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ANNUAL REPORT 2012


Core Values & Mission Contents

Malthouse Theatre is at once a treasured building, a theatre company, a creative site and an engine for change.

Chairman’s Report

5

Executive Report

7

Production Summaries

9

It is also the imaginative expression of a committed team of artmakers reaching out to an even larger number of local, national and international artists. All are dedicated to an ongoing conversation with audiences of exciting diversity and character.

Artistic Development Additional Activities

21

This conversation chooses contemporary theatre as its vehicle: a compelling annual program of adventurous, multi-disciplinary work inspired by writers, directors, designers, choreographers, audio artists and performers. Here, the combined possibilities of all theatre arts are offered centre stage – for entertainment, for inspiration, and for fun.

MUSE

25

Board, Staff & Partners

26

Key Performance Indicators

28

Financial Report

30

Education

19 20

The quality, depth and longevity of this relationship between artists and audiences are at the heart of everything we do and so our creative aspirations are driven by a number of values: Risk Works created by Malthouse Theatre aim to test and extend the boundaries of our art form. In order to be vital, cultural practice needs to be challenged and renewed. By acknowledging otherness and embracing experimentation as part of our day-to-day work, our assumptions are tested, our perspectives are expanded and our practice is rejuvenated. A celebration of difference, a desire to reach beyond our known limits and a willingness to venture into the thrilling unknown are how we define creative risk. Rigour Malthouse Theatre is committed to research, creative development and the ongoing examination of our practice. A work of art is created in the time and space between the first idea and its realisation. Its potential for intelligence, passion and beauty is the measure of how ideas are tested, developed and supported over time. While we have permission to fail, we have the right to create the best conditions for achievement: our rigour builds the strongest platform from which to leap towards greatness. Quest Malthouse Theatre lives its values both onstage and off: diversity, access and social inclusion are at the core of the world we want to represent and shape. Theatre allows us to imagine and interact with the wondrous spectrum of human possibility: it allows us to picture a different world and know that it can be one of our own making. Through theatre, we participate in an ongoing quest to define who we are and what we value.

2012 annual report/3


Number of female Directors/Creators presented in our season 7 Directors 12 Authors/Choreographers


Chairman’s Report Malthouse Theatre’s 2012 opened with a live duck on a stage listening to Bach, and finished in chilly London, with purring kamikaze diva Meow Meow hot-footing it to the foyer of the Queen Elizabeth Hall to sell her CDs. In between, we enjoyed a glorious, finely-chiselled program of 13 productions, the ‘quality and ambition’ of which critic Cameron Woodhead praised in his annual round up of Melbourne stagecraft for The Age. Welcome to the Malthouse Theatre 2012 Annual Report; it was a year of which to be proud. At Malthouse Theatre we relish our pivotal role in contemporary theatremaking, not just in Melbourne but across Australia – in 2012 corralling 174 artists across 12 mainstage productions, one opera mini-fest, five Helium productions, six world premieres, 374 performances, and over 70,000 attendees through our Melbourne season and tours to Sydney and London. Our broader community of followers grew exponentially too – more than doubling via social media – while visitors to our website topped 150,000 over the year. Our reach into the next generation of Victoria’s arts-goers also grew by nearly 40% in 2012; just under 3,000 students participated in Malthouse Theatre workshops on site and, just as importantly, across the state in community arts spaces as dispersed as Dandenong, Wodonga and Frankston.

Of course, a huge number of thanks are due: to all my fellow board members; to our tireless government stakeholders; to our very own crowdsourced volunteers; and to the many private, commercial and philanthropic donors, sponsors and supporters who join us in the pilgrimage. It was also encouraging to see our community of Muse donors grow strongly for a fifth successive year, as well as to celebrate the extraordinary generosity of Maureen and Tony Wheeler in their major support of a new and ambitious international touring program. Marion Potts and Jo Porter continue to lead the company with great passion, commitment, intellect and energy. More specifically I would like to mention here our Major Partner, Victoria University; Production Partners, Sofitel Melbourne On Collins and Qantas; Media Partner, Time Out Melbourne; and our suite of Corporate Partners, Allens, Medina, Roy Morgan Research, Avant Card, John Mullen and Partners, and company supporters Gorman, Bang & Olufsen, Avenue Bookstore and Moritz. We are also hugely grateful to government partners, Arts Victoria, the Major Performing Arts Board of the Australia Council for the Arts and the City of Melbourne, as well as the many private philanthropic organisations thanked more carefully in the body of this report.

It was a very special thing to sit in that sister Southbank theatre on the other side of the planet, surrounded by friends and family, and to witness the conflagratory power of Malthouse Theatre’s investment in creativity – lighting fires under the feet of audiences all over the world. So thank you, as ever, to the genius makers of our work – actors, designers, musicians, costumiers, directors – those who support them front- and back-of-house – tech and production crew, front-of-house charmers, our fabulous volunteers – and everyone in our pugnacious ‘small giant’ organisation who produce, sell, market and fundraise to make it all happen. Nothing would happen without you. Great things happen because of you.

Simon Westcott

It was also gratifying to enjoy the fruits of a concerted investment in our best female talent; seven female directors and 12 female writers were involved in 2012 productions, and with the appointment of Sarah Morgan to our board, we officially became gender-imbalanced in favour of female board directors.

2012 annual report/5


Number of world premieres in season 6


Executive Report In 2012 Malthouse Theatre’s creative identity asserted itself through a season of 13 provocative and adventurous new productions. Borne of the values and work practices initiated in 2011, the most rewarding aspect of this program was to see a number of works reach fruition through The Engine Room – our research and creative development arm. Blood Wedding and On the Misconception of Oedipus sat side by side in the Beckett and the Merlyn, two vastly different offerings but ones which were just a glint in the artists’ eyes some years prior. Wild Surmise and Pompeii, L.A. were united by a rigour of approach but were otherwise two very distinct new Australian works. Collectively, all four productions received critical and industry acclaim and gave our audiences a sense of spectrum: this diversity of experience reflects not only the breadth of our artists’ capabilities, but the wealth of our broader culture. Blood Wedding brought the second most-spoken language in the world to our stage and allowed many culturally-diverse audience members to project themselves and their own backgrounds into the work. It was deeply rewarding to see different audiences in our building – to have our foyer bubbling with three or more languages spoken, sangría consumed and poetry read. This highlight was matched by Angela’s Kitchen – the Maltese community at the theatre in full force, waving flags at the curtain call of Paul Capsis’ tour de force. During our season of Pinocchio, the foyer was overrun by children – the noise of eight-year-olds claiming our space as their own was deafening and thrilling. 2012 was also a first time for circus at The Malthouse: audiences were exposed to the seductive and breathtaking dexterity of Circa – one of Australia’s most internationallyacclaimed companies.

All of our productions elicited strong responses from our audiences, some still reeling from the emotional impact of The Wild Duck or cringing from the taunts of Tina C. Most importantly we were able to celebrate the work of Bille Brown and receive his farewell gift to Australian audiences. Bille threw himself into The Histrionic as the true theatre animal he was and his performance was unforgettable. Melbourne’s independent theatre sector is one of its great and unique cultural features. In 2011 rawcus and Chamber Made Opera performed Another Lament in a suburban lounge room. Some months later, Four Larks created visual and musical magic in a garage in Northcote. Malthouse Theatre’s ability to include the work of these companies in our season is a privilege. The success of our inaugural Helium season attests to our audience’s appetite for the brave and the experimental – and proves that our artists’ audacity is often matched by theirs. From these big ideas that are explored in the small confines of our Tower Theatre, many key relationships are formed and their potential is unknowable. Our invitation to remount Meow Meow’s Little Match Girl at the Queen Elizabeth Hall on London’s Southbank could not have been known in 2011 when we held a creative development session, as part of The Engine Room activities, with some photos, a white board and a few coloured markers. Undoubtedly a company highlight, this award-winning production played to over seven hundred people on its closing night and produced palpable evidence of Malthouse Theatre’s capacity to enter the international arena. That Malthouse Theatre’s wingspan can reach from the garages and lounge rooms of Melbourne to the banks of the Thames is a noteworthy achievement.

2012 also saw the launch of Prompt, our revitalized Youth and Education Program. Along with innovative programs such as the Provocateurs, workshops and access initiatives, it reached a record number of attendees and scooped three Drama Victoria Awards. Engagement involves both attendance and participation and Malthouse Theatre values this principle by providing a variety of pathways for young people. From Prompt, through to the Besen Family Artist Program, to our Female Director in Residence position (attributed to the talented Adena Jacobs in 2012), we are steadily demonstrating the positive long-term impact of these opportunities. These initiatives sit alongside many others: the formation of our Aboriginal and Torres Straight Island Advisory Committee being a crucial one. These are often perceived as the background vocals to our main act but they are in fact strong, gamechanging initiatives. We characterise Malthouse Theatre as a theatre company, a creative site and an engine for change. These aren’t distinct facets of what we do but emerge through everything we do: our program is the result of our imaginative reach, our expressive tussle with the themes and subjects that affect our lives. We continue to offer our audience provocative alternatives, we like experiences that reframe our perspective, that prod at our assumptions and energise us. In every attempt, we return to the idea of our theatre as a cultural hub, a place that uses our artform as a pretext to come together, as a conduit that allows us to think, feel, and celebrate. Marion Potts Artistic Director

2012 annual report/7


2012 season

Number of artists employed

174

Attendances – At The Malthouse 54,269

Attendances – The Malthouse and Tours 70,594


2012 season

The wild duck

Sorry Seems to be the hardest word

17 February – 17 March

Photo credit: Pia Johnson

Photo credit: Lachlan Woods

21 march – 14 april

A Malthouse Theatre presentation of a Belvoir production Written by Simon Stone with Chris Ryan after Henrik Ibsen Directed by Simon Stone Set Design Ralph Myers Costume Design Tess Schofield Lighting Design Niklas Pajanti Composition and Sound Design Stefan Gregory Assistant Director Anne-Louise Sarks Dramaturgy Eamon Flack Performed by John Gaden, Anita Hegh, Ewen Leslie, Eloise Mignon, Anthony Phelan, Toby Schmitz Production Manager Glenn Dulihanty Stage Manager Lisa Osborn Assistant Stage Manager Amy Morcom Technical Manager and Lighting Design Associate Teegan Lee Head of Sound Caitlin Porter

A Malthouse Theatre, Christopher Green, Julia Holt and Melbourne International Comedy Festival production Created by Christopher Green Performed by Tina C with special guest Auriel Andrew OAM and musical accompaniment by James Henry

“In the time-honoured tradition of delivering shocking truths with a smile and sting in the tail, Green’s comic vehicle is as brilliant as she is disingenuous. Go see Tina C.” Elly Varrenti, The Age

“The great strength of this adaptation of Henrik Ibsen’s five-act play, The Wild Duck, is the exquisitely balanced, sensitively wrought performances.”  Kate Herbert, Herald Sun

