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Will ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ give viewers a sting to remember? Film Review Page 19

DINÉ PRIDE

VOL 4 | ISSUE 170 | JULY 6, 2018

LGBT community converge in Window Rock. Story Page 15

COUNTING DOWN TH TO THE 25 ANNUAL WILD THING CHAMPIONSHIP. Story Page 4


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Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

Revised 5/14/2018 jh

NEWS


NEWS

Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018

3


NEWS ‘Wild Thing’ to pile on the excitement for its 25th anniversary EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED NEXT WEEKEND

By Cody Begaye Sun Correspondent

T

he 25th annual Wild Thing Championship Bullriding rolls into Red Rock Park July 13-14. This year’s event promises to live up to the excitement and visitor expectations, as said by event orga n i zer L a r r y Peterson. “There’s always something special at Wild Thing,” he said. The concept for Wi ld T h i ng began brewing in Pe t e r s o n’s he a d about 26 years ago, with the goal to putting on a fun, professional show for everyone to enjoy. From bringing in top pyrotechnics, buck i ng bu l ls, a n nou nc er s a nd funny men, Peterson said he and organizers try to improve t he event ever y year. “[We] just keep fighting hard and climbing that ladder, [and] making the show really fun for everybody,” he said. Visitors have thought of Wild Thing as a rodeo throughout its history, but Peterson says it is more than that. It is home to the number one open

6 4

NORTHSIDE RESIDENTS SPEAK OUT They’re sick of drunks roaming their streets

bull riding show in the southwest that even non-rodeo/bull riding buffs enjoy. The event features some of the most competitive and

[between a rodeo and bull riding]. The entertainment and electricity level is so much higher than a normal rodeo,”

Photos courtesy of Larry Peterson via Becenti Photography rankest bulls around, and their riders are going for large payouts, with a total purse of $28,000 and $10,000 guaranteed for the first place finisher. “ T her e’s a d i f fer e nce

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he said. To that end, Peterson said that classic rock and roll is played during the show to match the intensity of the bulls. “[The] entertainment level

is off the hook,” Peterson said. “[Visitors should] expect the unexpected. [There are] some surprises for everybody. There’s so much fun

than just the bull riding.” In addition to the championship bull riding, visitors will find entertainment that includes a fireworks show which is touted to be bigger and better than ever in

celebration of Wild Thing’s 25th anniversary. Some of the top entertainers and announcers in the industry will return to the arena. These events are all hooked t oget her for two and a half hours of action w ith a shor t intermission. One event that will have attendees hanging on the edge of their seats is Cowboy Poker. Participants t r y to play t he game while a bull cha rge s a rou nd the arena – and towards them. The last person left sitting is the winner. In addition, six s e a s o ne d wo ol y riders will compete to win Wild Thing championship buckles. The riders have qualified from previous events, so they will be at their best, Peterson said. There is also pre-entertainment for visitors who arrive early, Peterson said. This includes games such as a balloon toss and a sack race, where people from the crowd get involved to help pass the time until the main event. “So many people arrive early to get the good seats,”

WILD THING | SEE PAGE 9

WHAT’S INSIDE …

DWI DRIVER SMASHES HOUSE He tried to run, but cops later found him

Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

9

STATE POLICE OFFICER BUSTED The disgraced cop allegedly delivered drugs to teen

12 17 A TANKER MYSTERIOUSLY DERAILS Hazmat crews clean up the hydrochloric acid leak

ARTIST ARMANDO ALVAREZ DIES Local personality designed notable sculptures NEWS


WE NEED YOU!

Gallup Housing Authority

TO APPLY FOR PUBLIC HOUSING: Individuals must fill out a GHA Housing application and submit the following: All applicants/household members must submit: • Original Birth Certificates • Original Social Security Cards All applicants/household members 18 years or older must submit: • Photo ID • Proof of Income • Proof of INS Status [If not a US citizen] • All Auto Registrations and Insurance Proof of Income docs may include: • Pay check stubs [Last 3 months] • Social Security/ SSI Benefits Statements • Welfare/ Public Assistance Statements • Most recent Tax Returns • Unemployment Benefits • Child Support documents • Bank Statements [Checking/ Savings] • IRA Account Statements • Any other form of income

Intake only on Wednesday and Friday between 8:00 am and 11:00 am. 203 Debra Drive in Gallup, NM (505)722-4388 Applications may be requested by email: GHA.Main@galluphousing.com NEWS

Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018

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Northside residents say street drinkers continue to negatively impact city GPD CHIEF PHILLIP HART ON HAND TO ANSWER TOUGH QUESTIONS By Cody Begaye Sun Correspondent

I

n the first six months of the year, there have been upwards of 29,000 calls to the police department, Gallup Police Chief Phillip Hart said. Police expect calls to increase during July 4th festivities, as alcohol consumption increases and the city swells with visitors. The most common call pertains to intoxicated individuals, Hart said. He also said they receive thousands of these calls, known as a code 203. “We have to prioritize the calls we go on,” Hart said during a community meeting at the Neighborhood Senior Center, 607 N. Fourth St., June 28. While frequent calls on transient activities are lower priorities, acts of violence and life-threatening scenarios

