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Worcester Park Life

KT4’s ONLY FREE Independent Community Magazine and Business Guide November 2020 Issue 143

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Welcome BACK to YOUR Worcester Park Life

from jenny@maldenmedia.co.uk

Countless years ago I took a call from a lovely lady called Ruth Jemmett asking how she could help promote the Dancing Club ‘Glitters’ that she belonged to. I asked if she’d like to write an article about the pleasures of ballroom dancing, and that became the first of her monthly articles for Worcester Park Life. We enjoyed lots of email banter over the years and she would affectionately sign off ‘Aunty Ruth’.

I hope you enjoy a good read please make sure you see what our local businesses and advertisers have to offer. If you’ve any feedback on how our advertisers are doing, or have any ideas for future editions, news or views to share then please get in touch. We need more to keep the magazine going, so please do recommend advertising to businesses you have links to. Thank you!

Ruth shared with all her readers that she was having treatment and check ups for breast cancer over the years and I was so sad to receive an email from her husband John to say that Ruth passed away on 24th March. This is our first edition in print since then and the article on page 10, poignantly titled ‘Remember me’ featured in our November edition, 7 years ago. Rest in peace Ruth, we miss you. x

Remember, we deliver to most homes every second month but if it’s not delivered to you, you can read it on your phone, tablet or PC. There are a limited number of copies available from Waitrose, Worcester Park Library, St Mary’s and Christ Church with St Philip.

Until next time, best wishes,

& Since ‘08

The copy dates for the next couple of editions are below. If you’d like to advertise or have a local story to tell, please call or email.

Jenny Since ‘05

Deadline for our December editions is 20th November

Published by Malden Media Ltd Editor Jenny Stuart jenny@maldenmedia.co.uk 020 8336 2915 www.maldenmedia.co.uk 36 Rosebery Avenue KT3 4JS

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Please note that the opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily represent the views of the editor. All advertisements are commercial and not indicative of any endorsement by the editor who accepts no responsibility for any loss suffered directly or indirectly by any reader as a result of any advertisement or notice published in this magazine. All in-house artwork and editorial presented in this magazine remains the copyright of Malden Media Ltd. No part of this magazine may be reproduced, stored on any retieval system, or transmitted in any form - electronic, mechanical. recording, photocopying, or otherwise without prior permission from the Publisher.

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Worcester Park History Marking an anniversary – a little late by David Rymill Welcome back to WPL in its conventional format! In the summer of 1895, 125 years ago, local people were looking forward to the opening of St Mary’s Church, at the top of The Avenue – a new parish church for the parish of Cuddington, over 350 years after the medieval church, located in what is now Nonsuch Park, had been swept away to make room for Nonsuch Palace. It had been arranged that the church would be consecrated on 17th July by the Bishop of Winchester, Rt Revd Anthony Thorold (Cuddington was then still in the Diocese of Winchester; it was transferred to the new Diocese of Guildford in 1927). In the event, things didn’t work out quite as planned. The building had been under construction for about a year, but had been much longer in the planning. A temporary Iron Church, which stood where the lawns are now between the church and the Garden of Remembrance, had been opened in 1867. In 1892 the parish had considered replacing it with another iron church but, in December that year, the local architect J Alick Thomas was invited to draw up plans for a permanent church, and a tender of £4,392 by Goddard and Sons of Farnham for its construction was accepted.

the church was finished, and he died on 25th July. This meant that the church could not be formally consecrated until a new Bishop was appointed. Despite the delay, the congregation moved in anyway: Mr Glubb took the last services in the Iron Church on 14th July, and the first services in the new building were held on 21st July. The new Bishop, Rt Revd Randall Davidson, later Archbishop of Canterbury, finally came on 20th November to perform the consecration. One of our illustrations shows the design for the church’s exterior. Originally, as the population was still very small, only three of the five bays of the nave (the main seating area) were built, and when the church was completed in 1959 it was to a slightly different design, without the side porch seen here.

The church’s foundation stone was laid in August 1894 by Bishop Thorold. He was already suffering from poor health, but was determined to do his best that summer and autumn to visit every parish in the Diocese – at that time including all of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, much of Surrey, and the Channel Islands. He also came to Cuddington’s rescue when the minister who had been temporarily officiating in the Iron Church left – he sent one of his chaplains, the Revd John Matthew Glubb, to take services until a permanent Vicar could be appointed. This decision had an unexpected result, as Mr Glubb would later marry Adelaide Kühner, from The Cottage (now Iris House), off Old Malden Lane. Bishop Thorold’s health had worsened by the time

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events, this has been used by local organisations for activities ranging from lacemaking to dog training.

