2021 Corporate Sustainability Report by Reimagine

Page 1

MÉTIS CROSSING CULTURAL GATHERING CENTRE

June 2021

Corporate Sustainability Report REIMAGINE.CA


Reimagine At a Glance: Edmonton

4

Bucharest

studios Calgary

Vancouver

1

3

Platinum

Certified

5

9 18 Gold

LEED Projects

Silver

50%

48%

of full-time staff are women

of design professionals are women

4/9 principals are women

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6%

First Nations and Métis team members


27

countries across the globe represented by our team

49

projects working with First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities

$49,303.05 contributed to charities (2015-2020)

5 babies per year for 5 years running

$120,000

100% We are committed to

of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)

pro-bono work contributed through our Blue Sky Award program

GREENSTONE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA BUILDING REIMAGINE ARCHITECTS LTD. | CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY REPORT • 3


Our Story

Reimagine’s journey began over thirty years ago, when Vivian Manasc and Richard Isaac started designing in the far north. Working with Indigenous communities engrained many values in the two young architects: how to use the power of the sun, how to bring people together and ask the best questions, and how to design with beauty, a sense of place and with respect for local culture. They learned to design buildings that improve our environment. Vivian and Richard brought these lessons together to form Manasc Isaac in 1997, quickly earning a reputation as a collective of sustainable design mavericks, launching the first Sustainable Building Symposium and championing the burgeoning third-party-certification system, LEED®. As our firm enters its third decade of pioneering, we transform into Reimagine. This new name reflects the growth of our leadership team, our increasingly global outlook, and most of all, the work that we do every day. Although our name has changed, we continue to draw on the strength of our partnerships, to design differently. To design better. To reimagine our world. THE MOSAIC CENTRE FOR CONSCIOUS COMMUNITY AND COMMERCE, LEED® PLATINUM

Driftpile Community School

1992

Alberta Urban Municipalities Association (First LEED® Certified Building in Alberta)

1996 1996

Yukon Visitor’s Reception Centre (Governor General’s Award in Architecture)

2003 2003

Banff Town Hall (First C-2000 Green Building in Alberta)

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Greenstone Government of Canada Building (First LEED® Gold Building in the Arctic)

City of Calgary Water Centre (LEED® Gold)

2005 2005

St. John Ambulance (First LEED® Silver in Alberta)

201 2008

Boreal Centre for Bird Conservation (LEED® Gold)

Athabas Universi ARC (LEED® G


M

PCL Building One

011

habasca versity ARC D® Gold)

MacEwan University Allard Hall

2015 2014

Hugh A. Bennett School (LEED® Gold)

2019 2018

The Mosaic Centre for Conscious Community and Commerce (First Net-Zero and LEED® Platinum Commercial Building in Alberta)

Northern Lakes College High Prairie

2020 2019

Red Deer College Student Residence (Canadian Wood Council Award)

2020 2020

Métis Crossing Cultural Gathering Centre (Prairie Wood Design Award)

Kehewin Community Education Centre K-12

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What’s The Big Idea?

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SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS FRAMEWORK Buildings provide shelter, the most basic of human needs - but they also extend into the aspirational realm. Architecture is a process that impacts, even transforms the world. The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals [SDGs] form an elegant framework that Reimagine applies to our process: a blueprint to build equity and prosperity, for people and the planet.

There are 7 Big Ideas that Reimagine holds close to our heart: ideas that ground our practice in our values. Across the following pages, we will map our Big Ideas to the United Nations SDGs.

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1.

Value Alignment Reimagine builds on the reputation Manasc Isaac earned. We design for good. We design for change. We create joyful journeys toward regenerative architecture. We believe that the practice of architecture can support all SDGs. Although our work directly contributes to certain Sustainable Development Goal outcomes in highly tangible ways, our ability to contribute to other SDGs manifests through our partnerships. Relationships are at the heart of our work. Our partnerships with our clients, the communities to which our projects belong, contractors and trades, and the relationships our team builds internally are critical to the success of our vision. Partnership isn’t an object, or a tool in our belt. It’s a verb. It’s a “do” word.

