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LEEDS TRIBUNE THE ONLY SOURCE FOR LEEDS NEWS

March 14, 2019 | Volume 4, Issue 10

www.LeedsTribune.com

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Leeds wins growing tech firm’s HQ BY BLAKE ELLS Special to the Leeds Tribune

Kevin Sena has moved his IT company to Leeds, where he also lives.

Leeds has quietly become headquarters to a prominent tech firm that has 300 clients, a dozen employees and offices across the Southeast. Viperline Solutions Inc. moved from the Innovation Depot in downtown Birmingham to Leeds in the last few weeks and plans to officially introduce itself as part of the Leeds community when it hosts community leaders for a private ceremony in April. The ceremony will also celebrate its 10-year anniversary, its move

to the new space and plans to expand within its Leeds space. Viperline has expanded to include satellite offices in Huntsville, Mobile, Atlanta and Chattanooga, but the location at 1408 8th Street in Leeds now serves as its headquarters. Why Leeds? Owner and CEO Kevin Sena has called Leeds home for the last five years and decided it would also be a great place to grow his business. "The city couldn't have been better," Sena said. "Lee Barnes helped me find a property, and it was a perfect scenario. We couldn't be in a better situation than we are right now. The

city has embraced us with open arms." The space next to the Leeds City Schools Board of Education has been renovated and modernized. It houses a full training center, game room and lounge. Sena started the IT company 10 years ago in his home under the name Skyfire Technology, an ode to the Transformer that was Sena's favorite childhood toy. A larger company in California by the same name threatened a lawsuit that forced the name change, and he landed on the current name after securing the website. Sena was operating the business from

home while moonlighting at a furniture store and delivering mattresses to make ends meet. He had just one client that was based in Texas. "I am the CEO and owner," Sena said. "But I have a lot of titles. I'm the janitor. We all wear lots of hats around here. It's a small company." Three years ago, Sena had an opportunity to move the operation into Innovation Depot in downtown Birmingham. At the time, it was the second fastest growing company within Innovation Depot, an achievement reached without needing any money from investors.

The company's rapid growth soon became too much for the space they had at Innovation Depot. While Sena fondly recalls his time downtown, he also decided that the opportunity to search for a larger space was an opportunity to cut down on his commute. That’s how he landed in Leeds. Today, Viperline serves more than 300 clients. His staff includes a dozen employees, which he hopes to see grow with a call center in the neighboring space.

See LEEDS WINS, Page 2

New K-8 school to open in Leeds this fall BY KARIM SHAMSI-BASHA Leeds Tribune Staff There will be another educational option for the Leeds community this coming fall. The Grove School will open its doors for grades K-8 at their building on Parkway Drive. “We’re excited to offer the people of Leeds and surrounding areas a flexible and rigorous learning facility. In other words, if I have a kindergartener reading at a thirdgrade level, he can be in third grade level for reading. We're not going to hold them back to grades,” owner Mandy Fox said. “We have more groupings so they can get what they need and not stop learning while the rest of their classmates catch up.” Fox, a career educator, intends on creating a school that teaches academics and develops the particular interests of the students, so they are engaged and interested in learning. “In addition to opening the school this coming Fall, we're also doing summer camps that

are completely out of the box,” Mandy Fox said. “Camps you won't find anywhere else like filmmaking, cooking, cake decorating and others.” The Grove School building will also be utilized as a venue for those looking to hold events such as family-reunions, weddings, and other gatherings. Although education is what sings to Fox’s heart. “I have always loved the fact that the heart and vision for this project comes from kids. We will be teaching them academics and how to find their own gifts and talents in order to find their purpose and their passion, so they can in turn make this world a better place.” Fox says starting the school was propelled by her search for purpose, and also the joy in this purpose. She has been teaching elementary school, technology and gifted education for 21 years. She and husband Steve intend to share this purpose with their students. “When you see the smiles on the children’s face, you cannot help but smile and laugh and feel joyful. When you hear a lit-

Mandy and Steve Fox work on repairs to the building that will hold their new school called The Grove that is scheduled to open in the fall. tle kid giggle, you just find happiness,” Fox said. Students for The Grove will come from the Leeds area as

well as Moody, Irondale, and Shelby County. She is excited at the different ways of teaching the school will provide.