The postcard view shows the view from The Avenue during the church’s early years. Over the past 125 years there have been various changes to the church and associated buildings. A temporary small hall was built on part of what is now the church car park in about 1934, so that a wider range of activities could take place, and in 1955 a larger hall was opened on the corner of The Avenue and Royal Avenue, used for activities ranging from badminton to the operatic and dramatic productions of the Cuddington Players. In 1995 a new meeting-rooms complex was opened adjacent to the church, replacing both halls. As well as being the venue for church

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The congregation has long had a concern extending well beyond its boundaries, building long-term links with a number of charities such as Crisis and the Children’s Society. In the 1980s there were connections with Friends Anonymous which worked with the community in Hackney, and Ted Blackmore’s Chibolya Faith Mission in Zambia which provided accommodation and medical care for children who were homeless or living with long-term conditions. For many years members of the congregation also provided support to patients at the Epsom Cluster hospitals, helping with the League of Friends or playing the organ for services. Current church members are active in community organisations such as the Epsom and Ewell Foodbank and Epsom Street Pastors, and the Cuddington Scouts, Cubs and Brownies etc. The congregation had been planning to mark the 125th anniversary with a number of special events, but once again things have not worked out as planned. In late March St Mary’s, like

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all other church buildings, had to close, but the congregation has remained active. Services have been available in a range of formats, with service sheets and texts of sermons sent by email, YouTube recordings, and live Zoom events. The church even had a remote visit from the Bishop of Dorking, Rt Revd Jo Bailey Wells – she spent some time with the Sunday Club on Zoom (a system which Bishop Thorold might have found useful). Sunday services are now once again being held in church at 8 am and 9.30 am, with the numbers limited at each service, and they are simultaneously streamed on Zoom. The church is also open for individual prayer, on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, 10am-12 noon, with appropriate social distancing measures in place; please see www.cuddingtonparish.org.uk for the latest news. Two congregation members have been recording the memories of some of the longer-standing members of the church community, and by the time you read this the results should be on display in church; all are welcome to visit during the hours listed above. I set myself the challenge of finding a photograph or document relevant to each of the 125 years, originally

intended to form a timeline around the walls of the church. This display is now available online at www.cuddingtonparish.org.uk/stmarys_history. html. I am still collecting photographs and other material about St Mary’s through the years, so if you have photographs or memories of family events at St Mary’s, such as christenings or weddings, or of church occasions you attended, such as church fairs or Rose Queen fêtes, or of youth groups, the choir or Young Wives, or the many community organisations that have met in the church halls over the decades, and would be willing to let me have copies or to lend them for copying, I should love to hear from you.

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Our other illustration shows the earliest christening photograph taken at the church that we know of so far, taken at the christening of John Vickars on 5th June 1949. Behind the family group you can see the small entrance porch in the temporary west wall of the church, as constructed in 1895 – and as it remained until it was extended in 1959. We are hoping that Bishop Jo will visit St Mary’s for the 9.30 am service on Sunday 22nd November. Once again, numbers in church will have to be limited, but you can also attend the service on Zoom. If you would like to attend this or any other service in person, or to be sent the Zoom link, or if you would like to speak to someone, please contact the Vicar, the Revd Theresa Ricketts, on 07949 769580 or 020 8337 4914, or by email via the website. By the 22nd we also hope to have a smaller version of the timeline exhibition on show in the church. David Rymill rymilldavid@outlook.com 01962 868976.

Worcester Park, Old Malden and North Cheam: History at our Feet Published in 2012 and available at £10 (plus £2 towards postage if required) from the Rymill family. Ring 020 8330 6563 for more details. This 300-page book tells the story of Worcester Park from the Iron Age to the present day, and includes memories of local life from 1908 onwards, and over 150 maps, photographs and drawings - mostly never published before.

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Ruth Jemmett Writes Remember Me... Ruth very sadly passed away in March - see my notes on page 4. This article was originally published in November 2013 Ruth Jemmett Reflects On

How November Confronts Us With The Subject Of Loss It’s that time of year when the sight of poppy sellers tells us that Remembrance Sunday isn’t far off. As a child of the 1950s I grew up in the wake of The Second World War. My family had been bombed out of London, and I spent the first few years of my life living in a ‘prefab’ - a supposedly temporary solution to the post-war housing crisis in this country. I lived there for twenty-one years. Hardly temporary! Our garden shed had been constructed with a corrugated iron roof on it as the government of the time knew that it could double as an air-raid shelter, should hostilities break out again. Food rationing and financial hardship were a way of life for us. Countless people were in mourning for loved ones they had lost in the war. Even though I remember seeing the bomb sites in London at that time, my young mind couldn’t comprehend the reality of death, with all its implications. November’s yearly services of remembrance around the world provide communities and countries with an opportunity to officially grieve for their dead, both military and civilian. Younger people, whose lives have been rarely touched by such things, must wonder what all the fuss is about. The nearest most of them have come to death is when they are zapping people on a computer screen in the name of ‘fun’. As I was growing up National Service was still in operation, and such training instilled a sense of discipline in young men, and some appreciation of moral values. Some might say that some sort of similar training - even in a community service guise - might be of great benefit to upcoming generations, many of whom seem to be aimless lost souls! Of course, not all young people are without ambition. I was recently introduced to a young man, whose dream, since his early years, was to be a soldier. As I watched him talk excitedly about enlisting, I felt for his

