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LEEDS TRIBUNE THE ONLY SOURCE FOR LEEDS NEWS www.LeedsTribune.com

May 2, 2019 | Volume 4, Issue 14

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Leeds High School gives more students a ‘leg up’ AP classes added for 2019-2020 school year BY CINDY FISHER Leeds Tribune Staff As Leeds City Schools graduates its 15th class since becoming an independent district, Leeds High School is launching an ambitious plan to offer more challenging classes for Leeds’ high achievers. LHS is adding three more Advanced Placement classes in the coming school year, bringing the total to 11 AP classes. Leeds Superintendent John J. Moore said the district is

“happy to announce that we will continue to add to our Advanced Placement offerings for 2019-20.” “AP courses prepare our students for work at the next level, and as an A+ College Ready School of Distinction, one of two such high schools in Alabama, we are thankful more students will begin college with a ‘leg up,’” Moore said. The three new AP classes are government, Spanish and environmental science.

The teachers of those courses will receive training over the summer to be ready to teach the higher-level courses. Students receive college credit if they pass an exam at the end of the class. Leeds High School received the School of Distinction designation because of the high number of students passing AP exams. LHS already offers AP statistics, computer science, calculus, biology, chemistry, English

Cristina Allen teaches LHS's AP U.S. history class. for 11th and 12th grades and U.S. history. LHS Principal Rayford Williams said offering tougher

classes improves a school’s culture for learning and excellence. “It helps the culture of the school when you offer advanced

offerings,” Williams said. “It bleeds into the regular classes as well when more emphasis is placed on academics.”

National brand coming to former Hardee’s location BY BLAKE ELLS Special to the Leeds Tribune The abrupt closure of Hardee’s on Ashville Road a few weeks ago left a bad taste in the mouths of Leeds residents. But they may soon be salivating over a new restaurant option in Hardee’s place. Leeds Development Services officials have confirmed a new tenant is coming to 1824 Ashville Road. However, a nondisclosure agreement prevents them from saying who the tenant will be. Officials did say it is a “national brand,” and that they will be ready to share the news with the community with “the next couple of weeks.” A restaurant chain seems most plausible, based on the accommodations and location. Residents have speculated online about everything from Newk’s to Chicken Salad Chick to Buffalo Wild Wings. The closure caused some concern about the stability of the main thoroughfare off Interstate 20 and next to a Chick-fil-A. The closure was not due to economic conditions. The eatery closed because a local franchisee

with multiple Hardee’s locations in Jefferson and St. Clair

counties decided to close all stores he controlled. Stores in

Pinson, Springville, Oxford, Heflin and Pell City also

closed. Trussville and Clay locations remain open, serv-

ing as the closest Hardee’s stores to Leeds.

The Leeds Hardee’s closed in January and speculation over its replacement has reached a fever pitch.

Leeds High School class wins second place for cleanup project Leeds’ PSA will run on ABC 33/40 and affiliate stations SPECIAL TO THE LEEDS TRIBUNE Leeds High School science students and science teacher Desmond R. Parker placed second in the Cahaba Watershed competition. To spread awareness of the effects that littering has on the environment, LHS students implemented a plastic bottle recycling program and a paper recycling program. Also, they hosted a cleanup event in the Russell Heights community on March 9 with the assistance of several service organizations, community volunteers and city employees. LHS students created and entered a video PSA along with other high schools throughout Jefferson County. As the second place winner, the school received $500 from the Jefferson County Litter Quitters Committee. Additionally, 10th grade student Pedro Vazquez was selected by his classmates to represent the Leeds

community, along with other schools, in a PSA sponsored

by the Jefferson County Litter Quitters Committee, which will

begin airing soon on ABC 33/40 and their affiliate stations.

A trailer packed with trash picked up by the LHS science class at the cleanup day March 9.

Leeds High School science class accepted a check for $500 from the Jefferson County Litter Quitters Committee on Friday. Photos provided.

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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

May 2, 2019

Community NPR seeks political viewpoints from Leeds residents StoryCorp project records pairs talking out differences in politics BY CINDY FISHER Selma Sun Staff Birmingham NPR station WBHM has been chosen to participate in One Small Step, a national project launched by StoryCorps to break down boundaries created by politics – and they are looking for participants in Jefferson, Shelby and St. Clair counties. The One Small Step project involves recording two people who have differing views on politics as they talk about how and why they ended up with those differing views, with a goal of them finding some common ground. NPR is looking for pairs to apply to participate in hourlong recording sessions. Pairs could include a conservative and a liberal or someone from a younger and older generation. Single applications are accepted, but those most likely to be chosen are already paired up, said Michelle Little, producer/ facilitator of the project.