“A lot of times you'll find that some schools will let students choose what they want to learn. There's still a very specif-

ic path they're going to follow of academic standards, but within those standards, they can progress as they want,” Fox said.

Leeds High School students clean up Moton community BY KARIM SHAMSI-BASHA Leeds Tribune Staff High School students have many options to spend time on a Saturday, includ-

ing sleeping late, shopping, homework and hanging with friends. This past Saturday, Leeds High School students had another option: They partic-

ipated in a cleanup in the Moton Community. “We thought it would be a good idea to come out today and clean up in this community,” said Leeds High chemistry

teacher Desmond Parker, who helped organize the event. “We wanted to help and beautify this neighborhood.” The cleanup is good timing. Leeds residents have

Leeds High School students cleaned up Moton community as Leeds residents urge more enforcement on littering.

been clamoring for less litter around the city and even spoke before the City Council recently about improving enforcement of anti-littering laws.

Students spread out over the grassy area near the Moton Community Center and picked up the trash scattered

See LEEDS STUDENTS, Page 3


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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

March 14, 2019

Business Don’t give up on New Year’s workout resolutions just yet By Blake Ells Special to the Leeds Tribune

You’re going from moving to a sedentary lifestyle. It’ll have a direct effect.� To accommodate those who use their tricky schedule as an excuse, gyms like Workout Anytime establish hours that can fit most

any schedule. The facility is open 24 hours, seven days a week for members to go workout, and staff is there from Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m., on Saturday from 9-5 p.m. and on Sunday from 1-5 p.m.

New Year’s resolutions often begin falling apart by March. People want to achieve their fitness goals by Spring Break but feel like they’ve gotten too far behind to see their desired results. Trainers at Workout Anytime in Leeds say don’t give up. There are ways to stay motivated to stick with the workouts and make it over the hump of March and look great – and feel great – by summer. “I get a huge spike in personal training clients at the beginning of the year,� said Workout Anytime trainer Jalil Nance. “People want to start off the year on the right note. But that will sometimes start to decline around this time of year.� According to U.S. News, about 80 percent of resolutions fail by the second week of February, so by March, it is tough to stay on track. Some experts say it’s actually better to start a resolution in March, after you’ve had time to plan how to make the changes you chose as a resolution in January. A psychology professor at the University of Texas at Austin said get through the holidays and take the first two months of the New Year to plan out how to accomplish your goals. Then start the goal in March. Before giving up on 2019 goals, consider the potential regression. Nance warns that it’s difficult to recover. “Stopping is a horrible idea,� he said. “You’ll lose the progress that you’ve made. Jalil Nance is a personal trainer at Workout Anytime in Leeds.

make huge strength gains that surpass the groups sessions. If I can focus on people individually, I can diversify their plan a lot better, and I’m going to make sure you get $30 worth out of your session.�

Nance is NASM certified, and he and two other qualified personal trainers work with those from basic levels to advanced. For more information, visit www.workoutanytime. com/leeds.

continued from page 1

Leeds Wins Viperline is an IT security solutions company that now provides services to clients across Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Tennessee and South Carolina. They offer products and services in networking,

Nance says working with a personal trainer helps members see better results than group sessions or working out alone. “One-on-one sessions is where I always see a huge difference,� said Nance. “They

data protection, productivity, application delivery, network security, cloud storage and managed services that provide cyber security for any kind of business. It has grown to become one of the 100 most prof-

itable privately held businesses in Alabama. Sena, 46, a Colorado native, fell in love with the South after completing college in Tennessee. "I loved the South, so I just stayed," he said.

Viperline has creative workspace, including video games and a pool table and roomy couches.

