May/June 2019

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MALIBU www.malibumag.com

HOME + DESIGN SPECIAL

Construction, Decor and Everything In Between SHOPPING

An East Coast Favorite Lands in Trancas SCHOOLS News From SMMUSD

MAGAZINE

REPORT

Why Malibu’s Cell Service is So Bad POINT DUME A View From Above SAN DIEGO The Perfect Summer Getaway

WHITE’S MERCANTILE

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LETTER FROM THE EDITORS

Julie Wuellner

Holly Bieler

With June Gloom still in the air, it’s hard to imagine summer is almost here. However, before we know it we’ll be in the full swing of it, braving the crazy PCH traffic but also savoring all the incredible ways this city comes alive when the temperature rises and the sun comes out. We start out our May/June issue taking a look at Malibu’s endless cell phone problems, which have only gotten worse for many residents since the Woolsey Fire. In our piece “Malibu’s Endless Cellphone Problems” journalist Barbara Burke delves into some of the reasons for Malibu’s notoriously bad service and explores some possible solutions. Next we take a look at what Southern California Edison has been up to. If you live near Bonsall Dr., I’m sure you’re all too familiar with their tree-trimming plans, which are set to start as this issue goes to print. And of course, who hasn’t noticed the new (temporary) command center near the Civic Center which has caused much concern surrounding the permitting process, as it sits adjacent to an environmentally sensitive area. On another serious note, we explore the recent slew of sexual assault reports at Pepperdine University, which skyrocketed this year. Shifting to the skies, we had the privilege to work with the extremely talented filmmaker and drone photographer Jules Williams, who took us on a flight above one of Malibu’s most beloved neighborhoods, Point Dume, for a never before seen birds-eye-view of the area. If you were around the area in the last couple of months, it’s hard not to have noticed the thousands of Painted Lady Butterflies who recently made their way through town. Seeing them all fluttering on our trails, beaches and streets made us take a long hard look at what’s going on with their larger counterparts — the monarch butterfly. Generally, monarchs migrate through Malibu in late summer and while twenty years ago we had thousands of butterflies migrating through town, in 2017 there were less than a hundred spotted. We investigate the myriad of problems the butterflies are facing as well as what Malibuites can do to help. The bulk of this issue is devoted to our Home + Design special, which is jam-packed with some of the area’s best designers, builders and architects. We start the section off by welcoming an out-of-towner to Malibu. Hailing from Nashville, singer-songwriter and interior designer Holly Williams (daughter of Country Star Hank Williams Jr. and granddaughter of legendary Hank Williams) just opened the sixth outpost of her cult-favorite southern-inspired general store White’s Mercantile in the Malibu Country Mart. We also sit down with Arri/Lecron Architects to talk about their expertise in building fire-resistant homes out of a relatively new material named Gigacrete. For anyone impacted by Woolsey and looking to rebuild, this is definitely worth a read! And after all that strenuous reporting, we slow down and head to San Diego for a weekend jam-packed with fun, adventure and of course a good dose of relaxation. If you haven’t been to the Rancho Bernardo Inn in upstate San Diego County, we definitely recommend it! With a championship golf-course, inventive restaurants and acclaimed full-service spa it’s the perfect place to escape Malibu’s summer crowds for a weekend. Lastly, if you would like to get involved with Malibu Magazine, we’d love to have you join our team! Whether you’re a writer, editor, photographer, sales rep or a Malibuite with pitches and ideas, we are looking for more contributors. You can email us directly at julie@malibumag.com

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RENDERING

Compass is a real estate broker licensed by the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. License Number 01866771. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only and is compiled from sources deemed reliable but has not been verified. Changes in price, condition, sale or withdrawal may be made without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footage are approximate.

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CONTENTS

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PEOPLE EVENT ROUNDUP Coverage of spring events in Malibu over the past two months, plus our People We Love features.

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CELL SERVICE CONTINUING ISSUES Cell service has always been notoriously poor in Malibu, and for many has gotten worse in the months since the Woolsey Fire. 88 I BULIEVE The next I BUlieve feature focuses on Malibu’s Shoshana

Kuttner, founder of Malibu Playhouse’ Young Actors Project.

60

SCE HARMING OUR LAND? After bulldozing a grassy parcel of land at Stuart Ranch Way, SCE finds itself in even more hot water with some local residents.

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PEPPERDINE SEXUAL MISCONDUCT 88 EDISON Many locals are up in arms about SCE’s tree trimming plans.

88 MATT EDWARDS METHOD Healthy living, simplified.

Why are reports of sexual conduct on the rise at Pepperdine, a univerisity known for its safety and near zero crime rate?

76

FASHION ALICIA ADAMS ALPACA Alicia and Daniel Adams bring their cult-favorite line of 100% baby alpaca fiber clothing and home goods to the Trancas Country Mart.

84

ART ASHES TO ALCHEMY

76 ALICIA ADAMS ALPACA For the Adams family, a new Malibu home

and store is just the latest in a lifetime of adventures.

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After losing her studio in the Woolsey Fire, Malibu artist Kandy Lozano is turning loss into art by creating new pieces from the ashes.

MALIBU MAGAZINE

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MALIBU COUNTRY MART | PALISADES VILLAGE

Clothing for Life’s Great Moments

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CONTENTS

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PHOTO STORY POINT DUME Jules Williams offers a completely new vantage point of one of the oldest and most beautiful neighborhoods in Malibu.

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HOME + DESIGN SPECIAL SECTION Whether you’re rebuilding, renovating or just refreshing your interiors, our special section covers all that’s new in home and design. 90 VIEW FROM ABOVE Malibuite Jules Williams offers spectacular views of a favorite Malibu neighborhood.

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HOLLY WILLIAMS SOUTHERN CHARM With a new Malibu outpost of her beautiful general store White’s Mercantile, Holly Williams is bringing a taste of Nashville to SoCal.

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148 SAN DIEGO Our guide to the perfect weekend trip.

134 AMBER INTERIORS A Malibu local makes her mark.

A WEEKEND IN... SAN DIEGO From golf at the idyllic Rancho Bernardo Inn to inventive eats in the Gaslamp Quarter, you can pack a ton of fun into a trip to San Diego.

164

SCHOOLS UPDATES The latest news from Malibu schools, including a new principal at MHS and recently-announced community partnership at OLM.

169

REAL ESTATE TODAY’S MARKET

116 WHITE’S MERCANTILE As a child, country singer and White’s Mercantile founder Holly Williams had two passions: making music and interior design.

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Esteemed Malibu real estate agent Ellen Francisco discusses the current state of the market in Malibu.

MALIBU MAGAZINE

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MALGOSIA MIGDAL DESIGN

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MASTHEAD

MALIBU www.malibumag.com

MAGAZINE

HOME + DESIGN SPECIAL

Construction, Decor and Everything In Between

REPORT

Why Malibu’s Cell Service is So Bad

SHOPPING

An East Coast Favorite Lands in Trancas

POINT DUME A View From Above

SCHOOLS News From SMMUSD

SAN DIEGO The Perfect Summer Getaway

WHITE’S MERCANTILE

Holly W illiams

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PUBLISHER

Dirk Manthey EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Julie Wuellner

MANAGING EDITOR

Holly Bieler

ART DIRECTOR

Petra Pflug

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Michelle Gisler $ 5.95 US

JUNE 2019

SALES MANAGER

Makenzie Rasmussen 5/9/19 17:17

SALES LEAD

Lauren McCarran Danny Wang Dorie Leo EDITORS-AT-LARGE

Holly Bieler Barbara Burke Michelle Willer-Allred Josie Lionetti Arielle Eckerman

Jules Williams Ellen Francisco Susan Chobani Tom Mullen

Julie Wuellner Kevin McDonald Kristin Barlowe Jules Williams Cara Harman

Jamar John Johnson Jennifer Fujikawa Tom Moore Isak Tiner

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

SECURITY / MODELS

Bailey Emma ADVERTISING

advertising@malibumag.com DISTRIBUTION

Disticor Right Way Distribution CORRECTION: The photo on on page 50 of our Mar/Apr 2019 issue was incorrectly attributed to @ oneloveranch. The actual photographer was Cassie Denham, @cassiedenham25

Malibu Magazine (ISSN1938-9272) published bimonthly by ES Media Service LLC. 23410 Civic Center Way Unit E-8, Malibu, CA 90265. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publisher and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material, and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to Malibu Magazine’s right to edit. POSTMASTER

Send address changes to Malibu Magazine 23410 Civic Center Way Unit E-8, Malibu, CA 90265. Copyright © 2018 by ES Media Services LLC. All rights reserved.

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CONTRIBUTORS

BARBARA BURKE

Barbara Burke is a freelance journalist and writer from Malibu. She obtained a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Broadcast Journalism from the University of Arizona. She delights in digging deep, delving into details and thoroughly researching a topic, whether the subject focuses on the lighter side or delves into deeper topics, such as her articles in the realm of investigative journalism. She is honored to write for Malibu Magazine. KRISTIN BARLOWE

Made in Oregon but living in the South, Kristin Barlow is a Nashville, TN based director and photographer who loves to connect with other artists and brands. “Its simple. I am a girl, I take pictures” Kristin says. This issue, we were fortunate enough to have Kristin shoot our stunning cover of Holly Williams. You can reach her at barlowestudio@icloud.com

JOSIE LIONETTI

Josie is a senior at Pepperdine University studying journalism and political science—but mainly, she is a storyteller. She grew up with a passion for storytelling and in high school, knew she wanted to raise awareness about important issues and share people’s experiences. Aside from writing, she is an anchor for NewsWaves 32 at Pepperdine and hopes to one day to host her own political news show. KEVIN MCDONALD

Kevin McDonald is a freelance photographer and videographer based in Malibu. A few years ago he begrudgingly helped his now-wife photograph a few weddings knowing little more than which end of the camera goes where, and since then has fallen in love with capturing moments and telling stories. Kevin has worked with Malibu Mag on many occasions and this issue traveled to San Diego to shoot the beautiful Rancho Bernardo Inn starting on page 158. MICHELE WILLER-ALLRED

Michele Willer-Allred is a journalist who covered news for the Ventura County Star for more than 20 years, and whose work has appeared in USA Today and numerous other publications. A true “Valley Girl,” born and raised in Southern California, she has spent countless hours in Malibu over the years even though she lives in Moorpark. She is a docent at the Conejo Valley Botanic Garden, and writes a blog called Discover 805. JULES WILLIAMS & ALISON POTHIER

Jules Williams and Alison Pothier are husband and wife filmmakers living in Malibu. Also writers, coaches and intuitive practitioners, they create short-form documentaries, write books, and coach private and professional individuals. Jules has directed Elliott Gould, Sir Alan Parker,and Hans Zimmer, among others. The owner of Inside Out Retreats, Alison runs retreats for individuals and executives.

ELLEN FRANCISCO

Ellen Francisco is one of Coldwell Banker’s most accomplished real estate agents. She consistently ranks among the top one percent in the nation. Ellen is also a long-time Malibu resident of 47 years. She serves her clients with a deep appreciation and understanding of Malibu’s subtle nuances, unique neighborhoods, and beautiful beaches. This issue, Ellen shared her expertise in the real estate market with our readers on pages 170 and 171.

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THE BIG PHOTO

A SEA OF GOLD After the recent fires and then the much-needed rains, Malibu‘s mountains have come to life with wildflowers like never before. Entire mountainsides, like the one above are filled with yellow mustard, native poppies, and purple arroyo lupine.

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MALIBUITES

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BGCM Spring Social

Sally Phillips, Amy Cohen, Mona Vince and Monica Lurey

Dana Bird and Kristin Grannis

On Thursday, March 28 from 6 pm - 9:30 pm the Boys & Girls Club of Malibu held its Spring Social Event at Rosenthal Bar and Patio. The Boys & Girls Club of Malibu has been part of the community for the past 19 years dedicated to mentoring middle and high school students during their most critical decision-making years. Guests were invited to join in for a fun, social evening with live music, food and drinks. The food was catered by Nicolas Eatery, who plans to open its first restaurant in Malibu in the late summer. Wine was of course from the lovely Rosenthal Wines. The event was sponsored by The Agency with special thanks to Anne Burkin, Misha Ford, Tony Barsocchini, Sandro Dazzan, Cooper Mount, Eric Haskell, Brittany Monforte, Kendra Wilson, DeeDee Cortese, Sean Landon and Brennan Boesch. The evening featured numerous local bands with the headlining band being The Deltaz + Angel City Fiddle Squad. As the evening progressed, guests were encouraged to partake in a silent auction. All proceeds went towards the Boys & Girls Club of Malibu. To donate to the Boys & Girls Club of Malibu, head to bgcmalibu.org Photography by Kevin McDonald

Paul Johnson and John Tompkins

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MALIBUITES

TRANCAS COUNTRY MARKET

ReBU Live On Saturday, March 23, Burdge Architects, Sun Fire Defense, Homebound and Euro West in association with Bay Screens and Shades and numerous other vendors put on REBU LIVE at Trancas Country Market with the goal to inform and educate all those affected by the recent Woolsey Fire who are now in the rebuilding process. The event hosted countless vendors sharing new building techniques, new design ideas and free information about the rebuilding process and sustainable design. Malibuites had the opportunity to meet experts and learn about the various services offered. There was also an expert speaker panel which included architects, designers, builders, landscape artists and other alternative housing companies who discussed building high quality homes at all price points. There was also a discussion about what materials go into a pre-fab home. One especially interesting vendor was Living Vehicle, a company that makes luxury travel trailers designed for off-grid living. The vehicles are also an adaptable solution for housing recovery as they support long-term use with all the comforts of a modern home and are self-supported by internal systems.

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MALIBUITES

MALIBU LUMBER YARD

Brian Bowen Smith ONE Opening On Saturday, March 23, Brian Bowen Smith brought his artword to the Malibu Lumber Yard for his fourth solo fine art show. ONE is a body of work that is indicative of its name. Each piece is one of ONE, an original work and unique with its own history and accompanyin story that can’t be reproduced. The event was sponsored by Casamigos and Chandon. Delicious bites were catered by Beverly Hills Premier Catering and entertainment was put on by DJ Amara.

Photography by Jennifer Fujikawa

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MALIBUITES

JOHN VARVATOS AT THE MALIBU COUNTRY MART

Get Styled by John Varvatos On Thursday, April 4 from 6 pm - 7 pm, John Varvatos held a special event event at their Malibu location in the Country Mart hosted by John Varvatos himself. John Varvatos is a world-renowned clothing brand for men and their Malibu store carries everything from men’s footwear, belts, eyewear, limited edition watches to men’s fragrance. Music, specifically rock n’ roll has and continues to be John Varvatos’ biggest influence and their clothing truly embody the rock-star look. During the event, guests had the opportunity to be styled by the designer himself. Guests were able to enjoy a martini bar and music was put on by DJ Andres. Ten percent of the sales during the event went to the Malibu Foundation in order to support Malibu and its neighors as they rebuild after the Woolsey Fire.

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Malibu Fashion Weekend

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38

On March 13, Malibu Fashion Weekend put on by Endless Road Entertainment, Inc opened for its second season at Rosenthal Wine Bar and Patio. The Event featured countless designer and beauty brands, DJ’s, live music and more. Designers included Malibu Road, Trinidad 3, Christina Lehr, 27 Miles Malibu, Bodell and Butter SuperSoft. When it came to accessories, the even boasted the likes of Jessica Elliot’s handmade jewelry, Streets Ahead’s custom leather pieces, Marque Supply’s pre-owned designer items and Bed Stu’s sustainable leather shoes. Fashion weekend-goers were able to enjoy some of the best wines in Malibu from Rosenthal Wine Bar and Patio and refreshing glacial water from Icelandic Glacial. CURE spa was also at the event to serve guests at is beauty booth and Trinidad 3 offered quick trims in its airstream.

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MALIBUITES

HOLLYWOOD

Save the Humans Gala On March 10, comedian Jeff Garlin, celebrities, activists and Silicon Valley moguls came together for a benefit gala held at NoName to officically kick off the #SaveTheHumans campaign. Their mission is to provide healthy food, training, education and jobs for “single mother” families without homes. INUNISON.ORG (IU) is a non-profit organization, is spearheading the campaign with UCLA Extension and S.H.A.R.E, to launch IU’s BUDA VIDA, the first fully sustainable “seed to table” non-profit restaurant in Venice, which will employ “single mother” families without homes.

LOS ANGELES

The Jane Club’s New Home On Thursday, April 4, The Jane Club joined forces with Harper’s Bazaar, Farfetch, Chateau D’Esclans and Jane Walker by Johnny Walker to support their mission of celebrating the many achievements of women. Guests included Stephanie Alllyne, Whitney Cummings, Estelle, Tess Sanchez and Max Greenfield, Tig Notaro, Kelis, Chris O’Dowd among others. The Jane Club is the first and only community workspace with onsite childcare designed with mothers in mind. Their mission is to create a village that values and centers the work that women do.

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PEOPLE WE LOVE

WILLIAM HAMMOND

A Standout Malibu High Senior “I’ve participated in my first play when I was in the third grade after seeing my older brother be involved in children’s theater,” William Hammond, a senior at Malibu High School, told Malibu Magazine the evening before he joined the MHS choir on a trip to perform at Carnegie Hall. “At MHS, I began to learn the standards of theater with Ms. Jodi Plaia, who taught me to hone my techniques.” Hammond, a gifted actor, has appeared in many roles at the Malibu Playhouse as well as at MHS. “When you assume a role on stage, you are your character,” He said. “It’s definitely crunch time, but there’s nothing like it.” Malibu Magazine asked William what he wants to do for a career. “I’m torn between acting and international relations.” He said. “I know I’ll sort it out and make a good choice.” William loves Malibu. “It’s a nice, small town where everyone knows one another,” He said. “You can’t go to the grocery store without seeing someone you know – it feels like I live in a fantasy world and it’s nice to call it home.” As the interview ended, William went to Sweet Bu to stock up on candy for the trip to Carnegie Hall. Malibu Magazine knows his future is definitely sweet. MALIBU MAGAZINE loves William Hammond for his involvement and commitment to the arts.

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CAYTLYN MCCLOSKEY

Deep Roots In Our Community As one enters Sea Lily Malibu, the lovely floral aromas astound and there she stands, smiling radiantly amidst a sun-lit, crystal-immersed, sea of succulents, roses, wisteria, tulips and baby’s breath – Caytlyn McCloskey, the establishment’s proprietor. A Malibu native, raised in a family of creatives and insightful thought-leaders, Caytlyn became a mother just as Malibu reeled from the Woolsey Fire. These days, Caytlyn brings her beautiful baby girl, a fourth generation Malibuite named Leighton Phoenix Gothard to the floral shop each day. There, little Leighton’s lilting laughs fill the air with joy and the little baby, nurtured in nature’s beauty, coos at and delights the customers. “Caytlyn was probably one of the most well-travelled fetuses in history,” mom Carla McCloskey wrote in her book, Grandma Told Me So, Lessons in Life and Love, recounting the many ports Carla and Caytlyn’s father, Leigh, visited as Leigh worked as an actor on appearances on Dallas, The Love Boat, and Hearts in Armor, traversing through many countries in just those few months! “I think it’s wonderful that Caytlyn works so hard and can bring Leighton with her,” Carla said. “Our whole family appreciates the kindness and generosity of the amazing Malibu people who support her small business.” MALIBU MAGAZINE loves Caytlyn McCloskey for her bright spirit, deep Malibu roots and stunning floral creations.

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PEOPLE WE LOVE

MITCH TAYLOR

Aloha Spirit in Malibu From the time he first saw First Point at the age of seven, standing on the beach and watching the surfers, Mitch Taylor knew surfing would be significant in his life. “We still had our luggage in the car after arriving from Chicago where we were moving from,” Mitch told Malibu Magazine. “I saw the surfers and my jaw hit the ground, and I thought, “I think I’d like to do that.” His dad bought him his first surfboard for $65 bucks and he was off for adventures as a professional surfer in the 1990’s and as manager of Malibu’s Becker Surf Shop where, for twenty-five years, he has shared the stoke with customers. “Surfing is my life,” Mitch said. “It’s what I wake up for – you can be in a terrible mood, but when you get out and surf, it is the greatest day ever.” Mitch shares the stoke by volunteering with Surf Aid, a non-profit organization delivering aid to remote Indonesian communities desperately needing programs to provide clean water and health care. Mitch also shared the stoke by staying in Malibu during the fire, helping to deliver food, water and supplies and fighting to save homes. Mitch and his wife are raising three lovely children. MALIBU MAGAZINE loves Mitch Taylor for his passion for our community, surf and locals.

REX LEWIS-CLACK

Seeing the Song of Life Blindness and the challenges that come from autism can’t fade the love and joy for life that shine through Malibu’s 23 year-old Rex Lewis-Clack. A prodigious savant, Rex can instantaneously improvise musical themes and play everything from the Beatles, to Louis Armstrong to Mozart. Rex’s biggest fan is his mother Cathleen Lewis who has advocated for him since he was born. After Rex graduated from MHS, he started Rex and Friends, a program providing musical support, training and performance opportunities for individuals who are blind and/or on the autism spectrum. Rex loves to try new things, like when Leo Harrington, Rex’s high school classmate, took him out surfing during a Therasurf event. “Leo was wonderful to me and took me on the board,” Rex said. “I surfed! It was awesome!” Leo loved it too. “Although Rex cannot physically see, his vision is clear,” He said. “He uses his talent and perseverance to live life to the fullest. Whether it is on the piano, or surfing in the ocean, Rex has no limits to what he is capable of doing. Leo’s father notes how special Rex is to Malibu. “I’ve watched Rex grow up in Malibu, consistently stunning audiences with his virtuosity at school events and talent shows,” Eamon Harrington said. “He’s authentic Malibu and we’re lucky to have him here in the community.” MALIBU MAGAZINE loves Rex Lewis-Clack for his tenacity and inspiration to overcome challenges and live life to the fullest.

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PEOPLE WE LOVE

ANN BUXIE

Spreading the Love, Energy and Art A searching, soulful scribe. A sensational seanchai. Ann Buxie’s life is filled with exploring, re-phrasing, philosophizing, sharing and caring, and always loving. A dynamo in Malibu’s cultural community, Ann spearheaded Tales By the Sea, a storytelling gathering and Poetry By the Sea, a collegial colloquium for performing prose, events serving as a cornerstone to Malibu’s cultural scene. “When I obtained a PhD in mythology, the depth of my exploration exploded,” Buxie said. “I was exposed to other realms, including wisdom texts, the Koran, the Kabbalah, and Rigveda.” Optimistic and full of energy, tirelessly facilitating storytelling and encouraging new and emerging poets, Ann is a Malibu thought leader. “I view life as a pot of devotion,” She said. “I love that image which is about accessing what other people describe as spirit. We need to know that love is a stream of energy that purifies us and that poetry is a flowing of love.” For Ann, words have power and how one views life defines one’s journey. Malibu poet Florence Weinberger said, “Ann Buxie peopled Malibu for me, brought me in to her home, where I found new friends, poetry and art, and an abiding sense of love and harmony.”

GENE ARNOLD

Malibu’s Hometown Health Guru

photo by Jamarr John Johnson

MALIBU MAGAZINE loves Ann Buxie because she helps to make Malibu Magic.

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Malibu’s Gene Arnold is always ready to give customers at the Vitamin Barn his well-informed advice about the store’s health care products, ever-popular shakes and food items. “I value relationships because they are where it’s at,” He said. “My whole store is based on respect and civility.” Gene is carrying on the business that his father and his mother, “Magical Pat” started. Gene and his wife, Diane, ensure the Vitamin Barn is an oasis offering quality health care products. “My customers and employees are very respectful,” Gene said. “This town’s brought it to me and I’ve brought it to them.” Joe Grochaoski, who has worked for Gene for thirty years, noted “Gene’s got a great sense of humor and he is very knowledgeable about his products.” Long-time customers greatly admire Gene. “Whenever I walk into the store, I feel comfortable because of its great hometown atmosphere,” Rene Elizondo said. “Everything is healthy and it fills me with gratitude.” Nikki Nilan totally agreed, “The Avo Toast and the Veggie Burger are consistently excellent here.” Rony Peters added, “Gene’s an absolute life saver and I wouldn’t be who I am without him – I have been coming to his store since 1988 and he helps me keep a healthy lifestyle and live a vital life.” MALIBU MAGAZINE loves Gene Arnold for his commitment to to his family’s legacy, customer service and yummy bites.

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PEOPLE WE LOVE KALIN KINOV

A Favorite in Malibu’s Restaurant Scene

photo by Cara Harman

John’s Garden in the Malibu Country Mart has been a fixture on the local culinary scene for more than four decades. The venue suits busy mid-day diners, families visiting the playground and those on dates. Kalin Kinov, venue manager, is ensuring that the restaurant’s tradition of fine food at competitive prices continues on, yet evolves to suit the ever-changing tastes of customers. “What is your menu philosophy?” Malibu Magazine asked. “We use as much fresh, organic, locally-sourced food as possible and we always highlight a weekly special,” Kinov said. “I research food trends and develop new recipes and I enjoy viewing chef’s videos.” John’s Garden is a mecca for vegans. “We offer a multitude of multi-grain vegan sandwiches, Gluten free options and vegan snacks,” Kinov said. “Malibu’s vegans are taken care of here.” What’s new on the menu? “We are the only Malibu venue to offer GT’s Cannabliss – CBD-infused Kombucha,” Kinov said. “Try it with one our popular sandwiches, like the Surfer - turkey and avocado - or the Malibu - tuna and avocado.” Kinov’s avocations – reading, especially books about health, hitting the gym and travel. “I love to explore new places,” He said. “I believe, good health, good sleep, good workout – good life.” MALIBU MAGAZINE loves Kalin Kinov for giving Malibuites inventive lunch options along with classic favorites at John’s Garden.

