Page 1

…and the antelope play Winne r of t he C BDN A You ng Band Com p o si t ion Com pe t i t ion

John Carnahan c o n c

e

M a nh at ta n

r t

b a

n d

Be a ch

M u sic


Recording Credits for …And The Antelope Play: Performance by California State University, Long Beach, Wind Symphony, John Carnahan, conductor

This virtual conductor score and recording are designated “private,” and any publication or distribution beyond the web sites of Manhattan Beach Music is prohibited


…and the antelope play FO R CONC E RT BA N D

JOHN CARNAHAN I N S T R U M E N T A T I O N 1 Full Score

3 Eb Alto Saxophone 2

2 Bass Trombone

1 Piccolo

2 Bb Tenor Saxophone

3 Euphonium B.C.

8 Flute 1 & 2

1 Eb Baritone Saxophone

2 Euphonium T.C.

3 Bb Trumpet 1

4 Tuba

2 Oboe 1 & 2

3 Bb Trumpet 2

1 Timpani

4 Bb Clarinet 1

3 Bb Trumpet 3

2 Percussion 1

4 Bb Clarinet 2

2 F Horn 1 & 2

(one player doubles on Soprano Recorder)

4 Bb Clarinet 3 2 Bb Bass Clarinet 1 Bassoon 1

(can be performed as a single part by only one player)

2 F Horn 3 & 4 (can be performed as a single part by only one player)

2 Trombone 1

1 Bassoon 2 3 Eb Alto Saxophone 1

2 Trombone 2

Snare Drum, Bass Drum

2 Percussion 2 Suspended Cymbal, Triangle, Slapstick, Temple Blocks, Crash Cymbals, Wooden Wind Chimes (from Perc. 3)

2 Percussion 3 Wooden Wind Chimes, Bells, Xylophone

P R I N T E D O N A RC H I VA L PA P E R

 M A N H AT TA N B E AC H M U S I C 1595 East 46th Street Brooklyn, New York 11234 Fax: 718/338-1151 World Wide Web: http://www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com E-mail: mbmband@aol.com Voicemail: 718/338-4137


.


PROGRAM NOTE

My tone poem, ...and the antelope play, depicts the transformation through time of the Antelope Valley — from ancient times, to the eventual displacement of the Native American culture, to modern times. The work considers both geographical and cultural aspects in its musical portrayal of this vast and beautiful high desert of California. The title is taken from the 19th-century song, Home on the Range, specifically from the line, “Where the deer and the antelope play,” although you will not hear the song except in some melodic fragments. The thematic material of the music is based solely upon these fragments and word association from the song. Although well hidden, you may find the themes more readily by word association than by melodic association. …and the antelope play is a through-composed tone poem in eight sections, played without pause, with each section bearing a descriptive verse from my poem: …first there was wind …morning light …behold the valley …and the antelope play …the plight of the valley …the spirit remains …and the antelope? …the valley home …first there was wind The piece begins with the sound of the warm desert wind and a lone tumbleweed blowing across the valley plain. The haunting sound of the Native American flute (portrayed by solo soprano recorder) breaks the silence and summons forth the Spirit World. …morning light The rays of the brilliant sun (represented in high woodwinds) break through the sky. …behold the valley The expanse of the Valley is depicted by a warm and lyrical Western chorale.


…and the antelope play: The hot open plains play host to the indigenous Pronghorn Antelope, which frolic freely across the valley floor to the sounds of a woodblock, slapstick, and timpani. …the plight of the valley The western expansion of the railroad (signified by the snare drum), and the arrival of the Spanish settlers (snare drum and trumpet fanfares), disrupt the natural serenity of the valley and herald the demise of the antelope and the Native American tribes of the Serrano, Kitanemuk, Kawaiisu, and Tatavian. …the spirit remains Throughout the vast change toward westernized civilization and industrialization, the Spirit World constantly remains, depicted by a reprise of the Native American flute theme, now played on solo piccolo. …and the antelope? Although the home to the Pronghorn Antelope and Native Americans has been changed forever, the valley will always hold their memory and be home to their spirit. …the valley home The beautiful expanse of the valley endures, with a grand reprise of the Western chorale. The piece concludes with the first complete statement of, “Oh give me a home,” played in the saxophones and clarinets and ends on the single note, “home,” on the flute and triangle. JOHN CARNAHAN

