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LEEDS TRIBUNE THE ONLY SOURCE FOR LEEDS NEWS www.LeedsTribune.com

February 28, 2019 | Volume 4, Issue 9

50 ¢

Leeds Tribune: Growing to better serve Leeds BY CINDY FISHER

Publisher I believe a community is better when it’s served

by a community newspaper. Since my company, Kingfisher Media LLC, purchased the Leeds Tribune in September 2018, my staff and I have worked hard to bring Leeds news, features and advertising messages that help keep the community connected, in print and online.  This week, we unveil our new look, a full-size newspaper that has more room

for impactful stories, features, photos and announcements that are important to you, our readers. This new design also gives our advertisers more choices and more visibility to reach their customers. Inside, you will find sections for News, Education, Community, Lifestyle and Sports. You will continue to enjoy our standing

features: Local Heroes of the Month, our Business Spotlight and Leeds High School Athlete of the Week. And of course, Leeds resident Andrew Armstrong heads up our Lifestyle page with his popular recipe column that shares the page with puzzles and a calendar of upcoming events. Don’t forget that we have

a strong online presence. We share top stories at LeedsTribune.com, keeping you informed about news in Leeds in real time. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. If you want to keep in touch with your community, enjoy our paper at home every week with a subscription for only $26 a year. Visit leedstribune.com/about to sign up or

mail a check to P.O. Box 340, Leeds, AL 35094. You can also pick up copies for 50 cents each at Leeds Jane Culbreth Library, Mills Pharmacy Leeds and the Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce. We’d love to hear from you. Email me at publisher@ leedstribune.com and send newstips and story ideas to news@leedstribune.com.

Tech park by Leeds to bring 1,200 jobs, $85M impact BY CINDY FISHER

Leeds Tribune Staff Leeds is set to reap major benefits from the new Grand River Technology Park that Gov. Kay Ivey announced is coming last week. The park sits on the border of Leeds and the city of Birmingham, which means much of the economic ripple effect will spread to the City of Valor as this and other projects in that area grow. The tech park and relocation of the Southern Museum of Flight to the property off Barber Motorsports Parkway are estimated to bring 1,200

jobs and an economic impact of $85 million to the Birmingham area. The park is a partnership with the Alabama Department of Labor’s Abandoned Mine Land Program, U.S. Steel, the City of Birmingham, Southern Museum of Flight, Jefferson County and the City of Leeds. U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby secured federal funding for the pilot program. “This reclamation project has the potential to bring millions of dollars in economic impact, and hundreds of jobs to the Greater Birmingham area,” Ivey said in a statement. “The new Grand River

Technology Park will be a regional nexus for research and development, tourism, and light manufacturing. This project will bring positive improvements to the citizens who call this community home.” In 2018, U.S. Steel and its community partners were given approval for a $6 million grant by the ADOL AML Pilot Program toward the development of its Grand River Technology Park. The Grand River Technology Park represents a multiphase opportunity to reclaim and transform about 105 acres of undeveloped land surrounding and

including several pre-1977 abandoned coal mine lands in east Jefferson County. The governor’s office explained that dangerous abandoned mine land has been reclaimed on the property included many portals and vertical openings connected with Red Diamond Mines as well as the former Tennessee Coal and Iron Mine, all of which ceased operations in 1948. After the closure of the underground mines, a major portion of proposed development was strip-mined for coal

See TECH PARK, Page 5

Leeds wins with new location of Southern Museum of Flight

Brian Barsanti looks forward to the move to land on the outskirts of Leeds. BY MEREDITH CUMMINGS

Special to the Leeds Tribune The Southern Museum of Flight hopes to help lead the way to create new jobs in the area, and in Alabama, when the Grand River Technology Park on the outskirts of Leeds is complete. The museum will move to the new tech park from its current home adjacent to the Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport. The museum has big plans for expansion, not just physically – it will increase from the current five acres to 24 acres

– but also with a long-term view of how it can help transform industry in Alabama, said executive director Brian Barsanti. The majority of people who visit the museum are children in K-12 schools, and those visits help hit Alabama course of study standards, which helps teachers. Yet those visits serve as much more than school-day fun. Barsanti said that those children tap into the future of aviation and other industries in Alabama. “When it comes to the cornerstone of our mission being education and what we do, we do

education really well,” Barsanti said. “One thing that we identify, though, within this industry, is a need to bridge the gap between the K-12 world and the aviation industry in and of itself.” To bridge that gap, the museum’s board of directors has a plan to help serve the industry. Airbus broke ground on a new manufacturing facility in Mobile last month. Huntsville has Boeing. In addition, with other jet engine manufacturers in the state, Alabama is ripe for more aviation-related jobs. To fill this need, Barsanti said, more focus needs to be on civilians. Military, he

said, have a good tradition of already “setting people up for success and entering this industry.” “But for civilians it can be a difficult road to navigate. What we fail to do on the civilian side is to provide 12th graders who want to get into this industry, into aviation – whether it be maintenance, as a mechanic, as an engineer, as a pilot – how do you get them to that point? And how do you navigate the educational road to get there?” In addition to big plans to expand its educational outreach in its new location, the museum faces challenges in