JOAQUIN HOSFELD

Worth a Standing Ovation “He’s an amazing colleague,” Maria Newman, classical composer and violinist, said about her son, Joaquin Hosfeld, 11. Yes – colleague. On May 1, Joaquin debuted at Spring Serenade at the Malibu Friends of Music at the Montgomery Arts House for Music & Architecture (MAHMA), a lovely performing arts center in Malibu named in honor of Joaquin’s maternal grandmother, the actress, Martha Montgomery. Joaquin ably narrated Oscar Wilde’s allegorical tale, The Sleeping Giant, employing perfect dialect, his seven soliloquys in lively colloquy with interspersed original violin pieces composed and performed by his mother. “I like to perform the Oscar Wilde piece because it’s fun to do the accents,” Joaquin said. “It’s an interesting work.” Maria and Joaquin’s father, renowned conductor and violist, Scott Hosfeld, nurture their son’s talents, which Maria aptly characterizes as “innate musicality.” However, because he is a lively, gifted boy with many interests, music vies for Joaquin’s attention with acting – he’s appeared in many Malibu Playhouse productions, most recently in Matilda. In turn, those avocations vie for Joaquin’s attention with baseball – he plays second and third base. MAHMA is a home entrenched in history – Joaquin shyly shows his grandfather Alfred Newman’s Oscar for Camelot. But most of all, it is a home filled with love and the joy of creativity and fun! MALIBU MAGAZINE loves Joaquin Hosfeld for representing the talent of our next generation. If you have suggestions for community members to feature in our next issue, email us at editorial@malibumag.com

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MALIBU’S ENDLESS

CELL PHONE

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SPECIAL REPORT

Malibu has long struggled to have consistent cell phone connectivity and since the Woolsey Fire problems have intensified. Nestled between the Santa Monica Mountains and the ocean, the City’s unique terrain presents challenges for cell phone providers and there is no easy fix. MALIBU MAGAZINE did a deep dive to define the challenges and discuss various alternative solutions. In a world rapidly moving toward 5G technology, it is clear that the City has a role in helping build Internet infrastructure.

S

✎ written by Barbara Burke

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Why Can‘t I Text? My Phone Has Service. If your internet is slow and your texts aren’t going through even though your phone shows full bars, you might have coverage but not enough capacity. For optimum connectivity both coverage and capacity must be strong and consisten. Coverage - Coverage is literally the area that a cell phone provider covers, in other words it’s how far the signal reaches. It’s possible for the signal to drop in areas with hills or tall buildings. Capacity - Wireless signals that connect towers or nodes with devices are only capable of carrying so much data at once. If too many people use too much data, everyone’s connections become slower.

WIRELESS DENSITY Signals to and from a tower can only carry so much data. Source: www.crowncastle.com

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Dropped phone calls, signal stalls and area code – 90265 - gets abysmal ratings totally non-existent cell phone service across all major carriers. Other nearby are legendary problems that have infuricommunities, including Calabasas, Toated Malibu residents for years, paralyzpanga, get equally poor ratings. ing their ability to carry on with everyMalibu Magazine drove across Malibu, day personal and work activities. Many traveling from Getty Center to CounMalibuites maintain that the Woolsey ty Line and found that, although Sprint Fire exacerbated the problems. had a slight edge in East Malibu, over“I’ve had such terrible problems with all, service from all vendors was spoSprint because calls drop in the middle radic. The attached maps were created of very important calls,” said Malibuite and indicate red where there was no Maggie Luckerath. “Last week, I must cell service and only up to one bar, yelhave had ten calls that just dropped – it low for areas with service between two has happened to me at home and on the and three bars and green for areas perPacific Coast Highway – it has been a real forming at between three and four bars. hassle.” Seldom did a venLuckerath noted dor’s service achieve the problems prea 4-bar setting and ceded the Woolsey service fluctuations Fire and are continuwere experienced ing. Further, changusing cell phones ing providers has not serviced by all major solved the concerns. telecommunications “Verizon doesn’t carriers. work at home for me “After the fire, we and my son has AT&T had dropped calls and that doesn’t and no cell phone work at the house eiservice at all at ther,” She said. “We times,” said Lisa Hall, MAGGIE LUCKERATH Like many residents, Luckerath comhad so much aggrathe school secreplains of horrendous service. vation with Frontary for Our Lady of tier we switched to Malibu School. “The Sprint and now we have the problems school didn’t have service for a few days with our current providers – it causes during the rainy season, which caused aggravation to the highest degree.” serious concerns because staff needed During and after the Woolsey fire, citto communicate with parents about earizens and emergency workers and other ly dismissals and other details that one professionals struggled with commudeals with when operating a school.” nication challenges. Now, months on, Clearly, inconsistent cell service is not in some isolated areas such as Nichomerely an inconvenience - it presents las Beach along the PCH and mountain serious safety issues. As one attempts to and canyon areas, there still is no cell define the ongoing obstacles that Malibu service. Further, there are pocket areas citizens face as they try to obtain consiswhere some citizens consistently experitent cell service, one wonders whether it ence dropped calls and many Malibuites is really necessary for there to be a digclaim that they experience such frustraital divide in America such that citizens tions more now than they did before the of Malibu are the victims of information Woolsey fire. asymmetry? According to cellreception.com, a There are several prefatory principles constantly-updated, well-respected into understand when figuring out how to dustry ratings site that enables a person define and how to try to solve Malibu’s to check reception in his area, Malibu’s cell phone service problems. First, cell

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SPECIAL REPORT

SMALL CELL TECHNOLOGY Unlike most cities, Malibu’s unique geography doesn’t lend itself to cell towers. Instead the city relies on a volumonous series of small cells, or “nodes” for its cell service. These are generally attached to existing infrastructure.

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Malibu Magazine‘s Exclusive Test: Cell Coverage by

SPRINT’S COVERAGE RESULTS When Malibu Magazine conducted its cell phone service test on April 10, Sprint seemed to have the most consistent cell phone coverage of 3+ bars in eastern Malibu and over the canyon with service declining into western Malibu.

T-MOBILE’S COVERAGE RESULTS When Malibu Magazine conducted its cell phone service test on April 10, T-Mobile had mixed cell phone service of one to four bars in most areas of Malibu with a the only location with no service being Sycamore Meadows.

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SPECIAL REPORT

Malibu‘s Top Four Providers

Cell Phone Coverage by Number of Bars No Service, 0 Bars, 1 Bar 1-2 Bars, 2 bars, 2-3 Bars 3 Bars, 3-4 Bars, 4 Bars **All tests were conducted April 10, 2019 utilizing one phone per service provider (iPhone). Results solely reflect tests conducted on this day and should not be read as definitive conclusion on overall service.

AT&T’S COVERAGE RESULTS When Malibu Magazine conducted its cell phone service test on April 10, AT&T had mixed cell phone service of zero to two/three bars in most areas of Malibu with better service towards Broad Beach and Leo Carillo.

VERIZON’S COVERAGE RESULTS When Malibu Magazine conducted its cell phone service test on April 10, Verizon had mixed cell phone service of zero to two/three bars in most areas of Malibu with better service between Point Dume, Malibu Park and Tran-

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Why Do My Calls Keep Dropping? Instead of cell phone towers, cellular service in Malibu is provided by a voluminous number of small nodes or cells that are mounted to utility poles. The biggest entity providing such infrastructure is Crown Castle, which utilizes mall cells and fiber and partners with wireless carriers, broadband providers and municipalities to deliver end-to-end infrastructure. Because there is no unified endto-end infrastructure in Malibu, but instead there is a hodge-podge of several cellular providers who service

various parts of Malibu, cell phone connectivity is compromised. “When a call is dropped, that means that a person has cell phone coverage but the phone signal is not getting through consistently,” Adrian Fernandez, Senior Planner for the City of Malibu said. “A signal is dropped when redundancy within a system goes down, that is, when there is a series of overlapping antennas so that as a person drives along, his phone can jump from one antenna’s signal to another.”

Why Is There No Service When The Power Is Out? Because Malibu does not have an integrated wireless telecommunications infrastructure and companies provide cell service using small cellular sites - also known as nodes - that are attached to utility poles, when utility companies cut off the electric power during high winds, fires or other disasters, or when utility poles are damaged, cell phone connectivity is negatively affected. Some citizens advocate that the City of Malibu take measures to further its Local Implementation Plan, which has an objec-

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tive to facilitate “the creation of an advanced wireless telecommunications infrastructure for citizens, businesses, industry and schools.

service can be provided via cell towers, or via small cells, often referred to as “nodes” and fiber that are mounted on utility poles. Alternatively, customers can obtain cell phone service via WiFi and it can even be accessed via satellites. Second, cell service coverage – the area that a particular type of communications infrastructure covers - differs from capacity, which is affected by connectivity limitations attributable to the fact that signals to and from a cell tower, or via another internet service mechanism, are only able to carry so much data at any given time.

The Traditional Infrastructure for Cell Phone Service When people think about how cell phone service works, they often think of cell towers. “Malibu no longer has cell phone towers per se,” said Adrian Fernandez, Senior Planner for the City of Malibu. “Verizon had a cell phone tower in the City center, but removed it to make way for the Santa Monica Community College and the company has since placed a temporary pole next to the Malibu Library to provide service.” Hans Laetz has been highly involved in seeking ways to ensure that the cell phone sector is responsive to Malibu’s needs. He is very knowledgeable about cell phone vendors using telephone poles for infrastructure because he successfully advocated and convinced the State of California to bring an action before the California Public Utilities Commission against SCE and five co-defendant cell phone companies for their causing the 2007 Malibu Canyon Fire. Laetz, who manages KBUU, Malibu’s only radio station, has to access consistent cellular and internet service for the station. “Using cell towers in Malibu is not cost effective because one-half of the signals would go out to sea and one-half would go to canyons that are very sparsely populated,” He said. “Therefore, companies like AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint and Verizon, as well as others such as Google,

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SPECIAL REPORT

utilize the infrastructure established by Crown Castle to put up cell antennas on a series of poles.” Instead of cell phone towers, service in Malibu is provided by a voluminous number of small cells, or nodes, that are mounted to utility poles, Hernandez said. The biggest entity providing such infrastructure is Crown Castle which utilizes small cells and fiber and partners with wireless carriers, broadband providers and municipalities to design and deliver end-to-end infrastructure. Such “small cell technology” utilizes a system of small cell nodes attached to existing infrastructure in the public right of way, such as utility poles, street lights or signposts. The nodes are controlled and amplified via computers as cell signals travel along. Similar to a cell tower, small cell nodes communicate over radio waves and then send the signals to the internet or a phone system. Small cells are similar to WiFi networks in that their coverage is limited to somewhere between 300 to 500 feet and therefore, providers have to deploy numerous devices to provide coverage to relatively small areas. “There are literally hundreds of these nodes in Malibu Park alone and they all need electricity.” Laetz stated, noting that reality should be addressed, given that in recent wildfires the loss of electricity affected cell phone service. With regard to capacity, sometimes called wireless density in the cell phone industry, small cells are connected with fiber and often can handle massive amounts of data at fast speeds. Laetz noted that some days, an antenna works to provide service for a consumer, but some days it doesn’t and he explained that every model of cell phone has a different built-in antenna, which can affect reception. Further, the car that a person drives can impact cell service, as can even the direction that a person is driving. “My Ford Mustang convertible affords me better cell reception than does my Ford van because of the magnetic properties in the vehicles,” Laetz said, citing

“You’re looking at literally billions of variables that can affect cell reception ” an example of factors that can affect cell service. “You’re looking at literally billions of different variables that can affect cell reception.” Fernandez agreed and noted that in Malibu, the notoriously inconsistent cell connections “are a function of the terrain as well as of the economics of the business, because cell phone companies often provide service to neighborhoods in areas that are densely populated, such as along the PCH, but they have a

HANS LAETZ Operating the only local radio station, Laetz advocates having the City explore establishing integrated cell phone infrastructure.

harder time providing coverage in areas that are less densely populated.” A given cell phone company might not provide good coverage in a neighborhood due to a paucity of customer subscriptions, he added. Laetz often has to go up on the roof of Pavilions Market in Pt. Dume where the station has a microwave relay and, in the past, when he was on the store’s roof, where he was positioned just ten feet away from a Sprint antenna, his Sprint phone would not work. “Perhaps I was too close to the tower so the radio device might have been overwhelmed.” He said. “I do not know, just as I don’t know why, for years, whenever I would go down the hill near Cher’s house, or whenever I was at the traffic light at Heathercliff, my cell phone service always went out. It is very complicated why one day, a person’s cell phone will work, but the next it won’t.” Fernandez provided some insights about why Malibuites experience a lot of dropped calls and about why some customers seem to be experiencing more dropped calls after the wildfire. “When a call is dropped, that means that a person has cell phone coverage but the phone signal is not getting through consistently,” He said. “A signal is dropped when redundancy within a system goes down, that is, when there is not a series of overlapping antennas so that as a person drives along, his phone can jump from one antenna’s signal to another.” Customers may be experiencing more dropped calls after the Woolsey fire, Hernandez said, “because, although a lot of cellular sites have been replaced, perhaps not all of them have been repaired or replaced.” The City is not aware of any sites that need repair, but Hernandez noted that customers don’t usually call the City to complain about dropped calls. Rather, they call their cell phone provider. Therefore, unfortunately, the City does not have any aggregated data documenting statistics relative to whether overall, Malibuites are experiencing

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more dropped calls after the Woolsey fire. Hernandez noted that cell phone providers are insular and do not want to share data regarding connectivity problems with the city or customers.

So, what viable options exist for customers? Before addressing the fact that perhaps using WiFi-based cellular service rather than traditional cellular service may be prudent, one must first address 5G - an acronym for 5th Generation, a wireless capability that implicates unchartered territory. The next generation of wireless connectivity, 5G can deliver data rates as high as 1 gigabit per second, more than twenty times faster than current networks, and equal to the speeds afforded by a fiber optic wireless service or cable. Initial 5G launches will depend on existing 4G (also known as LTE) infrastructure because underpinning 5G networks will be wireline fiber supporting the “small cell” nodes mounted on street poles or other public infrastructure. The emergence of 5G in Malibu and elsewhere may change the dynamics of cell phone coverage. However, for now, issues relating to rolling out 5G are embroiled in litigation because two dozen cities and counties, with the support of the U.S. Conference of Mayors which represents more than 1,400 cities, have filed lawsuits challenging the FCC’s promulgated rules concerning 5G, both because of the agency’s limiting the collection of site rental fees and equipment installation charges and also because the FCC Rule imposes timelines on municipalities’ processing of permits to install devices. Those suits are pending in the Ninth Circuit, the federal appellate court that covers California’s federal courts. Further, suits filed by telecommunications companies challenging those same FCC rules have been consolidated in the Tenth Circuit, which turned down a motion to stay the FCC’s rules on January 10, 2019. Subsequently, those cases were

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People The Development of

1G - 4G

1G

2G Year: 1991 Standards: GSM, GPRS, EDGE Technology: Digital Bandwidth: Narrow Brand Data rates: < 80-100 Kbit/s

Year: 1991 Standards: AMPS, TACS Technology: Analog Bandwidth: – Data rates: –

3G

SMS/MMS

SMS/MMS

INTERNET ACCESS

VIDEO CALLS MOBILE TV

Year: 2001 Standards: UMTS/HSPA Technology: Digital Bandwidth: Broad Band Data rates: up to 2 Mbit/s

transferred to the Ninth Circuit. Although the U.S. Congress could act legislatively to address the issues, to date, it has not weighed in on the matter. However, common cellular service, including 5G, is not necessarily a panacea for communities like Malibu that are experiencing cell phone service nightmares.

Satellite Cellular Phones An Expensive Limited Solution On the extremely high end of possible solutions is to obtain voice connectivity globally using a satellite phone, a technology that has been in existence

4G

SMS/MMS

INTERNET ACCESS

GAMING SERVICES

VIDEO CALLS

CLOUD COMPUTING

MOBILE TV

Year: 2010 Standards: LTE, LTE advanced Technology: Digital Bandwidth: Mobile Broad Band Data rates: xDSL-like experience 1hr HD movie in 6 minutes

for more than two decades and that first began as a government sector endeavor. The system operates via 66 low-orbit satellites that Motorola launched decades ago. Iridium and ISat Pro, which operates on a newer system of satellites, and other companies offer this species of cell phone service and individuals and businesses can subscribe to those elite options. However, Hernandez warns that the satellite phones are a limited solution to cell phone woes. “A person has to be outside a building to get a satellite signal,” He said. “Such phones do not generally provide data functionality.” At least not without significant extra costs.

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SPECIAL REPORT

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Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) Alternatively, it is often more effective to access cell service over the Internet via Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP), a technology that uses a person’s highspeed connection as a digital phone line, instead of accessing service via cell phone towers, small phone technology, or satellite phones. According to techlicious.com, a website offering information about new and established technology, “all major cell phone carriers offer WiFi calling, with support for the recent iPhones and Android phones.” Readers can refer to that website to determine what phones support WiFi calling for each of the major

carriers. Various other companies also offer VOIP, such as Google WiFi, a phone carrier that can be enabled on an iPhone or an Android. Unlike other phone plans, Google Fi offers cellular coverage across three other leading networks T-Mobile, Sprint and U.S. Cellular and Wi-Fi hotspots. Some Malibuites have selected this option and, when one peruses comments on various social media sites such as NextDoor Neighbor, many of them are pleased with this option. Laetz also noted that cable companies are involved in the wireless service sector, citing Spectrum, also known as Charter Spectrum, as an example, and noting that company markets ca-

ble television, internet, telephone and wireless services and its customers can acquire cell phone coverage with WiFi Hotspots.

Going Forward All in all, cellular service woes may continue to impair Malibuites’ abilities to access consistent cell coverage for the foreseeable future. So, is there any city-wide solution? Laetz believes that there is - the City of Malibu can set up WiFi city wide, as other municipalities have done. “The City could establish nodes at Trancas Market, Malibu High School, Pt. Dume and areas across the City,” He said. “At every node, there should be a generator and batteries.” Public procurement laws would require the City to issue a request for proposals and, Laetz said, such a solicitation should mandate that the winning vendor install ten to twenty fiber optic lines travelling to the Internet backbone in L.A. “Having such fiber optic lines would mean that when the power goes out, lines are cut or there is a fire, we may still have internet service.” Laetz said. “This solution was recently proposed to the City of Malibu’s Public Safety Commission and some councilpersons viewed the proposal favorably.” Indeed, the City of Malibu’s Local Implementation Plan at Chapter 3, entitled Malibu’s Zoning Designations and Permitted Uses, has as one of its objectives furthering the goal of facilitating “the creation of an advanced wireless telecommunications infrastructure for citizens, businesses, industries and schools.” Laetz submits that the time for doing so has come and many Malibuites heartily agree. Hernandez also agreed, noting that the City of Malibu’s Municipal Code, enacted in 2007, “encourages using small cell sites because it allows companies to use existing infrastructure and it avoids MM having cell towers in the city.”

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Photo by Julie Wuellner

MALIBU WIDE EFFORTS (Above) A group of Malibuites bring in supplies from boats at Paradise Cove. (Below) The Bombers fight tirelessly to put out hotspots and embers to stop the spread of the fire.

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SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON

“ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER” As Malibu recovers from the Woolsey Fire, citizens and City officials question whether SCE is over-reacting with regard to its trimming and cutting of trees and whether the utility followed appropriate procedures when erecting a staging area to coordinate its activities. MALIBU MAGAZINE talked to stakeholders, city officials, and SCE representatives regarding next steps. ✎ written by Barbara Burke

A

s Malibu recovers from the devastation caused by the Woolsey Fire, citizens are expressing concerns regarding how Southern California Edison (SCE) is conducting tree-cutting and general vegetation management and whether applicable laws were followed when SCE bulldozed fields on a private parcel located at the corner of Stuart Ranch Road and Civic Center Way, next to an environmentally sensitive habitat area (ESHA) known as Egret Pond in order to set up a temporary workstation.

SCE Vegetation Plans Appall Citizens “In the past, SCE has dealt with a sixand-a half-foot area on both sides of a

TREE TRIMMING A workers follos SCE mandates regarding how much to trim a tree or whether to cut a tree.

power pole when it conducted vegetation management,” Mayor Pro Tem Karen Farrer told Malibu Magazine. “Now, that area has been expanded to twelve-feet on both sides of such infrastructure.” The 12-foot radius derives from a standard suggested by – but not mandated by – the California Public Utilities Commission (“CPUC”). MALIBU MAGAZINE reached out to Susan Cox, SCE’s Media Spokesperson, on April 30 to discuss the issue. “Southern California Edison understands the trimming of trees is a sensitive issue for many of our customers,” Cox said. “However, our first priority continues to be public safety, the safety of our customers, employees and contractors, and the reliability of the power grid. State regulations require utilities to trim trees or vegetation so they don’t grow into or fall into high

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Edison‘s Tree Trimming Responding to the concerns of citizens and City officials, SCE has promised to work with the City regarding trimming and cutting of trees, but states it can cut trees to ensure safety pending the City’s decision.

voltage power lines, which can not only cause a power outage, but could spark a fire or be a danger to the public.” When asked about the new 12-foot radius guidelines, Cox responded, “New recommendations for tree clearances adopted by the CPUC in 2017, include a minimum 12-ft. clearance at the time of trim between a tree and power line in high fire risk areas, regardless of the species and how fast it grows.” Previously, California regulations and the CPUC guidance required utilities to trim a 4-ft. minimum clearance between a tree and a power line, plus an additional 6-10 ft. to allow for the tree’s growth over a year’s time, Cox stated, adding. “Depending on the tree species, that meant a minimum 10-ft. clearance.

Citizen Objections Some Malibu citizens are vociferously objecting to SCE carte blanche using the 12-foot standard. They assert two salient points. First, there are alternative ways other than significant tree trimming or tree cutting for the utility to address concerns when vegetation is located near SCE’s utility wires and officials are concerned about fire hazards. The CPUC vegetation management order, CPUC General Order 95, Rule 35, states that those alternatives include insulating the wires. Second, the City has jurisdiction to require a Coastal Development Permit (CDP) for tree trimming, a procedure that, according to Kraig Hill, City of Malibu Planning Commissioner, “would likely involve a more specific inventory of planned cuts, with some oversight by the City of Malibu’s Planning Department and the City Biologist or a consulting biologist.” Rumors regarding SCE planning to fell groves of centuries-old sycamore trees on Bonsall Drive and other trees elsewhere have caused extreme citizen concerns, Farrer said, culminating in lengthy discussions regarding those concerns at the April 24 City Council meeting, followed

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by a series of teleconferences between city officials, including City Manager Reva Feldman, City Planning Director Bonnie Blue, Farrer, City legal counsel, SCE and representatives of Los Angeles County. An example of citizens’ distress was posted on a Malibu-centric Facebook page in a comment stating: “I received a call from the power company alerting me to their plans to cut trees within 12 feet of their lines as a future prevention: is there anything we can do other than sit and cry? This grove of sycamores on this street is 250 years old and extends the length of the street . . . the beauty of Bonsall Drive owes much to the beauty of these old trees, the sense of sheltering they provide, as well as their graceful forms.” Farrer noted that citizens on Dume Drive, Zumirez, Wildlife Road and Grayfox had expressed similar concerns. As MALIBU MAGAZINE goes to print, SCE is beginning to cut trees in Malibu, starting on Bonsall Drive and moving to the east side of Malibu where City Councilperson Skylar Peak and others asked the company to focus first in order to allow trees on the westside of Malibu to heal some from the trauma of the Woolsey Fire. Residents near Malibu who live in the unincorporated area are also experiencing angst about the tree trimming and cutting. SCE is working with the City of Malibu to address both the City’s and citizens’ concerns, Cox stated, noting “SCE met with the Malibu planning director last week and agreed that SCE could proceed with its vegetation management plan to conduct routine tree trimming beginning in grid 6 of the map (a map depicting the various grids can be found on page 67). There are just under 300 trees identified in that grid that are in need of trimming. Routine trimming will proceed in other grids once Edison completes grid 6.” In a letter to the Malibu City Council expressing objections, Patt Healy, a Malibu environmental advocate, explained why citizens are so upset about SCE indiscriminately trimming or cutting down trees. “Edison has to be more selective in its

clearing of trees for several reasons. More than 23,000 trees were lost locally in the Santa Monica Mountains due to the recent fire,” Healy wrote. “Now, Edison wants to continue the devastation by chopping, topping and over pruning more trees. Trees are important. They sequester carbon. Trees give us oxygen. It is nesting season and trimming trees with nests is prohibited.” To date, many details regarding how SCE will administer the cutting and trimming of trees within twelve feet of its power lines and poles and its annual vegetation management still are in the development phase, according to Farrer, Rudy Gonzales, Government Relations Representative for SCE and Malibu City Council person Mikke Pierson. MALIBU MAGAZINE asked Cox for clarification. “SCE and Malibu will continue to work together and come to an understanding of what Malibu will require and review for issuance of a coastal development permit (CDP),” She said. “The requirements will encompass city-protected tree species (western sycamore, oaks, alder and black walnuts), heavy trims requiring a branch cut greater than 7” in diameter, full removal of a tree, and tree trimming in environmentally sensitive habitat areas.” However, she added, “If the city refuses to allow tree

“The beauty of Bonsall Drive owes much to these [250-year] old trees.”

trimming to continue, Edison is permitted to cut the tree to a safe condition until a permit has been obtained.”