WBHM is looking for 20-30 applications that can be made online. WBHM, which is supported by the University of Alabama at Birmingham, is one of only six stations in the country selected to find pairs and record them for research. The recordings will be archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. More information from WBHM: Some questions participants will be asked include: Was there a moment, event or person in your life that shaped your political views? What is most hurtful to you about what people across the political divides say about people on your side? Can you think of any traits you admire in people on the other side of the political divide? These conversations are not meant to be debates over particular beliefs, but a chance to share stories of life experiences that have shaped

individuals’ political beliefs and listen to those of their conversation partner. Participants in the project are asked not to raise their voices, name call or interrupt their conversation partner. They are asked to listen while being present and curious, remember this is a two-way conversation, and be prepared to ask, and answer, questions. Conversation partners should not debate political issues or argue positions but should rather talk and listen to each other. An example is Cheraton Love, who identifies as liberal, and her father-in-law, Jim White, who identifies as conservative. Love invited White to have a conversation at his home in Silver Valley, N.C., about some of the things that are most important to them, and how they do not let their differences pull their family apart. WBHM will use a screening survey to find a partner for

each participant for the interview. StoryCorps sessions are not scripted and are intended to be natural conversations, but it is a good idea to spend some time thinking about what questions to ask or topics to explore. Some suggested questions will be provided, and participants are welcome to bring their own questions. Do not over-prepare; just come ready to be yourself. The interview itself is approximately 40 minutes long, and the entire process takes about one hour. A trained facilitator is present throughout the entire interview process and handles all technical aspects of the recording. Within a few weeks, participants will receive a digital download link of the audio, which they are encouraged to copy and share with friends, family and colleagues. StoryCorps is a national nonprofit organization whose

mission is to preserve and share humanity’s stories in order to build connections between people and create a more just and compassionate world. Since 2003, more than 400,000 people have shared life stories with family and friends through StoryCorps.

StoryCorps is one of the largest oral history projects of its kind, and millions listen to its weekly broadcasts and on NPR’s “Morning Edition.� To learn more about StoryCorps, visit https://storycorps.org/ about. Listen and give online at WBHM.org.

Beverly’s Dance celebrates 65 years at recital this month Recital includes students at Beverly’s new Leeds studio BY DURY SHAMSI-BASHA

ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

Special to the Leeds Tribune Students at Beverly’s Dance Unlimited are practicing for a recital to celebrate the 65th anniversary of the studio. The recital will be May 15-18 at Pinson Valley High School. Performances of Beverly’s Dance Unlimited presents “That’s Entertainment� will be May 15, May 16 and May 17 at 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. and May 18 at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 3 p.m., 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. At a recent practice, as dance students filed into Beverly’s Dance studio in Leeds that opened in the fall, a few early arrivals were already tying their pointe shoes and warming up on the barre. One student needed an older student to help get her laces just right. Watching the girls get ready was Sheree S. Grose, owner and director of Beverly’s Dance in Leeds. “We are getting ready to celebrate my mother, Mrs. Beverly, and the 65th anniversary of her studio,� Grose said. “We are going to bring in students and former students to perform at our recital.� B eve rl y Simpson Cunningham started her first studio in 1954, and now there

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Sheree S. Grose, daughter of original founder Beverly Simpson Cunningham, coaches dance students. Photos by Dury Shamsi-Basha are three locations with over 200 students each, Grose said. “Mrs. Beverly is actually teaching again this year. She is 82 and will be 83 in May.� As the class filled up, Grose began warm up exercises with the girls. They showed grace and poise as

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Emma Claire Kimbrough warms up before class.

they changed from position to position. Grose watched closely to make sure they were doing their exercises correctly. Leeds is one of three locations for Beverly’s Dance Studio. There are two more in Clay and Gardendale.

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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

May 2, 2019

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News Leeds’ Charles Barkley Leeds turned 132 years this week donates $1M to promote job training for black youths BY NATHAN PREWETT Special to the Leeds Tribune Leeds native and NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley donated $1 million to help black youths in training for trade jobs such as carpentry, plumbing and electricity, according to a story by 2paragraphs.com. Barkley was moved to make the donation after reportedly having trouble finding skilled black workers to help him with his house in Alabama, a problem that he said was present nationwide. He expressed his concerns in a podcast called Unbothered, hosted by sports journalist Jemele Hill, saying that he worries for the youths today.

Barkley said he wants to inspire black youths to aim for more realistic job goals in

life rather than ambitions like the NBA, which is a rarity for people to achieve.

Charles Barkley is a Leeds native and often donates funds for education.