its current location, including being in a flood pane and surrounded by homes, which make expansion difficult. A quarter of the museum’s collection is down the road from the main museum building, and the museum has slowly started to add other modes of transportation, such as cars and bicycles (the Wright brothers, Barsanti pointed out, worked on bikes before they started flying). “We are relocating is because we’ve simply run out of space,” Barsanti said. “Our museum’s collection has grown over the last several decades and I think that our founders back in the 1960s probably had no idea that we would grow to the size that we’ve become to include over 100 aircraft now.” By some estimates, the tech park project will bring 1,200 jobs and an economic impact of $85 million to the Birmingham area. The park is a partnership with the Alabama Department of Labor’s Abandoned Mine Land Program, U.S. Steel, the City of Birmingham, Southern Museum of Flight, Jefferson County and the City of Leeds. “When this opportunity came … where industrial manufacturing engineering tech firms are going to be recruited, we see this as an opportunity to help in furthering that part of our mission and bridging that gap in setting young students, who leave the 12th grade, up for success and getting into the industry. We would like to see this museum become more and more of a teaching institution.” In the museum’s three-phase plan, the first phase would move museum collections, which span over 100 years, to the new location, which would have equivalent space to the current square footage. Phases two and three involve growing the collections over many years. Barsanti envisions a future

for the museum as a careertech, teaching facility that partners with the community college system and local schools to provide educational routes to into the industry. In addition to traditional programming, certification might be offered. While “the aviation industry is booming,” Barsanti said many aviation skills transfer to other industries gaining traction in Alabama, such as the automotive industry. “So not only are you getting well equipped to serve the aviation industry, but you’re also equipping yourself to serve multiple industries within the state,” Barsanti said “The synergy that will exist between the museum, the Barber Motorsports Park, the Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum, and the other organizations that are going to eventually build and provide jobs in this area. But we want to be a multiplier when it comes to those jobs, because we want to be more of a teaching institution as we want to supply the Alabama workforce with certified candidates to fill vacancies that are going to exist, and that exist now, within this industry and in other industries.” Barsanti hopes the museum will have a hand in to help curb the shortage of pilots in the aviation industry, as well as those jobs that support pilots and airplanes. “We really want to do our part to help identify them,” he said. “One job opportunity multiplies and creates eight additional jobs for every one that they create. [Grand River Technology Park] is a nexus of tourism and engineering and manufacturing. They are all coming together in this one area of the eastern side of Birmingham and it’s a great thing. I think that we are fortunate to be a part of it.”


2

February 28, 2019

The Leeds Tribune

Community

LOCAL HERO OF THE MONTH The Leeds Tribune honors a Leeds first responder from the Leeds Police Department and Leeds Fire & Rescue. For February, we honor Sgt. Jacob Scott.

For the past five years, Sgt. Jacob Scott has worked as a detective and investigated felony crimes. Before that, he was on patrol for seven years. “Working here as a detective is exciting. When on patrol, you get to know everybody in Leeds, then you develop relationships on the street, and you start caring about the people out here. Then you get on the investigation side of it. That’s when you investigate the crimes and get to dig into them further,” Scott said. Scott enjoyed being on patrol, but he loves being

Com The Leeds Tribune is now offering a Classifieds section where posts are only 25 cents per word ($10 minimum).

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able to investigate crimes and being on the detective side of thing. He also specifically appreciates serving in Leeds. “Leeds is an exciting place to be a police officer because there’s always something to do. You’re never just sitting back. It’s a small town so you get to know everybody. When

you walk the streets, citizens say, ‘Hey, Officer Scott,’ you get more smiles and appreciation,” Scott said. “That just makes my day.” Sgt. Scott doesn’t mind putting himself in dangerous spots to protect the citizens of Leeds. “We have to put ourselves on the line, and when the

Send your classified information, including job postings, to theleedstribune@ gmail.com.

citizens see you and respect you and say thank you, man, that’s just the greatest. I like the fact I’m appreciated. It keeps you motivated,” Scott said. Sgt. Scott studied criminology in Florida and moved to Leeds after college, and he encourages other policemen to join the department.

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Dolores Hydock to present WEDDINGS ‘Soldiers in Greasepaint’ at Leeds Tribune Leeds Arts Council in the

BY NATHAN PREWETT

Special to the Leeds Tribune Presented by renowned storyteller Dolores Hydock, “Soldiers in Greasepaint” is a performance that pays tribute to USO shows that entertained soldiers in World War II. “From Utah Beach to the Philippines, from wrestlers and tap dancers to the biggest names in show business, from 16,000 servicemen in an amphitheater in southern France to 20 GIs in Jeeps

in a lonely stateside outpost, USO is free. Email The Leeds Arts Council is Camp Shows during WWII were theleedstribune@gmail.com part of a diverse, hilarious, mov- located at 8140 Parkway Drive. ing, and inspiring story of voluntarism and service.” “This program shares a next to one small slice of this big-hearted story from a remarkable time of the in U.S. history,” says a synopsis on the Facebook event page.  most-read The Birmingham Harmony pages in the Belles will perform the opening act.  “Soldiers in Greasepaint” will be held on March 9 from 7-8 p.m. Admission to this performance

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February 21, 2019

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The Leeds Tribune

February 28, 2019

Business Spotlight:

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Koplon father and son keep dentistry in the family at former Leeds Hospital BY BLAKE ELLS