What Citizens Can Expect Regarding SCE’s Actions Gonzales stated that when SCE decides to trim or cut trees on a citizen’s parcel, as in years past, “SCE will engage in robust communications with citizens, who will be provided with advance notice of between thirty and forty-five days, as well as with notices a few days before we come onto their land and, of course, on the day that we enter their land. SCE places door hangers on citizens’ doors that have all the appropriate contact information.” Citizens who want to express concerns should contact the SCE representative named on the door hangers as that is the representative whom is most knowledgeable about a given tree or trees. Healy told MALIBU MAGAZINE that before SCE begins to work on trees, the utility should be mindful of the fact that many native trees are protected by law. Specifically, the California Native Plant Protection Act protects all native Oak tree species, California Sycamores, California Bay, Toyon and California Black Walnut trees when trees have reached four inches or greater in diameter at a height of 4.5 feet above ground. Malibu City Councilperson Mikke Pierson told Malibu Magazine that constituents had sent him picture of trees along the coast that SCE has cut drastically. “The pictures were awful because many of the trees were just butchered,” Pierson said. “I advocate more sensitivity be used in deciding which trees to cut and that a CDP or an ECDP (emergency coastal development permit) be required in consultation with arborists.” Healy wholeheartedly agrees. “There is a community-wide concern regarding Edison’s indiscriminate trees destruction plan in the name of safety,” She said in a letter to Malibu City Council dated April 20. “Edison told the city council that there

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are 5,000 trees in Malibu impacted by its cutting plan.” Healy expressed concerns that there will be dramatic visual impact in Malibu from the project and it would change the look and character of the city, noting that in a city council meeting in early April a SCE representative had alluded to such a scenario. “In many instances this brutal approach will result in leaving only tree trunks and limbs and leaves will be destroyed,” Healy wrote. “In others, trees will have a hard time surviving since the tree will not be getting enough nutrients for the energy needed to survive.” Healy, Pierson and others express concerns that there is no discernment in how Edison trims the trees around its wires and the utility may cut trees even when doing so is not needed. “One way to see that reasonableness prevails rather than having Edison dictate what it is going to do is for the City to take control of the situation and oversee it by issuing the required CDP,” Healy said. “The City can then insist Edison use a rational approach in all instances.” Healy noted that the Coastal Commission has stated it requires a CDP if there if there is a protected tree or any major vegetation removal and L.A. County is requiring a CDP in the Santa Monica Mountains. Accordingly, she maintains that “To avoid whole scale tree mutilation and destruction,” the City should require the same. City Planning Director Bonnie Blue was asked at a Malibu Planning Commission meeting on April 22 why SCE needed to take out a CDP from Los Angeles County for tree trimming outside city limits, but no similar permit from the City of Malibu. She provided no answer.

SCE has Options Other Than Cutting or Severely Trimming Trees Hill pointed out that trimming vegetation is only one of four permissible options to address power lines being affected by trees. In a letter to City Council dated April 20, he noted that CPUC

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MIKKE PIERSON Concerned about SCE’s extensive trimming and cutting in other localities, Councilperson Pierson advocates that arborists be consulted.

Rule 35 states that when SCE knows that “its circuit energized at 750 volts or less shows strain or evidences abrasion from vegetation contact, the condition shall be corrected by reducing conductor (wire) tension, rearranging or replacing the conductor, pruning the vegetation, or placing mechanical protection [insulation] on the conductors.” Accordingly, cutting down or seriously pruning vegetation is not SCE’s only option. Hill stated, “In implementing the Rule, SCE could just as well decided that

“For SCE to suggest its primary recourse is to trim trees is arbitrary.”

its policy, whenever vegetation is present, is that lines should be covered conductor (insulated wires). [F]or SCE to suggest that its primary recourse is to trim trees is arbitrary.” Hill, Healy and others also noted that the City has jurisdiction to require SCE to obtain a CDP ancillary to the CPUC rules. Overall, those stating objections believe that SCE is acting rashly and without due regard to proper processes. “ESHA is also protected and Edison failed to address how it would protect ESHA areas, especially since it is clearing habitat within a 12-foot radius of its poles,” Healy said. “Edison’s vegetation plan is not only a visual blight, but an environmental disaster.”

SCE’s Temporary Maintance Yard The tree cutting controversy is not the only action by SCE that has caused citizens to assert that the environment is being harmed. At a recent City Council meeting, Pierson asked about the large SCE staging lot that SCE has constructed on Stuart Ranch Road below City Hall. Gonzales told the City Council that the lot was for “enhanced overhead inspection work.” The lot is not being used as a staging area for tree trimming. The staging area, which SCE calls a “temporary maintenance yard,” has also raised citizen ire. Convinced that fundamental principles of procedural due process were violated, some Malibu citizens are furious because, without giving notice to the Malibu City Council or providing an opportunity for a public hearing - and with only the imprimatur of city staff who swiftly issued an emergency over-thecounter permit and a subsequent ECDP, SCE began to bulldoze fields on a private parcel located at the corner of Stuart Ranch Road and Civic Center Way. The property is known as the “Bell property,” and has a physical address of 23801 Stuart Ranch Road. Surfrider Partners, LLC, owned by Bradley Bell, acquired the parcel from Hitoshi Yamaguchi, Successor Trustee of the Tokiye A. Yamaguchi Re-

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California Fire Threat Little or No Threat to People Moderate Threat to People High Threat to People Very High Threat to People Extreme Threat to People Pacific Ocean

District 35 - Thousand Oaks Index Map14 Fire Threat Map Southern California Edison

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6 8 5 Issued For: Jon Pancoast

Prepared By: Julie Crescione Henry 7 Southern California Edison (SCE) has no reason to believe that there are any inaccuracies or defects with information incorporated in this work and make no representations of any kind, including, but not limited to, the warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular use, nor are any such warranties to be implied, with respect to the information or data, furnished herein. No part of this map may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic or mechanical, including phototcopying and recording system, except as expressly permitted in writing by SCE.

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15 Miles

Date: October 21, 2009

Projection: NAD 83 UTM Zone

Project Number: i2009-008-003 Contains Transmission Information Distribution limited to FERC Standards of Conduct

Thomas Bros. Maps is a registered trademark of Rand Company. Reproduced with permission granted by Ra and Company. · Rand McNally & Company. All rights reserved.

CONFIDENTIAL Contains Critical Electric Infrastructure Information If any questions contact Corporate Security (27875) for handling/storage requirements.

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vocable Living Trust by Grant Deed dated January 14, 2009. On February 12, citizens noticed the bulldozing and quickly took to social media sites voicing surprise, confusion and outrage. Soon, they were calling City Hall, demanding explanations. “How can SCE do this without red tape or substantive review while hundreds of residents whose homes were burned (possibly by SCE) are paralyzed in their rebuilding efforts?” asked Bruce Silverstein in a Facebook post. Silverstein, who

owns a home in Malibu Knolls above the City Hall, is exploring filing a lawsuit in the matter. After initial emails by citizens asking what was going on at the Bell property, they learned that the City had given SCE an emergency permit to prepare the property for operating a temporary material yard “to support urgent wildfire mitigation maintenance activities scheduled for existing infrastructure.” It is important to note that on January 22, Amy Biamonte, Right of Way Agent for SCE, sent an email to the City of Malibu seek-

The Bell Property Frustrated Citizens maintain SCE and the City ignored laws mandating environmental impact reviews be conducted before SCE altered the landscape of a parcel near City Hall.

DURING Prior to construction the parcel was lush with vegetation and flora.

AFTER The parcel has been altered to accommodate SCE’s workstation.

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ing permission to use the Chili Cook-off property, owned by the City of Malibu, for this purpose, noting that parcel had been utilized as a command post to respond to the Woolsey Fire and stating that the Chili Cook-off property “is perfect for our needs and we are hoping it may be available for use again.” Biamonte also sent a follow-up email, noting that “SCE entered into a license agreement with the City of Malibu for the Woolsey Fire,” at the Chili Cook-off site. She stated that the term of that license “extended to November 9, 2019,” and queried “would it be possible to amend the agreement for the current use we are requesting?” However, the City denied SCE’s request to use the Chili Cook-off Property on grounds that the City was obligated to provide parking for Chumash Days, a two-day cultural event in April, and noting that there would be a “week-long preparation” for doing so, stating that it had to use the Chili Cook-off property for employee parking necessitated by a now-postponed solar panel project, and that “other rentals have requested the use of this lot.” On February 4, SCE sent a letter to the City informing that it had located the Bell property directly across from the Chili Cook Off lot and justifying its need to obtain the permit by explaining that it conducts infrastructure and equipment inspections as part of ongoing regular operations and “in high fire risk areas, inspections are a top priority and part of SCE’s wildfire mitigation plan.” Further, SCE stated that it intended to utilize the Temporary Material Yard for approximately six months to allow contractors to stage materials “to support urgent wildfire mitigation maintenance activities scheduled for existing infrastructure.” The company averred that the project would “not result in the expansion or increase in electrical use and capacity, and will only support needed repairs and maintenance.” The request also stated, without providing any support, that “preparation and use of the yard is not

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expected to result in impacts to sensitive environmental resources,” and that SCE believed that the City’s review of the permit request would “confirm that the proposed project is exempt from the need for a coastal permit pursuant to the Malibu Local Coastal Plan, Coastal Act, or CEQA requirements.” Bonnie Blue, Planning Director for the City of Malibu, wrote an email to SCE officials on February 5, stating, “I think the most expeditious way to permit this is with an Emergency Coastal Development Permit (ECDP).” In a later email, she stated, “I want to clarify that I am only commenting on the method of permitting an ECDP – NOT promising an approval. There are significant Public Works issues to be addressed.” On February 7, the City sent SCE stamped Over the Counter plans, approving the preparation of the site. Subsequently, on February 15, after SCE had begun to alter the parcel, the City issued an ECDP for the 90-day use. Silverstein maintains that because the ECDP was issued by the City after SCE had begun to alter the parcel, relevant laws were violated. On February 11, City Staff sent SCE an email stating, “Could you give me an estimate on how much grading is to be done, including total yardage graded?” Genevieve Cross, SCE’s Environmental Advisor for Major Environmental Projects, replied, “For grading – the entire 7-acre site is going to be tilled in order to level it and place rock. We are not removing soil offsite, or doing massive grading, since the site is pretty flat. Because of the anticipated rain, the crews are developing some berm along the southern boundary to protect the site from runoff.” Readers should note – that email exchange referenced “grading,” and not “grubbing,” and “grading” is prohibited by law during a rainy season. Further, the City of Malibu’s “Site Grading Policy” does not mention “grubbing.” On February 11, Craig George, Environmental Sustainability Director for the City of Malibu, issued an email stating that

“How can SCE do this without red tape when hundreds of residents are paralyzed in their rebuilding efforts? ” “Fortunately or unfortunately, it (referring to the scope of work being proposed by SCE) is just grubbing on steroids. Does not rise to the level of grading yet.” Although citizens have subsequently asked the City to address the issue, there is no clear clarification regarding what distinguishes “grubbing,” from “grading,” in California, except for an email that city staff sent to an inquiring citizen on February 12, stating that activity on the parcel that day constituted “grubbing or scraping up the vegetation, putting up temporary fences and laying down gravel.”

February 12- Landscape on the Bell Property is Altered by SCE On February 11, the Malibu City Council held a regularly scheduled meeting and there was no mention of SCE’s request to utilize the Bell property as a staging area. On February 12, SCE began to bulldoze the field. Dismayed citizens called and emailed the City expressing concern. Malibuite Mari Stanley’s email objected to the issuance of an emergency permit, noting that the City Planning Commission was neither consulted nor involved in that decision. Her

email stated in relevant part, “I and many others are alarmed with grading and what seems to be a slurry surface application on a property that is adjacent to wetlands and historically known as Egret Pond for the bird life that has historically inhabited the area.” Stanley maintained that SCE’s planned activities did not constitute an “emergency,” and she expressed concerns about the water table and toxins possibly filtering through to the Malibu Lagoon, which could affect the water quality. Stanley also noted that the activities were being conducted during rain and postulated that “the grading should cease with a focus on prevention of mud flow that can cause problems for other properties and enter drains to impact the water quality of our shoreline lagoon.” Stanley, Silverstein and other citizens expressed concerns about the Bell property abutting an adjacent property, referred to as the White parcel, that is designated as ESHA. Stanley questioned why the City didn’t allow SCE to conduct its operations on the Chili Cook-Off site, stating that would be preferable to “tearing up a property with far more significant habitat to protect from grading.” Responding, the City explained that “SCE is prepping for a laydown yard they will use for about the next three months for staging materials and equipment while they work on urgent fire hazard inspections and related hazard mitigation repairs.” On April 30, Cox discussed SCE’s use of the property with MALIBU MAGAZINE, stating, “The property on the west side of Stuart Ranch Road is currently being utilized as a temporary construction yard as SCE completes its enhanced overhead inspection scope of work in the area. The field was graded and a layer of gravel was put down. SCE is likely to be there until August.” “Can you please define what “enhanced overhead inspection is?” MALIBU MAGAZINE asked. “Enhanced overhead inspection scope of work entails work being completed by Edison linemen temporarily housed at the Edison construction laydown yard in Mal-

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ibu,” Cox said. “The scope of work ranges from placing “high voltage” signs on poles to complete pole replacements.” Silverstein, Patt Healy, a Malibu environmental advocate, and others voiced objections. Silverstein maintains that although the City clearly knew there were wetlands on an adjacent property – known as the White property - the City did not follow applicable law mandating that a biologist conduct an inspection of a parcel that is adjacent to wetlands before any activities on the parcel begin. Therefore, Silverstein, Healy and others allege that the city staff violated substantive environmental laws and procedural requirements by issuing an emergency permit without an environmental inspection and analyses being conducted, and therefore SCE violated the law by improperly working on the lot. Their position is bolstered in the records that the City produced in response to Silverstein’s report. On February 13 – the day after SCE began “grubbing” the property, Bonnie Blue sent SCE an email stating “As a head’s up, the property adjacent to the west of the lot you’re using has been mapped in the past as containing wetlands. We are looking at that issue closely and may need you to adjust the boundaries of the laydown yard to ensure an adequate buffer is maintained from that area.” Silverstein also maintains that the City did not comply with the Malibu Local Coastal Program standards to make a determination regarding the status of environmental conditions on the Bell parcel as well as on the adjacent White parcel before issuing SCE a permit. He also notes that the City had an obligation under relevant law to evaluate whether there were any ecological, archaeological, traffic or aesthetic factors militating against approving the permit. In that regard, Silverstein points out that the City’s biologist did not even review the premises until February 25, many days after alterations to the Bell parcel began on February 12, a flaw that most likely explains why SCE was forced on February 22

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BRUCE SILVERSTEIN Upset that legally-mandated procedures were not followed, Bruce Silverstein is considering filing litigation.

to remediate part of the Bell parcel by restoring a segment of the parcel that abuts the White parcel that is clearly in an ESHA designation and to place a buffer zone in the area to protect the wetlands on the White parcel. Moreover, Silverstein and others also note that SCE’s working to alter the fields – whether properly characterized as “grubbing,” or “grading” - took not only the citizens by surprise, but also occurred without the members of the City Council being informed. MALIBU MAGAZINE has confirmed the

“There was no environmental analysis conducted for the Bell parcel.”

truth of that claim with Mayor Jefferson Wagner and Councilperson Mikke Pierson, both of whom stated that they were unaware of the SCE permit issuing or of the work on the Bell lot until citizens became aware of the activities on February 12. It should be noted that City staff did quickly place a small sign regarding the pending permit on the Bell parcel only a couple of days before SCE began its operations. Further, notably, there is no record that County, State or Federal agencies were consulted in advance of permitting the project. “There was no environmental analyses conducted for the Bell parcel because the Malibu Bay Company Development Proposal did not include that property,” Silverstein told MALIBU MAGAZINE. “What is very interesting is that there are documents that, when Malibu Presbyterian sought to use the Bell property to operate a temporary church after its property was destroyed in the 2007 fire, the church abandoned those efforts because it was informed that it was an environmentally sensitive lot.”

Where Things Stand Now Silverstein is exploring pursuing litigation against the City for the expedited and allegedly flawed processing of SCE’s request to use the Bell parcel. He asserts that the Chili Cook-off lot should have been used, which would not have implicated an ESHA and would not have resulted in harm to the public fisc because SCE would have paid the City rent. Whereas, as it stands now, a private party – Bell – receives rental monies from SCE. Silverstein and Healy express concerns that the parcel cannot be properly remediated because gravel is integrated into the soil. Overall, they and other citizens are very troubled by the fact that a prime parcel of land in Malibu’s City Center has been altered, without the City complying with proper substantive and procedural safeguards and seemingly in defiance of the City’s stated policy to preserve precious MM lands in the middle of Malibu.

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5/10/19 5:40 PM


PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY All Spring Malibu and surrounding areas have seen thousands upon thousands of Painted Lady butterflies migrating through the area.

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Photo by Ray Ford

PEPPERDINE UNIVERISTY Generally considered extremely safe with a near zero crime rate, Pepperdine University has sseen an increase in sexual misconduct reports this past sememster.

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PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY

A CRISIS ON CAMPUS?

Since January, a university with a near zero crime rate, experienced a spike in sexual misconduct reports—leading many to question why more are coming forward and how the university is responding. MALIBU MAGAZINE investigated the recent situation at Pepperdine by talking to university officials, and a student who has been a victim of sexual assault during her time at the school. ✎ written by Josie Lionetti

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even. That may not seem like a big number, but for a school like Pepperdine, it’s huge. Seven is how many incidents of sexual misconduct were reported during the university’s spring semester. The first account is believed to have occurred on October 1, 2018 with the most recent allegedly occurring on March 14, 2019. The latest incident occurred in the Drescher Apartments, a residence hall for undergraduate upperclassman at the university. Soon after, Pepperdine University administration issued a Timely Warning to the Pepperdine community via email, stating, the matter had been turned over to local law enforcement. The email included

a warning to individuals to be cautious of a college-aged man named Jonathan Pope. Pope, who is not a Pepperdine Student, was reported to have “touched [a female student] in an unwanted and unwelcome manner…when she allowed Mr. Pope to use a phone charger in her on-campus residence,” according to the email. In a recent survey, Sexual Assault Awareness at Pepperdine conducted by Pepperdine student Anastassia Kostin of 50 fellow Pepperdine students, only 14 were aware of the recent sexual assault reports. While Pepperdine has experienced incidents of sexual misconduct reports before, never have they been of this size. The seven incidents during the spring semester nearly double that of 2017, which included four cases of fondling--but not

rape--on the Malibu Campus, according to Pepperdine’s Annual Campus Safety and Fire Safety Report. In 2015 and 2016, there were no reported incidences of rape or fondling. Yet the report seems to have left out one incident from 2016 which falls into the definition the university provides for sexual misconduct, which states that sexual misconduct includes “sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.” In speaking with Pepperdine’s Title XI coordinator, La Shonda Coleman, a definitive answer on this matter was hard to come by. “I cannot speak to specific cases,” Coleman said. “However Pepperdine adheres

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to all federal and state laws. Besides complying with all federal and state laws that regulate how information is shared about incidents of sexual assault, our Christian Mission affirms our commitment to safety, equity and response in these matters, without compromising privacy.” Coleman’s role at the university is to ensure compliance with Title XI rules on the campus. Title IX is a federal law promulgated by the Department of Education which prohibits sex discrimination in education and activities related to one’s education The increase in reported cases begs the question: are sexual crimes on the rise at Pepperdine and other college campuses, or have victims simply been silent? While Coleman said she cannot speak to the reports of sexual assault at other schools, she is aware that the prevalence of sexual violence on college campuses warrants immediate attention. As for Pepperdine, Coleman says the university will continue to address the seriousness of these matters. For one Pepperdine student, the one whose report seems to have been left out in 2016, remaining silent was her first instinct. “I was actually never going to report it,” Senior Emily Marshall (names have been changed to protect anonymity) said. Marshall’s assault occurred while she was studying abroad with one of Pepperdine’s international programs. Eager for the journey she was about to embark on, she could have never imagined how her experience and her life would change so abruptly. “We were all excited and wanted to experience the town, so we decided to go out to a few of the bars downtown,” Marshall said. “The drinking age was 18, and we were being responsible, but there was some drinking, which is where I feel like the problem started in the first place.” As the evening progressed, a male student in her program continued to approach her and act inappropriately. “He would try dancing on me and try touching me, and I felt extremely uncom-

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“Prevention is the university’s first priority”

JONATHAN POPE Pepperdine Public safety released this photo on March 14 of Jonathan Pope. He is accused of unwanted touching in the most recent sexual crime report.

fortable,” Marshall said. “I called over my guy friends and told them that this person was making me feel uncomfortable and to tell him to leave me alone.” Despite warnings from friends, the student continued his behavior, and later that night, assaulted Marshall. “I ended the night sobbing, furious, confused, and extremely embarrassed,” she said. “I didn’t know where to go from there, because I had always heard of sexual assault, but I never in a million years thought it would happen to me.”

For Marshall, it turned her world upside down. “In his eyes, he did nothing wrong. For me, it not only affected my abroad experience, but it also affected my entire life,” Marshall said. “It changed my college experience, and deeply affected my interactions with people--there was always a sense of fear.” Initially, she was hesitant to report the incident to the school out of concern the process would take too long. It wasn’t until word got around regarding what had happened that she was confronted by a resident advisor and had to decide whether to remain silent or to come forward. “At that point, I was still so upset about what happened and so angry at the fact that he was walking around like nothing happened, that I decided to report it,” Marshall said. Coming forward validated prior suspicions she had concerning her assailant. “I was also confirmed in my decision [to report] when I heard [from classmates] that he had done similar things to girls in the past and gotten away with it,” Marshall said. The choice Marshall made to come forward was not only for her personal well-being but for the well-being of those around her. “I wanted to make sure that he could never sexually assault any girl at Pepperdine ever again,” Marshall said. “This was unacceptable, and I wasn’t going to let him get away with it as he had before.” Marshall’s experience of reporting was more optimistic than some would imagine. “I think Pepperdine did a great job for the most part,” Marshall said. “The people I spoke with were comforting, understanding, trustworthy, and compassionate.” However, it was not without some difficulty. “The only thing I would say that I was disappointed in, is the length of time it took to finish the entire case,” Marshall said. “I understand it was difficult to deal with when I was abroad and the campus is in Malibu, however, the entire length of

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2019 Reports So Far the case took almost five to six months. The five months Marshall spent having to relive her experience time and time again, was not her only disappointment. “While this happened, he was still in the program,” Marshall said. “I felt extremely uncomfortable having classes with him, seeing him around the house, and even seeing him out.” If it were up to her, things would have been different. “I would have liked him to leave the program once this happened, and not get to walk around enjoying the abroad experience like nothing happened, after just sexually assaulting a girl in your program. It just didn’t seem right to me,” Marshall said. The university required him to undergo drug and alcohol counseling, and eventually he was expelled. Marshall decided not to pursue legal action with the police, out of worry it would add more stress to an already stressful situation. In regards to the recent reports of sexual crimes this year, it comes as no surprise to Marshall, and only further confirms her assumptions. “It’s heartbreaking, but I had a feeling that it has been going on my entire four years here,” Marshall said. “I guess now it’s just getting reported more often.” The fact that the #MeToo movement has gained significant traction in the past year could help explain the increase in reports. “I have not measured the impact of the #MeToo Movement on the rate of reporting sexual misconduct at Pepperdine,” Coleman said. “However based on my understanding of the Movement, I consider how it may support dialogue about this critical issue.” She believes there is value in the movement for the University and its students. “These conversations can help to educate our students and the larger community about the impact of sexual misconduct,” Coleman said. “It is my hope that every member of our campus community, local and abroad, will accept responsibility to be a part of the solution to prevent all forms of gender based harm.” Yet, even if students feel more inclined to report, 55 percent

1. Jan 15 - The first report of the semester took place at Alumni park and was one of “forcible rape, including date rape and sexual battery,” according to the report 2. Jan 25 - The second report took place on Jan 14, but was not reported until Jan 15. The incident occurred in a freshman dorm, and was declared “sexual battery.”

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3. Jan 18 - Similarly to the second report, the third took place months before it was reported. Reported on Jan. 28, but taking place on Oct. 10, 2018, was another case of “sexual battery” which occurred in the same freshmen dorm as the second reporter. However, the university has declined to comment if both reports involved the same individual(s). 4. Feb 2 - The fourth report was a case of “sexual battery,” as well as other crimes that occurred in the Seaside Residence Hall. This incident was reported on the same day it occurred. 5. Feb 7 - The fifth report was another incident of “sexual battery” however, it did not take place on the Malibu Campus, but instead on Pepperdine’s Laussane Campus. The incident took place between Jan. 17 and Jan. 24, 2019. 6. Feb 7 - The sixth report was again one on the Lausanne Campus occurring between Oct. 1 and Oct. 31 of 2018. 7. Mar 14 - The final and most recent report occurred on Mar. 14 in the Drescher Apartments. The incident led the university to issue a Timely Warning to the Pepperdine community via email which stated that the matter had been turned over to local law enforcement.