Mayor denies claims of age discrimination in city’s yard waste cleanup service The City of Leeds is addressing a resident’s claim that the city wouldn’t pick up his yard waste due to his age and inability to do yard work. In an announcement, Leeds Mayor David Miller said he investigated the claim himself and the resident had left three times the volume of debris that the ordinance allows to be picked up. "The city in no way discriminates against seniors or those with disabilities as this resident claims," he said. "On the contrary, the City has spent and continues to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on our sidewalks and public facilities making them ADA-

compliant as well as having developed plans to build additional facilities for our seniors." "Picking up non-compliant amounts of debris from one individual’s property diminishes the City’s ability to equally serve all our citizens." He also said that despite the current policy, a city vehicle will still pick up the debris from the senior's home, though he said that the amount will take up the entire truck's capacity and will necessitate a "special trip" to the dump. This is the second statement from the city about the trash and limb pick up policy. On April 13, the city released

As the city of Leeds grows toward 12,000 residents, we say Happy Birthday to the City of Valor. The Alabama Newscenter posted recognition of the Leeds’ 132nd birthday with some historical information on their website. “The city of Leeds was incorporated April 27, 1887. The settlement was named for Yorkshire’s iron center in England. It got its post office in 1884, three years before being incorporated. In recent years, the city has benefited from the development of the Barber Motorsports Park and the Outlet Shops of Grand River Leeds’ downtown is historic, some buildings dating back to its founding mixed-use development.” 132 years ago.

Rose garden at Moton community keeps growing

an announcement saying some residents were abusing trash pickup service by leaving out inappropriate items for pick up by city vehicles. After that statement, citizens "expressed discontent and negative comments" on social media, which included a senior resident who is unable to do yard work saying that he was being discriminated against after city vehicles did not pick up tree debris from his street. As with the last announcement, the city government advised residents with similar issues to call contractors to pick up items such as tree limbs for a fee.

Leeds man jailed, charged with murder in 2 year old’s shaking death BY NATHAN PREWETT Special to the Leeds Tribune A man from Leeds has been jailed and charged with murder in the case of a two year old boy who died after being reportedly shaken. According to a story by AL.com, the man – identified as Jason Daniel Sparks, 24 – was arrested after the two year old died following a brain injury as a result of being shaken. The boy’s name was Tyler Michael Haws and he was in the care of Sparks’ and his wife. Leeds Police Chief Jim Atkinson reported that they were Tyler’s aunt and uncle. The two had taken Tyler in when his biological mother could not care for him.

On April 17, Sparks took the boy to Children’s of Alabama where he told staff that Tyler was experiencing symptoms of vomiting and refusing to eat. He was also unresponsive to changing his diaper. Social workers at the hospital later called the police after it was determined that Tyler was suffering from an injury that caused bleeding in his brain. He passed away on April 21. The Jefferson County Coroner’s Office confirmed the injury but do not have a formal cause of death yet. Investigators believe the injury happened while Sparks’ wife was at work. She has not been charged with any crime, but Sparks was charged with

Publisher: Cindy Fisher publisher@leedstribune.com Staff Writer Karim Shamsi-Basha Sales Representative sales@leedstribune.com

Jason Sparks of Leeds has been charged with shaking a 2 year old boy to death. murder as well as aggravated child abuse. Sparks remains at the Jefferson County Jail on $130,000 bond.

Leeds Tribune is published weekly by Kingfisher Media LLC, 7901 Parkway Drive, Leeds, AL 35094. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Prices in Pending at Leeds, AL. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Leeds Tribune, P.O. Box 340, Leeds, AL 35094.

Copyright 2019 All rights reserved. Any reproduction in whole or part other than for personal use is prohibited withStay up-to-date on Leeds News at our out the express written consent of the website publisher Kingfisher Media LLC LeedsTribune.com The Leeds Tribune is a news source for the community of Leeds, Alabama. Information gathered for coverage of Leeds is from sources that are considered reliable, but accuracy cannot be guaranteed. Issues with accuracy or errors should be brought to the attention of the publisher at publisher@leedstribune.com.

Albert Daws Jr. started plans for a rose garden at Moton Park in February and now has bushes and fruit trees planted. BY BLAKE ELLS Special to the Leeds Tribune Albert Daw has long had a vision for a community garden. After earning the support of city leaders like Councilwoman Linda Miller and Councilman Ryan Bell, he has now been able to see it become a reality; and faster than he could have anticipated. “I have always dreamed of a small, neighborhood botanical garden,” Daw told the Leeds Tribune back in February before his vision was realized. “It will bring joy to the people who live here; and to anyone who walks by. The garden will also include a meditation

spot where you can just sit and enjoy nature. We are just concerned citizens who want to beautify their community. The rose garden will be for everyone.” The space, located near the Moton Center and behind the baseball field, is most easily accessed via Charles Barkley Avenue. Just three months ago, the space was 25 vacant acres. It now features 65 rose bushes and a budding orchard that is home to six peach trees and two Red Delicious apple trees. The trees have already reached heights of seven feet tall, and have begun growing fruit. Daw charges no admission to residents that wish to enjoy his garden.