Special to the Leeds Tribune In the early 20th century, Leeds Hospital was located at 8125 Parkway Drive. Today, the building houses Koplon Implant and Family Dentistry, a family practice that the father, Scott, purchased from Dr. Harold Fendley in 2000. Scott had worked for Fendley for the previous decade. Fendley purchased the building from Dr. Clayton around 1950. Scott Koplon and Harold Fendley ate lunch together every day for 10 years. Fendley would regularly declare that one day, he was going to let Koplon buy the practice. “One day out of the blue, my accountant called me and said that Dr. Fendley had sent him a letter and wanted me to buy the building,” Scott said. “It was kind of crazy because we’d sit there and talk every day. He

always told me he felt like I already owned the practice, but he wanted to make it official.” Two renovations have been necessary; once because of fire damage, and another for general maintenance. “We’ve tried to preserve the historic feel of this building, but make it to match our clientele,” Scott said. “It has an old, historic feel, but it also has an elegant environment. It’s a warm environment. It feels like you’re walking into someone’s living room when you first walk in the door; it’s bright and cheerful as you walk down the halls. It’s always so much bigger than people envision.” Now, Scott’s son Adam has joined the practice. The duo offers a number of services and performs a variety of procedures from the routine to the emergency and the cosmetic; cleanings, tooth extractions,

root canals, implants, crowns and bridges, lumineers, permanent dentures, pediatric dentistry and more. “I always knew that I wanted to do something in the medical field, but I didn’t decide until college that I wanted to go the dental route,” Adam said. “Working with dad made it an easy transition.” Adam attended the UAB School of Dentistry. Staying close to home allowed him to learn a lot from his father. Adam specializes in the more cosmetic procedures offered by Koplon Implant and Family Dentistry like implants and botox. “We get to change people’s lives,” Scott said. “Somebody comes in and lacks confidence in their smile, and we’re able to change the way they feel about themselves by making their teeth straighter and by fixing up their smile. It’s a cool feel-

ing.” While many procedures are covered by insurance, the

Koplons also offer an in-house discount plan for the uninsured which provides up to two free cleanings a year with X-rays and up to 20 percent off other dental work. The Koplons take a lot of pride in the personal relationships that they develop with their patients. “I don’t want to just be their dentist office, I also want to be their friend,” Scott said. “A patient told me recently that she wasn’t sure she was going to be able to make her appoint-

ment in time, and I told her, ‘Next time, call me and I’ll come pick you up!’ I mean that from the bottom of my heart. That’s the way I want to be. That’s the way it is when you live in Leeds or when you practice in Leeds. It’s nice to know who your dentist is and that you’re not just going into a facility. There’s a heart and soul there.” To learn more about Koplon Implant and Family Dentistry, visit them online at koplondmd.com  or call their office at 205.699.2551.

REAL

Publisher: Cindy Fisher publisher@leedstribune.com Staff Writer Karim Shamsi-Basha Director of Graphic Design Andrew T. Schrimscher Sales Representative sales@leedstribune.com Copyright 2019 All rights reserved. Any reproduction in whole or part other than for personal use is prohibited without the express written consent of the publisher Kingfisher Media LLC

The Leeds Tribune is a news source for the community of Leeds, Alabama. Information gathered for coverage of Leeds is from sources that are considered reliable, but accuracy cannot be guaranteed. Issues with accuracy or errors should be brought to the attention of the publisher at publisher@leedstribune.com. Leeds Tribune is published weekly by Kingfisher Media LLC, 7901 Parkway Drive, Leeds, AL 35094. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Prices in Pending at Leeds, AL. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Leeds Tribune, P.O. Box 340, Leeds, AL 35094. Stay up-to-date on Leeds News at our website LeedsTribune.com

LIFE

EDUCATION

www.accs.edu


4

February 28, 2019

The Leeds Tribune

Cooking with Chef Andrew Armstro Cooking with Chef Andrew Armstrong Lifestyle

Mexican

By Andrew Armstrong until all the ingredients have been fully mixed and well covSpecial to the Leeds Tribune ered. Pour out onto a baking

pe to share in 2019, then please send it to me at P.O. Box 693 Leeds, Alabama 35094 -Andrew M. Armstrong

sheet and bake at 450 degrees for 10 - 15 minutes or until the ends of the broccoli are tender and crisp.

This week the rain in the forecast has many people like myself trying to avoid the outdoors. This is the perfect time BROCCOLI & HASHBROWN to tryout some easy newCASSEROLE recipes! 1 bag of hash browns, shredIf you have an exciting recipe to share in 2019, then please ded 1 head of Broccoli, diced send it to me at P.O. 2Box Leeds, Alabama 35094 cans of693 cheddar cheese soup

DOLL’S BROCCOLI SALAD 2 Heads of broccoli, chopped 1/2 Pound of bacon, crispy and crumbled 1 red onion, diced 1 Cup of nuts 1/2 Cup of white raisins 1/2 Cup of mayonnaise 1/2 Cup of sour cream 2 Tablespoons of sugar 2 Tablespoons of vinegar Mix everything together and refrigerate at least 1 hour, before serving.

BY ANDREW ARMSTRONG Special to the Leeds Tribune

This week’s column is not only about a very healthy vegetable, but it’s also vegetarian friendly. This is the perfect edition to your family recipe collection. It doesn’t matter if you’re looking for new meal options or potluck favorites. The recipes this week will leave all of your guest full and green with envy! If you have an exciting reci-

1 onion, diced 1/4 a stick of butter 1 Cup of sour cream 2 Cups of cheese, shredded 1 Cup of ritz crackers, crushed Preheat the oven at 300 degrees. Sauté the onions, broccoli and butter together. Mix with the soup, cheese, potatoes and sour cream. Pour into a greased casserole and top with the crackers. Bake at 300 degrees for 1 hour and 15 minutes.

1 Pound of pinto beans, cooked soft 1/4 Cup of shortening Salt and pepper to taste

Cook the beans in water, until they ing in a skillet. Fry the beans in the sh the spoon. Cook until the beans have burn.