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parents. After all, soldiering was invented to kill real or perceived enemies, no matter how glamorous the adverts for the forces are, with their lure of travel and comradeship. Death in combat is always a possibility. A friend of mine works in the field of helping soldiers who have been damaged, either mentally or physically in one of the many wars our country has been involved in over the past few years. Talking to her is quite sobering, as on a day to day basis she deals with the tragic aftermath of combat, death, mutilation, and grieving families. Young men, who are often being reared on watching violent computer games, probably have no real comprehension of what being a soldier truly entails, and I pray that my young soldier friend never has to confront a worst case scenario. No matter how scientifically advanced our world becomes, man’s natural instinct is to compete. One only has to watch the daily news to see endless visions of men fighting or wanting to fight. War is nature’s ritualised way of dealing with such a primitive feelings, and the wearing of uniforms can tap into latent violent urges to control others. Research has shown that men who wear uniforms as part of their jobs top the list in cases of domestic violence. Very much food for thought ….. On Remembrance Sunday the reality of what such instincts always lead to, is brought home to us as we watch soldiers of all ages march proudly together, as they recall their war-time experiences, and pay tribute to their lost comrades. Many of you in Worcester Park will be familiar with the fact that my late son was multiply physically disabled. At the time of his difficult birth, an uncle, who had suffered a lifetime of severe mental illness during the years following his evacuation from Dunkirk, said to me “Yes he will be very disabled, but at least he won’t run the risk of being cannon fodder, like me …”. I must say that it was strangely comforting to me. Some old soldiers cope with the memories of their traumas by talking about it, or writing a book about their experiences.. Some find it too painful to refer to. Others find that memories of witnessing wholesale death and destruction so traumatising that they, like my uncle, are mentally scarred for life. Many inmates in Epsom and Ewell’s former cluster of so-called mental hospitals during the 1950s were such people, who had literally been sent mad by such things. How

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sad it is to think that countless young shell-shocked men were shot for ’cowardice’ in The First World War. Many were barely out of school, and had never even been away from their families until that time. My late grandfather’s lungs were damaged by enemy mustard gas as he fought in French trenches during World War I. The legacy of that lung damage hastened his eventual death a few years later. Like many before him, he had been proud to fight in a conflict that was meant to be “the war to end all wars”. Despite such a promise made all those years ago, it is food for thought to consider that at any given moment there are approximately forty-one wars taking place around the globe right now. Our country’s involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan over the past few years have made it necessary for aftercare services such as the famous Headley Court and The British Legion to play a never-ending role in supporting physically or mentally damaged soldiers and their families. Cruse Bereavement Care is, of course, always there to give solace to the grieving. The hackneyed phrase “time heals” can be true to a certain extent, as the passing of the years can soften the blow of grief, and blur its cutting edge just a little. Those who are no longer with us would want us to look forward, and enjoy what is left of our own lives. The

wonderful poet Christina Rossetti summed it up in her poem “Remember Me”, when she said “Better by far you should forget and smile, than that you should remember and be sad ….”.. Remembrance Sunday gives us a chance to formally pay respect to all the people who we have lost, and to be mindful that many of them in the forces had to pay the ultimate physical or mental price, on our behalf, so that we can now enjoy the freedoms that many take for granted. Hopefully their experiences can teach us lessons for the future. Of course we can never forget the those we have loved and lost, whatever the circumstances. They walk within us, and it is our duty and privilege to live out the rest of our own days as well and as happily as we can, as a tribute of our affection for them. Ruth Jemmett is a Member of The Society of Authors Copyright 12.10.13

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“We put caregivers at the centre of everything we do so that they can care more, clients can live better and families can feel more assured” As a local couple, we are thrilled to bring the successful Visiting Angels care approach to the local area. Our mission is to redefine the role of caregivers in Society. By doing this, we will deliver a new standard of person-centred care. We believe that our approach where we treat caregivers well - beyond the usual care industry standards, will help us to recruit the very best caregivers who can deliver the very best care to either you or your loved one. These past few months, we have all heard about the amazing job that caregivers do. Caregivers working in the community have allowed people to stay living in their own home where they feel most safe. They have simultaneously reduced the number of contacts the person has had with the outside world during lockdown, as well as provide much needed contact with the outside world. Something needs to change in the care world so that these real life ‘Angels’ continue to get the recognition that they deserve long after the pandemic focus has gone. “I have worked in care for the past 30 years. I have sat in homes where families are struggling to cope with the demands of caring for a loved one alongside work, childcare etc, and the person who would benefit from care is finding the decision to accept care a challenge.” Lynn James. Owner and Managing Director

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Need care but are worried about Covid-19? Visiting Angels are continuing to deliver vital care and support in the community. However we understand that Covid-19 is a major concern for our clients and their families. Visiting Angels have always had robust infection control measures in place. This coupled with the additional infection control training we have provided our caregivers, means that you can be assured they will continue to deliver meticulous standards of hygiene and cleanliness when providing care and support. Our high staff retention means that our care teams are consistent. Fewer people coming in to provide care gives the best possible protection from infection. Because our clients choose their caregiver and the same caregiver comes each week, you can be sure that even in the uncertainty of the current situation, there will always be the comfort of a familiar face.

