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Ansonia Cowl book 14

WINTER/SPRING 2018 NEWSLE T TER


TA B L E O F

Contents DESIGNER INTERVIEW

| 4

Sachiko Uemura F E AT U R E D K N I T PAT T E R N

| 8

Starry Shawl F E AT U R E D C R O C H E T PAT T E R N

| 12

Mindfulness Shawl BOOK SPOTLIGHT

| 18

Book 13: Shawl Road, Book 14: Mechita & Sock BEHIND THE SCENES

| 22

Meet Mariana NEW COLORS

| 26

Speckled Mechita QUICKIES AND MFPP PROGRAMS

| 28

What You Need To Know UPCOMING EVENTS

| 30

Trunk Shows and Fairs

Douglass, Offset Triangle Shawl book 13


DESIGNER INTERVIEW

Sachiko Uemura Sachiko Uemura is a Japanese designer, who knits and designs from her home in Tokyo. While living in Portland, Oregon, she started self-publishing her patterns under the name “knittimo” on Ravelry in 2011. She always finds a way to keep her hands busy and full of beautiful fabrics! With whatever she is toying with at the time, she has a way of incorporating quirky or romantic motifs with interesting combinations of materials. Recently, Sachiko has been focusing on creating a style of simple and elegant designs for cowls, shawls, and scarves. We know you’ll love her designs as much as we do and enjoy her insightful answers to our questions below!

What inspired you to start knitting? My knitting life started with a chance encounter in a yarn shop back in 2009. I taught myself how to knit when I was a child but wasn’t as passionate about the hobby until the autumn of 2009 when I happened to find a beautiful yarn shop in downtown Portland, Oregon. The yarn shop was right next to the fabric store where I shopped while I was sewing. I remember

4 | D e signe r I nte r vie w

I was fascinated with the shop’s gorgeous display of yarns and beautifully knitted samples, so I was instantly inspired to pick up my knitting needles again. I soon found at least 2 more yarn shops within walking distance from my place and many more around the city. I think such a knitterfriendly environment of Portland and rainy weather of Pacific Northwest contributed to my renewed passion for knitting.

What was your very first project? I don’t exactly remember my very first project in childhood … it must have been a garter stitch scarf or something like that. My first project after restarting knitting in Portland was a pair of socks. I found a very interesting sock-knitting book of patterns with lovely illustrations and learned lots of things that were totally new to me, including how to read written instructions or


Spring Kerchief

chart symbols and how to use circular needles. My very first sock ended up being too big and unwearable, but I still cherish the memory. When did you discover malabrigo yarn? I got to know of Malabrigo yarn through Ravelry soon after I started knitting seriously and first saw them in person at a local yarn shop in Portland. It was love at first sight (and touch)! My very first Malabrigo was Worsted in Olive; I made a cowl with it and was deeply impressed with its subtle variegation of color, nice hand and warmth! When designing do you draw inspiration from anything or anyone in particular? I love romantic motifs like flowers, ribbons, stars, polka dots, and try to bring them out in my designs in a way that is not overly feminine but elegant enough to add a little extra charm to the outfits. Sometimes designs used in jewelry and other fashion items give me ideas. Do you have any preferred

(continue)

D e si gne r I nte r v i e w | 5


Spring Kerchief 6 | D e signe r I nte r vie w


techniques or styles you use when designing? Simple and clean designs which use shiny beads are my favorite. I find the contrast between wool and glass very appealing and it is fun to play with ways of combing the two. I change my method of beading to suit the design, but I would say I prefer attaching beads while I knit using a small hook rather than pre-stringing beads onto the yarn. When choosing beads for my project, I make sure that the color will not fade or rub off easily - a lesson I learned from my earliest experiences. Knitting with beads is quite easy once you get used to it, I would love to see more people give it a try. What other hobbies do you have besides knitting? I love to make things with my hands, so I have dabbled in several other arts and crafts such as flower arrangement, decoupage, tassel making, upholstery and faux finish painting, but lately what I enjoy most besides knitting is dressmaking. I had been taking classes for some years and although it is less relaxing than knitting for me, it’s fun and exciting to see my chosen fabric turn into the garments rather quickly. I usually choose designs

from dressmaking magazines then draw the pattern using my own measurements so the finished garment fits perfectly. Walking is another thing I have recently taken up if you can call it a hobby. Do you have any big plans for 2018? Nothing big, but I have some jewelry-inspired design ideas in mind. I also hope to publish some patterns in 2018. Apart from Lace, which you use a lot in your designs, what is your favorite yarn / colorway? As you know, I’m a big fan of Lace. The delicate texture of the singleply fine Merino is just irresistible! It’s so soft and warm and knits up beautifully. Apart from Lace, I particularly like Finito, Mechita, Silkly Merino, and Worsted for the same reason. Favorite colorway? It’s a hard question to answer. I love mildly variegated, semi-solid colorways; tender grays such as Pearl or Polar Morn and fresh greens such as Apple Green or Lettuce are among the best.