OVEN ROASTED ASIAN BROCCOLI 1 Pound of broccoli florets 2 Tablespoons of olive oil 2 Tablespoons of soy sauce 1 teaspoon of sesame oil 1 Tablespoon of sesame seeds Preheat the oven at 450 degrees. Toast the sesaBROCCOLI PIE me seeds in a dry skillet for 1 package of frozen brocco30 - 60 seconds, until lightly browned. Place the ingredi- li, thawed Cup of onions, chopped ents in a large container with HE EEDS 1/2 RIBUNE 1 bell pepper, chopped a matching lid. Seal the con1 Cup of cheese, grated tainer and shake really hard

Strawberry Brownies

1 box of cake mix (without pudding in the mix) 2 large eggs 1/3 Cup of oil 1 teaspoon of extract (any flavor) T L T 1 Cup of powdered sugar 1-2 Tablespoons of water or fresh juice

Caribbea

1 large Zucchini, chopped 2 small Squash, chopped Preheat the oven at 350 salt and pepper over it. Mix the 3/4 Cup of Bisquick 1 can of Baby corn degrees. Coat a pie plate with remaining ingredients togeth1 1/2 Cups of milk er and pour into the pie plate. cooking1spray. Place the broc3 eggs small can of Mushrooms coli, onions, bell pepper, and Bake at 350 degrees for 40 min1 teaspoon of salt cheese 1 in the pan. Sprinkle the utes. 1 teaspoon of black pepper Onion, chopped 1 head of broccoli, chopped 1 green bell pepper, chopped Preheat the oven at 325 degrees. Mix the eggs, extract and oil together. The bat- 1 can of petite diced tomatoes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ents Cash Domino Killers ter will be thick. Spread into a well greasedFebruary baking21 pan and bake at 325 March 8 degrees forMarch 18 of margarine, (1950’s/60’s band) at 7 p.m. 1 stick melted 12 13 11 The Leeds Area Chamber The “What Horses Can The Leeds City Council Tickets are $20. Call 69930 - 45 minutes or until done. Once removed from the oven mix the remaining of Commerce will host their Teach Us Luncheon” is from meets 1at can 6 p.m.of at cream the Leeds of coconut 1892 for tickets. 15 14 monthly luncheon at 11:45 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Club in Civic Center at 6 p.m. ingredients together to form16the glaze and spread over the brownies, while it is a.m. at Leeds First United Birmingham. It benefits The 1 can of coconut milk 19 20 17 Methodist Church Family Life Red Barn in Leeds and The May 2 still warm.18 March 21Cup of pineapple Center.  Lunch is $12 ($15 for JAYC Foundation. The event Leeds’ 1 Thursdays down1/4 rum The Leeds Area Chamber of 21 22 23 24 25 no reservation and nonmem- will feature guest speakers town will be held. More details Commerce Luncheon will be atof Kahlua coffee liquor 1 Tablespoons bers).  The LES Jump Rope Jaycee Dugard, Dr. Rebecca to come. Leeds First United Methodist 30 26 27 28 29 Team will perform.  Guest Bailey, and Beth Holloway, How to Make Chorizo Sausage Family1Life Center at 11:45 teaspoon ofa.m. vanilla extract speaker will be Kelly Klein, who will share the impact The speaker is Darren J. Mott May 3 32 33 31 Program Manager of horses have had on their own of FBI 1/4Counterintelligence. teaspoon of ThLeeds yme Elementary School Northeast Region CASA (Court lives and what horses have Lunch is $12 ($15 for no res- hosts its annual Spring Fling 234 Pounds of pork, ground Appointed Special Advocates, a taught them as they struggled 36 35 3 cloves of fresh garlic crushed ervation and nonmembers). from 4-7 p.m. with games, convolunteer-based program that for healing in times of heartRSVP to Sandra McGuire cessions, silent auction, raffle, 2 Tablespoons of chili powder is appointed by the judge to ache and grief. Purchase tick37 38 39 40 41 42 1/4 teaspoon of all spice at (205) 699-5001. bounce house obstacle coursgive abused and neglected chil- ets at theredbarn.org. 243 Tablespoons of paprika es, food trucks, vendors and a dren a voice in court).  Please 1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon 45 46 47 44 dunking booth. RSVP to Sandra McGuire March 25 2 Tablespoons of salt March 9 of celery salt at (205) 699-5001. The1/2 Leedsteaspoon Public Library and 49 50 48 Moody Miracle League the Redevelopment Authority May 6 1 teaspoon of garlic powder hosts the fifth annual Miracles 1 teaspoon ofNat oregano Breakfast for the Brave will presents “Alabama’s own Leeds City Council meets 52 53 51 in Motion 5k race at Moody 1 teaspoon of cumin be served at 9 a.m. at Eden King Cole” with Alabama at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Miracle League Ball Field from 1 small pinch of marjoram Westside Baptist Church River Humanities Foundation Road Center. 8-11 a.m. This race is great for 1/2 Cup of vinegar enon ACROSS Campus for all first respondScholar Daphne Simpkins at of flour, for thickening 1 1/2 teaspoons all individuals regardless of 1 Profit by DOWN ers including area police, fire noon. A light lunch will be proage or athletic abilities. Visit May 11 1/4 Cup ofEastwood Onions, 4 "___ Torino" film diced 1 Next-to-last word of the It is theof third speaker Italian seasonings mixed Across Down and city workers.  Come by for the Facebook page for more vided.Dash Leeds Arts Council 8 Primeval golden rule a free breakfast. as part of a year-long speak111 "Yes" 1 Next-to-last Profit signal by word of the golden rule information. Community Chorus Concert 2 Dove bar? er series focused on Alabama’s Salt and black pepper to taste say Eastwood film Beat the Odds Car Show is at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. 3 Ragged part 412 Snarling, 2 Dove bar? "___ Torino" Bicentennial celebration. Mix all the ingredients together and store covered in the fridge. When buying 13 Fork over will be held from 11 a.m. to Call 699-1892 for tickets. February 22 4 Musical set at Rydell High 8 Primeval 3 Ragged part 14 Catch stealing School Leeds Arts Council is host- 3 p.m. All proceeds will be 11 4 "Yes" signal Musical set at Rydell High School chorizo thee.g.store it 5comes casings, but home it isn't necessary. 15 Prow andat stern, Compete inin a marathon donated to the American Heart April 1Sauté the fresh vegetables with the se ing for the play The use 39 Steps, May 14 1216 Potato 5 Compete spot Snarling, say in a marathon 6 Keeps talking directed by Suellen Wilkins, Association. Open to all cars, The Leeds City Council LadyBUGS Luncheon and 17 "Oberon" is one 13 Fork over 6 Keeps talking 7 Avian homes at the Leeds Theatre & Arts trucks, and motorcycles with a meets to at 6the p.m. side. at the Leeds Once theyat are browned a 19 Move ever-so-slightly Meeting the Livery Event 8 Be at the controls 1421 Hockey 7 Avian Center Catch stealing homesin downtown Leeds. $10 entry fee for each vehicle. Civic Center. stick wood Center at noon. 9 Put in position, as bricks ingredients. Bring the mixture to a bo times are 7 p.m. Feb. 22 Register upon arrival. It will 1523 Prow 8 Be atShow and stern, e.g. the controls Center-to-quarterback 10 Lose the gray be located in the front parkand 23 at 7 p.m. and 24 at 2 p.m. transitions 16 Potato spot 9 Put in position, as bricks Aprilminutes. 4 18 Baby toy Ladle the over fresh Tickets are $10 per person. Call ing lot. For more information Maymixture 16 26 As a preferred alternative