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When Metroland came to Worcester Park By Roy Buchanan Before I retired, I thought staff meetings were too frequent. At one meeting, a colleague made the comment that he did not want to be responsible for the Worcester Park area as he was depressed by its “1930s kitsch” (tastelessness). I didn’t take it personally. Opinion must always be allowed if not always accepted, after all, they are usually subjective because they are biased. For example, I grew up on a council housing estate in the north-east. My house was a strange design with the kitchen at the front. It was unattractive. The homes I admired were privately owned with a traditional quality appearance; bay windows, garages and drives, well maintained fences, trimmed privet hedges and gates that closed properly. The experience of youth lingers into maturity continuing to influence. What happened in Worcester Park, like other areas of London during the Inter-War years, has become an area of fascination. It is used by authors as settings for their novels, by film directors as locations for productions and analysed in numerous TV documentaries. The question that is so often asked is where did the expression, Metroland, come from? This is where population growth, railways and affluence come together in an absorbing way. From 1863 to 1933 the Metropolitan Railway Company provided a train service that initially ran through Central London and into the City, the financial heart of the capital. Later it extended in the opposite direction into Middlesex and Buckinghamshire. Much of the adjoining land was owned by the railway company and it soon became obvious that here was a business opportunity. Greater London was expanding whilst the attractive employment remained in Central London. Why not build desirable homes that many could afford, in pleasant surroundings, and with excellent transport links to the inner-city?

the imagination of the public, helping to promoting the housing boom we now associate with the name. Although not ubiquitous, the level of affluence lubricated the desire for what was being offered by this new venture. By the 1930s mortgages became available at 4.25%. bringing privately owned homes within the reach not only of the middle class but also the better-off working-class sector. The fashion was not corralled in Metroland, it spread with remarkable vigour and reached Worcester Park. The area had similarities. It had a good railway service that took commuters into Central London and there was an abundance of land ripe for selling in order to build housing estates. Much of this land had been used for farming and some argued that it should have stay that way. However, the population growth generated a demand, encouraged by an understandable ambition, for home ownership. This desire appealed to entrepreneurs who saw the value of investing in speculative development and so Worcester Park flourished. Not everyone shared this enthusiasm. For some, the appeal was low and attracted comments

In the late 19th century the Metropolitan Railway had wooden gas-lit carriages pulled by steam locomotives that travelled through tunnels from Paddington, linking Euston and King’s Cross before passing Farringdon Road, to Smithfield becoming the world’s first underground railway. The continental term Metro comes from this period. In 1905 electrical multiple units were tried leading to the introduction of electric locomotives in 1908 to reduce the smoke and steam in the tunnels. However, it was not until 1915 that the company’s marketing department coined the term Metroland. It was inspirational, capturing

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such as “ribbons of housing” and, like my colleague’s remark, areas that are tasteless. Taste is a moot point but popularity is less so. In the 21st century, the 1930s style houses in Worcester Park are still much soughtafter. Juxtaposed with the optimistic housing market of the ‘30s comes sadness, Worcester Park Station was “replaced”, in other words, it was demolished and a new one built. Thankfully, its twin-brother escaped this misfortune and still exists today, protected by Listing as a good example of 19th century railway architecture. You can see it by visiting Ewell West Station. I am sure I would have admired The Square opposite Worcester Park Station, a charming corner with a gas-lit street lamp. Its three-storey terrace with a parade of small shops had a small post office separating it from a pub called The Railway Inn (not the Worcester Park Tavern). This spot was “modernised” for reasons I am unaware. Its loss is a shame because, even in photographs, I get the feeling The Square was atmospheric. Close-by, Worcester Park House was another attractive property that was lost after the Second World War. It was an elegant neo-classic building that fell into disrepair and eventually razed.

It is interesting to compare my experience of house buying when I moved into the area in 1996. The estate agency’s premises were very smart with subdued lighting and a floor-to-ceiling glass front. Images of the houses for sale were on back-lit pedestals and I was welcomed by a polite young man in a blue suit, collar and tie. My house was built in 1937. The first owner was the works manager of an engineering firm in Rotherhithe. I wonder if he went to any of the estate agents selling houses in Worcester Park in the 1930s? Their offices resembled garden sheds but the house prices are quite remarkable. For £750 to £1000 you could buy a freehold property with a monthly repayment of 18/4d. That’s less than a pound. Historians call the 1930s the “Glamourous Decade” using words like sophistication, streamlining and Noel Coward but it was also a decade of division. Those in work benefitted from zero inflation and stable prices. Those out of work struggled dreadfully with substandard accommodation and an oppressive feeling of hopelessness. Yet surprisingly these years had a gaiety about them. It came to an end in 1939. Now, we can only imagine what Worcester Park was like in the days of Metroland. I would love those old black and white photographs to come alive – just for a little while.

