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LEEDS TRIBUNE THE ONLY SOURCE FOR LEEDS NEWS

March 8, 2019 | Volume 4, Issue 10

www.LeedsTribune.com

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Wintzell's Oyster House to become second new restaurant to open in Leeds BY KARIM SHAMSI-BASHA Leeds Tribune Staff Construction to turn a former Japanese steakhouse in Leeds into Wintzell’s Oyster House is almost complete. Managers are interviewing and hiring locals to fill jobs – all in preparation of opening the latest Wintzell’s in Leeds. Doors will open to customers starting the third week of March, said manager Donald Jones. “We are so excited to offer the people of Leeds and Birmingham what Wintzell’s has to offer: The best and freshest seafood you can find,” Jones said at the huge and airy restaurant on Ashville Road in Leeds. Hallmark Hospitality Group owns the franchise restaurant, which includes Jones and partners Keith Hall and Frank Hall, (no relation). The restaurant is spacious, with availability to seat 200

See OYSTER HOUSE, Page 3 Donald Jones is manager of the Wintzell's in Leeds.

Leeds teen wins

Miss Alabama Outstanding Teen BY CINDY FISHER Leeds Tribune Staff Zoe Champion of Leeds won the Miss Alabama Outstanding Teen 2019 pageant at Thompson High School's auditorium last weekend. Leeds' Emma Terry earned 1st Runner Up in the statewide competition. Champion, who attends Connection Academy Virtual High School, is wellknown around Leeds for her musical talents. She won

Miss Jefferson County’s Outstanding Teen 2019 to earn the spot in the Miss Alabama Outstanding Teen pageant. At the talent portion Saturday, Champion won the talent portion for her jazz dance “To the Rescue.” Champion’s platform is M.A.D.E. (Make A Difference Every day). Champion will compete in the Miss America’s Outstanding Teen on July 27 in Orlando. Her sister, Chandler, was Miss Alabama in 2013.

Champion served as Miss Leeds Outstanding Teen in the 2018 statewide pageant and won 2nd Runner Up. That earned her $24,000 in scholarships. Emma Terry, a sophomore at Leeds High School, finished as 1st Runner-Up. Terry won the preliminary Evening Gown and On-Stage Question award. Terry performed her ballet en pointe to a "Gigi Medley." Terry’s platform is Stomping Out ALS One Step

Zoe Champion of Leeds was named Miss Alabama Outstanding Teen at the statewide pageant Sunday. Photo

See MISS ALABAMA, Page 2 courtesy of Miss Alabama Outstanding Teen

Leeds springs into spring sports

Greenwave second baseman Avery Stephens tags a Shades Valley runner in the fourth inning of their match up. Photo by Karim Shamsi-Basha

SEE OUR SPORTS COVERAGE ON PAGE 8


THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

2

Community

Leeds Primary School nurse keeps students healthy

Lynnette helps many students take medications daily. Photos by Karim Shamsi-Basha. By Karim Shamsi-Basha Leeds Tribune Staff For nurse Georgia Lynnette at Leeds Primary School, there is never a dull moment. “This is an extremely satisfying job,� Lynnette said. “I love working with the little kids. I love all ages, but the young ones are very special to me. They’re so precious.� Lynnette has seen just about everything at the school, from broken fingers to broken elbows to cuts to bruis-

es to upset stomachs to head injuries and everything in between. She does have to be aware of head injuries. “In case of concussions, we do our neurological assessment to make sure they're OK. If it's severe, I'll call their parents and let them know. If it's not a severe and they just went into the wall, which happens a lot, I'll just put some ice on it let them go back to class. If they continue to have any problems, they'll send them back to me to let their parents know.

Concussions can be serious,� Lynnette said. Lynnette also dispenses medicine to the students who have to take it daily. Most of what she sees is minor injuries repaired by bandaids. There is one thing that is demanded of her more than anything else. “Sometimes they just want a little love. I adore being a positive influence on these children. Some of them just come in to hang out. I have to send them back to class, but it’s precious,� Lynnette said.