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17 "Oberon" is one the gray 20 Kind of information 10 Lose(205) 699-1892 for ticket reser- and question, please contact 30 Organ knob 22 Holds title to 1931 Circus 18 Babyvations. Move ever-so-slightly toy Braidyn Lazenby at bslazenitem 24 Money on a poker table 2132 Tahiti's 20 Kind of information Hockey island stick wood group by@crimson.ua.edu. 25 KGB figure enclosure Leeds Arts Council presents 2334 Stable 22 Holds title to Center-to-quarterback transitions 26 "__ a trap!" e.g. storyteller Dolores Hydock with 2636 Jupiter, 24 Money The As a preferred alternative on a poker table 27 Realize Leeds Public Library 37 Orange skin “Soldiers in Greasepaint: USO 28 Spoke sharply 3039 "Cut" 25 KGBand Organand knob figure the Redevelopment "paste" Camp Show” at 7 p.m. at the 29 ''Man's best friend'' presents “Rock in a sweater 3143 Shirt Circusoritem trap!" SUDOKU by Myles Mellor 33and Susan Flanagan26 "__ aAuthority Leeds Theatre & Arts Center Lids centerpiece Weary Land: The Black Church 3245 Still-life Tahiti's island group downtown. Admission is free. 35 Crowbar, essentially 27 Realize th 47 Have a little lamb? in the 19 Century Alabama” 3448 Be 28 Stable enclosure Spoke sharply The Leeds Greenwave 38 Source of igneous rocks liable withsubdivided Alabama into Humanities Each Sudoku a 9X9 grid that 29 has''Man's been nine smaller Quarterback Club is host40of Librarian's imperative 3649 "As Jupiter, e.g. puzzle best friend'' __" (letter closing) consists Foundation Road Scholar Dr. ing a Chili Cookoff from 11 41 Unveiled Metallica: "Where the 3750 Orange 33 Lids skin squares. grids of 3X3 To solve the puzzle each row, column boxatmust contain each Richardand Bailey 11 a.m. A 42 Potpourri a.m. to 2 p.m. at Rails and Wild ___" 39 Things 35 light essentially lunch will be provid"Cut" and "paste" Crowbar, 43 Single digit 51the It may be in sight of numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult. Ales. Corporate and individed. ofItigneous is the rocks second speaker 4352 Lab-maze 38 Source Shirt or sweater 44 On one's ___ solvers ual entries are available. $5 as part of a year-long speak46 Game, ___, match 4553 Still-life 40 Librarian's imperative Early morning phenomcenterpiece admission. There will be live er series focused on Alabama’s Level: music and family games. 47 HaveMedium 41 Unveiled a little lamb? Bicentennial celebration. Turn in entries at Rails and 48 Be liable 42 Potpourri Ales or email Scott Cain at 49 "As __" (letter closing) 43 Single digit scottcain1344@gmail.com. 50 Metallica: "Where the Wild Things ___" 44 On one's ___ Leeds Arts Council pres51 It may be in sight 46 Game, ___,The matchMartini Shakers ents 52 Lab-maze solvers (Rockabilly trio) at 7 p.m. at the The LadyBUGS will host a erschool program encourages teens to we doTheatre Lego-Mania twice Leeds & Arts Center in a month. I try to do a 53 An Earlyaft morning phenomenon Luncheon and Meeting at the

February 28

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February 21, 2019

Sudoku

Vehicle Title 1 3 8 5 9 4 6 3 Problem? 4 9 7

March 12

learn about the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute and discuss social justice. Edwards keeps coming up with ways to make reading fun for 9 the young. 2 3“We started a board 6 game2night this year, and 1

We Have A Solution! 3 4

$15. Call 699-1892 for tickets.

