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Old Malvernian NEWSLETTER

I SS U E 41 – AP R IL 2 01 8


Get connected with

OM Connect

We recently launched OM Connect, the official networking platform for Malvern College alumni, and now have over 1200 members! You can sign up in less than two minutes by importing your LinkedIn or Facebook profile, or you can use your preferred email. This is a closed network, for those in the Malvernian Society, to provide career-mentoring and float ideas, to job-hunt or recruit, or simply to reconnect and arrange regional get-togethers of ‘likeminded’ groups. Within the platform, the OM Clubs each have a dedicated customised group, which enables club members to communicate, discuss and plan in a closed forum as well as uploading photos, adding events and posting updates. OM Connect is managed by the Malvernian Society office.

Visit us now at https://malverniansociety.global/ to get connected!

So many ways to stay in touch with us... facebook.com/malverniansociety/

linkedin.com/groups/144402

instagram.com/malverniansociety/

twitter.com/malsoc_malcol

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CONTENTS | From the Headmaster ..................................................................................................... | 04 From the Operations Director ..................................................................................... | 05 Events in 2018 .................................................................................................................... | 06 News and notices .............................................................................................................. | 07 OM contacts ........................................................................................................................ | 08 Development impact report Welcome from the Head of Development ............................................................... | George Sayer fellowship fund ....................................................................................... | Spotlight on Assisted Places ......................................................................................... | Annual Fund ........................................................................................................................ | Rogers Theatre ................................................................................................................... | Malvern around the globe .............................................................................................. | Legacies and the 1895 Association ............................................................................. | The Alan Lyall legacy ........................................................................................................ | Conversations ...................................................................................................................... | Donors .................................................................................................................................... |

10 11 12 14 15 16 17 17 18 19

OM Events in 2017 Class of 2007 reunion....................................................................................................... | Law networking event ..................................................................................................... | Downs Light Railway Trust ............................................................................................. | MiL March & June ............................................................................................................... | MiL October & December ............................................................................................... | Ellerslie reunion .................................................................................................................. | OM lecture: Escaping from Colditz ............................................................................. | The Quads ............................................................................................................................ | Guy Disney lecture ............................................................................................................ | Property networking. ....................................................................................................... | No. 2 reunion ....................................................................................................................... |

23 23 24 24 25 28 34 34 35 35 36

Featured OMs Cezar Rugasira (SH.11-16) ................................................................................................ | Rose Cameron (NĂŠe Webb-Carter) (6.97-02) ........................................................ | Tanya James (4.12-15) ....................................................................................................... | Rory Hopkinson (9.09-14) .............................................................................................. |

42 42 44 45

OM News ............................................................................................................................... | 46 OM Books ............................................................................................................................. | 54 Ellerslie News ..................................................................................................................... | 56 Ellerslie Obituaries ........................................................................................................... | 58 OM Obituaries .................................................................................................................... | 59 OM Sport Football Club 1st XI ........................................................................................................... | Cricket .................................................................................................................................... | Squash .................................................................................................................................... | Golfing Society ................................................................................................................... | Teams & Results .................................................................................................................. | Hockey ................................................................................................................................... | Rifle Club ............................................................................................................................... | The Malvern Swordsmen ................................................................................................. | Netball Club ......................................................................................................................... | Sailing Club .......................................................................................................................... |

70 71 72 73 75 77 78 80 81 82

The College year House Singing competition ........................................................................................... | Borneo service expedition ............................................................................................. | School Council .................................................................................................................... | The Ledbury Run ............................................................................................................... | Academic Report for 2016-17 ........................................................................................ | Sports Day Records .......................................................................................................... |

83 84 85 85 86 88

Annual Report & Statement of Accounts ................................................................ | 89 OM Merchandise ................................................................................................................ | 94 Cover photo by Robert Nolan (2.05-10)

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| WELCOME

| FROM THE HEADMASTER I trust that the pages which follow will be an indication to you that Malvern is a vibrant and, indeed, inspiring community of pupils and teachers who work in concert with each other in the academic, cultural, sporting and other co-curricular activities which are the hallmark of the school. This is a school in which each pupil is able to find his or her niche: as you would expect, the College has developed enormously over the years, reflecting simultaneous changes in society. The Malvern of today is a vibrant and forwardlooking 21st century school with many opportunities for young people. These range from a plethora of interesting lectures through to opportunities in relatively novel areas such as musical theatre or canoe polo. We have peer mentors who, after a rigorous induction are able to advise and counsel younger pupils in their House. There are Digital Leaders who are trained to support their fellows in the

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area of technology and to steer them away from harmful practices. We enjoy our environment to the full through mountain-biking and kayaking, and we are still able to retain and develop excellent standards in cultural activities, the CCF and our major sports We have introduced the Malvern Qualities as being worthy of special focus: the enduring characteristics of integrity, resilience, self-awareness, kindness, independence, appropriate risk-taking, collaboration, open-mindedness, curiosity, ambition and humility are increasingly important in the work in which young people are growing up. I believe Malvernians are confident, but not arrogant, and understand the importance of good manners. We talk often about courtesy and service to others less fortunate than ourselves. Principally through the generosity of Old Malvernians, parents and Friends of Malvern College, the infrastructure of

the College has developed significantly recently: the opening of the new stateof-the-art Sports Complex (2009), along with two new boarding houses (2009), the refurbishment of the rackets courts (2012), the remodelling of the science facilities (2015), and the laying of a water-based astroturf (2016) are all landmarks along the way to improving opportunities for our young people. The most recent project entails the extension and redevelopment of our theatre to provide much better facilities for drama. This is due to be completed in the autumn of 2018, and we have ambitions of further widening access to the school through the Malvernian Society Assisted Places scheme and significantly supporting development in the realm of music. Simultaneously we have developed the ‘Malvern brand’ internationally through the creation of schools in Qingdao, Chengdu, Cairo and Hong Kong. We are also set to move into Dubai in 2020 and to establish a school which will initially be focused on the younger years. All of this is not as easy as it may seem but, reflecting on these developments, two things are significant: firstly, a range of students throughout the world are benefiting from the establishment of our schools inasmuch as pupils from the Shandong province, for example, have made their way to Edinburgh, St Andrew’s, Bristol and other universities in the UK as well as to MIT, Columbia and McGill in North America and, secondly, Malvern College has benefited from the revenue which accrues to our school as the numbers grow in the international schools. The link between the Malvernian Society and the school remains extremely strong. The work of the Malvernian Society continues to help stimulate interest in and commitment to the alma mater on which the sun continues to shine. Antony Clark


WELCOME | | FROM THE OPERATIONS DIRECTOR I would like to start by thanking Syd Hill for his wonderful service to the Malvernian Society for the last nine years. His is a strong legacy of friendraising, established with aplomb and great good humour. If alumni relations are strong today, it is Syd we must thank. We have continued to build on his legacy, with regular informal gatherings in London. In October we hosted ‘Malvern in London’ at the May Fair hotel, and were pleased to note that some 120 OMs attended. Again, in December, at the London Capital Club, OMs gathered to hear carols from a small, hastily-convened OM choir, to feast on canapés, and to catch up in the run-up to Christmas. In October we held a Property Networking event, also at the London Capital Club. In November the Carlton Club was the venue for the Law Networking event. On page 6 you will find a schedule of OM events in 2018.

development of the Rogers Theatre, a project which is nearing completion as I write. The focus of our fundraising efforts in the coming years will be to ensure, by the provision of assisted places, that a Malvern College education is available to talented boys and girls who might otherwise not be able to come here. The Malvern College Assisted Places scheme was the key element in our 2017 Annual Fund, and it will be central to the work of the Society, as we look to build up our endowment fund. You may be aware that there have been changes to the regulation of charities in recent months. These changes culminate in the introduction of the GDPR in May

2018, and I want to assure you that Malvern College and the Malvernian Society have been carrying out reviews to ensure that we are compliant with requirements. It is now more important than ever that you let us know your communication preferences, so that we can continue to keep you informed of events, news and fundraising activities at the College. To let us know how you would like to be contacted by the Malvernian Society, please email malsoc@malcol.org, or feel free to call us on +44 (0)1684 581 517. Please also bear in mind that, if you are in the vicinity, you would be most welcome to call in at the office. I hope you find plenty to interest you in these pages. Paul Godsland

We have looked to improve our presence on social media over recent months. It is pleasing to note that, from a standing start, we have some 600 followers on Instagram, and that our following on Facebook is in the top five of similar schools. Of course, we depend largely on your contacting us with your news, so please do keep us informed. When I asked for OM news for this newsletter, I was inundated with replies, I am delighted to say. Keep the news coming in! We have launched a new careermentoring website, OM Connect. This will enable OMs to re-connect, and to network. It also offers us a platform to inform you about upcoming events, and for members of OM clubs to exchange information. Thank you to all the OMs who contribute financially to the College through the Society. In the ‘Development’ section of this edition you will discover how the College is benefiting from your philanthropy. In particular, you will read of the re-

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| EVENTS IN 2018 Date

Start

Event

Location

Tuesday 23 January

19:15

OM Lecture: James Aldred ‘The Man Who Climbs Trees’

Lewis Lecture Theatre, Malvern College

Friday 26 January

19:00 OMGS Annual Dinner

Dyers’ Hall

Thursday 1 March

19:00 Careers seminars (for the Hundred & Sixth Form)

Malvern College

Monday 5 March

14:00 Malvernian Society & OM Club Trustees’ meetings

London

Monday 5 March

18:00 Malvern in London

The Oriental Club

Saturday 10 March

14:00 OM sports fixtures v Malvern College

Malvern College

Tuesday 20 March

11:00

Malvern College

Tuesday 20 March

15:00 The Ledbury Run (note 3)

Malvern College

Friday 23 March

19:00 OMCC Annual Dinner

Lord’s Cricket Ground

tbc

18:00 Financial Services Networking Event

tbc

Monday 9 April - Thursday 12 April

The Ledbury Walk (note 2)

Malvernian Society visit to the Normandy Battlefields

Friday 20 April

19:00 OMFC Dinner (see note 1)

Cavalry & Guards Club

Saturday 28 April

10:30 Reunion for OMs leaving in 1968

Gryphon Room, Malvern College

Friday 11 May

19:00 OMGS: Spring Meeting

St George’s Hill GC

Friday 11 May

18:00 Malvern in Madrid

Hotel Orfila

Monday 14 May

17:30

All Bar One, Brindleyplace, Birmingham

Friday 25 May

15:00 Malvern College Sports Day (note 4)

Court Road Playing Fields

Saturday 26 May

9:00

Commemoration and Prize-giving (note 5)

Malvern Priory & Malvern College Sports Complex

Monday 4 June

14:30

Monet & Aerchitecture Exhibition

The National Gallery, London

Monday 4 June

17:30

Malvern in London

The Escapologist

Saturday 9 June

12:15

Reunion for OMs of No.6

College Chapel & the Gryphon Room

Saturday 16 June

9:00

Malvernian Society & OM Club Trustees’ meetings

The Studio, Malvern College

Saturday 16 June

10:30 Malvernian Society & OM Club AGMs

The Studio, Malvern College

Saturday 16 June

11:30

Governors’ AGM

The Studio, Malvern College

Saturday 16 June

12:30

Benefactors’ & Governors’ Lunch (note 6)

Gryphon Room, Malvern College

Sunday 17 June

11:00

OMCC v Old Alleynians CC (Cricketer Cup round 1)

Malvern College

Tuesday 19 June

19:00 Malvernian Society Lecture: Christo Brand

Lewis Lecture Theatre, Malvern College

Thursday 21 June

10:30 Royal Ascot (note 3)

Ascot Racecourse

Wednesday 27 June

Malvern in the Midlands

OMGS: Public Schools’ Meeting

Little Aston GC

Friday 29 June

21:00 Leavers’ Ball (class of 2008) (note 7)

Wednesday 4 July

19:00 OMAS: Hallé Orchestra at Cheltenham Music Festival (note 3) Cheltenham Town Hall

Friday 6 July

11:30

Monday 9 July - Friday 13 July Tuesday 10 July

17:30

Thursday 12 July

Malvern College

Morgan Motor Company factory tour & tea

MMC & Gryphon Room

OMCC Tour

Eastbourne

OM Classic Car Cocktail Party (note 3)

JD Classics, Mayfair

OMRC: Veterans’ Match

National Shooting Ground, Bisley

Saturday 1 September

19:00 OMGS Dinner

Formby GC

Sunday 2 September

9:00

OMGS: Northern Meeting

Formby GC

Friday 7 September

9:00

Ludlow Food Festival (note 7)

Ludlow Castle

Saturday 15 September

12:15

Reunion for OMs of No.9

College Chapel & the Gryphon Room

Friday 28 September

19:00 History Dinner

tbc

Sunday 30 September

9:00

National Shooting Ground, Bisley

Monday 1 October

18:00 Malvern in London

The Oriental Club

Monday 8 October

18:30

Property Networking Event

London Capital Club, London

OMSC: Arrow Trophy

Cowes

OM Lecture: ‘The Chindits’, Piers Storie-Pugh

Lewis Lecture Theatre, Malvern College

Law career-mentoring Panel

Malvern College

Friday 12- Sunday 14 October Tuesday 6 November

19:15

Friday 9 November

OMRC: Gryphon Cup

Saturday 10 November

14:00 OMRC: .22 Match

Malvern College

Saturday 10 November

15:00 Malvernian Society & OM Club Trustees’ meetings

Malvern College

Sunday 11 November

11:00

An Act of Remembrance

Malvern College

Monday 26 November

18:30

Law Networking Event

tbc

Tuesday 27 November

19:00 The Nutcracker’ Royal Ballet (note 7)

Friday 30 November

18:00 Malvern in Paris

Monday 3 December

18:00 Malvern in London: Ice-skating (note 3)

Somerset House

Wednesday 12 December

19:15

College Chapel

tbc Notes

Town Carol Service Malvern in Munich

1 By invitation 2 Please contact the Malvernian Society if you would like to walk the course in the morning, and have lunch at the College afterwards 3 Please contact the Malvernian Society if you would like to take part

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Birmingham Hippodrome

tbc 4 The medals are awarded from the Malvernian Society 5 All prizes are funded by the Malvernian Society 6 by invitation 7 Please contact the Malvernian Society if you would like to attend


NEWS AND NOTICES | | NEWS AND NOTICES Reunions

OMs of No.6 should have received an invitation to their House reunion on Saturday 9 June 2018. OMs of No.9 can expect soon to receive their invitation to a reunion on Saturday 15 September 2018. These are always splendid occasions, and made all the better if OMs contact their contemporaries to ‘make up a table.’ In addition, there will be a reunion for OMs of 1968 on Saturday 28 April 2019. Reunions are planned for No.3 in June 2019 and for No.5 in September 2019.

Leavers’ Ball on Friday 29 June 2018 at Malvern College OMs are welcome to attend the Leavers’ Ball on Friday 29 June 2018, but we are promoting the idea of a 10-year reunion (for 2008 leavers). Please note that this is a ticketed event. A limited number of tickets are available to OMs and their guests at a rate of £50 per person, excluding dinner. To apply for tickets, please contact the office (malsoc@malcol.org). The closing date for applications is Monday 4 June. Please note that tickets must be purchased in advance and will be issued on a first-come, first-served basis.

Notice of General Meetings

Saturday 16 June 2018 1 Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the Malvernian Society will be held on Saturday 16 June 2018 in the Studio at Malvern College at 10.30 am. 2

Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the OM Club will be held immediately following the above meeting.

3 Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the Governors of Malvern College will be held on Saturday 16 June 2018 in the Studio at Malvern College at 11.30 am.

Benefactors’ Lunch

Benefactors will receive individual invitations to lunch on Saturday 16 June 2018 in the Gryphon Room.

‘The Malvernian’ 2017

This year’s ‘Malvernian’ magazine is available online at https://issuu. com/malverncollege/docs/2598_-_ malvernian_2017-web If you would like to order a copy, please contact the Malvernian Society office.

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| OM CONTACTS CLUB Club Name

email

Arts Society

Paul Godsland

pg@malcol.org

Court Games Club

Philip Shaw-Hamilton

philipshawhamilton@gmail.com

Cricket Club

Mark Hardinges

meah@malcol.org

Football Club

Alex Richardson

alexander_richardson888@hotmail.com

Golfing Society

Richard Thompson

richardmedia@yahoo.com

Hockey Club (women’s)

Rebecca Raby-Smith

rebecca@raby-smith.com

Hockey Club (men’s)

Tom Saxton

tomsaxton92@gmail.com

Netball Club

Bella Stanforth

arabellastanforth@hotmail.com

Rifle Club

Andy Symonds

awsymonds@sky.com

Sailing Club

Robert Hammond

roberthammond@hotmail.com

Masonic Lodge

Nicholas Engert

nicholas@engert.co.uk

COUNTRY Country City

Name

email

Argentina

Anthony Lockwood

ajlockwood@valam.com.ar

Buenos Aires

Australia Brisbane Australia

Sydney

Peter Lyon-Mercado

plm@crescentcap.com.au

Canada

Montreal

Paul Warrington

marpaul@sympatico.ca

Canada

Toronto

Paul Warrington

marpaul@sympatico.ca

Canada Vancouver France

Paris

Anthony Upex

anthonyupex@yahoo.ca

Germany

Berlin

Max Hetzler

max.hetzler@hotmail.de

Germany

Hamburg

Christoph Stöcker

stoecker@MCFcorpfin.com

Germany

Munich

Erik Hameister

erik.hameister@gmx.de

Germany

Stuttgart

Johannes Bahlsen

johannes.bahlsen@gmail.com

India

New Delhi

Sumanjit Chaudhry

sumanjit_chaudhry@yahoo.co.in

Malaysia

Kuala Lumpur

Hashim Natt

hashim.natt@gmail.com

Malaysia

Kuala Lumpur

Ahmad Fauzi Ali

fauzi@mac.com

Portugal

Algarve

Luc St John Webb

lucsaintjohnwebb@hotmail.com

Singapore

Andy Fong

azfong@hotmail.com

South Africa

Cape Town

Simon Holland

hollandsimonpr@gmail.com

South Africa

Durban

Geoff Pullan

geoffpullan@iafrica.com

Spain

Madrid

Nigel Hack

nigel@madridandbeyond.com

Switzerland

Geneva

Hilda Neleskaite

hilda.beleskaite@ehl.ch

Thailand

Bangplee

Peter Bachner

bachnerassociates@hotmail.com

USA

East Coast

Chip Burke

chipburke@gmail.com

USA

West Coast

Tom Hardy

trhaia@sbcglobal.net

West Indies

Barbados

David Barnard

wdavidbarnard@gmail.com

UK

Bath

Jono Richardson

richardson.jono1998@gmail.com

UK

Birmingham

Hedley Horler

hedley.horler@btinternet.com

Italy

Bocconi

Angeliki Andreou

angeliki_98@hotmail.com

UK

Bristol

Tara Hollis

tararhollis00@gmail.com

UK

Cardiff

Hannah Priest

hannahpriest0699@talktalk.net

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OM CONTACTS | UNIVERSITY Country City

Name

email

UK

Coventry

Fran Tocher

ftocher@gmail.com

UK

Durham

Helen Cussans

hcussans20@googlemail.com

UK

Edinburgh

Rory Buchanan

r.buchanan1999@gmail.com

UK

Exeter

Flora Cripwell

floracripwell@gmail.com

UK

Exeter Fal

Tristan New

tristannew@ymail.com

UK

Leeds

Jessica Freeman

jessica@delacourfreeman.com

UK

Liverpool

Yasmin Cook

yazcook2@gmail.com

UK

London KCL

Christina Lusser

christinalusser@hotmail.com

UK

London LSE

Cezar Rugasira

rugasira_cezar@icloud.com

UK

London QMC

Flavia Maria Borgognone

flaviamaria.borgognone@gmail.com

UK

London UCL

Fiona Steiger

fiona.steiger@yahoo.co.uk

UK

London UCL

Niccolo Panizzardi

n.panizzardi@hotmail.com

Spain

Madrid

Oliver Devillard

oliverdevillard@gmail.com

UK

Manchester

Martha Doherty

martha-muffin@hotmail.co.uk

USA

New York

Sara Tazartes

saratazartes@gmail.com

UK

Nottingham

Tara Prasad

taraprasad98@gmail.com

UK

Oxford Brookes

Hebe Vosper-Brown

hebevosper.b@gmail.com

UK

Oxford Brookes

William Rose

williamrose154@gmail.com

UK

Reading

Francesca Garbi

garbifrancesca@gmail.com

UK

Royal Agr Uni

George Queen

georgequeen@mac.com

UK

St Andrews

Riku Yagi

riku75pancras@gmail.com

UK

Warwick

Ashok Manandhar

ashokn.manandhar@gmail.com

UK

York

Heather Macdonald

heather.macdonald14@gmail.com

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 9


| DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT | WELCOME FROM THE HEAD OF DEVELOPMENT It gives me great pleasure to introduce this section of the OM Newsletter, the Development Impact Report. In the last ten years, an impressive £10 million has been raised for a wide range of projects, which have enhanced the College’s facilities, widened access for pupils from lower income backgrounds and improved the pupil experience at Malvern. Key projects include the Sports Centre, new No.7 and EH boarding houses, the refurbished Rackets Courts, the Science Centre and most recently the refurbishment of the Rogers Theatre, not to mention many smaller projects. Importantly, philanthropy has enabled the expansion of the Malvern College Assisted Places scheme, increasing both the level of fee assistance available, and the number of pupils who receive financial support to attend Malvern. This scheme is central to Malvern’s ethos of providing a leading education to as wide a range of pupils as possible. You can read more about its impact in this section of the OM Newsletter.

Malvern is fortunate to have such a supportive and diverse donor community. We are grateful to the OMs, parents, grandparents and Friends of the College who choose to help the school by making gifts to support our fundraising initiatives. Gifts range from regular donations, through to cornerstone gifts, and the crucial impact of legacy giving. The chart below gives an idea of the type of support you have generously given. The impact of philanthropy is tangible to all who study and work at the College, and I would like to take a moment to highlight the ‘everyday’ aspects of Malvern that simply would not exist if it were not for the gifts we so gratefully receive from our generous donors. Malvern prides itself on its accessibility and the diversity of its pupil population: it is essential to our vision that we continue to offer fee assistance to deserving and talented pupils. Education is the gateway to children growing up to be the leading minds of tomorrow, and Malvern has a role to play in developing youngsters who will go on to be leaders.

10 year philanthropic income 10 year philanthropic income

Sport is thriving at Malvern; witness our Elite Performance Programme, Legacy which income provides enhanced holistic Legacy income Major Gifts coaching for pupils who show Regular Giving Major Gifts to the highest promise to advance Regular Giving levels in their sport. Of course, many £3,670,440 (41%) OMs have fond memories of sporting £4,162,070 glory from their schooldays, but (46%) £3,670,440 few will deny that the opportunities (41%) available to pupils today are far more £4,162,070 extensive; and many of these would (46%) not be possible, were it not for our excellent facilities, such as the Sports Complex, Rackets Courts, golf practice areas and outdoor pursuits facilities that OM philanthropy has funded. Legacy income

£1,157,860 £1,157,860 (13%) (13%)

hropic income

Major Gifts Regular Giving

70,440

41%)

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A strong co-curricular programme at Malvern adds value to academic education, encouraging pupils to

embrace new experiences across a broad spectrum of endeavours. The Malvernian Society has supported pupils in the pursuit of their ambitions, providing grants for activities such as charity work overseas and attending sports training camps. In this way, philanthropy is enabling pupils to reach their potential. You can watch a short film on the impact of giving at Malvern, from both the perspective of our donors, and from those who have benefited directly from philanthropy. The film can be found on the Malvernian Society website: https://www. malverniansociety.org.uk/. If you would like to learn more about our current fundraising projects, we would be delighted to hear from you. I would like to take the opportunity to thank our generous donor community for all that you have made possible here at Malvern College. Alexandra Albright


DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT | | GEORGE SAYER FELLOWSHIP FUND Many OMs will have fond memories of George Sayer, who was Head of English at Malvern from 1949 until his retirement. In life, George was firm friends with CS Lewis and JRR Tolkien, whom he met in his days at Oxford University, and they could often be found walking the Malvern Hills and at various establishments across the town. George went on to be CS Lewis’ official biographer, and is, in part, responsible for bringing The Lord of the Rings to the world, by encouraging Tolkien not to lose confidence in his work and continue looking for a publisher. In June 2017, the Malvern Civic Society chose to commemorate George’s contribution to literature and his literary friends, by placing a blue heritage plaque at his former Malvern home in Alexandra Road. Malvern College was delighted to be involved in the process, and OMs were invited to join friends and family on a sunny day in June for the unveiling. News of the Civic Society’s commemoration of George prompted OM Richard Wintour (SH.66-71) to generously establish the George Sayer Fellowship fund here at Malvern College. Richard was inspired by George, his English teacher, to go on to study English

at Cambridge University and to develop a passion for literature. Richard chose to make a gift to the Malvernian Society as a way of recognising the contribution George made to his time at Malvern, and to enhance the teaching of English at Malvern by creating new experiences for our pupils. I am pleased to say that this is a sentiment that is shared among the Malvernian community, with OMs making further contributions to the fund that Richard started. The inaugural recipient of the George Sayer Fellowship, announced in January 2018, is Professor Alister McGrath, the Andreos Idreos Professor of Science and Religion at Oxford University and an expert on CS Lewis. He visited the College on Thursday 8 March to deliver workshops with pupils across the year groups, followed by a public lecture in the evening. Dr Bradley Wells, Head of English at Malvern says: “One of the wonderful tangible benefits of this new perpetual Fellowship is that it will provide our pupils (and the wider Malvern Community) with access to some great minds, writers and thinkers

in the field of literature. I’m sure George Sayer would be chuffed knowing that, through the generosity of his grateful former pupils, a new generation of current Malvern pupils are being given a unique opportunity to enhance their joy of the literary world. “It has been a privilege to be involved in the foundation of the George Sayer Fellowship. After being asked in 2017 to help unveil the commemorative plaque at the former Malvern residence of George Sayer, I, like many others, have been inspired by the response and support from OMs and other George Sayer admirers to institute an ongoing living legacy to him and his legacy, and it is wonderful to see this come to fruition this year. “I am particularly excited that one of the unique and extremely beneficial aspects of this Fellowship is that it provides for a flexibility of opportunities each year to help forge new links between the College and the literary world beyond. It honours a past schoolmaster of great renown but it also serves the present generation of Malvernians. “And what more fitting inaugural recipient than Alister McGrath – the current world expert on both Sayer and Lewis.”

Dr Bradley Wells, Mrs Margaret Sayer, Prof Alister McGrath

If you would like to know more about the George Sayer Fellowship Fund, or are interested in making a gift, please contact us by telephone +44 (0)1684 581 654 or email development@malcol.org.

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 11


| DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT | SPOTLIGHT ON ASSISTED PLACES Each year bright and talented children who would thrive at Malvern College are unable to take up a place here for financial reasons. This is disappointing on so many counts. These pupils who have the potential to embrace the breadth of our academic and extra-curricular provision are denied this opportunity; and the College community misses out on the valuable contribution of a bright and committed young person.

| Since I left Malvern, I’ve been really proud to play first for Worcester and now for Yorkshire County Cricket Club. I’m living the dream of my childhood and I couldn’t have made it without Malvern College.

Assisted Place recipient Tom Köhler-Cadmore (5.09-13)

In recent years we have been steadily improving our provision of fee support through philanthropy, with an expansion of the Malvernian Society Assisted Places scheme. As ever, the OM community is proving generous in its support. In the coming academic year, the Malvernian Society will be supporting 10 pupils through the College, with generous levels of direct ‘sponsorship’ of pupils, enabling them to take maximum advantage of a Malvern College education, expanding their horizons, and helping them to reach their full potential. We are looking to increase this direct support year on year. Crucially, we are also setting up an endowment fund for future years with the ambition of preserving the Malvern College Assisted Places scheme in perpetuity.

| Malvern is always a part of you. The outstanding education, the wonderful facilities, and the inspirational role models make you what you are. In later life … it is very, very nice to give something back. Children are our future. Christopher Nieper (9.77-83) Donor

| Malvern College has

provided nothing but good memories for me... I would never have been able to achieve such results if it weren’t for the academic brilliance of the College and for that, I am thoroughly grateful. Assisted Place recipient Katy Munro (9.77-83)

12 | Old Malvernian Newsletter


DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT | | As a member of staff at Malvern College for the best part of forty years, I can say that Malvern has enriched my life and the lives of countless others. This is why I have decided to leave a gift to the Malvernian Society in my will to support Assisted Places and bursaries. I would like to help make a Malvern education accessible to as many talented youngsters as possible. Martin Frayn member of 1895 Association

| If I ever saw the

people who donated [to the Assisted Places scheme] I would want to say how thankful I am and let them know that their money was put to good use. They funded my future. Assisted Place recipient Freya Delingpole (4.14-16)

| The children who I see come

into the school on an Assisted Place really seize the opportunity to make the most of that. They understand how lucky they are, they understand the commitment their parents have made, but they also understand the commitment the donors have made to enable them to come to school in the first place. G Vosper-Brown Registrar Malvern College

| [Benefactors

| Being able to attend Malvern, even for

just two years, has given me opportunities I wouldn’t ever have thought of before. Assisted Place recipient James Scott (7.15-17)

to the Assisted Places scheme] have provided an opportunity to our son to have an education that is unparalleled. Without them, his life chances would have been severely diminished. Parent of Assisted Place recipient

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 13


| DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT

like myself, and to hear about what Malvern was like in the past. Learning about Malvern’s history from past students was fascinating, their stories from their time here were simultaneously surprising and heart-warming. More heartwarming still was the extraordinary generosity shown by so many OMs as they committed to donating to our Annual Fund. All their donations, no matter the size, contributed to smashing our fundraising target. On behalf of the school, my fellow fundraisers, and the students who will benefit from the fund, I would like to sincerely thank every OM who took the time to talk to us, especially those who were able to make a gift.”

| ANNUAL FUND Yesterday’s pupils supporting today’s We would like to say a big thank you to all those who took part in our fourth ‘Annual Fund’ calling campaign in August 2017. Over the course of two weeks, 13 recent leavers spoke to over 560 OMs, enjoying the opportunity to share the College’s latest news, hear about OMs’ experiences at Malvern and beyond, and, of course, to ask OMs to make a regular gift in support of the many important fundraising projects at the College. Projects included the Malvern College Assisted Places scheme,

14 | Old Malvernian Newsletter

the increasingly popular outdoor pursuits programme, interactive whiteboards to enable flexible teaching methods, and an expansion of the Sixth Form Common Room. An impressive £90,000 in gifts and pledges was raised, and we are very grateful to everyone who chose to commit to this initiative. Emma Tudor (EH.14-16) recalls: “In the summer of 2017, I was a member of a team of 13 recent leavers who were fundraising in a telephone campaign for Malvern College’s Annual Fund. This was a fantastic experience as it allowed me to reconnect with recent leavers

Regular gifts are very important in helping the College to plan for the future. By grouping together regular commitments such as Direct Debit and Standing Order gifts, the College is able to support projects including the Malvern College Assisted Places scheme, providing significant fee assistance to enable children from all backgrounds to attend Malvern. Since its inception, Malvern’s Annual Fund has raised some £400,000 for causes that have an immediate impact on the pupil experience. We are grateful to all of the OMs who take part in our calling campaigns, and particularly so to those who pledge their support. Thank you.


DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT |

| ROGERS THEATRE The refurbishment of the Rogers Theatre is underway and we are very excited about the prospects for Drama in particular and the College in general once the building has been completed. Our more senior Old Malvernians will remember this space as the gym, built in 1903, and in those days our theatrical productions were performed at the Festival Theatre in town. In 1983 it was converted into a space for Drama and named the Rogers Theatre in honour of the then Headmaster, Martin Rogers. Fastforward 35 years and the theatre is being overhauled and properly equipped for the 21st century. There will be a brand-new foyer extension to provide hospitality facilities and a flexible teaching and exhibition space. The auditorium will provide opportunities for

of finish than might otherwise have been possible. multiple staging and seating layouts, giving pupils greater freedom to plan their own productions; and budding theatre technicians will be inspired by state-of-the-art sound and lighting equipment, operated from a new technical control panel. Together with a new balcony, new seating, better sightlines and acoustics, the audience experience will also be greatly improved. This is yet another project that is hallmarked with the generosity of the whole Malvern College community, including parents and OMs, and it is evidence that the value of a Malvern education has stood the test of time. We are very grateful for all the gifts we have received to date, either as a contribution to the major refurbishment, or to name a seat in the auditorium. They will help us to achieve a greater degree of modernisation and a higher quality

Our fundraising campaign for the Rogers Theatre is still in full swing. If you would like to help in other ways, please contact Alexandra Albright on ara@malcol.org or +44(0) 1684 781607 to discuss how you can be a part of this story.

Parent, Paul Salnikow, said: “I have chosen to support this refurbishment because I think the art of performance and presentation is important to us all in later life, and the Rogers Theatre is a wonderful place for learning these skills at Malvern. Most importantly, the pupils are going to really enjoy having the facility to be more adventurous with their productions, both on stage and behind the scenes.�

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 15


| DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT | MALVERN AROUND THE GLOBE One fifth of Old Malvernians live or work outside the UK, and staying in contact with them has, of course, become so much easier. However, meeting face-to-face remains key to good relationships, and our Headmaster, Antony Clark, is always keen to meet OMs and Ellerslie Old Girls when he travels abroad, as well as current, past and prospective parents. In 2016-17 he caught up with our friends in Hamburg, Frankfurt, Munich, Milan, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, and Belgium. When asked what he enjoys most about these gatherings, he will talk about the anecdotes and individual stories about Malvern College that people tell him. “I am always delighted by the obvious affection that people continue to feel for the College. When our pupils leave here at 18, they take with them their qualifications, their friendships, their memories of fun and exciting experiences. The passage of time allows us all to appreciate things differently, and people in later life talk about the broader experiences from their time at the College that have stood them in good stead over the years. It gives me great pleasure to witness professional and personal fulfilment that has been achieved

16 | Old Malvernian Newsletter

with the knowledge and skills learnt during their school years.� These visits are also about the future of the College. They allow us to talk to OMs, to listen to their thoughts and understand their views. It is important that we bring these ideas back to Malvern and incorporate them into our planning and strategy for the future. It is this breadth of vision that will continue to inform our strategic direction and feed our ambition for the future. We are planning a similar schedule of events for 2018. Please contact us on development@malcol.org for more information.


DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT | | LEGACIES AND THE 1895 ASSOCIATION There are many reasons why you might choose to leave a legacy in support of Malvern College: whether in gratitude for your time at the College, to honour the memory of a special teacher or loved one, or to promote outstanding academic provision for future generations. The 1895 Association has been established to acknowledge indeed, to thank - all those who have chosen to tell us more about their legacy planning. Once we have an idea of your intentions, we are able

to plan to make best use of your legacy and respect your particular wishes (including, of course, the purpose for which the legacy might be used, or whether it should remain anonymous). In September, the Headmaster will be hosting the inaugural 1895 Association event and we look forward to seeing as many members there as possible. Please contact Alexandra Albright for further information on ara@ malcol.org or +44(0) 1684 581607.

| THE ALAN LYALL LEGACY At Malvern he famously plotted with Robin Burnett (SH.46-51), who also died this year, a new and quicker route back from Ledbury for SH to win the House Competition in 1951. As an adult, the mountains proved to be his great love.

Alan Lyall’s (SH.46-51) passion was ‘the great outdoors.’ A Cambridge graduate who went on to a career as a solicitor, it was mountaineering that he loved. He climbed the Matterhorn in Switzerland in 1962 and Mount Snowdon over 500 times, retiring to Snowdonia where he wrote many books on the subject of mountaineering.

of our minds. A large proportion of his gift will therefore go into an endowment fund to support the Malvern College’s Assisted Places scheme, currently one of our top priorities. We will also set aside £250,000 for the Rogers Theatre refurbishment. We are confident that Alan would have been happy to see the way in which the College will benefit from his generosity, and we are immensely grateful to Alan for his transformative support.

When Alan had let us know that he would be leaving all or part of his estate to the Malvernian Society, we were, naturally, grateful to have the opportunity to thank him and we were pleased to welcome Alan to the College on several occasions, to discuss how his legacy might enrich the lives of current Malvernians. Alan’s gift has been the most significant legacy given to the Malvernian Society to date. It clearly has the potential to be of huge benefit to pupils in the years to come; we intend to steward this legacy with care and with Alan’s own wishes always at the forefront

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 17


| DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT | CONVERSATIONS Sometimes our connections with OMs lead us in unexpected directions... We have struck up a helpful relationship with the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families. This has come about thanks to an OM, Dominic Shorthouse, who is a trustee of the charity. The Centre has been pioneering mental healthcare for over 60 years and has been in the news recently thanks to the high-profile involvement of the Duchess of Cambridge. Their ‘Schools in Mind’ programme offers a wealth of useful research and advice, and Tom Newman, the College’s Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead, has been tapping into this

resource. We are delighted that one of their tutors will be coming to Malvern College to talk to parents and pupils later on in the year. Lewis Faulkner, Deputy Head Pastoral, is charged with making sure that our provision for the emotional wellbeing of our pupils and staff is as considered and measured as our academic programme. The pressures on young people today are widely reported in the media, so it is good to know that the College’s pastoral strategy focuses on addressing these pressures, tackling the causes, and making sure that our pupils are as well-equipped and supported as possible as they go through the school.

| BENEFACTORS’ LUNCH It was a pleasure to welcome our benefactors to drinks and lunch in the Gryphon Room on a sunny day in June. We were delighted that so many people could join the Headmaster, Antony Clark, and the chairman of the College Council, Robin Black,

18 | Old Malvernian Newsletter

at the 2017 Benefactors’ Lunch. This is always a lovely occasion and the College is grateful to have the opportunity to thank our many supporters in person. The Chapel Prefects represented the pupil body and were able to circulate with our guests and give them a flavour of the College today.


DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT | Donors and Legators 2017

M C Behrend

SH

1978

N S Bradford

1

1978

T W Pellew

SH

1938

C M Blucke

SH

1979

P Toomey

1

1978

G H Naylor

SH

1942

R W Percival

SH

1979

S M Johnstone

1

1978

M J S Kirkham

SH

1943

G H H Smith

SH

1980

W H Morris

1

1980

J A H Porch

SH

1944

R Y Hartshorne

SH

1981

P D Chopra

1

1983

J E Rowsell

SH

1945

S J Ward

SH

1981

A E Rissbrook

1

1985

N G Coates

SH

1945

A C S Wood

SH

1982

C J Sharp

1

1985

J S Garlick

SH

1947

R Ellcock

SH

1982

R D J Brinkman

1

1987

A W Dennis

SH

1949

S D R Griffin

SH

1982

E J Middleton

1

1993

A T L Lyall

SH

1951

J F Threshie

SH

1983

A J Sweetman

1

1994

I N Smith

SH

1951

J P M Bowtell

SH

1986

W A Middleton

1

1996

M Elder

SH

1951

A P Temperton

SH

1987

L S E Gamble

1

2000

A W D Sankey

SH

1952

R E B Clayton

SH

1991

C K Delingpole

1

2001

D M Whiteford

SH

1952

M G John

SH

1997

H Latham

1

2002

Lt Col P H Courtenay

SH

1952

F A N Lisk

SH

1998

C B B Middelmann

1

2005

T R Prifti

SH

1952

M H Body

SH

2005

D C Pilcher

1

2006

S W Twyman

SH

1953

R J Harris

SH

2014

F Liebelt

1

2015

R F Barton

SH

1954

S R Thurlow

SH

2017

J Brundrit

2

1949

C R L Bland

SH

1955

M M L Sutcliffe

1

1949

J M Jones

2

1950

G A Ensor

SH

1955

R J G Jones

1

1951

T C E Congdon

2

1950

H G Westmacott

SH

1955

A F Gee

1

1952

R W Stuchbery

2

1951

J E Taverner

SH

1955

I G Elliott

1

1952

G Cuttle

2

1952

J W Gartside

SH

1955

J R Griffiths

1

1952

C J W Haines

2

1954

T J Hickman

SH

1955

P Gibson

1

1952

A W Beeson

2

1955

D Knill-Jones

SH

1956

R Hughes Sr

1

1954

R A Berkley

2

1955

D L Hughes

SH

1956

G G Rollason

1

1955

J M Davies

2

1957

M A B Kirk

SH

1956

J L Smith

1

1955

N C Farebrother

2

1958

N J H Morris

SH

1956

M J Davison

1

1955

J D L Holdaway

2

1960

D J W Teasdale

SH

1958

R Crawley

1

1955

P Bowen-Simpkins

2

1960

R D Holl

SH

1958

G T Prance

1

1956

S L Preedy

2

1960

R D Milnes

SH

1958

R C F Newton

1

1956

S G Danks

2

1961

G K A Zimmerli

SH

1959

R Haley

1

1956

P & J Cartwright

2

1962

A R Pirie

SH

1960

D P Davies

1

1957

W I Burgess

2

1963

H E Wardle

SH

1960

A C E Maynard

1

1958

Rupert Mann

2

1964

R H H Cordy

SH

1960

A E Manning

1

1958

T A R Curran

2

1964

R P Lewis

SH

1960

P J Salter

1

1958

G P Shirville

2

1966

J C Thorne

SH

1961

G D Crosthwaite

1

1959

C B Le Bas

2

1967

J W Holl

SH

1961

T S R Mort

1

1959

H R A Fleming

2

1967

M S Davidson

SH

1961

D J Widgery

1

1960

T G Kieft

2

1968

R H S Bellhouse

SH

1961

C N W Haig-Prothero

1

1961

A R Higgins

2

1970

S A Knill-Jones

SH

1961

G W Batchelor

1

1961

E V Tyack

2

1971

S R Lawrence

SH

1961

R B W Beale

1

1961

J R T Holland

2

1971

C G G Born

SH

1962

A C Hamilton

1

1962

L W Axel-Berg

2

1972

P A Bond

SH

1962

R D Field

1

1962

N D Kieft

2

1972

P L W Morgan

SH

1962

J R Dent

1

1963

R H Caudwell

2

1973

E A W Peel

SH

1964

M R Ogden

1

1964

S L M Charrington

2

1974

R W Everall

SH

1964

R P F Makin

1

1964

C J Titcomb

2

1976

G R Brutton

SH

1967

J S J Craig

1

1965

M M Ware

2

1976

N C Dee

SH

1967

R F Hall-Jones

1

1965

A M Coleman

2

1981

J B M Winter

SH

1968

G B Sinclair

1

1966

J G Miller

2

1988

J P R Hunt

SH

1969

J F E West

1

1966

P S Gandhi

2

1991

J W G Perry

SH

1969

J R Lines

1

1967

R R A May-Hill

2

1991

R D John

SH

1969

C S Keeling-Roberts

1

1968

M A Schouten

2

2007

N B Tyler

SH

1970

J R O David

1

1968

P A Titchmarsh

3

1945

M A H Hannaford

SH

1971

L P C Taylor

1

1969

J K M Phillips

3

1948

R D Wintour

SH

1971

N G H Draffan

1

1969

S E Grant

3

1948

J K Retallack

SH

1974

C M Wynn

1

1973

N H Leadsom

3

1949

S R Hopkins

SH

1974

P J Everett

1

1973

P L R Paxman

3

1949

P J Draper

SH

1975

S L Palmer

1

1974

A G A Pepper

3

1950

R T Coates

SH

1975

A W M Fergusson

1

1975

N R Steele Mortimer

3

1953

R C Beverley

SH

1977

T R Heatley

1

1975

S B Simpson

3

1953

S M Richardson

SH

1977

C B Davis

1

1976

D G Knott

3

1954

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 19


| DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT D P R Brass

3

1954

D H M J Steavenson

4

1953

M J Bridge

5

1957

J G Morris

3

1955

D S Morgan

4

1953

H J Bailey

5

1958

P W King

3

1956

G Farrer-Brown

4

1953

M J Theobald

5

1958

A B Taylor

3

1957

T H Thompson

4

1953

C J A Gallimore

5

1959

G B Standring

3

1957

R S Viner

4

1954

D M Dent

5

1959

K E Britton

3

1957

D Smeeton

4

1955

G J Mitchell

5

1959

A P Tudor Miles

3

1959

J R Jakobi

4

1955

J M G Hamilton-Sharp

5

1961

J B McBroom

3

1959

P E Hughes

4

1955

J W I Bridle

5

1961

M J Panter

3

1959

E R Greey

4

1957

P M Jones-Davies

5

1961

P J Green

3

1959

S Morley

4

1957

J J H Holdsworth

5

1964

P J P Daniell

3

1960

J M M Bassett

4

1958

C T Hebden

5

1965

R T Andrews

3

1960

J O Cash

4

1958

D L MacNicoll

5

1965

J B Cooke

3

1961

F M Southern

4

1959

R Rattansi

5

1966

M S Driver

3

1961

J P M Cook

4

1960

R T H Wilson

5

1966

R W Henman

3

1961

C R F Chadder

4

1961

B A C Chivers

5

1967

T D W Gracey

3

1961

M C Mason

4

1962

J A Swift

5

1967

B A Richardson

3

1962

P D Walsh

4

1962

T J Forrester

5

1967

T M P C Begg

3

1962

C H Tuckwell

4

1964

J P Foxall

5

1968

H R A Anderson

3

1963

G W B Bomford

4

1964

C C Halliwell

5

1970

D E P Mashiter

3

1964

N H H John

4

1964

D I Wright

5

1971

S P Roberts

3

1964

P S Robinson

4

1964

M R Byers

5

1971

C M F Pidgeon

3

1965

T H S Rawstron

4

1964

N J G Hayes

5

1973

E J T Huntington

3

1965

A J Ridgway

4

1965

A M Houghton

5

1974

R J Stork

3

1965

J S R Edge

4

1965

P J Bridge

5

1974

B M F Jacomb

3

1966

R C B Wade

4

1965

T J P Burroughs

5

1977

C B Cohen

3

1966

B B Waugh

4

1968

C A L Hayward

5

1978

A K R Jacomb

3

1968

M P Robinson

4

1968

S J A Morris

5

1979

D B Dale

3

1968

R C B Smith

4

1968

A G F Philip

5

1981

C L A Edginton

3

1969

A M Oliver

4

1969

J D H Hayward

5

1981

D J Wheeler

3

1969

P H Edge

4

1969

W E Bower

5

1982

M D Kettle

3

1970

A C Buckoke

4

1970

A W Symonds

5

1983

P N Shaw-Hamilton

3

1970

G S E Carter

4

1971

M J Ansley-Young

5

1984

W J Perry

3

1970

P L Welch

4

1975

N R C MacLaurin

5

1984

P M Desmond

3

1972

N H Redfearn

4

1976

R M Young

5

1985

T D Straker

3

1972

N P Viner

4

1979

C R Hutton

5

1991

P M Steele Mortimer

3

1974

C R Milton

4

1980

J A P Hamilton

5

1998

G N J Mills

3

1976

S D Rowan

4

1980

J A Smith

5

1998

D G Darby

3

1978

M A H Fearnall

4

1981

G M D Price

5

2003

M J Newey

3

1978

T C J Tarplett

4

1982

C D Aldous

5

2007

A Y-D Cheng

3

1979

P J Horne

4

1983

P H Walker

6

1940

T J A R Coughtrie

3

1979

J M Davey

4

1984

D G W Barham

6

1944

K A Stevenson

3

1984

J Morley

4

1985

J E Capito

6

1950

J H R Hadley

3

1990

S D T Froggatt

4

1985

C Hudson

6

1951

D G Arnold

3

1994

N R Hack

4

1987

D I Shearer

6

1951

E Ellwood-Russell

3

1997

J R Wileman

4

1988

A P Firth

6

1952

R M MacCallum

3

2003

L C Parkinson Gadd

4

1993

B C Jones

6

1952

S E Gallie

3

2004

C L Rousseau

4

1995

P T Hunnisett

6

1952

O S Radchenko

3

2005

L J Aldridge

4

1995

A M Bowman

6

1953

M E Bourcier

4

1943

S L-A Godwin

4

1999

B L Davis

6

1953

R K Murray

4

1944

E M De Jager

4

2003

R M Berry

6

1953

A R Henderson

4

1946

W W H Foyn

5

1942

R Newton

6

1953

A M Brough

4

1947

K W Mayne

5

1945

R Shearer

6

1953

J F K Hinde

4

1947

C P G Wodeman

5

1946

R W Hartman

6

1953

C D C Willy

4

1948

J M Watson

5

1946

M D Stone

6

1954

A Newell

4

1949

J S V Davy

5

1948

R H E Russell

6

1954

M Lock

4

1950

P D Spence-Thomas

5

1952

A C M Prince

6

1955

T P Slessor

4

1950

J E R Robertson

5

1953

T S Charrington

6

1955

B O Jolliffe

4

1951

J L C Young

5

1953

D J Steinberg

6

1956

M Caulfield-Giles

4

1951

B W Deller

5

1956

R C Hickman

6

1956

M W Le Ray

4

1951

I C MacLaurin

5

1956

J B M Moir-Shepherd

6

1957

B M Glanvill

4

1952

P M Oliver

5

1956

P M L Lewis

6

1957

D R L Erskine

4

1952

C M Davies

5

1957

R Grigsby

6

1957

20 | Old Malvernian Newsletter


DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT | W J B Sneath

6

1957

J S Murray

7

1960

P H Donovan

8

1952

M G W Faulkes

6

1958

W E Wilde

7

1961

A C S Hordern

8

1953

C J Styles

6

1959

C G Hall

7

1962

B E C Hale

8

1953

D R & D Mehta

6

1959

R H S Lane

7

1962

I Hilton-Bailey

8

1954

G R Rastall

6

1959

S V Drew

7

1962

D R G Rhodes

8

1955

L R Kennard

6

1959

D L Livingston

7

1963

J B Pickup

8

1955

R A Farrer

6

1959

J A Graham

7

1963

J I McEntyre

8

1956

D J Carmichael

6

1960

J F Sandison

7

1963

M B Downey

8

1956

G P Hunt

6

1960

H R Weeks

7

1964

M Woodgett

8

1956

A J A Grey

6

1961

R F W Holder

7

1965

R J H Price

8

1956

R H Hardwicke

6

1963

R W Page-May

7

1965

S S Clarke

8

1956

J G Shearer

6

1964

A R Brown

7

1967

W G S Hordern

8

1957

R C Hadley

6

1964

C L Houghton

7

1967

P J Pegrum

8

1958

F Priest

6

1965

R M Goodenough

7

1967

P M Wrigley

8

1958

C W O Burrill

6

1966

C J D Warry

7

1968

R T Collet

8

1958

M A Walker-Smith

6

1966

R V Upex

7

1968

J P Clough

8

1959

R Treverton-Jones

6

1967

J A Crowther

7

1969

R D Vaughan-Davies

8

1959

J D Browning

6

1968

R A Denney

7

1969

A D Blackstock

8

1960

J M Hadley

6

1969

R W Hoyle

7

1969

J S Lowe

8

1960

P J Millward

6

1969

A R Upex

7

1970

R P G Lewis

8

1960

A M W Don

6

1971

D Hilton-Jones

7

1970

J M P Newman

8

1961

P T Courtney

6

1971

S G Coulby

7

1970

M R Brocklehurst

8

1961

T N Young

6

1971

T P Stockil

7

1970

S Anand

8

1961

A B J Jemmett

6

1972

R H Leachman

7

1971

T J W Smith

8

1961

R N H Moulton

6

1972

R J S Coundley

7

1971

C R G Lewis

8

1962

A J Knights

6

1973

B C T Clitherow

7

1972

G R Weston

8

1962

R D Hewitt

6

1974

D H Price

7

1973

W J Farr

8

1962

R J Tabberner

6

1974

S M Fry

7

1973

R J Sharp

8

1963

C M Bradley-Kidd

6

1975

W J Burke

7

1973

W A J Potter

8

1963

R J Grainger

6

1976

A E C Adams

7

1974

M F Tommey

8

1965

O J C Toole

6

1978

C G J Williams

7

1974

W E H Bagnall

8

1965

R A George

6

1979

M C Woodgate

7

1974

A M Lee

8

1966

A G Baulcombe

6

1980

A N Grainger

7

1975

S D Jones

8

1966

D J O Carver

6

1980

M D K Wills

7

1977

M B G Black

8

1967

S R Shenkman

6

1982

C E Gill

7

1979

D J H Shaw

8

1968

C B Rycroft

6

1983

A G Buchanan

7

1980

J C Adam

8

1968

N M Walker

6

1985

M E Fordham

7

1980

R M Moss

8

1968

P J Orton

6

1988

M W Gittins

7

1980

N C P Bird

8

1970

N N J Garston

6

1992

N J Sibley

7

1980

S A Broadbent

8

1970

F J Roberts

6

1996

K Ramanathan

7

1985

C N Dickinson

8

1971

G K Padgett-Duncan

6

2005

K K Chiu

7

1990

P J Bassett

8

1973

K J Bath

6

2005

H L V L V Fan

7

1992

J A H Potter

8

1976

R F R Clarke

6

2007

J A Haddock (7)

7

1993

J G Davis

8

1976

T K Wendelstadt

6

2017

J J Ribchester

7

1993

R K Black

8

1976

D F W Holder

7

1936

R B F Rouch

7

1994

C E Price

8

1977

R D Williams

7

1941

J D M Sharp

7

1997

J C Forsyth

8

1977

J L Vigers

7

1942

C J Dolman

7

1999

M R M Ballard

8

1977

J G Willis

7

1943

J R E Bath

7

2002

J M C Rawlings

8

1978

J W Gould

7

1946

T M Dunbar-Constable

7

2005

J W B Spencer

8

1983

D H Nieper

7

1950

R J V Bรถckel

7

2008

E Blok

8

1985

T G Cunningham

7

1952

W R Fogden

7

2008

R E K Golding

8

1989

P R Hartley

7

1953

R Blanco Villar

7

2009

J E Vaile

8

1992

A C N Neale

7

1954

R S Norem

8

1931

K R C Shermer

8

1992

A J M Blumer

7

1954

R M L Humphreys

8

1945

D J Parkinson

8

1993

K P Bentley

7

1954

K N Miles

8

1948

R D N Hunt(8)

8

1993

A E S Field

7

1955

T R Elliott

8

1950

W W S Chu

8

1996

J V Dent

7

1955

Canon R I Thomson

8

1951

F M Ansell

8

2007

P G Hatch

7

1956

H A Naylor

8

1951

A E C Griffith

9

1937

C J Mawson

7

1958

I A Maiden

8

1951

P J F Condy

9

1950

D H Barlow

7

1958

J N Perrins

8

1951

J W Toovey

9

1951

J P Rhodes

7

1959

A R Rosswick

8

1952

J F Nasmyth-Miller

9

1952

M I Harwood

7

1959

J W Corbishley

8

1952

J K Bradshaw

9

1954

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 21


| DEVELOPMENT IMPACT REPORT P L Wilson

9

1954

J Horsfall

J Hylands (5)

2009

R K Whiley

9

1954

K & S Jain

I Isabekov (7)

2016

G R B Creed

9

1955

S & S James

M E Jamieson (9)

1988

P J Paterson

9

1955

H E Jones

J-M Jetter (9)

2011

D M French

9

1956

K & N Kalinin

N H H John (4)

1964

J T G Andrew

9

1956

Keasbey Memorial Foundation

D Kaarboe (9)

2009

A R Hoare

9

1957

I & H Klemm

A Kisiel (2)

2007

M H L Bowler

9

1958

M J P & J M Knott

S A Knill-Jones (SH)

1961

J N S Lowe

9

1959

C Leonard

M Y A Lam (8)

2002

I G Campbell

9

1960

A P M & S E Liechtenstein

K Ley (EH)

2011

J T Rowe

9

1961

S & S Marr

S R Lawrence (SH)

1961

R M Barnes

9

1962

A J & L C Murtagh

J L Libson (7)

1956

R G Woodward

9

1964

S Nicholls

J N S Lowe (9)

1959

J D Hudson

9

1965

S Palmer

C G Mackenzie (8)

1960

M G Fray

9

1965

M & N Paspaley

M Michikata (6)

2002

N R L Fry

9

1965

F Paterson

K N Miles (8)

1948

J D Lace

9

1966

P I Quickfall

A G Milton (5)

2014

M H Denton-Thompson

9

1967

L A & G R H Ralphs

P R Moritz (7)

1952

P A D Storie-Pugh

9

1967

P Romanzina & N Joynson-Romanzina

A J Morrice (3)

1958

A C Lowcock

9

1968

E & J Shepherd

I H Pacey (2)

1983

Q G Edwards

9

1970

P & A Tocher

C Page (9)

1944

J M Patterson

9

1972

S & A Underwood

H F Palmer (5)

2016

J L Hall

9

1973

S & N Wall

D A G Pardo (7)

1967

E P G Pitts

9

1974

W Watt

J Perrott (6)

1970

J P B Kidson

9

1974

R D A Wedderburn

J W G Perry (3)

1970

M W Nicholls

9

1974

H & N Wendelstadt

M Petersen (7)

2005

R M Chowkwanyun

9

1974

S & J Whitfield

J R Pitts (4)

1954

C W O Stoecker

9

1975

D P Yung

M Podhradskรก (6)

2011

C G Rose

9

1976

C Zetti

R M D Porter (SH)

2016

P C Nicholls

9

1976

D R J Powis (6)

1993

M J Porter

9

1977

Legacy Donors

G T Prance (1)

1956

P P Hampson

9

1977

A Andreou Fernandez (4)

2016

D R G Rhodes (8)

1955

W J Watkins

9

1980

J T G Andrew (9)

1956

S P Roberts (3)

1964

J M C Delingpole

9

1983

M Bashlakov (1)

2016

K Sapanatan (1)

2010

J C F Barwell

9

1986

L H Berlien (9)

2016

H D Simmons (4)

2012

S R Peachey

9

1994

T Blanc-Garin (8)

2003

L W Taylor (SH)

2016

M Tikilyaynen

9

1999

B E A Bรถckel (6)

2013

J W Toovey (9)

1951

N Singh

9

1999

R D J Brinkman (1)

1987

M G Trueman (5)

1978

A J Bruce

9

2002

W J Burke (7)

1973

G A H Turner (1)

1959

F Kassatkin

9

2005

P J Cartwright (2)

1962

S L V Turriff (1)

1980

P D Kidwell

9

2005

P M Cohen (3)

1965

R V Upex (7)

1968

M S H Cheng

9

2009

O E Cunningham (7)

1988

R S Viner (4)

1954

L H Berlien

9

2016

M M Davey (4)

1959

H R Weeks (7)

1964

J P Dawson (5)

1992

A S H Woolhouse (5)

1981

Non-Alumni Donors

J R Dent (1)

1963

C Adriaenssen & D de Spoelberch

P H Donovan (8)

1952

1895 Association Members

C Artigas Brugal

S V Drew (7)

1962

J C F Barwell (9)

C & P Best

R H Farnfield (3)

1955

H Duce

B & G Bramson

C E Gill (7)

1979

M R Duce (6)

P Brough

S L-A Godwin (4)

1999

M C Frayn

B C Castilho

N P A Groves (1)

2015

P J Green (3)

1959

A R Clark

P J Green (3)

1959

D Griffiths (SH)

1955

L R A Davies

O H Greensted (7)

2014

M E Jamieson (9)

1988

K & P De Cuyper

A M Grill (6)

2015

S A Knill-Jones (SH)

1961

E & G De Brabandere

D Griffiths (SH)

1955

P D Lilburn Watson (2)

1975

F de Melker

R Grigsby (6)

1957

K N Miles (8)

1948

CTM Dunn Foundation

R Haley (1)

1956

J R Pitts (4)

1954

R H Farrar

A C Hamilton (1)

1962

D R G Rhodes (8)

1955

J & C Forbes

A B Harris (9)

1994

S P Roberts (3)

1964

K W Hayter

P M Heinz (6)

2015

M Woodgett (8)

1956

S M Hill

C J Hewitt (6)

1974

C & E Horler

S R Hopkins (SH)

1974

22 | Old Malvernian Newsletter

1986 1961


OM EVENTS IN 2017 | | CLASS OF 2007 REUNION

We were delighted to welcome back a number of OMs who left in 2007 last June. The photos show them in the Sixth Form Centre preparing for the Leavers’ Ball later in the evening. On Friday 29 June 2018 we look forward to welcoming back to the Leavers’ Ball those OMs who left in 2008.

| LAW NETWORKING EVENT Over 30 OMs working in the legal field gathered together for an interesting and enjoyable reception at the Carlton Club on Monday 27 November. It was great to see so many OMs come together for this special networking event. Particular thanks go to Bill Perry (3.66-70) for arranging hospitality at the Carlton Club which really added to the occasion. Senior barristers, solicitors and entrepreneurial lawyers met with

younger OMs, including recent leavers who are at university and OMs who are just embarking on their careers. Some OMs were old friends and for others it was a great opportunity to meet new people. Everyone appreciated the opportunity to talk together in such wonderful surroundings. We were also pleased to welcome Richard Thurlow, i/c careers at the College who appealed to OMs to mentor current pupils who are

considering a legal profession. A special thank you to OMs who have already given their experience and time to mentor recent leavers and pupils at the College. A good evening was had by all, with many new connections forged. The Society plans to host another law event in the autumn of 2018 and we hope you can join us.