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Best for online shopping: Honey Fed up with discount codes that turn out to be expired? Try Honey. Honey is owned by PayPal, installs in your PC or Mac’s web browser and automatically tries to find discount codes when you shop online. It knows about many online retailers and saves lots of time as well as money.

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History The History of Place Names by Catherine Rose

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The origin of our village and town names can provide a fascinating insight into their history. Did you know that the study of place names is called toponomastics? Generally, places have earned their names from the people that founded the settlement, the surrounding landscape, or the flora and fauna that have featured there. Over time, with the evolution of language and through local dialects, place names have changed throughout generations, sometimes becoming quite different versions of what they were hundreds of years ago. The UK has had a varied history, having been home to many conquering invaders and numerous tribes. Consequently, our modern place names have been contributed to by the Celts, the Anglo-Saxons, the Vikings and even the French. We often think of the Romans as having founded our major cities but their Latin names were either based on the existing Old English ones or were so radically different that their use hasn’t survived (for example, the Roman Verulamium for what is now St Albans). Many people think the word ‘chester’ is Roman but in fact its roots are Celtic. Manchester is derived from the Celtic words mamm meaning ‘a breastshaped hill’ and ceaster – ‘a fortified city’. Most of our current city, town and village names were given to them by our most ancient ancestors. Tre in a place name denotes a homestead or hamlet and was usually paired with the name of the person who owned it, so Tregare in Wales means ‘Gare’s home’. Perhaps unsurprisingly, given their proximity across the Bristol Channel, this prefix is seen even more widely in Cornwall. Another common Cornish prefix is penn which is a ‘headland’. Penzance is a conjugation of penn and sans which together mean ‘holy headland’. Like tre, a town or village name ending in by is Old Norse for ‘homestead’. The Vikings are also responsible for place names that begin or end with holm. In Old Norse, this meant ‘island’ and usually referred to a settlement surrounded by marsh or water. Water, especially rivers, features widely in place name origins. For example, Luton is derived from ‘Lea’ after the river that flows through it and tun which is Anglo-Saxon for a large farm or settlement

(which probably later evolved into our modern word ‘town’). Another common place name inclusion is ‘ham’. Hamm was Anglo-Saxon for ‘small village’ and is almost certainly the origin of the word ‘hamlet’. Mor(e) or Mer referred to a ‘lake’ in Old English (mer also means ‘sea’ in French). You can find variations of it in town names such as Cromer and Swanmore. Numerous places have the word bury in them. This did not refer to a burial plot as it might sound but is the Old English word for a large estate, known by the Anglo-Saxons as a burh. The root has also given rise to towns with ‘borough’ and ‘burgh’ in them. Stead or sted comes from the Anglo-Saxon word stede for ‘place’ (hence the word ‘homestead’ means ‘place of home’.) Featured in the town names of Stow, Stowmarket and Stow on the Wold (from wald or weald being the Old English for ‘forest’), a stow was somewhere holy. Less obviously, it also gave Bristol its name as the town was originally called ‘Brigg’s Stow’ meaning ‘the holy place by the bridge’. The suffix ley signifies a forest clearing and there are many villages and towns in the UK ending in -ley or -ly that date from a time when our island was covered in woodland. The Viking word was thwaite, seen particularly in the north today. One interesting suffix is wick or wich. This was the Anglo-Saxon noun for ‘produce’ and was bestowed on a farm with a prefix that told you what it produced. So, for example, Greenwich is said to have originally been an arable farm some

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distance from London, Woolwich, a sheep farm, while Chiswick would have been a dairy farm (chis being ‘cheese’). Other Old English words which feature in place names are cott or cote for ‘small house’ (hence our word ‘cottage’), clopp meaning ‘small hill’, combe which referred to ‘a valley’, holt for ‘a wood’, and den which was a pasture, usually for livestock like pigs (not to be confused with the suffix don which comes from the word dun meaning ‘hill’.) Many of our county names also have ancient origins. For example, ‘Essex’ was the place where the East-Saxons settled (‘East Sax’), ‘Sussex’ the South-Saxons, and Middlesex, which has now been absorbed into Greater London, was where the Middle-Saxons lived. East Anglia was also named from the tribe that once inhabited it, the Angles. Although today it is difficult to still see their origins, deciphering old place names can give us the strongest clue as to how the landscape must have once looked.

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Parkin’ some thoughts Rainbows by Nick Hazell It’s raining. Again. I’m sat here staring out of the window. It overlooks Queen’s Square in the centre of London, one of those quaint little grass squares surrounded by Georgian houses that you find about town. There is a small dog chasing a squirrel across the greenery pursued by its owner and leaving Pret carrying pedestrians in its wake. I’m also in a slightly contemplative mood. Brain surgery has that effect on a chap don’t you know. Three days ago, I had deep brain stimulation. DBS is the main type of surgery used to treat Parkinson’s when the medication just isn’t doing the job. The stuff I take works for about half an hour in the morning then takes the rest of the day off. So thanks to the feckless efforts of my medicinal workforce the Neuro-Profs suggested this as the only way forward. Essentially it involves a sort of brain pacemaker being placed under the skin which is connected by fine wires to specific parts of the brain. The idea is then that the device delivers high frequency stimulation to the affected parts. If it works, it can hugely improve some of the symptoms. If it doesn’t, I’ll just be a walking interference with the airspace above New Malden. Despite Anna’s protestations that her prodigious efforts to watch Greys Anatomy should qualify her to conduct the necessary procedure on the kitchen table with some of our blunt knives, I decided that the National Hospital for Neurosurgery and Neuroscience is a better and somewhat more mainstream option. Not put off by the Surgeon’s meaty hands, I survived the surgery and am now waiting to see whether this new addition to the Hazell physique will give rise to the potential benefits all of which seem seem wonderful or be another aimless wander up a dark, dank and somewhat pointless alley to nowhere.