April 13

Leeds Arts Council presents Ron Dometrovich in Concert. Tickets are $15. Call 6991892 for tickets and times.

April 15

Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center.

April 18

May 18

The annual Creek Bank Festival & Car Show will be held from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Leeds Memorial Park.

May 18

Leeds Arts Council presents Jil Chambless & Scooter Muse (Celtic Duo). Tickets are $15. Call 699-1892  for tickets and times.

The Leeds Area Chamber of Jenny Edwards is the children's director at Commerce Luncheon will be at Leeds Jane Culbreth Leeds First United MethodistLibrary downtown. Family Life Center at 11:45 a.m. The Leeds City Council Lunch is $12 ($15 for no reserva- meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds tion and nonmembers). RSVP to Civic Center. Sandra McGuire at (205) 699-5001. Include your community event in our calendar! Email information to news@leedstribune.com. Leeds Arts Council pres-

May 20

April 20

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Civic Center.

LadyBUGS annual Fashion Show will be held at Cedar Grove Baptist Church at noon.

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big program once or twiceLivery a month and might Event Center at noon. have a tea party coming up soon,” Edwards said. March March 4 For more information, visit 17 www.leedsliLeeds Arts Council presents The Leeds City Council Rosewood at 2 p.m. Tickets are brary.com meets at 6 p.m. in the Leeds downtown Leeds. Tickets are $15. Call 699-1892 for tickets.

April 9

The Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce Luncheon will be at Leeds First United Methodist Family Life Center at 11:45 a.m. Lunch is $12 ($15 for no reservation and nonmembers). Speaker is Jefferson County Commissioner Steve Ammons. RSVP to Sandra McGuire at (205) 699-5001.

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March 2

The event 1st Thursdays will begin being held downtown. More details to come.

Serving Breakfast & lunch Proprietors John & Vicky Dean Sharon Dean

7601 Parkway Drive Leeds, AL 35094

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The Leeds Tribune

February 28, 2019

5

LeedsTribune.com

Leeds first responders mourn loss of Shelton Waldrop Leeds firefighters and police officers are remembering 17-year-old Shelton Waldrop, son of a Leeds Police officer who passed away last week of cancer. Shelton spent hours at Leeds Fire Station 2 as an explorer during the three years he battled a rare lung cancer. His father, Richard Waldrop, is a Leeds police officer who brought Shelton with him to work often for him to hang out at station 2. The week before Shelton passed away, Leeds Fire & Rescue went to visit him at Children’s of Alabama in Birmingham with Irondale’s bucket truck and got into

the bucket to show Shelton signs made to him, Leeds Fire Chief Chuck Parsons said. He watched from his window and waved. Birmingham City Police blocked the roads for the firefighters’ visit with Shelton. The funeral for Shelton, a junior at Fultondale High School, was last Friday at Gardendale First Baptist Church. Firefighters served as pallbearers at his funeral and first responders from at least 15 different agencies in the area held a formal firefighter procession for Waldrop. A vintage fire truck carried his casket.

City offices switch places If you’re looking for Leeds city administration, they’re not at City Hall next to the Police Department on Park Drive anymore. Leeds City Hall offices are now

on 9th Street and Parkway Drive, in the former courthouse where the magistrate office has been. The magistrate office is now in the place of city offices, next to the Police Department.

Mayor David Miller said the move was made to get the magistrate closer to the police department and the admin people closer to the inspection department, which is already on 9th Street.

“In both cases, this eliminates people having to make a trip to two different locations for services and also makes it more efficient for those staffs to be co-located,” Miller said.

THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

COMMUNITY

Tech park

prior to Aug. 3, 1977, near the current location of the Barber Motorsports Park. As part of the redevelopment of the property, extensive reclamation will be performed on-site. “Our Abandoned Mine Land Program does a wonderful job in helping to ensure that old, dangerous mines are properly reclaimed, which eliminates safety hazards and allows the land to be redeveloped,” said Fitzgerald Washington, Secretary of the Alabama Department of Labor. “In addition to cleaning up this site and making it safer, this

continued from page 1 project will help to improve the lives of many.” U.S. Steel President and CEO David B. Burritt said they are pleased to see the redevelopment of this land. “We look forward to providing quality economic and community development projects that will benefit the Birmingham community.” To date, the ADOL AML Program has reclaimed 81.6 miles of dangerous former mine highwalls, eliminated 1,613 dangerous mine openings, and completed about 661 reclamation projects in the coalfields of Alabama.

rts Council starts GoFundMe page money for repairs It’s official: Ribbon cut for new Three Earred Rabbit

Leeds Mayor David Miller, City Councilwoman Linda Miller and Three Earred Rabbit owner Christine Leonardi cut the ribbon

today to officially open the symbolic gathering with restaurant in downtown business leaders from around Leeds joining in on the honor. Leeds. Also today, the Three The Leeds Area Chamber THE LEEDS TRIBUNE of Commerce arranged the Earred Rabbit announced it

is looking to hire part-time cooks, servers and delivery help. Those interested can apply in the store after 2 p.m. at 8101 Parkway Drive.

Support your community newspaper! Subscribe to the Leeds Tribune for only $26 a year!

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Mail form to: P.O. Box 340 Leeds, AL 35094

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$8,000. The four AC units are the same for, but most no longer exist, Karr said. Gift s to the Arts age and need to be replaced at 2018 therate sheet Email sales@leedstribune.com to get a copy of our and show youLeeds care about yourCouncil community!are same time, which would cost $40,000. tax deductible. The goal of the GoFundMe campaign February 21, 2019 11 asking is to reach $50,000.