Tues-Fri 10am-6pm Sat 10am-5pm 5415 Beacon Drive, Irondale, AL 35120 Suite 127 De’Ja Ray Consignment De’Ja Ray Boutique

205-635-8131

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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

March 14, 2019

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News Construction begins for Rex Lake Road subdivision By Cindy Fisher Leeds Tribune Staff Construction has begun on the latest subdivision in Leeds. U.S. Steel broke ground this week on development of 50 acres of a planned 700-acre subdivision at 500 Rex Lake Road, Mayor David Miller said on Facebook. The first phase, Grand River South, is on U.S. Steelowned land and being built by U.S. Steel without a partnership with a developer, as they had for Outlet Shops of Grand River with Daniel Corp. The builder of the 64 lots has not been announced. This first phase is a small part of a larger plan to develop 2,000 to 3,000 acres the steel giant has owned for a century that is in Leeds city limits with housing and retail. This new development will feature homes in the $260,000$300,000 price range, Miller said. “These new high-quality rooftops are a welcome addition to our city,” Miller said. The 700-acre property was annexed into Leeds and includes a 22-acre, city-owned site for an additional school if needed in the future, Miller said. “This development is the culmination of agreements between the City of Leeds and U.S. Steel and is part of the overall development plan for the Grand River project,” he said.

Construction has begun on the first phase of a new subdivision in Leeds on Rex Lake Road. Photo courtesy of David Miller.

Leeds Students continued from page 1 all over the grass. There were bottles, newspapers, cans and various pieces of trash everywhere. “We’re actually starting a recycling project at Leeds High School, so we are collecting all this paper and others items we can recycle,” Parker said. “It feels good to help our community with an environmentally friendly method. This trash we are picking up eventually finds its way to our water system, so it’s essential we do this.” Parker spoke of how our oceans and lakes are littered with plastic and other trash that sinks to the bottom and destroys the environment. He deems it a necessity that clean up begins in our homes and neighborhoods. “We are separating the garbage from paper and other products we can recycle,” Parker said. “So today we will fill up bags and bags of recyclables and take it over to the recycling center which is located on the other side of the city.”

Dozens of Leeds High School students chose to clean up their community instead of sleep in last Saturday.

Correction In the photo on Page 8 of the March 7 edition, the

name of the Leeds High School player sliding into

home plate is incorrect. The player is Brody Goodman.

Publisher: Cindy Fisher publisher@leedstribune.com Staff Writer Karim Shamsi-Basha Sales Representative sales@leedstribune.com

Leeds Tribune is published weekly by Kingfisher Media LLC, 7901 Parkway Drive, Leeds, AL 35094. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Prices in Pending at Leeds, AL. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Leeds Tribune, P.O. Box 340, Leeds, AL 35094.

Copyright 2019 All rights reserved. Any reproduction in whole or part other than for personal use is prohibited without the express written consent of the publisher Kingfisher Media LLC

Stay up-to-date on Leeds News at our website LeedsTribune.com

The Leeds Tribune is a news source for the community of Leeds, Alabama. Information gathered for coverage of Leeds is from sources that are considered reliable, but accuracy cannot be guaranteed. Issues with accuracy or errors should be brought to the attention of the publisher at publisher@leedstribune.com.

More details released about Leeds’ First Thursday Street Fest By Nathan Prewett Leeds Tribune Staff The upcoming First Thursday Street Fest will come to Leeds starting on April 4 and will be a community event to celebrate the city's small businesses. First Thursday will feature a number of festivities and activities. Several local businesses will be open for the event, including Mum & Me Mercantile, Pants Store

and LA Salon & Boutique. The recently opened Three Earred Rabbit will be open for patrons as well. Among the festivities will be a Porsche night, sponsored by Eurasian Auto Services. There will be a racing Porsche, a vintage 1957 Porsche as well as others. The Corvette Club is planned for May 7. All cruise ins will happen at the Parkway between 6th Street and 9th Street.

Other activities include arts and craft vendors, live music and street entertainment. These will take place on the corner of 6th Street and Parkway on April 4. On May 2, the festivities will take place at the corner of 9th Street and Thornton Avenue and the corner of 8th Street and Parkway on June 6. The festival will be held from 4 to 7 p.m.