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| OM EVENTS IN 2017 | DOWNS LIGHT RAILWAY TRUST An unusual OM gathering took place at the Downs Malvern, one that has not taken place for probably 40 years. Michael Whitehouse (6.66-71), Charles Cattell (7.68-73) and Nick Dodson (6.68-70) were each in turn Secretary of the Malvern College Railway Society under guidance of Reg Farrar. The reunion took place on the occasion of a Railway Exhibition and Steam Gala (30 April and 1 May 2017), to celebrate the re-opening of the pupils’ 1925-built miniature railway. As many will know, the little railway is a unique educational tool that adds teamwork, carpentry and basic engineering skills to ‘out of classroom’ activities at the Downs. Photo generously provided by the Downs Light Railway Trust.

| MiL MARCH & JUNE

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OM EVENTS IN 2017 | | MiL OCTOBER & DECEMBER

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OM EVENTS IN 2017 |

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| OM EVENTS IN 2017 | ELLERSLIE REUNION It was a great pleasure to welcome so many Ellerslie Old Girls, aged between 19 and 90, on a bright and very warm Saturday afternoon 10 June 2017. This was the biggest reunion the College has had, with 171 guests in total from both Ellerslie School and Ellerslie House. It was wonderful to see Patricia, India, Alba, Stella, Cathrine, Amanda, Zoe, Laura, Emma, Clare and Serena, Ellerslie House alumni from the past eight years. Equally, the ‘older’ alumnae amongst them really enjoyed coming back and seeing all the changes in the House, as well as looking at all their old House photos and reminiscing about all the activities they did whilst they were here at Malvern! They also left us a little note on our whiteboard to remind us that ‘Ellerslie is the best’!

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We are very proud of the connection between the House and Ellerslie School, which is an integral part of the history of girls at Malvern College: the Ellerslie schoolgirls of the early nineties were the very first girls to join the College, and it is a privilege to share their name. It was an absolute delight to see the joy on people’s faces as they reconnected with old friends and members of staff from Ellerslie School, and the atmosphere buzzed all afternoon. The current Ellerslie girls thoroughly enjoyed learning more about the history of Ellerslie School when the Old Girls joined us after lunch in House for tours and tea. We already have a number of Ellerslie School photographs, paintings and honours boards, and these provided a focal point for the afternoon as the ladies


OM EVENTS IN 2017 |

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OM EVENTS IN 2017 |

shared memories of their school days. There were many special guests but I must mention Miss Pamela Binyon, former Headmistress. it was lovely meeting her on such a special day.

in the afternoon. Thank you to all our visitors for sharing your stories with us – we had a truly fantastic time and are already looking forward to the next reunion! Eileen Crewdson (Ellerslie.42-51)

The connection between Ellerslie House and Ellerslie School has seeped into the current girls’ imaginations in many ways, and they were captivated by the stories they heard on Saturday. We were also privileged to be able to share Serena Smith’s prizewinning 150th Creative Writing Competition piece, a story which revolves around both Ellerslie School and Ellerslie House, with Jasmine reading an excerpt to all of our guests after lunch. Everyone was able to leave with a copy of the story. My thanks go to the Malvernian Society team, most especially Mia and the outgoing Secretary Syd Hill, for a truly wonderful afternoon. Thank you also to Jasmine, Juliette, Toni, Ella, Lea, Trixi, Jayda, Alejandra, Georgina and Emma for welcoming the Old Girls and showing them around the House

If ever you feel like a ‘pick me up’, nothing can make you feel better than attending a school reunion and that’s exactly how I felt after attending the Ellerslie reunion at Malvern College this June. Despite only five attending from my time (79-86) the sheer joy of bumping into familiar faces from the past from years above and below me and being able to talk about the Ellerslie days made me feel 35 years younger which in itself is fantastic, given that this year has been a significant birthday year for me. We were welcomed with open arms by Malvern College, with a service held in the Chapel, followed by a wonderful champagne drinks reception in the beautiful sunshine.

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| OM EVENTS IN 2017

There followed a delicious buffet lunch and a chance for us all to catch up before we heard speeches from Ellerslie housemistresses past and present including a guest appearance from Miss Pamela Binyon, my old Ellerslie headmistress. We were treated to a story read by Ellerslie House Sixth Formers and then headed off in a minibus for a tour of the old Ellerslie Cherbourg and Southlands Houses on the Wells Road, which have now been transformed into a gorgeous retirement residence for the over 55s (note to self: only 5 years to go until I can check myself in again!). More champagne on offer there and then a return journey back to Malvern College for tea and a natter with students from Ellerslie House. Ellerslie House is an impressive building offering, in my opinion, luxury student living. I hope the pupils appreciate just how lucky they

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are - of course this only hits home when you’ve left and return years later. I’m really looking forward to the next Ellerslie reunion and count myself very fortunate in being a member of the Malvernian Society. Sarah Merriman (née Davies) (79-86)


OM EVENTS IN 2017 |

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| OM EVENTS IN 2017 | OM LECTURE: ESCAPING FROM COLDITZ The Malvernian Society was pleased to welcome back Piers Storie-Pugh (9.63-67) to speak at the College on Tuesday 7 November 2017. Piers’ talk, supported by a presentation with over 70 photos (many of German origin), was based on the experiences of his father Colonel Peter Storie-Pugh, CBE MC TD DL, also an OM (9.33-37). Peter S-P was a prisoner in Colditz for over four years, being involved in over 20 escape attempts; little wonder that

he awarded the MBE for Gallantry in addition to the Military Cross awarded in 1940. Piers followed his father into the Army, also rising to the rank of full Colonel. In addition, he specialised in overseas war cemeteries and memorials, establishing and running for many years Remembrance Travel. Last year he handed over as Chief Executive of ‘The Not Forgotten Association’, a tri-service charity for the wounded, after five years in post.

P S-P is the chap with the pipe.

| THE QUADS OMs of No.4 in 1966 have formed a dining club (appropriately named the ‘Quads’) and they meet for dinner twice a year in London (sometimes on their own and sometimes with partners). The photo of the Quads Winter Dinner 2017 held at The Royal Society of Medicine, Wimpole Street, London. Seated (left to right): Roy Lewis, Esta Lewis, Michael Bowles, Anu Chaudhry, Adrian Dawson (face hidden), Anne Cripps, Roger Corfield, Sumanjit Chaudhry and Jan Corfield. Adrian flew in from New York whilst Sumanjit and Anu Chaudhry came from New Delhi to attend the dinner.

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OM EVENTS IN 2017 | | GUY DISNEY LECTURE The Malvernian Society was pleased to welcome back Guy Disney (2.95-00) to speak at the College on Thursday 11 May 2017. Guy’s talk was entitled: ‘From Malvern College to Sandown Park, with a lot of ‘stuff’ along the way!’ Guy lost his right leg below the knee after being injured when his vehicle was hit by a rocketpropelled grenade while serving in Helmand Province, Afghanistan in July 2009. On 17 February 2017 he became the first amputee jockey to win a horse race at a professional racecourse in Britain, when he rode Rathlin Rose to win the Royal Artillery Cup at Sandown Park. A good mix of students, OMs, current and former members of Common Room and Friends of Malvern College were present in the Lewis Lecture Theatre to hear Guy’s inspiring talk.

he was commissioned into the Light Dragoons and soon found himself deployed to Afghanistan. Despite the massive personal consequences, Guy spoke very warmly about the general population of Afghanistan and has confidence that the good will win through in the end. Then Guy spoke in some detail about his expeditions to the North Pole (2011) and with Prince Harry to the South Pole (2013) in aid of the charity ‘Walking with the Wounded’, which helps wounded former servicemen and women to transition to civilian life. Finishing with a brief reference to his passion for riding horses and to horseracing, Guy then answered questions before further conversations with students and visitors at a Reception in the foyer of the Lewis Lecture Theatre.

After graduating from the Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester,

| PROPERTY NETWORKING On Monday 9 October 2017, we held a very successful Property Networking event at the London Capital Club, thanks to the good offices of Charles Bradshaw (6.7378). We were also delighted to hear an address by Nick Abell (5.72-77).

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| OM EVENTS IN 2017 | NO.2 REUNION Housemaster Justin Major began by welcoming some of his predecessors, who together had 53 years’ experience of House 2 housemastering: Bert Lacey, Brian White, Martin Knott and, of course, the inimitable Michael McNevin. Below are extracts from his address: ‘It is clearly a long and winding road, a very winding road, which sees me, an OM of No.8 in the time of Roger Smith, attending my first proper OM reunion with No.2 of all Houses! If you had told me when I was here at school that I would become a Housemaster at Malvern, or even a teacher I would have laughed you out of the room. If you had told my housemaster he would have had an even more violent reaction! When I was in No.8, Martin Knott was housemaster of No.2 and it was very much the Welsh House. The Llandaff House. The singing House! No doubt some of you here today hail from those parts and will have

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enjoyed a hearty sing in chapel earlier. Whilst the Welsh heart of the House might have been lost, in spite of the valiant efforts of Martin’s successor Brian White, whose boys continued to dominate the house singing competition in the nineties, the voices of No.2 are still very much singing! To such an extent that after many years as also rans, ‘robbed of the trophy’ as Bert himself described it, we did last year manage to win the House Shout. And on the subject of House competition I know that many of you will be sitting there, mistyeyed remembering the rivalries, victories and also defeats against other Houses, no doubt wondering if No.2 is still faring well. Well to put your minds at ease, in recent years there have been victories in House drama, singing, cricket, hockey, tennis, general knowledge and almost Chemistry. An unfortunate steward’s enquiry saw us disqualified

for one of the boys nipping out and asking an unsuspecting passing Science teacher the answer to a question! In No.2 we call that using one’s initiative but apparently in the Science building it is cheating! Now whilst we have not been able to replicate the dominance of Brian White’s rugby teams who went unbeaten at senior level from 1996 to 2000 I must mention our absolute domination of the croquet scene in recent years.


OM EVENTS IN 2017 |

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The House motto ‘Domus Secunda secunda nulli’ - House 2 second to none - is nowhere more evident than in the House spirit: in the way in which the boys continue to throw themselves in and give things a go, and to support each other by doing so. And this is something of which the House remains very proud. Win or lose, No.2 is an environment which continues to celebrate participation. Indeed it is not so much the House songs themselves which Bert remembers but rather the celebrations which followed the competition, regardless of the result. Beers, pizza, and outrageously loud singing until late in the night. Clearly the aim remains to annoy House 1, always fun, but last year we actually managed to incur the wrath of boarders as far afield as No.9 and School House. Sore losers!

Beyond House competitions you may also be sitting here wondering what changes have taken place in your former home. If we consider the recent past then the library has become a games room (an indication of where No.2 boys’ priorities lie!), the Armenian block a Sixth Form sitting room of sorts! Half of the shower block or chaggers has become the FY study, a ground-floor study has become the assistants’ duty room and much more. Michael, while you might be surprised to hear that the boys no longer do hall by candlelight, Bert will be even more surprised to hear that the boys do hall at all! Indeed last year saw No.2 twice claim the Clark Cup, a muchvalued trophy awarded to the House for the highest effort grades. The housemaster’s study is the old duty room, the old study now a kitchen.

Last year the House linked itself to a charity set up in the name of Roger Gower, who, some of you will remember, lost his life tragically when shot by poachers in Tanzania last year. Roger was in No.9, but his brother Max, a good friend of mine, was delighted that No.2 showed such energy in getting behind him and supporting him. In so doing there have been and continue to be a number of events such as charity football matches, in house competitions and most notably our ‘No.2’s Got Talent’ evening. All of which contribute to the work carried out in Roger’s name. Amidst the changes and developments, there is so much which has not changed. Talking to my predecessors, Martin remembers the friendship, tolerance and mutual

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| OM EVENTS IN 2017

support which formed such a strong presence in his time. Bert, in spite of the fortune spent on therapy since he hung up his boots, remembers more than anything the care, kindness and honesty shown by the boys towards each other and indeed to him as housemaster as well. Brian too remembers the group support and encouragement, the atmosphere which saw the lovers of sport supporting the musicians and of course vice versa. There is something special in this camaraderie.

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Talking to former boys of the house and also the housemasters it is clear that the camaraderie is in no small part forged by shared experiences, many of which punctuate the memories of our school days. As a No.2 boy, whether it’s Michael’s unique fire drills, made realistic with the use of various chemicals to make smoke, boys being rusticated for selling potatoes to the general public during the potato shortage, crashing the school glider when flying in CCF, breaking out of the House by night, super-sized paddling pools

in the shower block flooding the entire basement, there have been no shortage of notable and indeed hysterical incidents to celebrate. Indeed the House is an environment which never gets boring. It is also an environment which has the potential to bring out the best in young men at an important transitional phase in their lives.’ Justin Major


OM EVENTS IN 2017 |

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| FEATURED OMS | CEZAR RUGASIRA (SH.11-16) During my gap year before going to the LSE to study law, and while singing at Merton, Oxford, I decided it would probably do Kampala a bit of good to have an impressive choir sing pieces there, from the standard choral repertoire. So I created ‘The Kampala 22’, which we hope will soon become a fully professional choir.

We had a wonderful concert in 2017 and one of my great hopes is to get funding for eight to ten choral scholars in Kampala to be taught singing along with their studies. However, we have a way to go to achieve this, it seems. I will begin to try to find a teacher who could come here to teach them and I will let you know of my progress.

| ROSE CAMERON (NÉE WEBB-CARTER) (6.97-02) I left Malvern after five happy years in the summer of 2002 and spent the next year working and travelling

in Southern Africa before going on to Exeter University to read Philosophy. Over those three years I toyed with many career ideas, one of which was to work in the wine trade, but the travel bug had already hit by then and I wanted to go into something that would allow me to work and travel in exciting parts of the world. And so began a short career in the world of international charities and non-governmental organisations, which in turn led me to where I am today – leading trips and expeditions all over the world. It all started in the small Himalayan town of Leh, Ladakh, north-west India where I went to work on a maternal health project funded by Save the Children. It was supposed to last just six months but luckily for me I was to stay 16 months in this magical place 12,000 ft up in

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the mountains, which included a very cold but beautiful winter. Then it was back to London for an MA in International Development before returning to India to work for Save the Children in Delhi. A couple more NGO jobs followed over the next few years including a year working for The HALO Trust clearing landmines in Sri Lanka and Afghanistan. Following this and now back in London working in a charity HQ I started to act on an idea that I had had for a while. I wanted to recreate something that had become a hobby of my father’s – organising riding holidays in far-flung places following a historical story. Over the years I have been lucky enough to join him on trips all over the world and pursuing three passions: travel, riding and history. The idea has always been to find an interesting story in


FEATURED OMS | beautiful countryside and follow it on a horse (or mule). I was still at Malvern (1998) when we went to South Africa to ride the battlefields of the Boer War and Zulu War (an article followed in the Malvernian magazine). Since then we have ridden in Ethiopia, Pakistan, Jordan, Argentina and Chile, Oman and the Pyrenees. So fantastic have these adventures been that I decided to combine business and pleasure and sell them commercially. The first step was to learn a little about the industry so I completed my Mountain Leader Award and started leading trips for all ages across the globe while also starting up my own riding trips. I am now running my Wellington ride in the Pyrenees under the umbrella of a company called Ride World Wide which runs riding holidays and safaris all over the world.

The ride covers spectacular scenery in the Basque country of the western Pyrenees and follows in the footsteps of the Duke of Wellington during the final offensive of the Peninsular War in July 1813. The ride traces the route taken by Wellington’s army and over five days takes in the sites of a number of battles. However it is by no means a history-heavy affair – the story simply adds another layer of interest to what is a lovely ride through magnificent countryside. Picnic lunches and wine are carried in saddle bags and evenings are spent in Basque house B&Bs. It is a week of fabulous views, good food and great riding. I am also currently planning some new trips for 2018 so watch this space…

For more information on my rides please email me at rosewebbcarter@gmail.com or look at www.rideworldwide.com

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| FEATURED OMS

| TANYA JAMES (4.12-15) I am writing this from Bangladesh where I have spent seven weeks (four more to go) volunteering in a small community five hours from Dhaka. I am volunteering with a charity called Tearfund as part of ICS (International Citizen Service), which is part funded by the British government. My team consists of seven UK volunteers, and five ICVs (In-country volunteers). This is truly an amazing experience being able to volunteer with Bangladeshi volunteers because they teach you so many things about their fantastic culture, and it helps an enormous amount with the language barrier and our safety. I am really appreciating how loving and welcoming the Bangladeshi culture is. It constantly amazes me how generous they can be when

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they themselves don’t have much, they are so hospitable. In my host’s home we have no running water and very little electricity, but luckily enough to have a few lights and watch a budget Indian TV series in between the power cuts in the evening. We are teaching a six-week leadership and English course in two different places, a boys’ hostel and a school for sponsored children. Our wonderful ICVs help with translation, as the children we teach do not speak English (apart, maybe, from the odd ‘hello, how are you?’ if you’re lucky). We are also creating a children’s playground, because a lot of places in Bangladesh are segregated by religion - for example, a Hindu child cannot play in the Muslim

playground. So we are creating a playground in which children of all religions can play. I found this terribly upsetting and hard to understand why this was how it is, so I am very pleased that we have now completed the playground. Next week, we are teaching a healthy lifestyle and first aid course to the elders of the community; this is needed as my 15 year-old host sister thought it would be a good idea to put nail vanish on a deep cut on her finger to stop dirt getting in. To her surprise, it did in fact result in her getting an infection! I have come to realise a lot of effort and time here is to build relationships with the ICVs and help them grow in confidence and leadership, so the kids in community look up to them, as they can relate


FEATURED OMS | to them more easily. We have set up a youth group for the community which runs three times a week and it’s a blast - definitely the highlight of my day!

This experience is teaching me many things, but mainly how grateful I am to have had a quality education and knowledge of basic hygiene which out here is just not commonly available.

I am really grateful for all the support I have received from the Malvernian Society; I know I will always treasure this experience that your support has allowed me to have.

| RORY HOPKINSON (9.09-14) On 1 October Rory Hopkinson (9.0914) and a friend, Hugh Carthew, set off on bicycles from Warner Beach, Durban, on the east coast of South Africa on an adventure that could only have been thought up from an evening in a pub. Their 2100 km journey to Cape Town began with the help of a support driver and guide, Johan Evert. From helping with acquisition of bicycles through to mending near-broken bones his help was invaluable. Heading out of Durban through sweet smelling cane plantations and into the stunning landscape of the Transkei was no easy start. Crunching of gears and plenty of foul language led to exhaustion and cramp. However, we made it day by day, mile by mile, each one getting easier than the next, or so we thought.

our first rest day which was most welcomed along with a full moon party to keep us all in high spirits. However, the journey did not come without incident. Shortly after the halfway point, when racing down Nature’s Valley, a sharp right-hand bend caught me off guard. At such speed this ploughed me into a low concrete barrier on the outside of the bend flipping me over into a well-placed thorny acacia. Although a little torn up from the impact, the acacia would be my saving grace having caught me before plummeting over what could have been a 200-metre drop. Sadly, this left me unable to cycle for a while as we continued into the well-known Garden Route. After a physio appointment on our third and last rest day in Mossel Bay, getting back in the saddle was a relief

although a touch uncomfortable. Hugh continued to push through this venture and carried me a lot of the way through especially post-crash. Covering the last miles of our journey we hit the most southern point of Africa, Cape Agulhas. Then we weaved round the coastal roads all the way to Cape Town and our finish at Chapman’s Peak on the 24 October. As painful and exhausting as many of the days were, pushing through constant head winds, it was an incredible experience giving us both the chance to see so much of a country that we have come to love, and in doing so raise money for two brilliant charities, Save The Rhino and the Army Benevolent Fund Soldiers’ Charity.

It must be noted that neither Hugh or I are cyclists. Having spent the months before working we had little time to train so it was a trial by fire: as two chaps with zero cycling experience this was quite a shock to the system. Our biggest ride on just day three was 160 km with an elevation gain of 3130 m taking us a full nine and a half hours in up to 34º heat. Through river crossings and areas that were so remote that the sight of two British blokes on bikes was enough to leave most locals looking quite bewildered, especially in the pouring rain! Much of the challenge was also undertaken on dirt roads with our first being the most extreme as we followed GPS coordinates on a hand drawn map to Coffee Bay and

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| OM NEWS Leavers during the 1930s & 1940s Tony Uloth (4.43-46) lives with his wife, Margaret, in Nether Wallop where she breeds ponies. He has long since retired and they are in reasonable health for octogenarians. They get much pleasure and satisfaction from our four children and nine grandchildren.

1950s After national service with 40 Cdo RM, Colin Congdon (2.47-50) spent the best part of 40 years working for tea producers in Tanzania; since 1993 he has been a Research Associate at the African Butterfly Research Institute, Nairobi. Tom Cornell (3.58-59) has retired and lives on the coast of Maine with access to, and views of, the Atlantic Ocean. He recently returned to the UK with his wife and his motherin-law who is over 100 y.o. when the air rate dropped to $99 each way. In Malvern they met up with Bridget Staniforth, wife of Tom’s housemaster. He sends a fond hello to all his housemates in No.3, and if any want to come to Maine, he will meet you in Boston, drive you to Maine and cook you fresh lobster and personally dug clams (steamed). He says that you won’t be in a hurry to return to the UK. Peter Green (3.54-59) is currently president of his Probus Club in Witney (average age about 80) so he is still one of the younger members. Former pupils of his vintage might remember him as a clean-shaven cricketer/athlete; he now has two replacement knees and a replacement hip as well as a beard - bionic, balding but fuzzy. John Hespeler-Boultbee (4.49-54) continues to be busy writing: he as three books out at the moment, all available through Amazon, Barnes & Noble and on Kindle, or through direct contact with the publisher, CCB Publishing: Mrs Queen’s Chump (Idi Amin, the Mau Mau, Communists and Other Silly Follies of the British Empire: A Military Memoir), A Story in Stones: Portugal’s Influence on Culture and Architecture in the Highlands of Ethiopia 1493-1634, and Somersaults: Rovings, Tears and Absurdities from the Fringe of Journalism.

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Lord Maclaurin (5.51-56), former Chairman of the College Council, was appointed President of the MCC for 2017-18. At the age of 85, John Oliver (9.4550) started yet another venture after being invited to supply one of the top 50 restaurants in the world, the 2-Michelin-starred Vila Joya in Portugal with his wonderful veg. Having retired from photography John is taking things ‘slightly’ more sedately and has managed almost a miracle in a season which threw everything it could at him, from extreme heat and drought to breakdowns. John Robertson (1.47-50) reports that he spends the winters in Florida, and the rest of the year in Ontario. John would love to hear from anyone who started at Malvern in 1947. Ian Shine (5.46-51) is currently living in Swampscott, MA, USA. Ian has authored or co-authored numerous books including ‘Serendipity in St. Helena’, ‘Thomas Hunt Morgan, Pioneer of Genetics’, and ‘The Discovery and Significance of the Blood Groups’. More recently, Ian and his wife of 60 years, Deborah Slier, annotated ‘Hidden Letters’, a book documenting a young man’s journey through the Holocaust. Due to press in the summer 2018 is a book that chronicles his time working as a physician on the tiny isolated island of St. Helena in the South Atlantic, which is populated with lovely people and fascinating genetic diseases. During his career, Ian has held positions at universities and institutions in many countries, and is currently president and cofounder of a biotech in Cambridge, MA called Aafi, that has patented technology for a novel blood-based diagnostic test. Gavin Turner (1.54-59) combined a career in the civil service with a musical career. He did regular concerts mainly in London (at the

Queen Elizabeth Hall, St John’s Smith Square, and the Wigmore Hall) in the 1970s. In the early 1980s Gavin was sent as Director of HMSOs Scottish office in Edinburgh and lost touch with the professional music scene down south. Before that he had toured abroad, did regular Radio 3 broadcasts and made commercial recordings. Since retirement from the Civil Service twenty years ago, he has been much less active musically, but in the past few years he has done an annual concert at Salle, one of the great North Norfolk Churches, and at one or two other fine local churches. This year his professional ensemble, the William Byrd Choir, are pushing the boat out a bit and doing their concert at Norwich Cathedral (on 28 July from 6pm), with 16 professional singers and a Renaissance wind band.

1960s

Graham Ball (9.64-68) is founder and CEO of The Victoria Foundation, a medical charity he set up ten years ago, which helps to transform many lives by providing mobility aids for children, accessible transport for the elderly and grants for students studying medicine who are from disadvantaged backgrounds. Graham takes part in an annual overseas fundraising challenge


OM NEWS | alongside supporters and this year it is six days trekking or cycling in Northern Vietnam in November. Peter Bowen-Simpkins (2.55-60) retired from the NHS as a consultant gynaecologist and obstetrician about 15 years ago when he was the Treasurer of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, a post he held for 7 years. Shortly after relinquishing that office, he became the Treasurer of the Royal Medical Benevolent Fund for six years. Apart from that charity, he has been a trustee of Wellbeing of Women for many years. Presently he is the Executive Medical Director of the London Women’s Clinic. He led the Cambridge expedition to Eritrea and has successfully crossed the Atlantic in a 42-ft yacht in the Atlantic Race for cruisers. A keen fly fisherman, Peter is also a golfer, skier and Welsh rugby enthusiast!

Dennis Bury (5.57-61) is retiring from practice as a Health Care Council Practitioner Psychologist and Lecturer (Adjunct Professor for Syracuse University). He is an Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society, Chartered Psychologist, Chartered Scientist, Member of the Institute for Health Promotion and Education, Member of the Association for Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy, Associate Member Br Association of Science Writers, BABCP Accredited Cognitive Behavioural Therapist and a Personal Construct Therapist, Dennis is training to do science reporting. Alastair Dods (1.62-67) still lives in the Turks and Caicos Islands, running a semi-submarine taking tourists out to see the reef. He has been doing this for the past 13 years now and is now reaching the stage of wanting to retire. His niece now works for him and is driving the boat while he

spends more time with his hobby of wood-turning. Alastair’s wife died five years ago and he is currently dating a lady who has the same background of Kenya which is where he was brought up. After leaving Cambridge, John Elford (7.64-69) went into publishing (with a brief diversion into making stained-glass windows and doing an MBA at Durham) spending nearly 25 years running Green Books firstly in North Devon then on the Dartington Estate. The company was sold and he is now very involved in local activities including the work of Transition Town Totnes, the hub of a global network of communities that are trying to build local resilience and address the issue of peak oil and climate change. He is married to Eriko and has one daughter living in Japan. He also plays a mean game of squash considering his 40-year lay-off. Brothers Richard Field OBE (1.59-62) and Peter Field OBE (1.62-67) now work together with both national and international companies, supporting them in their drive in becoming more collaborative, thus winning new and repeat clients and contracts, and bringing more joy to the world of work. This is after co-founding what became, they believe, the largest alliancing & partnering company in Europe. They would both like to slow down, however there is such a need and demand…and they both love seeing the positive changes in behaviours… Peter previously served in HM Forces and Richard in the world of business. Toddy Hoare (6.61-65) is guest artist at St John’s College, Oxford. He also has a volume of sonnets at the publisher for this year, entitled Sonnetry. He has also written his

reflections with illustrations on over 30 years of rural ministry with a contrast to that of his grandfather in his parish 1915-57. After a 44-year career in Fleet Steet, Colin Mackenzie (8.5560) then freelanced writing two books and doing some television documentaries before joining the Daily Mail in 1980. He left in 1985 to join the Racing Post as a racing correspondent and columnist before returning to the Daily Mail in 1988 as their racing correspondent, retiring in 2008. Since then he has made three more documentaries and is currently working on ‘Sacred Turf’, the history of six grass-based sports namely Soccer, Rugby, Cricket, Golf, Tennis and Horseracing. Having spent much of his working life abroad he is much enjoying the company of his three daughters, plus three step-daughters and nine grandchildren. I think it is possibly true that daughters stay closer to their parents than sons: certainly the bank and babysitting capabilities of grandparents seem to be much appreciated in West London, where he still plays squash three times a week. Kanit Muntarbhorn (5:64-68) received a Recognition Award from the Thai Rhinological Society in 2017 for the first published report (1987) of Endoscopic Sinus Surgery in ASEAN countries. Kanit also pioneered sleep medicine research and surgery in ASEAN countries. Tim Rawstron (4.58-64) has retired from a career in Banking and Business Development. He has also been a volunteer with The Princes Trust since 1985 and for a while was on their payroll before full retirement came calling. His wife, Margaret, and he will notch up 50

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| OM NEWS years of marriage next January; both lead a most active life - golf, allotment, tennis, three labradors and, following retirement from the playing side of cricket 4 years ago, Tim is now umpiring. He still keeps in close touch with his closest friends from Malvern, meeting for lunch on a regular basis and rotationally in Preston, Manchester, Liverpool and Birmingham. Graham Park (1.63-68) retired from private practice as senior partner of a firm of solicitors in Manchester some years ago. Since then he has served appointments as a member of the Parole Board, as a Tribunal Judge in the Mental Health Review Tribunal and in the Criminal Injuries Compensation Appeals Tribunal. He is presently appointed as a panel chair for the Fitness to Practise Committee of the Nursing & Midwifery Council in London. Myles Robinson (4.63-68) is now semi-retired having been in business with Michael Romain (4.63-68) for nearly 30 years; they are still friends. Myles and Angela have three sons and five grandchildren. Their eldest son Dan ran in two Olympic Games marathons, Athens in 2004 and Beijing 2008 and won the bronze medal in the Melbourne Commonwealth Games of 2006. Myles doesn’t run but is an active member of Stroud Choral Society.

John Rowe (9.58-61) and his wife, Sue, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary last September. They have two grown-up daughters and four grandchildren, two boys and two girls. They are happily settled in North Norfolk, after too many years of John’s work as a bank manager! John is involved in charitable work, being treasurer of a hospital charity and another local charity.