…and the antelope play is dedicated to the Antelope Valley Unified School District Honor Band. Read Dr. Keith W. Kinder’s analysis of …and the antelope play in Issue No. 4 of MBM Times, available December 2008 …and the antelope play is the Winner of the 2007 CBDNA Young Band Composition Competition


SUGGESTIONS FOR PERFORMANCE

If your band lacks a complement of four horn players, the F Horn 1 & 2 part can be performed as a single part by one player, and likewise the F Horn 3 & 4 part can be performed by one player. In those few places that the parts divide, the F Horn 1 & 2 player will play the top notes, and the F Horn 3 & 4 will play the bottom notes. (See mm. 79, 84–95, 138.) Measure 1: Vary the volume of the wind slowly yet dramatically to achieve the best effect. The snare drum with brushes should be subtle and repeat ad lib. to represent a tumbleweed rolling across the desert. Cymbal rolls and wooden wind chimes must be at pp and very distant in the texture. Measure 2: Solo soprano recorder should be very deliberate and rest between statements (2-3 seconds). Measure 8: Low brass must speak clearly through the texture as the first statement of the theme. Measure 13: Keep the tempo moving at Quarter-note = 78. Anything slower will cause the music to lose momentum. Clarinets must “dig in” in the low (chalumeau) register and project! Measure 30: Alto saxophone must make a definitive entrance on the sixteenth-note pickups. Measure 31–37: The accelerando must move ahead to reach the marked tempo at measure 37. The tendency will be to hold back. You must press the tempo forward through this section. Measure 37–46: Percussion must be dominant through these bars. Measure 46–63: Low brass, follow the articulations as marked. This influence is what produces forward momentum and style. Measure 79–95: All instruments must maintain good pulse and make definitive entrances. Measure 90: Mariachi Spanish trumpets must use very wide vibrato and the xylophone must be at a strong dynamic. Measure 95: Bassoon, bass clarinet, and baritone saxophone should take a good breath before the downbeat to ensure a sfz entrance. Measure 97: Piccolo, bassoon, bass clarinet, and baritone saxophone hold notes to make a clean release on count 6 of the measure.


Measure 106: Saxophones, play strong through the quarter note triplets. Measure 110: All instruments release to the sound of the bells on count 1. Measure 111: Alto saxophone and horns make a deďŹ nitive entrance on the sixteenthnote pick-ups. Measure 120: Horns will never be too loud! Measure 138: The major resolution of the piece! Measure 142: Begin the wind sounds softly then increase the intensity. Measure 143: Percussion must release exactly together on count 3. Measure 145: No vibrato on ute solo. Saxes and clarinets hold tied dotted half-notes strong to the release on count 2 of measure 147. Measure 150: Saxes and clarinets hold tied dotted half-notes strong to the release on count 1 of measure 152. Measure 160: Listen to the decaying sound of the last triangle strike to guide you to silence.... JOHN CARNAHAN


.


My Western Home Oh, give me a home, Where the Buffalo roam, And the Deer and the Antelope play; Where never is heard a discouraging word, And the sky is not clouded all day. from the original poem — by Dr. Brewster M. Higley, 1872 (by 1910 the song was known as Home on the Range)

More information about the origins of Home on the Range may be found online on the website of National Public Radio (NPR.org), at this URL, from an April 29, 2002 airing: http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/features/patc/homeontherange/index.html


dedicated to the Antelope Valley Unified School District Honor Band

…and the antelope play

John Carnahan

For Concert Band …first there was wind I — 15 sec.

…the spirit world

II — 10 sec.

III — 8 sec.

2

25 sec.

Piccolo

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

Solo Soprano Recorder slowly flat slide *

1 2

Flutes

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

* Slowly roll fingers over tone holes

1 2

Oboes

Using the syllable “shhh” represent wind at

to end of m.2 **

Using the syllable “shhh” represent wind at

to end of m.2 **

Using the syllable “shhh” represent wind at

to end of m.2 **

Using the syllable “shhh” represent wind at

to end of m.2 **

Using the syllable “shhh” represent wind at

to end of m.2 **

1 B Clarinets 2 3

B Bass Clarinet

1 2

Bassoons

E Alto Saxophones

1 2

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

B Tenor Saxophone

E Baritone Saxophone

I — 15 sec.

II — 10 sec.

III — 8 sec.

25 sec.