March 14, 2019

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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

Lifestyle Recipes from Leeds Chef Andrew Armstrong BY ANDREW ARMSTRONG Special to the Leeds Tribune This week’s column goes back in history a good ways. The Ocean State of Rhode Island borders Massachusetts and Connecticut. Their foods are as unique as the state history. The area was a discovery in 1524 by the Italian navigator Giovanni Verrazano, after he came across a small island that he claimed was in the shape of a triangle. Many years later a man by the name of Roger Williams founded the first permanent European settlement in Rhode Island at Providence in 1636. This was done on land purchased from the Narragansett Indians. On May 4, 1776, Rhode Island was the first colony to renounce allegiance to Great Britain’s King George III and declare independence by an official legislative act. Several weeks after the passage of the Act,

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48 Auction action 49 "___ in the Family" DOWN 1 Studied visually 2 Close to home 3 Statistical information 4 On the ferry 5 Acme 6 Got really angry 7 Boston or Chicago 8 Equal 9 Five-sixths of a dozen 10 Magician's stock item 16 Sculler's gear 18 A ___ technicality 21 Gospel 22 Period of success on Broadway 23 Unified 24 Oyster's place 25 Work on Broadway 26 It's more than a mere battle 27 This or that 28 Support for a tire swing 31 "I'm with you!" 33 Snitcher 34 Put faith in 36 Where Borneo is 37 Poky part 38 Like most N.B.A. players 39 Bench-pressing limb 40 Sweet flower 41 Prospector's tool 42 Mixed doubles team

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RHODE ISLAND CLAM CHOWDER 2 cans of clams, chopped 1 Tablespoon of butter 1/4 Pound of bacon, diced 1 large Spanish onion, diced 2 stalks of celery, diced 12 red potatoes, cubed 1/2 Cup of a dry white wine 3 sprigs of thyme 1 bay leaf 1/4 Cup of fresh parsley, chopped Salt and pepper to taste In the bottom of a pot sauté the onions, celery, potatoes and butter. Add the wine and stir well. Mix in the remaining ingredients and fill the pot with water. Bring to a hard boil, then simmer on low heat for 30 minutes. RHODE ISLAND STYLED CLAM BEIGNETS Canola or other vegetable oil for frying 3 eggs, beaten 1/2 Cup of buttermilk 1/2 Cup of Chicken Broth 1/2 Cup of cold beer 2 teaspoons of maple syrup

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the Assembly ratified the Declaration of Independence on July 18, 1776. The history of their beginnings and the influence of the surroundings, such as the native Narragansett Indians, has shaped even their foods. Figgy pies come from the state’s English roots and the Johnny Cakes go back to the struggles at the beginning of the American Revolution. This week let us raise our flags to our nation’s heritage and our recipes! If you have an exciting recipe to share in 2019, then please send it to me at P.O. Box 693 Leeds, Alabama 35094 -Andrew M. Armstrong

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1 1/2 Cups clams, chopped 1 teaspoon of salt 2 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder 3 1/2 Cups of cake flour 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda 1/4 teaspoon of baking powder 1/4 teaspoon of salt 1/8 teaspoon of paprika Oil for deep frying Preheat the oil at 350 degrees. Sift together the dry ingredients and fold in the wet. Mix all the ingredients together, just until it is all combined. Drop by the spoonful into the hot oil. Flip the fritters, until they are golden on both sides. Once they are crispy, drain on paper towels and serve with tarter sauce or more maple syrup. GRILLED FIGGY PIES 1 package (2 sheets) refrigerated pie crust 12 dried figs 1/4 Cup of bourbon 1/2 Cup of walnuts, crushed 1/4 Cup plus 1 tablespoon of maple syrup, divided 1 teaspoon of cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon of nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract 2/3 Cup (about 5 ounces) mascarpone cheese 1 large egg 1 Tablespoon of water Warm pie pastry to room temperature according to the package directions. In a small saucepan, combine figs and bourbon, then add enough water to cover by 1 inch. Cook for 15 minutes on low heat, until the figs are plump. Remove from the heat and drain. Cool 15 minutes and pat dry. Cut each fig into quarters and set