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February 28, 2019

The Leeds Tribune

Community

Leeds mom becomes advocate for Willow the Warrior and other children with heart ailments BY KARIM SHAMSI-BASHA February is American Heart Month. For Jamie Kendricks and the rest of her family, every month is heart month. You could sense the strength in Kendricks’ voice when she describes the ordeals her daughter is going through. Three-year-old Willow was born with Noonan Syndrome, congenital heart defects, Chiari Malformation and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. She also has a feeding tube in her stomach. Kendricks shares her daughter’s journey on Facebook with a page she calls Willow the Warrior. There she has formed a community of other families dealing with a loved one with heart ailments and asks followers to pray for the child “Heart Warrior” and his or her family. Willow’s journey wasn’t easy from the start. Kendricks had a complicated and high-risk pregnancy. When Willow was born, she spent two months in the

NICU where she had a lot of problems, including sepsis. At six weeks, she was diagnosed with Noonan Syndrome and congenital heart defects. A genetic disorder, Noonan Syndrome affects the heart, kidneys, nerves and causes bleeding disorders and leads to childhood cancers. And then there is the Chiari issue. “The Chiari malformation is a birth defect we discovered when Willow was two years old. The brainstem in back of her brain sits down at the base of the skull where the spinal fluid goes, and it’s blocking the normal flow. They had to put a shunt there,” Kendricks said. Kendricks has five other children, a 23-year-old son, 16-yearold twin girls, an 8-year-old boy, and a 7-year-old boy. Willow holds her own among the older family members. “Her brothers and sisters are the greatest therapy she could have. She’s always ready to run and play with them. She tries to do everything they do. She’s a feisty little girl and fights with

her siblings like a normal kid,” Kendricks said. Kendricks’ faith got stronger after Willow was born. The little girl has brought the entire family closer. “She was sent to me when I was ready for a child like her to teach me things. God blessed me with her for a reason. I don’t know all of his reasons, but one thing I know: don’t stress over little things as an adult. Sometimes we struggle with things like depression, anxiety, and we get upset about the bills. Then I look at someone like her who fought for her life and had major surgeries and heart procedures, and she’s going to have other surgeries in her future. I say to myself, ‘if this little person can handle such big things and overcome them, I can overcome anything,’” Kendricks said. Willow’s brothers and sisters play all kinds of sports, which resulted in her being the little athlete. “I know that my little girl is very strong. She’s a fighter, and she’s come a long way. She’s

conquered a lot of hard things that some adults couldn’t handle,” Kendricks said. “We are all so very proud of her. She fell in love with baseball watching her big brothers play. So she played at the Moody Miracle

League and participated in a few games. She knows how to catch a ball with her glove and has a nice bat. Baseball is her favorite thing. Now she loves football. This child loves everything that her big broth-

ers love.” Willow Kendricks may have several diseases to endure, but one thing is for sure: she, along with her entire family, are living every day to its fullest, one day at a time.

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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

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The Leeds Tribune

February 28, 2019

Education

7

Leeds Primary School turns into a Wax Museum Walking the hallways at Leeds Primary School last week, you encountered American figures like Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain, Henry Ford, Humphrey Bogart, and Elvis Presley. “Today is our living Wax Museum. Our second graders have spent weeks preparing and doing research in their social studies. They picked famous Americans that they wanted to learn about, did the research, and looked through books and iPads in their classrooms,” Leeds Primary School Principal Leah Pendergrass said. Characters from American history were scattered throughout the school and dozens of parents crowded the halls to see them. When a little button on their posters was pushed, they interacted with visitors and told them something about the character they were portraying. “The students wrote about why their character was famous and other interesting facts. They have a button that you push, they stand

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HEPresident EEDS Jonah Hayes chose Donald RIBUNE Trump.

EEDS NEWS up, they give their speech, and then they sit back down,” Pendergrass said. “It’s a great way to bring the community into the school. We’re always looking for ways for parents and the community to come in and see the great things we’re doing.” The Wax Museum at Leeds Primary School was open for visitors first, then for their

fellow students. Costumes ranged from the extra elaborate to the simple, but all were a true representation of the characters. “The Wax Museum is open for the parents, and then they share it with the rest of the kids in the school. So the other students will be able to walk through the hallways and learn about the charac-

Second graders dressed like historical figures for the 15th annual wax museum at Heidi Dietrich plays Amelia Melanie Nelson is Rosa Leeds Primary School. Earhart. Parks. ters, which is good. They will never forget their characters,” Pendergrass said. The Wax Museum is a long-standing tradition of 15 years at Leeds Primary School. Pendergrass, along with the teachers, hope the children

have a deeper understanding of the people who have contributed to our country and history. “I hope our community sees our kids are researching and creating and diving into the characters, and not just sitting

in desks to learn,” Pendergrass said. “This year we did both historic and contemporary characters. We also included athletes like Babe Ruth and Jackie Robinson, as well as politicians and other famous folks.”

community-wide Five Questions with Leeds Tues-Fri cleanup day set for early March d Benjamin Rabbit becomes 10am-6pm Franklinthe first

o open downtown in years BY NATHAN PREWETT

Special to the Leeds Tribune

When were you around? “I was born on Jan. 17, 1706. I became one of the founding fathers, and I died on April 17, 1790. Thank you for visiting me today.” Hold on, tell us about your inventions? “I invented the lightning rod, bifocals, and I had a lot to do with discovering electricity.”