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How to Report Sexual Misconduct The process of reporting was explained by Pepperdine Director of Public Safety Dawn Emrich. According to Emrich, any reported sex crime that poses an ongoing threat, will result in an immediate Department of Public Safety (DPS) response to ensure the safety of the alleged victim and community. If the alleged victim is reporting an incident that does not pose an ongoing threat, every effort will be made to connect the reporting party to the Title IX Coordinator to ensure they are provided interim support and apprised of their reporting options. When a student discloses a possible Title IX complaint to the University, they are informed about reporting options and are provided interim support, like counseling. An investigation of the complaint is immediately initiated and a report is generated. This report is forwarded to the Office of Community Standards for assessment and resolution. Pepperdine Public Safety Location: adjacent CCB (310) 506-4441 Pepperdine Counseling Center Confidential Resource Location: TCC 270 (310) 506-4210 Pepperdine Health Center Location: HC1 (310) 506-4316 LiveSafe App Anonymous reports may be made on the LiveSafe app or by calling the Wave Tip line at 310.506.7634

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said they were unaware of the process of reporting a sexual assault, according the survey by Anastassia Kostin. The university is actively working to ensure students are better informed about sexual assault and improve that process. “Prevention is the university’s priority,” Coleman said. “We actively work to prevent sexual violence and other forms of gender--based harm through prevention education, policy and our coordinated response efforts.” Examples of this include campus-wide trainings, presentations and student programming to educate students about these issues. The Student Health Wellness Advisory Board (SWAB) is a student 2 organization that works to empower their peers with education and resources that combat the issue of sexual violence amongst other areas wellness. The Title IX Prevention Education Committee serves to address campus wide prevention. This committee consists of faculty, staff and students that work collaboratively to create and implement awareness raising, primary prevention efforts and cultivate support. The school has enhanced the prevention education programs to include extended training for our abroad staff. In fall 2019, the Prevention Education Committee will launch the Step Up! To Prevent Gender Based Violence Leadership Program. This program seeks to engender and strengthen the capacity for students to have an in depth understanding on the issues related to Gender Based Harm and Prevention. Students are encouraged to access existing tools like the LiveSafe App to report concerns and participate in prevention efforts like the bystander intervention programs (Step Up!) to enhance the safety of our community and intervene when necessary. Marshall acknowledges that while these recent incidents are devastating, she hopes they will inspire great-

“I never in a million years thought it would happen to me” er change and reduce the stigma surrounding victims of sexual crimes. “It’s scary being in that situation where you feel like you’re the only one who knows what you’re going through, but the fact that there have been recent reports lately, I think in a strange way, allows other women and men feel like they can step up as well and report,” Marshall said. Reporting is something Marshall strongly encourages those who have been a victim of any sexual crime. “The only way to help stop it is to come forward and bring light to this issue that is so widely swept under the rug most of the time,” Marshall said. “It’s challenging and extremely emotional, but you will leave the situation knowing you did the right thing.” While reporting provided Marshall some comfort knowing she and others would be safe, that night, and the pain she endured, can never be entirely forgotten. “Although this happened a few years ago, I still remember every single detail, and I doubt I will ever forget,” Marshall said. “To date, it was the most emotional, and challenging time of my life.” Moving forward, Marshall is hopeful these recent events at the university can lead to greater change within Pepperdine, Malibu, and beyond. “The only thing I can do now is to help others in any way I can and turn a bad situation into a good one.” MM

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ALICIA ADAMS ALPACA

Alicia Adams’ line of 100% baby alpaca clothing and home goods has amassed fans the world over. Now, she’s bringing her coveted, ridiculously soft wares to Malibu. ✎ written by Holly Bieler

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Photography by Julie Wuellner

COZY LUXURY

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Photography by Julie Wuellner

SHOPPING

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RARE FIBER

Alpaca fleece is coveted for its softness, durability and sustainability, not to mention its rareness. There are

only four million alpacas in the world, compared to 250 million cashmere goats. Photo by Tom Moore

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ALICIA ADAMS Tired of upstate New York’s frigid winters, Alicia and her husband Daniel moved their family to Broad Beach in 2018, opening their first West Coast store in the Trancas Country Market in May of this year. Photo by Isak Tiner

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licia and Daniel Adams are not ones for waiting. That’s not to say the husband-and-wife duo behind Alicia Adams Alpaca, the cult-status line of ultra-luxe, 100% baby alpaca clothing and home goods, aren’t patient. Indeed patience is kind of an occupational necessity if you work with alpaca fiber. Wily, coarse and streaked with wiry guard hair when it’s first shorn, a process that doesn’t harm or hurt the animals, turning raw alpaca fleece into an Alicia Adams Alpaca throw or sweater is a ridiculously long, tedious and expensive process, requiring hours of meticulous brushing to rid the fiber of every last coarse strand. But if the Alicia Adams Alpaca process takes a lot longer and costs more than traditional cashmere and alpaca fur processing, the results are more than

Tom Moore

RUSTIC CHIC Adams’ line is timeless and delicate but very durable. Pieces are designed to become heirlooms, passed down through generations.

worth it. Stunningly soft (think cashmere coziness times 10) preternaturally durable and never, ever scratchy, the Alicia Adams Alpaca line has exploded since it was founded in 2009, currently available and routinely selling out in some of the most exclusive department stores and boutiques in the world, from Barneys New York to the Malibu Colony Company. It’s been a whirlwind few years for Alicia and Daniel, who not 15 years ago were business professionals living in Munich who had never seen, let alone heard of, an alpaca. But for the Adams, who recently moved to Broad Beach with their four children and just opened their second brick-and-mortar Alicia Adams Alpaca store in the Trancas Country Market, risk-taking has always been the inclination over sitting back and waiting. “We thought—what’s the worst that could happen?” said Alicia. It was 2005 when Alicia and Daniel, ready for new adven-

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“WE SAID, LET’S JUST DO IT. WHAT’S THE WORST THING THAT COULD HAPPEN?” ture after years in Munich, began looking into different locales for their young family. The Adams had always been fascinated with farm life, and with two young children and a third on the way, began envisioning vineyards in Australia or olive farms in Italy where they might raise their children and make a living off the land. That year Daniel and Alicia decided on a few dream locations and Daniel dispatched on a whirlwind tour, trying to find an ideal location before Alicia gave birth. Landing in New South Wales to scout various vineyards, when serendipity hit. While sitting in the backyard of his rural guesthouse after a vineyard showing, Daniel found himself face-to-face with a family of animals scompletely alien to him. The peculiar creatures looked like llamas, with the same long tufted necks and furrowed, doe-eyed faces, but were much smaller, about the size of great danes. These were alpacas, the homeowners told Daniel, a rare species counting a tiny global population of four million (compared with 250 million cashmere goats) whose coveted fiber produces one of the most luxurious and durable natural materials on the market. Daniel was immediately intrigued by the animals and even moreso as he began researching the alpaca breeding industry, which can prove incredibly lucrative considering the high demand for the animals’ quality fiber, with well-bred males fetching upwards of five figures. That same day Daniel was back

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ALPACAS A cousin of the llama, alpacas look similar to their better-known brethren, with the same sweet nature and furrowed brow, though they’re about two thirds smaller.

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SHOPPING

FAMILY

The Adams’ moved their family, including Alegra (left) and Alana (right), to Broad Beach last year.

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FARM LIFE The Adams’ 80-acre Millbrook, New York farm is home to 200 alpacas. Photo by Isak Tiner

in Munich, where Alicia gave birth to their son, Tassilo. As they cooed over their new baby in the hospital, Alicia inquired after the vineyard scouting trip. “We’re not doing vineyards,” Daniel told her, passing along the latest edition of Alpacas Magazine. “We’re going to breed alpacas.” “My first reaction was: can we talk about this a little later?’” said Alicia with a laugh. “My second reaction was: what’s an alpaca?” After doing some research, however, Alicia was immediately on-board with the idea. “After a few months of figuring everything out we just said, let’s just do it,” she said. “What’s the worst thing that could happen?” Within a year the Adams family had relocated from Munich to the small town of Millbrook in New York’s Hudson Val-

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ley, purchasing an 18th century farmhouse set on 80 acres, which slowly built into a breeding operation starting with 16 alpacas. Daniel began traveling the country showing their alpacas at livestock shows, and was soon commanding high fees for their animals, who had developed a reputation for the superior quality of their fiber As the breeding business grew, the Adams began amassing more and more of their animals’ sumptuous fiber, mostly donating it to local co-ops or selling to local weavers. Soon, however, Alicia became interested in utilizing the wool for themselves. “We were selling these animals, telling everyone how wonderful the fiber is, and Alicia started thinking; why are we storing or giving away all this fiber?” said Daniel. “Why don’t we make something with it for our kids?” Alicia knew exactly what: a tradition-

al children’s Austrian cardigan like she had spent her summers wearing, typically made of felted wool, with big silver buttons down the front. If she fondly remembered her mother wrapping her up in the sweaters for dinner or special occasions, how pretty and colorful the sweaters were, her warm memories came with a big caveat. “They were always so scratchy,” said Alicia. “I hated them so much and my cousins did too, and I said: I promise I’m going to make the soft version of this.” Alicia began sending the fiber out to local mills for processing, a tedious process in which the fiber is carded over and over again to remove as much rough guard hair as possible. However each time she received the fiber back, it still wasn’t soft enough. “It was coming back scratchy and that’s the one thing I never wanted,” she said. “I knew my kids were just not going to wear

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it [if it was scratchy]. And then what would old farmhouse on their Milbrook property cation was a no-brainer. be the point?” into their new office and showroom, where “We’ve always loved Malibu,” said AliFinally, she had the wool where she they began expanding their line and discia. “It’s so beautiful here. Even when it’s wanted it to be, and working with a local tribution, adding items like sweaters and gray, I see the palm trees and they make knitter, produced her first batch of sweatjackets, introducing new designs and colme happy.” And so, in fall of last year, the ers. Her kids were in love with them, as ors, expanding to stores around the world, Adams and their four children moved to were her adult friends, and she quickly and launching a successful e-commerce Broad Beach, immediately falling in love produce more, giving them out as gifts and site. Within a few years they had outgrown with their new home. Witnessing how starting to design. Her sweaters and baby their home office, moving their headquartheir new community came together folbooties became coveted among friends ters to a beautiful old building in downlowing the Woolsey Fire, just months after and family, and after a scoutthey’d moved in, only served ing trip to Peru with her father, to strengthen their feelings . Alicia found a a team of arti“We love this community sans who began creating even and we very much fell in love higher-quality products out of with this whole group of wontheir fiber derful people,” says Alicia. While the Adams had never Now Daniel and Alicia split considered getting into retail, their time between Millbrook, they increasingly began to where their office headquarwarm to the idea after seeing ters are still located, taking the overwhelming reaction of turns to check up on business. friends and family. And so in For the moment, however, 2010 they decided to put their these perennial adventurers fledgling business to the test, say that in Malibu they feel like registering for a spot at the they have found a true home. New York International Gift Impressed with the Trancas Show (now called New York Country Market and its local Now), one of the most importfeel, the Adams were quick to ant trade shows in the country. pick up a vacant retail space “That show was really a on a whim, opening their secmake or break for us,” says ond brick-and-mortar store Daniel. “We obviously thought in Trancas in the spring. In just what we were making was a few weeks the airy, beautiful great, but we said let’s see how store has already become a professional clients, stores and Malibu favorite. Isak designers react to it.” “We quietly opened the TinFROM FARM TO COAST Daniel Adams and his two sons Their selection was ministore without any shebang, er Emilio and Tassilo on Broad Beach Road. Photo by Isak Tiner mal—only a few blankets in without any signage, and the natural colors—and completeresponse has been great from ly new to the world of retail, Alicia still reday one,” said Daniel. calls how anxious she was. Originally planning on returning to New “I was just so nervous,” she said. Howevtown Millbrook, where they opened their York after a year, the Adams have decided er the show proved to be an overwhelming first brick-and-mortar store in 2015. As to stay in Malibu. “Especially after the fire, success, with stores like Barneys New York their business began to grow, however, the watching how everyone came together, we placing orders for items and one of Alicia’s Adams started yearning for adventure once are convinced this is a great place continMM designs, a travel set comprising an alpaca again. Tired of East Coast winters and the ue to raise our kids.” throw and eye-mask, winning the show’s distance between their older children, who Best New Product award. were attending boarding school in SwitzerWithin six months, both Alicia and Danland and Scotland at the time, the Adams Alicia Adams Alpaca iel had dedicated all their energy to Alidecided they wanted to move somewhere 30745 PCH, #16-17 cia Adams Alpaca. Focusing less on their warm, where their whole family could live (310) 457 7944 breeding business, the couple converted an and continue growing the business. The loaliciaadamsalpaca.com

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ART

KANDY LOZANO

ASHES TO ALCHEMY Malibu artist, Kandy Lozano lost her studio and much of her artwork in the Woolsey Fire but instead of letting it keep her down, Lozano sought inspiration from it and now creates beautiful new pieces using ashes and soot from the fire. ✎ written by Michele Willer-Allred

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n her studio on Kanan Road, Malibu resident Kandy Lozano would create beautiful works of art utilizing special, one-of-a-kind tools, paper, and other materials she collected over the past 30 years as an artist. The Woolsey Fire changed all of that, destroying her studio and everything inside of it, including works in progress and completed commissioned works. Lozano was left devastated after losing her beloved studio and belongings, as well as seeing the Malibu community she loved end up losing so much in the fire. The experience inspired her to create a unique collection of paintings, which were shown recently in the “Ashes to Alchemy” exhibit at the art gallery, CANVAS.MALIBU. Jacqueline ‘Jac’ Forbes, owner of CANVAS. MALIBU, curated the collection of Lozano’s artwork, which combines the encaustic painting technique while incorporating ashes and soot from the Woolsey Fire. A portion of the exhibit proceeds went to The Boys and Girls Club of Malibu Emergency Relief Fund. Lozano said the strength of the community’s human spirit was tested following the fire. “I wanted to create a collection that honors the loss and yet, celebrates the renewal of life and the human spirit,” Lozano explained. “Ashes to Alchemy is a resurgence and transformation from the destruction into something beautiful while each piece expresses glimpses of hope.”

KANDY LOZANO “You see potential

and beauty” Lozano says of starting her journey as an encaustic painter.

When she returned to Malibu after the fire, Lozano looked at the ash and pieces left behind and saw something different than most people. “As an artist, you might see something that may look like trash to someone else, but it inspires you. You see potential and beauty,” Lozano said. “I just had this thought to collect it and do something with it and my art.” Lozano collected the ash and soot in mason jars, but had to do so quickly before the rains came following the fire. Adding ash to encaustic paintings is actually something that early artists did when

using the technique, which dates back to early 1st century BC. Encaustic painting involves an intricate process of using heated natural beeswax and dammar resin (crystallized tree sap from Indonesian trees) mixed with colored pigments. Heated metal tools are used to shape or move the wax around, and other tools shape the paint. An accomplished encaustic painter in her own right, Lozano embedded the ash into her paintings, creating a unique coloration and texture with added complexity. All the elements make for beautiful layering, a building of a story, in each of her paintings. At first, Lozano said she found the ash difficult to work, but ended up finding a way to chisel it down fine enough. She found working with the ash very soul-stirring, often pausing to ponder if the ash was once part of a photo, a door, or the remains of a treasured memento. Lozano said the Woolsey Fire completely changed the way she works. She said many people have moved on from the fire, but for those that lost everything, it is sometimes a struggle. But, like many in the Malibu community, she wants to move forward in a positive direction. She plans to continue making more of the paintings, which has helped many to reflect but with something beautiful. “This is a place to go, a way to give MM back,” she said of her work.

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THE I BULIEVE PROJECT

B.U. On Your Stage In the latest installment of husband and wife duo, Jules Williams and Alison Pothier’s ongoing docu-series, I BUlieve we are introduced to Shoshana Kuttner, founder of Malibu Playhouse’ Young Actors Project.

SHOSHANA KUTTNER Since co-founding the Young Actors Project in 2016, Kuttner has produced and directed fifthy projects.

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reading the boards her whole life, wowing audiences with performances as far ranging as Shakespeare’s plays to the titular role of Joan of Arc, Shoshana Kuttner is an actor and founder of Malibu Playhouse’ Young Actors Project. Generously sharing her passion for and belief in the healing power of acting, she co-founded the inspiring non-profit youth organization in 2006. Kuttner has produced, directed and sound-designed an astonishing fifty theatrical productions since

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its inception. Featured in the short-form docuseries, “I BULIEVE”, Kuttner shares her life story and how it shaped her passion, beliefs and philosophy. Speaking to the importance of Malibu and its Playhouse, Kuttner expresses, “I BUlieve in the community we have created here in Malibu and I BUlieve in Malibu Playhouse, the theater that has become a place for the community to grow and to build a family, with each and every class and performance.” A graduate in drama and dance from San Francisco State University with an advanced certificate in classical theater from

Oxford University in the United Kingdom, Kuttner has deep-dived into the study of acting as a conduit to healing our emotional vulnerabilities. Through the Young Actors Project, she helps children and young adults reconcile anxiety, fear and stifled self-expression through acting in film and on stage. Her passion is to help each find their voice and arrive into their lives confident, empowered and fully expressed. Believing in the power of the voice, she says in her narrative, “I BUlieve in the power of the voice … your voice, our voice my voice … and I BUlieve in helping others find their real voice. Not the voice

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I BUlieve Creators we have created to get through the world, but the voice that is connected to you and your authentic self. I BUlieve in physically teaching people to place their open hand on their chest, right next to the heart and find the place that feels the most relaxed and secure. Make a sound on the exhale so that all the tension just melts away. That voice, the one with the least amount of stress, is the one that’s connected to your deepest desires and passions, to your intentions and to your truth.” “I BUlieve we are out of practice in sharing our real voices and that by connecting people to their voices, I am connecting them to their soul, to their true nature and to love. If you lose connection to your voice, you lose connection to you… and connection to love. “I BUlieve that the art form of acting is the practice of being yourself … and knowing that you are enough. I am enough. We are enough.” Kuttner is a much-loved local who has touched numerous lives of the younger generation of Malibu, BUlieving in the Young Actors Project and its ability to send out into the world “embodied children with their own voices, in touch with their capacity for passion and feeling their feelings, equipping them with self-expression, authenticity, healed wounds and open and loving hearts.” In her story, Kuttner shares her love of pastoral Malibu stating that she BUlieves “in nature’s magic as present at Point Dume and in the trail, that leads to its peak” adding, “I BUlieve you can feel the richness of life by standing there and taking a breath in the middle of nature - in the company of Dolphins and Whales.” Kuttner’s closing sentiment brings a smile to viewers as she shares her heart’s intentions, “And finally, I BUlieve in leaving people better than I found them.” To watch current episodes visit MM www.ibulieve.com

ALISON POTHIER

JULES WILLIAMS

Previously a Chief Operating Officer and Managing Director in investment banking, Alison has long worked in the business of Futures and Options. Only now, she works on helping others to redesign and refine their options for the future they dream to experience in this lifetime. As Director of Inside Out Retreats, Alison provides coaching, retreats and consulting to professional and private clients wishing to transform their worlds “from the inside out”. Through her many endeavors, Alison’s passion is to help others to write and rewrite the stories that shape their worlds. Sharing her own story, Alison was featured in the documentary “ChoicePoint” alongside world leading thinkers and visionaries including Richard Branson, Nelson Mandela, Jack Canfield, Barbara Marx Hubbard and others. Collaborating to inspire, Alison films, produces and edits “I BUlieve” alongside her beloved husband.

First conceived by him in 1992 under the name “I Believe”, Jules wanted to create a series about how our lives get framed by our experiences and the beliefs that are borne out of those experiences. From our aspirations to the significant events that impact us, Jules envisioned encapsulating the inspirational life philosophies that are derived from living it. Jules called this our “I Believe”, a statement of the beliefs that derive from our life story expressed through poetic prose. Twenty-five years and two countries later, now readied by his own colorful life experience, Jules, together with his beloved wife Alison, launch “I BUlieve” adding one key ingredient to the mix: the desire to Be You (“BU”) in the world. Recognizing that our lives are not only a reflection of our beliefs, but also the acceptance and celebration of our authenticity, I BUlieve invites you to “B and Believe in U.”

Coach, Writer, Intuitive, Filmmaker, Dreamer

Writer, Director, Producer, Coach, Intuitive

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WELLNESS

THE MATT EDWARDS METHOD

Health for the Mind and Body For model Matt Edwards, achieving peak mental and physical health has been a lifelong passion. Now, Edwards is introducing the world to his surprisingly easy-to-follow yet results-driven regimen. ✎ written by Holly Bieler  photographed by Julie Wuellner

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or 29-year old Matt Edwards, one of the top fit models in L.A., maintaining a perfect body isn’t just a goal; it’s a job requirement. For models like Edwards working in this specialized industry, wherein designers can check the exact fit and drape of a garment before it goes into production, it’s not enough to have perfect measurements come shoot day. Instead, Edwards must maintain a runway-ready physique every single day, with even a halfinch difference between fittings potentially derailing a whole months-long job. What might come as a surprise, then, is the fact that Edwards doesn’t count calories. “That would make me go crazy,” he says with a laugh. Equally surprising is the fact that he doesn’t starve himself— far from it—instead opting for three substantial meals a day. When it comes to gym time, Edwards’ routine doesn’t sound like a typical model’s either—he spends only about 60 minutes

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most metabolically-blessed among us, it’s not. Instead, anyone can adopt and see results from Edwards’ routines, with The Matt Edwards Method. Based on a mission of achieving unparalleled mental and physical health while promoting best anti-aging practices, and all in the most easy-to-follow and simple-to-use way, The Matt Edwards Method is a highly-researched, results-driven regimen formulated for people of all ages and body types to feel and look their absolute best.

CACAO Edwards incorporates nutrient-dense ingreidents like cacao.

working out a day, usually completing low-impact exercises like swimming. If you’re hating Matt Edwards right about now though, you shouldn’t be. Because if a daily routine wherein you eat large, good meals everyday, don’t spend a ton of time killing yourself in the gym and still ultimately end up with a model’s body sounds like a dream only reserved for the

Quiet Time While fine-tuning his method a couple years ago, Edwards put a few friends on the regimen to collect feedback. If the quick and dramatic results surprised many, so too did the element almost everyone reported as their favorite part of the method: Quiet Time, the 10-15 minute block each morning Edwards set aside for grounding the mind. “The quiet time is number one,” Edwards said. “You can be the fittest, best-look-

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ing person in the world. But what’s the point if you’re empty on the inside?”

Diet For Edwards, eating right isn’t about deprivation, but instead getting as much good stuff in your body as possible. “I’m really big on nutrient-dense foods,” he said. “I wanted to make recipes that incorporated the foods that gave you the most bang for your buck.” Edwards consulted with countless natural health and medical doctors over years, and in The Matt Edwards Method has compounded his research and experience into affordable and easy recipes utilizing extremely nutritious, Omega-3 heavy foods packed with a ton of vitamins. Common ingredients in Method recipes include sockeye salmon, avocados and cage-free organic eggs. Each recipe has been meticulously engineered to foster health at every level, especially in the gut.

Exercise While formulating his method, Edwards knew from the onset he wanted a regimen that he could maintain for his whole life. This instantly eliminated the more grueling, high-impact exercises often favored in results-driven workout regimens. “I want to feel good everyday,” said Edwards. “And if I pound an insane workout, there’s a high likelihood I wont be able to go the gym the next day because my body will have to recover. Instead, I want do something just enough so I get all of the results from the increased blood flow, but shut it off in time so I can recover properly and do it the next day.” All of Edwards’ workouts time in at just 60 minutes or less, and comprise low-impact, high-intensity training with minimal wear MM on the body, like swimming.

www.themattedwardsmethod.com medwardsmodel@gmail.com (214) 886-0363

MM

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Jules Williams, Malibuite and co-creator of the “I BUlieve” series, takes us on a journey from Westward Beach to Point Dume Plaza, for a totally new view of one of Malibu’s oldest and most beautiful neighborhoods. 92

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PHOTO STORY

A FLIGHT ABOVE

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CHANGING TIMES The first houses on Point Dume began sprouting up in the 1940s following WWII, and were largely modest and working-class.

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ON THE COAST One of the most expensive real estate markets in Malibu, Point Dume is largely comprised of larger homes, including some of Malibu’s most exclusive ocean-abutting properties.

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PRIVATE PARADISE One of the neighborhood’s most coveted features are the numerous private access points to Little Dume which require a resident key for entry.

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PHOTO STORY

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POINT DUME CLUB Opened in 1970, the Point Dume Club sits right next to the Point Dume Plaza. Many homes offer spectacular ocean views.

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PHOTO STORY

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NATURE

BUTTERFLIES IN MALIBU

PERIL OF THE MONARCHS 20 years ago, tens of thousands of Monarch butterflies migrated through Malibu annually, in 2017 less than 100 were counted. With countless of Painted Lady butterflies currently passing through town, MALIBU MAGAZINE takes a look at what’s going on with the Monarchs. ✎ written by Barbara Burke

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ast year, the City of Malibu joined 400 other municipal entities and announced that July 23, 2018 to July 23, 2019 would be the Year of the Monarch Butterfly, a species that graces Malibu with its presence as it migrates each year. For centuries, Monarchs have captivated people, as evidenced by the fact that European settlers were so awed by them that they named the species “Monarch” in honor of King William III. Unfortunately, Monarchs have experienced an extreme decline in recent decades, so much so, that in June 2019, officials will determine whether to place monarchs on the threatened species list. Monarch butterflies are a kind of milkweed butterfly known for their tiger-like

orange-and-black stripes and their large wingspan. They are larger than the Painted Ladies that recently passed through Malibu as they migrated. Work conducted by Dr. Lincoln Brower, a world-renowned expert in studying Monarch butterflies, and other scholars establishes that the Monarch is the only butterfly known to have a two-way migration pattern, similar to a bird’s. Each fall, millions of Monarchs migrate more than 3,000 miles south from the Canadian border, ending their journey on the California coast, including here in Malibu, or in Mexico’s fir forests, where they rest during a process called overwintering. Young Monarch hatchlings start their lives as Monarch caterpillars and at that stage in their development, they can only feed on milkweed plants. In Spring, after

they emerge as butterflies, they join migrating Monarchs returning north for the summer, and, on their way, they lay eggs on only milkweed plants, which unfortunately are declining due to habitat destruction and climate change. Individual Monarch butterflies do not live through the whole migratory cycle. Instead, the migration is an intergenerational journey - the insects that are born on the route north live for approximately one month and their offspring may also just make a month-long step in the long journey. However, there is a special group of butterflies that live for 8 months and return to Canada. “If you’ve ever looked inside the brain of a butterfly, it’s about the size of a pinhead,” Brower said in a New York Times article in 1990. “And yet the minicomputer inside that pinhead

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NATURE

has all the necessary information to get them to Mexico without having been there before.” Scientists still don’t understand how they do it, but a number of theories have emerged, including butterflies following the sun, leaving chemical markers, or recognizing certain landscapes.