Zoe Champion, center, won the crown, and Leeds High School senior Emma Terry won 1st Runner Up.

Miss Alabama at a Time. Her local title was Miss Covered Bridge's Outstanding Teen. Rounding out the top 5 were 2nd Runner-Up, Marissa Luna, Miss Tennessee

Georgia Lynnette checks a student’s temperature.

Valley's Outstanding Teen; 3rd Runner-Up, Jayla Duncan, Miss Childersburg's Outstanding Teen and 4th Runner-Up, MaKenzie Ward, Miss Trussville's

continued from page 1 Outstanding Teen. Miss Leeds Area, Coco Green, finished in the Top 20. The Leeds girls competed against 50 others for their titles.

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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

March 8, 2019

3

News

Leeds to host downtown Street Fests starting in April By Nathan Prewett Special to the Leeds Tribune First Thursdays Street Fest is coming to Leeds starting in April and will feature a variety of activities for those in the community. The event is presented by the Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce, City of Leeds and Leeds Redevelopment Authority. Each event will take place on the first Thursdays of April, May and June. The festival will feature street entertainers, food trucks, arts and crafts, vendors, car cruise ins, kids’ activities and shopping. The first event will be held on April 4, followed by May 2 and will end on June 6. All will be held from 4-7 p.m. on Parkway Drive in Leeds. An event page for this occasion can be seen on Facebook. For more information, visit www.LeedsAreaChamber. com.

Popular carnival returns in April The carnival that returned to Leeds for the first time in 15 years in October is coming

back this spring. The carnival will be held April 10-14 in downtown Leeds

on 27 acres between the Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce and Lehigh Cement Company.

Sonshine Amusements out of St. Clair County will operate the carnival that is com-

ing to Leeds. This is the same company that runs carnivals in Trussville and Moody.

Sales of wristbands and tickets will pay for the carnival, so no city or chamber funds are being used.

Crews plan to be finished renovating the Wintzell’s from a Japanese steakhouse in late March.

Oyster House continued from page 1 Publisher: Cindy Fisher publisher@leedstribune.com Staff Writer Karim Shamsi-Basha Director of Graphic Design Andrew T. Schrimscher Sales Representative sales@leedstribune.com Copyright 2019 All rights reserved. Any reproduction in whole or part other than for personal use is prohibited without the express written consent of the publisher Kingfisher Media LLC

The Leeds Tribune is a news source for the community of Leeds, Alabama. Information gathered for coverage of Leeds is from sources that are considered reliable, but accuracy cannot be guaranteed. Issues with accuracy or errors should be brought to the attention of the publisher at publisher@leedstribune.com. Leeds Tribune is published weekly by Kingfisher Media LLC, 7901 Parkway Drive, Leeds, AL 35094. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Prices in Pending at Leeds, AL. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Leeds Tribune, P.O. Box 340, Leeds, AL 35094. Stay up-to-date on Leeds News at our website LeedsTribune.com

in the restaurant area and includes a banquet room with meeting space that can seat 100. That means they can fit large groups and they plan to cater. “Lots of folks love seafood, and Wintzell’s fans really love what we do with the seafood in our special dishes. Most of our seafood is sourced from the Gulf and is as fresh as it can be,” said Jones who spent 14 years with Chuck E. Cheese’s and 14 years at Ryan’s Steakhouse.

The original Wintzell's location in Mobile has been open for more than 80 years, and Jones finds the long-term success of the original to be “encouraging.” The Leeds Wintzell’s will serve many popular seafood dishes, including their award-winning gumbo. The Wintzell’s owners credit Leeds Mayor David Miller with recruiting them to the city to bring another sit-down restaurant option.