Creating ripple effects to improve the health of people, and the planet:

Our Blue Sky Award, founded in 2011, serves Albertan non-profits by offering pro-bono design work to kickstart an organization’s dream project. Over the years, we have partnered with diverse organizations ranging from an aquarium all the way to children’s sports initiatives. These contributions help change the world, not because of our reach as architects - but because of our clients’ reach! Other organizations that we have partnered with include the Edmonton Community Foundation, Boyle Street Community Services, SKILLS Society, and St. John Ambulance. By continually circling back to our values, from which we draw our 7 Big Ideas, Reimagine ensures that the tasks we undertake bring us closer to saving the world through architecture.

By aligning with clients whose ambitions serve to make the world a better place, we extend our impact well beyond the act of designing a building. 8 • REIMAGINE ARCHITECTS LTD. | CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


SKILLS Society, a Blue Sky Award Winner, used their award to map out a social innovation lab. This space can be booked by community organizations, and used as a problem-busting laboratory, offering various tools that facilitate smoother problem solving and discourse. We ended up borrowing some of these tools to use in our own office!

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THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY

n io

on

Con

r se

str uc t

U

Envisi

te Fabrica

The process of building generates a huge amount of waste. Spent materials, and embodied energy from buildings that we tear down and replace, are particularly wasteful. Reimagine supports a circular economy for the design and construction world: one in which waste fuels our future! Reimagining old buildings, and repurposing and upcycling materials from buildings that are torn down, are crucial components of our vision.

Architecture

De sig n

cli y c Re

ng

FROM TREE TO TABLE A micro example of this philosophy is located in our Edmonton studio. When a 65-year-old ash tree needed to be cut down to make space for one of our buildings, we decided to save it from becoming mulch. Working with a local carpenter, we transformed the tree into a beautiful table, large enough to seat our studio for staff meetings and events. Our values are engraved into the centre of the table, inspiring us to continually envision new life for old things! 10 • REIMAGINE ARCHITECTS LTD. | CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


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2.

inclusive, Quality Supporting equitable and Learning lifelong learning: Environments

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Today’s learning environments are evolving and their shape is changing daily as we begin to plan for post-pandemic realities. Gone are the days of rank-and-file classrooms, each lined with rigid rows of desks. Places for learning hold a special space in a community, and their role in shaping tomorrow’s thinkers and visionaries is a crucial one. Reimagine is passionate about designing learning environments that delight, inspire, accommodate and empower learners, teachers and the surrounding community. We are redefining learning as a collaborative activity - a place where learners come together in person or virtually to spark ideas and invite conversations. The new Escuela Mill Creek School for instance, articulates how our educational environments feel different from a typical school: it’s full of highly flexible spaces that are designed to meet the needs of students who learn in different ways. By offering varied, beautiful spaces, the school sets all students up for success. Natural light, fresh air, and a connection to the outdoors are cornerstones of our educational environments. Additionally, the school’s role in the community is enhanced in the new building, by celebrating Spanish culture and language, indoors and out. Recent designs for First Nations on-reserve community schools showcase the blend of spaces for intimate in-person learning and diverse virtual environments.

The new school at Kehewin First Nation creates opportunities for local craftspeople to participate in the design and construction while creating long-term learning environments that reflect the community’s unique language and culture. Similar approaches to the design of new schools at Frog Lake, Saddle Lake and Alexander showcase our exploration of learning spaces tailored to each place. We’ve also prepared for the practice of virtual learning. When we designed the Athabasca University Academic Research Centre, we worked with an organization ahead of it time, preparing for distance learning and a dispersed global faculty and student body, right here in northern Alberta. Since then we have created learning environments for trades training, academic and research settings. Working with a diverse cross-section of post-secondary institutions, we have shaped the spaces where the next generations chart our future. Our passion for education extends into our practice, as well. Continuing education is a priority for our team, and reimagine not only subsidizes staff’s educational endeavours, but provides time off to pursue them. Additionally, internal education, ranging from lunch and learns to workshops, are regularly scheduled to make sure that all of us remain informed and inspired.