Partnering with Leeds High School and Jefferson County Litter Quitters Committee, the city of Leeds will be holding a community-wide clean up in early March. Leeds High School students will be taking part and will film the event for “Litter Quitters” competition with other schools. Competing schools will be Trussville, Homewood, Hoover, Vestavia and Mountain Brook.  A prize of $1,000 will be given to the winning school. “Litter negatively affects our drinking water and marine life when it gets into our rivers and streams,” the City of Leeds states on its website. “The video will be a great tool to promote the value of taking care of our environment.” Community service hours will be awarded to volunteers. It is suggested that long pants and shoes without open toes be worn. This event is scheduled for March 9 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Registration will begin at 9:30 a.m. at the Moton Center locat-

nted to give people ing different and us,” Leonardi said. What else did you do? “I helped write the book of ll offer salads, soups, laws, was a news reporter, and I’m on the $100 bill.” ches, and homemade Why are you on the $100 goods. Everything is bill? om scratch.” “I have absolutely no idea.” Three Earred Rabbit is You’re not really Benjamin Franklin now, are in Trussville for their you? “Not really, I’m just a secle sandwiches as well ond-grader here.” homemade chicken (We were glad to arrive at nd pimento cheese. that conclusion). Benjamin Franklin was opening was held played by Levi Dill at the annual wax museum at Leeds Primary y and now the Three School Levi Dill played the role of Benjamin Franklin at the Wax Museum. Rabbit is officially sandwich with smoked tur- Chow Mein noodles, and r business. key, Havarti cheese, Ver- sesame dressing. The restauve an amazing team. mont cheddar cheese, apple, rant also offers a wide variacy is our chef, and bacon, and tangy mustard. ety of shakes and floats, as ankin is the kitch- Another popular time is the well as The Rabbit Tray to go, ager. Those two will Cantaloupe Boat, which is a for those on the run. his place run smooth- wedge of cantaloupe stuffed nardi said. “We offer with homemade chicken For more information, vish. My favorite is our salad. The Rabbit Salad in- it www.thethreeearredrabeuben.” cludes grilled chicken breast, bit.com w of the menu items mixed greens, Mandarin the Four-Corner oranges, toasted almonds, which is a grilled police vehicle will be stationed in the parking lot regularly. “They want an increased presence, so they’re giving us space for a satellite office,” Mayor David Miller said. “It’s not 100 percent, but it should be a good deterrent.”

New parking lots in downtown Leeds is adding parking downtown as it grows with new businesses and a new restaurant. The City Council Monday night approved turning two parcels downtown into parking lots to accommodate an estimated 85 new employLeaders in Alabama Schools, BY NATHAN PREWETT Special to the Leeds Tribune luncheon in Prattville ees at three new businessesheldin athe central busiMonday where Leeds High School was among eight addition nessIndistrict and totheirbeing patrons. named among 24 “Schools of schools to be named a Banner One parcel is located Parkway Drive and Distinction” by CLAS, Leeds atSchool. “The CLAS Banner School High School was recently rec8th Street features from program wasacross created in 2001 to ognized as athat Banner School bygreenspace recognize schools in Alabama the organization. the CLAS, LeedsorJane Culbreth Library. The other parthe Council for that showcase outstanding pro-

cel fronts Railroad Avenue and 7th Street. Construction is estimated at $150,000 and includes knocking down one part of the building beside the greenspace. The City Council approved selling cityowned industrial property on Weaver Avenue for $155,000, which would cover the cost of the parking project. The new restaurant coming downtown is the Three Earred Rabbit that opened this week across from the greenspace parking lot. The businesses are Vyperline, which opened recently next to the Leeds Board of Education, and T.A. Services across from Vyperline. The grams and service to students,” schools which provide excellent examples of the signifisaid a statement by two companies areCLAS. bringing jobs with an aver“Each school was nominated cant learning opportunities taking place in public educafor this awardofby$75,000 their superage salary a year.

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LHS named ‘Banner School’ by CLAS intendent with 160 school programs nominated statewide.” Leeds High School was the winner in District 7. “Congratulations to these wonderful Alabama public

tion in Alabama. Further, the stakeholders at every school are to be commended for striving for excellence daily,” said Vic Wilson, executive director of CLAS.

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February 28, 2019

The Leeds Tribune

Sports

Athlete of the Week

Leeds High School senior Alphoncie Hopson signed to play football with Brevard College, a Division 3 school in North Carolina. Coach Lee Gibson said Alphoncie “worked very hard in the classroom and on the field to earn this opportunity to continue his education and football career.”

Name: Nicole Armstrong Grade: 12  Sport: Tennis  How long have you been playing this sport? 4 years  Favorite Team? Crimson Tide  Favorite Athlete? Tua Tagovailoa  What are some top achieveRIBUNE ments you are proud of ? Winning a tie breaker in a match, which won the team match against Oneonta! I am also proud of me and my dou-

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bles partner Presley Anderson for playing in the finals match at sectionals. What other activities are you active in at Leeds High School? FCCLA, National Honor Society, Varsity Cheerleader, Mu alpha Theta, Leeds Chamber Diplomat, and Quill and Scroll.  Where do you plan to go to college or do after graduation? I plan to attend Troy University and earn a degree in nursing.

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The 2019 Leeds High School tennis team.

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The Miss Leeds Area Committee held a Send-Off Party for Miss Leeds Area’s Outstanding Teen, Coco Green Sunday at St. Theresa’s Catholic Church Parish Life Center. Coco will be competing in the Miss Alabama’s Outstanding Teen Pageant this weekend at Thompson High School. The winner will go on to compete in Miss America’s Outstanding Teen Pageant in Orlando in August

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