An Alarming Decline in Monarch Populations Although the Monarch’s marvelous migration is mesmerizing, the species’ recent history has been troubled. According to the mayoral declaration, “Monarchs overwintering in coastal California have seen a 95% decrease since the 1980s, and while tens of thousands of Monarch butterflies typically overwintered in Malibu 20 years ago, fewer than 100 were counted in 2017.” Scientists across North America warn that the Monarch butterfly species is in peril. Because the Monarch’s migration spans the United States, Mexico, and Canada, the mayoral pledge to act, as Mali-

bu is participating in, expanded to these countries through new tri-national partnerships in 2017. The California State Legislature has also recognized the Monarch’s threatened status by enacting Assembly Bill 2421 in September, 2018. The legislation aims to address the Monarch’s precarious condition. First, it recognizes that more than one-third of the most promising California winter habitat for Monarch butterflies is on privately-owned land. Second, it establishes a Monarch Butterfly and Pollinator Rescue Program aimed at recovering and sustaining Monarch butterflies and other pollinators. Finally, it permits the State’s Wildlife Conservation Board to provide grants to private landowners, nonprofit organizations and public agencies to help achieve those efforts and allows the Board to provide grant recipients with technical assistance. In the enactment, the legislature said: “Experts estimate that the probability of extinction of migrating Monarch butter-

flies in the western United States is 72 percent over the next 20 years.” In June, the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service will determine whether to categorize the Monarch as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act. In January 2019, the Xerces Society released a call to action for addressing significant declines in the western Monarch population. The Society noted: “The California overwintering population has experienced a 99.4% decline since the 1980s, dropping from a population of 4.5 million (larger than the current population of Los Angeles) to a population of 28,429 as of January 2019 (smaller than the current population of Monterey). The Society noted: “It can be hard to wrap one’s mind around the scope of this decline. For every 160 monarch butterflies there were in the 1980s, there is only one left today. For a different sense of scale, the decline from 4.5 million to 28,429 monarchs is similar to the difference in size between Los Angeles and Monterey.”

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PAINTED LADY BUTTERFLIES All Spring Malibu and surrounding areas have seen thousands upon thousands of Painted Lady butterflies migrating through the area.

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What Went Wrong? Monarch butterflies face a variety of threats, including loss of breeding and overwintering habitat, effects of climate change, pesticides, and disease, according to the state legislation. Kian Schulman, RN, MSN, Director of Poison Free Malibu, an advocacy group fighting against the use of Monsanto’s Roundup and other pesticides to combat pests, explains that “The catastrophic decline of Monarch butterflies has been driven in large part by the widespread planting of genetically engineered crops in the Midwest, where most Monarchs hatch. The vast majority of genetically engineered crops are made to be resistant to Monsanto’s RoundUp, a potent killer of milkweed, the Monarch caterpillar’s only food source.” The dramatic surge in Roundup/glyphosate use and “Roundup Ready” crops has virtually wiped out milkweed plants in Midwestern corn and soybean fields, Schulman noted. It is estimated that in the past 20 years, these once-common butterflies may have lost more than 165 million acres of habitat — an area about the size of Texas — due to pesticides and loss of breeding grounds.” Pepperdine University Biology Professor Stephen Davis concurred with Poison Free Malibu’s analysis. “There’s a very solid study in the journal Ecography published in 2017 that links the decline in Monarchs with glyphosate use as well as climate change in agricultural areas of the Midwest,” He said.

Plans for the Future Malibu Methodist Church is revamping its labyrinthian garden so that it will have milkweed plants that nurture the migratory butterflies. “Planting the milkweed garden can help to defend the Monarchs against extinction and that will help make for a better Malibu and a better world.” Pastor Sandy Liddell said. Malibu resident, Suzanne Guldimann explained the project to Malibu Magazine. “This is a very special project for me. One

How Can I Help Monarchs? Plant Your Own Butterfly Garden You can help Monarchs by planting nature Malibu plants in your garden such as Milkweed, Deerweed, Arroyo Lupine, Yarrow, White Sage and Black Sage.

Become Involved In The Malibu Monarch Project The Malibu Monarch Project is a local advocacy group that provides information and supports residents wanting to help Monarchs.

Plant California Sunflowers Planting native California sunflowers can help Monarchs by providing a source of energy for the adult species.

Stop Using Pesticides Garden organically to minimize your impact on Monarchs, their food source and other pollinators.

of my first feature assignments for the Malibu Surfside News back in 2007 was on labyrinths in Malibu,” Guldimann said. “The labyrinth garden has become a little overgrown, but it’s still beautiful. When the City of Malibu announced the Year of the Butterfly, I thought how perfect it would be for a butterfly garden,” Guldimann said. “I approached Patt Healy at the Malibu Monarch Project and Rev. Liddell at the Church and they were enthused about the project, which includes restoring the labyrinth, and adding milkweed and other nectar plants for the butterflies.” Guldimann also noted “The garden at the church is already a flower-filled haven for birds, butterflies and anyone seeking peace and beauty. The goal is to enhance the existing labyrinth garden area with the milkweed that essential for the Monarch butterflies, and nectar plants for all pollinators.” The planting party for the new butterfly garden occurred on May 11. The recent super blooms in Malibu also may help the Monarchs, according to Dr. Stephen Davis, a plant biology professor at Pepperdine University. “The large burn areas of the Woolsey fire have exceptional postfire super blooms resulting from exceptional rain this last winter,” Dr. Davis said. “There is an increased milkweed abundance due to the invasion of exotic milkweed, which is considered a “weed” in Southern California that supplement native milkweeds.” That there are more milkweed plants in Malibu after the fire sounds positive and may lead people to wonder whether something good actually come out of the Woolsey Fire. Unfortunately, not all milkweed is created equal in the context of Monarchs surviving to adulthood. Entomologists continue to evaluate various milkweed species’ effect on Monarch butterflies’ ability to grow to adulthood. Armed with local and state legislative bodies recognizing how pivotal it is for the Monarch butterflies to revive and thrive, many Malibuites are committed to ensuring MM that their habitats are restored.

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Should I Get My Dog A Rattlesnake Vaccine? ✎ written by Arielle Eckerman  photographed by Julie Wuellner Now that the sun is starting to come out Zuma won‘t be the only place where you’ll find sunbathers. As the season changes and temperatures warm up, snakes come out from their hiding places to bask in the sun. Snakes are cold-blooded and can’t control their body heat on their own, which is why on a hot summers day you’ll see them moving between shade and sun-exposed areas. While we need to be careful out on the trail and walking through brush, it is important to remember that our furry friends are also at a high risk of a snake bite. There are more options to help us protect our dogs from snake bites than ever before. While the best option against snake bites is avoidance, the rattlesnake vaccination functions as an additional defense if your pet does happen to get bitten. However, even if vaccinated, the pet still needs to be seen for emergency care. The rattlesnake vaccine functions as a

stimulant to the dog’s immune system, causing it to create antibodies against rattlesnake venom. The concept is that the antibodies already created in a vaccinated dogs body will work towards neutralizing the venom when bitten. Ideally, the patient will have less permanent damage from the bite, experience less pain, and give the patient a larger time window to reach medical care which is crucial if a dog is on a hike or doesn’t live near an emergency clinic. The rattlesnake vaccine is a great option for many dogs that spend a lot of time outdoors and have frequent possible exposure to rattlesnakes. However, if your dog has an autoimmune disorder, is suffering from an illness, or has ever had a vaccine reaction, it might not be the right choice. Consulting with your veterinarian about your dog’s health and lifestyle will help determine if the rattlesnake vaccine is the right choice for your dog.

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PETS

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HOME+ DESIGN

SPECIAL

From acclaimed interior designers to architects, flooring specialists, luxury home theater installations and much more, we bring you all the best resources for your home projects - no matter how big or small.

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HOME + DESIGN SPECIAL

WHITE’S MERCANTILE

FROM NASHVILLE WITH LOVE In just a few short years, country singer and entrepreneur Holly Williams’ line of meticulously-curated general stores have developed a cult-following. With her new Malibu outpost of White’s Mercantile now open in the Malibu Country Mart, the first on the west coast, Williams is taking her southern charm national. ✎ written by Holly Bieler  photography via Holly Williams

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rowing up, Holly Williams always had an unusual dream career. Or, at least, part of it was unusual. “I remember in high school telling my counselor: I want to make music, and I want to be an interior designer,” Williams said. Aspirations of the former weren’t exactly rare in Nashville, with such a rich music scene and history people often call it Music City, U.S.A. Coming from Williams, however, this pie-in-the-sky dream sounded

MALIBU LOCATION The Malibu

Country Mart location of White’s Mercantile has already developed a loyal following since opening in May.

just a little less far-fetched. The daughter of legendary country star Hank Williams Jr. and granddaughter of Hank Williams, one of the most significant songwriters of the 20th century, Williams hails from one of the most famous country music families in history. From an early age it became clear her bloodline’s considerable talents had also been passed along to her. Obsessed with poetry from the time she could read, by 9 years old Williams already had a folder filled with song lyrics, and soon began showing an aptitude for piano and guitar. By high school Williams was writing and performing her own music in front of

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HOME Born and raised in

Nashville, Holly Williams still makes her home in the Tennessee capital with her family.

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White’s Mercantile Locations: Nashville, TN Franklin, TN Wilson, AK Charleston, SC Louisville, KY Malibu, CA New Orleans, LA

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HOME + DESIGN SPECIAL

“I WAS REALLY INSPIRED BY [MY GRANDPARENTS’] INTERIORS WHEN I WAS YOUNGER.”

MALIBU STORE

Williams’ first West Coast store opened in the Malibu Country Mart in early May.

friends and any Nashville venue that would let her on stage. When her father finally heard her perform for the first time, a composition about the recent death of his best friend, he confirmed to his daughter what had become increasingly obvious to those around her: “You’ve got the real thing,” he said. But while her musical inclinations weren’t a surprise, the interior design thing, on the other hand—that was a little out of left field. “My mom had good taste but she didn’t love design,” Williams said. “In no way did I grow up going to furniture stores and learning about wallpaper.” She had, however, grown up visiting the home of her maternal grandparents June and Warren White, not as famous as her celebrity paternal counterparts, perhaps, but ultimately of no less inspiration to the young Williams. She remembers how magical every room in the Warren’s house felt, shelves brimming with beautiful antiques deftly intermixed with unique modern and contemporary pieces. “I was really inspired by their interiors when I was younger,” Williams said. “There wasn’t really one style. It wasn’t all modern or all shabby chic or all antiques. It was such a perfect mix of a few family heirloom pieces, a few modern pieces, a few antiques. Just anything that spoke to their heart.”

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MOMMY TIME Holly Williams has three children with her husband, musician Chris Coleman.

FIXER-UPPER Holly Williams has bought and renovated nearly 10 homes across the south.

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Fast forward a few years later and incredulous college counselors, not to mention Williams herself, might be surprised to see how deftly she’s juggled her disparate passions. A celebrated singer-songwriter with three critically-acclaimed albums under her belt, Williams’ lyrical, genre-fusing ballads have made her one of the most popular young voices in the country sphere today. At the same time Williams has quietly become a leading figure in the new generation of Southern design. The founder of White’s Mercantile (named after June and Warren), a rapidly-expanding collection of shops rendered in the tradition of a traditional Southern general store, Williams’ beautifully-appointed storefronts and meticulously-curated inventory, mixing high and low, old Southern antiques with new local artisans, have inspired a contemporary Southern aesthetic all their own. Featuring everything from food to clothing to home goods, in just a few short years Williams’ jewel box shops have gained a cult following, and now count 8 locations, including a new store in the Malibu Country Mart, with plans to open more in the next couple years. Which is not to say that living your dream is easy. The mother of three young children, Williams is the first to admit that turning a passion into a profession is hard, let alone two. However she knows no other way. “God gave me the type of personality, where I’m very much a risk-taker,” she said. “I don’t know if I’m crazy or smart. I haven’t figured that part out yet. But I do take risks.” Indeed risks are the reason Holly Williams is where she is. After graduating high school at 18, Williams immediately began pursuing music full-time, eschewing college in favor of a cross-country roadtrip to test out her talents. Armed with an acoustic guitar and a beat-up copy of On the Road, Williams jumped in her mom’s Suburban and set out across the U.S., jumping on stage at every hole-in-the-wall venue and open mic she could find. If her friends and family were skeptical ,and traveling young

and alone could undoubtedly be tough, Williams couldn’t have been happier. “It was a really important experience to me culturally I think,” she said. “Young people will put out an album and go straight into massive fame; tour buses and jets and arenas. Which is awesome. But you don’t really get to see the world that way. I got to do such incredible traveling, and really experience life through that.” Hard-scrabble anonymity did not last long, however. Within a few years Williams had begun drawing the attention of stars like like Sheryl Crowe and Keith Urban, and was soon opening massive arena shows

“I GOT TO DO SUCH INCREDIBLE TRAVELING, AND EXPERIENCE LIFE THROUGH THAT.” around the country while quietly working on a debut album. Released in 2004 by Universal South Records, The Ones We Never Knew drew rave reviews and strong sales, further catapulting Williams’ career. However as Williams star was starting to grow, tragedy hit. While driving with her sister Hilary on an unlit Mississippi road, Haley hit a small patch of gravel, losing control of the car before it flipped into a ravine. “All I remember is screaming bloody murder and almost telling myself, you need to shut down,” Williams said. Hilary was pronounced dead at the scene before she was ultimately revived by EMTs, and for the next few days her condition was touch-and-go. When she finally stabilized, doctors let her family know she was facing a long and brutal road to rehabilitation: she wouldn’t be out of the hospital in less than a year, and having broken nearly every

bone in her body, would need to relearn all of her basic physical functions, including walking. And while Holly had fared far better than her sister, sustaining just a broken arm and wrist, the injuries were severe enough doctors couldn’t say with certainty she would every play music again. Just a few days earlier, Holly had been scheduled to embark on a massive German tour. However facing her injuries and her sister’s frightening prognosis, Williams realized she needed to reconsider her career in muic. “I remember telling my mom, ‘I need a plan B’,” said Williams. “I can’t go to Europe and leave ya’ll to take care of her. And then I just decided, kind out literally of the blue one day: I want to try to open a clothing store.” While Williams had never worked in retail before, a clothing store, in many ways, seemed like an obvious choice. Entrepreneurship ran in her family as well, with her grandfather Hank Williams, and his wife, Audrey, opening Nashville’s first retail clothing store in 1951. And when Williams surveyed the current state of retail in her home city, it seemed things hadn’t much changed since. If you were looking for country club formalwear or a dress for church, Nashville had plenty of options, as it did stores catering to college students. Shoppers looking for anything in between, however, were generally out of luck, especially when it came to contemporary brands like Rag & Bone and J. Brand that Williams had been exposed to and come to favor during her tours. After working on a business plan for a year and a half, Williams opened her store in downtown Nashville in 2009, naming it H. Audrey after her her first initial and her grandmother’s name. The store proved a huge success, drawing shoppers across Tennesee in its first year. It wasn’t long before Williams had fully caught the retail bug, and just a couple years later was onto her next project. “I had this crazy idea where I wanted to open,

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FAMILY TIME Williams

with her husband and daughters Stella and Lillie.

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a small-town feel.” Locations in Louisville, store, perusing the shelves of small-batch what I call now, a general store for the modKentucky and Charleston, South Carolina condiments and rows of books, rifling ern day tastemaker,” Williams said. “It just soon followed, before opening her New through bins of knickknacks to the lilt of kind of popped in my head. I was like I’m Orleans and Malibu shops in May of this country music always on shuffle. For Wiltoo busy to go to the paper store and the year. dog store and the gift shop and all these difliams, this first west coast store epitomizes Throughout expansion, Williams has ferent places. And from being on the road what White’s Mercantile is about: casual ensured that each White’s Mercantile shop all the time I had the chance to discover so luxury, not taking yourself too seriously, retain the community feel at the core of its many wonderful lines. I was really passionand finding a little piece of home in an osmission. Each location is involved in local ate about trying to bring everything I loved tensibly very different place. charity efforts, and 20% of each store’s in into one place.” “The first time I went to the Country Williams took as inspiraMart I remember thinking tion the old Southern genthis is incredible,” she said. eral stores she had grown “I saw a horse walk by and I up hearing about, often the was like, there’s a horse? It heart of small towns, where felt like the South did in certain ways—very warm and neighbors gathered to chat welcoming.” and picked up their necessities. With a goal of opening 10 “I really wanted to caplocations of White’s Merture the old American gencantile by next year, Wileral store,” she said. “I love liams is getting close to seenothing more than when ing her vision fully realized. some 85 year old comes in Not that that’ll mean down and says, ‘This reminds me time. Currently at work on a of the general store in my fourth album, scheduled to hometown.’” begin recording this FebruWhen it opened in 2013 ary, and with a burgeoning out of a renovated Nashville side business renovating gas station, White’s Mercandilapidated farmhouses tile was an instant success, and cabins across the South, drawing tons of daily visithere is truly no rest for IN THE STUDIO White still carves out time to write music while tors and soon an obsessive Williams. As long as she can juggling her various businesses. She’s set to record her fourth Instagram following. pursue her passions, howalbum early next year. “It became bigger than ever, every last one of them, anything I had expected,” she’s not complaining. Williams said. “Our Insta“Expanding this brand gram numbers started growing rapidly, ventory is locally-sourced. In the Malibu that I am so crazy about can be extremely customers were coming in from all over, shop, a light-filled space in the Country overwhelming and nerve-wracking,” said and I started dreaming about this one-stop Mart, expect to find local goods such as Williams. “But my love for White’s and my shop growing far past Nashville.” Simple Nature candles made right here in amazing team are the magic. I do believe A second Nashville location soon folMalibu and copies of Malibu Farm Cookthat if you are passionate about something, MM lowed, and then another in Wilson, Arkanbook. This in addition to the store’s own you do it.” inventory, a dizzying, meticulously-curatsas. Galvanized by their success, Williams began mapping out a future for White’s ed collection of specialty foods, beauty and Mercantile much larger than she had imaggrooming products, exquisite home wares White’s Mercantile ined at first, identifying 6 more locations and a small but thoughtful selection of 3835 Cross Creek Rd., #37 for future stores. “I just based it off towns men’s and women’s clothing from brands @whitesmercantile I liked to hang out in,” she said. “I wanted like Agolde and Mason du Soir. One could www.whitesmercantile.com places that had a sense of community, and get lost roaming the surprisingly expansive (310) 317-4750

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THE TEAM Principals Karen Arri-LeCron and James LeCron work with their contracting partner Bob Niesner (right) from the onset of design, ensuring plans stay within budget.

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ARRI / LECRON ARCHITECTS, INC. LEGACY CONSTRUCTION & DEVELOPMENT

FIRERESISTANT HOMES IN ANY STYLE

Pioneers in the science of fire-resistant construction, Arri/LeCron Architects, Inc. has an unparalleled reputation for delivering dream houses large and small, on-budget, that don’t burn. ✎ written by Holly Bieler

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hile the constant threat of wildfire has always been a somber reality of living in California, the historic devastation inflicted across the state over the last two years has, for some residents, finally led to a reckoning. From 2017’s Tubbs Fire in Sonoma County to last year’s devastating Camp and Woolsey fires, which left scores dead and thousands without homes, residents of hard-hit communities like Malibu are increasingly beginning to ask a heartbreaking but seemingly necessary question: if you live in a high-burn area like Malibu,

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Four-Hour Test with GigaCrete Arri/LeCron Architects works with cutting-edge techniques and materials to create their trademark fire-resistant homes. One of the latest advances in fire-resistant technology is a steel-frame system called GigaCrete that has proven to be extremely strong and durable. The test belows shows a GigaCrete panel withstanding a temperature of 1,700 degrees for hours.

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“WE STARTED THINKING, THERE’S GOT TO BE A BETTER WAY OF BUILDING.”

how much sense does it make to rebuild a some of the most jaw-droppingly beautiful home you know will eventually burn again? 10-15,000 square foot estates in California For clients of Santa Barbara based archiand Hawaii, they remain firmly committed tecture firm Arri/LeCron Architects, howto delivering whatever kind of dream home ever, having to choose between leaving a client might have in mind. your community or living with the con“We had a client in Malibu recently ask, stant fear of losing your home, is a thing ‘would you do something at 1,500 sq. ft.?” of the past. Among the foremost experts Karen said. “That’s what we do. We don’t in fire-resistant design and construction, just do big homes. It’s really about creating husband-and-wife duo Karen Arri-LeCron dreams for people.” and James LeCron, both licensed architects, The firm’s adherence to budgets is also have been designing fire-resistant homes a major selling-point for re-builders. If it’s for 30 years, building evannoying for anyone builderything from small bungaing a home when a project lows to large estates that can ultimately goes over-budwithstand direct fire contact get, a common occurrence with nary a scratch. during the construction For Karen and James, bephase, late added costs can ing able to build fire-resisbe ruinous for families retant homes is the culminabuilding, who are often tion of a fascination with, relying on a fixed amount and passion for, fire-resisfrom insurance for most if tant techniques developed not all of their construction early in their career. Just a costs. few years after graduating One way Arri/LeCron architecture school with a Architect is able to consisBA & Master’s Degree from tently deliver quality projUC Berkeley, Karen was ects within budget is by designing a home in Oakupending the standard deland when 1991’s Tunnel Fire sign/construction process. roared through the Oakland While most design firms Hills. begin working with conCUTTING-EDGE TECHNOLOGY Arri/Lecron Architects has been building fire-resistant homes for thirty years. “People died trying to tractors only once plans are get out and so many homes nearly or completely finalwere lost,” Karen said. “So we ized, Karen and James have started thinking, there has got to be a better from Malibu to Northern California to their streamlined the process, enlisting their way of building that can prevent this.” hometown of Santa Barbara since founding long term relationship with Bob Niesner, a They began researching the then-fledgtheir firm some three decades ago, Kar40-year industry veteran and president of ling science of fire-resistant home design, en and James offer a wealth of knowledge Malibu/Westlake-based Legacy Constructesting out materials, attending conferand experience navigating all of the unique tion & Development, Inc., from the onset ences and researching all the ways a home’s challenges intrinsic to the rebuilding proof design. This enables James and Karen design could help blunt the impact of fire. cess, from permitting to dealing with into truly design within a budget, discussing “It’s all about using the proper materials surance claims. With home designs that with Bob how much certain elements will and design techniques,” said James. “We use have survived the Tea Fire, Jesusita Fire, and cost in real-time, and ultimately ensuring several construction systems that are very the Thomas Fire, Arri/LeCron Architects’ they design the best house they can build good for fire-prone areas.” reputation for building in a vast array of within that budget. Their fire-resistant expertise is just one of styles and sizes is another reason they have “We’re getting his input of what things we the reasons people facing a rebuilding projbecome one of the top design firms in L.A. can change, what things we can do to keep ect have turned to Arri / LeCron Architects While luxury residences are what Karen the cost down for construction,” Karen over the years. Having worked with families and James are known for, with a portfolio of said. “If an owner says look, we have to stay

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“WE DON’T JUST DO BIG HOMES. IT’S REALLY ABOUT CREATING DREAMS FOR PEOPLE.”

within this price range, I’ll be the bad guy that says [to Karen and James] let’s simplify this, let’s use a different product here, so we are staying within their budget,” added Niesner. Ultimately, whether a client is building their first home or rebuilding after tragedy, every project is about delivering a family’s dream. “We try to take it as an opportunity [when families lose their homes],” said Karen. “It’s a tragedy to lose your house, but a lot of people are looking at it as, ‘it’s time to build my dream house.’ And we strive to make that dream come true.” For many of their clients, especially ones who lost their homes, this dream involves the peace of mind of knowing your home won’t burn again. Indeed, Karen and James say they are working with clients in Malibu who are now looking at fire-resistant techniques after loosing their home or witnessing the damage to their community during Woolsey. To achieve this, Karen, James and Bob rely on years worth of work researching and implementing fire-resistant design techniques as well as a deep grasp of many cutting edge fire-resistant materials and how to use them. This is still rare in Southern California, where the majority of designers and architects work exclusively with wood, instead of the new cutting-edge framing and siding

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STYLE Arri/LeCron Architects, Inc. has developed a reputation for working in a varierty of styles and sizes, from modest bungalows to large luxury estates.