and colorways coming from every corner of the world, the knitting community truly is world-wide! Does your global background or international influence ever effect your designs or techniques? I don’t think my designs or techniques necessarily have to do with my global background or international influence. However, I wouldn’t have developed my passion for knitting so deeply without getting connected to the international knitting community, Ravelry – a great place to get inspired and share passion with like-minded people from around the world! As a designer, I’m most grateful for their encouragement and kind support on my work. It’s not rare that I spend quite some time there searching for the yarn suitable for a project. It clearly plays an important role in my designing life!

~ CONNEC T WITH SACHIKO

With designers like yourself, yarn,

D e si gne r I nte r v i e w | 7


F E AT U R E D K N I T PAT T E R N

Starry Shawl designed by Sachiko Uemura P A TTER N INFORM A TI ON SI Z E S

NE E DL E S

One Size

4.0mm / US 6 needles

F I N ISH ED MEA SUR E M E N T S

3.5mm / US4 32” / 80 cm circular needle, or size to obtain gauge

Length along top edge: 3″ / 60cm Width: 4″ / 6cm Y A RN A MO U N T S

1 skein of malabrigo Yarn Sock, #SW806 Impressionist Sky

2.75mm / US2 32” / 80 cm circular needle, or size to obtain gauge 0.6 mm / US16 steel crochet hook (for beading) NOT IONS

694 pcs. of size 8 round seed beads

GAU GE

20 sts / 36 rows = 4″ / 10cm in stockinette stitch; Gauge is not critical, but will affect yardage and size.

Stitch marker Blocking pins (optional)

A B BR EVIATIONS inc’d

increased

rep

repeat

k

knit

RS

right side

k2tog

knit two sts together (1 st decrease)

sb

slide and set a bead next to the st just knitted

m1L

with left-hand needle, lift strand between sts from front, knit through back loop

sm

slip marker

st(s)

stitch(es)

WS

wrong side

yo

yarn over (1 st increase)

m1R

with left-hand needle, lift strand between sts from back, knit through front loop

p

purl

8 | Fe a tu re d K nit Pa tter n


Fe at ure d K ni t Pa t ter n | 9


10 | Fe a tu re d K nit Patter n


T E C H N IQ UES

BE ADE D G AR T E R BOR DE R

HOW T O P L A CE B E AD S

Row 1 (RS): k2, yo, k to marker, m1R, sm, k1 (center st), m1L, k to last 2 sts, yo, k2. (349 sts)

Beads on the eyelets are placed using a hook as you knit. Beads on the border are strung onto yarn, slid and set on the garter ridge as you knit. D I RECTIO N S GA RT ER T A B A N D S E T U P

Using the larger needle (3.5 mm), cast on 2 sts. Knit 2 for 7 rows (= garter stitch). Then without turning the piece, pick up and knit 3 sts from garter ridges on the left side of the piece and 2 sts from cast-on sts. (7 sts) Set-up row (WS): k2, yo, p2, place marker, p1, yo, k2. (9 sts) Row 1 (RS): k2, yo, k to marker, m1R, sm, k1 (center st), m1L, k to last 2 sts, yo, k2. (4 sts inc’d) Row 2 (WS): k2, yo, p to last 2 sts, yo, k2. (2 sts inc’d) Repeat Rows 1 – 2 until Row 14 is completed. (51 sts) MAIN B O D Y W IT H E Y E L E T S AN D B E AD S

Work the following 14 rows for 7 times. Row 1 (RS) (eyelet row): k2, yo, rep [k5, yo, k2tog] to 2 sts before marker, k2, m1R, sm, k1 (center st), m1L, k3, yo k2tog, rep [k5, yo, k2tog] to last 6 sts, k4, yo, k2. Row 2 (WS): k2, yo, p to last 2 sts, yo, k2. Row 3 (beading row): k2, yo, k1, rep [k6, put a bead on the next st and knit it] to 4 sts before marker, k4, m1R, sm, k1 (center st), m1L, k4, rep [put a bead on the next st and knit it, k6] to last 3 sts, k1, yo, k2. Row 4: same as Row 2. Row 5: k2, yo, k to marker, m1R, sm, k1 (center st), m1L, k to last 2 sts, yo, k2. Row 6: same as Row 2. Repeat Rows 5 – 6 until Row 14 is completed.