QUEEN ELIZABETH HIGH SCHOOL ACTION LAB REIMAGINE ARCHITECTS LTD. | CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY REPORT • 13


HUGH A. BENNETT SCHOOL

ATHABASCA UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC RESEARCH CENTRE

AMISKWACIY ACADEMY

DR. ROBERTA BONDAR SCHOOL

RED DEER COLLEGE STUDENT RESIDENCE

RED DEER COLLEGE STUDENT RESIDENCE

QUEEN ELIZABETH HIGH SCHOOL ACTION LAB

RED DEER COLLEGE STUDENT RESIDENCE


LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS BY THE NUMBERS:

1

Over

45

Edmonton Urban Design Award

Design Charettes held with communities designing new schools, over the past two years!

LEED certified schools achieve

41.5% water use reduction compared to baseline

for Historic McKay Avenue School Playground

1

5

Early Learning Centre

School Evaluations

fully designed during the COVID-19 pandemic, with all engagement done over Zoom

88.5% of construction waste diverted from landfill for LEED certified schools in Calgary

completed largely by Zoom, with only one site visit for each

1

st

Alberta PostSecondary to achieve SSRIA funding for Green Building Innovation

LEED Certified schools achieve

55%

energy cost reduction over the NECB baseline

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3. Have you ever entered a building, or even a single room, and instantly felt better? Perhaps it was a beautiful ray of sunlight streaming through a window that boosted your mood, or a breath of fresh air that wafted in through an open window.

Reimagine designs buildings that make the people feel good, and improve occupant health. Spaces should be places of healing, and of delight. These are the types of spaces we create, both in our projects, and at home in our studio. We have long been known for designing buildings with windows that open! The buildings we design serve occupant health on four levels: physical, and mental, emotional and cultural or spiritual. On the physical side, we ensure that buildings get plenty of fresh air and sunshine, and materials are specified to eliminate off-gassing. To enhance mental health, we design for diversity, allowing people a variety of spaces to meet their changing needs. To support emotional health, we design using colors and textures best suited to the space,

Holistic Well-Being Creating buildings that promote physical and mental health:

and create safe spaces that are well-lit and accessible. To bolster cultural and spiritual health, we account for orientation and significant symbolism that appears in each culture, and ensure that our client engagement is thorough enough to create an alignment between design and culture. The COVID-19 pandemic has taught us how critical it is to design for health. We are increasingly aware that community spaces are for building culture, and that people need safe and effective spaces to gather both indoors and outside. We design spaces to facilitate safe gatherings, such as Red Deer College Residence, and the Métis Crossing Cultural Gathering Centre, where an exceptionally large deck even allowed for a wedding to take place in the summer of 2020: a time when most weddings had been cancelled.

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Third-party certification systems, such as the WELL and Fitwel standards, have developed to measure how well buildings support human well-being. We are currently expanding our expertise in this area, as we envision these standards will become increasingly important in design conversations on how to build in a post-pandemic world. We also recently secured the first Architectural Post-Doctoral Fellow through Mitacs, allowing our team to research the impact of COVID-19 on the design of learning environments. Additionally, we have been awarded a Mitacs Post-Doctoral Fellowship, allowing us to further research the post-pandemic design practices that will ensure healthy and resilient pandemic-proof spaces for the future.


90% of our building have operable windows, for natural ventilation

HEALTH BEGINS AT HOME Our studios are testbeds for the work we complete for others. Our commitment to holistic well-being is easily spotted in our office. At our Edmonton studio, we offer yoga twice a week, provide access to an in-house chef who prepares healthy food for the team, and make amenities to bolster health and well-being available to our team. These include a wellequipped bike storage and shower facility, a rooftop garden, a green wall and more!

In-House Chef

Green Transportation Policies Shower Facilities

Yoga Lunches

Fitness Subsidies REIIMAGINE OFFICE

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4.