flash his guests over the Christmas turkey. So far, the only sign of out of character behaviour has been in response to the constantly rude, complaining, farting, button pressing occupant of bed 12 who insists on speaking to his extended Cypriot family on speaker phone at 3am each morning. I suddenly heard myself shouting “SHUT THE **** UP YOU *******FAT, FLATULENT OLD GIT. Oh, did I just say that out loud.” Fortunately, despite the potentially pleasing aliteration and according to my learned friend in bed 9, a QC with a tumour up his nose, only the last eight of these words made it into circulation. Still, I’ll just be relieved when they’ve turned on the equipment and all will become clear. I’m not asking much. I’d just like to be able to take the mutt for a stroll or walk down the street without performing a demented Riverdance. Being in this mess for so long though it’s hard to think of life being different. I suppose I need to be positive and hope for the best. I need to trust that the experts know their stuff, perhaps listen to more country and western, lock away the valuables and remember to move the turkey. After all, as Dolly Parton once said, “I guess if you want the rainbow you’ve got to put up with the raIn.”

Leaving aside potential death, pain, confusion and flat batteries, the side effect that most got my attention was the risk of a change in personality. Some might think I could do with that but I’ve only just got used to not being a work obsessed arse. That and its consequences have been the only positives of having this disease. I don’t want some implant that makes me a Hank Williams devotee inclined to gamble away the family silver and

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0208 394 2555

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Last month we reported nearly half our sales agreed were to first time buyers. This month none were. The late summer market is often marked by that change as first-time buyers tend not to have school aged children and therefore take their summer break just as the school term starts. Consequently, they are less likely to go house hunting, but the effect is more marked than we expected this year. Over two thirds of buyers this month are upsizing and three-quarters already live locally, a slight increase on last month which is not unrelated to the lack of first time buyers as they are more likely to currently live out of the area.

Covid continues to dominate the news. Restrictions are increasing in the North and time will tell whether that extends here, but we are very aware of the impact so far. Spring and Summer are periods during which we reconnect with our neighbours. People are out and about able to catch up with each other. For those who can get out those accidental meetings made the lockdown period a lot more bearable. The shorter, colder, wetter days ahead will make meeting up with people more difficult for all but one of the strengths of our area is the community. Talking to locals daily has made us very aware of how much help has been given and how it has been appreciated. A couple of well known locals have been recognised in the honours list however there is an army of volunteers who checked on those who were isolating, ran food banks, delivered shopping and undertook innumerable little tasks to help. We would like to say a huge thank you and let them know there is an immense amount of gratitude amongst those that needed help.

There are anecdotal reports the market is beginning to cool in London but there is less evidence of a similar slow down locally. Most people start their search with a broad look at areas and then hone in. Proximity to amenities, schools and transport are important as are the styles and size of property built in an area. By the time they are ready to commit buyers can often give us a very short list of specific roads they would be interested in. We have really LITTLE EXCITEMENTS noticed that, in this time of restrictions, the pace of life has slowed enough for people to Meanwhile our lettings team has found that when appliances need replacement the discuss more and browse less. more affordable models have been out of Our team are all locals and know the area stock because of a reduction in the numbers very well indeed. It’s been a pleasure to manufactured in the spring. For reasons we share that knowledge to help buyers find will never understand, break downs always their perfect new home and, whilst that is seem to come in clusters, with washing often in one of the roads they have machines being the latest, so it is with some excitement that we can report you can identified, it is equally likely to be in a finally obtain a reasonably priced location they hadn’t previously considered, replacement. It’s the little things in life we or been aware of. are so grateful for at this time!

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This warming veggie stew will hit the spot on a cold autumn evening. Serve with steamed couscous or orzo pasta instead of rice, if preferred. Serves 4 • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Ready in 50 mins

1 tbsp olive oil 2 onions, peeled and diced 2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed 1 tsp ground cumin 2 tsp smoked paprika 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper 2 x 400g cans chopped tomatoes 2 tbsp tomato puree 1 tsp brown sugar 2 x 400g cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed Salt and freshly ground black pepper Cooked long grain rice, to serve 2 tbsp freshly chopped parsley, to garnish

1. Heat the oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat. Add the onions and fry for 8-10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until softened and golden, adding the garlic after 5 minutes. 2. Stir in the spices and cook for 1-2 minutes until fragrant then add the tomatoes, puree and sugar. Simmer gently for 15-20 minutes until the sauce has thickened, stirring occasionally. 3. Stir in the chickpeas and simmer for a further 10 minutes. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Serve with cooked long grain rice and garnished with the parsley. TIP Stir a handful of baby spinach leaves in to the stew just before the end of cooking time, if liked.