Venue

Merlyn Theatre

Venue

Beckett Theatre

Total No of Performances

33

Total No of Performances

25

Total Paid Attendances

8,521

Total Paid Attendances

1,693

All Attendances

9,529

All Attendances

2,130

Net Box Office

$324,094

Net Box Office

$50,100 2012 annual report/9


2012 season

The HISTrIONIC (Der THEATERMACHER)

The plague dances 14 APril – 6 MaY

Photo credit: Jeff Busby

Photo credit: Jeff Busby

2 APRIL – 3 MAY

A Malthouse Theatre and Sydney Theatre Company production By Thomas Bernhard Translated by Tom Wright Directed by Daniel Schlusser Set and Costume Design Marg Horwell Lighting Design Paul Jackson Composition and Sound Design Darrin Verhagen Performed by Bille Brown, Kelly Butler, Barry Otto, Josh Price, Katherine Tonkin, Jennifer Vuletic, Edwina Wren Stage Manager Meg Deyell Assistant Stage Manager Alice Fleming

“It is a performance of transfixing power and reverberation and in the context of this restlessly confident and impressively over-reaching production, it represents an almost poignant homage to the old theatre on the part of the new.” Peter Craven, The Spectator

A Malthouse Theatre presentation of a Four Larks production Created by Four Larks (Mat Diafos Sweeney, Sebastian Peters-Lazaro and Jesse Rasmussen) Written with Marcel Dorney Direction Mat Diafos Sweeney, Jesse Rasmussen, Sebastian Peters-Lazaro (movement) Set Design Sebastian Peters-Lazaro and Ellen Strasser Costume Design Ellen Strasser Lighting Design Tom Willis Hair and Make-Up Jesse Rasmussen Stage Management Lisette Drew Music Composition and Direction Mat Diafos Sweeney, arranged and developed in collaboration with the musicians Lyrics Jesse Rasmussen Performed by Adam Casey, Matt Crosby, Ida Dueland-Hansen, Genevieve Fry, Esther Hanneford, Benjamin Hoejtes, Kevin Kiernan-Molloy, Lisa Salvo, Karen Sibbing, Emily Tomlins Four Larks were Malthouse Theatre’s 2012 Company in Residence.

“The great strength of any Four Larks show is its singing. The increasingly complex vocal harmonies … seem to fan out in three dimensions. As the stranger Hannelore, Esther Hannaford brings a light and creamy soprano into the mix.” Chris Boyd, The Australian

Venue

Merlyn Theatre

Total No of Performances

31

Total Paid Attendances

3,605

All Attendances

4,830

Venue

Tower Theatre

Net Box Office

$124,268

Total No of Performances

23

SYDNEY SEASON  Wharf 1. Sydney Theatre Company

Total Paid Attendances

1,541

Total No of Performances

45

All Attendances

1,791

All Attendances

8,260

Net Box Office

$37,071


2012 season

Briwyant

29 may – 10 june

4 JULY – 14 July

A Malthouse Theatre presentation of a Circa production

A Malthouse Theatre production

Created by Yaron Lifschitz and the Circa ensemble Director Yaron Lifschitz Performed by Nathan Boyle, Jessica Connell, Daniel Crisp, Jarred Dewey, Todd Kilby, Alice Muntz, Brittannie Portelli Producer Danielle Kellie Tour Manager/Director Diane Stern/Sally Blackwood Technical Director/Lighting Designer Jason Organ Production Manager Mark Middleton Costume Designer Libby McDonnell

Directed by Vicki Van Hout Choreographed by Vicki Van Hout in collaboration with the performers Produced by Performance Space Interactive Media Imogen Cranna Videography Marian Abboud Lighting Design Neil Simpson Composition Elias Constantopedos Dramaturgy Kay Armstrong Performed by Henrietta Baird, Raghav Handa, Rosealee Pearson, Beau Dean Smith, Melinda Tyquin, Vicki Van Hout Company Manager Rosalind Richards Assistant Company Manager Alison Murphy-Oates Production Manager Richard Whitehouse

Photo credit: Jeff Busby

Photo credit: Justin Nicholas

Circa

“Without uttering a word for 75 minutes, Circa manages to speak more fluently than many text-based theatre pieces. Very articulate circus indeed!” Stephanie Glickman, Herald Sun

“In its rich imagery and ideas, its detailed and thoughtful integration of movement and live media, and in its humorous take on the reconciliation of indigenous identity with modern life, Briwyant manages to break new ground and surprise us every step of the way.” Jordan Beth Vincent, The Age

Venue

Merlyn Theatre

Venue

Merlyn Theatre

Total No of Performances

12

Total No of Performances

13

Total Paid Attendances

4,787

Total Paid Attendances

848

All Attendances

5,474

All Attendances

1,520

Net Box Office

$199,383

Net Box Office

$32,338 2012 annual report/11


2012 season

blood wedding 21 july – 19 august

On the Misconception of Oedipus

Photo credit: Jeff Busby

Photo credit: Jeff Busby

10 AUGUST – 26 AUGUST

A Malthouse Theatre production

A Malthouse Theatre and Perth Theatre Company production

By Federico García Lorca Adapted by Raimondo Cortese Directed by Marion Potts Set and Costume Design The Sisters Hayes Lighting Design Paul Jackson Composition Tim Rogers Sound Design Russell Goldsmith Assistant Director Claudia Escobar Performed by Silvia Colloca, Nicole Da Silva, Ivan Donato, Mariola Fuentes, Ruth Sancho Huerga, Irene del Pilar Gomez, Matias Stevens, Greg Ulfan, David Valencia Stage Manager Lisa Osborn Assistant Stage Manager Rebecca Poulter Dialect Coach Suzanne Heywood

Devised by Zoë Atkinson, Matthew Lutton and Tom Wright Text by Tom Wright Directed by Matthew Lutton Set and Costume Design Zoë Atkinson Lighting Design Paul Jackson Composition and Sound Design Kelly Ryall Assistant Director Daniel Lammin Performed by Natasha Herbert, Richard Pyros, Daniel Schlusser Stage Manager Alice Fleming

“Under Matthew Lutton’s direction, Schlusser and Herbert develop a commanding eloquence and rhythm.” Cameron Woodhead, The Age

“Potts’ production is punctuated by these sudden vivid influxes of movement and song, creating a compelling rhythm that heightens the intensities of the different scenes, and which also, not unincidentally, accustoms our ears to listening to Spanish.” Alison Croggon, Theatre Notes

Venue

Merlyn Theatre

Venue

Beckett Theatre

Total No of Performances

31

Total No of Performances

17

Total Paid Attendances

6,016

Total Paid Attendances

1,300

All Attendances

7,028

All Attendances

1,797

Net Box Office

$211,086

Net Box Office

$45,965


2012 season

Pinocchio

4 september – 23 september

6 september – 28 september

A Malthouse Theatre presentation of a Griffin Theatre Company production

A Malthouse Theatre presentation of a Windmill Theatre and State Theatre Company of South Australia production

By Paul Capsis and Julian Meyrick Director Julian Meyrick Associate Writer Hilary Bell Design Louise McCarthy Lighting Design Verity Hampson Composition and Sound Design Alister Spence Audio-Visual Design Steve Toulmin Performed by Paul Capsis Stage Manager Karina McKenzie Production Manager Micah Johnson

Directed and created by Rosemary Myers with Writer Julianne O’Brien Design Jonathan Oxlade Composer and Musical Director Jethro Woodward Video Design Chris More Lighting Design Geoff Cobham Movement Carol Wellman Kelly based on the books by Carlo Collodi Performed by Danielle Catanzariti, Jude Henshall, Derik Lynch, Nathan O’Keefe, Geoff Revell, Sam Routledge, Alirio Zavarce Musicians Shireen Khemlani and Paul White Production Manager Jason Warner Stage Manager Gabrielle Hornhardt

Photo credit:Tony Lewis

Photo credit: Brett Boardman

angela’s kitchen

“Capsis’ story will resonate with those who share his migrant heritage, his love of his grandmother or his memories of a dysfunctional family.” Kate Herbert, Sunday Herald Sun

“Created by veteran director Rosemary Myers, this production takes Pinocchio on a journey full of twists and turns, while mixing in themes from the original tale.” Stephanie Glickman, Herald Sun

Venue

Beckett Theatre

Venue

Merlyn Theatre

Total No of Performances

23

Total No of Performances

30

Total Paid Attendances

3,741

Total Paid Attendances

5,594

All Attendances

4,100

All Attendances

6,488

Net Box Office

$155,174

Net Box Office

$141,788 2012 annual report/13


2012 season

9 november – 2 december

16 november – 9 december

A Malthouse Theatre production

A Malthouse Theatre production

Based on the verse novel by Dorothy Porter Adapted by Jane Montgomery Griffiths Directed by Marion Potts Set and Costume Design Anna Tregloan Composition and Sound Design Jethro Woodward Lighting Design Paul Jackson Assistant Director Adena Jacobs Performed by Humphrey Bower, Jane Montgomery Griffiths Stage Manager Alice Fleming

By Declan Greene Directed by Matthew Lutton Set and Lighting Design Nick Schlieper Associate Lighting Design Tom Willis Costume Design Mel Page Composition and Sound Design David Franzke Performed by David Harrison, Belinda McClory, Tony Nikolakopoulos, Luke Ryan, Anna Samson, Greg Stone Stage Manager Lisa Osborn Assistant Stage Manager Neole Goss

Photo credit: Pia Johnson

POMPEii, L.a.

Photo credit: Pia Johnson

wild surmise

“A luminous production that uses every element of theatrical craft to magnify the brilliance of a major Australian poet.” 4.5 Stars Cameron Woodhead, The Age

“Anyone who thinks theatre can’t be as potent, mind-blowing and time-bending as the best of David Lynch needs to see this. It’s a gamechanger … Pompeii, L.A. is a masterpiece in staging, design (Nick Schlieper) and sound (David Franzke). It’s elusive, addictive and harrowing. It may not be for everyone, but it is no less unmissable for that.” Chris Boyd, The Australian

Venue

Beckett Theatre

Venue

Merlyn Theatre

Total No of Performances

24

Total No of Performances

23

Total Paid Attendances

1,438

Total Paid Attendances

2,046

All Attendances

1,904

All Attendances

3,058

Net Box Office

$57,199

Net Box Office

$67,620


Opera xs

OPEra xs: a convergence of opera With a diverse program featuring established productions alongside special events, works in progress, an operatic tête-à-tête with mezzo soprano Merlyn Quaife and an Open Mic Night, Opera XS was a showcase of contemporary Australian opera held over the Queen’s Birthday long weekend.