Empowered Communities

Facilitating a sustainable future for communities:

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Our work serves our individual clients, and the larger community to which they belong. Reimagine’s holistic process pivots on community integration and buy-in, and we deeply value the relationships that develop along the timeline of our projects. Spaces don’t just belong to a community; they can help build community. One emerging trend that we’ve been tracking is the development of social innovation labs - spaces designed to facilitate creative, collaborative solutions to challenges that their users are working through. One such project is the SKILLS Society Action Lab. SKILLS Society, a 2015 Blue Sky Award Winner, wanted to use their prize to develop a social innovation facility. In designing the Action Lab, our team became well versed in new problem-solving techniques, many of which have been integrated into our other projects. Other social innovation spaces followed, including the University of Alberta’s TEC Edmonton Accelerator Space. Another significant community-focused cultural facility is MacEwan University’s new Allard Hall, with its theaters, visual and performing arts spaces, spaces for music and dance, and a social enterprise centre called the Roundhouse. This facility empowers students to create a sustainable and inspired future for our community through exhibition, cultural expression and engagement in the social enterprise ecosystem. We empower the communities we work in, through our process, too. Working with Indigenous communities, we build capacity, through partnerships with local artists, designers, engineers, trades, contractors, labourers, and suppliers. These partnerships are key to our most

successful projects. They serve as a tangible articulation of the value that a community should be accorded in the design and construction of a facility. They also build a sense of pride into the process, ensuring that the community values the building which they co-created, and that it is cherished for its long life. Community engagement helps communities change course while dealing with challenging questions. In 2019, the City of Lethbridge decided to tackle the question of whether an Indigenous Cultural Centre would be of value to the community. To address this question, Manasc Isaac embarked on a expansive community engagement process that culminated in a dynamic two-day conference, in the fall of 2019. This process distilled myriad community voices into a cohesive response to the question of the Indigenous Cultural Centre, and made a path forward for the development of this project.

KEHEWIN COMMUNITY EDUCATION CENTRE K-12

At home, Reimagine demonstrates our commitment to empowering community, by reducing inequalities in our own studio. Approximately 50% of our staff are women. Critically, this same percentage applies to our leadership: half of our principals are women, too! Over 50% of our team members are born outside of Canada, with almost every cultural background represented. Racial equity is of critical concern to reimagine. In 2020, the hard realities of racism blasted into public discourse, more widely than ever. Although our team has always been diverse, we acknowledge that we should always strive to do better. This will continue to be reflected in our office culture.

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Lethbridge Indigenous Cultural Centre

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CITY OF LETHBRIDGE

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ECONOMICAL DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM

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FOOD, HOSPITALITY & LOCAL BUSINESS

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LEGEND SURVEYS

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MANASC ISAA C Engaging. Architecture.

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Opokaa’sin Early Intervention Society

Acting Ch ief Crown Prosecutor , Lethbridge region

Recon ciliatio n Com mittee

03 / Reg ion 3

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Met is Lo cal 20

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WORKSHOP

REGIONAL INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES

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CONFERENCE PARTICIPATION

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SITE VISITS

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FOCUS GROUP

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INTERVIEW

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URBAN INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY SERVICES


• Broad public engagement (October 2019 City community engagement event noted above) • Online engagement: through Get Involved Lethbridge (noted above)

TOURISM CENTRES

• Urban Indigenous Engagement workshop (with individuals and / or agencies; or similar)

i inn pits ers piiy oth ma s to Kim dnes in k -

• Engagement with Blackfoot Confederacy Nations (Siksika, Kainai, Piikani)

Aa t - s simo pir y itu ika ali an ty

EMPOWER

ELDERS

INTERVIEW

Focus Groups: A significant focus of the engagement leading up

D AS -F

to the conference event in November will involve focus group FOCUS GROUP

k or tw Ne

SITE VISITS

CONFERENCE PARTICIPATION

indigenous audiences are also represented by a particular location which will form part of the engagement process. These site visits may involve interviews but will also seek to learn from the various places in and around Lethbridge.

MANASC ISAA C Engaging. Architecture.

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p Society i Friendshi

REGIONAL INDIGENOUS WORKSHOP Site Visits: Some stakeholders and indigenous audiences will be COMMUNITIES best engaged through actual site visits as these stakeholders and

ok Sik-Ooh-kot

h alt He al nt Me nd na tio

discussions. This will include groups who represent a cross section of a particular category of stakeholder or where having real-time feedback between various groups is deemed beneficial. These sessions will work as workshops where participants are active in the creation of the workshop outcomes from visioning sessions to idea generation sessions. This work will continue beyond the current engagement timeline and will extend into the governance model design and other activities.