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Getting Fruity

by Pippa Greenwood

Would you like to grow some fruit in your garden, but are a bit short on space? There’s a simple solution: make the fruit work in more ways than one. Fruit trees, canes and bushes need not be just productive and tasty, but can also be made to perform other functions in a garden – and with a bit of extra thought and creativity, you can make best use of their good looks too. Fruit plants are available at most times of year, but it is between about now and early next year that the widest selection is available from specialist fruit nurseries as ‘bare root’ plants, and this is also the perfect time to plant fruit. A simple and otherwise boring metal arch can easily You can buy these ready-trained and the horizontal be transformed into a fruity delight if you train tree ' P U T Yarms O Uare R generally G A R Dabout E N 45cm M A(18ins) I N T above E N Aground NCE IN THE fruit such as apples or pears up the vertical sides and H A N Dlevel, S Omeaning F SOM O Ncan E easily W Hstep O over REA LY CARES' thatEyou theLapple. over the top. Make sure you have perfect pollination Covered with blossom in spring and fruit later in the (and so maximum crops) by choosing two different summer, they look great and taste wonderful too! apples, one planted up each side of the arch. Choose - Tree surgery - One off Tidy apples in the same pollination group and they will Stump Grinding Vines areMaintenance another great option, and have the each pollinate the other. You can use cordon apples or - Garden - Strimming - Decking Lawns potential and to produce a good crop in the UK if and grownWeeding simple ‘whips’ (basically a straight stem and the least in a sheltered, sunny spot. They can be trained over Garden clearance expensive way to buy fruit). A good fruit tree nursery - Hedge Trimming will be able to advise you as to the best combination Path and Patio Washing - Landscaping to grow.

Cherries can do surprisingly well in a large pot or planter, or in a wooden half-barrel. The combination of their lovely white blossom in spring followed by shiny cherries in the summer also means that they make an attractive plant for a sunny, sheltered patio or back yard. When you buy your cherry make sure you ask for ‘PUT YOUR GARDEN MAINTENANCE INTel: THE020 8330 7787 one on what is called a ‘dwarfing rootstock’ , such as info@cypressgardenservices.co.uk HANDS OF SOMEONE WHO REALLY CARES’ Gisela 5, meaning that the variety you select has been www.cypressgardenservices.co.uk Mobile: 07958 727 2 grafted on to a different cherry – one that will ensure it - One off Tidy does not get too big. If space is really limited then there are many types of fruit that take up extremely little space. You can either get varieties sold as Ballerina apples or, for even better value and to increase the range of varieties you can choose from, choose cordon apples or pears and simply train them vertically. These will form columnar trees that can be spaced 60-90cm (2-3ft) apart. To keep the shape good and compact, you’ll need to prune the fruiting laterals in summer and restrict the height of the trees to 1.8-2.4m (6-8ft). 'PUT

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Perfect for planting at the front of a vegetable plot or a flower border, a stepover is basically trained to form just one ‘arm’ of fruit to the left and one to the right.

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27/10/2020 06:38:21


a wall or allowed to grow over a pergola to create shade. Many vines have leaves that take on fabulous autumnal colours. There was a time when growing a peach in this country meant having massive greenhouses (and fleets of gardeners to tend them!), but nowadays there are a number of varieties readily available that grow well and produce a very worthwhile crop. If you have the space, I’d recommend Avalon for its ability to crop in a warm summer, but there are several varieties available on sufficiently dwarfing root stocks that will do well in good-sized containers. Try peach Bonanza grafted on to a St Julien rootstock to keep it compact, which has attractive pink blossom and, despite its dwarf size, produces full-sized fruit. Hybrid berries can also be trained over arches to form useful shade and a very delicious crop. There are several options – one of my favourites is when they are loosely tied to a chunky wooden arch. You can then enjoy the flowers in spring or summer, and the rich good looks of the fruit in summer or autumn. Strawberries in a pot can crop heavily if kept well fed and watered. Either plant them into a large pot or other container full of good quality compost, or

go for a special strawberry planter – which is rather like a large urn with lots of planting holes around the sides where one strawberry plant goes into each hole. The end result looks good and you’ll have the added advantage that it is harder for the slugs and snails to get to the fruit! Visit Pippa’s website (www.pippagreenwood.com) to book Pippa for a gardening talk at your gardening club or as an after-dinner speaker.