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John Swift (5.61-67) is now four years into (and much enjoying) retirement after 25 years as Chief Executive of the British Association for Shooting & Conservation; and prior to that six years as their Director of Conservation Research. Having now shed many/most responsibilities he remains active as a charitable trustee of the Wildlife Habitat (Charitable) Trust. He currently serves as an independent expert to the European Chemical Agency (ECHA) on behalf of UNEP’s Africa Eurasian Waterbird Agreement. He continues as Chairman of the erstwhile DEFRA/ FSA Lead Ammunition Group, a group of senior scientists and practitioners from various disciplines and backgrounds, reviewing all the emerging evidence on lead ammunition impacts on wildlife and human health. Tim Waite (1.56-60) been working abroad for over 15 years teaching English to students at many levels. One of his students passed her Doctorate at Victoria University, Melbourne under his tuition. Tim now lives in Oxford.

Nigel Willis (3.62-66) has three daughters who between them have four degrees, 1 PhD (colorectal cancer) 1 nearly PhD (footrot in sheep) and first grandchild due March. He says that he leads ‘an extremely dull life compared to most OMs, spending his time doing a lot of work for nothing’, chiefly helping to organise fund-raising events, or just ‘things’, including the Tour d’Ilmington, the Shipston-on-Stour Wool Fair, (no connection with the PhD above), and now something called the Neighbourhood Plan. He did a bit of trekking in Nepal last autumn: ‘Wonderful people’, he says.

1970s Peter Bachner (1.69-73) has moved to Phnom Penh, Cambodia as his primary residence and commutes to Bangkok, Thailand on a monthly basis, working in both countries on marketing initiatives for the public and private sectors. He actively stays in close touch with OMs in Thailand. He plays guitar and flute quite extensively now and generally enjoys life in S.E. Asia where he has lived now for over 13 years.

Blair Butterfield (5.73-74) retired from his full-time role as President of VitalHealth Software in 2015 and spend his time doing board work and part-time consulting, as much of it as possible from his ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. He had a career in health IT which took him around the world several times, and put him in a front row seat to one of the great emerging industries of our age. However, nothing compares with retirement and spending time with his wife, Nancy, and friends and enjoying the amazing nature where they live. He still stays in touch with Rob Holdsworth No.5 and would love to hear from any contemporaries. Charles Cadwallader (SH, 71-75), formerly a zookeeper at London Zoo, Regents Park and latterly Curator of Auckland Zoo, has taken up a new role working for the Western Australian Government as Senior Compliance Manager in the Department for Primary Industries and Rural Affairs (Animal Welfare). The role involves issues as diverse as livestock shipping export and, last week, he was traipsing around the hinterlands of Kalgoorlie visiting three farms (it took four days driving to reach the reach the first one) and, as hotels aren’t exactly abounding in the Outback, living in a ‘swag’ = small tent, but actually = plastic bag


OM NEWS | Neil Chambers (5.72-77) runs a business more local to Malvern, The Handmade Scotch Egg Company. The business, which he runs with his wife Penny, is going from strength to strength and now runs the very popular Nest in Ledbury, a café and farm shop and in March will open another Nest in Worcester in the old Worcester Porcelain development.

that you can’t even sit up in! It was quite warm, around 47ºC during the day but cooled down to refreshing 35ºC at night. Wildlife abounds, mostly reptilian and grumpy, if you accidentally annoy them, especially the tiger snakes, but living in the same environment as the marsupials is fulfilling a childhood dream, to see them and all this wildlife in their natural environments is a great privilege, notes Charles. Despite the heat, the flies, and those damn drums, nonetheless it is a fabulous wilderness with the opportunity to catch up with some equally fabulous characters and eat some...interesting... things... squidgy, with a bit of slimy, yet satisfying, about them… around the camp fire. Mmmm... bugs... Life is fantastic and, having emigrated here from New Zealand at the spritely age of just-turned-sixty, Charles is hoping for a good few years yet to explore this amazing country. Scott Chambers (5.74-79) celebrating 10 years of running a successful management training company. With over 40% of his business coming from overseas, he has just opened his first overseas office in Hyderabad, India. Scott has been married to Sarah for 33 years and their second son married last year (his wife is part of the management team at the Oriental Club) and the elder is marrying in September this year. Their younger sister is at university in Bristol.

Peter Jones (4.69-73) was the Liberal Democrat candidate for Chesham and Amersham in the June 2017 General Election. He increased the party’s vote compared with 2015, but still came third. He has also been a contestant on the ITV quiz programme The Chase.

from the Tour de France. He cycled up it in June 2017 and raised just over £2000 for Restart Africa, an orphanage in Gil Gill, Kenya where his son has been working as a volunteer. It took him 2 hrs and 15 mins to cycle up and 25 mins to cycle down!

Ian McDowall (4.68-73) retired towards the end of 2014 and, as the new cliché goes, he doesn’t know how he found the time to work! His golf handicap is now down to 12, and he plays for Kedleston Park GC Seniors. He also plays tennis twice a week and captains the Church Broughton Tennis Club third team where he is the club treasurer; all that activity keeps him very busy. His wife, Julie, also plays tennis so they enjoy many mixed-doubles socials. Their two boys have flown the nest: Archie is in Australia having a gap year and his older brother James is a PGA golf professional and has been working in Switzerland and Thailand and is currently in Florida.

Philip Shaw-Hamilton (3.65-70) worked for Rolls-Royce (Aero Engines) in Derby, Japan, Saudi Arabia and Hong Kong from 1970 to 1987. He played squash for Japan and reached the finals of the All Japan Darts Championships (1980), won the Riyadh open in ‘82/’83 and played for Hong Kong (1984). He played for Derbyshire over-35s team, captained by David Jenkins (5.60-65) then discovered real tennis in 1990. He became hooked, dropped squash and tennis. He won the world amateur over-50 singles (London 2002), world amateur over60 singles and doubles (Australia 2012) and the world amateur over65 doubles (Australia 2017) and a few British Amateur Singles and Doubles titles on the way. Now retired, enjoying kayaking off the coast of Pembrokeshire, playing rackets at Malvern on a Wednesday evening club night, real tennis at Moreton Morrell, and squash and tennis at Leamington Lawn Tennis and Squash Club. He is partner to Wendy (25 years together) and has one daughter and two grandchildren.

Tony Potter (8.72-76) stepped down as the Chief Executive of Calvert Trust Exmoor at the end of 2016 and now works part-time with various projects including assisting the National Trust in North Devon with ‘accessibility’ and a military charity helping the rehabilitation of injured service personnel and to find employment in the land-based sector. Martin Roberts (7.73-77) has been raising money for Restart Africa: the photo shows him at the summit of Mt Ventoux, one of the killer climbs

For the last ten years, Win Sheffield (9.72-73) has been absorbed in being a career coach with a strong public speaking component, which

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| OM NEWS extended to London a couple of years ago. He is now building on his podcasts to write a book for which the next step is publishing. Anyone know any agents? On a personal level he continues to enjoy living in New York where he occasionally sees fellow OM Chip Burke. He indulges his love of cooking in part by participating in a group that prepares meals for homebound elderly each Saturday.

Chris Smith (6.73-78) is a Chartered Surveyor, working for Legal & General and living in rural Northants with wife Kim, sons Maxim and Joshua, who are, respectively, a music student at Oxford and a self-employed photographer/graphic designer, plus daughter-in-law Jess. Chris retired from the reserve forces several years ago and is now actively involved with WW1 living history/re-enactment. He still rides and is currently helping to organise a cavalry expedition from Cambrai to Mons in September, to commemorate the end of the Great War. Guy Staight (8.71-75) is still working as a private GP in London as well as part time for the British Horseracing Society. His three children have left home which has allowed him some time to write a book called ‘Testament’, based on the story of his grandfather who fought in Egypt during WW1 before returning to farm in Worcestershire. Tim Wills (7.72-76) writes that this year his triplets should all finish Italian senior school and continue on to university, so freedom beckons. Finding more work for him and them will be essential to minimise their student loans, but at least Tim will have more time. For the moment work continues to centre on the fi-compass project for the European Commission and European Investment Bank, to

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continue increasing the efficiency of public support through financial instruments. He has visited 23 EU Member States in the last three years, capacity building for Ministries of Finance and public administration. Being relieved of daily parental duty should allow him to take the motorbike further afield. In the last couple of years he has been to the south of India, supporting a charity helping victims of human trafficking, to the Himalayas and the Seven Sisters of India, including the site of the Battle of the Tennis Court. Now he is considering setting off from home in central Italy, where the earthquakes were in 2016, to revisit the Transfagarasan highway in Romania and then on to Odessa.

Mike Winfield (7.67-71) was, following his retirement from the resort, Cambridge Beaches, retained as a consultant in the creation of the Bermuda Tourism Authority, a new entity bringing independence to tourism management and decisions for the Island of Bermuda for 2013 and 2014. Hoping he could retire following this, he was asked to lead the Bermuda bid team to try and secure the 35th America’s Cup being held in Bermuda. Following success of this effort, he agreed to serve as CEO of the America’s Cup Bermuda ensuring that all of Bermuda’s commitments were delivered and that the events overall were successful. He served in this position from 2015 to January of 2018. The 35th America’s Cup was described as one of the most successful in its 160-year history. Mike is now trying to retire, again!

1980s Simon Holt (No.4, 1979-1984) has been living in Stonington, Connecticut with his family since May 1999. His sons Oliver (26) and Joseph (24) live in Manhattan.

Oliver is a classical church singer and works at Blue Hill, a restaurant that showcases local food and a wine list with producers who respect artisanal techniques. Joseph works at Island Burgers & Shakes and is an indie song writer with several albums to his name. Simon’s wife Alison is a freelance viola player and string teacher and runs her own catering business, Soundbites. Simon is the founder of Salt Marsh Opera, now in its 18th season, is Director of Music at The Williams School in New London in Connecticut and The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme also in Connecticut, and Executive Director of the Thames Valley Music School in New London. Mark Jamieson (8.83-88) has spent the last 13 years in the Middle East working on some of the region’s biggest construction projects. In November 2017 he was appointed Managing Director of Design, Engineering and Project Management firm KEO International Consultants’ Project Management International (PMI) division. He was previously the Executive Director for PM Services at KEO. He is a Chartered Civil Engineer with more than 25 years’ experience in construction project management, engineering and delivery. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) where he represents the Middle East and Africa on Council and is a Chartered Manager and Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute. He is also Chairman of Darjeeling Cricket Club, Dubai, the oldest western ex-pat cricket club in the UAE. Mark lives in Abu Dhabi with his wife, Rebekah, daughters Sophia and Charlotte, three dogs and two cats. Christopher Nieper (9.77-82) is MD of the family company which will feature this year for the first time in the Sunday Times top 100 UK companies to work for. He employs 300 staff in the UK and Europe. He has been named as one of 14 British leadership exemplars by ‘The Manufacturer’ in 2015, and, along with his father, received a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Direct Commerce Association for their contribution to British-made fashion/ direct marketing in 2014. He has also formed, for the company, an educational trust with the intention of turning around one of Britain’s


OM NEWS | very weakest schools in a social mobility coldspot: the David Nieper Academy opened in Sept 2017 for 850 secondary pupils. Geoffrey Pelham-Lane (6.7681) founded Capital Market Communications Ltd (‘Camarco’) in 2014 after a 30-year career in the city, which saw him at Leopold Joseph specialising in fund management, NatWest where he became Head of Investor relations. He then joined Financial PR and Investor Relations consultancy, Financial Dynamics and became UK CEO. Camarco now has 25 employees (all employees own a stake in the business) and it won awards as Financial PR firm of the year in 2017 and 2018. Geoffrey is married to Lois, and they have two children at university.

Fraser Smith (4.82-87) has been working for HSBC for the last ten years and is now the Global CFO of one of their larger businesses, based in London but spending lots of time in Hong Kong, New York and India. Married to a doctor he has two boys. Fraser joined the Royal Marines CCF unit at Malvern, under Trevor Southall, and after leaving the regular Royal Marines, he volunteered to join the Royal Marine Reserves at university. He was mobilised for tours in both Iraq and Afghanistan and has just passed the 30-year milestone of being a Royal Marine and he is still regularly doing 50-60 days a year. Still pretty active, he has taken up mountain-bike racing (eyes closed most of the time on the descents) and has found a renewed passion for Telemark skiing. In February he was made a Freeman of the City of London for Services to the Reserves. Guy Story (1.77-82) followed his time in the RAF with work for the airlines as a pilot and then as a Shark

Awareness Diving Instructor. He is now back in aviation and a Chief Flying Instructor and Flight Examiner at Ravenair at Liverpool Airport, and also back in the RAF Reserves as a Pilot with 10 AEF at RAF Woodvale.

Congratulations to John Hendicott (1.93-98) on winning the award for Best Sound Design VR Experience at the Raindance Festival in September. David Hill (5,92-97) writes regularly for The Guardian on human rights and environmental issues, and is a consultant to non-governmental organisation Global Witness.

1990s

Congratulations to Steffan Ball (8.9597) on his appointment as chief economic advisor to the Chancellor of the Exchequer in November. Luke Bull (8.85-90) recently spent two years as Honorary National Secretary of the National Association of Round Tables of Great Britain & Ireland, part of an international organisation which offers social, charitable and networking opportunities for men aged 18 to 45. In this role he oversaw operations at the organisation’s national HQ in Birmingham and was responsible for organising and overseeing two national AGMs. He has just started a new role as Associate Director with Beattie Group, a national communications consultancy with offices across the UK. Luke is married with two daughters and lives in Redditch, Worcestershire. Danil Gribkov (9.96-98) lives in the suburbs of Saint Petersburg with his wife, Jane, and their children.

Aznan Ithnin (5.93-95) has changed careers: from engineering to training and development, an opportunity to use his 15 years of experience in engineering to help young engineers when they start their career. He is currently preparing for his third year in a row participation for Powerman World Series Malaysia, with a goal of improving his personal best. Pete Morgan (8.93-98) lives and works in West Sussex as a Doctor specialising in Sports Medicine, A&E and General Practice. He has a wife and three children, and still supports Wales in the rugby. Cerian Morris (née Steer) (4.9398) is working for Nuvias in South Cerney, Cirencester as a Project Manager, HR Systems. She returned from Jersey, CI in December 2015 and now lives in Winchcombe, Cheltenham. Her husband Andrew is a lawyer for Harrison Clark Rickerbys in Cheltenham and they have two children, Amaya (5) and Joshua (7 months).

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| OM NEWS Mathew Newman (9.90-95) is a partner in the Guernsey office of offshore law firm Ogier, and heads a team specialising in dispute resolution, insolvency and contentious trusts work. He has lived in Guernsey for the past ten years and qualified as a Guernsey advocate in 2011, having qualified as an English solicitor at his previous firm, DLA Piper, in 2002. Mathew has three sons: Felix (10), Freddie (8) and Gabriel (6) and a dog called Billy.

2000s

Richard Straker (8.90-91) is an Airbus captain for British Airways at Heathrow on the short haul network. He has two children.

Rhydian Ball (7.99-04) is to marry Arla Saarainen on 19 May 2018. Wedding planning is in full swing and it will take place in Rhydian’s family home in North Wales, Snowdonia. Arla is from Finland and so the wedding will have elements in Welsh, Finnish and English.

College, London in 2013. Since qualifying, she has worked at Great Ormond Street Hospital and now specialises as a research nurse working in clinical trials.

Apart from her work at Malvern Active, Emma Fosh (3.00-05) is part of the Worcester Valkyries rugby squad (part of the Worcester Warriors), captaining the Development team on one occasion. Congratulations to Kate Golubeva (née Jantchuk) (3.96-00) on the safe arrival of her fifth child, Jesenia. Kate writes that she is ‘a very happy mother’.

After working at Honda, Ian Taylor (1.85-90) then moved to Williams (Formula One) where he has been for the last six months as a Senior Technology Lead. He is engaged to Hazel and they are getting married later this year on 30 June with several OMs attending. The couple plan to honeymoon climbing the highest peaks in Banff National Park Mountain Range, Alberta, Canada. Following a stint in the airborne forces (Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Kosovo and a total of five years in Iraq and Afghanistan) Rob Whitfield (7.91-96) is now selfemployed and now calls himself an ‘International Turnaround and Transformation Consultant’, basically a troubleshooter. He picks up organisational and commercial ‘car crashes’ and turns them around. Most recently he has been in the Middle East working for an organisation owned by the Qatari Royal Family. His latest project (20 months) has been opening Sidra Medical, which is a 500-bed women’s and children’s hospital in Doha. It is finally open and so Rob be moving onto the next project this year, whatever that is!

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Hilda Beleskaite (3.01-06) left to study in Switzerland and pursued a career in hospitality. She is now a director in the head office of an international hotel chain. Richard Böckel (7.05-08) has been working for an entrepreneur in the area of medical technology., running the business development for a medical technology company. He is also very involved in a social project of the order of Malta youth group, the Lebanon Project supporting disabled people.

Philly Hunt (3.03-08) has spent the past few years working as an Art Technician in a secondary academy in London, complementing this by acting as Artist in Residence in the Kentish Town Health Centre, devising therapeutic art workshops for mental health service users. She then moved jobs and became Marketing Manager and Art Director for a UKbased sustainable and ethical textile importer and boutique. However, having gained experience in a council role supporting the Kidderminster Arts Festival, Philly is now working with a new funding initiative ‘Great Place Herefordshire’ to bring artsbased learning and environmental awareness projects to the county.

Tom Constable (7.03-05) is currently completing his PGCE. He is engaged to a History teacher, and they are to be married in April this year. They have both been appointed to teach at Cranleigh School in September.

Congratulations to Greg Kirchhoff (1.06-10) on the success of his début feature film ‘Dusky Paradise’ (poster shown right), the story of an apathetic young man, who, after the death of his parents, travels to a foreign country to live in their house and look after their turtle.

Having studied History of Art at the University of York and worked in London auction houses for two years, Sophie Foxall (4.99-03) went on to retrain as a paediatric nurse, completing her course at King’s

Joe Lewis (1.96-01) now has four children, aged between 8 and 2. He is in his third year of housemastering at Pangbourne College. In April he is running the London marathon for Great Ormond Street Hospital.


OM NEWS | Congratulations to Sammy Mercer (4.00-05) on the birth of Abigailin July 2017. Sammy works for her family business in Leominster. Josh Morgan (SH.04-06) is getting married this summer to Jess, his business partner. They run a tour operator business, specialising in luxury catered-chalet holidays in Morzine and Les Gets. Their primary focus is fine food and wine and they have had Michelin-starred (ex-Great British Menu chefs) out to cook for them on special occasions. They also make a point of using Land Rover Defenders for client transport around the resort. Business is going well and apart from a relatively high level of stress, life is treating them both pretty well! Jess and Joshorganise and sponsor an annual charity golf day at Kingswood, attracting 80-90 and raising decent sums for a good cause. Apart from that, a group of SH boys do manage to meet up every summer on the Southbank, which is always a good laugh but a shame it isn’t more often! Rob McArthur (9.98-03) will be taking on a world first challenge this summer travelling from London to the island of Svalbard, a few hundred miles from the north pole, by human power alone. The route is broken down into four stages; a run from London to Dover (87 miles), a swim across the English Channel (21 miles), a cycle from Calais to Tromso, in northern Norway (over 2,000 miles) and finally a row to Longyearbyen, Svalbard (over 700 miles). He begins

on the 15 June 2018, and aims to reach his destination by the end of August. The target is to raise over £100,000 for charity.

yachts, catamarans, motor yachts and gullets.

Helena Otterbach (4.02-04) married Nils Grimm on 15 October 2017. Helena manages the European recruitment team for Adient, a Tier 1 supplier to the automotive industry (automotive seating) and lives in Cologne with her husband.

After graduating from Reading with a Real Estate degree, Edward Wrigley (7.04-09) worked for three years at CBRE in Paris as a property valuer for international clients. He quit last April to go back-packing around Northern and Eastern Europe and the Balkans covering over 20 countries in six months. He is now back at work in Paris still at BNP Paribas Real Estate as an investment analyst.

Charlotte Rugeroni (4.05-10) has joined Deloitte as a consultant in the London office; working within Human Capital Consulting, and more specifically, HR & Technology Advisory. Beforehand, she worked in recruitment supporting startups, boutiques and fast-growth businesses to drive their ongoing growth/success by bringing on board top graduate/early-career talent. Greg Swinford (5.00-05) is a teacher of Music at the King’s School, Canterbury. He got engaged to Lizzy Thompson last August and they are getting married this August.

Congratulations to Lucinda Walker (née Cooper) (3.95-00) on her marriage.

Congratulations to Charlie Yarrow (née Hill) (4.98-01) and Alastair on the arrival of Henry Sydney Michael in June 2017, a brother for Honour and William. Charlie and Alastair have been living and working in Singapore for five years but are looking forward to returning to their home near Pangbourne in 2018, when Alastair returns to work in London for Willis Insurance and Reinsurance.

George Tolchard (1.95-00) is still based in East Africa, currently with Singita Grumeti Reserve, Western Serengeti in Tanzania, with one of the largest safari companies on the continent. He runs the guiding department as well as leading the walking safaris, and is involved in much of the guide-training on the ground. Pictured right. Rupert Wakeley (2.03-08) runs a yacht brokerage, creating bespoke sailing holidays for any budget in destinations across the world, on

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| OM BOOKS | BOOKS James Aldred (7.91-93) has published a book ‘The man Who Climbs Trees’ based on his work as a freelance wildlife cameraman for the BBC and National Geographic. He has worked with David Attenborough and other top nature presenters. His work has taken him to such exotic places as Borneo, Venezuela and the Congo to film a variety of wildlife from eagles and elephants to orangutans and birds of paradise.

John Browne’s (6.52-57) most recent offering is ‘Hidden Account of the Romanovs’, a work of romantic historical fiction. In preparation for President Putin’s State Visit in 2003, The Bank of England has been instructed to close any remaining Russian Imperial accounts. The Bank’s investigation follows the career of a Grenadier officer through World War I and the Russian Civil War from 1914 to 1922. Against a background of international intrigue and Imperial elegance, the story winds its way through two of history’s greatest mysteries, the murder of the Russian Imperial Family and the Ml6-led plot to kill Rasputin.

Alastair Carew-Cox’s (7.75-80) latest book ‘Damozels & Deities, Edward Burne-Jones, Henry Holiday & Pre-Raphaelite Stained Glass, 1870-1898’ has been published. With an introduction written by Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber, the book sets out to raise awareness of these much-neglected masterpieces in so many churches including numerous Oxford and Cambridge University chapels, in order to protect them. Alistair is offering the book at a substantial saving to OMs, at £50 (including UK postage & packing). It is hardback, 404 pages.

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OM BOOKS | In ‘Journeys with Open Eyes’ Hugh Roberts (2.64-68) offers a ‘lifetime’s experience of working and engaging with people from myriad cultures all over the world, many roads less travelled and peoples less visited… The keyword is in the title strapline, ‘empathy’. There are continuous flashes of real insight into delicate situations, which have no doubt helped greatly in delivering the hoped-for result.’

This book is a compilation of reflections on Christianity and the nature of the fulfilled life by Michael Harvey (staff.59-93). Most of these essays were originally delivered as sermons or addresses during his teaching career and for Michael’s many friends and former pupils the rediscovery of his stimulating analysis and style will bring much pleasure and for those unfamiliar with his writings a treat awaits. As a linguist, teacher and writer for whom literature, art and architecture are daily companions he brings to his theological interpretations a wealth of literary and artistic references and powerful imagery. It is appropriate that the text is accompanied by many of his own drawings as well as illustrations from his earlier study of churches in the Aude region where Michael and Suse have made their home. Copies may be purchased through the Malvernian Society for £12 plus p&p

In his novel ‘In the Shadow of Hitler’ Richard Vaughan Davies (8.54-59) tells the story of lawyer, Adam, wounded in Normandy, who falls in love with a young German woman. Rose has been forced into prostitution in the ruins of the bombed-out city. They discover an extraordinary secret from an old doctor about Hitler’s troubled childhood, and face real danger trapped in the forbidden zone of the Dead City. The story begins and ends in a mellow Cotswold village in the present day, but even now Adam cannot escape the shadow of Hitler.

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| ELLERSLIE NEWS Pam Binyon writes:

I am still going strong (for a mideighties bod) and still living over the Food for All Christian and General bookshop that I opened nearly 28 years ago, swapping the premises with my family chalet bungalow. The shop has always been run entirely by volunteers. The present manager and her team are really working hard to make sure that the shop is providing a really up-to-date Christian centre, servicing Bromyard and its environs, not only with books, cards and gifts but also in continuing to provide a welcome drop-in centre for all and sundry. I myself am still a trustee as well as being the landlady. My other activities include attending a ‘senior activity’ class in the gym, going for walks most days, visiting, with a friend, a local residential and nursing home with a monthly service of Holy Communion and for an occasional Sunday afternoon hymn-singing session, good old-fashioned hymns and ‘up-to-date’ ones known to the residents through Songs of Praise. I also take Holy Communion to other home-bound people. One of these is 102 y.o. and has a phenomenal memory; wish mine were half as good! (I’m sure you will remember that my memory has never been good for years and now it is much worse! I so much enjoyed the Ellerslie reunion at Malvern College in the summer. There were so many exEllerslie staff and girls present. I think I was the eldest. So many people came and ‘introduced’ themselves, enabling me to enjoy memories of Ellerslie. It is obvious that Ellerslie is recognised by Malvern College as having contributed a great deal to the ethos of the College today – and rightly so. May the seeds sown due to your links with Ellerslie in the past bless you as you face the challenges of today. They can….” God is still on the Throne”!

Barbara Cary writes:

We sold our dairy herd at the end of March and my husband is recovering from a hip replacement; he needs reminding about doing his exercises! I still work as a physiotherapist three days a week and am still riding. I

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judged Arabian horses in Abu Dhabi last year which was great fun and very interesting.

Verity Eminton writes:

I trained at Whitelands College as a teacher in 1952 and I taught for over 30 years. In the Spring of 2017 the Roehampton Institute decided to give those with two-year training an Honours degree in Education! It was a marvellous day held at the Festival Hall. We dressed up in hat and gown and met many friends: not bad at 83! I’m not so mobile but still drive, which is a great asset. Our 1 year-old great-grand-daughter gives us great pleasure, running about and into everything!

Sara-Jane Hamilton (née Platt) writes:

Earlier this year I left my job at Lewisham Hospital and moved to St Guy’s & St Thomas’ Hospital where I am working as an MRI radiographer. It really is a great unit and a joy to work at such a well-known hospital and to get back to a clinical role once more. In August I got married in Newquay to be near the memory of my sister Rachel. It really was a beautiful day on the beach at Lusty Glaze.

Lucy Parker (née Fawcus) (68-73) writes:

I remember starting at Hampton House with matron Ward and my uniform was far too large for me as it had been handed down from my sisters, Caroline and Susan Fawcus! I had come from Croftdown Prep School (Malvern) so my reputation came before me!! I had to hide when matron checked the clothes list as my mother sent me back with a box of tissues rather than the named 24 white handkerchiefs and I never quite got to grips with the ‘over knickers’ and for what purpose they were used?? I managed to have lots of fun and not ahuge amount of work to actually get to my O level year without being expelled!! Malvern College was a great source of excitement at that age and we used to do Sunday Silent Reading in Southlands eating Sherbet Pips and try to spy the boys in their green rugby shirts, walking along the road!! When I left (much to Miss Prior’s relief) I was promptly sent off to Eastbourne School of Domestic Economy to learn how to cook and sew and wait for the husband to turn up!! .....!


ELLERSLIE NEWS | I worked at the Dragon Prep School for a year as an assistant matron then went to do my nursing training at The Middlesex Hospital in London. Somehow things came together and I enjoyed learning and even maths made sense! I then nursed at The Royal Marsden Cancer Hospital, London St. Stephens A/E, Department London, Cheltenham A/E, The Royal Star and Garter Home for Disabled Ex-Servicemen, Richmond (although my friends thought I worked at a pub as there was one with the same name near Kew Green! and even a couple of years in James Pringle House (STD clinic) near Oxford Street where Aids was one of the first hospitals to pioneer and bring to light the Aids virus. Princess Di visited which helped the cause! I also did a stint as a chalet girl in Val d’Isère. I married my husband, who is a landscape gardener in 1982 and we have just celebrated our 35th wedding anniversary! We have two wonderful children, and live in beautiful Ludlow, Shropshire. I often go the theatre in Malvern and feel really nostalgic when I traipse up Church Street where the record shop used to be and we would ask for records to be played, listen to them in booths then decide that we did not want to purchase them after all!! I see Burley’s hairdressers is still going (they used to come and wash our hair every two weeks!!)

I have worked as a school nurse in an Independent school for 25 years and it makes me wonder how we managed without the use of mobiles etc - just a good weekly letter home seemed to suffice! I try very hard not say ‘Well, in my day...’ For those that remember me, I have not changed and still have the same infantile sense of humour even at the great age of 60!

Beverley Willsea writes:

Thank goodness for my computer which allows me to stay in touch with people; I am so glad of that! And for telephones too, although the smart ones are sometimes a mystery to me, and Skype. I can’t see me coming to England, but every summer we go to the mountains for a week to a ski resort with our two children and two grandchildren. If walking is difficult, at least I can count on a patient husband and friends. These include Rosemary Melcher (née Phillips) whom I see a couple of times a month, once at a meeting of a group of English ladies - we get together for lunch - and once at a regular chamber music concert that we subscribe to. I can still drive which is a blessing as public transportation is too difficult to handle. Our daughter is a clarinet player and teacher and she lives in New Jersey so it’s really nice when

we can all get together.

Rosie Belcher writes:

It was with excitement and a degree of curiosity that we four Liz Hall (Grainger), Dee Sheriff (Hill), Joy Harvey (Lees) (69-76) and Rosie Belcher (Till) (70-74) returned to Malvern for a longawaited reunion of our own. We had arrived in Malvern from the Vale of Glamorgan, Leicestershire, Rutland and Somerset. For two of us, over forty years had elapsed since we were both at Ellerslie, but it was amazing how quickly mannerisms and the details of wicked exploits came to mind. There were certainly no awkward silences and, in fact, the only awkwardness was caused by us sitting for far too long over an excellent tea whilst the staff at The Cottage in the Wood were politely attempting to lay the tables for dinner. So easily did the conversation flow, we hardly noticed the time at all. We managed to persuade the security gentleman at the old Cherbourg Boarding House to allow us to view a recently completed apartment. With the benefit of overshoes we managed to navigate over pristine carpets into spaces long since vacated by us. Joy was delighted to think she

Ellerslie did teach me to steer a course through most situations and it did not put me off sending own children to boarding school. I keep in touch with Eunice Evans née Dorrell, Sarah Davenport-Price and Mary Carr (née Perkins). In fact this summer Eunice, Sarah and myself spent a night in Malvern which was great fun - we did the walk up to St. Ann’s Well and our hotel room was the same view we had from our dormitories when in Southlands and Cherbourg but this time we WERE allowed to talk after lights out and there was plenty of that!!