Opokaa’sin Early Intervention Society

SURVEYS

Business Case and Governance Models: This stage of the process will come after the definition of the ICC is created and it is better understood what is to be governed and operated. Once this is in place and the final partners, stakeholders and indigenous audiences identified to be part of the ongoing operations of the Centre are identified, additional workshops will be conducted to design this governance model according to what the Centre needs and the community can provide. The City of Lethbridge, City Council is the ultimate decision making authority.

Acting Ch ief Crown Prosecutor , Lethbridge region

stakeholders and indigenous audiences; and who may need additional information to what can be determined through focus groups or other methods. Additionally, individual interviews will allow for stakeholders who do not naturally fall within a focus group or category to be engaged directly.

Recon ciliatio n Com mittee

LEGENDInterviews: Interviews will be conducted and recorded with partners,

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POST SECONDARY

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individuals to participate (see “Involve” section). for engagement (i.e. current City engagement) or to aggregate information from stakeholder and indigenous audiences. As the In 2020, the project was awarded by the Comsize of survey group increases, the questions will be more closed Design Criteria Workshops: The conference will be completed with (e.e Yes/No, Multiple Selection). For smaller groups, more openmonwealth Association Planners, fordesign Outworkshopsof for determining the facility and site selection criteria. ended questions will be used to gain more detail and nuance in their These may be open to thein full conference participant list but will at least standing Planning Achievement the Comresponses. A City of Lethbridge staff survey has begun concurrently involve key partners, stakeholders and indigenous audiences identified with the engagement planning with additional monwealth. surveys to be and already engaged through other means in the Consult section. designed for the community and other stakeholders.

Met is Lo cal 20

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Pii ka ni Na tio n

District

The consultation process resulted in a shared understanding of what role an Indigenous Cultural INVOLVE INFORM Centre might play in Lethbridge’s With an in the Conference Presentations: future. The conference, illustrated Various opportunities exist to inform the community of the plans OCT NOV TIME SEPT emphasis “Collaborate” section, will manyDEC of the partners, stakeholders and moving forward. These include announcements during reconciliation on alignment among allallow partners and indigenous audienaces to be involved in the discussions and to be a week, engagement planning meetings involving many of the City Council voted to accept the held in November to fundamental part of the agenda for a conference stakeholders and internal workshops. The ideastakeholders, of an Indigenous discuss the vision and possibility of creating the Indigenous Cultural Cultural Centre arose out of discussions within the communityof and the report findings and move forward to find a Centre. involved many stakeholders who are now part of this project. This site for and the project, and consider its location in fumeans that many of the key stakeholders are well informed COLLABORATE require less time to understand the project. ture budget discussions. The stage is set to move Conference: In November, we will be hosting a conference in Lethbridge THE CONSULT the project forwardinto develop a governance order to hear additional voices for the visioning of this Centre. This LAND is intended to allow many different organizations and Surveys: Surveys will be used primarily to establish baselines model for the new conference Indigenous Cultural Centre. Library

City Managers Office

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K-12 SCHOOLS

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Lethbridge School

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Engagement and Communications Planning Workshops

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Holy Spirit School Board

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HOSPITALITY & LOCAL BUSINESS

LETHBRIDGE INDIGENOUS CULTURAL CENTRE ENGAGEMENT PLAN l cia So

ARTS & CULTURE

wa nnaistoka Aoahka g comes in pairs - everythin (balance)

We will conduct a few preliminary interviews with members of the Committee, as we craft a process that is respectful and aligned with the land as well as with the people. The plan seeks to be aware of, and sensitive to Indigenous cultural protocols and will ensureYthat the engagement and the ou th sequence of conversations is respectful and humble. Engagement is being Ad visare seen to be largely conducted in alignment with Blackfoot values which or yC universal and applicable. ou nc Re il & al Yo Est ut ate Fa h cil &L i t He an ies Pla art dD nn of e i ve ng Ou lop rC me ity Co nt mm itte Tra nsp e ort atio The City of Lethbridge needed to explore the Hel n en Sch ule r Na three-pronged question of whether or not to ture Par k proceed in creating a space dedicated to IndigePub Park lic A s rt Co mm nous Culture, what that could that look like, and is place-based A workshop to confirm theUengagement plan is required so that we can get feedback on the draftspace plans. We recognize effective engagement ittee rban Rewith as well as virtual and we will work the best locations for gatherings and places ofcommunity. engagement. vitaliyour team to identify what role it might play in the Multiple zatio n creati Through the SMART StartReworkshop on & and subsequent discussions, the project has identified project stakeholders of many types. These stakeholders form Cuaddressed demographics, both Indigenous non-Indigelture various groups or categories which are in various forms through the engagement strategy. Following and the Spectrum of engagement provided by the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2), these stakeholders are addressed which meet the participation required for each stakeholder or nous, needed to bein forms integrated. group of stakeholders. These forms of participation include Inform, Consult, Collaborate, Involve and Empower. GALT Museu m ity un m m Co