Residents of the Leeds community can contribute to the garden by purchases trees or rose bushes and making a $25 donation. The donation covers the expenses of upkeep and includes a nameplate that can be dedicated to the honor or memory of a loved one. To learn more about how to donate a plant or tree to the garden, contact Daw at 205.383.8626. Next year, Daw hopes that he can expand the garden to include a vegetable garden. “We’ll be adding the vegetable garden next summer,” Daw said. “Probably around the end of spring. We’re making preparations now for that addition by building some raised beds. They’ll be all down the fence line.”


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May 2, 2019

THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

Community Leeds Community Chorus celebrates Bicentennial with May performance at Leeds Arts Council BY BLAKE ELLS Special to the Leeds Tribune The Leeds Community Chorus will present its 2019 production on May 12 at 3 p.m. at the Leeds Arts Council. Admission will be $10, with proceeds benefiting the Leeds Arts Council. Light concessions will be available for purchase. This year’s performance marks the first under the direction of Chip Wise. While Wise may be a new face to some members of the Chorus, he’s well known in Leeds. He began his local music career at First Baptist Church of

Leeds in 2002 before becoming the band director at Leeds High School in 2008. The Leeds Community Chorus will celebrate the state of Alabama’s bicentennial with a performance that celebrates the rich musical history of the nation’s 22nd state. Selections span all of those 200 years, reaching as far back as the original state song “Alabama,” a tune that first appeared as a poem penned by Julia Tutwiler. Among the other selections that will take audience members through the history of Alabama include “Tuxedo Junction,” originally writ-

ten by Birmingham native Erskine Hawkins; “Mobile;” “Hey, Good Lookin’” by Butler County native Hank Williams; and an arrangement of the spiritual “Every Time I Feel the Spirit” by Anniston native William Dawson. The Chorus will also perform more recent pop selections like “All Night Long” by Tuskegee native Lionel Richie and “Flying Without Wings” by Birmingham’s own Ruben Studdard. The program, which will last approximately 90 minutes, will begin with the full group performing together.

Smaller collectives will perform after an intermission. Wise said he is eager to grow the Leeds Community Chorus. The chorus that started in 1994 has long been comprised of people of all ages throughout the community, from school choir kids to adults and seniors. The group has between 25-30 members. Participation is seasonal and does not require a large commitment, he said. “It’s a thing where folks can sing this year, and maybe next year, they don’t have the time,” Wise said. “It doesn’t need to be a hassle. This is fun.”

The Leeds Community Chorus started in 1994 and continues today with singers of all ages. There’s no formal audition process. If anyone is interested in joining, they simply need to show up to a rehearsal, which typically take place at the Leeds Arts Council on Tuesday at 7 p.m. Each “season” takes place from around

January to May, with this performance signaling the season’s conclusion. The group disperses through the summer and fall months. Anyone interested in future participation is invited to attend when the Chorus reconvenes in 2020.

Looking Ahead. We share with our neighbors a common ŐŽĂůͶƚŚĞŚĞĂůƚŚ͕ĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂŶĚǁĞůůͲďĞŝŶŐŽĨ people statewide. Poarch provides over 9,000 jobs to Alabamians, pays millions in state taxes each year, and makes ĐŚĂƌŝƚĂďůĞĐŽŶƚƌŝďƵƟŽŶƐƌĞĂĐŚŝŶŐŶĞĂƌůLJ ĐŚĂƌŝƚĂďůĞĐŽŶƚƌŝďƵƟŽŶƐƌĞĂĐŚŝŶŐŶĞĂƌůLJ $9 million annually. We are proud to be a partner in Alabama’s progress. ALABAMA NATIVES. ALABAMA NEIGHBORS. WŽĂƌĐŚEĞŝŐŚďŽƌƐ͘ĐŽŵƉĐŝͲŶƐŶ͘ŐŽǀ

Leeds Chamber honors graduating LHS diplomats The Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce recognized the outgoing high school seniors who participated in their Diplomat Program

during this school year. Those recognized at the April chamber luncheon were Katheryn Rice, Shelby Truitt, Nicole Armstrong,

Dalton Cates, Camell Looney and Presley Anderson. Jay Lamar, executive director of the Alabama Bicentennial Commission, was the

guest speaker at the April chamber luncheon and spoke about the Alabama Bicentennial. - Dona Bonnett

Jay Lamar was named executive director of the Alabama Bicentennial Leeds High School students who served as Chamber Diplomats this year were Katheryn Rice, Shelby Truitt, Nicole Armstrong, Dalton Cates, Commission in early 2014. Camell Looney and Presley Anderson. Photos courtesy of Anthony Baumann.