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Puzzle Time fairly easy

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not so easy

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CODEWORD Codeword

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Each letter in this puzzle is 3 represented by a number between 1 and 26. The Each letter in this puzzle is 3 codes for three letters are represented by a different number shown. As you find the between 1 and 26. The codes for letters enter them in the box three letters are shown. Once you 24 below. have filled these throughout the grid you can start guessing words and 3 reveal other letters. As you find the letters enter them in the box below. 26

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Makes 14 Ready in 30 mins, plus chilling • 50g hazelnuts, chopped • 50g pecans, chopped • 50g dried ready-to-eat apricots, chopped • 50g Medjool dates, stones removed and chopped • 2 tbsp smooth peanut butter • 1 tbsp coconut oil, melted • 50g desiccated coconut • 1 tbsp honey or agave syrup

These no-bake energy balls are packed with dried fruit and nuts and are great for on-the-go snacks. They can be stored in the fridge for up to two weeks. 1. Place the hazelnuts and pecans in a food processor and pulse until finely ground. 2. Add the apricots, dates, peanut butter, coconut oil and half the coconut to the processor and process until everything is combined. Add the honey or agave syrup and pulse briefly. 3. Divide and shape the mixture into about 14 balls. Spread the rest of the coconut on a plate and roll each ball in the coconut to coat. Chill for 1 hour or until firm. Store in an airtight container in the fridge.

TIP Use any combination of nuts you prefer and replace the dried apricots with dried figs or prunes for a change of flavour.

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Home Instead - Caring through Covid Living through a pandemic has reminded us that human contact shouldn’t be underestimated. We at Home Instead know that the bond between our clients and CAREGivers is special, but we could never have anticipated just how dedicated our CAREGivers have become to supporting our clients through lockdown and beyond. We wanted to highlight just a couple. Overcoming feelings of anxiety: Many clients chose to self-isolate during the initial lockdown. Carly was asked to go back to one such client after nearly three months of no contact. Carly’s client, Joan, suffers with anxiety and Carly was nervous too. With lots of gentle encouragement Carly was allowed in and they both started to relax, calmed by the precautions Carly had taken. The client’s daughter hadn’t been allowed to visit since March and anyone else who had tried, including her two sons, couldn’t get over the threshold and were only allowed to talk to her through the window. Carly’s professionalism and understanding gave Joan the confidence to let her in. Thank you, Carly. Creative and cultural calls: Dianne and Vera are both music lovers, it is part of the reason they have bonded so well as client and CAREGiver. As a musician, Dianne can bring real joy to Vera with her visits but when the lockdown interrupted their time together

Dianne arranged video calls with Vera so that they could continue their musical sessions online. The sessions brought so much happiness to Vera and they are now regularly with each other again. Thank you, Dianne for your creative communication skills. Raising spirits and funds for charity: We couldn’t be with our clients for Macmillan’s Coffee Morning this year, so we provided CAREGivers with coffee-mornings-in-a-box instead. Nearly a hundred impromptu coffee mornings in client’s homes were hosted across Wimbledon and Kingston, lifting moods, and helping raise money for a great cause. Moments like these have helped return some normality in times that are anything but. We are always looking for new and innovative ways to deliver the right support at the right time. Reflecting on the last few months is a chance to feel truly proud of this outstanding team. If you would like to chat with one of our Care Managers about any aspect of care at home, please call 020 8942 4137 and Nancy or Tina will be happy to discuss how we can help.

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Solutions

CodeWord Codeword

Solution

Quiz

1. Bram Stoker’s Dracula 2. Ronald Reagan 3. Wednesday 4. Marilyn Monroe’s 5. Jackie Collins 6. c) for richer, for poorer 7. Rod Stewart 8. Adrian Mole 9. Princess Diana 10. Ross

Sudokus 'PUT YOUR GARDEN MAINTENANCE IN THE HANDS OF SOMEONE WHO REALLY CARES'

Pictograms - Tree surgery - One off Tidy 1. Fancy That - Stump Grinding - Garden Maintenance 2. A Stitch In Time - Strimming and Weeding - Decking 3. Dead Ofand TheLawns Night - Garden clearance - Hedge Trimming Wordwheel NEWSPAPER - Path and Patio Washing - Landscaping

‘PUT YOUR GARDEN MAINTENANCE INTel: THE020 8330 7787 info@cypressgardenservices.co.uk HANDS OF SOMEONE WHO REALLY CARES’ www.cypressgardenservices.co.uk Mobile: 07958 727 27 - One off Tidy - Garden Maintenance - Decking and Lawns - Hedge Trimming - Landscaping - Tree surgery - Stump Grinding - Strimming & Weeding - Garden clearance - Path & Patio Washing IN THE INTENANCE GARDEN MA RES' REALLY CA 'PUT YOUR EONE WHO M O S F O S HAND - Tree surgery g - One off Tidy - Stump Grindin nance Weeding - Garden Mainte - Strimming and ns - Decking and Law den clearance Gar g min shing Trim ge Wa o Hed - Path and Pati - Landscaping

Contact us on: Tel: 020 8330 7787 or 07958 727 272 info@cypressgardenservices.co.uk www.cypressgardenservices.co.uk

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rdenservices.co.uk info@cypressga enservices.co.uk www.cypressgard

Tel: 020 8330 7787 272 Mobile: 07958 727

27/10/2020 06:38:29


n

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Profile for jenny stuart

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