ANOTHER LAMENT 6 – 10 JUNE

IN THE BEGINNING WAS THE WORD 8 – 11 JUNE A Malthouse Theatre and Victorian Opera production Musical Director Richard Gill Director of Improvisation Casey Bennetto Tenor Carlos Bárcenas Tenor Timothy Reynolds Bass Jeremy Kleeman Stage Manager Tia Clark Venue

Beckett Theatre

Total No of Performances

4

Total Paid Attendances

80

All Attendances

137

Net Box Office

$2,321

Redfern 8 – 11 JUNE A Malthouse Theatre presentation of a Short Black Opera Company production

Photo credit: Paul Dunn

Director Cameron Menzies Composition Deborah Cheetham (Soprano) Musical Director Toni Lalich (Piano) Performed by Deborah Cheetham, Toni Lalich, Stephen Grant and Tiriki Onus Stage Manager Tia Clark

A Malthouse Theatre presentation of a Chamber Made Opera and rawcus production Director Kate Sulan Composition and Musical Performance Ida Duelund Hansen (Voice, Double Bass) Assistant Director Nilgun Guven Costume and Set Design Emily Barrie Lighting Design Richard Vabre Sound Design Jethro Woodward Performed by rawcus ensemble members Clem Baade, Rachel Edward, Nilgun Guven, Mike McEvoy and Ryan New Stage Manager Lisa Osborn “Another Lament merges improvised physical performance with songs by Henry Purcell … [It is] beautiful and beguiling theatre, buoyed by the rigorous conception and concentrated presence that distinguishes rawcus’ work.” Cameron Woodhead, The Age

Venue

Beckett Theatre

Total No of Performances

4

Total Paid Attendances

112

All Attendances

156

Net Box Office

$3,337

Merlyn Quaife: One on One 8 – 10 JUNE A Malthouse Theatre production Director Matthew Lutton Lighting Design Lucy Birkinshaw Performed by Merlyn Quaife and Caroline Almonte (Piano) Venue

The Bagging Room

Total No of Performances

12

Total Paid Attendances

4

All Attendances

31

Net Box Office

$469

OPEN MIC 9 JUNE

Venue

Beckett Theatre

Venue

Merlyn Theatre

Total No of Performances

5

Total No of Performances

1

Total Paid Attendances

390

Total Paid Attendances

39

All Attendances

438

All Attendances

116

Net Box Office

$15,371

Net Box Office

$758 2012 annual report/15


helium

HELIUM Helium is designed as a season for contemporary performing artists to present their own work in a venue provided, equipped and staffed by Malthouse Theatre. The Tower Theatre is a space for experimentation and daring. For such a small space, it has produced some big ideas and the artists who work in it are valued for the size of their ambition. Helium is Malthouse Theatre’s acknowledgement of this ambition – and of the valuable resource that such a space can be.

Personal Political Physical Challenge 11 August – 25 AUGUST

BILD-LILi 18 JULY – 4 AUGUST

Presented by Hydra Poesis and Malthouse Theatre

Presented by Lull Studios and Malthouse Theatre in association with Arts Radar Writer/Director/Performer/Composer/Costumier Elena Knox Designer/Composer/Builder/Translator/Artist Lindsay Webb Illuminator/Inventor/Operator/Poodle trainer Phil Downing Producer Sam Hawker

Conceived and directed by Sam Fox Choreographed by Sam Fox, Rachel Arianne Ogle and Martin Hansen Performed by Rachel Arianne Ogle, James Welsby, Bianca Martin, Heath Barrett, Storm Helmore Original score by Stina Design concept by Thea Costantino Design team Ainsley Canning (set), Pierce Davison and Dimity Magnus (special props), Mandy Elmitt (costume), Ben Taaffe (mixing and sound design), Simon Wise (original lighting design) Lighting design Bluebottle - Ben Shaw and Ben Cobham Producer Sam Fox Associate Producer Francesca Hope Production Assistant Renae Coles Developed with original cast Martin Hansen, Rachel Arianne Ogle, Kathryn Puie, Bianca Martin, Heath Barrett

Venue

Tower Theatre

Venue

Tower Theatre

Total No of Performances

14

Total No of Performances

11

Total Paid Attendances

426

Total Paid Attendances

386

All Attendances

635

All Attendances

499

Net Box Office

$9,627

Net Box Office

$7,534


helium

PALE BLUE DOT

opal vapour

11 August – 25 August

21 september – 6 october

Presented by Optic Nerve Performance Group and Malthouse Theatre

Presented by Jade Dewi Tyas-Tunggal and Malthouse Theatre

Devised and written by The Ensemble Directed by Tanya Gerstle Associate Director Gary Abrahams Associate Dramaturgy by Hannah Liddy and Gary Abrahams Performed by Lachlan Woods, Stephen Phillips, Luisa Hastings Edge, Ben Pfeiffer Sound Design Russell Goldsmith Lighting Design Tom Willis Set and Costume Design Eugyeene Teh Production Manager Amber Hart Producer Nicole Smith

By Jade Dewi Tyas-Tunggal in collaboration with Paula van Beek and Ria Soemardjo Choreography and dance performance Jade Dewi Tyas-Tunggal Live and recorded music performance Ria Soemardjo Animateuring and lighting design Paula van Beek

Venue

Tower Theatre

Venue

Tower Theatre

Total No of Performances

14

Total No of Performances

12

Total Paid Attendances

527

Total Paid Attendances

485

All Attendances

645

All Attendances

574

Net Box Office

$11,409

Net Box Office

$8,475 2012 annual report/17


helium

2012 touring

OrLANDO

little match girl

12 october – 27 OCTOber

SYDNEY, LONDON

Presented by THE RABBLE and Malthouse Theatre in association with Melbourne Festival

A Malthouse Theatre commission in association with Meow Meow Revolution

Created by Emma Valente and Kate Davis Directed by Emma Valente Design Kate Davis Lighting Design Emma Valente Performed by Dana Miltins and Mary Helen Sassman

Director Marion Potts Composition & Music Arrangements Iain Grandage Original Lyrics Meow Meow Set & Costume Designer Anna Cordingley Lighting Designer Paul Jackson Additional Material Mitchell Butel Musicians (Sydney season) Lance Horne (Musical Director & piano), Steve Fitzgerald (percussion), Alexandra Kolac (violin), James Manson (guitar) Musicians (London season) Lance Horne (Musical Director & piano), Mike Porter (percussion), Emma Smith and Jenny May Logan (violin), Jacob Quist (guitar) Production/Stage Manager David Miller Sets, costumes & props constructed by Malthouse Theatre Workshop Workshop Supervisor David Craig Steel Fabricator Goffredo Mameli Scenic Artist Patrick Jones Head of Wardrobe Amanda Carr Head Electrician Stewart Campbell Chandelier Wrangler Kate Aubrey Little Match Girl is supported by Maureen and Tony Wheeler

Venue

Tower Theatre

Total No of Performances

12

Total Paid Attendances

869

All Attendances

1,011

Net Box Office

$19,746

“At The Malthouse, Marion Potts is producing theatre of high quality and ambition.” Cameron Woodhead, The Age

Sydney The Famous Speigeltent 5 January – 29 January 2012 6,554 attendances

LONDON Queen Elizabeth Hall, Southbank Centre 13 December – 30 December 2012 9,771 attendances


Artistic Development In 2012, Malthouse Theatre saw the debut of six new works for the stage, as well as co-producing six original works originating elsewhere. Of our original works: • The  Histrionic was an original adaptation by Tom Wright and director Daniel Schlusser of a Thomas Bernhard play. It was renowned actor Bille Brown’s final stage performance, and also starred Barry Otto. It garnered high critical acclaim for both its Melbourne and Sydney seasons. • The  Plague Dances was an original work of live music and dance theatre that utterly transformed the Tower Theatre. It was created by local ‘junkyard opera’ independent theatre company, Four Larks, as Malthouse Theatre’s Company-in-Residence. • Blood  Wedding was a new bilingual, Spanish/English adaptation of the Spanish classic play by Lorca. Directed by trilingual Malthouse Theatre Artistic Director Marion Potts, the play featured original music compositions by You Am I front man, Tim Rogers, and design by the design/artistic-concept team, The Sisters Hayes (in their mainstage debut). Renowned Spanish actress Mariola Fuentes (one of the Pedro Almodóvar cinematic stable) led the cast. • On  the Misconception of Oedipus, directed by Malthouse Theatre’s Associate Artist Matthew Lutton, was an original stage reworking of the Oedipus myth scripted by Tom Wright. The three-hander also had a successful season in Perth after its premiere in the Beckett Theatre. • Wild  Surmise was an adaptation of Australian poet Dorothy Porter’s verse novel of the same name, with the permission and encouragement of the late poet’s estate. Directed by Marion Potts and designed by Anna Tregloan, the script was created through an exhaustive poetryto-drama adaptation process by classicist/actor Jane Montgomery Griffiths through workshops with the Malthouse Theatre team.

• Pompeii,  L.A. was an original work for the stage by Melbourne playwright Declan Greene, directed by Matthew Lutton. Continuing the relationship between Malthouse Theatre and Greene that arose from Moth in 2010, Pompeii, L.A. starred Belinda McClory as Judy Garland as well as David Harrison in his Malthouse Theatre debut. Other Engine Room initiatives that forged important relationships and yielded a number of commissions and developments were: • Regional Listening Tour: members of the artistic and producing team took a week out on the road and travelled to regional communities to meet with artists and attend regional arts events (co-ordinated with Regional Arts Victoria). Regional-based writer Catherine Ryan has been commissioned after meeting with Malthouse Theatre on this trip. • Repertoire Week: the artistic team and a number of actors and colleague ‘thinkers’ read repertoire during this week in order to solidify knowledge and extend programming conversations beyond the immediate and obvious. This results in ideas for original ‘makes’, adaptations and repertoire to re-investigate and stage. This was the case for Hate and The Dragon, both included in our Season 2013. • Pitch Sessions: a group of independent artists were invited to pitch project ideas to the artistic and producing team and/or workshop their ideas over number of sessions with the resident artistic team. This resulted in the commission of writer Peta Brady’s Ugly Mugs and the development of Ash Flanders’ The Woman Project. Other works in development have included: Thumb (collaboration with BalletLab); ASIO Files (ongoing collaboration with Ilbijerri Theatre Company); and Voices (Wayne Blair and Richard Frankland).

Copyright Agency Female Director in Residence With the support of Copyright Agency, Malthouse Theatre has been pleased to have Adena Jacobs as our Female Director In Residence. In its second year of implementation, the residency gives a female director a six-month full-time opportunity to be part of Malthouse Theatre’s artistic team, participating in internal creative developments, networking opportunities, developing personal projects and assistantdirecting mainstage productions. In Jacob’s case, this has led to the programming of her work Persona (with Fraught Outfit) for Season 2013.