March 8, 2019

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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

Lifestyle

Leeds Chef Andrew Armstrong shares family recipes BY ANDREW ARMSTRONG Special to the Leeds Tribune

Andrew Armstrong and his Aunt Donna Jo Abernathy, who was a pastry chef from Leeds. 1

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ACROSS 1 "Diamonds _____ a girl's ..." 4 Grabbed a chair 7 Be impolite at the table 11 Performed 12 You might come up for this 13 Blow up 14 Follow tirelessly 15 Supposed 17 Remarkable bargain 19 Family-size vehicle 20 Shows up 22 Fish with large pectoral fins 25 Reins 28 Itch cause, perhaps 29 Change from a cashier 30 Many years 32 Not dry 33 Opener of many a toast 34 Start of the Lord's Prayer 35 Engraved honour 39 Eventual 43 "You're as cold as ___" (Foreigner) 44 Glide effortlessly 45 Prime-time hour 46 Timeline time 47 They can be prying or crying 48 Attack one's plate 49 Thieves' hangout

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IDELLA FARLEY'S MEATBALLS & SAUCE 3 Pounds of beef, ground 3 Tablespoons of flour 2 eggs 2 Tablespoons of sweet pickle juice Salt and pepper to taste Mix the above ingredients well and shape into Meatballs. Sauce 1 bottle of ketchup 4 Tablespoons of sweet pickle juice 3 Tablespoons of French’s mustard 1 Tablespoon of sugar 1 onion, chopped 2 Cups of water and more if needed In 1/2 teaspoon of butter sauté the onion. Add the remaining ingredients and bring to a boil. Drop in the Meatballs and cover with a lid. Simmer on low for 30 minutes to 45 minutes. CHRISTINE'S SWEDISH MEATBALLS 1 1/2 Pounds of beef, ground 2 Cups of “Grape Nut” cereal, crushed 1 Cup of water 1 medium onion, grated 2 teaspoons of salt 1/8 teaspoon of nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon of black pepper 1 beef bouillon cub dissolved in 2 1/2 Cups of hot water 2 or 3 Tablespoons of flour Oil for frying In a mixing bowl combine the first 7 ingredients in a

bowl and mix very well. Shape into the desired size and fry in a skillet of hot oil. Fry the meatballs, until browned and cooked on both sides. Remove the Meatballs and drain on clean paper towels. Lower the heat and brown the flour. Pour in the beef broth and thicken into a gravy. Add the Meatballs back into the skillet and simmer for 1 hour. If needed add more water to the gravy. BANANA ICE CREAM 5 eggs 2 Cups of sugar 2 cans of evaporated milk 3 Cups of whole milk 3 Cups of bananas, mashed 1 Tablespoon of vanilla extract 1 Teaspoon of almond, extract If desired 1 Cup of nuts, chopped Beat the eggs, sugar, milk and extracts together. Mix in the remaining ingredients and pour into your ice cream machine canister. Freeze according to the machine operation instructions. CHOCOLATE BROWNIES 2 sticks of butter or margarine, softened 2 Cups of sugar 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract 3 eggs, beaten 1 1/4 Cups of all purpose flour, sifted 3/4 Cup of coco powder 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder 1/4 teaspoon of salt 1 Cup of milk chocolate chips If desired add peanut butter as desired into the batter. Preheat the oven at 325 degrees. Cream the sugar, eggs and butter together. Fold in the ingredients by hand, until moist. Pour into a greased 9x13 baking pan and bake in the