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May 2, 2019

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Community Many options for summer camps in Leeds BY BLAKE ELLS Special to the Leeds Tribune Summer is coming, and many parents are making plans for how their children will spend it. Local schools offer camps and enrichment programs that allow children an opportunity to continue learning in June and July. Leeds City School Summer Enrichment Program takes

place from June 3 until July 26. The program is open to children between the ages of 5-11 and that are currently attending and zoned for Leeds Primary School or Leeds Elementary School. The program is $100 each week, which includes a t-shirt and the cost of any field trips that students take. Registration packets can be picked up at the offices of Leeds Primary

School or Leeds Elementary School. The Grove also offers summer programs for young students. Among the week-long specialized camps available are: • Coding Camp for Beginners – June 3 (Ages 6-11) • Coding for a Purpose – June 3 (Ages 8 and up) • Stop Motion Animation Camp – June 10 (Ages 8 and up)

• Film Making Camp – June 10 (Ages 10-13) • Robotics Camp – June 17 (Ages 8 and up) • Tinkering Camp – June 17 (Ages 8 and up) • Yarn Art Camp – June 24 (Ages 10 and up) • Cookie and Cake Decorating Camp – June 24 (Ages 8 and up) • Super Science Camp – July 1 (Ages 6-11)

Many summer camps take kids on field trips. Photos provided.

Field trips include indoor play centers.

Sometimes the kids just like to play in the gymnasium.

• Rockets and Space Travel Camp – July 1 (Ages 9-13) • Let’s Get Crafty Camp – July 8 (Ages 8 and up) • Slime and Squishy Camp – July 8 (Ages 6 and up) • Game Camp for Littles – July 15 (Ages 5-7) • Game Camp for Bigs – July 15 (Ages 8 and up)

• Math-a-palooza Camp – July 22 (Ages 8-11) • Imagination Camp – July 22 (Ages 8 and up) Prices for week-long camps at The Grove vary each week. To learn more about each camp that is available and to register for summer camps online, visit learningatthegrove.com.

Photographers headline Leeds Arts Council for May Photographers Maura Davies and Kevin Wheeler. SPECIAL TO THE LEEDS TRIBUNE Maura Davies and Kevin Wheeler are the Leeds Arts Council’s featured artists in May. The public is invited to the opening reception on Sunday, May 5, 2019, 5-7 p.m. at the Leeds Arts Center to view their beautiful photography. Admission is free. Maura Davies is a Leeds resident, originally from Huntsville. She has enjoyed photography as a hobby for many years, beginning as a teen and taking photography courses in college. Her photography often highlights her other interests, such as plants and gardening, nature, and history. Documenting her children’s activities has led to opportunity for photographing for others. Maura has enjoyed taking photos for the band programs at Leeds High School and Leeds Middle School, and for Leeds High School Soccer. Upon moving to Leeds about 10 years ago, Maura began to explore local history, eventually joining the Leeds Historical Society. Photographing old places has sparked curiosity about the stories and people behind these places. As a member of the Trussville Photography Club, she has exhibited at Leeds Arts Council, St. Vincent’s East, and the Genesis Gallery of the Cahaba Springs Church. Her photographs are also displayed at the Trussville Public Library and have appeared in print in the Leeds Tribune. Originally from Connecticut, Kevin Wheeler is an avid photographer living in Odenville, AL. He retired from the

U.S. Air Force in 1995 after serving over 21 years and from pastoral ministry in 2016, when he and his wife, Roxanne, moved to Alabama. In his youth, Kevin’s passion was drawing and oil painting, copying the masters and doing nature and landscape scenes. In recent years, he's taken up photography as an art form, still passionate about nature and landscapes. His website entitled Glimpses of Glory to indicate his desire to capture and share glimpses of God's glory as revealed in nature. Kevin has photographed such glimpses of glory in various locations around the world, including England, Ireland, Guatemala, Tanzania, Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Hawaii, Louisiana, New England, New York, Tennessee, the Smokies, and more. Some of his work, including two murals, is permanently displayed at The Chateaus at Montclaire, an assisted living facility in Shreveport, La., and in the Trussville Public Library, as well as in the homes of family and friends. As a member of the Trussville Photography Club, he has displayed at the Trussville Public Library, the Leeds Arts Center, the gallery at St Vincent's East Hospital, and the Genesis Gallery of Cahaba Springs Church in Trussville. Their photography will be on exhibit through June 1. The Leeds Arts Center is located at 8140 Parkway Drive, in downtown Leeds. The gallery is open during events. In case of inclement weather, call the center at 205-699-1892 to confirm opening hours.