Besen Family Artist Program Since 2005, the Besen Family Artist Program (BFAP) has provided unique opportunities to emerging artists wanting professional development opportunities with an innovative mainstage theatre company. The program provides bursaries for performers, creative artists, technicians, writers, dramaturgs and associated theatre workers to pursue ‘attachments’ inside the company’s activities. With a focus on diversity of culture, gender and geography, the BFAP proudly supports Malthouse Theatre’s commitment to finding pathways for artists to mainstage work. During 2012, five developing artists were offered placements across Direction and Design. These included: Bridget Balodis  Directing  The Histrionic Daniel Lammin  Directing  On the Misconception of Oedipus Priya Namana  Design  Wild Surmise Zoey Dawson  Directing  Pompeii, L.A. Cymbeline Buhler  Directing  Community art programs

2012 annual report/19


Education

Prompt Key Youth and Education Program Activities The philosophy of Prompt, Malthouse Theatre’s Youth and Education Program, is that students and teachers are artists. We engage them as intelligent theatre makers and encourage them to be critical thinkers as they respond to our work and feed into our own practices. In 2012 we delivered a range of workshops to 567 students and teachers throughout the year, led by professional practising artists. Three key activity areas are: Provocateurs The Provocateur initiative was piloted in 2012 and aims at developing critical thinkers and eloquent, curious communicators. A small team of Provocateurs (16 years to 26 years) were selected to attend Malthouse Theatre performances and facilitated post-performance conversations with members of the audience. This initiative aims to enrich the experience at the theatre for both the Provocateurs and general audience members, promoting intergenerational conversation. The 2012 team of Provocateurs were a talented, dynamic and culturally-diverse group of young theatre makers and enthusiasts. They attended six performances and continue to stay connected to activities at The Malthouse through social networking. Based on feedback from 2012, we have extended the program to include ‘In Conversation’ sessions throughout 2013 with the artistic team; Marion Potts, Matthew Lutton, Van Badham and Paul Jackson.

The Suitcase Series The Suitcase Series is both a performance and an education program. Armed with a script and stimulus material, all created and provided by Malthouse Theatre, students in Years 9 and 10 developed their own ensemble performances and presented them at The Malthouse (or, for the first time, at regional locations; Hothouse, Wodonga; The Drum, Dandenong; or Frankston Arts Centre). The student ensembles enjoyed and responded to one another’s performances during an in-theatre day. They then watched and responded to the Malthouse Theatre ensemble’s interpretation of the same script. Already lauded, The Suitcase Series won the 2012 Drama Victoria Award for years 7-10 for Best Performance by a Theatre Company. In 2012, we had 538 participating students across 40 schools.

VCE Playlist In 2012 Malthouse Theatre had three productions on the Playlist for VCE Theatre Studies. These were Blood Wedding, The Histrionic and The Wild Duck, with 4,812 students attending the productions and the delivery of specialised post-show seminars to 1,470 students. Each of the Playlist productions had a rich resource pack, the Prompt Pack, for teachers and students available online. The Prompt Pack is a complimentary resource targeted at senior-secondary students to enrich their engagement with the production and give them access (through videos) to artists involved in the development of each work. These videos also offer insight into the variety of skills and careers that make a theatre company tick.

Primary Aged Access Pinocchio invited primary-aged children into The Malthouse. This initiative brought fun and wonder to the foyer and The Merlyn. Our primary school presentation was accompanied by a Crafternoon during the September school holidays; an engaging afternoon of craft activities, dancing and performance making. The Crafternoon activities were led by a range of celebrated local artists including Anna’s GoGo Academy, The Sisters Hayes, Tamara Rewse, and Fingal Oakenleaf.

Number of students participating in Education program workshops and events 2,822 (up 39% on 2011)


Additional Activities Limited Editions is a series of postperformance discussions, extra events, sneak previews from The Engine Room and stand-alone performances. All Afeather a forum and presentation about our fascination with birds included a performance by BalletLab and talks by artists Uncle Herb Patten, Sean Dooley and Richard Nylon. Fiesta de la Tarde a foyer celebration of Blood Wedding. With sangria and paella, Lorca poetry and foyer music, our Fiesta raged between the matinee and evening performance on a Saturday and carried a palpable buzz all day and night.

Sunglasses at Night was a companion ‘end of show’ celebration for Pompeii, L.A., that included a DJ, cocktails and croquet. It was open to the public and the wider Malthouse Theatre community, including mainstage artists, volunteers, program participants and casual staff.

Wet Wednesdays New in 2012, Wet Wednesdays are an informal gathering on the first Wednesday of every month at our bar. Recognising that meeting new people and creative conversations are most likely to take place in an informal setting, Wet Wednesdays make the Malthouse Theatre team ever-more available to artists and arts workers.

Time to Talk engages the cast and creative team of select productions in post-performance discussions with the audience. Often as enlightening for the audiences’ responses as they are for revelations about the artistic process and experience, these performances are among the most popular in each season. Time to Talk is a free postperformance event.

Crafternoon a deliberate audience development strategy to welcome families to The Malthouse via Pinocchio. Crafternoon offered puppetry, dance and tassel-making workshops as well as foyer music. Artists included The Sisters Hayes, Tamara Rewse, Anna Go-Go and Fingal Oakenleaf.

Increase in unique website visits 36.6%

2012 annual report/21


COMMUNITY PARTNERS

In 2012, Malthouse Theatre proudly established partnerships with the following organisations: Worawa College

Malthouse Theatre’s Community Partners are a handful of organisations whose established programs empower young people from a range of backgrounds and geographic locations across Victoria. By forging formal ties, Malthouse Theatre extends existing activities by offering young people experiences in attending theatre, making theatre and considering a career in the arts.

provides a holistic education and boarding experience for young Aboriginal women from suburban and regional Victoria and remote interstate communities. In 2012, a group of Worawa students attended Malthouse Theatre’s presentation of Pinocchio: “The girls enjoyed the experience. They were particularly interested in the use of space, and the development of the revolving central stage, which was an island, a city, a screen, a whale ... This really fired the imaginations of the creative students who were inspired by the transformation of space. Pinocchio and his nemesis were particular favourites. The fact that one of the actors, Derek Lynch from Finke Apatula community, was known to some of the students added to the positive nature of the day.” Leigh Waters, for Worawa Aboriginal College Big Brothers, Big Sisters builds relationships and sharing experiences with adults as mentors of young people from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Youth Junction and Headspace works with youth services in Sunshine at the VISY Cares Hub to provide opportunities to attend and make theatre. Fairfax Festival, Swan Hill works in partnership with young people in regional and remote Victoria to participate and attend theatre. Foundation For Young Australians Malthouse Theatre staff participate in the World of Work (WOW) program which offers young people opportunities to talk about work, career pathways and life satisfaction. “… I had a good time with you and [am] proud I met people who contributed in my life by giving me open-minded advice …” Ajith Madhol, WOW participant. St Martins Theatre offers young theatre makers from diverse backgrounds and abilities opportunities to attend and make theatre. Western Edge Youth Theatre development programs for young people in the Western suburbs of Melbourne with a focus on Horn of Africa and migrant communities. Australian Business and Community Foundation (ABCN) A foundation providing mentorship programs with senior business leaders and young people attending schools in low socio-economic areas or from newly arrived communities.


Access and Engagement Established in late 2011, Malthouse Theatre’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee continued to meet during 2012. This group garners advice from the local Victorian community under the leadership of Jason Tamiru, Malthouse Theatre’s Audience Development Advisor. The Committee is made up of Uncle Jack Charles, Isaac Drandic, Lisa Maza, Melodie Reynolds and Malthouse Theatre representatives. They met three times during the year, on March 12, August 31 and October 17.

Malthouse Theatre now conducts an annual venue access and disability audit and has staff committed and championing access considerations. Strong connections have been made with Victorians with a disability, with some key achievements including: • Audio Description training for four staff and six sessions offered across four Malthouse Theatre shows • Auslan translation of two shows and regular attendance by a number of patrons requiring this service • Appointment of a Besen Family Artist Placement in 2013 who is hearing impaired. For many years, Malthouse Theatre has run a ‘Playclub‘, organised through our volunteers, who enjoy privileged access to closed talks, tours of the venue, lunches and reception events.

Venue The Malthouse had yet another busy year, with the Beckett at 76% utilisation and the Merlyn reaching 78%, while the Helium season kept the Tower pumping for over four solid months, hitting 68%. In addition to major hires from Melbourne Festival, Wesley College, Victorian Opera and the National Play Festival (PlayWriting Australia), The Malthouse was temporary home to 26 productions presented by outside hirers, as well as offering rehearsal and meeting room space to numerous other hirers. Support was offered to the local arts community, with approximately $139,000 offered in discounted or free rental to 19 organisations.

Increase in social media connections Facebook — 107%  Twitter — 80%

2012 annual report/23


Malthouse Greenlight Malthouse Greenlight is a committee of Malthouse Theatre staff who introduce, encourage and oversee policies to improve environmental practices. The table right compares our recycling rates against those of 2011. These figures include staff and local businesses using our recycling facilities as well as directly accumulated waste.

2012 e-waste

Steel

Batteries

120kg

3t

30kg

Light bulbs

8kg

Cardboard

6.44t

White paper

1.46t

Co-mingled recycling

30.3t

Other waste

33t

2011 NOTES 157kg Approximate. Reduction due to previous year’s mass clearance. 3t Approximate.

55kg Reduction due to introduction of rechargeable units at end of 2011. 3kg Increase due to inclusion of non-fluorescent bulbs in calculation. 5.37t Increase in recycling as a result of more accessible recycling stations and staff awareness. 1.93t Decrease in overall paper usage from ‘paper budget’ initiative. 21.41t Increase in recycling as a result of more accessible recycling stations and staff awareness. 39.2t Correspondingly, as recycling increases, general waste decreases.

Throughout 2012, the Malthouse Greenlight team has continued to work through its goals, including: • installing LED globes throughout public areas of The Malthouse (leading to a 39% reduction of energy use for these areas) • introducing a ‘paper budget’ where office paper was purchased in bulk and kept on display as a constant reminder for office staff of its use, leading to a reduction of 21% • retro-fit waterless urinals in our foyer bathrooms • switching our chemical and cleaning products to environmentally-friendly alternatives and installing cleaner solutions such as a dishwasher

• partnering with Bikefest as a Festival Partner • becoming a founding member of Greening Our Performance; an alliance of performing arts companies and individuals who are striving to reduce our industry’s carbon footprint Increasingly, the workshop and designers are collaborating to build scenic elements that can be kept and re-used in future productions. For example, Blood Wedding’s design required 15 refrigerators – not only were these all second-hand, but post-show, they were recycled or kept for future productions.


Muse Donor PROGRAM 2012 Thank you, Malthouse Muses, for supporting our artistic vision and helping us to create a unique and dynamic environment for artists and audiences.