oven at 325 degrees for 30 - 40 minutes, until done. GINGERBREAD LAYER CAKE 1 Cup of Honey 1 teaspoon of ginger 1 teaspoon of cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon of cloves 2 1/2 Cups of all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon of Baking powder 1 teaspoon of baking soda 1/2 teaspoon of salt 1/2 Cup of butter softened 1/2 Cup of brown sugar 1 teaspoon of lemon zest 1/4 teaspoon of lemon juice 1 egg 1 1/4 Cups of buttermilk Filling 1 1/2 Cups of whipping cream 1 Tablespoon of granulated, sugar 1 teaspoon of vanilla Glaze 2 Tablespoons of coco powder 1 Tablespoon + 2 teaspoons of water 1 Tablespoon of crisco 1 Tablespoon of corn syrup 1 Cup of powdered confectioner sugar Preheat the oven at 325 degrees and grease two 10 inch round cake pans. Sift the dry ingredients together. Cream together the liquid ingredients and fold in the dry just until moist. Pour into the cake pans and bake at 325 degrees for 30 minutes or until golden brown and done. Cool the cakes and whip together the cream, vanilla and sugar. Once stiff peaks have formed, cut each cake in half and layer together. Place the coco powder, water, crisco and corn syrup in a pan and cook over low heat, stirring constantly. Once smoothed, remove from the stove and mix in the confectioner sugar. Pour over the cake and refrigerate.

Community Calendar

3 Sharpness of voice 4 Hand on deck 5 Sharpshooter's skill 6 One with an itinerary 7 Small beam 8 Had charge of 9 Candle count, perhaps 10 Board partner 16 Neon, for one 18 Intermissions separate them 21 Middle-of-the-roader 22 Done with, with ''of'' 23 Chewed and swallowed 24 Referendum choice 25 Farm mooer 26 "___, Two, Buckle My Shoe": Christie 27 What you keep 28 Low 31 Bond 33 Forget the words maybe 34 Museum pieces 36 Diminished, with "down" 37 Large property size, for residences 38 Like good hamburger meat 39 "--- only as directed" 40 Make, as a wager 41 Blackjack players call it a push 42 Crumpet chaser

DOWN 1 Puts in 2 Comedy hit

In life people are placed in your presence for a reason. It can be for a lifetime or for a season. This column is a little different than my others, but it's something I need to do, before I lose my chance. As many of my readers know I am in culinary school at Jefferson State Community College. I have a strong culinary background. My mother's sister Donna Jo Abernathy passed a couple years ago. Donna was a pastry chef and a native of Leeds. She was well known for her exceptional cakes. On my father’s side I have a couple cousins who are chefs and I have my Great Aunt Christine Farley Armstrong. My Aunt Christine was born on Sept. 20, 1922 and is now 96 years old. She was a self-taught Pastry Chef and sold cakes out of her home many years ago. Uncle Tommie, her beloved husband, died very suddenly of cancer and her children were still young. The money made from her cakes was used to support her family. She also was exceptionally known for her cake flavors and designs. Christine's extremely detailed basket weaved cake frostings were part of what gave her a name in the industry. My cousin Susie and her husband Michael Mayo have lived with her the last several years as she has been battling dementia. I would like a moment to honor my legacy and allow the citizens of this great city to have a few cherished recipes from a woman whose business was supported by some of the same people who view my columns. I would like to thank

you all. May the light of life shine greatly upon your own families! If you have an exciting recipe to share in 2019, then please send it to me at P.O. Box 693 Leeds, Alabama 35094 -Andrew M. Armstrong

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May 11

The “What Horses Can Teach Us Luncheon” is from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Club in Birmingham. It benefits The Red Barn in Leeds and The JAYC Foundation. The event will feature guest speakers Jaycee Dugard, Dr. Rebecca Bailey, and Beth Holloway, who will share the impact horses have had on their own lives and what horses have taught them as they struggled for healing in times of heartache and grief. Purchase tickets at theredbarn.org.

The LadyBUGS will host a Luncheon and Meeting at the Livery Event Center at noon.

LadyBUGS annual Fashion Show will be held at Cedar Grove Baptist Church at noon.

Leeds Arts Council Community Chorus Concert is at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. Call 699-1892 for tickets.

March 17

April 13

Leeds Arts Council presents Rosewood at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15. Call 699-1892 for tickets.