aside. In the same saucepan over medium heat, combine the walnuts with 1/4 Cup of maple syrup, cinnamon and nutmeg. Cook while stirring constantly, until the liquid is almost evaporated. Spread the nuts on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and freeze until set, about 10 minutes. Unroll the pastry sheets. Using a 4-in. round cutter, cut 12 circles, rolling and cutting scraps as necessary. In a bowl stir in the vanilla and the remaining maple syrup into the mascarpone cheese. Spread 1 tablespoon of the mascarpone mixture over half of each circle to within 1/4 inch of the edge. Layer with 2 teaspoons of maple walnuts and four fig pieces. Make an egg wash by whisking egg and water and use it to moisten the edge of the pastry. Fold the dough over the filling and seal the edges by pressing with a fork. Repeat with the remaining dough and the filling. Brush with the egg. Freeze pies on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet for 10 minutes. Remove from the baking sheet. Grill pies the covered on a well-greased grill rack over medium direct heat, until golden brown, 7 minutes on each side. BREAKFAST JOHNNY CAKES 1 Cup of cornmeal 2 Cups of buttermilk 12 breakfast sausage links, cut in half 1 1/3 Cups of all-purpose flour 1/4 Cup of sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda

1/2 teaspoon of salt 1 egg, beaten 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract Maple syrup Preheat the oven at 400 degrees. Brown the sausage in a cast iron skillet. Drain the oil into a mixing bowl. Combine with the remaining, unused ingredients and mix. Place the sausages back into the skillet and pour the batter over it. Bake at 400 degrees for 30 minutes, until a toothpick can be inserted in the center and comes out clean. Serve warm with maple syrup. RHODE ISLAND HOT WIENERS 1/4 Cup of butter, cubed 1 medium onion, finely chopped 2 Tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce 2 Tablespoons of paprika 2 Tablespoons of chili powder 3 teaspoons of cumin 1 teaspoon of mustard 3/4 teaspoon of cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon of allspice 1 Pound of beef, ground 1/4 Cup of water 8 hot dogs 8 hot dog buns Toppings Yellow mustard 1 onion, chopped Celery salt In a skillet sauté the first 10 ingredients. Pour in the water and bring to a boil. Once boiling reduce to a simmer and cook, uncovered for 30 minutes. In another skillet fry the hotdogs, until browned or you can grill them. Top with the ground beef mixture and with any of the other listed toppings for a traditional Rhode Island dinner.

Community Calendar March 12 "The LadyBUGS will host a Luncheon and Meeting at the Livery Event Center at noon.

about Vulcan as well as other mythological figures.

March 25

The Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center at 6 p.m.

The Leeds Public Library and the Redevelopment Authority presents “Alabama’s own Nat King Cole” with Alabama Humanities Foundation Road Scholar Daphne Simpkins at noon. A light lunch will be provided. It is the third speaker as part of a year-long speaker series focused on Alabama’s Bicentennial celebration.

March 20

March 27 - April 1

Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce Corporate Ambassadors Group meets at the Leeds First United Methodist Church Family Life Center. Corporate Ambassadors meet the third Wednesday of each Month at 11:30 a.m. Lunch is $10 and an RSVP is required by Tuesday morning. Please RSVP to Sandra McGuire at 205.699.5001 or Dona Bonnett at 205-2029593.

Friends Book Sale at the Leeds Jane Culbreth Library All proceeds will go to support the Summer Reading program for adults, teens, and children. All members of the Friends of the Leeds Library are invited to the Friends Preview Sale on Wednesday, March 27. The sale dates for the general public and non-Friends members will be March 28 - March 3. For more information, call the library at 205-699-5962.

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March 27

The Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce Luncheon will be at Leeds First United Methodist Family Life Center at 11:45 a.m. The speaker is Darren J. Mott of FBI Counterintelligence. Lunch is $12 ($15 for no reservation and nonmembers). RSVP to Sandra McGuire at (205) 699-5001. Leeds Jane Culbreth Library "After School Special" centers around mythology from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. The activity will be held at the Leeds Civic Center where kids are invited to come and learn

A Time to Read Book Club - Discuss what was read that month and enjoy a pot-luck variety of snacks with Mrs. Ramona, Ms. Mondretta, and the rest of the book club members at 10 a.m.