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Engagement Plan As part of the draft Engagement Plan prepared by the consultant, the following are considered minimum requirements:

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Engagement Lethbridge Indigenous Cultural Centre

URBAN INDIGE COMMUNITY S


5.

ROOFTOP PV ARRAY AT EASTGATE OFFICES FOR ENVIRONMENT CANADA

Energy & Materials

Buildings and their construction account for 36% of global energy use annually, according to the United Nations Environment Program. As architects, we have an obligation to innovate design, construction and operational strategies to mitigate the vast quantities of energy that our industry consumes. Through our work, we have the power to help face climate change to ensure that our planet is capable of sustaining life for future generations.

Half of the equation has to do with reducing how much energy our buildings consume. Simple design strategies, such as passive heating and cooling, are able to cut down the amount of energy required to make our buildings comfortable. Because most of our buildings are situated in cold climates, we pay special consideration to envelopes: the material that wraps around our buildings to keep heat inside during winter, and out during summer. The better a building’s envelope, the less energy will need to be spent keeping it comfortable.

Innovating for sustainable consumption & production patterns:

The other half of the equation is about equipping our buildings to generate as much energy as possible, using sustainable technologies. As green energy technology evolves, reimagine seeks to apply this innovation to our buildings. Solar (PV) energy has become a signature feature in many of our projects; In 2005, on the Greenstone Government of Canada Building, we pioneered a building-integrated PV system, seamlessly integrated into the glazing in the curtainwall. Later projects, such as the Mosaic Centre for Conscious Community and Commerce, saw PV panels integrated into building facades, as cladding. Ultimately, we wish to see a built environment in which all buildings are net-zero (meaning, they consume only as much energy as they produce - or less!). Net-zero, and net-zero ready buildings are our future. We were proud to create Alberta’s first net-zero commercial building, the Mosaic Centre.

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As alternative energy becomes more prevalent, more post-secondary institutions are offering courses in this field. To date, we have designed two post-secondary Alternative Energy Technology Centres: one at Red Deer College, and one at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology.


REIMAGINE AT HOME In 2012, we installed PV panels as sunshades at our Edmonton studio. They help power our building while providing us shade as we work, proving that design thinking delivers elegant and functional results. We are currently seeking funding to re-lamp our entire building, using LED technology, to significantly reduce our energy use.

REIMAGINE EDMONTON OFFICE

NAIT ALTERNATIVE ENERGY CENTRE

RED DEER COLLEGE STUDENT RESIDENCE REIMAGINE ARCHITECTS LTD. | CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY REPORT • 23


6.

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTRE

Livable Cities

Our studios are situated in urban centres. Cities are our home. We are committed to making these concrete jungles more beautiful and livable, one project at a time.

Edmonton, Reimagine’s original point of origin, is a city that flourished in the 1970s. Concrete towers popped up throughout the core, painting a brutalist landscape that feels cold and unfriendly to the modern eye; many buildings weren’t designed to engage the public. The greenest building is the one that is already built, and as a result, our team has learned to spot hidden potential in existing spaces and to reimagine them. A great example is Vivian Manasc’s find of a vacant mechanical room atop a converted office building. Transforming an unused space into a vibrant penthouse, this space is a showcase of the opportunities hidden in plain sight. WSP Place is an excellent example of our approach toward existing buildings. Widely considered one of downtown Edmonton’s most unattractive buildings, the 1970s tower was given energy-efficient upgrades and a dramatic facelift. Replacing portions of the precast concrete cladding with glazing gave the