Leeds Arts Council presents Ron Dometrovich in Concert. Tickets are $15. Call 699-1892 for tickets and times.

March 9 Moody Miracle League hosts the fifth annual Miracles in Motion 5k race at Moody Miracle League Ball Field from 8-11 a.m. This race is great for all individuals regardless of age or athletic abilities. Visit the Facebook page for more information. Beat the Odds Car Show will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. All proceeds will be donated to the American Heart Association. Open to all cars, trucks, and motorcycles with a $10 entry fee for each vehicle. Register upon arrival. It will be located in the front parking lot. For more information and question, please contact Braidyn Lazenby at bslazenby@crimson.ua.edu. Leeds Arts Council presents storyteller Dolores Hydock with “Soldiers in Greasepaint: USO Camp Show” at 7 p.m. at the Leeds Theatre & Arts Center downtown. Admission is free. The Leeds Greenwave Quarterback Club is hosting a Chili Cookoff from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Rails and Ales. Corporate and individual entries are available. $5 admission. There will be live music and family games. Turn in entries at Rails and Ales or email Scott Cain at scottcain1344@gmail.com.

March 18 The Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center at 6 p.m.

March 21 The Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce Luncheon will be at Leeds First United Methodist Family Life Center at 11:45 a.m. The speaker is Darren J. Mott of FBI Counterintelligence. Lunch is $12 ($15 for no reservation and nonmembers). RSVP to Sandra McGuire at (205) 699-5001.

March 25 The Leeds Public Library and the Redevelopment Authority presents “Alabama’s own Nat King Cole” with Alabama Humanities Foundation Road Scholar Daphne Simpkins at noon. A light lunch will be provided. It is the third speaker as part of a year-long speaker series focused on Alabama’s Bicentennial celebration.

April 1 The Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center.

April 4 The event 1st Thursdays will begin being held downtown from 4-7 p.m. on Parkway Drive in Leeds. The festival will feature street entertainers, food trucks, arts and crafts, vendors, car cruise ins, kids’ activities and shopping.

May 14 LadyBUGS Luncheon and Meeting at the Livery Event Center at noon.

April 15

May 16

Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center.

The Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce Luncheon will be at Leeds First United Methodist Family Life Center at 11:45 a.m. Lunch is $12 ($15 for no reservation and nonmembers). Speaker is Jefferson County Commissioner Steve Ammons. RSVP to Sandra McGuire at (205) 699-5001.

April 18 The Leeds Area Chamber of Commerce Luncheon will be at Leeds First United Methodist Family Life Center at 11:45 a.m. Lunch is $12 ($15 for no reservation and nonmembers). RSVP to Sandra McGuire at (205) 699-5001.

April 20 Leeds Arts Council presents Cash Domino Killers (1950’s/60’s band) at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20. Call 699-1892 for tickets.

May 2 The event 1st Thursdays will begin being held downtown from 4-7 p.m. on Parkway Drive in Leeds. The festival will feature street entertainers, food trucks, arts and crafts, vendors, car cruise ins, kids’ activities and shopping.

May 3 Leeds Elementary School hosts its annual Spring Fling from 4-7 p.m. with games, concessions, silent auction, raffle, bounce house obstacle courses, food trucks, vendors and a dunking booth.

May 6 Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center.

May 18 The annual Creek Bank Festival & Car Show will be held from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Leeds Memorial Park.

May 18 Leeds Arts Council presents Jil Chambless & Scooter Muse (Celtic Duo). Tickets are $15. Call 699-1892 for tickets and times.

May 20 The Leeds City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Leeds Civic Center. Include your community event in our calendar! Email information to news@leedstribune.com.