Break yarn and string 526 beads onto yarn. Change to the smaller needle (2.75 mm) and work Rows 2 – 6. Row 2 (WS): k2, yo, k2, rep [sb, k2] to 1 st before marker, sb, k1 (center st), sm, rep [sb, k2] to last 2 sts, yo, k2. (351 sts) Row 3: same as Row 1. (355 sts) Row 4: k2, yo, k1, rep [sb, k2] to 1 st before marker, sb, k1 (center st), sm, rep [sb, k2] to last 3 sts, sb, k1, yo, k2. (357 sts) Row 5: same as Row 1. (361 sts) Row 6: same as Row 2. (363 sts) BIND OFF AND FINIS HING

Change to the larger needle (3.5 mm). Choose your preferred edge and bind off all sts. (Option 1) Straight edge: k1, *place the worked st back onto left-hand needle, k2togtbl, rep from * to end. (Option 2) Picot edge: *Using Cable Cast-On method (see below), CO 2 sts, BO 5 sts, place the remaining st on right-hand needle back onto left-hand needle, rep from * to end. Cable Cast-On: Insert right-hand needle between the first and second sts on left-hand needle, knit a st (don’t release anything from needle), place the newly created st onto left-hand needle. Weave in ends. Soak in water for a while and block.

Stitch count after working 14-row repeat 1 (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) time(s): 93 (135, 177, 219, 261, 303, 345) sts.

Fe a t ure d K ni t Pa t ter n | 11


Shown in “Dried Orange” and “Natural”


F E AT U R E D C R O C H E T PAT T E R N

Mindfulness designed by Elena Fedotova PATTERN I NFORM ATI ON SIZ E S

Y AR N AMOUNT S

One Size

Main Color (MC): 1 skein malabrigo Mechita, #895 Dried Orange

F IN I S H E D M E AS U R E M E N T S

Length: 55¼″ / 140cm

Contrast Color (CC): 2 skeins malabrigo Mechita, #063 Natural

Width: 22½″ / 7cm

NOT IONS

CROC H E T H O O K S

Tapestry needle Stitch marker

3.5mm / E-4 hook T ECH N I Q U E S

Working in back loops, Front post stitches, Single crochet (sc), Double crochet (dc)

G AUG E

20 stitches and 15 rows = 4″/10 cm, in textured st patt

ABBREVI ATI ONS cc

contrasting color

M

marker

ch

chain

MC

main color

dc

double crochet

pm

place marker

mm

millimeters

patt

pattern

rep

repeat

sc

single crochet

FPdc

front post double crochet

sk

skip

FPdc2tog

two front post double crochet together

st(s)

stitch(es)

Fe a t ure d C ro c he t Pa t ter n | 13


Shown in “Dried Orange” and “Natural” N OTES To prevent tightening of the fabric, work all FP stitches higher than usual, not around the posts, but right under their tops. You may also want to work the last st of each row higher (hdc and tr instead of sc and dc) to also help prevent tightening along the top of the shawl. D I RECTIO N S TEXT U RED ST P AT T

Row 1 (RS): With MC, 5 sc in magic ring. Turn. 5 sts Row 2 (WS): Ch 3 (counts as dc here and throughout), 2 dc in first st, 1 dc in next st, 5 dc in next st, PM in center (third) st, 1 dc in next st, 3 dc in last st. Turn. 13 sts Move M up to center st each row. Row 3: Ch 1, 2 sc in first st, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around first sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around next (second) sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around same (second) sc two rows 14 | Fe a tu re d C rochet Patter n

below, 1 sc in marked st, FPdc around next (third) sc two rows below, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around same (third) sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around next (fourth) sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, 2 sc in last st. Turn. 17 sts Row 4: Ch 3, 2 dc in first st, dc across to M, 5 dc in marked st, dc across to last st, 3 dc in last st. Turn. 25 sts Row 5: Ch 1, 2 sc in first st, FPdc around first sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around next (second) sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, [FPdc around next FPdc, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st] across to one st before M, FPdc around previously used FPdc, sk 1 dc, 3 sc in marked st, FPdc around next FPdc, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around previously used FPdc, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, [FPdc around next FPdc, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st] across to last four sts, [FPdc around next sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st] twice, 1 sc in last (just used) st. Turn. 29 sts Row 6: As Row 4. 37 sts