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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

Lifestyle Leeds Chef Andrew Armstrong offers some curry favorites BY ANDREW ARMSTRONG

tries and they all have their own versions. The ingredients are very interchangeable, and you can use almost anything. Try this week’s selection of recipes and sur-

Special to the Leeds Tribune This week’s recipes are for the people who love flavor! Curry is done in many coun-

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Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center.

May 4 Young Adult Book Club at Leeds Jane Culbreth Library. Join Ms. Ginny for a book club involves donuts and focuses on YA literature for preteen/teenage readers. First Saturday Breakfast at Leeds Masonic Lodge at 8 a.m. All proceeds go to the Leeds community.

May 3 Leeds Elementary School hosts its annual Spring Fling from 4-7 p.m. with games, concessions, silent auction, raffle, bounce house obstacle courses, food trucks, vendors and a dunking booth.

May 5 Artist Reception for May’s artist of the month, Maura Davies and Kevin Wheeler. Join the Leeds Arts Council at the Leeds Arts Center to view their photography gallery.

May 7 Tot Time at Leeds Jane Culbreth Library - Join Mrs. Ramona & Ms. Amy as they sing songs, read fun stories, and make a craft at 10 a.m.

May 11 Leeds Arts Council Community Chorus Concert is at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. Call 699-1892 for tickets. Little Cahaba Club Running Rails and Ales Scholarship Run - The 2nd Annual Scholarship run will once again seek to send deserving LMS students to attend the yearly field trip, this year to Philadelphia and New York City. Storytime at Green Up Garden Shop – Leeds Jane Culbreth Library’s Ms. Ginny will host a special Storytime with friends at Green up Garden Shop at 10 a.m. For more information, call 205699-5962.

May 14 LadyBUGS Luncheon and Meeting at the Livery Event Center at noon. Pre-School Craft at Leeds Jane Culbreth Library. Join the library for a different craft each date that will be fun for children ages 2 - 6 years old from 10-10:45 a.m.

May 16 The Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce Luncheon will be at Leeds First United Methodist Family

Jason Steward Enterprises (205) 267-5735

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First Thursdays Street Fest is from 4-7 p.m. with street entertainers, food trucks, arts, crafts, vendors, car cruise ins, kids activities, shopping and more. First Thursdays will include a Porsche Night and Corvette Club Night with the car cruise ins. These events are sponsored by Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce, City of Leeds and Leeds Redevelopment Authority. For more information, visit w w w. L e e d s A r e a C h a m b e r. com or call Sandra McGuire at 205-699-5001.

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THAI YELLOW FISH CURRY (GAENG LUENG) 1 Pound of fish fillets 2 Tablespoons of mild yellow curry paste (or to taste) 5 Cups of water 2 Tablespoons of sugar 1 clove of garlic, minced 1/3 Cup of tamarind sauce 1/2 Cup sliced green beans 1/2 Cup of sliced asparagus or bamboo shoots Cut fish into bite size chunks. In a large Dutch oven or soup pot, stir together water and curry paste and bring to a boil. Add the fish, sugar, tamarind sauce, garlic, long beans and asparagus of bamboo shoots. Reduce heat to a simmer and continue to cook over low heat until the fish is cooked (about 5 minutes). Serve over steamed Jasmine rice with Thai chili sauce.

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OYSTER CURRY 1 pint of oysters and their liquid 3 Tablespoons of butter 3 Tablespoons of flour milk 1/2 teaspoons of curry powder salt and pepper to taste Heat oysters in their liqour until their edges curl. Set aside oysters, keeping warm. Add enough milk to oyster liquor to make 2 cups. Blend butter and flour until smooth to make a cream sauce. Stir in milk and oyster liquor mixture. Continue to stir until curry has thickened and is smooth, then add salt and curry powder. Add

oysters and serve. Optional: Serve with hot fluffy rice and provide small bowls of chopped raw onion, chutney, crispy crumbled bacon, grated egg yolks for sprinkling at table.

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CURRIED CHICKEN SALAD 2-3 boneless chicken breasts, skin removed 2 stalks of celery, strings removed 1/4 Cup of fresh cilantro, chopped 1 Cup of real mayonnaise (not salad dressing) 1/2 an onion, finely minced 1 teaspoon of curry powder 2 cloves of garlic, minced lettuce leaves, for serving paprika (optional) Simmer the chicken in water (or chicken broth if you have it - then reserve for making soup later on. Do not allow the water or broth to boil. Meanwhile, remove the strings from the celery and dice it into 1/3 inch dice. Wash and chop the cilantro. Peel and dice or mince the onion and garlic. Stir the

curry powder, onion, and garlic into the mayonnaise, mixing well. Remove the chicken from the pan using a slotted spoon. Dice into bite sized chunks. Add to the mayonnaise. Mix well. Arrange a few perfect lettuce leaves in the center of a salad dish. Scoop the chicken mixture onto the center. Garnish with a sprinkle of paprika and top with a sprig of cilantro.