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materials which have shown to be fire-reearthquake, the wall consistently did not sistant. break. Instead, as testers ramped up the “It doesn’t make sense,” said Bob. “It’s a weight and pressure the equipment was no-brainer. Everyone should be doing this. exerting, their $300,000 testing machine But I do think that, surprisingly, Southern ultimately broke, while the wall remained California is a little slow on jumping on this intact. For James and Karen, this doesn’t new technology.” come as a surprise. Having built homes in He pointed to a recent high-cost resinatural emergency-prone areas across the dential project he worked on in Pacific Paliworld utilizing the GigaCrete system, and sades. While discussing materials, his client Arri/LeCron’’s tried and true techniques, fell in love with the idea of using GigaCrete, they have seen just how strong these homes an incredibly durable building system that are. “We have a project in Haiti that we did relies on steel frames, a proprietary plaster that has survived three hurricanes and an and EPS foam (a system ofearthquake,” James said. “It ten utilized by Arri/LeCron was the only building left Architects). standing.” Eventually, however, the Arri/LeCron Architects client’s architecture firm fire-resistant homes have convinced the owner to also shown to be more enmove forward with wood ergy-efficient and insulatinstead, as the architect ed than traditional woodwas uncomfortable working frame homes. One client with a material he’d never said his new 10,000 sq. ft. used before. home uses less energy than “A lot of contractors say, his previous 3,000 sq. ft. ‘This is what I do, I know wood-frame one did. Dohow to work with wood,’ and ing away with traditional they get sort of entrenched,” wood-frame construction said James. also eradicates many of the Not Arri/LeCron Archiproblems that invariably tects, who have been utilizarise when working with ing, researching and buildwood, including termites, ing, fire-resistant homes mold, and wood-eating EXPERIENCE James, Bob and Karen count decades of experience and a vast array of projects between them. for 30 years, making them fungi. among the preeminent ex“The United States is one perts and builders of fire-reof the few countries in the sistant homes. They have worked with Legen, James and Bob, building a home with world that still builds with wood framing,” acy Construction to build a 10,000 sq. ft. GigaCrete almost always costs exactly the said James. MM home in L.A. using the GigaCrete system, same as building with wood. and have used it all over California, Hawaii, There are many ways a fire- resistant and worldwide. They have found the benhome from Arri/LeCron Architects will imARRI / LECRON ARCHITECTS, INC. efits to building this way are tremendous. mediately feel different from your standard 109 Oliver Rd. GigaCrete, for example, is made of comwood home, however. Energy efficiency, Santa Barbara (805) 966-4034 pletely non-toxic materials custom-fabrisound suppressing characteristics, as well www.arrilecron.com cated, per design plans, in a factory in Las as the strength and durability of materials Vegas, allowing them to produce homes in makes them not only fire-resistant, but able LEGACY CONSTRUCTION & any style and size and which look completeto stand up to almost any range of natural DEVELOPMENT ly identical to their wood-framed coundisasters. In recent lab tests conduced on 31364 Via Colinas, Ste. 105 terparts, but are extremely fire resistant. a GigaCrete wall, in which a machine exWestlake Village Another major advantage is the price. For erted weight on the side, top and bottom (818) 874-0049 experts in fire-resistant materials, like Karof a wall in conditions meant to mimic an www.buildwithlegacy.com

“WE HAVE A PROJECT IN HAITI THAT SURVIVED THREE HURRICANES AND AN EARTHQUAKE.”

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BURDGE & ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS

A NEW OPTION Malibu’s hometown architect has a new project underway to get Woolsey families back on their property much quicker and cheaper than they could have imagined.

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n the months since the Woolsey Fire destroyed more than 400 homes in Malibu, architect Doug Burdge, a decades-long Malibuite and principal of acclaimed Malibu design firm Burdge & Associates Architects,

has been leading efforts to help arm his community with information and services during the complicated rebuilding process, through his platform Re-Bu (Rebuild Malibu). After talking with countless families rebuilding their homes over the last

few months, it became clear their temporary housing situation was becoming another source of anxiety and frustration for many residents. As a result, Burdge has introduced an option to help get his community back home a little earlier, with a new system made entirely out of shipping containers. “With everything going on post-fire, we knew that people would begin looking into alternative building methods so they could get back into their homes quicker,” Burdge said. “Traditional custom building can take a lot of time and natural resources to complete. My team is always looking for ways to be innovative and resourceful in a culture that can be everything but. When a client approached us about rebuilding after the Woolsey fire with shipping containers, we responded, ‘Why not? Sounds awesome!’” Less costly and time-consum-

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Rendering: MGI Designs

ing than traditional construction, shipping-container dwellings also provide flexibility; units can be mix-and-matched like legos, producing everything from a small bungalow to a traditional 3,000 square foot home with a two-car garage. Burdge’s new project comes at a time when many rebuilding families in Malibu, facing sky-high rents in the area which insurance oftentimes won’t cover for the duration of constuction, are looking for ways to complete the rebuilding process more efficiently. “This gives people an option to get on their property as soon as possible,” said Burdge. “You’re still paying your mortgage, you’re still paying for displacement costs.” Burdge said shipping containers could also present an option to the many homeowners who want to stay on their Malibu

properties but, underinsured, can’t afford to rebuild their homes as they were before. “Maybe now you can’t afford to rebuild what you had,” said Burdge. “People can take these units as an opportunity to say, “I was ready to move out of Malibu,’ but this presents a whole other [option].” Hoping to provide even more cost and time-effective options for Malibu families, Burdge has recently partnered with a leading prefab company on a line of units specially designed for Malibu. Details of their collaboration will be released later this summer. MM

Burdge & Associates Architects 24911 PCH (310) 456-5905 www.buaia.com

REBUILD Burdge is working to get Malibu families back on their properties quicker.

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VIBES ”My style is always a mix of patterned textiles and textures combined with color moments ranging from black to forrest green, and almost always a frequent use of white.”

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Q&A WITH AMBER LEWIS

A Local Designer to Watch For Malibu-born interior designer Amber Lewis, a continuing source of inspiration is the laidback aesthetic of her hometown community.

HOMEGROWN DESIGN Lewis has amassed a dedicated client-base with her casual but elegant designs.

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principal at Calabasas’ Amber Interior Design, Lewis has also opened two home interiors stores, Shoppe Amber Interiors in Calabasas and the Pacific Palisades.

How did you get into interior design? Whether it was doing art, or making collages, or rearranging my room, I was always busy finding ways to create beauty. Both my parents happen to be really creative as well, and they encouraged us kids to use our artistic imaginations. When I was younger I remember being genuinely curious about construction and design. My dad is a contractor, and I don’t think I have ever lived in a house that wasn’t under some type of renovation. It was awesome to see the bones of a house and it allowed me to have a very unique perspective about homes in general. My mom is the craftiest lady I know, and if I wasn’t coloring or drawing, we were making sock puppets, or pressing flowers. My path

to be in a creative field was inevitable. Fast forward years later, with that background in mind and several wacky jobs in between (i.e. jewelry designer assistant, pillow sewer, event planner, florist, etc.), I started working for an interior designer in Malibu. I became literally obsessed with design and decor, and after spending some time working there, she so very kindly nudged me to branch out on my own. I took a few courses at an interior design extension class, dropped out, and the rest is history!

How would you describe your style? In my opinion there isn’t really a word to describe it all. My style and general vibe is pretty laid back. It’s always a mix of patterned textiles and textures combined with color moments ranging from black to forrest green, and almost always a frequent use of white. I am a collector of vintage pieces and a flea market junky, so I mix at least 5 unique and one-of-a-kind elements into every single project. It’s earthy, it’s sub-

tly moody, and hopefully above all, it’s approachable!

You’re from Malibu. How does your home community’s aesthetic factor into your work? Malibu is one of the most beautiful places on earth and such a special place to me. The community of Malibu raised my brother, sister, and me, and I will forever consider Malibu my “home.” I gotta say though, I generally just have a real thing for all of California!! I mean, this place, and the colors, textures, weather, and vibe inspire me every day. Do you have a favorite step in the design process? Honestly no, because I love all of the things! Picking every tiny little detail, from the curve of an arch, to the pleat of a drape, I am in! I think it’s taking the time to pay attention to these little pieces of the puzzle that makes a home so special, and defines what myself and my firm do so MM well. It’s all about the DEETS!

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EUROPEAN STYLE ”My style is often described as having a contemporary twist with a European touch, along with casual comfort.”

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Q&A WITH MALGOSIA MIDGAL

The New Designer In Town

Interior designer Malgosia Migdal, owner of the Beverly Hills firm Malgosia Migdal Design, has developed a reputation for bold, timeless interiors that epitomize L.A. chic. Now she’s opening an office right here in Malibu.

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hile still a student at UCLA, Malgosia Migdal received her very first commission, and soon thereafter founded her eponymous firm Malgosia Midgal Design. In the 20 years since, Midgal has helmed a range of projects, from spas to large residential homes, imbuing every interior with her trademark sophistication and contemporary eye. We sat down with Migdal to hear more about her background and new office right here in Malibu. How did you first get into interior design? I grew up in Poland and, for as long as I can remember, I’ve always had a passion for design. When I was a small child, I vividly remember cutting and sewing my parents’ brand new drapery. When they found me out, they were torn between shock, upset, and pride as they witnessed how focused I was on my creation. I then began cutting pieces of paper in the shape of houses and hanging them in my newly redesigned drapery. Fast forward to adulthood, I moved to America and studied at the UCLA

and received my degree in Environmental Interior Architecture and Design. When did you found your own firm, Malgosia Migdal Design? While I was still a student at UCLA I received my first interior design job. At that moment, MMD came to life and I’ve been working for myself ever since. A few years after graduating from UCLA, I received my certificate from the National Council for Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ) – becoming a nationally recognized and certified interior designer. Over the last 20+ years, my projects have run the spectrum of large scale, ground-up construction of residential projects to smaller scale residential restoration, to personal yachts as well as hospitality design to spa venues, to commercial real estate offices – even dabbled in places of worship. Each project with their own unique design tailored to the client’s needs and with a mix of my personal aesthetic. Almost every piece in my projects are customized to ensure that the vision comes to fruition. How would you describe your aesthetic? Born in Poland, my style is often described as having a contemporary twist with a European touch, along with casual comfort. It

has been said that my discerning eye seamlessly blends both traditional and comfortable elegance with contemporary undertones, resulting in spaces that are tailored, luxurious and livable. I’ve heard testaments that my fresh, yet timeless, design aesthetic has made me a very sought-after design professional. These statements, coupled with a bit of edginess that is unique in my design style, is why clients come back to me time and time again. It is an honor and I can’t imagine doing anything else. You recently opened a second office in Malibu. Why was it important for you to serve your hometown now? After the devastation that my neighbors and friends endured from the fires, I felt it was my duty and obligation to put my talent and passion to work in my own community. It is vital that we come together in the wake of natural disasters. This is the true path to resilience and sustainability – helping others however we can with our resources and our MM compassion. Malgosia Migdal Design 29160 Heathercliff Rd., #415 Phone: (310) 432-7131 www.malgosiadesign.com

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FLEETWOOD Agoura Sash & Door features products from brands such as Fleetwood Windows & Doors, pictured here.

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AGOURA SASH & DOOR

GREATER L.A.’S WINDOW AND DOOR EXPERT For more than three decades, Agoura Sash & Door has been the go-to source for high-quality doors, windows and hardware. ✎ written by Holly Bieler

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ore than three decades ago brothers Dan and Don Smith, owners of a popular Agoura finish carpentry company named Smith Bros., were facing a conundrum in their industry; there were few dependable suppliers in the area of high-quality doors, windows and other materials. And so in 1984 Dan and Don endeavored to fill that void, opening a small showroom in Agoura focused on providing quality materials, with a specialty in doors and windows. Named Agoura Sash & Door, the Smith’s storefront began as a small showroom with only a few employees (including Dan and Don’s mother, Shirley), almost

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HOME + DESIGN SPECIAL

“OUR EXPERIENCED SALES CONSULTANTS KNOW THE INDUSTRY — MANY WERE CONTRACTORS THEMSELVES.”

exclusively directed towards builders ments to small individual homes, and and contractors. However in the three with customers ranging from experidecades since they opened their modenced contractors to first-time homeest storefront, Agoura Sash & Door has owners, Agoura Sash & Door’s staff has grown rapidly to become one of the amassed a reputation and countless most trusted and reliable names in happy customers with their vast experthe industry. Now housed in a 20,000 tise and dedication to each client’s projsquare foot Westlake Village store, and ect. offering some of the top suppliers in “We had referrals from contractor the industry, from Fleetwood and Marand developer friends to other winvin to Emtek and Baldwin, Agoura Sash dow guys, but Tim Davis at Agoura Sash & Door is the first place homeowners, and Door was by the far the most bencontractors, builders and eficial,” reads one recent designers from across Los review from Agoura Sash Angeles come for top-of& Door customer George. the-line windows, doors “We owe tons of savings and hardware at unbeatthrough intelligent adable, price-direct rates. vice, wisdom and honesIf much has changed in ty. He helped us pick out the 35 years since Dan and the perfect combination Don first opened their of products so the house store, one thing has relooks fantastic and we mained the same: a dedisaved money.” cation to providing a vast And while Dan and Don array of the highest-qualSmith’s dedication to ity doors, windows and customer service has rehardware on the market. mained true to the heart Indeed their Westlake Vilof the company over the lage showroom is one of years, it’s clear some the largest design showthings have changed rooms in the Southern since 1984. California area, boasting a One is price. Now one FAMILY AFFAIR Brothers Dan and Don Smith founded Agoura Sash & Door in 1984. 12,000 square foot showof the biggest suppliers room of windows, doors in the area, Agoura Sash and hardware from the & Door’s high sales voltop names in the industry. This allows agement team,” said General Manager ume has earned them incredible buytheir customers to interact with and Kerry Smith. “Our experienced sales ing power with the top brands, allowing fully experience firsthand a product beconsultants know the industry — many them to provide the most in-demand fore they install it in their home. were contractors themselves — and thus products to customers at some of the And if a 12,000 square foot showcan help educate the customer on the lowest rates in the industry. MM room sounds intimidating, don’t worbest solution for their project.” ry: Agoura Sash & Door has amassed a Indeed if competitive pricing and a talented, dedicated team of sales and limitless array of top-of-the-line, nameAGOURA SASH & DOOR management staff to assist at every step brand products are a few of the reasons 2301 Townsgate Rd., Westlake Villlage Phone: (805) 449-2840 of the way, from answering detailed for Agoura Sash & Door’s continued www.agourasash.com product questions to working with budsuccess, another is the experience and gets to helping plan out every window, helpfulness of its all-star team. Boasting door and fixture in a home, to assisting decades of experience and a wealth of with installations. “Our strength comes knowledge from working on everything from our experienced sales and manfrom large-scale multi-home develop-

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HOME + DESIGN

CONEJO HARDWOODS

THE ULTIMATE HOME UPGRADE Merging the massive inventory and array of services of a major chain with the customer service of a mom and pop, Conejo Hardwoods offers clients the best of both worlds. ✎ written by Holly Bieler

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onejo Hardbuilders across Southern California, the woods is one customer-focused ethos upon which the of the most escompany was founded remains. teemed players “Basically, we are always trying to do right in the luxury by the customer,” said Roth Johnson, presihardwoods indent of Conejo Harwoods. “That’s what our dustry today, business model is. Treat customers well, with a city-wide reputation for their vast and make sure [they are] completely satcatalogue of quality, luxury products from isfied. When people walk into their house, hardwood flooring to ipe decking to exotwe want them to be blown away by what ic and rare live edge wood they see.” slabs. Established nearly Achieving Conejo Hard40 years ago by Malibu-ite woods’ legendary customJohn Johnson, Conejo er satisfaction begins with Hardwoods was founded an intimate understandupon a mission of providing of both the industry ing a truly unparalleled and of their customers. customer experience for Their beautiful Westevery client, at every step. lake Village showroom is Much has changed in the stocked with a thoughtdecades since for Conejo ful, vast array of the most Hardwoods, which opin-demand materials for erates out of a stunning PRESIDENT any project, from indoor Company Westlake Village show- president Roth Johnson. hardwood floors in a wide room, where they offer an range of styles to an exexpansive catalogue of products, with over tensive inventory of decking, many made 200,000 square feet of the industry’s most from the famously durable wood ipe, the premium wood in stock. However if Conewood used in the decking at Malibu restaujo Hardwoods is now the gold standard in rant Nobu, as well as many other homes in wood purveyors for contractors and home Malibu. Products also includes windows

and doors from top luxury brands and Malibu favorites like LaCantina Doors and Western Window Systems. Don’t let the quality or wide array of their inventory fool you, however; pricing at Conejo Hardwoods is as surprisingly and consistently reasonable as when it was founded. This means cutting the mark-ups other L.A. showrooms impose. Luxury wood flooring selling for $15/square foot in other showrooms can often be found at Conejo Hardwoods for half the price. Conejo Hardwoods also keeps most products in-stock, meaning much quicker turnaround times and no re-stocking fees when customers order too much product, a common occurrence on building projects. “[Malibu and Valley] residents don’t throw their money away,” said Johnson. Born and raised in Malibu, Roth knows how important a good deal is to even the most exclusive local customers. “We deal with very smart consumers. And that’s the market we’ve developed around.” MM

Conejo Hardwoods 31275 La Baya Dr., Westlake Village (818) 889-0487 conejohardwoods.com

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CUSTOMER SATISFACTION Conejo Hardwoods was founded on a comitment to customer satisfation, an ethos which remains today. Industry-low prices and quality products have kept customers coming back for decades.

OPTIONS Conejo Hardwoods offers a vast catalogue of hardwoods in every style.

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HOME + DESIGN SPECIAL

GLOSTER FURNITURE

REFINED ELEGANCE

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amed for its resemblance to the shifting sands of the desert, the Dune collection combines soft lines and repeating patterns in an outdoor seating concept and a collection of new knitted fabrics designed by Sebastian Herkner. The designer’s initial inspiration for his first collection with Gloster was the scenario of having a good time with friends on the terrace enjoying a cocktail and nice conversation in amazing comfort. Softness and spontaneity are big parameters of the collection, with the requirement for both scale and flexibility defining the need for all classic seating elements to be included – Lounge Chair,

Ottoman, 2-Seater Sofa and 3-Seater Sofa. Herkner worked directly with Glen Raven and Sunbrella to develop a range of new 3D knitted fabrics especially for Dune that integrate deep dimensions and stretch with an understated aesthetic and incredible performance. The Wave, Dot, Ravel and Tuck fabrics have been designed in a soft knitted construction that embraces and supports for a comfortable and cozy seating experience. The upholstered seat cushion, quilted blankets and scatter cushions are arranged within an aluminum frame with a teak base. Sebastian Herkner was awarded the prestigious Maison & Objet 2019 Designer of the Year award in Paris. At only 37, the German designer is working with

the world’s most innovative international design houses. His love for traditional craftsmanship aligned him perfectly with Gloster– a furniture maker whose self-professed sole focus is to design and build the MM world’s best outdoor furniture.

WEST HOLLYWOOD

GLOSTER LOS ANGELES STUDIO

471 N. Robertson Blvd. gloster.com

DUNE COLLECTION Gloster’s latest collection boasts new kinitted fabrics designed by Sebastian Herkner.

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RESTAURANTS HOME + DESIGN SPECIAL

HOME THEATERS BAM can make virtually any residential tech dream a reality, including luxurious inside and outside home theaters.

BAM LUXURY AUDIO-VIDEO-CINEMA In just a few short years, BAM Luxury Audio-Video-Cinema has emerged as the industry leader in luxury residential tech.

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or the discerning L.A. customerlooking to outfit their homes in the most cutting-edge luxury residential technology available, there is no choice but BAM Luxury Audio-Video-Cinema. Take a look at some of the most spectacular homes in Los Angeles, from Beverly Hills to Malibu, and chances are you’ll find BAM’s signature suite of groundbreaking technologies keeping everything running smoothly, from the outdoor cameras to the in-home movie theater. Indeed, BAM’s limitless cadre of services means their exclusive clientele often entrust BAM with outfitting their entire estate with the newest technology — from multi-acre, cutting-edge sound systems to vast security apparatuses to in-

door and outdoor movie theaters that can instantly stream films the day they open in theaters. “We have assembled a world class team of the most innovative, in-house engineers, programmers and technicians that have shattered the glass ceiling in the field of luxury home technology,” said Christina Makowsky. “Bringing science and art together, creating a seamless revolutionary experience for our clients, with laser focus on attention to detail, has made us unparalleled.” “The James Bond world is real,” said System Designer John Alfano. “We make our clients’ dreams become a reality in a simple and reliable way, while offering limitless possibilities.” This, along with crafts-

manship and cutting-edge technology, is another of BAM’s trademarks: incredible reliability and simplicity. BAM utilizes only the most user-friendly, uncomplicated interfaces on the market today, ensuring even the most tech-challenged client can control their systems with ease. This is a game changer for the luxury home technology field, where oftentimes clients are left with complicated systems they have no idea how to use. “Our goal is resolute,” said BAM Founder and Owner Rich Makowsky. “To provide our clients with an overwhelmingly positive experience at every step, from design and execution to our 24/7 white glove service. And I can say with confidence: we MM do!”

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We believe that great design and execution involves many factors including trust, communication, teamwork, and years of industry experience. Our goal is to deliver a finished product that exceeds your expectations. Let us make your dreams into reality.

"The idea is not to live forever, but to create something that will" - Andy Warhol 818-642-8099 | factordesigninc.com | info@factordesigninc.com

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GETAWAYS

A WEEKEND IN... SAN DIEGO There’s no better time of year to get away for the weekend and discover all that San Diego has to offer. From wild animals and stunning coastlines to the historic Old Town and acclaimed restaurants, San Diego is sure to impress. ✎ written by Julie Wuellner

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SAN DIEGO

Photo courtesy sandiego.org BALBOA PARK San Diego’s Balboa Park area is home to countless gardens, walking paths, museums and theatres.

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renched in sunshine year round and just three hours down the coast, San Diego is a fun and easy weekend getaway for Malibuites. With its many distinct lively neighborhoods and laid-back beach towns, San Diego County is sure to have something for everyone whether you’re going with the whole family, planning a romantic getaway with your significant other or wanting to hit the town with the girls. If you’re interested in a cultural and historical taste of San Diego, head to Old Town, the sight of the first spanish settlement in California. With it’s plethora of heritage tours, museums, art galleries and restaurants Old Town is the perfect stop for any history buff. From Old Town, walk over to Heritage Country Park, an eightacre park developed to preserve San Diego’s historic Victorian architecture. If you’re traveling with kids, spend a day

at the San Diego Zoo and Safari Park. The zoo, located close to Balboa Park is one of the largest in the world, housing 3,700 animals. However, perhaps, even more impressive is the San Diego Safari Park, about 30 miles outside of downtown. The Safari park functions as a non-profit, specializing in species-preservation and breeding. Once there, you can book one of the various safari tours to visit the animals up close and personal in their large freerange enclosures, home to animals from Europe, Asia and Africa. Head to La Jolla for the best of San Diego County’s beautiful and vastly different coastline. Everywhere you look, La Jolla’s beaches boast dramatic cliffs, hiddden coves and seals lounging on the nearby rocks. The area is best explored via kayak or paddle board and you can even go snorkeling through the clear (but cold) waters of La Jolla’s underwater park to check out

colorful fish swimming by the reef. Heading into downtown you can explore Little Italy, housing some of San Diego’s best dining options and coffee shops as well as the Mercato Farmer’s Market every Saturday. The vibrant market features a seemingly endless array of vendors giving out samples of farm-fresh produce and local artisan foods. Of course, don’t forget about Balboa Park brimming with museums, shops and beautiful spanish architecture and gardens. We recommend checking out the spanish village art center which serves as a community hub for hundreds of local painters, sculptors, jewelry makers, glass artists and everything in between. If you’re planning a trip to San Diego in the near future we’ve put together together the perfect San Diego county getaway itinerary with something in mind for everyone.

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Photo courtesy of Lisa Field via sandiego.org SPANISH VILLAGE Tour the colorful hub for artists of all kinds.

Photo courtesy sandiego.org AXEVENTURES Try your hand at the ancient art of axe throwing. JUNIPER + IVY Try one of the restaurants inventive dishes.

FRIDAY 11 AM - AXE THROWING

To start out your trip to San Diego, why not try something that is completely different from your normal tourist activity? Located in the heart of San Diego’s North Park AveVentures offers an entertaining, unique and somewhat adventurous start to your trip. Not sure what axe throwing entails? Picture a game of darts, except a lot more extreme. For those of us not well versed in the ancient art of axe throwing, AxeVentures has a knowledgeable staff of coaches who can set anyone on their axe throwing ways in no time. While it may sound like a somewhat bizarre activity we guarantee it to be a fun, memorable experience.

2:30 PM - ATYPICAL WAFFLE CO.

After spending the first part of the trip throwing axes, sit back, relax and eat some delicious waffles at Atypical Waffle Co. (formerly Wow Wow Waffle), also located in North Park. The converted garage combined location combined with its unexpected options in liege waffles make for a fun and quirky lunch destination. We recommend the nutella chocolate lovers waffle with nutella, strawberries, whip and chocolate drizzle if you’re in the mood for sweet and the number seven with smoked brown sugar’d bacon, avocado and goat cheese if you prefer savory. 6 PM - BALBOA PARK + GASLAMP DISTRICT

Next, we recommend exploring Balboa Park and the neighboring Gaslamp

district. Both are iconic for San Diego and offer visitors entirely different views of the city. If you’re feeling up for it, we recommend going on the Ghosts of the Gaslamp Tour. Whether or not you’ll see a ghost is debatable, but the tours are fun and you’re guaranteed to learn an interesting fact or two about the area. 8 PM - JUNIPER + IVY

After you’re done exploring the gaslamp district head to Juniper and Ivy, one of San Diego’s most refined and creative restaurants guranteed to be nothing short of fantastic. Opened by Top Chef: All Stars winner Richard Blaise, the restaurant features inventive dishes such as Tuna Wellington with Sauce Au Poivre, Duxelle, Butterball Potatoes and Black Russian Kale and the Carne Cruda Asada with quail egg, cotija and Jalapeno. We highly recommend starting your meal with a delicious buttermilk biscuit which comes with smoked salt and strawberry jam.