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THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

March 8, 2019

5

LeedsTribune.com No students injured when Leeds bus hit by thrown rock

Leeds librarian Debbie Bennett

A rock thrown into traffic on I-59 last week hit the driver-side windshield of Leeds Elementary School’s bus. Photo provided

5 Questions with Leeds Librarian Debbie Bennett

By Cindy Fisher Leeds Tribune Staff

How long have you worked at the Leeds library? 10 years. What role does a library play in the community? Libraries are more than a place to check books out, they’re community centers offering programs for all ages. We have people who come in every day to read the paper and enjoy a magazine or two. What you do think about the talk of libraries being replaced by the internet?

I think the entire idea of the demise of public libraries is simply not going to happen. People love the many things libraries offer. When I was growing up, libraries were mostly books, but now there is a wide range of services at the library, although the books are still the most requested.

the community, and they call you by name, which feels really good. The other day a young girl probably eight or nine checked out books that were a much older level. When I asked her if they were for her siblings, she said they were for her. I love that libraries contribute to our children reading and learning.

What is your favorite part of working at the library? I love interacting with the folks who come in here. You get to know the people and

What community programs do you like at the library? Four book clubs meet at the Jane Culbreth Library.

A few of their monthly selections are, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Architect’s Apprentice by Elif Shafak, The Famished Road by Ben Okri, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by JK Rowling, At the Existentialist Cafe by Sarah Bakewell, The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt, and Selection of Leonard Cohen poems. To find out about those clubs and the range of services at the Jane Culbreth Library, visit www.leedslibrary.com

Support your community newspaper!

A piece of asphalt thrown into traffic on Interstate 59 hit Leeds Elementary School’s bus carrying the jump rope team back from a performance in Tuscaloosa Saturday. Leeds Schools Superintendent John J. Moore reported on Facebook that no one was injured in the accident. A busload of students and chaperons were returning to Leeds from performing at a University of Alabama basketball game during halftime when the incident occurred.

“I’m thanking God for his mercies this afternoon,” Moore said in a Facebook post. “While our jump rope team was making its way home from Tuscaloosa on I-59 this afternoon, some lost soul threw a piece of asphalt at our bus full of kids and sponsors—and hit the driver-side windshield. It was a scary experience for everyone. Everyone is fine, but this one could have been tragic.” Moore thanked the actions of the driver, Charles Banks, and for the calm of the kids and teachers, Principal Justin Burns and Melanie Jackson, who teaches English as a second language. “Hope they catch the culprit,” he said.

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March 8, 2019

THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

Education

Leeds Primary School’s new Club Day gives kids 30 options to learn something new BY KARIM SHAMSI-BASHA Leeds Tribune Staff Leeds Primary School students can explore many interests through the new monthly Club Days. “Club day is where the kids select a club they're interested in, they pick three of their top choices,” School Counselor Darlene Bean said. “Then they meet once a month and play and grow.” The children scattered after their monthly leadership assembly, each headed to one of 30 clubs throughout the school. Included were gatherings like the Lego club, community service, health care, cooking, gardening, fitness, science, rock painting and more. In one of the classrooms, yoga club participants sit on mats and listen to the teacher for a few minutes, then follow her teachings and participated in stretches and deep breathing. “We do this so the kids have an opportunity to work and cooperate with other kids and contribute to the community. For example, in the community service club today, we walked down to the police and fire stations and gave back to them because of their community help. The kids made them cards, and we brought them doughnuts and goodies. Just a simple way to say thank you,” Bean said. Clubs at Leeds Primary School offer new activities to the students. They also expose them to different teachers. “Our clubs also teach our kids to be leaders,” Bean said. “For example, we had assembly this morning and the kids ran the assembly. They spoke in the microphone. The teachers help kids find the leader within themselves.” Bean has been teaching for eight years, and she sees the value of clubs. “These clubs expose the students and expand their learning,” Bean said. “It’s just one more thing to make learning more exciting.”

The students in the club also visited Leeds Fire & Rescue at Station 2.

Leeds Primary School’s community service club took goodies to the Leeds Police Department to say thank you for what they do for the community.