Row 7: Ch 1, 2 sc in first st, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around first sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, [FPdc around next FPdc, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st] across to two sts before M, FPdc around next sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around previously used sc two rows below, 1 sc in marked st, FPdc around next sc two rows below, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around previously used sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, [FPdc around next FPdc, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st] across to last three sts, FPdc around next sc two rows below (2nd to last sc), sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, 2 sc in last st. Turn. Cut yarn. 41 sts RI BB IN G ST P A T T

Row 8: With CC and working in back loop only, ch 1, 2 sc in first st, sc across to M, 3 sc in marked st, sc across to last st, working in both loops, 2 sc in last st. Turn. 45 sts Rows 9-11: As Row 8. 57 sts

Shown in “Piedras” and “Natural”

Fe a t ure d C ro c he t Pa t ter n | 15


DI AMO N D ST P A T T

R IBBING S T PAT T

Row 12: Continue with CC, ch 3, 2 dc in first st, dc across to M, 3 dc in marked st, dc across to last st, 3 dc in last st. Turn. 63 sts

Rows 16-19: As Row 8. Cut yarn. 93 sts

Row 13: Ch 1, 1 sc in first st, FPdc around first sc two rows below, 3 sc, [FPdc2tog around previously used sc and next fourth sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 3 sc] across to M (last sc is worked in marked st), FPdc around previously used sc, 1 sc in same (marked) st, 2 sc, [FPdc2tog around previously used sc and next fourth sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 3 sc] across to last five sts, FPdc2tog around previously used st and next third sc two rows below (2nd to last sc), sk 1 dc, 3 sc, FPdc around previously used sc, 1 sc in last st. Turn. 67 sts

Row 20: With MC, as Row 4. 101 sts

Row 14: As Row 12. 73 sts Row 15: Ch 1, 2 sc in first st, 4 sc, FPdc2tog around FPdc and next FPdc2tog, sk 1 dc, 3 sc, [FPdc2tog around previously used and next FPdc2tog, sk 1 dc, 3 sc] across to three sts before M, FPdc2tog around previously used FPdc2tog and next FPdc, sk 1 dc, 2 sc, 3 sc in marked st, 2 sc, FPdc2tog around previously used FPdc and next FPdc2tog, sk 1 dc, 3 sc, [FPdc2tog around previously used and next FPdc2tog, sk 1 dc, 3 sc] across to last six sts, FPdc2tog around previously used FPdc2tog and last FPdc, sk 1 dc, 4 sc, 2 sc in last st. Turn. 77 sts 16 | Fe a tu re d C rochet Patter n

T E XT UR E D S T PAT T

Row 21: Ch 1, 2 sc in first st, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around first sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, [sk 1 sc two rows below, FPdc around next sc, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st] across to two sts before M, FPdc around next sc two rows below, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around previously used sc, 1 sc in marked st, FPdc around next sc two rows below, 1 sc in next st, FPdc around previously used sc, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, [sk 1 sc two rows below, FPdc around next sc, sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st] across to last three sts, FPdc around next sc two rows below (2nd to last sc), sk 1 dc, 1 sc in next st, 2 sc in last st. Turn. 105 sts Row 22: As Row 4. 113 sts Row 23: As Row 5. 117 sts Row 24: As Row 4. 125 sts Row 25: As Row 7. Cut yarn. 129 sts Repeat Rows 8-25 twice, repeat Rows 8-19 once. Fasten off and weave in ends.