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Photo courtesy Melanie Stocker via sandiego.org PADDLE OUT Rent a kayak in to paddle out and view La Jolla’s many caves -- you might even spot a seal or two.

SATURDAY 8 AM - COFFEE

Get your morning coffee fix at one of San Diego’s most beloved coffee shops, James Coffee Co. Located in Little Italy, the coffee shop offers all kinds of espresso based beverages made from in-house roasted beans as well as freshly made pastries. Favorites include latte with honey cinnamon and their almond croissants 10 AM - LITTLE ITALY FARMER’S MARKET

Sample an endless array of foods from over 200 vendors. If you’re interested you can also book the Little Italy Walking Tour with Wine Tasting for an informative tour which includes 12 tastings.

NOON - LUNCH

8 PM - UNDERWATER PARK

If you’re still hungry after walking around the Farmer’s Market, grab lunch at The Crack Shack (also located in Little Italy). Don’t let the name fool you, the small eatery is from Mike Rosen and Richard Blaise had so many patrons flock to its doors that it was forced to temporarily close its doors. Now, open once again the fast-casual restaurants serves various forms of gourmet fried chicken. We recommend the Senor Croque with crispy chicken, bacon, fried egg, miso-maple butter on toasted brioche.

No San Diego trip is complete without making it out on the water and one of the best places to do so is the 600-acre La Jolla Underwater Park. Whether you paddle board, kayak or even snorkel you are sure to be amazed by the beautiful, clear water showcasing a large variety of underwater life, such as bright orange garibaldi and playful seals which like to hangout on the nearby cliffs. Since the beach is protected by the reefs, the water is relatively calm and flat, making for a perfect place to paddle out and explore.

2 PM - SCRIPPS BEACH

10 PM - HEAD TO A BREWERY

After morning in Little Italy, make the drive down to beautiful La Jolla and head over to Scripps Beach, one of San Diego County’s most iconic and beautiful beaches. From there, walk over to the pier. While it isn’t open to the public, its still worth to go check out.

For dinner, head to one of San Diego’s 150 + breweries. We recommend Stone Brewing Co., a San Diego staple. The craft brewery is one of the largest in the United States and consistently brews unique and delicious beers. For dinner we suggest the slow roasted Brisket Grilled Cheese.

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FLORAL INFUSION Try Rancho Bernardo’s newest spa package.

EGGS BENEDICT Indulge in a delicious Sunday breakfast.

SUNDAY 10 AM - LAZY BREAKFAST

Take Sunday morning off and have breakfast at your hotel. If you’re staying at Rancho Bernardo Inn (page 158) we recommend heading to Verando Fireside Lounge & Restaurant for their Eggs Benedict and Jump Start smoothie. 12:15 - HEAD TO THE SPA

After breakfast, continue your relaxing morning with a trip to the spa. Try Rancho Bernardo Inn’s new Floral Infusion Spa Package for the perfect blend of relaxation and rejuvination. To start the treatment off you’ll head into the chef’s garden with your spa therapist to gather fresh seasonal herbs and flowers which will be used to create your own custom scrub. Your spa therapist will then make you an organic tea with some of the

GIRAFFE’S GALLORE Go on Safari at San Diego’s Safari Park.

herbs gathered, followed by giving you a relaxing massage using your custom scrub. After your treatment is done, any leftover herbs will be mixed into a second scrub for you to take home with you. 12:30 PM - ORGANIC LUNCH

Continue the feel-good vibes with a healthy, organic lunch at Goodonya Organic Eatery. Opened by former U.S. Olympic athlete Kristen Buchanan, the casual lunch spot is focused on healthy, whole foods made from 100% non-gmo and organic (also local when possible) ingredients. The atmosphere is friendly and extremely down-to-earth. The eatery offers a wide array of food from re-vamped brunch favorites to salads, sandwiches to burritos and salads as well as oh-so-trendy bone broth soups. We highly recommend that no matter what you order, you get the Golden Milk Latte to go along with it.

1:30 PM - SAFARI PARK

Finally, before heading home, experience the San Diego Safari Park. The park is home to thousands of different animals and is focused on species-preservation and breeding. What makes the Safari Park unique is that rather than keeping animals is individual exhibits, the majority of species live in one of the parks numerous large free-range enclosures. Visitors are encourage to book a safari tour, which takes them directly into the exhibit to experience the animals up close and personal. If you have time, we also recommend going to see the Shiley’s Cheetah Run to experience first hand the impressive 70 mph speeds a cheetah can reach. If you’re feeling up for it, you can also go on the jungle ropes safari to experience the park from the tree tops.

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SAN DIEGO Where To Stay HOTEL DEL CORONADO For an iconic San Diego experience, stay at the Hotel

Del Coronado on Coronado Island. The sprawling 28-acre resort offers everything from a charming victorian building, to contemporary ocean towers, California cabana buildings and a luxurious beach village so that there is a room to suite the style of any guest. In your downtime, you can partake in surf camps, luxurious spa retreats or go shopping at The Del, their collection of specialty shops.

More Time? TAKE THE KIDS TO LEGOLAND

Just 30 minutes north of San Diego, LEGOLAND California is sure to be a hit with the kids. The park houses more than 60 rides, shows and attractions for kids ages 2-12. This spring, kids can even go behind-the-scenes of a live movie set at The LEGO Movie 2 Experience and experience the LEGO soundstage as well as LEGO models as seen in the 3D movie. A ROMANTIC DINNER

For a romantic dinner, make a reservation at Herringbone where you dine in the company of 100-year olive trees and watch your food be prepared in their open-concept kitchen. The restaurant specializes in delicious ocean-to-table seafood and if you really want to splurge we recommend trying to chef’s tasting menu.

OLD TOWN INN If you’re looking for a nice but still affordable option, we

recommend staying at the Old Town Inn. The Spanish-style inn dates back to 1945 and is family-run, pet-friendly and conveniently located close to both Old Town and SeaWorld. It offers a beautiful courtyard with a heated pool and pool-side BBQ perfect for hanging out and relaxing after a day of sightseeing. There is also an arcade and game room for kids and complimentary breakfast in the mornings. The staff is friendly, the rooms are clean and the grounds are lush and well-kept.

OLD TOWN & HERITAGE COUNTRY PARK

Home to California’s first settlement, San Diego’s Old Town is chalked full of art and culture. The charming spanish-style neighborhood is perfect if you want to take a stroll, visit a gallery and learn about the cities history. Right next door, you’ll find Heritage Country Park, an eight-acre county park dedicated to preserving San Diego’s Victorian architecture. There you can view Victorian styles such as Italianate, Queen Anne, classic revival styles and Stick-Eastlake. WATCH A GAME AT PETCO PARK

If you can stomach watching a team other than the Dodgers, go see a game at Petco Park, home to the San Diego Padres. Petco park is centrally located in San Diego’s downtown offering impressive views of San Diego’s cityscape while watching the game. Not into Baseball? On June 22, Paul McCartney will be performing there.

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YOUR IDEAS

PROTECTED HERE We are one of the premier law firms that specialize in representing individuals and businesses in patent, trademark and copyright matters all over the world. Recognized by SuperLawyers, our firm represents clients ranging from startups to some of the largest corporations in the world. We have filed over a thousand patent, copyright and trademark applications, and have handled lawsuits in all of those areas as well. Our firm’s repuation is built on providing pragmatic advice to all our clients and we welcome the opportunity to do the same for you. five full stars on yelp.com (855) IDEA BANK or (855) 433-2226 www.OmniLegalGroup.com

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#1 TEAM IN SAN DIEGO SINCE 2008

RSF Covenant $39,000,000

RSF Covenant $17,995,000

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Del Mar Ocean Front $9,995,000

The Catherine & Jason Barry Team — Barry Estates With more than $3.5 billion in sales, the Catherine and Jason Barry team have developed a global reputation as the top real estate agents for San Diego’s luxury marketplace. Integrity, professionalism, and expertise are key reasons Catherine Barry, Jason Barry, Ryan McGovern, and Kendra Gibilisco are sought out by the most discerning families and titans of industry. Collectively, they have facilitated some of the most expensive home sales of all time in San Diego’s most prominent communities. For 2019, the highest sale to date in all Catherine Barry, Jason Barry, Ryan McGovern, Kendra Gibilisco | The Catherine & Jason Barry Team — Barry Estates

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OVER $3.5 BILLION IN SALES

Ryan McGovern, Catherine Barry, Jason Barry, and Kendra Gibilisco

La Jolla Farms $8,995,000

RSF Covenant $3,995,000

Carlsbad $29,950,000

The Catherine & Jason Barry Team — Barry Estates of San Diego is 1802 Ocean Front in Del Mar listed at $19,900,000; Jason represented the buy and the seller. The team’s benchmark sales have generated global recognition and The Wall Street Journal ranks the group amongst the top 100 performing teams annually, consistently #1 in San Diego. To achieve this requires unyielding tenacity for creativity and thoughtful consideration in all matters, which results in successful sales transactions and happy clients whom become friends. Catherine, Jason, Ryan and Kendra are so proud to push San Diego as a city they are blessed to call home. “We live what we believe, we sell what we believe. It’s all about chasing the dream and we have fun doing it!” 6024 Paseo Delicias, Suite A, Rancho Santa Fe | 858.756.4024 | CatherineandJasonBarry.com

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SAN DIEGO COUNTY

A STAY AT RANCHO BERNARDO INN

✎ written by Julie Wuellner  photographed by Kevin McDonald 158 MALIBU MAGAZINE

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The quintessential California golf resort and spa, Rancho Bernardo Inn is a perfect getaway for Malibuites looking for a relaxing weekend.

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ocated in quintessential North County San Diego about 30 minutes from downtown San Diego, hidden behind a residential neighborhood, lies the idyllic Rancho Bernardo Inn. More luxurious resort than traditional inn, Rancho Bernardo Inn sits on 265 acres and boasts an 18-hole championship golf course, four restaurants and cafĂŠs, three pools, tennis courts, a fitness center, and an acclaimed, full-service spa. With its Spanish terra cotta style roofs and cream exterior buildings amidst sun-drenched landscaping and lush greenery, the inn perfectly encapsulates Southern California charm. Should you choose to

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RELAXATION MM Editor, Julie Wuellner enjoys Rancho Bernardo Inn’s peaceful atmosphere.

stay in one of the inn’s 287 guest rooms and suites, you are sure to be rewarded with a view of either unhurried golfers making their rounds across the vibrant greens or the peaceful inn gardens filled with blooming flowers and birds chirping the day away. Rooms are elegantly designed with cream and olive-green interiors and are outfitted with flat-screen TV’s and, if you’re lucky, a cozy fireplace. Dogs (under 30 lbs) are invited to come along and will even be welcomed with a

personalized Rancho Bernardo Inn dog bowl and treats. For guests in the mood for relaxation, there could hardly be a better destination than Rancho Bernardo Inn. Play a leisurely round of golf, grab a bite to eat overlooking the course, and then take a stroll down the romantically lantern-lit walkway to the resort’s acclaimed spa to book one of their expertly put together spa packages. New to the line-up and highly recommendable is the luxurious Floral

Infusion spa package, which starts you off in the chef’s garden with your spa therapist to gather flowers and herbs (think: lavender, lemon balm, peppermint and chamomile among many others) to be made into first a soothing herbal tea for you to enjoy and then a scrub to be used in your massage. Which flowers and herbs you pick will depend on what you are wanting to get out of your spa experience (options include relief from ailments such as stress, anxiety, headaches, and trouble

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SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Whether you want to play a round of golf, relax by the pool or enjoy a great meal, Rancho Bernardo Inn has something for everyone.

VERANDA FIRESIDE LOUNGE & RESTAURANT For a casual, yet delicious meal head to Veranda Fireside Lounge & Restaurant. There you can enjoy locally-sourced fare while overlooking the inn’s champhionship golf course.

sleeping). Massages are performed in small private cottages amidst the inn’s gardens to the peaceful sounds of chirping birds and trickling water from nearby fountains. At the end of your treatment any remaining herbs will be made into an additional scrub that is sent with you to enjoy at home. Beyond getting to experience the spa itself, booking a package allows you access to the Cyprus-lined adults-only pool where you can sunbathe to your heart’s

content and enjoy pool-side plates and cocktails in your own private cabana. A fruity and delicious summer specialty is the poolside Frosé which can be ordered directly from your lounge chair. And when the day starts to wind down and you’ve had enough of playing golf and lounging by the pool, you can head to dinner at one of Rancho Bernardo Inn’s two sit-down restaurants headed by Corporate Executive chef Ron Fougeray and Sous Chef Chris Gentile. If the cham-

pionship golf course and the exceptional spa are two highlights, Rancho Bernardo Inn’s dining options are sure to be a third. For a vibrant, creative contemporary southern California menu, head to AVANT. “As far as AVANT, the focus is local, fresh and creative. We have a plentiful supply of produce and seafood here in SoCal and we utilize this as much as possible,” Fougeray said. The restaurant aims to bring bright flavors from the sea, farm, and garden onto patron’s plates along with inventive artisan cocktails and locally-brewed beers. If you’re in the mood for a more exclusive and extravagant dinner, AVANT’s Table 65 offers small groups of up to 12 a private cooking demonstration by AVANT’s chefs in an intimate setting. For Mediterranean with a twist of classic Californian, head to Veranda Fireside Lounge & Restaurant. The beautiful al fresco setting overlooks the golf course

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SAN DIEGO COUNTY

RON FOUGERAY Executive Chef Ron Fougeray prepares a dish out of his tasting menu at AVANT’s Table 65’s private cooking demo.

LOCALLY SOURCED INGREDIENTS Many of the ingredients used at the restaurants come from the property chef’s garden.

and while it’s guaranteed to be beautiful all day long, it’s hard to beat in the early evenings when soft sun rays shine through the patio and drench the dining room in that warm golden light California is so well known for. Similarly to AVANT, Veranda Fireside Lounge & Restaurant focuses its menu on locally sourced ingredients for more casual meals and cocktails. “We pride ourselves on our culinary offerings, with many ingredients sourced right on [the] property from our organic garden. Rancho Bernardo Inn’s talented chefs work with a designated gardening expert to produce a variety of produce, herbs, and fruits that are incorporated into the dishes served throughout the property,” Lemon said. Dishes and cocktails change seasonally at both restaurants, with many of the fresh ingredients coming directly from the Inn’s garden. “When I am on [the] property, walking to the garden to see what I’m going to cook for the day, I tend to get lost in the beauty of the nature that surrounds the proper-

ty. I want every single guest who dines at AVANT to see the beauty of the amazing fruits and vegetables we grow right here on the property.” Sous Chef Chris Gentile said. “Great produce doesn’t need a lot of manipulation and I try to keep that in mind when making a dish.” After dinner, experience Rancho Bernardo Inn’s new fireside s’mores and wine tasting with Rancho Bernardo Inn’s Fireside Connoisseur for a laidback, funfilled evening with friends or a cozy, romantic experience cuddled up by the fireplace with your significant other. And no, these are not your average s’mores — rather these are artisan s’mores, with each ingredient handcrafted by Rancho Bernardo Inn’s executive pastry chef Margaret Nolan Carvallo. Whether you’re looking for a relaxing spa getaway with the girls, a golf trip with the guys or a memorable weekend with your significant other, we recommend heading to San Diego to experience Rancho Bernardo Inn for the quintessential MM Southern California experience.

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AGES 3 months - 6 years

Where Friendships are Nurtured and Education is Fun Accepting Applications Now

(310) 456-6573 • www.ganmalibu.com Serving the Malibu community for close to 20 yrs 2017 & 2018 recipient of the Malibu Choice award for best Preschool

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PRESCHOOLS, K-5

THE SYCAMORE SCHOOL

The Sycamore School in Malibu will be launching its new independent middle school, Catalyst: A Learning Hub, in Agoura Hills this September. The independent schools, for those grades 6-8, will be located on the campus of the Gateway Foursquare Church off Agoura Road. It will feature three school buildings surrounded by trees, grass, and flora, which also serve as outdoor learning spaces. The Sycamore School’s curriculum is rooted in collaboration, innovation, and learning through play and creativity; Catalyst will be based on the same foundational belief that education must be humanized for the 21st century. UNDER THE OAKS

photo courtesy of SMMUSD

Students at Webster Elementary with vegetables from their classroom garden.

SANTA MONICA-MALIBU UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Sustainable Plans For the Future ✎ written by Michele Willer-Allred

Imagine a school where students are served healthy, nutritious, and locally-grown foods at lunchtime, and take classes in non-toxic, energy-efficient rooms on a campus using clean, renewable energy. Sounds idyllic, and that is exactly what’s envisioned for local public schools. The SMMUSSD recently approved a district-wide sustainability plan that will take affect at campuses throughout Malibu and Santa Monica, including at Malibu High School. The plan, approved at a regular school board meeting on March 21, 2019, had been in development for more than a year, and aligns multiple sustainable efforts that date back to 2010. For instance, the district is already replacing all existing lighting throughout schools and offices with LED lighting, which is expected to reduce energy consumption by 20 to 30 percent in the upcoming years. Right now, the district has solar on all nine of its elementary schools, and tracks and reports all energy usage, savings, and solar performance at every school. The district is also participating in the Cash for Kitchens Program offered by the West Basin Municipal Water District, which services Malibu. The plan is to coordinate installation of water savings devices in the Malibu food service facilities by the start of the 2019 school academic year, reducing water consumption by an estimated 623,055 gallons per year. Carey Upton, the district’s chief operations officer, said some of the recommended strategies are achievable with the resources the district already has. Some will need additional funding and support, including through grants. “The (sustainability plan) is a very exciting piece,” Upton said. “And, I think as a district moving towards being more sustainablesets us on a course to be what we’ve always wanted to be.”

Calabasas’ MUSE School will soon be bringing its mission of sustainability education statewide. The private school plans to offer franchises in the state of California to offer sustainability education for young children. “The original MUSE School is located in Calabasas, and we regularly attract students and families that choose to drive a surprising distance,” said Rebecca Amis, cofounder and chief innovation officer of MUSE Global. OUR LADY OF MALIBU

The school has been partnering this year with local wellness center Roots & Wings for a “Whole School, Whole Child” program, designed to assist the school at all levels utilizing a number of evidence-based models, including positive pyschology, transformational parenting, and mindfulness. Parents have been meeting weekly, and specialists have been on-hand during school hours to work with students on skills, such as stress reduction and bullying prevention. POINT DUME ELEMENTARY/JUAN CABRILLO

A name and mascot for the new combined elementary school is yet to be determined, but SMMUSD Superintendent Ben Drati said that the merger of both schools on the Point Dume campus is well under way. As many as ten portable classrooms being placed on the campus and other improvements being made before classes begin on August 22.

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CONGRATULATIONS TO VIEWPOINT SCHOOL’S 134 SENIORS IN THE CLASS OF 2019 FOR THEIR ACCEPTANCES TO OUTSTANDING COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES.

The University of Alabama • AMDA College and Conservatory of the Performing Arts • American University • The American University of Paris • Arizona State University • The University of Arizona • Aurora University • Babson College • Bard College • Baylor University • Bentley University • Boston College • Boston University • Bradley University • Brigham Young University • Brigham Young University, Idaho • University of British Columbia • Brown University • Butler University • California College of the Arts (San Francisco) • California Lutheran University • California State Polytechnic University Pomona • California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo • California State University, Chico • California State University, East Bay • California State University, Fresno • California State University, Fullerton • California State University, Northridge • California State University, Sacramento • California State University, San Bernardino • University of California, Berkeley • University of California, Davis • University of California, Irvine • University of California, Los Angeles • University of California, Riverside • University of California, San Diego • University of California, Santa Barbara • University of California, Santa Cruz • College of the Canyons • Carnegie Mellon University • Case Western Reserve University • Chapman University • University of Chicago • Claremont McKenna College • Clark University • Colby College • University of Colorado at Boulder • Colorado College • Colorado State University • Columbia College Chicago • Columbia University • Concordia University - Irvine • University of Connecticut • Cornell University • University of Dayton • Denison University • University of Denver • DePaul University • Dickinson College • Drexel University • Duke University • Durham University • Elon University • Emerson College • Emory University • Fordham University • Franklin & Marshall College • The George Washington University • Georgetown University • Georgia Institute of Technology • University of Georgia • Gonzaga University • Goucher College • Grand Canyon University • Haverford College • University of Hawaii at Manoa • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign • Indiana University at Bloomington • Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis • Ithaca College • James Madison University • Johns Hopkins University • Kenyon College • University of La Verne • Lehigh University • Lewis & Clark College • London College of Communication • Louisiana State University • Loyola Marymount University • Loyola University New Orleans • Marshall University • University of Maryland, College Park • University of Massachusetts, Amherst • Miami University, Oxford • University of Miami • Michigan State University • University of Michigan • Middlebury College • University of Minnesota, Twin Cities • University of Missouri Columbia • Mount Saint Mary’s University • University of New Hampshire at Durham • The New School - All Divisions • New York University • Northeastern University • Northern Arizona University • Northwestern University • University of Notre Dame • NYU Shanghai • Oberlin College of Arts and Sciences • Occidental College • The Ohio State University • University of Oregon • Otis College of Art and Design • Pace University, New York City • Pacific Northwest College of Art • University of the Pacific • Pennsylvania State University • University of Pennsylvania • Pitzer College • Pomona College • University of Portland • Pratt Institute • Princeton University • Purdue University • University of Redlands • Reed College • Regis University • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute • University of Rhode Island • Rice University • University of Richmond • Ringling College of Art and Design • Rochester Institute of Technology • Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology • Saint Mary’s College of California • San Diego State University • University of San Diego • San Francisco Art Institute • San Francisco State University • University of San Francisco • Santa Clara University • Sarah Lawrence College • Savannah College of Art and Design • Savannah College of Art and Design - SCAD, Hong Kong • University of the Sciences in Philadelphia • Scripps College • Shepherd University • Sonoma State University • University of Southern California • Southern Methodist University • Stanford University • Syracuse University • Temple University • Texas A&M University • Texas Christian University • The University of Texas, Austin • Trinity College • Tufts University • Tulane University • University of Exeter • University of Oregon - Clark Honors College • University of Sydney • University of Utah • Vanderbilt University • Vassar College • University of Vermont • Villanova University • Virginia Tech • University of Virginia • Wake Forest University • Washington College • Washington University in St. Louis • University of Washington • Wesleyan University • West Virginia University • Whitman College • Whittier College • College of William & Mary • Williams College • University of Wisconsin, Madison • Worcester Polytechnic Institute • Yale University

WE WISH THEM WELL IN THEIR BRIGHT FUTURES AHEAD.

23620 Mulholland Highway | Calabasas, California 91302 | 818.591.6500 | www.viewpoint.org

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MIDDLE & HIGH SCHOOLS, UNIVERSITIES

photo courtesy of SMMUSD

MALIBU MIDDLE & HIGH SCHOOL

SMASH students working on a project following the new science standards.

SANTA MONICA-MALIBU UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Next Generation Science ✎ written by Michele Willer-Allred At one time, memorizing facts and filling out worksheets were the standard way elementary school students learned science. Those days are long gone. Instead, students from Malibu and Santa Monica are making their own clouds to learn about condensation and the water cycle, building their own solar water heaters, and extracting DNA from strawberries. From there, the students form groups, where they ask questions, collect and analyze data and build theories. It’s what practicing scientists do every day, and its now part of the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District’s plan to incorporate the Next Generation Science Standards in motion throughout the district. California adopted the standards in 2013, and released the California Science Framework in 2016 for districts across the state to implement. “There is a massive shift in the design and delivery of science education in the whole state of California. It’s as big as what we experienced with Common Core,” said SMMUSD Superintendent Dr. Ben Drati. “When we look at our old science standards from 1998, it was basically a lot facts that students needed to know, but not a lot of application. That has changed,” added Dr. Irene Gonzalez-Castillo, director of curriculum and instruction. Marianna O’Brien, a science teacher at Lincoln Middle School in Santa Monica, said it’s now more about knowing a chemical reaction. “You have to now know its application and practice it, “ she said. “You can’t do science unless you do it. It would be like someone reading a bunch of cookbooks and thinking they can be a chef. You have to do it, practice and that’s how you get better.”

Patrick Miller has been confirmed as the 2019-20 Malibu High School principal Miller leaves his role as Webster Elementary School principal to take on the lead at the high school. He previously served as a Spanish teacher and assistant principal at MHS. “Mr. Miller brings a long-held spirit and enthusiasm for students, parents and staff of Malibu High School and will be able to hit the ground running,” SMMUSD Superintendent Ben Drati said. Melisa Andino, who served as assistant principal of MMS, is the new principal of Malibu Middle School. OAKS CHRISTIAN HIGH SCHOOL

A groundbreaking new Institute of Arts and Innovation is being launched in Aug 2019, with inaugural pathways in songwriting, vocal performance, music production and film. This unique program is expected to prepare serious art students for entry into college programs and the commercial marketplace. Master classes, lectures, and internships will be coupled with real-world entrepreneurship, marketing and branding classes. More distinct pathways will be launched in the future in both performing and visual arts. PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY

The Pepperdine School of Law has announced a gift by benefactors Carrol and R. Rex Parris to formally endow the Parris Institute for Professional Formation. The Parris Institute, established in 2014 with an initial gift of $1 million, is dedicated to the professional development of first-year law students at Pepperdine Law. An additional $2 million presented in 2019 names the Parris Institute in perpetuity and firmly establishes the Parris family legacy at Pepperdine Law. A national model for professional leadership training, the Parris Institute is committed to enhancing the core internal character competencies that have marked the great contributions of lawyers throughout human history.