Nourishing the sustainability and resiliency of the urban environment, for all:

tower a modern feel, and crucially, the facelift also gave the tower significantly better energy performance and a new connection to its community. LED neon running along the building facade allows the tower to change colours to reflect current events, and communicate with its neighbourhood. Elsewhere, the Edmonton Community Foundation (ECF), has a new home, created by combining two older buildings only accessible via a downtown alley known as Slatter Way. Bridging heritage preservation, contemporary architecture, public art and landscaping in this easyto-miss alley, the ECF reimagine enlivens the core of the city. Nearby, the Historic McKay Avenue School Playground, was recognized with a 2019 Edmonton Urban Design Award. Respecting the context of the historic school building adjacent to the greenspace, this playground provides a vibrant community space for Edmonton’s young families in the densely populated core. Designing child-friendly cities is important to our vision of vibrant and livable cities. During times of challenge, cities and their resiliency are put to the test. Our

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team designs resilient facilities that work. The Emergency Operations Centre in Calgary keeps the city running through floods, pandemics and fires. Designing the new Emergency Operations Centre, located in the established Crescent Heights community in Calgary, required skillful community engagement and imaginative design. By situating the building underground, the facility serves well when needed, yet becomes a good, unobtrusive neighbour at other times. This Emergency Operations Centre has been recognized internationally as among the best in its class, for design and effective operations.


“Our new space is in demand by groups we had hoped would use it, as well as others who are just hearing about it. The building that Reimagine [Manasc Isaac] created for us enhances our ability to do our business in ways we hadn't even imagined. From the principals, throughout the team they assembled, their best people were brought to bear on our project - with outstanding results, on time and on budget, for us and for our community.“ Martin Garber Conrad, CEO Edmonton Community Foundation EDMONTON COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

HISTORIC MCKAY AVENUE SCHOOL PLAYGROUND

“The engagement process has been open, transparent, cooperative and extremely productive in allowing local residents to help shape the physical form and function of the new EOC, which will be reborn in a somewhat sensitive area of our community. I would also go as far as to suggest that other community engagement processes to which we have been a party in recent years have not been nearly as effective, nor as productive or satisfying, as the sessions that have brought the EOC project to the important stage it is now.” John McDermid President Crescent Heights Community Association

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7.

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA BOTANIC GARDEN VISITOR’S CENTRE

Light Footprint Architecture

Reimagine is a Canadian leader in sustainable design. We have earned this reputation across two decades of pioneering design and construction techniques that tread lightly on the earth. We are grateful to our Indigenous clients who taught us early in our firm’s history that for every action we take, we must consider its impact on the following seven generations.

Saying is easier than doing; it’s easy to say that sustainable design is important. But how do we measure our commitment to the practice? We were an early adopter of third-party certification systems, which set objective standards to measure how green a building is.

Supporting a healthy planet by living in harmony with our ecosystems: By following these standards, and encouraging our clients to allow us to seek certification on their behalf, we keep ourselves accountable, and help proliferate sustainable design practices across our industry. From designing Alberta’s first LEED-certified building in 2003, to achieving the province’s first commercial net-zero LEED Platinum building in 2017, and beyond, we continually raise the bar for light-footprint architecture and landscape design in Canada. Through our work, we commit to leave the planet more healthy than how we found it.

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Recently, we have: innovated envelopes Increasing the performance of existing buildings, via reimagined building envelopes

30% of our projects are reimagined existing buildings

WSP PLACE

clad with photovoltaic Integrating PV cladding into two public buildings to encourage alternative energy generation

75% of our buildings have heavy timber structures

RED DEER COLLEGE STUDENT RESIDENCE

chased net-zero Integrating net-zero ready design into a new post-secondary building

NORTHERN LAKES COLLEGE

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Edmonton

Calgary

Bucharest

10225 100 Avenue

200 - 1550 5th Street SW

Bulevardul Hristo Botev,

Edmonton, Alberta

Calgary, Alberta

1st Floor, Unit 1

T5J 0A1 Canada

T2R 1K3 Canada

Bucuresti 3rd District,

+1 780.429.3977

+1 403.460.4177

Romania 030237 +40 722.394.316

MÉTIS CROSSING CULTURAL GATHERING CENTRE