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tinue to simmer for another hour or until potatoes are tender. Taste and adjust seasonings, adding salt and curry or garlic powder, if needed. Add water or chicken broth to desired consistency. Serve over hot rice with flour tortillas that have been heated.

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PAKISTAN PUNJABI CHICKEN CURRY 4 Tablespoons of olive oil 4 medium or 2 large onions, coarsely chopped 4 cloves garlic, minced (6 oz.) can tomato paste 2 Cups of water or chicken broth 1/4 to 1/2 tsp. garlic powder (adjust to taste) 3 Tablespoons of curry powder (adjust to taste) 2 Pounds boneless skinless chicken, cubed 6 Pounds of potatoes, cubed In a Dutch oven, sautĂŠ onions in olive oil until translucent. Add minced garlic, tomato paste, water, garlic powder and curry powder. Cook until mixture begins to thicken and onions are tender. Add chicken and cover. Simmer on low heat for 1 hour, being careful not to boil. Add potatoes and con-

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prise your loved ones with a meal that will leave you satisfied all evening long! If you have an exciting recipe to share in 2019, then please send it to me at P.O. Box 693 Leeds, Alabama 35094 -Andrew M. Armstrong

Solutions

Life Center at 11:45 a.m. Lunch is $12 ($15 for no reservation and nonmembers). Speaker is Jefferson County Commissioner Steve Ammons. RSVP to Sandra McGuire at (205) 699-5001.

May 18 The annual Creek Bank Festival & Car Show will be held from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Leeds Memorial Park. Leeds Arts Council presents Jil Chambless & Scooter Muse (Celtic Duo). Tickets are $15. Call 699-1892 for tickets and times. Barber Historics 2019: Historic Sportscar Racing debuts at Barber Motorsports Park on May 18-19 at 7 p.m. This event is the first of the HSR's partner events with the Historic Motor Sports Association for 2019, offering competitors and race fans a chance to visit one of North America's most pristine venues and circuits: Barber Motorsports Park in Birmingham.

May 19 Barber Historics 2019: Historic Sportscar Racing debuts at Barber Motorsports Park on May 18-19 at 7 p.m. This event is the first of the HSR's partner events with the Historic Motor Sports Association for 2019, offering competitors and race fans a chance to visit one of North America's most pristine venues and circuits: Barber Motorsports Park in Birmingham.

May 20 The Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center.

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May 21 Tot Time at Leeds Jane Culbreth Library - Join Mrs. Ramona & Ms. Amy as they sing songs, read fun stories, and make a craft. 10 a.m.

May 30 Dumbledore’s Army: Join the Leeds Jane Culbreth Library on the last Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. for Harry Potter fun. Each month we will be doing a different activity or craft. This club is for 6th grade-Adults. For more information or to sign-up please call or email Ms. Ginny at 205- 699-5962 or gedwards@bham.lib.al.us.

May 31 – June 1 Esther the Musical Audition. Roles available for ages 13 and up. A few non-speaking roles available for children age 6-12. Please prepare 16 bars of a Broadway musical type song. Resume and headshot not required. You will be photographed at the audition. For information, call 205-6991892.

June 7-9 The Barber Museum has teamed up with Mnnthbx to introduce the Barber Small Bore Festival to Barber Motorsports Park on June 7-9. The Barber Small Bore Festival is dedicated to miniature motorcycles, pit bikes, scooters – and their riders. So grab your sub-200cc bikes, your Groms, your ST90s, etc... both vintage and modern... and mark your calendars. June 8 - Storytime at Green Up Garden Shop - Ms. Ginny will host a special Storytime with friends at Green up Garden Shop at 10 a.m. For more information, call 205699-5962. Include your community event in our calendar! Email information to news@leedstribune.com.

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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

May 2, 2019

Education

Teacher Ann Boone and her Pre-AP English 9 students at Leeds High School spent a day researching at the Birmingham Public Library. Photos provided.

The students studied at the library using books available at the library.

Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce High School Diplomats recently toured Honda Manufacturing of Alabama. Photo provided. The final group of freshmen leaders attended the last Principal’s Breakfast of this year.