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| ELLERSLIE NEWS was standing in the place where her bed once stood and I was interested to discover the Common Room was nothing like as large as I remembered, but then I was rather smaller in those days!

the kitchen fridge I did work out there were enough unopened bottles of champagne to enable us to have one each, were they miraculously offered - which, of course, they were not.

Despite my tenuous grip on mathematics, it did not take me long to discover none of us would be buying an apartment in addition to our present homes, but having found

Talking of “having one each”, it was with great amusement, on finding we could not eat the entire contents of two cake stands, a voice suggested we should take the remains home

in tinfoil - which was duly provided. “How many sandwiches is that each?” was the next vital question as the silver foil made a path across the table. Memories of poor meals take many years to fade and good food remains important to us all whilst most treasured are old and sincere friendships and memories of years spent away from home on the Malvern Hills.

| ELLERSLIE OBITUARIES Jean Ann Fox (née Price) was at Hampton House, then at Ellerslie during the 1940s. The daughter of a Herefordshire farmer, she tried various activities including modelling, pig-farming and some secretarial work before meeting David Fox and marrying him and moving to live in South Africa where she lived all her married life initially based in Zululand farming sugar cane and latterly in Natal raising thoroughbred horses. She leaves behind three children, two daughters and a son and two grandchildren.

Margret Appleton writes of Rachel Bennett (1932-2017) Rachel Bennett was born to Marjorie (née Barrett) and George Appleton, a missionary in Rangoon. At the age of six she spent a year with her younger sister Margaret at a boarding school in England while

her parents returned to Burma. This was normal practice at the time. At the beginning of World War 2 the family was reunited, now including a younger brother Tim, and returned to Burma, but had to escape the Japanese invasion in 1942 and fled to lndia, with Rachel surviving bubonic plague en route, thanks to the heroic efforts of their mother. On returning to England her education continued at Ellerslie, Malvern, then Cambridge, where she was awarded a B.A. in English literature and later, from Manchester, an M.A. on the Victorian novel and a PhD. on Dickens. After Cambridge she lectured in Pakistan at Kinnaird College. lt was in Pakistan that she met again a fellow graduate, lan Bennett, who would later, like his father, become a clergyman, and they married in 1958 and had four twins, each of whom would become outstanding achievers in their different fields. Subsequently in Hemel Hempstead, Manchester, Birmingham and Sunderland Rachel continued to teach English and lecture on English literature to adults. She was also a regular contributor to the Review of English Studies. Rachel was something of a feminist, and she was not averse to holding unconventional views. One person even described her as mischievous, but her loving, inclusive and hugely generous nature earned her very many friends throughout her life.

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Eileen Crewdson writes of Ann Darnborough (née Studdard) (Ellerslie.46-50) Ann arrived at school aged 9 having spent two years strapped to a leather frame because of serious spinal problems and in her final year at school she had an operation for an infected kidney. After school she spent more than half her life fighting for disabled people. Among the positions she held was that of Deputy General Secretary of the Multiple Sclerosis Society where she launched a monthly bulletin concerning benefits, finance, equipment, aids and holiday opportunities. With her husband Derek she launched the Directory for Disabled People and the National Information Forum. It was for her work for disabled people that she received her OBE. Ann died suffering from dementia and leaves behind her husband Derek Kinrade, and a son.


OM OBITUARIES | Entries to the school in the 1930s Holderness Norcliffe Martin (Day.3739) Briefly a schoolmaster at Seaford Court School, but his heart was in horticulture: he worked in nurseries in Devon, and for Webb’s, and finally ran his own shop in Berkhamsted, before retiring to Malvern. Died 27 February 2017, aged 94. Pellew Myles Addington (SH.33-36) House Prefect. Died 7 April 2017, aged 98. Pratt Peter Frederick (2.39-43) Joined the army at 18. Went into France on D-Day+1. Reached the rank of major; after the war was ADC to Lt. Gen. Sir Brian Horrocks. Moved to Edinburgh as PT instructor then - reluctantly- returned home to take over the family dairy farm. Gained success at agricultural shows with his dairy herd. President of the Jersey Dairy Herd Society in 1980. President of the South Devon Cattle Society 2008. Died 28 September 2016, aged 91. Griffith Alan Edward Clifton (9.3437) WW2 FAA as a midshipman, then transferred to the RAF as a reargunner with 114 Sqn. DFM. Having earned his wings, he spent two years after the war flying dignitaries to and from India (when the flight lasted three days). He spent his career in banking with Barclays and Nat West. In retirement he enjoyed gardening and horse-racing, though he was never much of a gambler. Died 26 Feb 2018, aged 98.

1940s Beeson Christopher, William Restarik (9,7,5.40-44) School Prefect. Cricket XI. Athletics. Rackets Pair. Lieutenant, Scots Guards. Clare College, Cambridge. Farmer. Gold Prospector. Died 9 May 2017, aged 90.

Birley Lawrence Hornby (5/7, SH.4245) School Prefect. Head of House. Cadet Officer. Farmer in Colwall. Died 4 December 2015, aged 88. Broadbent Peter (1,8.40-42) 2nd Great War, Merchant Navy. Leeds University, BSc (Mech E), MI MechE, MIMP. Chairman, Thomas Broadbent & Sons Ltd. Peter started at Blenheim. He remembered taking the scholarship examination in February 1940 in one of the huts in front of the Main Entrance. It was freezing cold and everyone was shivering! He was awarded an Exhibition and started in April 1940. His dormitory was one of the Palace’s staterooms and still had the tapestries on the walls. Fountain pens were strictly forbidden! Died May 2017, aged 91. Comninos Michael (8.44-49) Governor 1982- Died 20 January 2018, aged 86. Michael BoydCarpenter remembers: ‘In September 1945 I was a new boy in Remove A when I met Michael. He was moved up into the hundred after two weeks. I was not! He was very bright, spending three years in the Sixth Form. He had been a day boy (at Harrow) until the return to Malvern when he boarded in No.8 He did not see eye to eye with his housemaster, but he enjoyed his time at the school. He was known amongst his many friends as ‘Mick the Greek’. I did not see him for some four years after Malvern until I spotted him coming out of Bank station: bowler hat, rolled brolly, smart suit. I asked what he was up to; he said ‘I’ve got a job at Rothschild’s; must look the part!’ Again he became a success. My wife and I had an easy friendship with him and his wife, Ann. She was keen on renovating properties, so they moved many times in their marriage. One had to check the address when an invitation arrived. In his retirement he bought a very fast motorboat in which he charged around the Solent at breakneck speed. We changed his name to Mr Toad. They often came to stay with us in the Aquitaine. He

was a member of Brock’s wine club seeking out fine wines in the region, or that was the excuse. Ann died some years ago, and after that he spent most of the time in his flat in Curzon Street. Sometimes he would pop into my son Patrick’s art gallery for a chat. Two years ago I had lunch with him in London. It was obvious that Alzheimer’s had struck. For the last year he was bed-ridden with constant care; a very sad end for a very good friend.’ Cox Christopher (2/6.38-41) 2nd Great War, RAF. Solicitor 1949. Partner, Byrch Cox & Sons, Solicitors, Evesham. Died February 2016, aged 92. Hinde John Frederick Keeling (4.42-47) Junior Chapel Prefect. Pembroke, Cambridge. Coxed Cambridge (winning) boat. Coxed Cambridge & Oxford boat v Yale & Harvard 1951. European Rowing Championships 1951, 1954. Olympic Games 1952, 1956. Solicitor. Head of Legal Division and Director, Shell International Petroleum Co. Ltd. Died May 2017, aged 88. Kirkham Michael Joseph Sperry (SH.39-43) After Sandhurst, served in WW2 as a captain in the Derbyshire Yeomanry. Spent much of his life since 1952 as a farmer. Died 13 August 2017, aged 92.

1950s Daniell Michael Kenneth Duperier (3:54-58) Gonville and Caius, Cambridge, BA. Swimming Half Blue 60-62. Systems Programmer at Ferranti, Bracknell. MBCS. Held British swimming record for 50m butterfly for his age group in 2001. Awarded silver medal in the British swimming championships for his results shortly before he died of cancer 17 January 2018, aged 77. Donald Graham Alexander (4.5457) Athletics. FLIA ALIA Diploma.

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| OM OBITUARIES Manufacturers Life Insurance Co. (Manulife), UK & Hong Kong. Eagle Star International, UAE. PCP Group, Cyprus. Died 26 May 2017, aged 77.

Member of the PGA. Died 6 June 2017, aged 80.

Fairclough Ian Walter (9.52-57) Junior Chapel Prefect. Head of House. Shooting. Cadet Officer. Chairman Eurocommodities Ltd., and Director of other companies. Memberof the London Community and Baltic Exchanges. Master of the Girdlers’ Company. Malvernian Society Committee 1966-2006. Chairman of the Public Schools’ Lodges Council. College Governor. Died 16 May 2017, aged 78. Frumin David Hilbré (2.57-59) Captain in the 2nd Yorks Regiment., TAVR Chartered Accountant. FCA Group Financial Director., Diamond Paints Ltd., and Director of Assoc. Companies. AMBIM. Died 16 August 2017, aged 73. Griffiths Ivan Merten Stewart (7.5154) died 13 Jan 2018, aged 80

Grubb Antony Gawen, known as Tony (6.50-53) National Service in Cyprus. Turned professional in 1954. Golf Assistant at Fulwell Golf Club, Porters Park GC and Coombe Hill GC. Winner of the Gor-Ray Cup, the Golf Assistants’ Championship in 1958. Winner of the Schweppes PGA Close Championship 1964. Joint winner of the pro-am Bowmaker Tournament in 1969. Honorary Life

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Hewitson Roger Ellwood (3.49-53) JP. RNVR. National Service at HMS Ceres and HMS Dryad. Ran Empire Scenic Studios. Founded Quinton Operatic Society, and in 2015 was awarded a Long Service Medal for 50 years’ service from the National Operatic and Drama Association. A further mark of his altruism was the award of a Gold Award from the NHS for reaching the milestone of 50 blood donations. Died 25 August 2017, aged 81. Hickman Timothy John (SH.5055) Living in Worcester for most of his life he followed in his father’s footsteps, becoming a successful West Midlands businessman, being involved with and owning various engineering businesses throughout his working life. He very much enjoyed hunting and fishing, owning a stretch of water on the River Wye, although he fished as far afield as Russia. He had a flat in Poole and enjoyed sailing and fishing for bass in the area. It is fair to say he lived his life to the full, sharing many of his enjoyments with friends and family to which he was always extremely loving and generous. He left a wife and daughter. Father of JJN Hickman (deceased) (SH 73-78). Died 15 April 2017, aged 80.

Lewis Jeremy Morley (1.55-59) was a writer, editor, publisher and man of letters, “one of the best loved figures in the London literary world” (Daily Telegraph). He was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and a committee member of the Royal Literary Fund. He flourished as a biographer of Cyril Connolly, Tobias Smollett, Allen Lane, David Astor and the Greene family. He hoped “that the detailed and sympathetic recreation of someone else’s life could be worthy to stand alongside the labours of the great novelists: it attempts, after all, the resurrection of the dead, and what could be more miraculous than that?” Auberon Waugh described his Cyril Connolly biography as “one of the funniest biographies I have ever read”. He also wrote three splendidly funny volumes of autobiography. The first, Playing For Time, describes his family, childhood, and time at Malvern and Trinity College Dublin. In the preface, he wrote “Since my life has been short on incident and ordinary to a degree (or so it seems to me), the only possible justification for producing a slice of autobiography must lie in its being entertaining, evocative of place and of a particular way of life”. There is space for only one anecdote, prompted by the reference to him in the OM records as Founder of Malvern College Literary Society. This started life as the “Intellectual Society” in the boiler room of No.1,


OM OBITUARIES | “festooned with gurgling Victorian pipes on which jock straps and footer shorts of the enemy were hung to dry”. Jeremy invited Gerry Sayer who addressed them “with fervour, not as we expected on Milton or Wordsworth, but on the iniquities of towing sewage out to sea in barges instead of drying it on racks for subsequent use on the soil”. Jeremy described his years at Malvern with typical exaggeration and self-deprecation. He “had made no impression whatsoever as a scholar, a character or, most importantly, as a sportsman”. His lifelong friends from No.1 would disagree. He was perceptive, insightful, witty, and appreciative of the oddities, frailties and joys of life. We will miss his company, his stories and his great roars of laughter. Died 9 April 2017, aged 75. Lloyd Davies Alan Trevor (2.50-54) House Prefect. King’s College, London and Westminster Medical School. MB, BS, MRCS. LRCP, DRCOG. Andover GP. Tutor at the London College of Osteopathic Medicine and former chairman of the Osteopathic Trust. Died 15 June 2017, aged 81. Morris Peter John (2.52-55) Died 1 November 2017, aged 79.

officer and conservationist, involved in over 25 major projects and credited with over 40 publications, Peter’s enduring commitment was to the Kafue National Park in Zambia where he worked for over 40 years. A former director of the Zambia Wildlife Authority summed up Peter’s contribution: ‘He was an icon of conservation in Zambia and particularly for Kafue National Park.’ Died 22 April 2017, aged 78. Newton Robert (6.48-53) House Prefect MBIM. Executive Committee, Timber Trade Federation Council died 14 October 2017, aged 82 Perrins John Neville (8.46-51) House Prefect. Chartered Accountant. Died February 2018, aged 84. Phillips Nigel James Carey (3.54-58). Solicitor with Lodders. Died 15 May 2017, aged 76.

Support), RAF. AO Scotland and NI, 1983-86; Senior Directing Staff (Air) RCDS 1986-87. Retired 1987 Air ViceMarshal, CB CVO. Member Executive Committee RNLI. Governor of Malvern College 1988- Member of College Council 1996-2004

Smith Michael Ian Montague (6.4852) House Prefect. Architect and planner, spending most of his working life as a Government Planning Inspector. Died 5 August 2017, aged 83

Walters Robert Hugh, known as Robin (9.53-57) House Prefect. Managing Director of Saccone & Speed Ltd., Director or Chairman of Associate Companies. Died 14 June 2017, aged 77.

Smith Robert Guy Foster (8,2.4751) College Prefect. Head of House. Editor of The Malvernian. MA Law at Downing College, Cambridge. Barrister. FCIS. Company Secretary, Redland Ltd. Died May 2016, aged 82.

Westwood James Anthony, known as Tony (7.53-56) House Prefect. Died 9 July 2017, aged 78.

Steavenson David Henry Michael John (4.48-53) Martin History prize. School Prefect. Head of House. Cadet Officer. Grenadier Guards serving for 4 years in the Middle East. Founder, Connell May & Steavenson. President of Lentheric Inc, USA. Chairman, Chartwell London Ltd. Chairman of the BWA Group. Died 13 June 2017, aged 82.

Moss Peter Frederick Newton de Vere (3.52-56) House Prefect. Cricket XI. Fives. Cambridge University. Guelph University, Canada. A colonial

Tetley John Francis Humphrey (3.4650) RAF College, Cranwell (1950-53). HQ Coastal Command 1955-64; RAF Staff College 1964. MoD (Air); RAF Germany; Director Air Staff Briefing, MoD (Air); Director of Ops (Air

Wilson Charles Edward. known as Ted (5.55-59) House Prefect. Football XI. Double amateur international, representing his adopted country, Singapore, at both football and rugby union. Ted was a chartered accountant until his retirement, working at Price Waterhouse, Singapore, where he was a senior partner. Died 26 July 2017, aged 75.

1960s Daniell Peter John Penrose (3:5560). RMA Sandhurst. RMCS Shrivenham. BSc (Engineering). Athletics for Army and Wiltshire. Served in the Royal Engineers in

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| OM OBITUARIES Hong Kong, Malaysia and Borneo, England, and Germany. Left the British Army in 1980 and emigrated with his family to Australia. Joined the Royal Australian Engineers (Reserves) and retired as a Colonel in 1990. After several mini-strokes, he died 26 December 2017, aged 75. Irvine Maxwell Stewart (4.55-60) School Prefect. Edinburgh University. MB, ChB, DCH, DORCOG, MRCGP. General Practitioner and Police Surgeon in Preston. Died 30 April 2017, aged 75. Morse Christopher George John, known as Robin (2.60-65) Martin History prize. School Prefect, Head of House. Editor of The Malvernian. Hon. scholar, Wadham College, Oxford, Cl.I, Jurisprudence, BCL. Harmsworth minor exhibition, Middle Temple. Barrister-at-Law. Lecturer in Law, King’s College, London. Author: Torts in Private International Law. Died 14 June 2017, aged 65.

Wilson Richard Thomas Henry (5.62-66) St Joh’s, Oxford. Managing Partner Constant & Constant. Senior partner at TLT Solicitors. College Council 2002-2017. Malvernian Society trustee1976-2018 (Chairman 2006-2016). College Governor. Key member of OM Football Club as player (1970-92), as well as secretary and captain. Chairman of the Arthur Dunn Cup Committee. Died 11

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February 2018, aged 69. We re-print below the eulogy delivered at his funeral in March: Richard was much admired by all those who knew him, as a friend, colleague, father and even referee! It has been truly touching to receive and read the letters from all over the world. It says a great deal about Richard’s character that he not only got letters from friends and family, work colleagues and clients, but also those who he regularly played football against and even those who he refereed. From these many letters a few descriptions kept reappearing: ‘a true gentleman’, ‘excellent sportsman’, ‘kind’ and ‘courteous’. A calm reassuring presence whether as a father, solicitor or left back. Richard was the third of five children and grew up in The Cottage, a house which is still in the family, in a little village called Broughton in Lancashire, with his parents, Margery and Eden, his older sister Jenny and two brothers Ted, the eldest, and Andrew, the youngest. He showed his athleticism and determination early on eschewing the usual crawling for a more ambitious bottom shuffling technique. He learnt to escape from his cot and shuffled to the top of the stairs and then launch himself forward and bounce down each step. Jenny remembers racing up the steps to catch him and prevent him falling but he never did! This early sporting success was to become a theme throughout his life. In the 1950s Richard went to prep school at Charney Hall in Grangeover-Sands. He lost his front teeth playing wicket-keeper whilst he was there, much to his mother’s annoyance as he had just finished wearing braces! His children used to ask him to take them out to scare them on occasion!

He told a few other stories about his time at Charney Hall, one which his grandson, Jacob, later took a shine to. There were three Wilsons there: Richard was Wilson Major, Andrew was Wilson minor and a third boy, the youngest and no relation, was Wilson minimus. There was also a ‘Smelly’ though no one can remember if he was a major, minor or just smelly! At prep school and Malvern College he played in both the football and cricket teams, making it into the 1st XI in 1965. After Malvern, Richard took a gap year, now commonplace, but then quite rare. Inevitably he used it to teach football in the United States. Richard went up to Oxford in the late 1960s to St John’s College. His time at university was rather more sporting than academic but we will leave those stories for Andy to tell. After Oxford Richard had a year in Liverpool, where he played football for the Liverpool Ramblers, in 197071, before heading down to London to start his articles at Gregory Rowcliffe where his meagre salary was subsidised by being plied with beer on a Friday night by the boss! He met Moira on a skiing holiday in Obergurgl, Austria, in the early 1970s. It was clearly fated as Moira had joined a party of friends at the very last minute and Andrew was largely ill that holiday, so they got to spend a lot of time together. Moira used to tell how she invited Richard to a party in London shortly after they had returned, and he was extremely grumpy having just lost a football match. Her friends were mystified as to what she saw in him. However, Richard’s easy charm and good nature clearly won through and they married in 1975, around the time that Richard joined Constant & Constant.


OM OBITUARIES | Whilst Constant & Constant was a specialist shipping firm, Richard always did private client work, becoming a trusted advisor to his many Greek clients and one of the youngest partners at the firm and later rising to senior partner. He always enjoyed his job, particularly the Greek balls, weddings and christenings in Greece and in the last few years even the weddings for those children he had seen christened. In more recent years Richard saw through the merger of Constant & Constant and TLT solicitors, becoming the Senior Partner for London and happily continuing with his private client work. He always said he would never retire. Shortly after joining Constant & Constant the children came along; Kate, Sally and Tom. Richard always told the story of when Moira was in labour with Kate, being told ‘it’s going to take ages’ and decided to go off to football training. We can only guess whether his was wearing his Bill Shankly tee-shirt at the time with the famous quote, “Some people think football is a matter of life and death. I can assure them it is much more serious than that.” Richard passed on his love of sport, adventure and the outdoors to his children. Holidays spent canoeing, skiing and hiking are all fondly remembered. He also demonstrated the true art of leadership by confidently asserting that they were heading in the right direction whenever questioned. On one memorable occasion he mistakenly took a wrong turn and led his very young family dressed only in t-shirts and shorts through the fog to the top of Great Gable, a rather tall mountain in the Lake District, rather than the much more modest Green Gable that we had set out to climb. Many years later, when in Aspen for cousin Lucy’s wedding, Richard repeated the trick. He decided a

nine-mile hike to some outdoor hot springs would be nice, forgetting to mention that it was nine miles each way! There were some slightly dicey moments on the way back through bear country as dusk fell. Everyone was less than impressed The habit continued every Boxing Day with the annual Wilson/ Parsley walk which inevitably involved Richard map reading and the whole party getting lost at frequent intervals. Kate, Sally and Tom remember a hardworking but mostly available dad (around the footballing commitments of course!). He used to take the three children swimming every Sunday. On one occasion he forgot to take towels for any of them. He managed tantrums and teenage rebellion in his calm and unflappable manner, providing support, advice and guidance. He was always so generous, treating friends to meals out when visiting the children at university, and happily providing a bed in Chiswick for various friends we met travelling who showed up unannounced. Richard played football throughout his life, for many years with the Old Malvernians, winning the Arthur Dunn cup on five occasions. Later he played for the HAC Vets for 10 years. Tom remembers being taken to watch some of these matches a very young lad, and being confused as to why they all drank their drinks so quickly in the bar afterwards.; although, of course, proud that his father seemed to be winning this too. Once his football-playing days were over, Richard continued to give back to the game he loved so much. He chaired the Arthur Dunn Cup competition and refereed almost every Saturday, even winning ‘referee of the Year’. He continued to referee until the day before his operation and was already thinking about how to get back in shape for next season. Richard was extremely happy when

the grandchildren came along, starting with Jacob in 2010 and followed quickly by Max, Ben, Felix and a little while later, the muchawaited granddaughter, Sophie. Jacob describes his grandad as old and clever but lots of fun. He also gave Jacob his binoculars so he and Ben could spot birds in their garden, passing on his love of twitching. There was the famous trip to the Wetlands Centre where grandad and Jacob (then a baby) saw a bittern, Jacob was less than impressed with the dull brown bird that Richard had waited 65 years to see. Ben describes grandad as enjoying birdwatching, wearing his funny hat and always smiling. Max and Felix remember all the holidays with grandad and how much they enjoyed them. After 35 years of a very happy marriage, Moira died far too soon in 2011 and was - and is - deeply missed by all her family. Richard’s friends rallied round and decided that he needed distractions. The walkers embarked on an ambitious plan to complete the entire the Thames path followed by many other long distance hikes. They all remember Richard’s uncanny ability to spot a bird that noone else could see. Other friends got Richard back into bridge as well as the regular Friday night trips to the Thatched House pub. Everyone was pleased for Richard when he met Susie, the sister of long-standing friends. Sadly, Susie was a wonderful companion for the last three and a half years and he regained his pleasure for life. They went on many adventurous trips to the Pantanal, the Bahamas and only missed out on a trip to Artic due to a broken down ship. Susie wrote a poem about Richard which ends: ‘The final whistle may have come too soon, but he kept playing right till the end and the game was won in the best possible spirit.’

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| OM OBITUARIES 1970s Bullock Anthony John (4.71-75) Royal Agricultural College. Farmer. Died 17 Jan 2018, aged 60. We reprint below the tribute paid at his memorial service held in Malvern College chapel on Friday 2 February 2018: Agriculture lost a true gentleman on 17 January with the passing of Jim Bullock. Jim was a deceptively tall and shy man which I think was partly responsible for his nervous laughter which become as much of him as his name. And laugh he would! Usually at what he had just done on his farm or some totally impractical farm policy ‘the powers that be’ had in the news. I first met Jim at an SMI (Soil Management Initiative, part of ECAF) meeting in 1994 where he was invited to contribute as a farmer trying to rejuvenate interest in direct drilling or no-tillage. His interest was founded on ‘if this technique is good for my business then it can only be helpful to my family. If it can do this for me then it can also help other farmers’. This was what drove him on - his family, and helping others. Around this time, he started his very successful and popular journalistic career and I remember particularly his frustration, irritation and annoyance at being told by an ADAS officer, at the time, that he wasn’t qualified to write in agricultural journals. That was a lesson he didn’t forget - not everyone in the industry was interested in genuinely trying to help farmers. As much as it didn’t put him off writing (luckily!) it did have an impact on his style of writing, causing him, it seemed, to focus on his mistakes as the dominant subjects in his articles. He felt secure that he obviously couldn’t be wrong writing about his own experiences as they were real, then adding large doses of humility, deprecating and cheery humour to complete his style.

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Many journalists strive to be popular or of interest and over the years many farmers have commented that Jim’s articles were the first they read when new editions arrived. It seems his unpretentious honesty and modesty ruled the day. Jim was always very generous with the time he had for others. At shows and other agricultural events, he would find time to talk to anyone be they friends, neighbours and even complete strangers who just wanted to chat to him to find out more about what he has been doing and they all said, “he made us laugh”, of course. He travelled a lot in his early years knowing he needed to improve his knowledge and understanding of no-till. On one such visit to France he met another inspirational farmer, Frederic Thomas, and over time they developed a close friendship built around their respect for each other and joint passion for conservation agriculture. In March 2012 during one of Frederic’s many visits to Jim’s farm and largely due to Jim’s frustration with farmer groups, BASE-UK was formed. A farmer-funded group for those interested in sharing their knowledge and experiences of conservation agriculture. Jim was the group’s first Chairman and latterly its first President and sadly unbeknown to Jim, he was to be its first Honorary member. Within BASE-UK his leadership and inspiration came to the fore to make the group what it is today - a 180-strong member organisation covering the UK; a fitting legacy to Jim’s passion and leadership. Jim, a devoted husband, father, brother and true gentleman, will be greatly missed, and to those of us interested in conservation agriculture he will remain an inspiration. Hickman Julian John Nigel (SH.7376) Shrewsbury Agricultural College. Rally driver, property landlord and ‘quintessential English country gentleman’. Died 18 Sept 2016, aged 56.

Wander Charles Gaspard Edouard (8.74-78) House Prefect. Guy’s Hospital and London University. Royal College of Surgeons. Died 24 April 2015, aged 54.

1990s King Oliver Charles Ayliffe (SH .85-90). Died 24 November 24 2017, aged 45. Oli’s brother, Giles, (SH.80-84) writes: Oli obtained a scholarship to Malvern. Unlike my own experiences at Malvern which mainly involved running around in a jock strap and appropriate sporting kit for five years Oli was winning various academic prizes with as little effort as possible. His Housemaster long gave up on him arriving at breakfast on time. Throughout his life he generally avoided having to do any jobs that might involve an early alarm call, donning a grey suit and boarding a dull commuter train. That was one of his most endearing qualities – he did things his own way, in his own style at his own pace – sucking up every ounce of culture around him, constantly learning and reading about a variety of different topics and becoming an expert in them. In his gap year he went backpacking to South America, came back fluent in Spanish and some Portuguese –(just to add to his fluent French and passable Italian) and was a little more worldly wise – having turned over a car in Chile with his friend Ben Miller and had a gun drawn on him on a beach in Colombia. Then he went up to Corpus Christi, Cambridge to read Modern Languages, proudly following in the footsteps of his grandfather, Sir Gordon Wolstenholme. It was a four-year course involving a third year in a foreign country. Rather than play safe and head to France or Spain, Oli decided he would go to Colombia, a country he came to love in more ways than just for travelling


OM OBITUARIES | through. As soon as he graduated he headed back to Colombia. It was at this time in 1997 he met his wife, Alba. This was a country with challenges at the time with the divisive rebel guerrilla’s movement, FARC and the various drug cartels. Oli spent over four years there. He spent much of his time teaching English, but also worked with his great friend, Gerard, on an import/ export business – importing herbs and lentils and Renault car spare parts – mind you, not all in the same container! He absolutely adored this time of his life with Alba, their love blossomed and he immersed himself in the sheer variety and vibrancy of South American culture, music, food and people. Much more recently a Colombian friend of Oli’s, who was the acting Director of the British Council, asked him to organise and help translate from Spanish into English the Peace Agreement between the Colombian Government and FARC. 323 pages: an example of Oli’s ability to surprise occasionally. He quietly got on with sorting this out with no song and dance and did much of the proof-reading. One of the few benefits of being at home a lot was that it enabled him to take his daughter, Isabel, to school and back on a regular basis in south east London, where he lived. At the school playground he always asked after the other parents health and well-being rather than talking about his illness or looking for sympathy. His friends had total admiration with the way he dealt with it. Never making a fuss. His employer, Marsh Insurance, has been incredibly understanding and supportive; in particular his boss and fellow workmates, who always kept in touch and where possible would visit him during his chemo sessions. He was inspirational to family and friends, kind, gentle, thoughtful and modest. He was a great talker, listener and good fun to be around; a loyal and supportive son to Mum

and Dad, a brother and true friend to me and younger sister, Philly. Oli had a sense of humour right to the end – he would have had a chuckle that, after a seven year battle with cancer, he chose Black Friday to leave this world. This was particularly difficult for my parents, as we lost my older sister, Jo, in 2010 to the same disease. We can rest assured that two people are smiling down on us today as the Gordon’s Gin stocks in heaven take a battering as sister Jo invites Oli to his first party! Sorrels John Arthur, known as Jay (5.93-95) St Peter’s College, Oxford. Jay worked in public relations notably at Ogilvy and Frank, Died 10 June 2017, aged 41. Winchester Oliver William (9.9398) Courtauld Institute. Oli worked as a curator at the V&A and the Wellcome Trust. Died 22 Dec 2017, aged 38.

2000s Sörensen Henning Dietrich Christian (9.03-05) Died 3 April 2016, aged 29.