TERPSICHORE (Muse of Dance)

John & Lorraine Bates, Craig Reeves, Rae Rothfield, The Pratt Foundation

Sieglind D’Arcy, Mark & Jo Davey, Taleen Gaidzkar, Charles Gillies & Penelope Allen, Brian Goddard, Scott Herron, Leonie Hollingworth, Brad Hooper, Susan Humphries, Irene Kearsey, Ann Kemeny & Graham Johnson, K & J Lindsay, Sir Gustav AC CBE & Lady Nossal Tony Oliver, Robert Peters, Tim & Lynne Sherwood, Maria Sola & Malcolm Douglas, Gina Stuart, Fiona Sweet & Paul Newcombe, Joanne & Dr Niv Tadmore, John Thomas, Richard P. Watson, Henry Winters, Angelika & Pete Zangmeister, Anonymous (2)

THALIA (Muse of Comedy)

ERATO (Muse of Love)

Frankie Airey & Stephen Solly, Betty Amsden OAM, Eva Besen AO & Marc Besen AO, Debbie Dadon, Roger Donazzan & Margaret Jackson AC, Neilma Gantner, Peter & Anne Laver, Richard Leonard, Michele Levine, Mary Ruth & Peter McLennan, Judith Maitland-Parr, Elisabeth & John Schiller, Carol & Alan Schwartz AM, Anonymous (2)

Simon Abrahams, Graham & Anita Anderson, Sandra Beanham, John & Alexandra Busselmaier, Robyn Campbell, John Carruthers, Ros Casey, Tim & Rachel Cecil, Min Li Chong, Diane Clark, Patricia Coutts, Mary Crean AM, Tania de Jong AM, Orla & Rachel, Peggy Hayton, Roberta Holmes, Irene Irvine, Graeme & Joan Johnson, Vas Katos, Patricia Keith, Ruth Krawat, Liquorice Studio, Brad Martin, Gael & Ian McRae, John Millard, Robyn & John Morris, Dr Kersti Nogeste, Linda Notley, James Penlidis & Fiona McGauchie, Irene Purcell, John & Margot Rogers, Katherine Sampson, Ernie Schwartz, Morry & Anna Schwartz, Lisl Singer, Thea & Hayden Snow, Ann Tonks, Rosemary Walls, Jan Watson, Joanne Whyte, Dr Roger Woock & Fiona Clyne, Barbara Yuncken, Anonymous (6)

URANIA (Muse of the Stars) Annamila Pty Ltd, The Dara Foundation, The Danielle and Daniel Besen Foundation, Maureen & Tony Wheeler CLIO (Muse of History)

MELPOMENE (Muse of Tragedy) Chryssa Anagnostou & Jim Tsaltas, Ian Hocking & Rosemary Forbes, Val Johnstone, Jon Webster, Tom Wright EUTERPE (Muse of Music) Ingrid Ashford, John Bourne, Beth Brown & Tom Bruce AM, Sally Browne, Diana Burleigh, Ingrid & Per Carlsen, Dominic & Natalie Dirupo, Rev Fr Michael Elligate, Carolyn Floyd, William J. Forrest AM, D.L & G.S Gjergja, Marco Gjergja, Colin Golvan SC, Michael Kingston, Sue Kirkham, Pamela McLure, Naomi Milgrom AO, Dame Elisabeth Murdoch AC DBE, Sue Nattrass AO, Jenny Schwarz, Neil & Barbara Smart, Mr & Mrs Smith Pty Ltd, Leonard Vary & Matt Collins, Jason Waple, Simon Westcott & Dr Ben Keith, Phil & Heather Wilson, Anonymous (1)

Malthouse Theatre would also like to acknowledge the ongoing support of its volunteers: Rod & Yvonne Albury, George Altis, Pauline Austin, Faye Batiste, Frances Beebe, Jill Brooks, Catriona Bruce, Wendy Dakis, Glenyce Dean, Andrea Devine, Jan & Patrick Doran, Dr Margaret Elder, Wilma Farrow, Angela Farrugia, Terri Fitzsimons, Neville Gaffney, Jean Ganther, Beverly Gardner, John Gibson, Doris Gordon, Lyn Grigg, Susan & Dennys Harraway, Patricia Hart, June Harvey, Adair Hilary, Mary Hill, Jean Hunt, Alwyn James, Jenny Jeffries, Anson Joyce, Helen Kausman, Janice Kent-Mackenzie, Yvonne Laird, Nola Masters Marchant, Phyl McLean, Pat Murphy, Alex Parfait, Janet Parr, Carolyn Paulin, Eileen Ragg, Jean Ross, Patricia Ryan, Peter Saint, Helen Sanicki, Elisabeth & John Schiller, Margo Seeley, Bernard Smith, Ron Smith, John Thomas, Barry Thomson, Charles Wilkins, Glyn Wilson.

2012 annual report/25


Board, Staff & Partners Board of Directors Simon Westcott (Chair) Frankie Airey John Daley Michele Levine Ian McRae Sarah Morgan (from August 2012) Thea Snow Sigrid Thornton Kerri Turner Leonard Vary Artistic Director Marion Potts Executive Producer Jo Porter Associate Artist – Design Paul Jackson Associate Artist – Direction Matthew Lutton Associate Artist – Writing Van Badham Female Director in Residence Adena Jacobs Marketing & Business Operations Manager Emma Calverley (until April 2012) Marketing & Communications Manager Lisa Scicluna (from May 2012) Media Manager Maria O’Dwyer Company Managers Nina Bonacci & Lucy Birkinshaw (job-share from April 2012), Marc Psaila (until March 2012) Associate Producer Josh Wright Youth and Education Programs Clare Watson Administrator Narda Shanley Finance Manager Mario Agostinoni Finance Administrator Liz White Finance Assistant Connie Stella Philanthropy Manager Tamara Harrison (until April 2012) Nicole Punte (from July 2012) Development Manager Jaclyn Birtchnell Development & Marketing Assistant Hiroki Kobayashi

Digital Strategy & Marketing Coordinator Carl Nilsson-Polias Ticketing Manager Emma Howard Assistant Ticketing Manager Lauren White Executive Assistant Carla Di Stefano (until February 2012) Emily Fiori (from March 2012) Audience Development Consultant Jason Tamiru Building Manager Peter Mandersloot Bar Manager Cherry Rivers Front of House Managers Tristan Watson & Sean Ladhams Production Manager David Miller Technical Manager Baird McKenna Operations Manager Dexter Varley Venue Technician Michele Bauer (until June 2012) & Nathanael Bristow (from June 2012) Head Technician Stewart Birkinshaw Campbell Head Mechanist Andy Moore Head of Wardrobe Amanda Carr Wardrobe Assistants Chloe Greaves, Tessa Pitt, Zoe Rouse Workshop Supervisor David Craig Steel Fabricator Goffredo Mameli Scenic Artist Patrick Jones Props Master Ross Murray (lifetime recognition)

Front of House/Bar Staff Matt Adair, Leeor Adar, Claire Beynon, Jacqui Brown, Ben Carollo, Mimi Catterns, Kathryn Delaney, Tom Dent, Carla Di Stefano, Alice Dixon, Graham Downey, Josh Green, Kate Gregory, Simon Jeanes, Bridie McCarthy, Ian Michael, Anna Nalpantidis, Daniel Newell, Ruby Nolan, Syrie Payne, Kliment Poposki, Beck Rafferty, Claire Richardson, Sanne Rodenstein, Kathryn Stuckey, Phoebe Taylor, Jade Thomson, Lee Threadgold Box Office Staff Jack Angwin, Abbey Barnes, Liz Btian, paul buckley, Mark Byrne, Rachael Dyson-McGregor, Sonja Fea, Jo Gibson, Dan Giovannoni, Kate Gregory, Suzie Hardgrave, Michelle Hines, Ian Michael, Liz White, Fiona Wiseman. Vale Marc Psaila, our Company Manager, much loved and greatly missed.


Government Partners Malthouse Theatre is supported by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body

Major Partners

Production Partner     Media partners

Corporate Partners     Corporate Associates

Company Supporters

Trusts and Foundations Slome-Topol Family Charitable Trust

Spanish Cultural Cooperation Program

Australian Communities Foundation

Vera Moore Foundation

PROGRAM Partners

EDUCATION & YOUTH ACCESS PROGRAM

REGIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

ARTIST PROGRAM

FEMALE DIRECTOR IN RESIDENCE PROGRAM

REGIONAL PERFORMANCE PROJECTS

NEW AUSTRALIAN COMMISSION & PRODUCTION

The Danielle & Daniel Besen Foundation Company in Residence DIRECTORS EXCHANGE PROJECT

Maureen and Tony Wheeler INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM

Annamila Pty Ltd Artists in Residence

Tom Kantor Fund Indigenous Theatre Program

Jeanne Pratt AC, Rae Rothfield, Sue Nattrass AO, Judith Maitland-Parr THE KENN BRODZIAK ASSOCIATE PRODUCER 2012 annual report/27


Key Performance Indicators Goals

Strategy

KPI

From 2012 to 2014 increase the proportion of Malthouse Theatre produced and commissioned works from 40% of total programming to 60%.

Allocate funds and effort to commissions and development projects with a range of artists, e.g. Philip Adams at BalletLab.

Number of such projects reaching the stage

Deepening of engagement with the small-to-medium independent performing arts sector.

Access to Malthouse Theatre facilities, e.g. Tower Theatre.

Expanded diversity in use of facilities

Transparent access points via artistic Peer recognition associates, Besen Family Artist Program. Company in Residence program Corporate partnerships Expand Malthouse Theatre’s database by 20,000 names by 2014, expand cultural diversity and geographic spread of the audience.

Increases in data and attendances

Diverse on-stage programming and casting Cohesive social media strategy and a website to support it Social/community/peer engagement

Successfully managing financial health and sustainability of the company.

Merger of PTC and PML

Efficiencies from PTC/PML merger Financial surplus in the third year of the 2012-2014 triennium Reserves maintained at above 20% of annual expenditure

Increase private giving and establish corporate support for the company.

Diversify philanthropic support base Individual giving campaign revenue via expanded donor cultivation activities to increase by $50,000 per year on an ‘all company’ basis. for each year of the triennium Establish corporate partnerships via grass-roots promotional touch points and niche project support.

Retention of existing donors

$250,000 in corporate support by the end of the triennium Create and maintain a company culture that is committed to the long-term sustainability of its culture, community, environment and employee wellbeing.

Completing the prioritised goals outlined in the Greenlight committee plan while developing the requirements for remaining goals.

Completed all short-term actions, eight medium-term actions and two long-term actions from Greenlight committee’s action list by the end of 2012. Evaluation of further goals and steps needed for implementation by end of triennium.


2012 result Six of 13 season works were Malthouse Theatre produced. Creative developments and commissions included BalletLab, Jacob Boehme, Melissa Reeves and Holly Throsby, Torque Show, totalling $156,000.