March 17 Leeds Arts Council presents Rosewood at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15. Call 699-1892 for tickets.

March 18

April 1 The Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center.

April 4 The event First Thursdays Street Fest will be held down-

town from 4-7 p.m. on Parkway Drive in Leeds. The festival will feature street entertainers, food trucks, arts and crafts, vendors, car cruise ins, kids’ activities and shopping.

Tickets are $20. Call 699-1892 for tickets.

April 24

LadyBUGS annual Fashion Show will be held at Cedar Grove Baptist Church at noon.

A Time to Read Book Club - Discuss what was read that month and enjoy a pot-luck variety of snacks with Mrs. Ramona, Ms. Mondretta, and the rest of the book club members at 10 a.m.

April 10-14

May 2

Leeds Carnival operated by Sonshine Amusements in St. Clair County runs from April 10 to 14 in downtown Leeds.

The event 1st Thursdays will begin being held downtown from 4-7 p.m. on Parkway Drive in Leeds. The festival will feature street entertainers, food trucks, arts and crafts, vendors, car cruise ins, kids’ activities and shopping.

April 9

April 13 Leeds Arts Council presents Ron Dometrovich in Concert. Tickets are $15. Call 699-1892 for tickets and times. Greenwave Quarterback Chili Cookoff at 11 a.m. This fundraiser at Rails and Ales aims to benefit the Leeds Football program.

April 15 Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center.

April 18 The Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce Luncheon will be at Leeds First United Methodist Family Life Center at 11:45 a.m. Lunch is $12 ($15 for no reservation and nonmembers). RSVP to Sandra McGuire at (205) 699-5001.

April 20 Leeds Arts Council presents Cash Domino Killers (1950’s/60’s band) at 7 p.m.

May 3 Leeds Elementary School hosts its annual Spring Fling from 4-7 p.m. with games, concessions, silent auction, raffle, bounce house obstacle courses, food trucks, vendors and a dunking booth.

May 6 Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center.

See COMMUNITY CALENDAR, Page 5

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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

March 14, 2019

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Outdoors Get your gobble on: Turkey season starts Saturday By Todd Prater Special to the Leeds Tribune Spring hunting season for turkeys starts this weekend for most of Alabama, including Jefferson, Shelby and St. Clair counties, and conservationists with the National Wild Turkey Federation have worked hard the last 45 years to ensure there continues to be a strong population of wild turkeys. The Alabama chapters of the National Wild Turkey Federation, one of the largest conservation organizations in the nation, are recognized consistently for conserving more than any other state east of the Mississippi River. When the NWTF started in 1973, there were 1.3 million turkeys in North America; as of 2018 there are 7 million. The NWTF is in its sixth year of a 10-year initiative called “Save The Habitat. Save The Hunt” to conserve or enhance 4 million acres of wildlife habitat nationally, create 1.8 million new hunters and to open access to 500,000 additional acres of public hunting land. On the state level, the goal is to conserve or enhance 250,000 acres of wildlife habitat, create 20,000 new hunters and create 10,000 new acres of public hunting land.

Turkey hunting season can be fruitful. This group hunted during spring turkey season last year as part of an Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries program. Charlie Duckett, a Selma resident and state NWTF secretary, said the nonprofit is funded primarily through contributions, their Super Fund Banquets ticket sales and the sale of firearms, ammo and other NWTF items at the banquet. This money goes national, but money raised by the sale of the Alabama’s NWTF specialty license plate stays with the state organization. Recently, Charity Navigator, the largest independent charity evaluator in the country, found that the NWTF put 89.8 cents of every dollar toward its mission. Duckett said that 10 percent of the NWTF income goes to land acquisition and donating to the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, in particular the

Charlie Duckett is secretary of the state National Wild Turkey Federation.

Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries to add to Wildlife Management Areas. The NWTF, however, often gives money instead of buying the land for one main reason: That money is considered income for the WFF, which makes it eligible for Pittman-Robertson three-toone matching funds. That is a pool of federal money funded by a tax on firearms, ammo and other hunting supplies. The funding is used for conservation projects. If NTWS gives $10,000, with PittmanRobertson matching funds, it becomes $40,000. WFF can now buy more land, which is then available for public use. Much of the tracts that are part of Wildlife Management Areas and Special Opportunity Areas in Alabama were acquired

for public use in this manner. In Dallas County there are two SOAs between Selma and Camden, The Cedar Creek SOA and the Portland Landing SOA. Equipment is often purchased this way also. Money raised from the sale of NWTF license plates in Alabama stays with the state chapter. That money is used for scholarships and education, sponsorship of shooting teams, both archery and firearms. There are land conservation projects and other youth outreach programs to teach conservation. Duckett said one of his favorite programs is archery in schools. He does not miss a competition. In Alabama, there are 75 chapters, according to Duckett, with 8,100 members.

continued from page 4

Community Calendar May 11 Leeds Arts Council Community Chorus Concert is at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. Call 699-1892 for tickets. Little Cahaba Club Running Rails and Ales Scholarship Run - The 2nd Annual Scholarship run will once again seek to

send deserving LMS students to attend the yearly field trip, this year to Philadelphia and New York City.

May 14 LadyBUGS Luncheon and Meeting at the Livery Event Center at noon.

May 16

May 18

May 20

The Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce Luncheon will be at Leeds First United Methodist Family Life Center at 11:45 a.m. Lunch is $12 ($15 for no reservation and nonmembers). Speaker is Jefferson County Commissioner Steve Ammons. RSVP to Sandra McGuire at (205) 699-5001.

The annual Creek Bank Festival & Car Show will be held from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Leeds Memorial Park.

The Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center.

May 18

May 31 – June 1

Leeds Arts Council presents Jil Chambless & Scooter Muse (Celtic Duo). Tickets are $15. Call 699-1892 for tickets and times.

Esther the Musical Audition. Roles available for ages 13 and up. A few non-speaking roles available

for children age 6-12. Please prepare 16 bars of a Broadway musical type song. Resume and headshot not required. You will be photographed at the audition. For information, call 205-699-1892. Include your community event in our calendar! Email information to news@leedstribune.com.

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March 14, 2019

THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

Community

Leeds couple hosts garage sales with a purpose BY KARIM SHAMSI-BASHA Leeds Tribune Staff If you were hunting for a garage sale this past weekend, you might have run across Fishes, Loaves and Love. Unlike most garage sales, this one had a purpose. “We are a local nonprofit organization that provides food for children with food-insecurities. The children are identified by the school counselors and are fed sporadically. Many of them go to bed hungry at night, so we had to do something,” Fishes, Loaves and Love Founder Lindsay Isbell said. For sale behind the Isbell home was just about everything. Items ranged from plates and kitchen items to clothing to toys to shoes to furniture to household items to sports equipment to knickknacks and everything in between. All proceeds from this sale go toward the backpacks program for school children. “We do these sales which help, and we also cook for shut-ins and leave meals at churches. So we provide ministry opportunities within the community of Leeds. We're funded solely by donations,” Isbell said. “We started the organization about three years ago. In addition, we provide backpacks for the children. We've got two schools right now.” Isbell and her team supply their hungry folks with things like ravioli, chicken-noodle soup, vegetables, raisins, breads and jams, and healthy snacks. The Isbells started Fishes, Loaves, and Love to help their community in Leeds, but mostly, they do it for a different reason. “It makes us feel really good on a personal level when we see the results of our work. There will always be the less fortunate, and someone has to help,” Isbell said. For more information or to donate, visit Fishes, Loaves and Love on Facebook.

Steve and Lindsay Isbell host a garage sale to raise money for organizations including Fishes, Loaves and Love.