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JOIN OUR TEAM! Malibu Magazine is searching for local contributors, journalists and photographers who would like to get involved with the magazine, as well as local sales reps looking to work for commission part or full-time.

for more info email:

julie@malibumag.com

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REAL ESTATE MALIBU MARKET TRENDS

MARCH MARKET TEMPERATURE BUYER

SELLER

BALANCED

While Malibu’s market temperature during Q1 and Q2 leaned more towards a seller’s market, Q3 and Q4 saw a shift towards a buyer’s market. Currently, there are around 189 listings on the Malibu market. Source: Zilllow.com/Realtor.com/Own Research

SALES CURVE IN THE LAST 5 YEARS

Source: Trulia.com

80

Source: Trulia

70 60 50 40 30 NOV 18

MAY 18

NOV 17

MAY 17

NOV 16

MAY 16

Source: Zillow.com

The median sold price is on average 10% lower than the median listing price.

$2.5M $2M $2.5M NOV 18

MAY 18

NOV 17

MAY 17

NOV 16

MAY 16

$1M NOV 15

MEDIAN SOLD HOME PRICE

Source: Trulia.com

$3M

MAY 15

MEDIAN LISTING HOME PRICE SQ/FT

MEDIAN SALES PRICE IN THE LAST 5 YEARS

NOV 14

MEDIAN LISTING HOME PRICE

MAY 14

$3.5M $1.2 K $3.2M

NOV 15

MAY 15

NOV 14

MAY 14

20

The chart on the left shows Malibu’s market fluctuations, with 2017 and 2018 averaging a higher number of sales than 2016. One can see that since the Woolsey fire, the market has seen a drastic downturn with a slight improvement in recent months.

Malibu’s median sales price has seen a slight but steady increase in the past five years with a slight decrease recently.

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t, d built ghout ning ntial signing e Native he Sur-

REAL ESTATE

ELLEN FRANCISCO

The Real Estate Market Right Now Consistently in the top 1% of Coldwell Banker agents, Ellen Francisco is a long-time Malibu resident, who in 1978 lost her home in the Malibu-Agoura fire, giving her first-hand insight into what many Malibuites are going through today.

E

llen Francisco has been a highly successful Realtor in Malibu for almost 40 years. Ellen and her husband, Kent, lost their home in the 1978 Malibu-Agoura fire and they did re-build on the same property. She has had the experience of losing everything and beginning again, so she can relate to what so many people are now going through. What is happening in the real estate market today? Since the Woolsey fire, the Real Estate market has been fluctuating rather dramatically. It was understandably quiet immediately after the fire, through the holidays and during the rainy season, but I can now tell you that people are coming back to Malibu. Seeing the beautiful green hills ablaze with the yellow mustard, coreopsis daisies and purple lupin and with the debris removal in full swing, Malibu is reflecting the change and starting it’s re-birth. Potential Buyers are attending weekend open houses, making appointments to see houses and there are properties going into escrow. There are currently at

least 26 properties (homes and condos) in escrow, waiting to have contingencies removed and another 9 homes and condos in escrow with contingencies removed. This is increasing on a daily basis. This is a very positive sign for the Real Estate market. There have been 61 recorded home, condo and mobile home sales since January 1st, 2019 ranging in price from $505,000 for a condominium up to $21,750,000 for a Point Dume blufffront home. We are experiencing a time where people are making decisions. Move to Malibu, stay in Malibu and rebuild, move out of Malibu and even move within Malibu. We are seeing all of the possibilities. Who are the current buyers? The current buyers, are as always, varied and represent Malibu, the Westside, the Valley and out of the area completely (other States and other countries). Some will be full time residents and others will be buyers who will be using their homes as second or sometimes third homes. The buyers in Malibu always make up an interesting group of people and represent various walks of life. It is one of the factors that makes

Malibu such an interesting place to live. The beach buyers tend to purchase vacation homes and the bluff top and land side Buyers tend to be our full-time residents. Although, I have noticed an increase over the last few years of people buying vacation homes not necessarily on the beach, but in the hills and in the more residential communities (Malibu Park, Winding Way, Point Dume, Malibu Knolls etc.). We have also seen Buyers who have ventured into the shortterm rental business, although we don’t know what is going to happen once the City makes some determinations and adds proposed regulations. Are many people selling their land and not re-building after the fire? We don’t know yet what everyone is doing. Malibu has never seen such a huge loss of homes in one fire. There have been a few sales already and residents who have sold their land have either bought other properties here or moved out of Malibu. I think many people still have to finalize their insurance settlements, determine how much it will cost them to re-build, find out what the process will be for their particular property, hire an architect and develop a plan

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and try to understand what the cost to re-build will be. Some people who are set on re-building have developed plans and are moving forward. According to the City of Malibu, there have been 67 plan verifications for in-kind replacement, 25 building permits issued for repairs & 17 re-build project applications submitted. There are 64 properties fully cleared of fire debris and 222 approved for private removal. As time goes on, we will have a better idea of what people will be doing. I believe that it is still too early to tell. Have prices been affected by the fire? There are fewer homes available for sale so it can be argued that prices may be higher if the demand becomes greater. However, we may have fewer buyers for a while so the lack of activity may affect prices and cause them to be the same or maybe a bit lower. Then there is the discussion that if someone is willing to buy in an area that was drastically affected by the fire that the values will go up after the homes are re-built, since the burned homes will be replaced with all new structures and landscaping. It is difficult to price “burn-out” properties right now since we don’t know how many will be on the market in the coming year. I have had this same discussion with many realtors and we are all waiting to see what happens, and trying to make decisions as needed. A lot of people are concerned about a possible coming recession in the real estate market. What is your opinion on this? I always take things one step at a time. I try to live in the present and not worry too much about the unforeseeable future. Even if there is a recession ahead of us, it has been my experience over the 39 years that I have been in Real Estate, that the market has always come back stronger after a recession. If people wait for the recession and it doesn’t happen, then they might be missing out on current opMM portunities.

Ellen‘s Picks

Most Interesting Sales In Recent Weeks

6130 VIA CABRILLO SALE PRICE: $4,040,000 LISTING PRICE: $4,150,000 4,831 SQ. FT. WHY? This 5 bedroom, 5.5

28820 GRAYFOX SALE PRICE: $8,650,000 LISTING PRICE: $8,500,000 5,999 SQ. FT. WHY? This property had been on

bathroom Malibu Park property was listed in October of 2018, and sold in early February of this year. The house on the same driveway directly behind it unfortunately burned in the fire.

and off the market since 2015 and originally was priced at $10M. It is oftentimes finding the right price point and the right buyers. Again, Point Dume had been affected by the fire in several areas.

7119 FERNHILL DR. SALE PRICE: $3,890,000 LISTING PRICE: $3,990,000 3,088 SQ. FT. WHY? This 4 bedroom, 4 bath-

33961 PCH SALE PRICE: $3,180,000 LISTING PRICE: $3,495,000 4,256 SQ. FT. WHY? This Encinal Bluff-ar-

room Point Dume home sold in early April. The home sits on approximately one acre and comes with a beach key. The house was originally listed in January of 2019 for $3,990,000 and sold quite quickly just a few months later.

ea property has four bedrooms and four bathrooms and sits on approximately one acre. The home was originally listed for $3,495,000 on October 16th, 2019, a few weeks before the fire hit, and eventually closed escrow on March 1st, 2019.

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31145 LOBO VISTA RD.

A VINTNER’S DREAM IN AGOURA A 12-acre property in Agoura Hills’ Lobo Canyon, now on the market, has been a cherished family vineyard for years. ✎ written by Tom Mullen

K

arin Hall lives on 12 acres of land in Lobo Canyon in Agoura Hills, just north of Malibu. The property includes one acre of vines. She named varietals produced from 900 vines after her children: Christopher Cabernet, Chloe Syrah and Colin Merlot. She worked with winemaker Christian Roguenant from The Rosenthal Estate, as well as vineyard consultants from Sunridge Nurseries, to establish her vines—40% Cabernet, 20% Syrah and the balance of Merlot. “The vineyard is my hobby. I was a stayat-home mom with three kids. In order to get the kids to help me, I named the varietals after each child, and they helped with harvest every year. The vineyard has been a challenge. The farmer’s life is tough. Pests include red tail fox, raccoons, coyotes, deer and gophers. And if you can wrangle all those, you still have winged pests and mildew to contend with. Drought was a challenge as well. My children will always remember waking up at 5 a.m. and harvesting ‘their grapes’ before catching the bus to school.”

Hall is still a member of the Malibu Coast American Viticulture Area (AVA) and attends events with fellow vintners. However the wildfire last year decimated many neighboring vines. Hall was fortunate that her property and vines avoided decimation, partially due to higher elevation of the property compared to some neighboring vineyards. “Our property is like a little oasis. Everything was scorched around it. I’m fortunate. My vineyard and property sustained minimal damage. I lost all my grape growing neighbors and most members of the Malibu Coast AVA. Some will replant and

Jeff Elson

WINE PARADISE Karin Hall’s 12-acre property sits in Lobo Canyon.

return, however some will not. Things are getting back to normalcy around here since the fire.” Her children, now in their teens and twenties, attend high school and college. She recalls a family trip they took to Rioja in Spain before their first harvest. That journey provided additional inspiration for their own family’s work in the vines. Today, Hall still enjoys walking through their vineyard, and—as the property is currently on the market—considers the possibility of working as a vineyard consultant for any future owner. “I enjoyed tending this family vineyard along with my children,” she said. “I’m so blessed to have had this opportunity. The kids will always have the memories of the vineyard and their role. My daughter, now 21 and home from art school, is applying for jobs, and will help prune the vineyard next week in exchange for paying her parking tickets. Pretty good trade, as she could be waiting tables (as I was at her age). The story and lifestyle is great. It’s bittersweet to be selling the property. However, I’m hopeful another young family will carMM ry on what we started here.”

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Sean Landon Luxury Estates Agent

Featured Listings In Escrow

In Escrow

21501 Saddle Peak Rd. | $3,595,000

For Sale

20693 Big Rock Dr. | $3,800,000

For Sale & For Lease

23401 Malibu Colony Rd. | $125,000/Month

31824 Seafield Dr. | $15,950,000

For Lease

27400 PCH #106 | $12,500/Month

(310) 926-4028 TheAgencyRE.com Lic# 01981562

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o: 310.457.3995 | c: 310.579.5887 | chris@chriscortazzo.com | www.chriscortazzo.com | CalBRE# 01190363

6962 WILDLIFE ROAD 4 ACRE BLUFF COMPOUND

$65,200,000

26848 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY $62,000,000/$450,000/MO. 10 BR | 14 BA | OCEAN VIEW ESTATE

33740 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY $48,500,000 6 BR | 8 BA | NEWLY-CONSTRUCTED

0 ZUMIREZ DRIVE $39,995,000 5 BR | 6 BA | JAMES PERSE RESIDENTIAL PROJECT

BROAD BEACH ROAD $37,500,000 TWO ADJACENT OCEAN FRONT PARCELS

6970 WILDLIFE ROAD $25,950,000/$100,000/MO. 5 BR | 7 BA | OCEAN VIEW ESTATE

©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.

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anker, the square gh perso-

o: 310.457.3995 | c: 310.579.5887 | chris@chriscortazzo.com | www.chriscortazzo.com | CalBRE# 01190363

7049 BIRDVIEW AVENUE 5 BR | 7 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

$24,500,000

23634 MALIBU COLONY ROAD 4 BD | 7 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

23950 MALIBU ROAD 4 BR | 6 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

$22,900,000

27316 WINDING WAY $19,495,000/$67,500/MO. 4 BR | 5 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

23556 MALIBU COLONY ROAD 4 BD | 4 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

$16,750,000

31412 BROAD BEACH ROAD 6 BR | 7 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

$23,500,000

$16,450,000

©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.

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o: 310.457.3995 | c: 310.579.5887 | chris@chriscortazzo.com | www.chriscortazzo.com | CalBRE# 01190363

1 W. CENTURY DRIVE, #35A $14,995,000 4 BR | 6 BA | REMODELED/FURNISHED CONDO

26524 LATIGO SHORE DRIVE 4 BR | 5 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

30966 BROAD BEACH ROAD 7 BR | 9 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

$12,900,000

28929 BISON COURT $11,995,000 6 BR | 4 BA | MODERN FARMHOUSE W/ BEACH KEY

26820 MALIBU COVE COLONY DRIVE 5 BR | 6 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

$9,995,000

27140 MALIBU COVE COLONY DRIVE 5 BR | 7 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

$12,995,000

$9,995,000

©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.

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363

anker, the square gh perso-

o: 310.457.3995 | c: 310.579.5887 | chris@chriscortazzo.com | www.chriscortazzo.com | CalBRE# 01190363

27445 WINDING WAY 7 BR | 8 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

$9,995,000

27580 WINDING WAY $9,995,000 5 BR | 3 BA | EQUESTRIAN COMPOUND

32453 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY 7 BR | 12 BA | OCEAN VIEW ESTATE

$8,850,000

25316 MALIBU ROAD $8,850,000 6 BR | 6 BA | OCEANFRONT PROPERTY

20858 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY 3 BR | 4 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

$8,795,000

31636 SEA LEVEL DRIVE 4 BR | 4 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

$8,795,000

©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.

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o: 310.457.3995 | c: 310.579.5887 | chris@chriscortazzo.com | www.chriscortazzo.com | CalBRE# 01190363

6172 BONSALL DRIVE $5,995,000 2 BR | 3 BA | GATED 1.5 ACRE PROPERTY

34305 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY $5,750,000 APPX. 20 ACRES W/ 180-DEGREE VIEWS

6415 MEADOWS COURT 6 BR | 7 BA | OCEAN VIEW ESTATE

20607 EAGLEPASS DRIVE 6 BR | 7 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

$5,450,000

21569 PASEO SERRA $3,995,000 4 BR | 3 BA | PANORAMIC OCEAN VIEW HOME

6701 PORTSHEAD ROAD APX. 2.64 ACRES WITH BEACH RIGHTS

$5,250,000

21701

$3,495,000

31546

©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.

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anker, the square gh perso-

o: 310.457.3995 | c: 310.579.5887 | chris@chriscortazzo.com | www.chriscortazzo.com | CalBRE# 01190363

1445 EL BOSQUE COURT, PACIFIC PALISADES ONE-OF-A-KIND APPX. 2 1/3 ACRE LOT

$3,150,000

449 WESTBOURNE DRIVE, WEST HOLLYWOOD $2,995,000 4 BR | 4 BA | TWO-STORY PRIVATE GATED HOME

21701 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY 4 BR | 3 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

$2,759,000

0 WINDING WAY $2,750,000 APX. 3.488 ACRES WITH OCEAN VIEWS

31546 VICTORIA POINT ROAD TWO-VACANT OCEAN VIEW LOTS

$2,650,000

11770 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY #U $2,395,000 3 BR | 4 BA | BEACH KEY ACCESS TO 2 SANDY BEACHES

©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.

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o: 310.457.3995 | c: 310.579.5887 | chris@chriscortazzo.com | www.chriscortazzo.com | CalBRE# 01190363

2451 NALIN DR., LOS ANGELES $1,999,000 LARGE FLAT BEL AIR CANYON VIEW LOT

5744 TRANCAS CANYON ROAD $1,850,000 OVER 10 ACRES WITH OCEAN VIEWS

9533 DEER CREEK ROAD $1,695,000 APX. 10.32 ACRES WITH OCEAN VIEWS

0 RAMBLO PACIFICO STREET $1,250,000 PRELIMINARY PLANS FOR CUSTOM HOME

26668 SEAGULL WAY, #D101 $1,000,000 1 BR | 1 BA | TWO-STORY OCEAN FRONT ROW UNIT

0 BALLER ROAD $895,000 APX. 74.8 ACRES W/ OCEAN VIEWS

©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.

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A

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o: 310.457.3995 | c: 310.579.5887 | chris@chriscortazzo.com | www.chriscortazzo.com | CalBRE# 01190363

23660 MALIBU ROAD $150,000/MONTH 5 BR | 7 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

31776 BROAD BEACH ROAD $100,000/MONTH 4 BR | 4 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

23556 MALIBU COLONY ROAD $75,000/MONTH 4 BR | 4 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

32496 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY $55,000/MONTH 4 BR | 4 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

6368 SEA STAR DRIVE $40,000/MONTH 6 BR | 6 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

25236 MALIBU ROAD $150,000/MONTH 4 BR | 4 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

27348 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY $85,000/MONTH 4 BR | 4 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

23314 MALIBU COLONY ROAD $100,000/MONTH 5 BR | 5 BA | BEACH HOUSE W/ 48’ FRONTAGE

30712 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY $80,000/MONTH 6 BR | 8 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

23649 MALIBU COLONY ROAD $70,000/MONTH 4 BR | 4 BA | GUARD-GATED HOME

23614 MALIBU COLONY ROAD $65,000/MONTH 5 BR | 5 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

1 W CENTURY DR. #35A $43,000/MONTH 4 BR | 6 BA | JUST REMODELED STUNNING CONDO

29075 GRAYFOX STREET $40,000/MONTH 5 BR | 7 BA | 1.6 PRIVATE ACRES W/ BEACH KEY

23618 MALIBU COLONY ROAD $39,500/MONTH 4 BR | 5 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

1 W CENTURY DR. #35B $37,000/MONTH 3 BR | 5 BA | JUST REMODELED STUNNING CONDO

©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.

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anker, the square gh perso-

o: 310.457.3995 | c: 310.579.5887 | chris@chriscortazzo.com | www.chriscortazzo.com | CalBRE# 01190363

22148 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY $35,000/MONTH 2 BR | 5 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

6345 TANTALUS DRIVE $35,000/MONTH 6 BR | 8 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

6750 FERNHILL DRIVE $30,000/MONTH 4 BR | 3 BA | RIVIERA II BEACH KEY HOME

27082 MALIBU COVE COLONY DR. $29,995/MONTH 4 BR | 5 BA | OCEANFRONT HOME

31569 SEA LEVEL DRIVE $17,500/MONTH 4 BR | 4 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

5828 FOXVIEW DRIVE $17,000/MONTH 5 BR | 6 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

29151 CLIFFSIDE DRIVE $14,500/MONTH 4 BR | 5 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

11770 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY #U $13,000/MONTH 3 BR | 4 BA | BEACH ACCESS HOME

6770 LAS OLAS WAY $7,500/MONTH 2 BR | 3 BA | OCEAN VIEW CONDO

21613 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY $6,500/MONTH 3 BR | 3 BA | CHARMING LA COSTA AREA HOME

6024 BONSALL DRIVE $34,500/MONTH 4 BR | 5 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

1710 SAN REMO DR., PACIFIC PALISADES $24,995/MONTH

5 BR | 6 BA | RETREAT HOME W/ INCREDIBLE VIEWS

32026 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY $16,000/MONTH 4 BR | 4 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

4774 ENCINAL CANYON ROAD $12,000/MONTH 4 BR | 4 BA | OCEAN VIEW HOME

28170 REY DE COPAS LANE

$6,000/MO. (4 MOS. OR LONGER)

1 BR | 1 BA | OCEAN VIEW CONDO

©2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.

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Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

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Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

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LE

PR Pritchett-Rapf Realtors Local & Global

M A L I B U H O M E S

Victoria Point Road $7,850,000 Custom Built Cape Cod - 4+4.5 Jack Pritchett & Gayle Pritchett

Pacific Coast Highway $5,575,000 Close-In Las Tunas Beach - 4+4.5 Gayle Pritchett

Puesta Del Sol Street $4,900,000 Ocean View Mediterranean - 5+4 Ginger Escobar

Big Rock Drive $4,590,000 Ocean View Compound - 3+4 Jack Pritchett & Kate Pritchett-Skene

Ramirez Canyon Road $4,350,000 Stunning Remodel - 4+3.5 Kirk Murray

Trancas Canyon Road- $2,750,000 Ocean View Mid-Century - 4+2.5 Matt Rapf

Paseo Canyon Road $2,500,000 Desirable Malibu West - 4+2.5 John Cosentino

Toscana Townhome $2,100,000 Gated Complex with Pool - 2+3 Vicki Salsberg

Victoria Point Road $8,295,000 Ultimate in beach living - 4+5 Jack Pritchett

T O P A N G A

Malibu Vista Drive $1,895,000 Ocean View Sunset Mesa - 3+2 Jack Pritchett

LOCAL & GLOBAL MM_SAMPLE PAGE (23).indd 2

Malibu Gardens Condo $595,000 Charming Remodel - 2+2 Brian Rapf

H O M E S

Colina Drive $5,950,000 Prime P.O. Tract - 5+3.5 Kirsten Bohman & Chryssa Lightheart

It’s different here. 5/10/19 6:39 PM


Offices in Malibu and Topanga Colony 310.456.6771 Topanga 310.455.4363

Santa Maria Road $2,950,000 Serene home on 4 acres - 3+2.5 Kirsten Bohman

Portage Circle Drive $1,299,000 Mountain View Architectural - 3+2 Chryssa Lightheart

Altaridge Drive $1,450,000 Modern Architectural - 3+3.5 Chryssa Lightheart H E R M O S A

Callon Drive $1,099,000 Vintage Creative Compound - 5+3.5 Chryssa Lightheart

B E A C H

M A L I B U

The Strand - Hermosa Beach $17,000,000 One of a Kind Legacy Property - 7+8 Brian Rapf

L E A S E S

Spacious Malibu Road 4+4.5 Beauty $24,000 mo/yearly or $40,000 mo/summer Gayle Pritchett

Point Dume Bluffs - Immaculate 4+3.5 $18,500 mo/yearly Gayle Pritchett & Jack Pritchett

Ocean View 3+3 Mediterranean $10,000 mo/yearly John Cosentino

Maison de Ville Ocean View 2+1.5 $5,200 mo/yearly Shelly Yrigoyen & Isabel Miller

Charming 2+2 with Little Dume Beach Rights $4,895 mo/yearly Matt Rapf

Gorgeous 2+2 in Malibu Villas $4,880 mo/yearly Kate Pritchett-Skene

Remodeled Carbon Beach Condo - 1+1 $3,800 mo/yearly Bianca Torrence

DRE 00528707

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Dramatic Oceanfront Architectural Home

Carbon Beach Oceanfront Penthouse

Private, guard-gated Malibu Cove Colony (approx. 50 ft. of beach frontage) 3 bedroom + guest house - expansive coastline views. $8,995,000

Inviting 3 bedroom penthouse condo with high ceilings, hardwood floors, oceanfront deck, sensational ocean views, in a prime Malibu location. $4,500,000

Spectacular Point Dume Lease

Malibu Bluff Front Property

Breathtaking ocean and coastline views from Point Dume Bluff Estate, w/4 bedroom main home, spacious guest house, gym, lagoon pool, spa, & private path down to the sand. $45,000/month

A rare opportunity to build on one of the last available undeveloped lots on the Malibu Bluffs, with an easement down a private road to a magnificent beach. $8,950,000

Fantastic Post & Beam View Property

Dramatic Malibu Architectural Home

Sweeping panoramic ocean views from this newly refurbished 3 bdr. Malibu ranch home w/ wood beam vaulted ceilings. Overlooking views from Palos Verdes to the Anacapa Islands. $2,250,000

Expansive, mesmerizing ocean views sparkle from almost every room of this immaculate home. Curved wood beams, artistic details w/ spacious decks give this home a real WOW factor. $3,895,000

“V su ro sp

En ju tre en

Historic Malibu Ranch

Prime Bluff – Front Zuma Bay Villa

This premier property encompassing approx. 9.5 lush acres has some remnants of its storied past: 1940’s adobe retreat, red pony barn, 6-stall barn & tack room, on a seasonal stream. $3,995,000

Watch the whales and dolphins from this beautifully updated 3 Bdr. townhome on prime bluff-front row, with coastline views. Amenities include: pool, spa, tennis court, stairs to the beach. $12,000/month

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310.589.2464 CalRE #00709314

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Spectacular Malibu Estate “Villa Jardin”, a beautiful Estate on almost 7 magnificently landscaped acres. One story Villa (approx. 11,605 sq. ft) includes: a spacious living room, 6 bdrm suites, cook’s kitchen, dining rm, office/study, media rm + 6 car subterranean garage. Gorgeous grounds include: pool, spa, T.C., vegetable garden, fruit trees & room for much more. Great care has been taken to create a seamless setting of indoor/outdoor living, with all of the rooms opening onto the majestic gardens, sprawling lawns & flower-lined pathways. This One-of-a-Kind Property offers a Most Incredible Lifestyle… Also for Lease $18,000,000

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Silver Raven Farms Enter the private gates & behold spectacular gardens, majestic trees & expansive lawns that surround the updated farmhouse on this 4+ acre estate, just a block from the beach. Located on prestigious Bonsall Dr. this very unique property includes: 3 self-contained guest houses, pool, T.C., fruit trees & vegetable garden. For the equestrian, the custom barn w/turnouts, large riding ring & nearby trails provide an opportunity to ride, train & enjoy your horses. Must be Seen to Appreciate the Incredible grounds with all the amenities. $12,500,000

View More Exceptional Malibu Real Estate at

r. es h

www.EllenFrancisco.com

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Come home to Malibu and come home to Bungalow, Ltd!

Come let us captivate your mind, delight your senses, and create your ideal home. Come to our design studio or call for an in-home consultation and let us show you why we’re proud to have many happy customers throughout California and the nation.

Welcome home to Bungalow, Ltd.

Curt Blackburn, lead designer and co-owner Kevin McEvoy, co-owner Keiko, the shop-dog

22223 Pacific Coast Highway Malibu, California 90265

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|

Malibu’s Premier Design Studio

(424) 644-0344

|

www.BungalowLtd.com

3/8/19 15:43



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