Yoga is one of the clubs the students can choose from.

Students got to climb around the fire trucks during their visit to Station 2.

Leeds High School students learn the reality of parenthood BY KARIM SHAMSI-BASHA Leeds Tribune Staff What used to be called Home Economics in high schools is now called Family & Consumer Sciences. Leeds High School embraced the name change to reflect new demographics and the changing ways of family structure. “The change in name is more appropriate for families these days, since both parents assume the children’s responsibilities and both could work outside the home,” teacher Christy Bartee said. One assignment was to take care of plastic babies and take

Maliek Evans cradles a plastic baby that teaches students the challenges of parenthood.

them home. The babies cried when needing food, a diaper change, or to be burped. Taking care of the babies is supposed to let high school students learn about the magnitude of parenthood. “These babies have sensors on them that imitates real-life needs and wants,” Bartee said. “They cry and burp like real babies, and they feel if the formula is too hot or too cold. You have to support the head and change their diapers. It’s as close to the real thing as it gets.” In Bartee’s opinion, the class has been an eye-opener for students. One of those students is Taylor Dawkin, who took one of

Christy Bartee, right, shows students how to feed babies.

the babies home and cared for it for a few days. “I had to feed it and change its diaper. I also had to rock it in the middle of the night, it wasn’t easy. I learned from this that right now, I definitely do not want a baby in my life,” Dawkin said laughing. “I’m definitely going to be smart about when to have a baby. They are way too much work.” When the students take the babies home, they have to put them in car seats and act as if they were real. “These babies are enough for any teenager to wait until the appropriate time,” Bartee said.


THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

March 8, 2019

7

Education

Leeds High School recognized sophomore leaders at the quarterly Principal’s Breakfast last week.

Leeds High School students and Principal Rayford Williams read at Leeds Elementary.

Leeds Elementary students read to each other on Read Across America Week.

Last week was Read Across America Week and Leeds Elementary School had a Twenty-two Leeds High School students were selected for the prestigious Academy of Craft Training program for 2019-2020. Two stulot of visitors, including Miss Birmingham Katie Cone. dents are returning for their advanced coursework, and 20 more will begin the program in the fall. These are future workers in welding, construction, HVAC, and masonry career fields. Principal Rayford Williams joins the students.

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March 8, 2019

THE LEEDS TRIBUNE

Sports Leeds High School Greenwave baseball beats Shades Valley BY KARIM SHAMSI-BASHA Leeds Tribune Staff

Greenwave second baseman Avery Stephens tags a Shades Valley runner in the fourth inning of their match up. Fans and Leeds High School baseball players never lost hope Saturday despite the early three-run lead by Shades Valley High School. The Greenwave varsity baseball team ended up winning the home non-conference game against Shades Valley in extra innings by a score of 5-4. At the end of the first inning, Shades Valley was ahead by three, then by the fourth inning Leeds scored a run, then two more runs in the seventh inning. The ninth inning saw a lot of action with one run for Shades Valley and two for Leeds. Coach Jake Wingo said he was pleased with the performance of his Greenwave players. "They played their hearts out Saturday and came from behind to win the game. They did outstanding." Josh Gragg hit three RBI's and a walk-off, then a single in the ninth inning to win the game after Leeds was down by one. Tucker Jones hit 3 for 4 and scored two runs. Sam Sertell hit 2 for 4 and pitched seven and two thirds innings, and 11 strike outs. Next up for the Greenwave are two games against Oak Grove on March 7.

Leeds’ Nick Armstrong slides into home plate.

Moody’s team played well but fell short against the Greenwave. Photo by Maura Davies.

Leeds High School’s girls soccer team won their area match against Moody 3-2 in overtime at Homer Smiles Stadium in Leeds last week. Photo by Christa Vandiver Leeds High School’s boys varsity soccer team played Moody the same night. Photo by Maura Davies.

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