Through the year over $222,000 in direct and indirect support was offered to the small-to-medium and independent arts sector. Rental subsidies were given to a spectrum of organisations including Lucy Guerin Inc, Victorian Actors’ Benevolent Trust, and Western Edge Youth Arts, in addition to Helium program support both cash and in-kind. Malthouse Theatre’s reputation as a home for artists continued to grow through 2012, as evidenced in the number of applications received for our various placements: Besen Family Artist Program received 57 applications for six positions; Copyright Australia’s Women Director’s Placement received 46 for one position, and Helium 48 applications for five slots. Four Larks was Company in Residence and presented The Plague Dances in the Tower Theatre. Increased attendance to Malthouse Theatre season of 2% on 2011. More than 8,500 new names were added to our database.

Both Blood Wedding and Angela’s Kitchen brought diversity to Malthouse Theatre’s stage and audience, as did increased connections with the education sector through The Suitcase Series. Our website upgrade garnered an increase in unique visitation of 36.6% on 2011, and an increase of 25.3% on overall web traffic from 2011 to 2012. Our social media presence increased by 107% on Facebook and 80% on Twitter. Engagement featured heavily in 2012, with partnerships established with seven new community groups. Limited Editions (particularly Crafternoon and Fiesta De La Tarde) invited new audiences to engage more deeply with the company, and we built on our engagement with the Victorian Aboriginal community through our Advisory Committee. Reduced time spent in reconciling inter-company transactions, reduced cost of compliance, greater transparency. N/A – not calculated until 2014 Reserves maintained at 24% of annual expenditure.

General donors increased by $10,000 in 2012, with a specific contribution from Maureen and Tony Wheeler of $450,000 over three years. 90% retention of existing donors, with an increased commitment from Major Partner, Victoria University.

On track – 30% of target reached. Environmental: 75% of all short-term completed, 63% medium and 40% of long- term completed by Dec 2012. Cultural: Partnership with Bikefest, involvement in Greening Our Performance, participation in Open House. Community: as per social engagement KPI above. Employee wellbeing: weekly pilates classes are offered to all staff on an ongoing basis, specialist Dogging training undertaken for three full-time production staff.

2012 annual report/29


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS The Directors’ Report

Sector Development

contents Directors’ Report

• Utilisation of performance and rehearsal spaces by as many artists as possible.

30

Auditor Independence Declaration 31 Statement of Comprehensive Income

32

Statement of Changes in Equity

32

Statement of Financial Position

33

Statement of Cash Flow

34

Notes to the Financial Statements 35 Directors’ Declaration

47

Independent Auditor’s Report

48

The directors present this report on the Company for the financial year ended 31st December, 2012. The names of the directors in office at any time during, or since the end of the year are: Simon Westcott (Chairman) Frankie Airey Sigrid Thornton Ian McRae Thea Snow Michele Levine John Daley Leonard Vary Kerri Turner Sarah Morgan (Appointed: 1/09/2012)

• Engagement with the smallto-medium and independent performing arts sector. Financial and Governance • Expansion of earned income base and maintenance of levels of existing funding. STRATEGIES Artistic:

Directors have been in office since the start of the financial year to the date of this report unless otherwise stated.

• Malthouse Makes: Characterised by rigorous creative development processes, investigation of public subjects and collaboration between artists from diverse practices, backgrounds and interests. Makes will be developed and presented as follows: – The Engine Room - creative development and research – Annual mainstage program.

Company Secretary

Access:

The following person held the position of Company Secretary at the end of the financial year: Ms Narda Shanley. Ms Shanley was appointed on 23 May 2011.

• MT’s Education Program: PROMPT • MT’s Access activities including community partnerships • Limited Editions • Opera XS • Broader recruitment strategies.

Principal Activities The principal activity of the Company (MT) during the financial year was to create, facilitate and present contemporary performance in a program of adventurous creative work, inspired by artists who practise a range of disciplines for entertainment, for inspiration, and even for fun. OBJECTIVEs The Company’s objectives are: Artistic: • Creation of exceptional work that appeals to demanding artistic collaborators, devotee audiences and third party presenters. Access: • Diversification of the cultural backgrounds of its staff, collaborators and audiences

Sector Development • Facilitation of independent works via programs including Helium • Presentation and collaboration of/ with independent artists, e.g. via Company in Residence. Financial and Governance • Stabilisation of earned income by continuing to buy in third-party works as stand-alone performance seasons that nevertheless sit within MT’s values • Continuation of existing fundraising and government support strategies • Initiation of building upgrade • Investigation of opportunities for a co-tenant at The Malthouse.


n or a ion on Dire

ors

imon Westcott Managing Director, Mr & Mrs Smith sia acific. esponsibilities: Chairperson, eople & ominations Committee Frankie

Mee in s o Dire

ors

During the financial year, six meetings were held. ttendances by each director were as follows: Directors’ Meetings

irey

umber eligible to attend

umber ttended

6 6 6 6 2 6 6 6 6 6

6 5 3 6 2 6 6 4 4 6

Director, hilanthropy Squared esponsibilities: Development Committee igrid Thornton ctor esponsibilities: Development Committee an Mc ae rts Consultant esponsibilities: eople & ominations Committee Thea now Senior olicy fficer, Social olicy Branch, Department of remier & Cabinet esponsibilities: udit, Finance & isk Committee Michele evine C

, oy Morgan esearch

esponsibilities: Development Committee eonard Vary Ceo, The Myer Foundation and SidneyMyerFund esponsibilities: eople & ominations Committee John Daley C

, Grattan Institute

esponsibilities: udit, Finance & isk Committee, eople & ominations Committee

Simon Westcott Frankie irey Sigrid hornton Ian Mc ae Sarah Morgan hea Snow Michele evine John Daley eonard Vary Kerri urner

he Company is incorporated under the Corporations ct 2001 and is a Company limited by guarantee. If the Company is wound up, the Memorandum and rticles of ssociation states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $10 each towards meeting any outstanding obligations of the Company. s at 31st December, 2012, the total amount that members of the Company are liable to contribute if the Company is wound up is $140 (2011 $140). u i or’s n epen en e De lara ion

u i or’s n epen en e De lara ion uditor’s ndependence Declaration under section 307c of the corporations ct 2001 to the directors of laybox Theatre Company imited I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, during the year ended 31 December 2012 there has been: (i) no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements as set out in the Corporations ct 2001 in relation to the audit; and (ii) no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

…...................................... …..................................... Crowe orwath Melbourne

…...................................... …...................................... nne ockwood Dated 10

pril 2013

he lead auditor’s independence declaration for the year ended 31st December, 2012 has been received and can be found on page 5 of the financial report. Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors:

erri Turner Director, initrader esponsibilities: udit, Finance & isk Committee

…...................................... …....................................... . Westcott Director

arah Morgan Director, Corporate Finance – Grant Samuel esponsibilities: Development Committee

…...................................... …....................................... J. Daley Director Dated 25 March 2013 2012 annual report/31


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012 Notes

2012

2011

$

$

2(a)

7,108,521

7,989,000

Production and touring expenses

3

(3,403,897)

(3,391,121)

Marketing and sponsorship expenses

3

(487,211)

(532,908)

Other expenses from continuing operations

3

(3,426,847)

(4,098,610)

(209,434)

(33,639)

-

-

(209,434)

(33,639)

192,369

1,256,342

-

(608,556)

Total comprehensive income for the year, net of tax

(17,065)

614,147

Total comprehensive income for the year

(17,065)

614,147

Total comprehensive income attributable to members of the Company

(17,065)

614,147

Revenues from continuing operations

Profit before income tax Income tax expense

1(n)

Profit for the Year Other comprehensive income for the year, after income tax

2(b)

Write off of amount owing by Playbox Malthouse Ltd.

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012 Accumulated Surplus

Reserves

Total

Balance at 1 January 2012

(34,380)

1,745,215

1,710,835

Transfer to Incentive Scheme Reserve

(60,986)

60,986

-

Transfer to Future Fund Reserve

(160,112)

160,112

-

Profit attributable to the company

(17,065)

-

(17,065)

(272,543)

1,966,313

1,693,770

Balance at 1 January 2011

554,526

488,873

1,043,399

Transfer to Incentive Scheme Reserve

(22,072)

22,072

-

(1,234,270)

1,234,270

-

667,436

-

667,436

(34,380)

1,745,215

1,710,835

Balance at 31 December 2012

Transfer to Future Fund Reserve Profit attributable to the company Balance at 31 December 2011


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2012 Notes Current Assets

2012

2011

$

$

Cash and cash equivalents

4

718,923

2,111,349

Trade and other receivables

5

187,366

187,400

Inventories

6

48,841

30,539

Other current assets

7

266,904

276,655

1,222,034

2,605,943

Total Current Assets Non-Current Assets

Property plant & equipment

8

496,721

498,057

Investments

4

1,716,874

370,144

2,213,595

868,201

3,435,629

3,474,144

9

242,147

223,102

Short-term provisions

10

124,135

105,870

Borrowings

12

215,000

-

Other current liabilities

11

1,109,984

1.195,253

1,691,266

1,524,225

Total Non-Current Assets TOTAL ASSETS CURRENT LIABILITIES

Trade and other payables

Total Current Liabilites NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

Long-term borrowing

12

-

215,000

Long-term provisions

10

50,593

24,084

50,593

239,084

1,741,859

1,763,309

1,693,770

1,710,835

Total Non-Current Liabilites TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS EQUITY

Retained earnings

13

(272,543)

(34,380)

Reserves

14

1,966,313

1,745,215

1,693,770

1,710,835

TOTAL EQUITY

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 2012 annual report/33


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS STATEMENT OF Cash flows FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012 Notes

2012

2011

$

$

Receipts from government grants

2,329,224

2,278,514

Receipts from patrons, sponsors

4,605,369

5,531,525

-

1,200,000

(7,167,384)

(8,253,545)

131,906

76,568

(100,885)

833,062

Payment for plant and equipment

(93,967)

(36,218)

Net cash used in investing activities

(93,967)

(36,218)

Payment of loan principal

-

(310,000)

Net cash used in financing activities

-

(310,000)

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held

(194,852)

486,844

Cash and cash equivalent held at the beginning of the year

2,481,493

1,994,649

2,286,641

2,481,493

Cash flows from operating activities

Receipts for Future Fund Payments to creditors and employees Interest received Net cash provided by operating activities

18(b)

Cash flows from investing activities

Cash flows from FINANCing activities

Cash and cash equivalent held at the end of the year

18(a)

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.


Notes

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ended 31 DECEMBER 2012 The financial statements are for Playbox Theatre Company Limited as an individual company, incorporated and domiciled in Australia. Playbox Theatre Company Limited is a Company limited by guarantee.

1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES Playbox Theatre Company Limited has elected to early adopt the Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements as set out in AASB 1053: Application of Tiers of Australian Accounting Standards and AASB 2010-2: Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from Reduced Disclosure Requirements to the annual reporting period beginning 1 January 2012. The financial statements are general purpose financial statements that have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) and the Corporations Act 2001. The Company is a not-for-profit entity for financial reporting purposes under Australian Accounting Standards.

