today’s music to be unavailable to those who will inhabit the future. If the music of the Renaissance had not been written on vellum it could never have been preserved and we would not have it today, some four hundred years later. Let us give the same consideration to the musicians in our future. It was with this thinking that Manhattan Beach Music in 1988 first addressed the needs of the archivist by printing all of its concert band music on acid-free paper that met the standards specified in the American National Standard for Information Sciences — Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials (ANSI Z39.48-1984). The standard was revised on October 26, 1992 to include coated papers; all of our new editions and reprints of older editions meet this revised standard. With proper care and under proper environmental conditions, this paper should last for at least several hundred years.

Technical notes: Paper permanence is related to several factors: The acidity or alkalinity (pH) of the paper is perhaps the most critical criterion. Archival paper (also known as acid-free paper, alkaline paper, and permanent paper) is acid-free, has a pH between 7.5 and 10, is tear resistant, has an alkaline reserve equivalent to 2% calcium carbonate (to neutralize any acid that might arise from natural aging of the paper or from environmental pollution), and contains no unbleached pulp or groundwood (no more than 1% lignin by weight). The specific standards summarized here are set forth in detail by the National Information Standards Organization in American National Standard Z39.48-1992. For more information, contact: NISO, 4733 Bethesda Avenue, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20814, http://www.niso.org/

This paper meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (Permanence of Paper)

BOB MARGOLIS — PUBLISHER N E I L R U D D Y — C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R COFOUNDERS P R I N T I N G : C H E R N AY P R I N T I N G , I N C .


.


E N w w C H A N T E D w . I S L A N D M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c . c o m

Enchanted Island for concert band by Steve Rouse  

The complete conductor score of Enchanted Island for concert band by Steve Rouse