1 B Trumpets

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end of m.2 *

2 3

1 2 F Horns 3 4

1 2

Trombones

Bass Trombone

Euphonium

Tuba

Timpani

Snare Drum with brushes 1

Suspended Cymbal with soft mallets freely cresc. and decresc. ad lib.

repeat ad lib. (like tumbleweeds)

Percussion

slowly flat slide *

2

Wooden Wind Chimes freely ad lib. 3

* Each player independently of the others should vary the dynamic at will anywhere from ** The “shhh” sound is produced by breath (not by air through the instrument).

to

in imitation of the sound of wind.

Copyright © 2008 — Manhattan Beach Music — All Rights Reserved — Printed and Engraved in the U.S.A. ISBN 1-59913-098-X (complete set) ISBN 1-59913-099-8 (conductor’s score) Purchase music, download free MP3s, view scores, and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

slide *


‌morning light! 7

3

= 66

4

5

6

Picc.

div. Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

div.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

div.

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

= 66

st. mute

1

st. mute B Tpts.

2

st. mute 3

3

3

3

3

1 2 F Hns. 3 4

Tbns.

1 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

1

Triangle Perc.

2

Bells 3 3

2

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


10 9

slow greatly

11

8

12

Picc. 3 3

1 2

Fls.

3 3

1 2

Obs.

1

3

B Cls. 2 3

3

B Bass Cl.

unis. Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

3

3

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

slow greatly 1 3

B Tpts.

2 3 3

3 3

1 2 3

3

F Hns.

3

3

3 4 3

Tbns.

1 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

B.D. 1

Susp. Cym.

(Tri.) Perc.

2

(Bells) 3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3


…behold the valley 13 a tempo

= 78 14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

Picc.

unis. Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

unis.

1 B Cls. 2 3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

a tempo

= 78

1 B Tpts. 2 3

1 2 F Hns. 3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

(B.D.) 1

(Susp. Cym.) Perc.

2

3

4

22

23


24

31 moving ahead 25

26

27

28

29

30

32

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

soften

soften 1 B Cls.

soften 2 3

soften B Bass Cl.

soften 1 2

Bsns.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

soften E Bar. Sax.

soften

moving ahead

1 B Tpts.

open 2 3

1 2 F Hns.

soften 3 4

soften

1

soften Tbns. 2

soften Bass Tbn.

soften Euph.

soften Tuba

soften

louden

soften

louden

Timp.

(B.D.) 1

(Susp. Cym.) Perc.

2

3

5

3

3


accelerate

33

34

35

36

Picc.

1 2

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

3

3

louden

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

louden

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

louden

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

1 3

3

3

louden

B Cls.

3

3

2 3

louden

3

3

3

3

3

3

B Bass Cl.

1 2

Bsns.

1

louden

E Alto Sax. 2

louden B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

accelerate

open 3

1 3

3

3

3

louden

B Tpts. 3

3

3

3

3

2 3

louden 1 2

louden

F Hns. 3 4

louden Tbns.

1 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

1

Perc.

2

3

6

3

3

3


= → …and the antelope play 37

= 158

41 38

39

40

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

1 B Cls. 2 3

B Bass Cl.

1 2

Bsns.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

= → = 158

1 B Tpts. 2 3

1 2 F Hns. 3 4

Tbns.

1 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

gliss. Timp.

Snare Drum 1

Slapstick Perc.

2

Xylophone 3

7


46

42

43

44

45

47

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

1 B Cls. 2 3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

unis.

A–G

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

plunger 1 B Tpts.

plunger 2 3

1 2 F Hns. 3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

(S.D.) (S.D.) 1

Temple Blocks with hard rubber mallets Perc.

B.D. 3

3

3

2

(Xylo.)

gliss.

3

8


48

49

50

51

52

53

54

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

1 B Cls. 2 3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

3

3

3

3

1 B Tpts. 2 3

1 2 F Hns. 3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

3

Timp.

(B.D.) 1

Slapstick Perc.

Slap.

Susp. Cym.

2

(Xylo.) 3

9

Susp. Cym. with stick


55

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

Picc.

1 2

Fls.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

1 2

Obs.

1 B Cls. 2 3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts. 2 3

1 2 F Hns. 3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

3

Timp.

(B.D.) 1

Slap. Perc.

Susp. Cym. with mallets

Slap.

2

(Xylo.)

gliss.

3

10


65

63

69 66 67

68

64

Picc.

3

3 3

1 2

Fls.

3

3 3 3

3

3

1 2

Obs.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

1 B Cls. 2 3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

div.