Australian Accounting Standards set out accounting policies that the AASB has concluded would result in financial statements containing relevant and reliable information about transactions, events and conditions. Material accounting policies adopted in the preparation of these financial statements are presented below and have been consistently applied unless stated otherwise. The financial statements, except for the cash flow information, have been prepared on an accruals basis and are based on historical costs, modified, where applicable, by the measurement of fair value of selected non-current assets, financial assets and financial liabilities. The amounts presented in the financial statements have been rounded to the nearest dollar. The financial statements were authorised for issue on 25 March 2013 by the Directors of the Company.

2012 annual report/35


NOTES

ACCOUNTING POLICIES (a) Revenue

(b) Other comprehensive income

Grant revenue is recognised in the statement of comprehensive income when the Company obtains control of the grant and it is probable the economic benefit gained from the grant will flow to the entity and the amount of the grant can be measured reliably.

Donations in respect of the Future Fund and interest earned by investing funds held in Future Fund Reserve and Incentive Scheme Reserve are recorded as income and transferred to the the appropriate reserve.

If conditions are attached to the grant which must be satisfied before it is eligible to receive the contribution, the recognition of the grant as revenue will be deferred until those conditions are satisfied. When grant revenue is received whereby the Company incurs an obligation to deliver economic value directly back to the contributor, this is considered a reciprocal transaction and the grant revenue is recognised in the statement of financial position as a liability until the service has been delivered to the contributor, otherwise the grant is recognised as income on receipt. Revenue from sponsorships and donations is identified with specific projects to which it relates. Where revenue received from the above sources relate to projects in future periods such revenue is written back as revenue received in advance and included in the statement of financial position as a liability. Revenue from the rendering of a service is recognised upon the delivery of the service to the customer. All revenue is stated net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST).

(c) Inventories Inventories of bar and set construction supplies have been measured at the lower of cost and current replacement cost. (d) Plant and Equipment Each class of plant and equipment is carried at cost or fair value as indicated, less, where applicable, any accumulated depreciation and impairment losses.  Plant and equipment are measured on the cost basis less depreciation and impairment losses. The carrying amount of plant and equipment is reviewed annually by Directors to ensure it is not in excess of the recoverable amount from these assets. The recoverable amount is assessed on the basis of the expected net cash flows that will be received from the assets employment and subsequent disposal. The expected net cash flows have been discounted to their present value in determining recoverable amounts.

The cost of fixed assets constructed within the company includes the cost of materials, direct labour, borrowing costs and an appropriate proportion of fixed and variable overheads. Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or recognised as a separate asset, as appropriate, only when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the Company and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. All other repairs and maintenance are charged to the statement of comprehensive income during the financial period in which they are incurred.


(e) D  epreciation The depreciable amount of all fixed assets is depreciated on a straight line basis over their useful lives to the Company commencing from the time the asset is held ready for use. Depreciation rates used for each of depreciable assets are:   Furniture & equipment 10%-20%  Theatre fixtures & fittings 5%-20%   Workshop improvements 5%-10% The assets’ residual value and useful lives are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at the end of each reporting period. Asset classes’ carrying amount is written down immediately to its recoverable amount if the asset’s carrying amount is greater than its estimated recoverable amount. Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing proceeds with the carrying amount. These gains or losses are included in the statement of comprehensive income. (f) Financial Instruments Initial recognition and measurement  Financial assets and financial liabilities are recognised when the Company becomes a party to the contractual provisions to the instrument. For financial assets, this is equivalent to the date that the Company commits itself to either purchase or sell the asset (i.e. trade date accounting is adopted). Financial instruments are initially measured at fair value plus transaction costs except where the instrument is classified “at fair value through profit or loss” in which case transaction costs are expensed to the statement of comprehensive income immediately.

Classification and subsequent measurement Financial instruments are subsequently measured at fair value, amortised cost using the effective interest rate method or cost. Where available, quoted prices in an active market are used to determine fair value. In other circumstances, valuation techniques are adopted. Amortised cost is calculated as: (a) The amount at which the financial asset or financial liability is measured at initial recognition; (b) Less principal repayments; (c) Plus or minus the cumulative amortisation of the difference, if any, between the amount initially recognised and the maturity amount calculated using the effective interest method; and (d) Less any reduction for impairment. The effective interest method is used to allocate interest income or interest expense over the relevant period and is equivalent to the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments or receipts (including fees, transaction costs and other premiums or discounts) through the expected life (or when this cannot be reliably predicted, the contractual term) of the financial instrument to the net carrying amount of the financial asset or financial liability. Revisions to expected future net cash flows will necessitate an adjustment to the carrying value with a consequential recognition of an income or expense in profit or loss.

Loans and receivables

Loans and receivables are nonderivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market and are subsequently measured at amortised cost.

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss:

Financial assets are classified at “fair value through profit or loss” when they are held for trading for the purpose of short-term profit taking, derivatives not held for hedging purposes, or when they are designed as such to avoid an accounting mismatch or to enable performance evaluation where a group of financial assets is managed by key management personnel on a fair value basis in accordance with a documented risk management or investment strategy. Such assets are subsequently measured at fair value with changes in carrying amount being included in profit or loss.

Financial liabilities

Non-derivative financial liabilities are subsequently recognised at amortised cost.

Impairment

At the end of each reporting period, the Company assesses whether there is objective evidence that a financial instrument has been impaired. Impairment losses are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income.

Fair Value

Fair value is determined based on current bid price for all quoted investments. Valuation techniques are applied to determine the fair value of all unlisted securities, including recent arm’s length transactions, reference to similar instruments and option pricing models.

2012 annual report/37


NOTES

(g) Impairment of Assets

(h) Employee Benefits

(i) Provisions

At the end of each reporting period, the Company reviews the carrying values of its tangible and intangible assets to determine whether there is any indication that those assets have been impaired. If such indication exists, the recoverable amount of the asset, being the higher of the asset’s fair value less costs to sell and value in use, is compared to the asset’s carrying value. Any excess of the asset’s carrying value over its recoverable amount is expensed to the statement of comprehensive income.

Provision is made for the Company’s liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees to the end of the reporting period. Employee benefits that are expected to be settled within one year have been measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled. Employee benefits payable later than one year have been measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made for those benefits. In determining the liability, consideration is given to employee wage increases and the probability that the employee may not satisfy vesting requirements. Those cash flows are discounted using market yields on national government bonds with terms to maturity that match the expected timing of cash flows.

Provisions are recognised when the Company has a legal or constructive obligation, as a result of past events, for which it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will result and that outflow can be reliably measured. Provisions are measured using the best estimate of the amount required to settle the obligation at the end of the reporting period.

Where an impairment loss on a revalued asset is identified, this is debited against the revaluation reserve in respect of the same class of asset to the extent that the impairment loss does not exceed the amount in the revaluation reserve for the same class of asset.

Contributions are made by the Company to employee superannuation funds and are charged as expenses when incurred.

(j) Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits held at call with banks and other short-term highly liquid investments. (k) Prepayments and Expenditure Incurred in Advance Expenses incurred are analysed to determine the plays and projects to which they relate. Where expenses relate to future period plays and projects, such expenses are written back as prepayments.


(l) Borrowing Costs

(n) Income Tax

(p) Comparative figures

Borrowing costs are recognised as expenses in the period in which they are incurred.

No provision for income tax has been raised as the Company is exempt under Division 50 of the Income Tax Assessment Act, 1997.

When required by Accounting Standards, comparative figures have been adjusted to conform to changes in presentation for the current financial year.

(m) Goods and Services Tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST, except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Tax Office (ATO). In these circumstances the GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of an item of the expense. Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included with other receivables or payables in the statement of financial position. Cash flows are presented on a gross basis. The GST components of cash flows arising from investing or financing activities which are recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO are presented as operating cash flows included in receipts from customers or payments to suppliers.

(o) Critical Accounting Estimates and Judgements The Directors evaluate estimates and judgements incorporated into the financial statements based on historical knowledge and best available current information. Estimates assume a reasonable expectation of future events and are based on current trends and economic data, obtained both externally and within the Company.

(q) Trade and Other Payables Trade and other payables represent the liabilities for goods and services received by the Company during the reporting period that remain unpaid the end of the reporting period. The balance is recognised as a current liability with the amounts normally paid within 30 days of recognition of the liability. (r) Economic dependence

Key Estimates – Impairment

The Company assesses impairment at the end of each reporting date by evaluating conditions specific to the Company that may be indicative of impairment triggers.

Playbox Theatre Company is dependent upon Australia Council and Arts Victoria for the funding of its core activity. At the date of this report the Board of Directors has no reason to believe that this support will not continue.

The financial report was authorised for issue on 25 March 2013 by the Board of Directors. . 2012 annual report/39


notes

2(a) REVENUE

2012

2011

$

$

1,948,385

2,606,608

563,506

615,976

1,052,527

1,029,870

30,000

-

15,000

-

30,000

-

21,025

15,502

32,000

51,611

1,048,408

1,131,947

100,264

102,077

83,589

60,000

1,241,803

1,171,186

Interest earned

88,693

111,597

Ticketing services

168,199

319,532

Bar takings

323,881

353,916

156,132

122,827

205,109

293,351

7,108,521

7,989,000

2012

2011

Future Fund

$

$

Donations

-

1,200,000

Change in Fair Value of financial assets

110,694

-

Income earned

33,478

34,270

Included in the revenues from continuing operations are the following items: Theatre and performance Venue hire Government Grants

Australia Council General purpose Interconnection New work External Artistic Agency Local Government

Department of Education & Early Childhood City of Melbourne Arts Victoria General purpose NGO maintenance Sponsorships and donations

Sponsorship Fundraising and donations Other Revenue

Workshop external commissions Other revenue from continuing operations Total Revenue

2(b) OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Incentive Scheme Reserve

Change in Fair Value of financial assets Income earned Total Other Comprehensive Income

38,462 9,735

22,072

192,369

1,256,342


3.

OTHER EXPENSES FROM CONTINUING ACTIVITIES

2012

2011

$

$

3,403, 897

3,391,121

510,005

532,908

95,303

93,681

19,100

19,170

15,191

28,249

2,257,062

2,353,119

Venue

539,473

716,747

Administration

278,225

463,365

Ticketing services

137,649

201,163

Other

62,050

223,116

3,426,847

4,098,610

7,317,955

8,022,639

Profit from continuing operations has been determined after: Expenses: Production & Touring Marketing & Sponsorship Other Expenses Depreciation Auditor’s remuneration Audit fees Finance Costs – external Wages & on Costs 3(a)

Total Other Expenses Total Expenses:

3(a) Wages and on costs for permanent staff have been allocated to other expenses rather than to individual departments. Key Management Personnel Remuneration The total of remuneration paid to key management personnel of the Company during the period are as follows: Key management personnel compensation: 4.