STAFF Bennett Simon Piers (Staff.74-84) Director of Drama 74-84. Master i/c Rugby 74-84. College Council 05-15. Governor 05-17. Died 15 Sept, aged 72. Bill Denny was a close personal friend of Simon and attended his funeral at St. Mary’s church, Bruton, Somerset with the family on Thursday 5 October 2017. He also designed all the theatrical sets for the many plays which Simon produced at Malvern, Bill writes. Simon was born in London on 1 February 1945. Soon afterwards he was taken to the family home in Bruton to be brought up by his grandparents. He attended

Winchester House Preparatory School and from there went as a scholar to Rugby. Holidays were spent in Jerusalem and Jordan where his mother was excavating at Petra. He left Rugby a few terms early in order to travel to Afghanistan before taking up a place at King’s College, Cambridge to read Classics but then changed to English. Sir David Calvert-Smith, who was Simon’s contemporary at King’s, reminisced about meeting Simon through rugby football, succeeding him as Captain when he went down. He remembers with great affection, when, as members of the Chetwynd Society, they met, drank and talked. On the final meeting of the academic year the university authorities were not amused when they made a pile of their notes in the then dry fountain in the Front Court. This became a spectacular bonfire with charred pieces of paper landing all over Cambridge with the instantly recognisable handwriting of a certain SPB clearly visible Nigel Turner, who followed Simon as Director of Drama at Malvern, having both begun their teaching careers at Trent College, remembers the following: via Gabbitas and Thring Simon was offered a position to teach English at Trent College, which was a small boarding school in Long Eaton near Nottingham. The school was in sad decline with a somewhat complacent staff and numbers around 200. Simon was full of enthusiasm actively seeking responsibility and experience. He became an Assistant Housemaster, helped with both rugby and cricket, directed the school play, which was always ambitiously conceived with huge casts. The appointment of a young, dynamic Head brought new vigour to the school and Simon was fully supportive of the new approach as being entirely in tune with his own sense of full-on commitment. He became Head of English and also built up school Drama as well as now being in charge of Rugby

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and Cricket. The school numbers increased to 500 plus, assuring the College’s future. The part played by Simon in this turn-around cannot be over-estimated. Moving to Malvern as Director of Drama in 1974 he invigorated the impact that Drama had on pupils throughout the school. His ability to organise and enthuse members of staff to assist in each production with set design and construction, costume, lighting and publicity ensured a high quality of performance, be it in the College’s Roger’s Theatre, or in the town’s Festival Theatre. In 1984 Simon produced a performance of “Comus” which was initially performed in Eastnor Castle by kind permission of James Hervey-Bathurst who had been a contemporary of Simon’s at Cambridge. The College Council then gave the go-ahead for the production to go to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival where it was well received. In other areas of school life Simon continued his rugby coaching and was a House Tutor. Roger Smith relates that in 1982 Simon joined the College expedition to Kashmir

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in which he ended up leading a very successful small sub-group to Ladakh. At that time Ladakh was visited by very few people and this visit was probably the very first made by a British school party. This life-changing experience led to Simon taking up the post of Housemaster of Budhanilkantha School, Nepal in 1984. After three years he returned to Trent College and a year later became Head of English at King’s School, Bruton. This meant he was able to live in his family home and marry Jane. They had two daughters Constance and Honour. Constance came to Malvern and was in No.4. After ten years at Bruton, Simon became one of Her Majesty’s Inspector of Schools working for Ofsted and was appointed the EU Inspector on the Board of Secondary School Inspectors in Brussels. On retirement from Ofsted he joined the Independent Schools Inspectorate for a number of years and was then asked to take on and lead, as its Chief Inspector, the School Inspection Service which he did until his retirement at the age of 70.

Previous to this, at the age of 60, Simon became a member of the Malvern College Council serving for ten years. Simon’s contribution whilst on the Council was invaluable as Headmaster Antony Clark writes. As a member of Council and, in particular, as Chair of the Educational Working Group and as a member of Management Board, Simon contributed in a very important way to helping Malvern progress. He loved reflecting on issues of best practice in the classroom and was an astute observer of teaching styles. Simon also had an encyclopaedic knowledge of the rules and regulations applicable to schools as he, himself, was an extremely experienced inspector of schools and this was invaluable in an era of significantly greater emphasis on following procedure laid down by the Department for Education and/ or the ISI. What seemed to amuse some of Simon’s contemporaries is that he had had scant regard for regulation or procedure when he taught at Malvern but entered something of a “second phase” in his life when he retired from teaching and became an inspector. The cry of “poacher turned gamekeeper” was never far from the lips of those who knew him best and loved his ebullience most. Simon had many interests including books, cricket, butterflies, fine wine, travel, local history, trains and his kitchen garden, but his family, friends and home were his greatest love. Murphy Lawrence Ian (Staff.73-81) Head of PE 73-81). Died 24 August 2017, aged 71. Ian’s son, Duncan, delivered a eulogy at the memorial service held for Ian in the College chapel on 12 October 2017, part of which is given below. Lawrence Ian Murphy was born on 19 April 1946 in Leeds, the first


OM OBITUARIES | child of Laurie and Muriel. Dad was raised in a humble, working class environment, with a liberal dose of Methodism thrown in, and it is fair to say that these two cornerstones of his upbringing never really left him. Dad was a hugely driven man, and an intensely enigmatic, philosophical one. His fierce ambition was essentially a quest for social mobility, compounded by a deep-rooted internal conflict – the best way to imagine it is: ‘Sunday School versus the Swinging Sixties’. At primary school, Dad was a bright, industrious, boy - virtues which he later cherished greatly, whether innate or involuntary and he must have derived great pleasure in passing on those genes (to my sister). Dad secured a place at Baines Grammar School, and he never looked back. He was in the first cohort of Gold Winners for the inaugural Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme in 1958. Under the tutelage of the appropriately named sports teacher, Mr Field, it quickly became clear that Dad possessed a natural athletic prowess. By the time Dad secured a place at Carnegie College, he had already shown a considerable talent at rugby union. As well as being a rampaging Number 8 for the Carnegie 1st XV, he was also the Head of the University Folk Club – a somewhat interesting duality! He would later represent Bath, the South of England and act as club secretary for Malvern RFU and Wasps. Elected as the Student of the Year in 1968, and headhunted by Marlborough College, Dad duly joined the staff of one of the country’s most venerable public schools. It must have seemed a completely different world. But Dad had taken with him a secret weapon, his fiancée, Sue, whom he had met in Leeds and they were married in the College Chapel in 1970. In 1971, Mum and Dad spent a year in California whilst Dad undertook a

Masters degree and upon return to the UK, promotion to head of department beckoned swiftly with a move here to Malvern, where yours truly was born in 1975 and my sister, Nicki, in 1978. On his watch, the first incarnation of the sports hall was built and rugby was introduced. Sapiens Qui Prospicit: nowadays, almost all of the famous footballing schools of yore have moved their football fixtures to accommodate rugby in the autumn term. Dad went on to be the Headmaster of three prep schools, with varying degrees of enjoyment and success, but his first and most significant contribution was to a small, boarding school called Forres, to which we moved in 1981. A far-flung, seaswept outpost in Swanage, Dorset, Mum and Dad worked incredibly hard each year to keep numbers up and the business solvent. Mum even drove a minibus across on the Studland ferry each morning before school to collect children (as she would often remind us). On a Sunday afternoon, Dad would read extracts from The Lord of the Rings to the boarders after ‘letter writing’, ‘shoe-cleaning’ and ‘walks’. It was a remarkably happy, old-fashioned place with a lovely family ethos. Fast-forward to Dad’s retirement in the late 1990s, which I am now glad he took so early, and it became evident that Dad craved a Mediterranean lifestyle as well as the opportunity to travel more widely. Thanks to a chance meeting in Richmond with Owen, Annie’s younger son, a blind date was arranged and a whirlwind courtship embarked upon. Annie and Ian were married in 1998 and eventually set up residence in Le Mas Verger, a classical French farmhouse in Bellegarde du Razes, a pretty, medieval hilltop village where they revelled in hosting family and friends with great company, delicious food and a seemingly infinite supply of wine. This was

the epitome of contentment for Dad, having achieved his own Gallic equivalent of the American Dream, and in 2005 he also fulfilled another lifelong ambition, flying out to New Zealand for the entirety of the Lions Tour. In recent years, Dad had created a great impression with the local village council and worked with them on the municipal team, providing a much-valued link between the French residents and the growing number of British ex-pats in Bellegarde. The Mayor complimented Dad on the courage and dignity he showed in coping with his illness. I am sure this would come as no surprise to those who knew him well. A husband of two long marriages, a father, grandfather and a brother – it is worth remembering that Ian was also a son, a son to two fantastic, grounded parents who instilled in him the unerring values of common decency and respect, as well as a healthy work ethic, all of which were to forge the man that he was to become. I feel sure that Dad wanted his children to have a passport to success, and, in his eyes, this was determined by a privileged education - which he considered to be a necessary vehicle for social mobility. Ironically, though, education itself had at long last started to evolve and reflect on its core purpose. Buzz words like ‘character’,

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| OM OBITUARIES resilience’ and ‘well-being’ are now commonplace vernacular – and the concept of a values-based education is no longer dismissed as a euphemism for unambition. So, I think, after all, Dad eventually came to realise that the background he once perceived to be an impediment – one that underpinned his childhood and gave him a strong moral compass, an unslaked thirst for knowledge as well as undaunted ambition - would serve him, his children and his grandchildren, equally well today, just as it did all those years ago. Rosser Norman (Staff. 51-88) Teacher of Mathematics and Geography 51-88. Head of Geography 56-86. Housemaster (No.1) 62-67. Master i/c rackets 5683. Governor 88-08. Archivist 88-08. Chairman of Hillstone Management Committee 88-01 College Council 9100. Died 7 October 2017, aged 89. We re-print below the eulogy given by Norman’s son-in-law at the memorial service held in Malvern College Chapel on Friday 10 November 2017: Norman was the only child of Sid and Doris. He grew up Ilford, attending The Redbridge

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Primary School before becoming a foundation boarding scholar at Brentwood School from 1938 to 1945, where he was Head of House and captain of cricket, football and squash. Games was his great passion; as his Headmaster wrote in 1945 “Rosser is outstanding as an athlete, he is a well-built boy… He appears to me to be just the type to make a thoroughly sound School Master”. Norman had read no geography since the fifth form, but this didn’t stop him excelling in his degree course in Mathematics and Geography at St John’s College, Cambridge which was interrupted by National Service in the Royal Artillery, where he was commissioned as a second lieutenant, and was followed by a year’s teacher training at Cambridge and Charterhouse. While at Cambridge he played soccer as a member of the winning Cuppers team, and was captain of both the squash rackets and lawn tennis teams for his college, and was awarded a squash blue. He first met Myra when their parents became friends in the congregation at the Methodist Church, Ilford. They married on 18 August 1951, and on 1

September that year he became a master at Malvern College. Moving to Malvern was the defining decision of Norman’s life. He spent 25 years as Head of the Geography Department, also teaching the bottom set for maths, and for the majority of that time he led the Gang of Four: Chesterton, Rosser, Saunders and Staniforth. The overriding recruitment criterion was to have been a blue or half-blue; knowing anything about geography was, it seems, a secondary consideration. Indeed, Norman’s own sense of geography wasn’t infallible: in his capacity as Major Rosser he conducted two coachloads of Army Cadets to Castle Donington in Leicestershire, when they should have been at a camp at Donnington, in Shropshire, some seventy miles away. But he loved the subject, and was a keen member of the Royal Geographical Society. The boys nicknamed him “Earth”, probably alluding to his body shape and deep voice, but also a reference to his stability and reliability. Norman and Myra ran No.1 for 15 years from 1962 to 1977. It was a very special period where most of the housemasters and their wives had children of similar ages, which led to a lifelong, unique camaraderie: Grayson, McNevin, Saunders, Chesterton, Staniforth, Surtees, Vyvyan-Robinson, Scott, etc. He loved participating in Alan Carter’s Common Room cricket team, and excelled in his consumption of the teas served afterwards by the housemasters’ wives. Norman’s uniquely comical one-handed bowling action was a source of wonderment. As a housemaster he was firm but fair, and scrupulously polite. The boys always knew where they stood. His meticulous attention to detail was demonstrated in his end of term reports. He was an avid supporter of the various inter-house competitions, whatever the sport, and whatever the weather. Norman


OM OBITUARIES | sat with a fixed grin to endure the sometimes less than entertaining efforts by the boys at the end of Christmas term parties. Norman had high expectations of everyone in his house, and was frequently delighted by the achievements of his charges. He was scrupulously even-handed – every boy received a mention at the House Supper. Norman was Worcestershire squash champion from 1954 to 1956, became a qualified amateur coach and marker and an international referee, officiating at the European Championships in 1976. He was the only grade 1 referee outside London and one year refereed the semi-final of the British Open in Edgbaston. Norman was a founder member and six times champion of Malvern Squash Club. He was also a stalwart of the masters’ football and cricket teams and a qualified football coach, but rackets was his first love. He was master-in-charge of rackets for 28 years (1955-1983), forming a formidable partnership with Malvern’s rackets professional Ron Hughes. He was a perfect foil for Ron, sometimes a calming influence and voice of reason and certainly the link between the professional and the rest of the staff, constantly battling with staff running other games for what was right for rackets. This combination resulted in a very successful period for Malvern rackets, and Norman was so proud to have mentored and coached several Malvernian champions – including his son Philip - at Public Schools’ competitions at The Queen’s Club. As Norman wrote in 1999, of 600 matches played since the resumption of rackets in 1954, Malvern had won 58%. He was a great admirer of the rackets professionals, often supporting their opinions about the best way forward for school rackets. At Queen’s he always had a good word of support for the loser and in his writing you could tell that he

regarded every rackets player and every school that played as equally important regardless of how good they were. He was a great early advocate of girls’ rackets, and he was delighted with the numbers now playing and that his granddaughter Flossie got to the under 16 girls’ doubles final two years ago. Norman retired on 31 August 1988 after 37 years at Malvern College. In retirement he served on the committee of the Tennis & Rackets Association from 1982 to 1997, was Chairman of the Masters in Charge of Rackets from 1987 to 1998, and was President of the Worcestershire Squash Rackets Association from 1988 to 2000. Norman was the rackets correspondent for both The Daily Telegraph and Country Life. His presence in the press box was reassuring, not least for the pros who would frequently forget the score. Norman never forgot. Norman brought his customary enthusiasm, organisational skills and attention to detail in the job of College Archivist, a role he only gave up at the end of 2009. He set out with two objectives: to consolidate the various records which were previously scattered in the offices of the Headmaster, the Bursar, the Estates Steward, etc; and to instil in pupils a sense of history of the College. He also gave further service to Malvern by sitting on the College Council. Outside of the College he was a JP from 1972 to 1997, becoming Chairman of the Malvern Hills bench in 1988. He was persuaded to become Chairman of the Governors of Hillstone Preparatory School during something of a crisis in 1988, and played an important

role in bringing the school under the Malvern College umbrella to become its prep school in 1992. Norman was also the architect of “The Crumblies”, an informal but tightly-bonded group whose love of walking was only exceeded by that of the pub lunch afterwards. With his usual meticulous attention to detail, Norman delighted in planning their walks for many years, and was very proud that the group continues to this day. When Norman retired as archivist in 2010, The Headmaster, Antony Clark wrote “You have been one of the great ‘stalwarts’ of Malvern and an inspiration to so many pupils who have passed your way. It is not easy to find the words which are appropriately appreciative of your dedicated service to our wonderful school and its pupils, but I do hope this letter will convey something of the deep appreciation of the Malvernians of many generations”. Norman died in Worcestershire Royal Hospital on 6 October 2017, and is survived by his wife Myra, daughter Gillian and son Philip.

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| OM SPORT | FOOTBALL CLUB 1ST XI The Old Malvernian Football Club 1st XI enjoyed a reasonably successful year, finishing the 2015-16 strongly as three wins from their last four games saw them finish in mid-table of the Arthurian League Division One. The 16-17 instalment was a similar tale, a sixth place finish and a cup semifinal representing a decent campaign for the Old Boys. The team continues to be marshalled by Ayo Afolabi, whose commitment is matched by his threat as an attacking force, providing pace and goals on a regular basis. He will however stand down as skipper at the end of this term – the club wishes him the greatest of congratulations on his recent engagement. Although the club lost last season’s top scorer, Lanre Vigo, to the glitz and glamour of the semiprofessional ranks as he signed a “mega-bucks” deal with Clapton FC, the money received was spent wisely, as Alex Magee added a powerful presence in attack. The big No.9 was enjoying an impressive first season when he was struck down by a broken leg before Christmas. The 2016-17 campaign began inconsistently, but six wins in seven games in all competitions in November and December propelled the side into the safety of midtable as well as their thrilling run in the LOB Cup. After seeing off the University of Hertfordshire in the last 16, the OMs then hammered Wood Green Old Boys 6-0 in a game which featured Ed Ford scoring from his own half! They fell short however at the semi-final stage, losing 3-1 to London Welsh FC in a game that really should have been won! Sadly, disappointment in the Dunn was an all too familiar tale, as after seeing off Radley they faced Old Berkhamsteadians for a place in the quarter-finals. Backed by the support of club legends such as

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Denham, King and Ryder-Smith, Malvern looked on course for victory when Afolabi headed home Peter Ford’s cross in extratime. But it wasn’t to be as they fell to a 4-3 defeat after the 120 minutes; more Dunn heartache but there is always next year! In terms of personnel, the club continues to be in rude health. Archie Velarde has stepped up to vicecaptain this season, and provides energy and goals from centre midfield – he won the golden boot for 201617 with 14 goals in all competitions. Kume Feese has developed into a consistent threat from wide positions, and recently scored the club’s only hat-trick of the campaign. Matt Wright has returned to the fold to provide some added steel and much-needed military leadership, while veterans such as Peter Ford (who leads the assist charts), Tom Drew (described by one referee as a ‘bull of a man’ and still with a wand for a left foot) and Will Gifford (who scored on both his first two starts of the season), continue to play leading roles at the club. OMFC stalwart Alex Richardson fooled nobody by retiring before the season, returning before Christmas to once again dictate play from the middle of the park. Richard Remington, Jack Nicholls and Liam Smith have all provided skill and creative guile from attacking positions, whilst Arslan Arkallaev has developed into one of the league’s best ball-playing centre backs alongside the classy strength of Mark Jefferson. Meanwhile in goal Will Stephenson has been in career-form at times this season, proving that keepers really do get

better with age; however he will be under pressure from the impressive Ed Street – a recent addition to the OM ranks. The likes of Tim Schmidt and George Davies have provided solidity at full back, with the latter’s return after completing his accountancy exams a welcome boost. There has even been the occasional appearance from Vigo, who whenever possible to provide some added quality. All in all there are plenty of positives for the OMFC 1st XI in 2017 and beyond. Training on Tuesday nights at Shepherd’s Bush continues to be fiercely competitive with the traditional youngsters vs oldies match always tightly contested. The presence of youngsters such as Ed Street, Demi Onabowale and Matt Baynham prove that the club has a bright short and long-term future. Peter Ford


OM SPORT | | CRICKET The OMs went into the 2017 Cricketer Cup campaign looking for an unprecedented three trophies in a row and, with much the same squad of recent years, confidence was high. The first round was against Ampleforth at Malvern. The previous meeting between the two sides had resulted in one of the shortest games in CC history, the Yorkshire side being bowled out for 20, knocked off in less than 3 overs by Malvern. With captain Will Gifford away it was left to stand in skipper Chris Harwood to rein in any complacency. Malvern won the toss and chose to bat, and it was soon a different type of record in sight. Odge Davey (74), Fred Wynn (88) and Alex Milton (116) destroyed a tame Ampleforth attack to get the OMs to a huge 412, just a few short of the highest ever CC total. It was never going to be a game after that, and Ampleforth staggered to 160 all out, O Griffiths with 4-19 doing most of the damage.

Round 2 was likely to be a much tougher test against Oundle, a side the OMs had met on several occasions in recent years. With a few key players missing it was going to be a very difficult fixture. Gifford won an important toss and batting first Malvern got off to a great start with the experienced Craig Wood (43) partnering the in-form Odge

Davey. Davey was joined by Fred Wynn and took the OMs to 225-1 before Davey was out for a brilliant 113, showing his ability to score match-winning innings in important games. Wynn finished on 60 and some lusty hitting from Harwood (25) took the OMS to 297. With a big score on the board and a turning wicket the odds were stacked hugely against Oundle, and after a couple of early wickets with the new ball spinners Mike King (4-43) and O Griffiths (3-35) were always in control bowling the opposition out for 193, a very convincing OM performance. An away fixture at Stowe in the quarter-final again looked a tricky task against a much improving side in recent years. On a usedlooking wicket Stowe chose to bat first, and got off to a solid start at 180-4 before a brilliant spell of accurate seam bowing from Liam Smith (5-25) turned the game on its head reducing the home

side to 192 all out. With a strong batting line up, including the return of Worcestershire’s Tom KöhlerCadmore and Alex Milton the OMs were confident. However, Malvern soon found themselves at 0-2 and despite some resistance from Milton (35) collapsed to 110-5 with the bowling side very much in the ascendancy. Ben Tegg joined Fred

Wynn at the crease and between them produced a wonderfully calm and assured run chase showing maturity beyond their young years to take Malvern over the line, Wynn (86*) and Tegg (38*), and into the semi-final. The match was away at Wellington on a very wet and gloomy day with many expecting the game to be rearranged. Every other cricket match in the country that day seemed to be washed out, but somehow the rain missed and Wellington won an important toss to put the OMs in to bat in difficult conditions. With Köhler-Cadmore, Hardinges, Malik and Wood all missing Malvern had a very young batting line-up who were going to be put to the test. Wellington bowled well early on and kept picking up the odd wicket without allowing any Malvern momentum. Josh Haynes (39) on debut was very impressive, but Malvern were soon 118-6 and needing to somehow get to a respectable total. Liam Smith joined captain Gifford at the crease and between them built a very skilful partnership to get Malvern up to 214, with Gifford (69*) producing some impressive late hitting. With the weather improving and the wicket drying out it felt the day was against the OMs. A solid start by Wellington was thwarted by a brilliant spell of bowling from Charlie Griffiths (4-22), the man of the match in last year’s final, who reduced the home side to 111-6. However, with the Wellington opener still in, they remained favourites and it was only when he was finally dismissed with the score on 203-9 that Malvern sensed their chance. In an extremely nailbiting finish the Wellington number 11 squirted two boundaries to get them over the line with two balls to spare and snatch the victory. A gutsy performance, but just not enough runs on the board. Wellington were to go on and comfortably win the final, leaving the Malvernians knowing they had come so close to the glorious hat-trick. Will Gifford

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| OM SPORT | SQUASH Dartington Squash Club, near Totnes, hosted the inaugural get-together of vintage, possibly super-veteran but definitely ‘of an age’ OM squash players: Guy Davies (6.60-63), Colin Mackenzie (8.55-60), John Elford (7.64-69), and Philip Shaw-Hamilton (3.65-70). Dartington is not a big place and, indeed, Dartington Squash Club (which is within Dartington Hall Estate) is not high on the list of venues that world class squash players choose to visit, but destiny drew both Guy and John there. Having returned from Zimbabwe in 2005 Guy chose to live in Totnes (just two miles from the court) with his wife Mary, and enjoys playing and coaching the juniors at the club. After a 40-year break from the game, John took it up some 10 years ago and is now Chairman of the Club! Colin had read last year’s piece on Guy and had emailed saying ‘Hey! I’m over 75, still playing squash and frightening the occasional 21 yearold with my fading skills.’ (I hope those that remember Norman Rosser don his knee bandages and tighten his belt around an ample middle recall his racket skills and broad smile when he sent one the wrong way, or ‘taxied’ in modern parlance). After a few email exchanges - 52 at the last count! - the four of us got together at Dartington on the first of several fabulously hot and sunny days in June 2017. We had the two courts to ourselves on the first afternoon at 3pm. We decided to play singles as a warm up – Colin v John, Guy v Philip. We stretched (Guy taking this to a whole new level of yoga and zen concentration), we knocked up, we played, sweated, grunted, questioned our sense at playing squash on a hot sunny afternoon (Guy hardly broke sweat since he was used to South African temperatures), and thankfully the singles was over (John beating Colin and Guy beating Philip) - then some

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bright spark mentioned doubles! Well – it was 5pm before we came off! We had an amazing game. It was a miracle no-one got hit or hurt. John surprised everyone (not least himself) with his accurate lengths and lobs having ‘never played squash doubles before’ (though he and Philip had been 2nd rackets pair 49 years ago!) Colin played shots not seen since the 50’s to very good effect; Philip just tried to blast it whilst Guy swept the floor with us playing perfect drop shots, boasts and lobs. Three of us came off court exhausted, only to find that someone had left the heating on full blast! We all decided it went so well we would do it again the next day, particularly since John told us that he wanted to see a rematch between Guy and Philip and besides, another club member, Sam, was coming along who was in the Guinness Book of Records for the greatest number of competitive matches played by a man 64 years old – 3723 or some such number (his car registration spells SQUASH using well placed screws and numbers!), and he was bringing along a Cornish over-60 player. The matches were scheduled again for 3pm. No court booking is allowed at Dartington…you wait patiently if someone is already on court. And so we did…Dartington Squash Club had never been so busy at 3pm on a Wednesday!! Finally, the courts became free. Sam completed his 3724th match against his Cornish rival, leaving Guy and Philip to get started whilst Colin and John waited for the other court. Philip was full of trepidation,

aching and weary from the previous day (real tennis may be the ‘King of Games’, but squash demands a different type of fitness), Guy was happily stretching. Not going into all the detail, an hour later, I think Guy let Philip win 15/11 in the 5th seeing that it meant so much to him and Guy was saving himself for another day coaching the juniors! Philip couldn’t speak for a few minutes – not even to protest that all four of us went on to play another three games of doubles! This doubles was again dominated by John and Guy. Colin would like to apologise to John for knocking his glasses off during a fiercely contested rally; Philip would like to publicly apologise for underestimating Colin’s speed and ability on court, but congratulate John on many outstanding shots; and acknowledge that Guy is in extremely good shape (the five-year age gap, as anyone over 50 knows, is significant), has excellent racket skills, a great temperament and is an inspiration to us all. It was all good fun, played in great spirit and camaraderie. We then met Mary and Eriko at The Ferry Boat Inn overlooking the Dart at Dittisham where we satisfied both thirst and appetite. So, any OM (over 60 please!) who would like a friendly competitive game drop me an email and we’ll make another date philipshawhamilton@gmail.com


OM SPORT | | GOLFING SOCIETY Our year starts with the Society Dinner, last year being our 44th, at the Dyers’ Hall, where our President, Peter Mathieson is a Livery Member and Past Master. It is always held on the last Friday of January. The Captain, Rob Mason, welcomed our guests and Nick Owen, Hon. Sec. of the PSGS (Halford Hewitt) replied on their behalf. This was the fourth time that Nick had spoken at one of our dinners (twice he was called upon at the very last moment) and he never lets us down with his quick wit (after barracking from the diners) and continuous flow of anecdotes. Simon Hooper, Hon. Sec. elect (Richard Thompson is stepping down in June after 24 years of outstanding and dedicated service) won first prize in the 100 Club draw, with Bob Anderson second, Edward James third and David Knill-Jones fourth. The Immediate past Captain, Nick Stockbridge, presented the Chesterton Salver - presented by George Chesterton in 1992, the year of his captaincy, in recognition of the Member who had made a major contribution to Society affairs over

the years - to Lionel Godfrey who has continuously shown considerable generosity and exceptional enthusiasm towards promoting College golf, as well as being a regular at many of our matches and meetings, over many years. The Society holds nine matches a year against other Old Boy School Societies. However, the year kicks off with the first match against the Members of Hunstanton and another versus the Royal Cinque Ports (a very recent fixture) just before the Halford Hewitt. In the early months we enjoyed a good run before losing to the Old Rugbeians mid-August. Unfortunately this was followed by losses against the Old Marlburians, Old Uppinghamians and Old Salopians - the final count being 3 wins, 3 halves and 4 losses - with a half and a win in the home and away matches against the College at Puckrup Hall and Sunningdale. Thanks to the kindness and generosity of their OM Members the match at Sunningdale is the highlight of the College golf year and affords the opportunity to meet and encourage the youngsters to play an active role in our affairs once they leave College. Chris Crisp and Nic

Rosenthal, both scratch, joined our ranks, together with Pranav Koneru, Joe O’Gorman and Henry Wall - we are pleased to welcome them as members. Our four Society meetings - Spring St George’s Hill, Summer Blackwell, Northern Formby and Autumn Royal Cinque Ports, Deal, all enjoyed increased attendance, although the latter still struggles to attract the numbers achieved before the Millennium. This is difficult to understand, as Deal is always in superb playing condition and has, since the days of Susie Mellin (mainly responsible for the founding of the OMGS in 1922) been our ‘home’. The high point of the year was recognising Tony Ensor’s huge contribution, over 43 years masterminding the Northern Meeting at Formby. The President, following warm and humorous words about Tony, now an octogenarian presented him with a superb painting by our own Simon Dalby - a truly fine and accomplished artist who has exhibited at the Royal Academy. Our unfortunate run in both the Halford Hewitt and Grafton Morrish continued. In the Hewitt we were drawn against Liverpool, a match we

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| OM SPORT a ‘Chimp’) is retiring after 24 years at the helm. Without question he has given his all and served with masterful efficiency and massive enthusiasm, way beyond the call of duty. Words of thanks are easy but they do not do justice to the extraordinary contribution he has made. We look forward to the reign of Simon Hooper who follows in the footsteps of Richard - some Members have already experienced his missives of encouragement, and he still has a few months to go before he assumes the mantle.

expected to win but on the day we were found wanting as unbeknown to us. they had found three young scratch golfers to strengthen their team. Epsom won the Hewitt with a combined handicap of a remarkable +4 whereas ours is over 30 - some difference. Malvern golf has not deteriorated but the standard of many other Hewitt schools has improved remarkably, so much so that there are very few easy matches. In the Grafton Morrish we won the qualifying competition at Denham, beating 16 other teams, but then in the main tournament over the links of Hunstanton and Brancaster (Royal West Norfolk) we were, in the first round, drawn against the holders, Birkenhead and failed to do the business. Not unsurprisingly Epsom won the ‘Grifty’ as well. Very few schools have won both events in the same year, Malvern being the last. The Arnell Bowl was expanded a few years back to include Members of the Old Reptonians (Reptiles). In the early rounds it is a regional knock-out tournament (to avoid travelling too far) and last year attracted an entry of 24 Malvernians and 27 Reptiles. The finals are held at Sunningdale - a free day - and James Vaile won for second year

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running, beating Huw Davis, another Malvernian in the final For the unlucky first round losers all is not lost, as the President’s Tankard (presented by David Pepper OR) awaits. The finals are held at Little Aston and Malvern succeeded again with Lloyd Lewis winning through against three Reptiles. During the year we lost Michael Feaver (5.45-50) and Robin Walters (9.53-57). Michael was a regular attender at many of our matches and meetings until his eyesight failed him and Robin (a sommelier and one of the very best), Chairman of Piltdown during their Centenary, played in numerous matches for the OMs as well as the Darwin’s. As mentioned, at the beginning of this report. Richard Thompson (the ‘Gorilla’ and now regrettably

Chis Boyd has brought much needed professionalism to our financial affairs and for those of our members struggling with Killer Soduko, he is a Master of the Art. Reg Farrar (remember him?) gave him a mark of 107% in his Common Entrance, so we are in great hands. Finally our Captain, Rob Mason, enjoyed an excellent year, attending numerous matches and most meetings where he was most generous with his wine contributions at lunches. This year we welcome Richard Hendicott as Captain who has also done so much for College golf together with his considerable enthusiasm for everything OMGS By the time this reaches the printing press we will have held our 45th Dyers’ Dinner and possibly with a record attendance, exceeding 40. Our guest speaker was John Hopkins, for 30 years golf correspondent of the Times. Jeremy Lowe


OM SPORT | COMPETITION TEAMS and RESULTS HALFORD HEWITT – ROYAL CINQUE PORTS/ROYAL ST. GEORGE’S Adrian Barrett-Greene, William Beeson, Sebastien Blanchet, Guy Davis, Will Gifford, Matt Hind, Edward James (C), Leon Milns, Ian Timberlake, Dan Walker Lost to Liverpool 1.5/3.5 Final: Epsom beat Ampleforth 4/1 PRINCES PLATE Adrian Barrett-Greene, Guy Davis, Will Gifford, Matt Hind, Edward James (C), Leon Milns, Lost to Felsted 0/3 Final: Merchant Taylors’ beat Bedford 2/1 ALBA TROPHY - WOKING Adrian Barrett-Greene & Philip Manduca PUTTING COMPETITION - ROYAL WIMBLEDON Edward James, Leon Milns, Ian Timberlake, Dan Walker Failed to qualify 1st Winchester (38pts), 2nd Epsom (32pts), 3rd Lancing (32pts) after play-off GRAFTON MORRISH QUALIFYING – DENHAM William Beeson, Will Gifford, Matt Hind, David Price, Ian Timberlake, Dan Walker (C) Qualified 1st from 17 BERNARD DARWIN (55+) WOKING Guy Davis, Jeremy Lowe, Philip Manduca (C), David Price, Bruce Streather, Richard Thompson Lost to Harrow 1-2 Semi-finals: Harrow beat Eton / Uppingham beat Charterhouse Final: Uppingham beat Harrow 2/1 SENIOR DARWIN (65+) - WOKING Bruce Bevan-Jones, Lionel Godfrey, Jeremy Lowe, David Rocke, Nick Stockbridge, Richard Thompson. Beat Marlborough 2/1, lost to Uppingham 1/2 Final: Tonbridge beat Eton 2/1

VETERAN DARWIN (75+) WOKING Bruce Bevan-Jones, Jeremy Lowe Winners: Radley Birkenhead (The Holders) 0/3 FINAL

v OLD HAILEYBURIANS – SUNNINGDALE – SUNDAY 12 MARCH Dawes Edginton Trophy (awarded to the losing team!)