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts. 2 3

1 2 F Hns. 3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

(B.D.) 1

Slap. Perc.

Susp. Cym.

2

(Xylo.)

gliss.

3

11

Slap.


73 70

74

72

71

Picc.

75

76

3

3 3

3

1 2

Fls.

3

3 3

3 3

3

3

3

1 2

Obs.

3

3

3

3

1 B Cls. 2 3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

3

1 B Tpts. 3

2 3

1 2 F Hns.

3

3

3

3

3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

3

Timp.

(B.D.) 1

Susp. Cym. with stick Perc.

Slap.

2

(Xylo.)

gliss.

3

12

Susp. Cym. with mallets

Slap.


‌the plight of the valley 79 Slightly less

78

= 152

77

80

Picc. 3

1 2

Fls.

3 3

1 2

Obs.

div. 1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

Slightly less

3

= 152

1 B Tpts.

3

2 3

div. 1 2 F Hns.

div. 3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

3

Timp.

S.D.

(B.D.) 1

(Slap.) Perc.

Susp. Cym. with stick

2

3

13

81


82

83

84

85

86

87

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

div.

1 B Cls. 2 3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2 3

B Tenor Sax. 3

E Bar. Sax. 3

fanfare!

3

3

1 3

3

fanfare! 3

B Tpts.

3

3

2 3

fanfare! 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

1 2 F Hns. 3

3 4 smear 1 6

Tbns.

6

1 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

3

Timp.

r.s. (S.D.) 1

Slap. Perc.

solo

(B.D.)

2

(Xylo.) 3

14

Crash Cym. l.v.


‌the spirit remains slow greatly and louden 95 solemnly slow = 52 88

89

90

91

92

93

94

96

97

solo

Picc. 3

div. 1 2

Fls.

3

1 2

Obs.

3

div.

unis.

3

1 3

B Cls.

div.

unis.

3

2 3 3 3

B Bass Cl.

unis.

div. 1 2

Bsns.

3

1 2

E Alto Sax.

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

div., soli with very wide Mariachi vibrato

slow greatly and louden

solemnly slow

= 52

1 B Tpts.

(div.) 2 3 3

1 2 F Hns. 3

3 4

div. Tbns.

1 2 3 3

Bass Tbn.

Euph. 3 3

Tuba

Timp.

r.s.

B.D.

(S.D.) 1

(B.D.) 3

Crash Cym. l.v. Perc.

Tri.

2

Susp. Cym. (Xylo.) 3

15

Bells with very thin triangle beaters


…and the antelope? 98

99

hold back 103 a tempo

100 101

102

= 64

104

105

106

107

Picc.

unis. 1 2

Fls.

3

unis.

3

1 2

Obs.

1 3

B Cls. 2 3

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

unis.

3

3

3

3

3

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

hold back

a tempo

= 64 solo

1 B Tpts. 2 3

unis. 1 2 F Hns.

unis. 3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

1

(Tri.) Perc.

Tri.

2

(Bells)

Wooden Wind Chimes (from Perc. 3)

3

16


hold back 108

109

112 a little faster with excitement

110

111

= 74

113

114

Picc.

div. Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2 3

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

1 2

Bsns.

1

louden

E Alto Sax. 2

louden B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

hold back

a little faster with excitement

3

= 74

1 B Tpts. 2 3

1 2

louden

F Hns. 3 4

louden 1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

S.D. 1

B.D. Perc.

2

(Bells)

with mallets

3

17


117 115

118

116

stretch 119

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

div.

1 B Cls. 2 3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

B Bass Cl.

louden 1 2

Bsns.

3

louden

1 E Alto Sax. 2 3

B Tenor Sax.

louden 3

E Bar. Sax.

louden

stretch 1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 2 F Hns. 3 4

1 3

Tbns.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

louden 2 3

louden Bass Tbn. 3

louden 3

Euph.

louden 3

Tuba

louden

Timp.

(S.D.) 1

(B.D.) louden Susp. Cym. Perc.

2

3

18


…the valley home 120 a tempo 121

122

123

124

125

126

127

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

1 B Cls. 2 3

B Bass Cl.

div. Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

unis.

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

…the valley home a tempo 1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 2 F Hns. 3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

(S.D.)

B.D.

(Susp. Cym.)

Susp. Cym.

1

Perc.

2

3

19


129

130

131

128 Picc.

3

3

3

3 7

unis. 1 2

Fls.