Bringing back the art of sewing Sewing club in downtown Leeds teaches new generation to create with patience Sewing Studio are bringing back a lost art. “I think sewing as a lost art because it takes a lot of patience. We're a generation that wants everything quick and fast. In sewing, you have to be patient, and you have to see a product all the way through,” owner Mae Taylor said. On this day, the ladies are making a cosmetics bag. They select the material first, cut it to size, and proceed on the sewing machines. Taylor’s passion for sewing is easy to see. “I'm doing this because I have been sewing since my teenage years, Home Economics in high school got me interested. I guess I was mentally mature enough

or patient enough to stick with it,” Taylor said. “During the summer months, when school was out and I didn't have anything to do, I would get my mother’s fabric and practice making stuff. She would pretend to be upset with me, but I think she was secretly glad I was interested.” Taylor learned to sew the hard way, by making mistakes and learning the ropes through trial and error. Now she loves to teach and doesn’t charge for her classes. She does it for fun, and to spread the knowledge of this lost art. “We have great fun in the studio. Right now, there’s a group of five or six ladies, and we do

MaDoray Sewing Studio owner Mae Taylor works with Eleanor Brown on her project. BY KARIM SHAMSI-BASHA Leeds Tribune Staff When you walk in off the main drag in downtown Leeds, the place looks like another business in the front room, but in the back, sewing machines line the tables, and rolls and rolls of thread are everywhere.

Welcome to the MaDoray Design Sewing Studio, where they make just about anything from purses and totes to clothing items, and where the chatter ranges from the different kinds of material to colors, textures and threads. Most importantly, those involved in the MaDoray Design

The ladies cut their fabric at the MaDoray Sewing Studio.

have one guy. We get together and laugh and eat and talk. We have lunch after we finish sewing,” Taylor said. “Last year, we made clothes for Alabama Baptist Children's Home. We made them shirts, dresses, shorts, and also blankets.” Taylor mentioned the two keys for mastering sewing: patience and persistence. “You gotta be patient enough, and you have to stick with it. I have not always had the patience, but I've always liked the idea of taking nothing and making something out of it. You've got to be passionate and creative. You also have to see something before it’s actually finished,” Taylor said.

The ladies at the MaDoray Design Sewing Club continued to work on their tote bags and cosmetics purses, while the sounds and hums of the sewing machines filled the air. There is something else Taylor loves seeing at her studio. “I love to see the look on people’s faces, some who have never touched a sewing machine before. It brings us great joy to see them sit there and be so nervous and not know what to do. I tell them it's like driving. Keep the fabric straight just like you would your car. You got it,” Taylor said with a smile. For more information on classes, see MaDoray Designs Sewing Studio on Facebook.


THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

March 14, 2019

Education LHS Students of the Month

LES Encouragers of the Month

Eight students were chosen for Leeds High School’s Students of the Month in February. They are: Kathryn Rice and Ben Davis (12th grade), Mackenzie Lockridge and Alex Dowell (11th grade), Hannah Stone and Jonathan Robinson (10th grade), Arianna Abercrombie and Miguel Luna (9th grade)

Leeds Elementary School’s Encouragers of the Month in February.

Leeds Primary School National School Breakfast Week

ATTENTION VETERANS!!! Served between 2003 and 2015? Deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan? ,ĂǀĞŚĞĂƌŝŶŐůŽƐƐŽƌƟŶŶŝƚƵƐ;ZŝŶŐŝŶŐŝŶĞĂƌƐͿ͍

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(205) 699-5195 Students of Leeds Primary School took part in National School Breakfast Week to promote healthy meals for students across the nation.

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March 14, 2019

THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

Sports ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Each week, the Leeds Tribune features a star player at Leeds High School. This week is Kaela Gimberg. Kaela Gimberg Grade: 11 Sport: Softball How long have you been playing this sport: 9 years

Favorite team: Florida Gators Favorite athlete: Tim Tebow What are some achievements you are proud of? I’m proud of the way my team has ultimately come together this year and buck-

led down and my work ethic and my ability to be able to receive two college scholarship offers. What are other activities you are active in at Leeds High School? I am in HOSA and FBLA. Where do you plan to go

to college or do after graduation? I am still on the edge of deciding, but I will either plan to accept my scholarship offer for softball or attend a small four year college and earn my degree in nutrition and certified training.

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