PUBLIC SCHOOLS MEETING LITTLE ASTON Bruce Bevan-Jones, Andy Gifford, Richard Hendicott, Rodney James, Adrian Milledge, Nigel Milroy, George Philip, Michael Philip, Bryan Richardson, Craig Sharp Winners: Bromsgrove 105pts / MALVERN 95pts

Philip Carr (G), Simon Chilton (G), Martin Eyre, Lionel Godfrey, Matt Hind, Jeremy Lowe, Rob Mason, David Rocke, Richard Thompson, Dan Walker Won 3/2

GRAFTON MORRISH FINALS – HUNSTANTON William Beeson / Ian Timberlake; Dan Walker / Will Gifford; Matt Hind / David Price Lost to Birkenhead 0/3 Final: Epsom beat George Heriots 2/1 EDWARD HARRIS CUP - ROSS-ONWYE Chris Boyd, Chris Crisp, Richard Hendicott (C), Roger Henman, Jon Horton, Harriet Matthews, Nick Stockbridge, Richard Thompson Winners: Bromsgrove 124pts / Malvern 113pts

MATCH TEAMS and RESULTS v OLD CRANLEIGHIANS / WALTON HEATH - SUNDAY 19 FEB Adrian Barrett-Greene, Tim Duerr, Will Gifford, Matt Hind, Edward James, Jeremy Lowe, Philip Manduca, Richard Thompson Halved 2/2 v HUNSTANTON GC / HUNSTANTON - SATURDAY 11 MARCH Harry Anderson, Simon Barham, Bruce Bevan-Jones, Chris Boyd, Tony Ensor, Ted Greey, Ed Kenyon, Roger Pitts, Rafiq Rattansi, Nick Stockbridge. Won 5-0 ROYAL CINQUE PORTS GC – SATURDAY 11 MARCH Adrian Barrett-Greene, William Beeson, Sebastien Blanchet, Guy Davis, Matt Hind, Jerry Hughes, Leon Milns, Bruce Streather,Ian Timberlake, Dan Walker Halved 5/5

v THE COLLEGE – PUCKRUP HALL – SUNDAY 19 MARCH OMs: Martin Eyre, Lionel Godfrey, Matt Hind, Bryan Richardson, Nick Stockbridge, Alex Taylor, Richard Thompson, Giles Winthrop, Matt Cleal, John Cox, College: Josh Baker, Chris Crisp (C), Angelo Garbi, Will Green, Angelo Guenther, Charlie Hickman, Jonas Knobloch, Isobel Lloyd, Ally Renton, Vera Vodinskaya Halved 2.5/2.5 v OLD REPTONIANS – WALTON HEATH – SUNDAY 22 APRIL Chris Cudahy, James Dawson, Martin Eyre, Richard Hendicott, Richard Keep, Jeremy Lowe, David Pepper (OR) Won 7/1 v THE COLLEGE – SUNNINGDALE – SUNDAY 11 JUNE OMs: Andy Clifton, Lionel Godfrey, Jon Horton, Rob Mason, Harriet Matthews, Blake Raymond, Dan Scarborough, Alex Taylor, Richard Thompson, Giles Winthrop College: Chris Crisp, John Cox, Will Green, Graham Hawkins, Charlie Hickman, Isobel Lloyd, Simon Lloyd (G), Allaster Renton Won 3.5/1.5 HIND AWARD (Contribution to College Golf) Chris Crisp v OLD SHIRBURNIANS / WOKING – SATURDAY 5 AUGUST Roger Barnes, Chris Boyd, Nigel Brown, Duncan Christie-Miller, Simon Constantine, Chris Halliwell, Jerry Hughes, Rafiq Rattansi, David Rocke, John Shearer Halved 5/5

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| OM SPORT v OLD RUGBEIANS - THE BERKSHIRE – SUNDAY 20 AUGUST Roger Barnes, Tim Begg, Chris Boyd, Martin Eyre, Richard Fisher (G), Matt Hind, Chris Halliwell, Roger Henman, Jon Horton, Ben Lavin, Robert Mason, Peter Mathieson, Richard Thompson Lost 3/8 v OLD MARLBURIANS – WEST HILL – THURSDAY 28 SEPTEMBER (The Hobbs Gavel) Duncan Christie-Miller, Simon Constantine, Chris Halliwell, Jon Horton, Jerry Hughes, Jeremy Lowe, Nick Stockbridge Lost 3/5 v OLD UPPINGHAMIANS / FORMBY / SUNDAY 1 OCTOBER Guy Davis, Tony Ensor, Tom Fair (G), Chris Hewitt, Nigel Milroy, Roger Pitts, Rick Taylor (OU), John Woods, Robert Woods Lost 0/55 v OLD SALOPIANS - BLACKWELL SUNDAY 7 OCTOBER Chris Boyd, Andy Clifton, Richard Duerr, Tim Duerr, Jon Horton, John Livesey, Harriett Matthews, Craig Sharp, Nick Stockbridge, Steve Wilkinson Lost 3/7 v OLD WYKEHAMISTS – BERKSHIRE – FRIDAY 27 OCTOBER Roger Barnes, Duncan Christie-Miller, Jerry Hughes, Robert Mason, Peter Mathieson, Richard Thompson Halved 1.5/1.5

SOCIETY MEETINGS and RESULTS SPRING / ST. GEORGE’S HILL – FRIDAY 12 MAY Chris Cudahy, Huw Davis, Tom Davis, Clive Edginton, Jim Foxall, Lionel Godfrey, Adrian Grim, Matt Hind, Simon Hooper, Dominic Hutt, Richard Keep, Lloyd Lewis, Jeremy Lowe, Rob Mason, Simon Morgan, Jim Parker, George Philip, David Price, Charles Rees, David Rocke, John Shearer, Nick Stockbridge, Bruce Streather, Richard Thompson, Ian Timberlake, James Vaile, Simon Varney, Dan Walker, Evelyn Wright Prima Donna (Scr): Dan Walker

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Wonderful Golfer (Hcp): Huw Davis Archie Crombie Ice Buckets (9 Hole Better Ball): Adrian Grim and Chris Cudahy SUMMER (MIDLAND) / BLACKWELL – SUNDAY 4 JUNE Chris Boyd *, Brian Davis, Tony Ensor*, Lionel Godfrey, Richard Hendicott, Roger Henman, Jon Horton, Simon Hooper*, Chris Lawrence*, Jeremy Lowe, Harriet Matthews, Adrian Milledge, Nigel Milroy*, Jim Parker, Roger Pitts, David Price, Nick Stockbridge*, Alex Taylor, Richard Thompson, Giles Winthrop (*Attended dinner at Blackwell G.C. Saturday June 3) Lawrence Challenge Cup (S/fd hcp): Richard Thompson Scratch (No trophy): Giles Winthrop Marston-Riley Salvers (Hcp F/somes) Nick Stockbridge / Jim Parker NORTHERN / FORMBY – SUNDAY 3 SEPTEMBER Robin* & Catherine* Anderson, Roger Barnes*, Rosemary Beeson*, Bruce Bevan-Jones, Chris Boyd, John Cox, Chris Crisp, Simon Dalby, Richard Duerr, Tim Duerr, Michael*& Jude* Elder, Tony & Jenny*Ensor, Jim Foxall, Paul* & Sally* Godsland*, Richard Hendicott, Matt Hind, Simon Hooper, Mike & Maggie*Kennan, Ben Lavin, Jeremy Lowe, Robert Mason, Peter & Jenny*Mathieson, Harriet Matthews, Nigel Milroy, John Pasquill*, George Philip, Michael Philip, Roger Pitts, Bryan Richardson, Richard Thompson, John Woods, Robert Woods, Evelyn Wright, (*Dinner only - September 2) Foster Bowl (Inter-house Cup): No 5 Matt Hind & Robert Woods Morrell Challenge Cup (S/fd Hcp): Robert Woods Lister Greenwood Trophy (Scr): Chris Crisp Hale Tankards (Bogey Hcp F/somes): Bruce Bevan-Jones & George Philip Flying Snooker Championship: Chris Boyd & Richard Thompson (Rules – 3 reds only behind pink / 11 points = a win / any penalty = disqualification)

AUTUMN (SOUTHERN) / ROYAL CINQUE PORTS – FRIDAY 13 OCTOBER Bruce Bevan-Jones, Chris Boyd *, Alistair Brearley*, Tim Duerr*, Jim Foxall*, Andrew Hartley*, Simon Hooper*, Jerry Hughes, Robert Mason*, Nigel Milroy*, Charles Rees, Mark Winter* (*attended dinner Thursday 12 October) Nicholls Tankards: Tim Duerr / Jim Foxall Mellin Cup (Scr): Tim Duerr Beeson Salver (Hcp): Bruce BevanJones ARNELL BOWL REGIONAL MATCHPLAY HANDICAP KNOCKOUT Entries - Malvern (24) / Repton (27) Malvernian Entries: Harry Anderson, Bruce Bevan-Jones, Chris Boyd, Nigel Brown, Duncan Christie-Miller, Andy Clifton, Simon Constantine, Guy Davis, Huw Davis, Richard Hendicott, Roger Henman, Chris Hewitt, Simon Hooper, Jon Horton, Lloyd Lewis, Jeremy Lowe, Philip Manduca, Adrian Milledge, George Philip, Charles Rees, Tony Ridgway, Richard Thompson, James Vaile, Toby Wright SEMI-FINALS & FINAL / SUNNINGDALE SUNDAY 15 0CTOBER Semi-finals: James Vaile beat Richard Hendicott; Huw Davis beat Tony Bishop Final: James Vaile beat Huw Davis PLATE / PRESIDENT’S TANKARD / LITTLE ASTON SUNDAY 22 OCTOBER Semi-finals: Lloyd Lewis beat Tony Ruddle (R); Richard Pinder (R) beat Michael Watson (R) Final: Lloyd Lewis beat Richard Pinder THE GEORGE CHESTERTON SALVER (for conspicuous contribution to the OMGS) Richard Thompson


OM SPORT | | HOCKEY The OM women’s hockey season 2017 got off to the most amazing start in March. Forming a mixed team with the OM men, we were invited back to Malvern for the opening of the new water-based pitch (and what an incredible pitch it is!). Despite the fact that we hadn’t played as a team for years and that some of us had not played hockey at all since leaving school, we worked together seamlessly (well, almost!). The inner competitiveness, engraved in us all by Mark Moss (aka Mossy), was probably the reason for the rapid regaining of flair - skills, sweeps and hits as well as - temporary! speed and agility (again, intermittent and short-lived). I can’t remember the scores from the three matches (against various pupils and staff),

but we certainly felt we’d won in terms of spirit, effort and resilience! In September we returned to Malvern to play in the pre-season match against the girls’ 1st and 2nd teams. Again, we played some great hockey (and laughed when we didn’t!) Unfortunately for the OMs, we had to admit we were rather impressed with the College’s standard of hockey. Despite this I think we came away with a win, especially as we were then lucky enough to re-visit Longy and the dancefloor! Last but not least was the 6-a-side hockey tournament at Dean Close in October. Gathering players from York to Southampton we fielded

an impressive team. With only one sub and five matches, we definitely weren’t walking the next day, but we played some superb hockey finishing on penalty flicks to come 5th overall out of 10 teams and beating some of our biggest schoolday rivals. Thank you to all the players who have given up their weekends to re-live the Malvern spirit and I look forward to seeing you all in 2018. To all those who are desperate to pick up their sticks again please contact me and join in – the more the merrier! It was great to note that early in 2018 a men’s hockey club was being established, under the stewardship of Tom Saxton (2.05-10). Rebecca Raby-Smith

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| OM SPORT | RIFLE CLUB The Rifle Club enjoyed some good fixtures in 2017 with three Bisley meetings and the annual .22 match against the College in November. As well as the annual Schools’ Veterans match in July and the club’s Gryphon Cup in September we had an informal practice on the ranges at Bisley at the end of May, an additional fixture of our calendar. The Public Schools’ Veterans Match at Bisley on 13 July saw many hundreds of public school veterans meet at 5pm on the 500-yard firing point with good weather on hand just as we enjoyed in 2016. 45 teams of five competed for the 1st team cup and 28 teams of four or five for the 2nd team cup. The OM A team achieved a good score of 243/250, dropping 7 points with 29 central V bullseyes placing them 17th out of the 45 teams. With only 7 points between us and the winners (Old Guildfordians A), the V bull count ultimately determines the placings, the more V bulls the higher up the results table the teams find themselves. Its worth noting Malvern was the highest placed team from the Midlands! Rupert Clark scored 50/50 (always consistent!) with 7 central V bulls winning the OM Vets Cup for the second year running with the highest individual score; James Creed, Malcolm John and Tom Harrison all achieved 49 with 6 or 7 V bulls.

As we were rather short on numbers (Andy Symonds was busy combineharvesting his barley crop!) and with one or two other regulars unable to make it the OM B team could only field four out of five firers so was placed well down the table 2nd team results table, but it is worth mentioning Chris Marlow’s excellent score of 49 with 6 V bulls. Had Andy got the team selection right the A team would have moved up the table nine places to finish 8th!

Gryphon Cup

Nine OMs met for the Gryphon Cup, the annual club championship at Bisley on 24 September. The weather was dry and sunny which is always a bonus! We shot at 3 different ranges, 300 and 600 yards in the morning session followed by 1000 yards in the afternoon. Unlike 2016 we had

A Team Tom Harrison James Glover Malcolm John Rupert Clark James Creed Total

Score 49.6 46.2 49.7 50.7* OM Vets Cup (highest individual OM score) 49.7 243.29 17th/45

B Team Chris Marlow Phil Vicars Tony Clayton Al Lidster Total

Score 49.6 42.3 33.0 40.1 165/10 26th/28

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target markers at all ranges so we could maximise the shooting without having to worry about the logistics of butt marking! We shot 2 sighters and 7 rounds to count at 300 yards followed by 2 sighters and 10 to count at 600 yards. It was great to meet up with Paul Godsland and for him to see what we get up to; we hope that his first Bisley experience was worth the trip from Malvern and an early Sunday morning start! Andy Symonds led the field at lunchtime with a full house of 35/35 at 300 yards and losing only one point at 600 yards with 49/50, but of course there was plenty of time for things to go downhill thereafter! As ever, everything changed at the long-range 1000-yard shoot in the afternoon! With some tricky wind conditions Andy shot a very mediocre 41/50 with only 1 V bull, but other scores were similar until Tom Harrison and Malcolm John took to the firing point. Malcolm scored an excellent 48/50 with 4


OM SPORT | V bulls and Tom 47/50 with 3 V bulls, which resulted in the dramatic situation of both Tom and Andy’s total scores finishing exactly the same on 125 with 9 V bulls! However, in such a situation the higher score at the longest range ‘counts out’ the other score so Tom’s 48 gave him victory… Andy had to resign himself to runner up for the 4th year running after leading at lunchtime! A great day however, and well done also to Matt Kerfoot who finished 3rd with a total of 122 and 8 V bulls, shooting well at 1000 yards scoring 47 and 3 V bulls.

.22 Match

Saturday 18 November A team of eight OMs competed against the school Rifle Club team and the CCF/College teams in the annual November match. The match turned out to be very closely fought in the end:the College rifle club team came in third place, and the winning OM team beat the CCF team by only 1 point! We look forward to the OM sports club day for a rematch at the .22 range on Saturday 10 March 2018. Finally, congratulation to Tom Harrison on completing his run of form by winning the Gryphondoor postal match held earlier in the year (competitors shoot a 10-bullseye card at their local rifle club with an independent witness to score the card) by a narrow margin of only 2 points over Al Lidster. Andy Symonds Tom Harrison James Creed Phil Vicars Tim Charrington Matt Kerfoot Chris Marlow Edmund Blok Malcolm John

Tom Harrison Al Lidster Chris Marlow Tim Charrington

300x 35.5 32.3 33.3 30.1 31.2 34.3 33.1 35.3 33.1 Rnd 1 Jan17 98 97 93 90

600x 1000x 49.3 41.1 46.3 47.3 48.3 36 38.1 37 41.2 25 41.2 47.3 43.3 33 46.3 38.2 41.1 48.4 Rnd 2 Feb17 97 96 93 93

Total 125.9 125.9 117.6 105.2 97.04 122.8 109.4 119.8 122.5

Rnd3 Mar17 97 97 94 95

Dates for 2018 OM Day .22 Match Malvern – Saturday 10th March Veterans Match Bisley – Thursday 19th July Gryphon Cup Bisley – Sunday 30th September .22 match Malvern – Saturday 24th November Andy Symonds Agg ex 300 292 290 280 278

Posn 1 2 3 4

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| OM SPORT | THE MALVERN SWORDSMEN Whilst Old Malvernians will be familiar with the late John Lewis’ science teaching legacy, it may surprise some to learn that he also founded, taught and encouraged what still continues today as a thriving OM English country dancing club, The Malvern Swordsmen. When John joined the College staff in the late 1940s he brought with him his interest in folk music and dance he had learned whilst at Cambridge and he quickly established a club within the Common Room encouraging staff and their families to dance both Scottish Reels and English social dances. At the same time he encouraged some of the senior prefects to learn firstly an English longsword dance and subsequently a small selection of Cotswold morris dances. This led to the creation of the Malvern Swordsmen who, as far as can be recalled, first performed at Malvern, somewhat incongruously, at a visit by General Montgomery in 1950. The team thrived throughout the 50s as a team of OMs, college staff, Lewis family members and friends establishing an annual weekend tour around the Cotswold villages and culminating in a visit to Norway in 1958. They were established as a full member of the Morris Ring, the national association, in 1961, and

performed that year at the then English Folk Dance Society’s annual show in the Albert Hall. By this time their repertoire included the Royal Earsdon “rapper” short sword dance and the Kentucky Running Set, an impressive country dance originally taken across to the United States by the Pilgrim Fathers. In the late 60s the team, already enjoying a wide membership through John and Maureen’s association with No.8, received a further boost when their sons Richard and Anthony entered the school and encouraged their friends to join. Lasting links were established with both Ellerslie and Malvern Girls’ College through a social dancing club held in the Salter Room, and in the early 70s the annual Cotswold Tour weekends, at the beginning of the Summer holidays and based on No.8, became substantial undertakings involving large numbers of OMs, their friends and families. In 1975 the team celebrated its 25th anniversary with some 80 OM dancers of varying vintages taking part. John’s retirement as No.8’s housemaster led the annual tours to become smaller but no less enthusiastic as they continued through the 1980s based at the Lewis family cottage in Withington,

near Cheltenham. The team again visited Norway performing at the Bergen Festival in 1993 and Vierzon, France in 1995 as part of Hereford’s Town Twinning scheme. Additional Whitsun dancing weekends were held across the country from Dartmoor to the Peak District and the Black Country to Kent. Over the years the team have danced at fêtes and weddings, barn dances and private parties and even performed on stage in Ludlow with members of Fairport Convention! In 2000 the team celebrated 50 years with an extended Cotswold weekend which included a marquee lunch at the College in front of St George and a splendid day of dance at Sudeley Castle, Winchcombe. The key success of the club, laid down by John from the beginning, has been to restrict the team’s repertoire of dances to a minimum incorporating a number of spectacular show dances. This ensures that the team can perform at any time with minimal practice and, just as importantly, former members can return after years’ absences and find the dances reasonably easy to remember! Indeed, other “traditional” teams who rehearse regularly regard us with some incredulity .. but the answer is that the formula works and The Malvern Swordsmen can put on a show dance with the best of them! The dances we perform are a mix of morris, sword and country dances which provides a varied, fast moving and colourful show. An absolutely essential element of the club are our musicians. We are fortunate to have members who play accordion, melodian, concertina, violin and penny whistle amongst other instruments and for our barn dances, often held in real barns, we can usually muster up a full ceilidh band. Today the Malvern Swordsmen has a wide membership of all ages and the Cotswold Tour, still held in either July or early August, is well attended by a regular group of performers; OMs, their friends and families, children and in many cases grandchildren!

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OM SPORT |

In June this year (2017) the team were invited to Romania and spent an enjoyable and interesting week performing at their Festival of Calus in Caracal. As we look towards our 70th anniversary in 2020 the team flourishes and, although we have many young members, there are still OM’s dancing with us who first

performed in the 1950s. We would, of course, be delighted to encourage some more recent OMs to join us so if you are interested in traditional music and dance do come along and see us perform .. contact details and tour dates are available through the Malvernian Society. Our shows around the Cotswold villages almost

always take place outside or within easy reach of an agreeable pub and we particularly welcome families and children, especially if they join in the dancing! Bruce Clitherow (7.67-72)

| NETBALL CLUB The OM Netball Club was formed in the Summer 2017 and plays in a summer and a winter league in London. This was an initiative of Hannah Jefferson (4.0409), aided by Poppy Donaldson (4.07-12); from summer 2018 the captain will be Bella Stanforth (4.04-09).

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| OM SPORT | SAILING CLUB I have great pleasure in picking up the mantle of OM Sailing Club secretary after many successful years with Bob Clitherow at the helm. Bob’s ability to galvanise a scratch crew together every October and almost certainly obtain a top ten overall position is testament to his experience and passion for OM sailing both on and off the water. The Arrow Trophy in October last year ran true to form, although a flurry of weddings, half-term holidays and other keener regattas meant that many a familiar crewmember was unavailable. However, with fantastic support from Bert Lacey and his network of OM sailors, a last-minute crew of 10 materialised, with an impressive number of ocean miles and Cowes Week experience between them. Supporting Bob on helm/tactics was Stephen Castens, Rob Smethurst, Francis Tocher, Jasper Ross, Tony Brown, Henry Henshall, Chris Denham and Simon Denham. Lighter winds across most races were a welcome change from previous breezier regattas, although equally challenging in making the boat perform to the fastest of her abilities. However, the crew gelled strongly and brought previous experience to bear with excellent set manoeuvres and spinnaker work. An overall score of 9th for the regatta was felt to be a very respectable score for a crew that met over a curry on the Friday evening, and would have been much better if one of Bob’s career-best starts was not subject to a general recall forced by others in the fleet. Whilst not making the top four positions to compete in the match racing on the Sunday, the crew was easily consoled with an excellent dinner in Cowes Yacht Haven. Overall a very successful weekend and a warm welcome to new crew members. The 2018 Arrow Trophy regatta will be held over the weekend of 13/14

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October and we welcome any new crew members who wish to take part in this or represent the OM Sailing Club in any other waterbased activity. We intend to enter a 4-person crew into the Belvedere Cup in April, racing J80s in an event run at Queen Mary’s Reservoir, Staines and also hope enter in a team into the Round The Island Race

on 7 July. A race against the school has also been rumoured… Rob Hammond


THE COLLEGE YEAR |

| HOUSE SINGING COMPETITION The House Singing Competition took place on Sunday 15 October in the Forum Theatre at Malvern Theatres. It was a huge success, so very well done to everyone who performed, including those who accompanied the singers and the conductors. Particularly well done to No.2 who ran out winners. No.5 kicked things off very well with an arrangement of Coldplay’s ‘Paradise’, which made an effective use of the antiphonal effect between the two groups. No.4 followed with Simon and Garfunkel’s ‘The Sound of Silence’, which captured the quiet but emotional message in the song very nicely indeed. No.1 then performed ‘History’ by One Direction. This was a very committed performance with a pleasing unanimity, both in their singing but all in following their conductor. Ellerslie House followed with George Ezra’s ‘Budapest’, and sang with a lovely blend and

relaxed, distinctive vocal quality which was very pleasing, showing a very good musical awareness and expressiveness. We were then treated to Simon and Garfunkel’s ‘The Boxer’, sung by No.2. This was a very impressive performance, with some excellent ensemble singing - their internal intonation and uniform phrasing were notable for their precision. Following them was No.8 whose arrangement of ‘How Far I’ll Go’ showed real imagination and flair and this, along with Lucie Fletcher’s very thoughtful and expressive conducting, led the girls to a lovely performance of this song with a nice, clear vocal sound. No.7 were next up, with Neil Diamond’s ‘Sweet Caroline’. There was a real vocal commitment to their singing and, because of this, the boys had a good, clear core sound which was greatly appreciated by everyone.

Abba’s ‘Dancing Queen’ was next up, sung by No.6. Again, the commitment showed by the girls, coupled with some excellent vocal control, technique and clear projection resulted in a super presentation. No.9’s performance of Gary Barlow’s ‘Let Me Go’ was well-executed, especially considering that there was some 4-part harmony at moments in this song. Again, a sound technique was the basis for this and it was really enjoyable. No.3 were the penultimate item with ‘Wouldn’t It Be Nice’, originally recorded by the Beach Boys. This arrangement was tricky in its key changing but, again, the girls managed this very well indeed, and the balance was carefully managed and a lovely, effective finish. School House brought the singing to a close with ELO’s ‘Mr Blue Sky’. There were some very good, confident moments here, and the boys did very well indeed, despite the complexity of the song.

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| THE COLLEGE YEAR | BORNEO SERVICE EXPEDITION On the last day of the Summer term, 14 Lower Sixth pupils and two teachers embarked on a 14-day expedition to Borneo. The team met the two adult expedition leaders and, after checking the kit, they took a coach to London and flew from Heathrow via Kuala Lumpur to Kota Kinabalu in Malayan Borneo. After this tiring 18-hour journey, they had their first meal and departed to the project site on the next day, a primary school located a two-hour drive away from KK near the central highway. They stayed in a traditional longhouse and encountered surprisingly large insects. The next few days were spent marking and building a concrete assembly square for the school children, as this would prevent mosquitoes from breeding in the puddles in the grass. All of the equipment was bought by the money fundraised by the Malvern pupils and after two and a half days of hard work under tropical conditions the square stood there complete. Now there was time to play with the children. ‘Rock, paper,

scissors’; football; handball and ‘Heads, shoulders, knees and toes’ were only a few of the different activities and, after a great lunch made by the parents of the school children, it was time to depart.

After this unforgettable experience the team spent a day on an island with giant lizards, climbed the highest mountain in Borneo in a two-day hike which stretched up a 2200m ascent to watch the sun rise at the peak at 6am, and visited the Bornean Sun bear and Orangutan Conservation centre in Sepilok where they took on the godparenthood for a three-year-old sun bear cub for three years. The entire trip was full of amazing and inspiring experiences, and over the 14 days, every team member had the opportunity to lead the group for one day, whilst others managed catering, accommodation, transport, health and safety and finance. The last meal in Kota Kinabalu showed everyone how close the team had become and how incredibly fast 14 days can pass. I am sure that everyone of us has made many unforgettable memories of this expedition of a lifetime. CAW

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THE COLLEGE YEAR | | SCHOOL COUNCIL The School Council is responsible for charity fundraising in the College, and consists of 15 elected members of the Upper Sixth. The charities which the College supports are many and varied, and include several longlasting relationships with charities such as COCO (£1500), Hospice Care Kenya (£1500), FOAG (£1500) and Cancer Research UK (£3000).