Shown in “Piedras” and “Natural”

Fe a t ure d C ro c he t Pa t ter n | 17


more choices, more freedom,

more books! Dorilton, Lace Hat, book 13


M A L A B R I G O

B O O K

1 3

SHAWL ROAD

M A L A B R I G O

B O O K

1 4

M E C H I TA & S O C K

In this issue we want to shine a light on the launch of not one but two books! For the first time ever we are releasing two books at the same time, Book 13: Shawl Road and Book 14: Mechita & Sock, both featuring patterns by some of our favorite knitwear designers. First up is Book 13: Shawl Road. This Book is a wonderful journey down the many paths your needles can walk to create a variety of Shawls. We use several varieties of our yarns, from our thickest like Rasta or Caracol to the thinner Finitio, to achieve textures like worked brioches, cables, and combinations of laces or colored stripes. There are designs for beginners and the ambitious alike, enough for anyone to make a gorgeous and warm shawl. Book 14: Mechita & Sock consists of designs for jumpers, hats, socks, and other garments which use malabrigo Mechita or Sock exclusively. Both of these yarns are fingering weight and as such can be used interchangeably, to create the precise effect you want. They can be used together to create eclectic and powerful features which boosts the effect of any of the laces, loop stitches, or diagonal lines found in this book. Every design has its own unique pattern and charm that you are sure to fall in love with. You’ll be counting the seconds until you can next cast on. Visit your local yarn store for hard copies of the book, and individual patterns will be available for download. We hope you like our new book, and that there will be many more to come.

Bo o k S p o t l i gh t | 19


Union, Chevron Triangle Shawl book 13

Sterling Place, Happy Pi Shawl book 13

20 | B o o k S potl ig ht

Washington Park, Eyelet Lace Shawl book 13

Degraw, Angular Shawl book 13


Dakota, Textured Hat book 14

Briarclift, Textured Pullover book 14

Ansonia, Scalloped Cowl book 14

Orienta, Wake Shawl book 14

Bo o k S p o t l i gh t | 21


22 | Be hind the S cen es


BEHIND THE SCENES

Meet Mariana In our ‘Behind The Scenes’ feature we introduce you to one of our much loved employees here at malabrigo yarn. Mariana has been with malabrigo since the very beginning and helped shaped it into the company you know and love today. She works directly with customers as well as ensuring the office continues running smoothly. While juggling an array of tasks, Mariana is one of the faces of malabrigo so to unwind she does yoga and pilates to give her the much needed energy to keep on top of everything. In this ‘Behind the Scenes’, Mariana provides a wonderful insight into the world of malabrigo.

How long have you been working for malabrigo yarn? I’m actually one of the employees who has been here the longest! I started 2006 so it’s been almost 12 years now. I’ve always done a little bit of everything so I’m a bit of a problem-solver around here. What do you do for the company? Oh, I do a lot of things so it’s difficult to describe: I work directly with the customer by processing orders and taking payments. The customers are mostly from the US but some could be from all over the world like China, Singapore or Austrailia. When there are special orders for specific customers I

handle that process and make sure it reaches them all right, so it’s quite a lot of things. What is your favorite yarn and colorway? My favorite yarns are Caracol and Rasta because they are quick and easy to knit with. The other yarn I quite like is Silky Merino because it is shiny and soft, but that might be because my grandmother likes to use it a lot when she knits. What sort of things do you knit? I am not a very skillful knitter. I love knitting scarves and hats; I’ve recently learnt a new technique for hats which makes them easier

to knit up . Personally, I love warm colors in multi or semi-solids, in reds, purples, oranges, yellows and natural, for example, some of my favorite colorways are Archangel, Piedras, Burgundy, Volcan, Glitter, but there are so many more! Does your Grandmother knit a lot then? My grandmother (90 years old!!) is an avid and talented knitter and always knits for me!.I have beautiful cardigans, sweaters, and even dresses made by her. I love yarn and really hate winter, so malabrigo always keeps me warm. One of the garments she made was from Malabrigo Book 4, the (continue) Be hi nd t he S c en es | 23


gorgeous Alcazar dress, with Rios Cumparsita. She doesn’t know how to “read” patterns because she learnt to knit from a friend when she was very young so she never needed to. She just looked at at the pictures of the garment and immediately knows how to reproduce it!! What sort of relationships do you think the shops have with malabrigo? Most of the shops are really happy with malabrigo. They are usually big fans and get really excited when new colors or types of yarn are launched. Many have visited our warehouse and enjoyed they experience, since they had the opportunity to learn about the process and get to know some of us. I guess malabrigo tries to transmit a friendly sense of