Leeds Primary School recognized their leaders for April

Class of 2019 The Leeds Tribune is featuring the 2019 Greenwave Graduates in a special Graduation Edition on May 23. Show your support for Leeds High School’s seniors by Congratulating them in this special edition that will be distributed to our subscribers and graduates and their family at Graduation. ASK US FOR OUR RATES! For more information, contact Publisher Cindy Fisher at publisher@leedstribune.comor 205-789-0973. Space is limited so call today!

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May 2, 2019

THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

Sports Greenwave football team starts spring drills, hosts jamboree against Moody on May 10

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

The Leeds High School football team hosts the annual jamboree game against Moody on May 10 at 7 p.m. By Blake Ells Special to the Leeds Tribune The Greenwave had a disappointing season in 2018, and no one was more disappointed in the 3-7 finish than Coach Lee Gibson and his players. With

spring drills now underway, he’s confident that he has the right group of players to turn things around. “We’ve got a good group of kids that are Leeds kids, and that want to play for Leeds High School,” he said. “They want to right the ship. They’re not satis-

Jared Latta played varsity as an eighth grader last fall and will have more experience going into the 2019 season as a ninth grader.

fied with 3-7; the kids aren’t satisfied. The community isn’t satisfied, and they shouldn’t be.” Fans will be able to get their first glimpse of what the new season will offer when the Greenwave hosts Moody in a jamboree game on May 10 at 7 p.m. at Homer Smiles Stadium. Admission will be $5. The most valuable asset that Gibson’s squad will have in his fourth season at the helm is experience. Jarod Latta started the final four games of last season at quarterback as an eighth grader; and while he’s still young, he’s now a little more familiar with the caliber of defenses that he’ll be seeing each week. Gibson is going to rely heavily on a huge junior class in 2019. Running back Cameron Dunklin and wide receiver Omar Conley are both part of that class, and the Greenwave will also welcome back senior Jackobi Hunter who rolled up 1,200 yards on the ground a year ago. Hunter and Dunklin will have an experienced offensive line in front of them anchored by Jackson Bartee and Deandre Oden. Gibson says he’ll move lineman Zach Niles to tight end, as he believes the senior can find new ways to contribute. Experience isn’t the only thing that improves with a very young team from a year ago. Gibson is also happy with some of the work his players have done in the weight room, adding some bulk that can help them make some plays. Junior linebacker Keylan Jones added 20 pounds in the offseason, while junior linebacker Jacob Cain added 15. “Some of the plays that those two couldn’t make last

year because they were a little undersized; they’ll be able to make them this year,” Gibson said. Retaining a substantial portion of his roster and a positive offseason workout effort is a great step in the right direction. This spring has been about fundamentals. “We were a play or two away in some games from winning,” Gibson says of the 2018 season. “If they continue that process and focus on the little things—being a year older and having that experience— we should be able to finish those games that we couldn’t last year.” The locker room has improved, and Gibson is confident that the growth he has seen in his players over the past four seasons is the direction that his program needs to be directed. “Even though the results weren’t what we wanted, the culture that we are trying to build showed,” he said. “The kids never quit. There’s no infighting or bickering. We are building toward the future.” Many familiar foes line the 2019 schedule which begins Aug. 23 at home against Sylacauga. Other home games include Elmore County on Sept. 9, Talladega on Oct. 4 for Homecoming, Handley on Oct. 18 and Pleasant Grove on Nov. 11. They’ll travel to John Carroll on Aug. 30, Lincoln on Sept. 13, Ohatchee on Sept. 27, Holtville on Oct. 11 and Childersburg on Oct. 25. “We want to go on playoff runs and go to the state championship,” Gibson said. “And these are the right kids to do that.”

Each week, the Leeds Tribune recognizes a star athlete who was chosen by his or her coach for the title of Athlete of the Week. This week, we honor Taylor Sisk. Taylor Sisk Grade: Senior Sport: Softball How long have you been playing this sport? Ten Years Favorite team? Auburn (War Eagle!!) Favorite athlete? Victoria Draper What are some top sports achievements you’re proud of? My best achievement in the

game of softball is being a part of last year’s team where we went to the semifinals of our region. What other activities are you active in at Leeds High School? I am a member of Mu Alpha Theta Math Honor Society, National Honor Society, LHS Ambassadors, HOSA, Oak and Ivy Theatre, and the ACT 30+ Club. Where do you plan to go to college or do after graduation? After graduating, I plan to attend Auburn University where I will major in biology with pre-med requisites, in hopes of studying pediatrics in medical school.

LHS sophomore wins at golf sectional Leeds High School sophomore Robyn Blakey was named a sub-state qualifier at golf sec-

tionals on Tuesday and will play again May 6 at Arrowhead Country Club in Montgomery.

Profile for Mike Kurov

The Leeds Tribune | May 2, 2019  

The Leeds Tribune | May 2, 2019  

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