We also arranged for St Richard’s Hospice to collect and recycle 17 Christmas trees from across the campus and in return (green initiatives are increasingly on the School Council Agenda) we paid the charity just over £260. This was a real winner: it not only reduced our waste, but also helped a local charity too.

This year the School Council voted to support Action Against Hunger, the British Red Cross, the Mandalay School for the Deaf, and St Richard’s Hospice. We also supported the charity work of OM Tash Bishop through her endeavours with Infertility Network UK, and a current pupil through her London Marathon fundraising for Kids Out.

The staff and pupil body alike really engaged with the 2016 Christmas Jumper Day with colourful, and often musical, jumpers, adding the festive spirit to classrooms and boarding houses all over the campus. This year we had a record demand for candy canes with a total of 4600 candy canes being sorted and

distributed to Houses, which was ahead of last year’s best-ever record of 4200 – and averaged eight treats per pupil! The Council collected orders, messages to loved ones, which were then attached to the candy canes, before distribution. It was also a record year for Valentine Carnations, with over 1700 being ordered and distributed to recipients. They added a splash of colour to the Main Building Reception on the dark, dreary February day that they were delivered. The 2016-17 School Council has had a very constructive year with over £18,500 raised to help those less privileged than ourselves. The group worked hard and with great commitment throughout the year. ALH

| THE LEDBURY RUN The course in 2017 was tough it was relatively dry. On the day we were blessed with near perfect conditions, partly cloudy with some sunshine. Picture the scene in Wilce’s field at 3.00pm: the atmosphere at the start line is a mix of nerves, adrenaline and excitement lightened by a cameo of Power Rangers (boys from No.2 running as Power Rangers for their House charity, Born to Fly: The Roger Gower Memorial Trust). Silence falls as competitors take their places standing as life-like statues, shoulder to shoulder. They are ready, and with the sound of the clacker they are off!

to the first nine boys who complete the course. In the girls’ race, the number varies each year – one cap is awarded for each complete group of ten girls who run in the race. This year 56 girls ran the race and five caps were awarded. Congratulations to all those who earned Ledbury Caps this year. Three OM members of staff completed the course; I suppose that pride of place has to go to the achievement of Jon Herod (6/4H.90-95) whose time this year was better by some margin than his previous best as a pupil.

53m 48s later the first boy appeared, running on to the Senior. and only ten minutes later, the first girl. Traditionally, Ledbury Caps are awarded

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| THE COLLEGE YEAR | ACADEMIC REPORT FOR 2016-17 PUBLIC EXAMINATION RESULTS IB

The 2017 cohort achieved a very impressive average point score of 36.94. The annual analysis produced by the University of Durham shows that Malvern College was in the top 16% of IB schools for adding value to its IB pupils’ results, comparing the forecasts made as a result of baseline tests taken at the start of the Lower Sixth with their IB results. 23 candidates (32% of the cohort) performed outstandingly, scoring 40 or more IB points. We were delighted that Carina Bate, Anastasiia Kalinina and Alexander Tocher all achieved the distinction of scoring the maximum 45 points. The highest points averages were recorded in the following subjects: German A Language & Literature HL (6.57); German B HL (6.77); Spanish B SL (6.56); Spanish B HL (6.30); French B HL (6.36); Visual Arts HL (6.75); Further Maths HL (6.5); History SL (6.33). Another outstanding subject performance was in Economics HL, where 39% of the 49 candidates attained a 7.

A Level

The A Level results were very pleasing with 42% A*-A grades and 71% A*-B grades. The annual analysis produced by the University of Durham shows that Malvern College was in the top 30% of schools for adding value to its A level pupils’ results, comparing the forecasts made as a result of baseline tests taken at the start of the Lower Sixth with their A Level results. The top performing individual candidates were Henry Wall (A*, A*, A*) Maggie Wong (A*, A*, A, A), Freddie Barrell (A*, A*, A), Polina Burak (A*, A*, A), Ilia Belikok (A*, A*, A), Emily Bennett (A*, A, A, A),

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Advait Manur (A*, A, A), Charlie Bijl (A*, A, A), Fiona Steiger (A*, A, A, A), Joe O’Gorman (A*, A, A) and Alice Clemit (A*, A, A). Among the top performing subjects in terms of the percentage of A* grades achieved were: Photography 100%; Music (50%); Art & Design (29%); Further Mathematics (25%); German (25%); Mathematics (23%); Politics (20%).

GCSE

This year’s GCSE results saw the Hundred achieving 57% grades A*-A. At the top end, the figure of 33% grade A* was very pleasing. The value-added results were very positive, showing that, on average, Malvern College pupils achieved GCSE results in each of their subjects 0.5 of a GCSE grade higher than predicted by their baseline tests which they took in the Foundation Year. The following departments particularly stood out in terms of the percentage of grade A* achieved: Italian (100%); Latin (67%); German (52%); History (41%). The highest achieving individual pupils were: Ariana Davison (12 A*); Isabel Wynn (12 A*); Emily Atherton (11 A*); James Wakefield (11 A*); Sasha Wilson (11 A*); Max Regan (11 A*, 2 A); Aran Kavan (10 A*); Poppy Delingpole (10 A*, 1 A); Ellie Calderwood (10 A*, 1 A); Emily Cox (10 A*, 1 A); Jaz Gobbo (10 A*, 1 A); Frédéric Reuther (9 A*, 2 A); Natasha Cook (9 A*, 2 A); Henry Forbes (9 A*, 2 A); Jamie Bityenyo-Jones (9 A*, 1 A); Izzy Hammond (8 A*, 2 A); Isobel Shuker (8 A*, 5 A). Pupils in the Pre-Sixth Form undertake a programme of study involving six or seven GCSE subjects, completed in just one year, in preparation for entering the Sixth Form. The Pre-Sixth Form cohort registered another excellent set of GCSE results, with the top

performances being by: Constanin von Witzleben (5 A*, 1 A); Georgina Hild (6 A*) Giampietro Ghidini (6 A*, 1 A); Alyssa Hendrikx (6 A*, 1 A); Lorena Merckle (6 A*).

Universities

This year five pupils were offered places at Oxford and Cambridge, of whom four met their offers: Anastasiia Kalinina, to read Architecture at Cambridge, Alex Tocher, to read Natural Sciences at Cambridge, Carla Walla, to read Chemistry at Oxford and Kaspar Klemm to read Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Oxford. 83 of the Upper Sixth secured places at their first-choice UK university, of which 57 were at Russell Group universities. A further 9 pupils secured places at their secondchoice UK university and 12 achieved a place through Clearing. With regards other university destinations, 22 pupils were accepted by US and Canadian universities, including Princeton, Northwestern, Northeastern, John Hopkins and Columbia.

Senior Mathematics Challenge

We were delighted that 15 pupils won gold awards in this year’s National Senior Mathematics Challenge.

Curriculum Developments

A Study Skills course was introduced for the Remove Year in September 2016, delivered through the tutor programme. The aim is to better equip pupils in the Lower School with the skills they need for success in their academic studies throughout their time at the College and beyond. Also for the Remove, a weekly Life Skills and Ethics lesson was introduced, with a carousel of six units taken over the course of the year. With a view to broadening our offering of public examination subjects, we have now replaced the


THE COLLEGE YEAR | GCSE Religious Studies short-course with a full GCSE in Religious Studies and, during the course of 2016-17, decided to launch Computer Science GCSE and IB Business Management HL in September 2017. There has continued to be a significant increase in the take up for the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ), with over 30 of the Lower Sixth A Level candidates choosing it. It is worth half an A Level and universities are increasingly taking note of it when making offers. From September 2017, the vast majority of A Level candidates entering the Lower Sixth will take three A Level subjects and an Enrichment course, of which to date the EPQ has proved most popular. Our menu of Enrichment courses has expanded to provide greater choice for the Lower Sixth. In the Summer Term, both the Foundation Year and Remove were involved in cross-curricular projects. The Foundation Year engaged enthusiastically in a largely science based project on a skin-care

product, with input from English and Economics as well. The Remove focused on change from historical, geographical, economic and cultural perspectives. The work produced and final presentations were very impressive, showing the benefits of collaboration and an interdisciplinary approach.

Marking and Assessment

New Quality grades were introduced in September 2016 for all year groups, based on the quality of the work that pupils are currently ‘working at’, replacing the previous quality grades that were ‘working towards’ grades. The new 9-1 GCSE grades were introduced in the Remove for all subjects except science, Graphic Products, Textiles and Resistant Materials.

Tracking and monitoring pupil progress

Further whole teaching staff training was provided in April 2017 on how to use baseline test data and internal effort and quality grades to track

and support pupil progress. Malvern, in common with most independent schools, uses Durham University’s baseline tests administered to the Foundation Year (MidYIS), Remove (YELLIS) and Lower Sixth (Alis). We developed further our use of a co-ordinated ‘intervention tracker’ to monitor interventions used to address unsatisfactory pupil effort or progress. This is now updated twice a term and communicated to staff, so that they are aware of current interventions, both in terms of sanctions and support measures.

‘Buzz’ (our VLE)

Departments increasingly have added podcasts of lessons and topics to Buzz to facilitate review and revision by our pupils. From September 2016, parents have had access to most areas of Buzz so that they can see the resources provided by departments and what Hall (homework) has been set. JAG

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 87


| THE COLLEGE YEAR | DO YOU STILL HOLD THE SCHOOL SPORTS DAY RECORD? SPORTS DAY RECORDS SENIOR BOYS

SENIOR GIRLS

JUNIOR BOYS

JUNIOR GIRLS

Hurdles

J. Guilbert (9) (2012) 14.11

H.A.H. Benest (3) (2009) 17.40

J. Brierly (5) (2003) 12.30

100m

N.A. Ndili (2015) 11.01

H.A.H. Benest (2009) 13.20

C. Gifford (7) (2003) 11.52

H.A.H. Benest (3) (2006) 13.00

200m

A. Afolabi (SH) (2005) 24.39

A. Marr (3) (2012) 28.64

L. Davies (3) (2012) 27.88

300m

R. Raby- Smith (4) (2012) 44.91

400m

J. Brierly (5) (2006) 53.13

J. Cram (4) (2007) 67.0

O.A. Ndili (5) (2015) 57.0

800m

R. Taylor (SH) (2005) 2.08.0

V. Moritz (EH) (2011) 2.27.08

J. Pritchard (SH) (2005) 2.17.0

H. Vosper-Brown (3) (2012) 2.30.40

1500m

J. Sharman (5) (2006) 4.37.1

A. Elias (3) (2015) 5.12

4 x 100m Relay

No.7 (2006) 47.40

No.4 (2013) 56.13

No.1 (2016) 50.70

No.3 (2012) 56.69

High Jump

N. Kingdon (6) (2012) 1.40m

Long Jump

N.A. Ndili (2015) 6.14

J. Girling (2) (2013) 5.55m

H.A.H. Benest (3) (2006) 4.93

Triple Jump

C. Nichols (2) (2004) 12.60

J. James (8) (2012) 9.12m

A. Baba-Kusa (2) (2004) 10.88

Shot Putt

Javelin

T. Hurdle (2) (2011) 42.60

S. Hunt (3) (2011) 26.00

Discus

B. Davies (2) (2008) 32.24

Where no name is given, the record is currently held by a pupils still at the College.

88 | Old Malvernian Newsletter


ANNUAL REPORT & STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS | The Malvernian Society Limited Financial Report & Statement of Accounts for the period from 1 August 2016 until 31 July 2017 The organisation is a charitable company limited by guarantee, incorporated on 30 April 1926 and registered as a charity on 1 November 1963. Directors: Trustees who are Directors for the purpose of Company Law, and Trustees for the purpose of Charity Law, are as follows: President: Rt. Hon Sir Stephen Brown PC, GBE (Elected 06/15 - 06/18) Elected:

JP Foxall (Chairman 06/15 - 06/18) NCS Engert (11/15 - 06/18) RJ Harris (07/17 - 06/20) JMJ Havard (06/17 - 06/20) PE Lambert (06/17 - 06/20) J Müller (06/17 - 06/20) JA Staniforth (06/15 - 06/18) BS Walker (06/17 - 06/20) RTH Wilson (06/15 - 06/18)

THE MALVERNIAN SOCIETY REPORT & STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS FOR THE PERIOD FROM 1 AUGUST 2016 UNTIL 31 JULY 2017 Achievements and Performance This report provides a 12-month review of the Society’s operations. Those events continued at the start of this financial year with a Sports Supper in London for the large numbers of OMs who contribute to Clubs associated with Football, Cricket, Golf, Court Games, Rifle Shooting and Sailing. The fourth annual Property Networking event for OMs working in the very broad fields of the property world took place in November 2016. We continued to hold our quarterly, informal gatherings for OMs in High Holborn, which on average 50 OMs attended each time; and 2016-17 saw two more very well-received House Reunions at Malvern for OMs of No.1 (117 attended, a good number) and Ellerslie House as well as Ellerslie School (184 attended, an excellent response showing the strong allegiance EOGs, who were the significant majority, feel for the College). In 2017-18 it will be the turn of House No.2 in September 2017 and No.6 in June 2018. Last year the Headmaster hosted OM events in Milan, Hamburg,

Ex-officio: Nominated:

AR Clark (Headmaster) CL Ferris (Parents’ Forum) (06/16 - 06/19) AR Higgins (Parents’ Forum) (06/17 - 06/20) SC Holroyd (Common Room) (06/15 - 06/18)

Vice- Presidents:

HCK Carson R de C Chapman PJ Cartwright MC Frayn PCU Jagger BTDM Laidlaw Lord MacLaurin of Knebworth DL HM Robinson MJW Rogers OBE

Operations Director: P Godsland

Frankfurt and Munich and in May 2017 made his now annual visit to Receptions for OMs in Hong Kong and Kuala Lumpur.

the College. This policy of support resulted in 2017 in a net inflow (2016 outflow) of cash resources of £335,000 (2016 (£156,000)).

All these events provide Old Malvernians throughout the world with the opportunity to re-acquaint themselves with their old school and with their contemporaries. Such events provide a platform for the Development team to promote the current popularity, achievements and progress of the College, thus engaging the Alumni with their old College, and encouraging Alumni and Friends’ involvement and support.

Overall funds were increased by a property revaluation where we follow accounting guidelines on present market value, assessed as an increase of £100,000. Secondly there was a return on funds invested of £207,000. Therefore, total funds increased to £11.434 million, much of which remains tied up in property, £3.9m, and restricted funds net of attributed property of £2.7m.

Financial review The Trustees have a reasonable expectation that the charity will continue in existence for the foreseeable future and have, therefore, used the going concern basis in preparing the financial statements. Income during the year was £4,035,000 which is a significant increase over recent years, occasioned by a bequest of £3,500,000, of which £2,000,000 was received during the year. Total expenditure was £519,000, of which grants awarded to the College amounted to £359,000; thereby maintaining our level of support to

We have continued to support the College in other areas of fundraising, such as with the Malvernian Society Assisted Places Scheme, to help attract talented students who otherwise would not be able to come to the College. Several pupils at the College are already receiving such support, including the first named Assisted Place from a local Charitable Trust. The Society has been able to use some longstanding restricted funds to support students in taking full advantage of the opportunities offered at Malvern, such as help towards the cost of sports tours, expeditions and voluntary work overseas. Also, we have introduced an improved system to help the Society

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 89


| ANNUAL REPORT & STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS and College identify the benefits and traceability arising from such grants. Reserves Policy The Society is committed to maintaining a practical working balance of Free Reserves consistent with the operating costs of the Society and our ability to have available funds to support shorter term College requirements. The Society reviewed its Reserves Policy during the year and also identified the shortfall in liquid reserves. The Reserves Policy now adopted allows us to achieve a minimum balance as required by current accounting regulations. The Society needs to build its Free Reserves to an agreed level in order to ensure our ongoing operation for an agreed period of time. The Trustees have discussed the required levels during the year, and determined that the policy is therefore, to allocate from cash received in the form of unrestricted donations and bequests sufficient funds over the course of the next 2 years to achieve the figures below. The Trustees have determined a policy of maintaining one year of salary and everyday expenses plus £50,000, representing one year of Designated and Committed Funds to the College, as being a sensible level of reserves to keep readily available to maintain ongoing operations without causing major interference to our aims. We calculate this amount as under: 1. Salary and related governance costs

£108,000

2. Running costs of the office excluding events £20,000 3. Balance of governance costs 4. Contingency to assure ongoing operation TOTAL REQUIRED

£16,000 £50,000 £194,000

Arising from our policy review the Trustees determined that Unrestricted Funds from bequests would be allocated to cash reserves annually as required in order to maintain the current cash balances required to satisfy the policy stated.

90 | Old Malvernian Newsletter

It is the Trustees aim to have built up the reserves to the required level by the end of the calendar year 2017. Investment Policy The Society adopts a cautious investment policy in order to preserve funds for both immediate and future use, as directed by donors. Our annual disbursement plan is aimed to support important College initiatives and in future to increasingly support the Assisted Places Scheme. The majority of our funds are placed with the leading London Investment provider Sarasins, and within their generalised and cautious fund, named The Alpha Common Investment Fund. The Society has benefited from the rising stock market in the last year. Our target is to achieve a 6% rate of return over a 10-15 year period. Plans for Future Periods (a) 2017-2018 Plans are in place for many OM events in the Autumn of 2017, including a Reunion at Malvern for the OMs of House No.2, an OM Arts’ Society evening of Christmas carols, Professional Networking Events for Property, Law and Financial Services, and the ‘Malvern in London’ informal gatherings in new venues, including the May Fair hotel in Mayfair, London and the Oriental Club in London. The Summer of 2018 will see a Reunion for No.6 House in June. The fourth Annual Fund telephone campaign will be run in August 2017. This already highly successful initiative will be managed by the Development Team; recent College Leavers will be re-engaging with a specific group of Old Malvernians, who were last contacted in this way in 2013. Apart from the Fundraising involved, the Annual Fund campaign has immense value in good alumni relations and in keeping old Malvernians updated with all that is going on at the College. The College’s current large-scale capital project is the refurbishment of the Rogers Theatre, with work having started in June 2017. The Development Team has already secured some significant pledges of financial assistance from OMs

and will continue to do so in the months ahead. The Malvernian Society will continue to redevelop the website pages for improved event registrations, for the purchase of merchandise and for online giving. We will introduce a comprehensive career-mentoring and support programme using the ‘Graduway’ platform, and hope to continue to benefit from the support of many OMs who have made a conspicuous success of their careers. We will broaden our reach via social media, both by re-vamping the Facebook page and by introducing Twitter and Instagram accounts, recognising that the younger OMs are unlikely to rely on the Society website for news or information. We will establish university-based reunions, both to encourage a sense of continuing community amongst students and to make the transition from College to university and from university into the workplace more transparent. We plan to hold ‘Malvern in ...’ reunions in Madrid, Paris, Milan, New York (i.e. where there are significant numbers of OMs, either studying or working). (b) Future Years The Development Team intends to introduce a comprehensive parent fundraising programme in future years and initial steps have proved encouraging. The Trustees will continue to consider how best to raise the profile of the College with the alumni and other related Friends of Malvern, while allocating resources for the short and mid-term advantage of the College. The priority at the moment is to fund additional Assisted Places to broaden the accessibility of the College to pupils. JP Foxall (Chairman of the Malvernian Society), on behalf of the Trustees


ANNUAL REPORT & STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS |

INCOME Life membership  fees Subscriptions  &  donations OM  Merchandise Investment  income Income  tax  recoverable Bank  interest Rents  received Events  income

Certified extracts  from  the  Audited  Financial  Statements: Income  &  Expenditure  Account  for  the  year  ended  31  July  2017 Year  ended 31.07.2017 £ £ 121,701   267,237   129   87,518   15,143   521   19,500   13,532   525,281   3,510,000   4,035,281  

Legacies LESS: EXPENDITURE Grants  to  Malvern  College: Malvern  College  General  Fund Malvern  College  Centenary  Appeal  Fund Assisted  Places Science  Centre Theatre Golf  Coaching Other  grants: Nieper  Art  Scholarship House  No.  7 RKB  Lecture  series South  Africa  Tour Marston-­‐Riley  Scholarship CTM  Dunn Colin  Nicholls  Fund

105,011 343,144   1,806   76,750   15,574   719   19,500   9,776   572,280   299,937   872,217  

1,517 15,386   29,766   -­‐   301,735   -­‐  

5,000 4,500   8,467   173,250   202,263   1,000  

10,000 500   -­‐   -­‐   -­‐   -­‐   500  

-­‐ -­‐   1,620   1,000   8,832   71,531   -­‐  

Other charitable  expenditure Staff  costs Events Office  expenses Directors  expenses Secretary's  expenses Accountancy  fees Auditor's  remuneration  (audit  services  only) Bank  charges Postage Printing  and  stationery

359,404 107,990   14,262   5,952   1,376   931   3,000   4,470   1,359   12,703   7,960   519,407   3,515,874   100,000   207,261   3,823,135  

SURPLUS Revaluation of  tangible  fixed  assets Gains  on  investment  assets NET  MOVEMENT  IN  FUNDS

FIXED ASSETS Tangible  assets Investments

Year ended 31.07.2016 £ £

BALANCE SHEET  AT  31  JULY  2017 31.07.2017 £ £

CURRENT ASSETS Stocks Debtors  falling  due  after  more  than  one  year Debtors  falling  due  within  one  year Investments Cash  at  bank  and  in  hand CREDITORS: Amounts  falling  due  within  a  year NET  CURRENT  ASSETS

101,864 12,644   3,368   99   724   1,800   3,180   1,505   11,920   6,507   621,074   251,143   125,000   56,187   432,330  

£

3,931,300 2,879,237   6,810,537   11,652   1,517,500   42,483   2,000,000   1,137,935   4,709,570  

477,463

31.07.2016 £ 3,831,300 2,592,124   6,423,424  

11,292 36,000   444,060   -­‐   802,422   1,293,774  

(67,777)

(70,078) 4,641,793

1,223,696

Total assets  less  current  liabilities Creditors:  amounts  falling  due  after  more  than  one  year

11,452,330 (18,075)

7,647,120 (36,000)

NET ASSETS

11,434,255

7,611,120

232,447 3,319,907   59,075   7,822,826   11,434,255  

220,294 3,295,710   59,075   4,036,041   7,611,120  

FUNDS Endowment Restricted Unrestricted -­‐  Designated  funds Unrestricted  -­‐  other  charitable  funds

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 91


| ANNUAL REPORT & STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT AUDITOR ON THE SUMMARY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS The accompanying summary financial statements, which comprise the summary Balance sheet as at 31 July 2017 and the summary Statement of financial activities for the year then ended, are derived from the audited financial statements of The Malvernian Society Limited for the year end 31 July 2017. We expressed an unqualified audit opinion on those financial statements in our report dated 11 November 2017. Those financial statements, and the summary of financial statements, do not reflect the effects of events that ocurred subsequent to the date of our report on those financial statements. The summary financial statements do not contain all the disclosures required by the Companies Act 2006 and Accounting and Reporting by charities: Statement of Recommended Practice applicable to charities preparing their accounts in accordance with the Financial Reporting Standard applicable in the UK and Republic of Ireland (FRS102) (as amended for accounting periods commencing from 1 January 2016). Reading the summary financial statements, therefore, is not a substitute for reading the audited financial statements of The Malvernian Society Limited. Trustees’ Responsibility for the Summary Financial Statements The trustees are responsible for preparing the summarised financial statements in accordance with applicable United Kingdom law and the recommendations of the charities SORP. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the summary financial statements based on our procedures, which were conducted in accordance with International Standard on Auditing (ISA) 810, “Engagements to Report on Summary Financial Statements.”

92 | Old Malvernian Newsletter

Opinion In our opinion, the summary financial statements derived from the audited financial statements and the Trustees’ Annual Report of The Malvernian Society Limited for the year ended 31 July 2017 are consistent, in all material respects, with those financial statements, in accordance with the applicable requirements of section 427 of the Companies Act 2006, and the regulations made thereunder. MOORE STEPHENS LLP Chartered Accountants Statutory Auditor London

I TRUSTEES’ STATEMENT The summarised financial statements contained in this report are extracted from the full draft financial statements prepared by The Malvernian Society Limited for approval by the Trustees on 11 November 2017. The full financial statements were externally scrutinised by Moore Stephens LLP, the entity’s statutory auditors, and given an unqualified audit opinion. The full financial statements will be submitted to Companies House in due course. The summarised financial statements may not contain sufficient information to allow a full understanding of the financial affairs of The Malvernian Society Limited. Copies of the full financial statements can be obtained from the Secretary (e-mail: pg@malcol.org) in the Society Office. Signed for and on behalf of the Committee on 11 November 2017

ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION Registered & Principal Office: Malvern College College Road Malvern Worcestershire WR14 3DF Bankers: CCLA Investment Management Senator House 85 Victoria Street London EC4V 4ET Lloyds TSB 48 belle Vue Terrace Malvern Worcestershire WR14 4QG Accountants: Kendall Wadley LLP Granta Lodge 71 Graham Road Malvern Worcestershire WR14 2JS Auditors: Moore Stephens 150 Aldersgate Street London EC1A 4AB Solicitors: RJV Owen Pinsent Masons LLP 30 Crown Place London EC2A 4ES Investment Advisors: Sarasin & Partners LLP Juxon House 100 St Paul’s Churchyar London EC4M 8BU Other Names: The Society reserves the right to use the title ‘The Malvern College Foundation’ Company Number: 00213672 Registered Charity Number: 527573 HM Revenue & Customs Ref: X25620


ANNUAL REPORT & STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS |

OM Club Income  &  Expenditure  Account for  the  year  ended  31  July  2017

INCOME Life membership  fees LESS:  EXPENDITURE OM  Cricket  Club OM  Football  Club OM  Golfing  Society OM  Rifle  Club OM  Sailing  Club OM  Netball  Club

Year ended 31.07.2017 £ £

Year ended 31.07.2016 £ £

9,669

9,506

2,500 2,500 2,500 1,700 1,250 500

2,000 2,000 2,000 1,000 1,000 -­‐

Sundry items

10,950 2,087 13,037

8,000 511 8,511

(DEFICIT)/SURPLUS

(3,368)

995

31.07.2017 £

31.07.2016 £

44,710 (3,368) 41,342

43,715 995 44,710

41,342

44,710

Balance Sheet as  at  31  July  2017

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 1  August   Net  (deficit)/surplus  for  the  year   As  at  31  July   REPRESENTED  BY: Loan  to  The  Malvernian  Society

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 93


| OM MERCHANDISE

OM Tie (non crease silk, improved quality)

OM Bow Tie (untied, in presentation box)

OM Socks (70% cotton)

OM Cufflinks – Glass

OM Cricket Sweater (long sleeve)

OM Cricket Sweater (sleeveless)

OM Beaded Bracelet No.3 (blue)

Ladies OM Gryphon Scarf

Necklace with House 8 Bead (pink)

Ellerslie School Tea Towel

Malvern College Tea Towel

Limited Edition colour print ‘Coming in for Lunch’ (unframed) *

94 | Old Malvernian Newsletter


OM MERCHANDISE | | WELCOME TO THE MALVERN SHOP To view the complete range of Society and College clothing and giftware and to make an online purchase, please go to www.themalvernshop.co.uk We hope you enjoy using the Malvern Shop and welcome any feedback and comments you may have. However, if you would prefer to contact us directly to make an order and pay by cash, cheque, or credit/debit card, or if you have any questions, please contact us on malsoc@malcol.org or 01684 581517. Prices are current as at 1st January 2018 and are inclusive of VAT. Full details of UK and overseas postal charges can be found online at www.themalvernshop.co.uk

Item £

Item £ OM Tie (non crease silk, improved quality)

25.00

OM City Tie (non crease silk)

25.00

OM Cambridge Tie (poly/silk)

14.00

OM Oxford Tie (poly/silk)

14.00

OM Court Games Tie (non crease silk)

25.00

OM Bow Tie (ready tied, in presentation box)

17.00

OM Bow Tie (untied, in presentation box)

17.00

OM Hatband

8.00

OM Scarf (100% lambswool)

26.00

OM Cufflinks - Gold

25.00

OM Cufflinks – Glass

30.00

OM Socks (70% cotton)

10.00

Limited Edition colour print ‘The Senior’ (unframed) *

49.00

OM Cricket Sweater (long sleeve) 100% wool Sizes 40-50

82.00

25.00

OM Cricket Sweater (sleeveless) 100% wool Selected sizes

72.00

Limited Edition colour print ‘Coming in for Lunch’ (unframed) *

25.00

Glass Paperweight with Crest

16.00

OM Cricket Sweater (sleeveless) acrylic/wool mix Selected sizes Reduced price, contact office for further details

POA

Whisky Tumbler (in presentation box)

Book ‘A History of Malvern College Chapel’ 1899-1999, compiled by George Chesterton

50.00

5.00

OM Polo Belt available in 95cm and 100cm length

Book ‘Malvern College Chapel’, published 2014

5.00

Ladies Compact Mirror

6.50

Ladies Necklace with House 3 Bead (Blue)

48.00

Malvern College Tea Towel

8.00

Ladies Necklace with House 4 Bead (Red)

48.00

Ellerslie School Tea Towel

8.00

Ladies Necklace with House 6 Bead (Yellow)

48.00

Ladies Necklace with House 8 Bead (Pink)

48.00

* Prints are available framed. Prices on request.

Ladies Necklace with Ellerslie House Bead (Teal) 48.00 House 3 (Blue) Charm

6.00

House 4 (Red) Charm

6.00

House 6 (Yellow) Charm

6.00

House 8 (Pink) Charm

6.00

Ellerslie House (Teal) Charm

6.00

Silver Acorn Charm

20.00

Silver Leaf Charm

15.00

Ladies Charm Bracelet (without charms)

15.00

Ladies OM Gryphon Scarf

29.00

OM Beaded Bracelet Ellerslie House

10.00

OM Beaded Bracelet No 3

10.00

OM Beaded Bracelet No 4

10.00

OM Beaded Bracelet No 6

10.00

OM Beaded Bracelet No 8

10.00

Limited Edition colour print ‘The Senior’ (unframed) *

Old Malvernian Newsletter | 95


Malvernian SOCIETY

www.malverniansociety.org.uk Malvernian Society Ltd

Malvern College College Road Malvern Worcestershire WR14 3DF

Tel: +44 (0)1684 581 517 Email: malsoc@malcol.org Registered Charity No. 527573

Registered Company No. 213672

OM Newsletter 2018  
OM Newsletter 2018