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS Current

2012

2011

$

$

250,700

278,970

2012

2011

$

$

Cash on Hand

3,549

8,272

Cash at Bank

216,961

(22,215)

Deposits at call

53,349

83,770

-

1,011,398

445,064

1,030,124

718,923

2,111,349

1,298,302

-

418,572

370,144

1,716,874

370,144

2,435,797

2,481,493

Future Fund Term Deposits Short Term Bank Deposits Non current

Investments Future Fund Incentive Scheme Reserve Deposit

2012 annual report/41


notes

5.

TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES

2012

2011

$

$

151,822

62,005

Playbox Malthouse Ltd.

-

608,556

Less write off Playbox Malthouse liabilities

-

(608,556)

19,435

69,118

Deposits paid

7,235

1,500

GST recoverable

8,874

54,777

187,366

187,400

2012

2011

$

$

13,230

8,000

35,611

22,539

48,841

30,539

2012

2011

$

$

266,904

276,655

2012

2011

$

$

1,101,135

1,037,669

(810,444)

(751,641)

290,691

286,028

1,236,673

1,206,171

(1,153,728)

(1,133,286)

82,945

72,885

263,086

263,086

(140,001)

(123,942)

123,085

139,144

496,721

498,057

Sundry debtors

Accrued income

6.

INVENTORIES At cost: Raw materials Bar Stock

7.

OTHER CURRENT ASSETS Prepayments

8.

PROPERTY PLANT & EQUIPMENT Furniture and equipment Less accumulated depreciation Theatre fixtures and fittings Less accumulated depreciation Workshop Improvements Less accumulated depreciation TOTAL PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT


8(a) MOVEMENTS IN CARRYING AMOUNTS Movement in the carrying amounts of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and the end of the current financial year. 2012

Furniture and Theatre Fixtures Equipment and Fittings

Balance at the beginning of the year

72,885

139,144

498,057

63,465

30,502

-

93,967

(58,802)

(20,442)

(16,059)

(95,303)

290,691

82,945

123,085

496,721

Furniture and Theatre Fixtures Equipment and Fittings

Workshop Improvements

Total $

Depreciation Expenses Carrying amount at the end of the year

Balance at the beginning of the year

307,487

92,831

155,202

555,520

36,218

-

-

36,218

Depreciation Expenses

(57,677)

(19,946)

(16,058)

(93,681)

Carrying amount at the end of the year

286,028

72,885

139,144

498,057

2012

2011

$

$

242,147

223,102

2012

2011

$

$

Employee entitlements - Annual leave

87,440

57,912

Employee entitlements - Long service leave

36,695

47,958

124,135

105,870

50,593

24,084

2012

2011

$

$

Young & Emerging Artists (Australia Council)

23,500

-

MPAB Strategic Assistance (Australia Council)

20,000

-

Core Grant One-Off Funding Model Adjustments

188,000

-

Income received in advance

878,484

1,195,253

1,109,984

1,195,253

2012

2011

$

$

215,000

-

-

215,000

Additions

9.

Total $

286,028

Additions

2011

Workshop Improvements

TRADE & OTHER PAYABLES Current

Sundry creditors & accruals 10. PROVISIONS Current

Non-current

Employee entitlements - Long service leave 11.

OTHER CURRENT LIABILITIES

12. BORROWINGS Current

Bank Loan - secured Non Current

Bank Loan - secured

Bank loan and overdraft facilities with National Australia Bank Ltd are secured by Registered Mortgage Debenture over the whole of the Company’s assets including goodwill and uncalled and called but unpaid capital together with relative insurance policy assigned to the National Australia Bank Limited but excluding funds held in the Incentive Scheme Reserve. The loan is due for repayment in September 2013. 2012 annual report/43


notes

13. RETAINED EARNINGS

2012

2011

$

$

(34,380)

554,526

Net profit (loss) for the financial year

(17,065)

667,436

Transfer to Future Fund Reserve

(160,112)

(1,234,270)

(60,986)

(22,072)

(272,543)

(34,380)

2012

2011

$

$

127,459

127,459

1,394,382

1,234,270

444,472

383,486

1,966,313

1,745,215

Opening balance

127,459

127,459

Closing balance

127,459

127,459

Retained earnings at the beginning of year

Transfer to Incentive Scheme Reserve Retained earnings at the end of financial year 14. RESERVES Capital Assets Reserve Future Fund Reserve Incentive Scheme Reserve (a) Capital Asset Reserve

The Capital Assets Reserve records the value of plant and equipment assets transferred to the Company at the conclusion of the Company’s relationship with Monash University. (b) Incentive Scheme Reserve Movements during the year: Opening balance Change in market value Income earned Transfer from accumulated surplus/(deficit) Closing balance

2012

2011

$

$

383,486

361,414

38,462

-

9,735

-

12,789

22,072

444,472

383,486

Funds held in the Incentive Scheme Reserve are subject to the terms of the Incentive Scheme Reserves Funding Agreement dated 21 June, 2004 between the Australia Council, Arts Victoria and the Company. In particular, these funds are held in escrow for fifteen years and cannot be accessed without the express agreement of the funding bodies under prescribed circumstances. Funds held in the Incentive Scheme Reserve are expressly excluded from the security charge held over the assets of the Company by the National Australia Bank Ltd. The Incentive Scheme Reserve records the amount set aside to fund the long term future operations of the Company. (c) Future Fund Reserve

2012

2011

$

$

1,234,270

-

Change in market value

110,694

-

Income earned

33,478

-

Movements during the year: Opening balance

Transfer from accumulated surplus/(deficit) Closing balance

15,940

1,234,270

1,394,382

1,234,720

The Fund is established for the purpose of accruing and accumulating a sustainable capital base for the Company to support the long-term financial viability of the Cultural Objects of the Company. The Fund is managed by the Audit, Finance & Risk committee of the Board.


15. MEMBERS’ GUARANTEE The Company is limited by guarantee. If the Company is wound up, the Memorandum and Articles of Association of the Company states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $10 cash towards meeting any outstanding obligations of the Company. At 31 December 2012, the number of members was 14 (2011: 14). 16. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENT LIABILITIES There are no capital expenditure commitments or contingent liabilities not otherwise disclosed or provided for in the accounts at 31 December 2012. 17. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS In accordance with the policy of the Board, in 2012 Roy Morgan Research Ltd. provided services to the Company for a value of AU$15,000. Michele Levine, a director of the Company is also the Chief Executive Officer of Roy Morgan Research Ltd. The transaction was on terms and conditions more favourable to us. 18.

CASH FLOW INFORMATION

2012

2011

$

$

(a) Reconciliation of Cash For the purposes of the Cash Flow Statement, cash includes cash on hand and in banks and investments in money market instruments, net of outstanding bank overdraft. Cash at the end of the financial year as shown in the Cash Flows Statement is reconciled to the related items in the Balance Sheet as follows: Cash on hand

3,549

8,272

Term deposits

445,064

2,495,436

Bank accounts

270,310

(22,215)

Investments

1,567,718 2,286,641

2,481,493

(b) Reconciliation of Net Cash Used in Operating Activities to Profit from Continuing Operations Net profit (loss)

(17,065)

614,147

95,303

93,681

(149,156)

-

34

549,689

9,751

(205,630)

(18,301)

(7,139)

(19,045)

(71,198)

44,773

(37,666)

(Decrease)/Increase in other current liabilities

(85,269)

(102,822)

Net cash provided by (used in) Operating Activities

100,885

833,062

Depreciation Change in net assets and liabilities (Increase)/Decrease in investments (Increase)/Decrease in receivables (Increase)/Decrease in other current assets (Increase)/Decrease in inventories (Decrease)/Increase in payables (Decrease)/Increase in provisions

2012 annual report/45


notes

19. Financial Risk Management The Company’s financial instruments consist mainly of deposits with banks, local money market instruments, short term investments, accounts receivable and payable. The totals for each category of financial instruments, measured in accordance with AASB 139 as detailed in the accounting policies to these financial statements, are as follows: Financial Assets

2012

2011

$

$

18(a)

718,923

2,481,493

5

187,366

187,400

Domestic and Corporate Bonds

18(a)

280,716

-

Equities Domestic

18(a)

990,002

-

Equities International

18(a)

297,000

-

2,474,007

2,668,893

Cash and cash equivalent Trade and other receivables

Note

Total Financial Assets Financial Liabilities Trade and other payables

9

242,147

223,102

Borrowing

12

215,000

215,000

457,147

438,102

Total Financial Liabilities

Net Fair Value For listed available-for-sale financial assets and financial assets at fair value through profit & loss, the fair values have been based on closing quoted bid prices at the end of the reporting period. 20. DIRECTORS’ REMUNERATION Directors do not receive remuneration for services provided in their role as Directors although they are eligible to be reimbursed for out of pocket expenses. 21. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS Other than the following the Directors are not aware of any significant events since the end of the reporting period. On 13 March 2013 it was announced that the extra funds ($188,000) provided for 2013 by Australia Council as a onetime project grant have become an integral part of the Company’s annual funding from the Australia Council. This news will allow the Company to budget for this recurring funding in the years to come. 22. COMPANY DETAILS The registered office of the Company is: 113 Sturt Street Southbank Vic 3006 The Principal place of business is: The Malthouse 113 Sturt Street Southbank Vic 3006


DIRECTORS’ DECLARATION The directors of the Company declare that: 1. The financial statements and notes as set out on pages 6 to 24 are in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001; and: (a) Comply with Accounting Standards and; (b) Give a true and fair view of the financial position as at 31 December, 2012, and of the performance for the year ended on that date of the Company. 2. In the directors’ opinion, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. This declaration is made in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors

S. Westcott

J. Daley

Director

Director

Dated this 25 day of March 2013

2012 annual report/47


INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT TO MEMBERS OF PLAYBOX THEATRE COMPANY LIMITED Report on the Financial Report We have audited the accompanying financial report for Playbox Theatre Company Limited, which comprises the statement of financial position as at 31 December 2012, the statement of comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, notes comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, and the Director’s Declaration. Board’s Responsibility for the Financial Report The Directors of the Company are responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Corporations Act 2001 and for such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those standards require that we comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial report is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Company’s preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the directors, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Independence In conducting our audit, we have complied with the independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001. We confirm that the independence declaration required by the Corporations Act 2001, which has been given to the directors of Playbox Theatre Company Limited, would be in the same terms if given to the Directors as at the date of this auditor’s report. Audit Opinion In our opinion the financial report of Playbox Theatre Company Ltd is in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001, including: (i) g  iving a true and fair view of the Company’s financial position as at 31 December 2012, and of its performance for the year ended on that date; and (ii) c  omplying with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Corporations Regulations 2001.

Crowe Horwath Melbourne Dated this 10 day of April 2013

Anne Lockwood


at The Malthouse 113 Sturt St Southbank VIC 3006 Box Office 61 3 9685 5111 Administration 61 3 9685 5100 admin@malthousetheatre.com.au www.malthousetheatre.com.au


2012 Annual Report