3

3

3

3 7

unis.

3

1 2

Obs.

3

7

3

1 3

3

3

3

7

B Cls. 2 3 3

3

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 2 F Hns. 3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

(B.D.) 1

(Susp. Cym.) Perc.

2

3

20

7


137 133 132

134

135

136

Picc.

138

139

7

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

7

unis.

div.

7

1 7

B Cls.

2 7

3 7

B Bass Cl.

1 2

Bsns.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

unis. div. 1 2 F Hns. 3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

(B.D.) 1

Crash Cym. l.v.

(Susp. Cym.) Perc.

2

3

21


140

141

142

144 Very slowly and free

143

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end

= 52

145

146

147

148

Picc.

All Flutes blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

Solo, with sorrow to end

1 2

Fls.

3

3

Using the syllable “shhh” represent wind at

to end

1 2

Obs.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Using the syllable “shhh” represent wind at

to end

1 2

Bsns.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

Very slowly and free Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end

= 52

1

B Tpts.

2

3

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end

Blow warm air through instrument ad lib.

to end

1 2 F Hns. 3 4

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Timp.

(B.D.) 1

Susp. Cym. Perc.

Triangle

2

3

22

3


155 149

150

151

152

153

154

156

Wind slowly disappears to end

157 158

159

160

Picc.

Wind slowly disappears to end 1 2

Fls.

3

3

3

to silence

3

Wind slowly disappears to end

to silence

1 2

Obs.

to silence 1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Wind slowly disappears to end 1 2

Bsns.

to silence

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

Wind slowly disappears to end

to silence

1 B Tpts.

Wind slowly disappears to end

to silence

2 3

Wind slowly disappears to end

to silence

1 2 F Hns.

Wind slowly disappears to end

to silence

3 4

Wind slowly disappears to end Tbns.

to silence

1 2

Wind slowly disappears to end

to silence

Bass Tbn.

Wind slowly disappears to end

to silence

Euph.

Wind slowly disappears to end Tuba

Timp.

(B.D.) 1

(Tri.) Perc.

2

3

23

to silence


PRESERVING OUR MUSIC I T I S I M P O R TA N T T O P R E S E R V E O U R M U S I C A L H E R I TA G E F O R F U T U R E G E N E R AT I O N S

Acidic paper has been in widespread use since the turn of the century, and has become the bane of archivists, librarians, and others who seek to preserve knowledge intact, because it literally will self-destruct as it ages. Some paper, only three or four decades old, already has become impossible to handle — so brittle it crumbles to the touch. Surely we do not want today’s music to be unavailable to those who will inhabit the future. If the music of the Renaissance had not been written on vellum it could never have been preserved and we would not have it today, some four hundred years later. Let us give the same consideration to the musicians in our future. It was with this thinking that Manhattan Beach Music in 1988 first addressed the needs of the archivist by printing all of its concert band music on acid-free paper that met the standards specified in the American National Standard for Information Sciences — Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials (ANSI Z39.48-1984). The standard was revised on October 26, 1992 to include coated papers; all of our new editions and reprints of older editions meet this revised standard. With proper care and under proper environmental conditions, this paper should last for at least several hundred years.

Technical notes: Paper permanence is related to several factors: The acidity or alkalinity (pH) of the paper is perhaps the most critical criterion. Archival paper (also known as acid-free paper, alkaline paper, and permanent paper) is acid-free, has a pH between 7.5 and 10, is tear resistant, has an alkaline reserve equivalent to 2% calcium carbonate (to neutralize any acid that might arise from natural aging of the paper or from environmental pollution), and contains no unbleached pulp or groundwood (no more than 1% lignin by weight). The specific standards summarized here are set forth in detail by the National Information Standards Organization in American National Standard Z39.48-1992. For more information, contact: NISO, 4733 Bethesda Avenue, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20814, http://www.niso.org/

This paper meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (Permanence of Paper)

BOB MARGOLIS — PUBLISHER N E I L R U D D Y — C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R COFOUNDERS P R I N T I N G : C H E R N AY P R I N T I N G , I N C .


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…and the antelope play

W inne r of the CBDNA Young Band Com p osi t ion Compet it ion

w w w. M a nh at ta n Be a c h M u sic . c o m

...And The Antelope Play for concert band by John Carnahan  

The complete conductor score of ...And The Antelope Play for concert band by John Carnahan