24 | Be hind the S cen es

home to the customers, with our simplicity and eagerness to help. What is the environment like in the office? The atmosphere at the office is really relaxed. We work hard but in a great environment, making jokes and laughing. Even when work is crazy, we try to to keep everything warm and relaxed. Our bosses are all really easy to work with. They are flexible and have a good sense of humor which contributes to making the office a great place to work. You’ve worked in both locations, in the warehouse and in the office. Can you shed some light on the whole process? When I was working at the warehouse I was physically close to the packagers and dyers and

learnt lots about the colors, yarn types, and the dyeing process just by witnessing it everyday. Being close to the actual yarns made me learn how each of them feels and looks like, which is important information when a customers asks. That was great for me since because it gave me a real in depth understanding which is important for somebody who has been in company for so long. I also know how each yarn type is made and about the logistics of our export process, etc. Has anything changed since you started regarding the relationship between malabrigo and the shops? Probably yes, when I started (12 years ago) malabrigo was a much smaller company, so the communication was mostly over


email and not as fluent. Now we are in touch with customers all day, whenever they need we are just a phone call away which I believe has really improved our relationship with them. They are usually easy to speak to because they are very nice and understanding, so , when a problem arises, it’s easy to work things out. Many customers have been ordering from us since the very beginning so we have really close relationships with many of them. Do you have a funny anecdote? I don’t think it is funny exactly, but some years ago when I was dealing with a specific customer, I made a mistake. I accidentally charged the wrong card and instead of there being any serious problem, while fixing and sorting everything out we actually became friends. When we email each other we share stories and it makes the whole process so much better!

~


NEW COLORS IN 2018

Speckled Mechita As usual we kept ourselves busy over the winter by experimenting with more colorways. We have been trying to find new and amazing speckled colorways for you to enjoy. This release is another update for our Mechita and has an interesting natural theme, including colors inspired by different environments and other wondrous natural phenomenon. With names like Selva (Jungle), Lava, and Desert, it’s enough to transport your next project anywhere in the universe. Passiflora is a colorway inspired by a flower of the same name in Spanish, meaning Passionflower. It uses a white base with a lovely purple as the dominant color and blue as a secondary. Passiflora has a light aesthetic, softly transitioning through each color while the speckles provide a textured shimmer on top. The colorway Selva, or “Jungle”, is a natural base speckled with several colors that recreate the atmosphere of a rainforest. Similarly, Desert is a gorgeously speckled colorway with yellows and oranges to help you create your own personal oasis. Monte is a new colorway named after the indiginous bush ecosystem, Monte is speckled with dark greens, soft grays, blacks, and other subtle colors hidden in the shrubbery. The new colorways Lago (Lake) and Island are inspired by the human experience with bodies of water; Lago is a deep blue with darker navy shades emerging from within, while Island is a brighter colorway with blues and sandy yellows. Fire is another element being represented in this launch: Lava is another warm

26 | N e w Col ors

colorway speckling our Marte and black over a white base to create the experience that there is magma flowing through your needles creating something new. The next colorways, Galaxy and Supernova, are myriads of various speckled colors from all across the universe. Galaxy has a combination of purples, blues, reds, yellows, and more over a stellar white base. On the other side of a similar coin, Supernova is an explosion of all the same colors that all but obscure the white base with the variety of color. A B O N U S S P E C K L E D T R E AT ! The new launch of Mechita also includes a spectrum of three colorways that transition through shades like the waxing and waning of the Moon. Similar to our Paris Teal set, the Moon Trio transitions through the main lunar phase: The Full Moon, Crescent Moon, and New Moon. New Moon is the darkest version, with as much depth as the night’s sky and speckles glittering like the stars around it. The central shade is Crescent, a heavily speckled natural base with a range coming together to create Crescent a wonderful color cascade. Finally, at the end of the lunar cycle we reach the Full Moon, where the dominant color is the natural base and its speckles shine like the full moon brightening the entire night’s sky.


Galaxy

Supernova

Lava

Desert

Island

Lago

Selva

Moon Trio - Full

Monte

Passiflora

Moon Trio - Crescent

Moon Trio - New


SUPPORTING INDEPENDENT DESIGNERS

Q u ic k i e s a n d M F PP Pro gr ams Here at Malabrigo we are typically more focused on making beautiful yarns and colours but we also understand that yarn is only one part of the project for the crafter. This is why we have spent years collaborating with independent designers to bring you patterns to bring out the best out of our yarn. We thought it would be fun to provide a little peek into what goes on behind the scenes with two programs that we have developed specifically to support and work with, independent designers. T he MF P P P ro g r a m

T h e Ma lab rigo Qu ic kies Progra m

First off we have the Malabrigo Freelance Pattern Project (MFPP). For each MFPP, a designer proposes a theme and builds a 3-to- 6 piece collection with our yarns. We then work with them to hone the theme. Our yarns serve as the raw materials for them to craft their vision into a reality. While we support and promote the finished collection, the credit (and profit) from pattern sales remain exclusively with the designer. We feel it is important for each designer to be able to express their creative voice so we remain pretty hands-off (except the yarn of course). The designer is thus able to offer their customers the unique style of photography and pattern writing that their customers expect and love. Since creating a multipiece collection requires a lot of effort, the MFPP only comes out a few times a year.

Creating a full collection is both a daunting task and scheduleing nightmare for any designer, so we created the ‘Malabrigo Quickies’ which works with one or two skein projects. Quickies allows designers the same creative control as the MFPP but on a smaller scale. Each year we ask designers for project ideas and then gleefully sort through the proposals inspired by our yarns. The very nature of Quickies makes it easier to consider new and aspiring designers, although we still expect high standards of pattern writing and production. The schedule for Quickies is organised a year in advance, each accepted design is assigned their own month. Then, we send them yarn and they work their magic!

We have a lot of amazing patterns in the works for 2018 and beyond, so make sure to follow Malabrigo on your favorite social media platform and check out our weekly blog to be on the look out for when patterns from these two fun programs go live. If you are a designer and would like to work with us in one of these programs please send an email to our design coordinator, Barbara, at submissions@malabrigoyarn.com for more information. 2019 will come sooner than you think.

28 | Q u ick ie s and MFPP Programs


Quickie: Pendulum by Amy Miller

94

Quickie: Casper Mountain Cowl by The Firefly Hook

different designers have participated in the Quickies program with a total of 104 designs.

76 MFPP: Sunwalker by Melanie Berg

different designers have created a MFPP containing a total of 383 designs.

MFPP: Anders by Sorren Kerr and Vivian Aubrey

Qui ck i e s and M F P P Pro gr a m s | 29


Upcoming EVENTS

Did you know that we have trunk shows packed with gorgeous garments from our books available to your shop? We currently have four shows touring the country: there are three large shows that feature pieces from our most recent books, including books 10 & 11 alongside select classics from earlier books. There is also a mini-trunk show, a smaller version of the larger shows, to give your customers a tantalizing taste of malabrigo! We’d love to make your LYS our next stop. If you’re interested in scheduling a show, please email us at admin@malabrigoyarn.com.

TRUNK SHOW 1

TRUNK SHOW 3

May 15, 2018 The Modern Skein Montegomery, Texas https://themodernskein.com

May 15, 2018 The Black Sheep San Diego, CA www.theblacksheep.biz

June 15, 2018 Alpaca Direct LLC Hayden, Idaho www.alpacadirect.com

June 15, 2018 Yarnatopia Oklahoma City, Oklahoma http://yarnatopia.com

July 15, 2018 The Loopy Ewe Fort Collins, Colorado www.theloopyewe.com

TRUNK SHOW 2

MINI TRUNK SHOW

May 15, 2018 The Artful Yarn Chagrin Falls, Ohio www.theartfulyarn.com

July 15, 2018 Cast Away Yarn Shop Santa Rosa, California https://castawayyarnshop.com

June 15, 2018 Yardgoods Center Waterville, Maine www.yardgoodscenter.com

30 | Upcoming Eve nts


Bring the malabrigo trunk shows to your shop! Up c o mi ng Even t s | 31


32 | Conne c t w ith Us

Briarclift, Textured Pullover book 14


Co n ne c t With Us facebook.com/malabrigoyarn

instagram.com/malabrigoyarn

pinterest.com/malabrigo

ravelry.com/yarns/brands/malabrigo-yarn

twitter.com/MalabrigoYarn

admin@malabrigoyarn.com

Co nne c t Wi t h U s | 33


Sterling Place, Happy Pi Shawl book 14

w w w.malabr igoyar n.com

Malabrigo Newsletter | Summer 2017  
Malabrigo Newsletter | Summer 2017  
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