6

trump all other calls for help. “We’re s t ret ched ver y thin,” Hart said when asked why the department has to be selective about the calls they respond to. “We are straight-up overwhelmed.” Ha r t sha red statistics about the calls the department receives. There have been over 400 calls for violent crimes in Gallup this year, surpassed only by Albuquerque and Rio Rancho. For each officer on duty, Gallup has received 16 calls per officer, whereas Albuquerque has received 7.1 and Farmington has received 6.8. City Councilor Linda Garcia was on hand at the meeting along with members of the Gallup police and fire departments to discuss the issue with Gallup citizens. Additionally, the meeting focused on the abundance of street drunks in the Gallup

Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

area, and some of the attendees mentioned that organizations like Na Nihzhoozhi Center Inc. are not doing enough to combat the issue in terms of rehabilitation, and that many residents do not feel safe as a result. Attendees asked why NCI does not do more to help intoxicated individuals. NCI officials were not on hand to answer, but Garcia said representatives from NCI would be invited to the next meeting. Attendees at the meeting said that it is often the same group of people who a re being called on for pickup by Community Service Aides. “Stats show they’re repeat offenders,” Garcia said during the meeting. Despite being stretched thin, the officers on duty run across the city throughout their 12-hour shifts. “[It’s] a dirty, thankless job

but they do it well,” Hart said. When asked what citizens should do to combat the issue, it was suggested by Hart that they come together as a community to protect their property and voice their opinions louder. “This community has to make themselves known to their councilors, mayor, [and] tell them we’re tired of this,” Hart said. Ga rcia stressed to the crowd that it is imperative they

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get out and vote when the time comes. “It’s the judges and district attorneys we need to be hard on,” Garcia said.

Gallup Sun Publishing, LLC Publisher/Editor Babette Herrmann Calendar Editor Lealia Nelson Photography Cayla Nimmo Knifewing Segura Design David Tsigelman On the Cover: TOP: Vern “V” Newton is originally from Chaco area but lives in Scottsdale, Ariz. He came to Window Rock, Ariz., June 30, to celebrate the first LGBT+ Pride event. Photo by C. Nimmo BOTTOM: In this undated photo, a bull rider attempts to reach a qualifying 8-seconds during Wild Thing Bullriding Championship at Red Rock Park. Photo by Becenti Photography The Gallup Sun, published Fridays, is not responsible or liable for any claims or offerings, nor responsible for availability of products advertised. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Gallup Sun distributes newspapers in McKinley, Cibola and Apache counties. Office: 102 S. Second St., Gallup, NM 87301 The Gallup Sun, pending USPS number 1, is mailed weekly. Application to mail at periodical rates is pending in Gallup NM. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM. Mailing Address: PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305 www.gallupsun.com Phone: (505) 722-8994 Fax: (505) 212-0391 gallupsun@gmail.com Letter to the editor/guest column ACCEPTED BY EMAIL ONLY. State full name and city/town. No pen names. ID required. All submissions subjected to editor’s approval. Guest columnists, email Sun for submission requirements.

NEWS


AG meets with ‘Keeping Families Together’ New Mexico and Mexico officials at the border Staff Reports

S

U N L A N D PA R K – New Mexico Attorney General Hector Ba ldera s urged the federal government to focus its efforts at the Mexican/ American border on violent international criminal organizations, instead of on caging children and families in cold jail cells during a border visit July 2. Balderas met with law enforcement leaders from southern New Mexico and Chihuahua, Mexico to discuss ongoing efforts to battle international crime and keep it from flowing into New Mexico. While touring 12 miles of the international border in Sunland Park, Balderas discussed with local law enforcement how Sunland Park, one of the safest cities in the entire borderland, is a national model for how to keep out dangerous, violent criminals. A lso Monday, Attorney General Hector Balderas joined attorneys general from around the nation in filing a motion that dema nds cha nges in what he considers the Trump Administration’s unfair and

un-American prosecution of vulnerable children and families at the United States’ southern border. “The Trump administration should be targeting these violent criminals that are attacking our communities through human trafficking, the drug trade, auto theft, and violent crime,” Balderas said. “Instead they are caging children, and tearing apart families who are seeking asylum at our southern border, which can impede efforts to prosecute human trafficking and other international crimes. The federal government should learn something from Sunland Park, a New Mexico border community, which is one of the safest towns in New Mexico.” Monday’s filings include a motion that would prevent the federal government from refusing to process asylum seekers who arrive at the Southern U.S. border; would declare family separation for deterrence illegal; requires prompt family reunification for those already separated; prevents immigration officials

BORDER | SEE PAGE 14

Protesters carry signs of support for the “families belong together rally,” as they march up Third Street in Gallup June 30. Protesters were one of many in a protest that spanned the nation, protesting against the camps separating the children from their their parents who are being detained for entering the United States without proper documentation. Photo Credit: Cayla Nimmo

John Ortiz carries the United States flag at the “families belong together rally,” starting at the Cultural Center in Gallup June 30. Photo Credit: Cayla Nimmo

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Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018

7


DWI suspect crashes into house, flees scene Staff Reports

A

Gallup man has been arrested after hitting and causing extensive damage to a house and then fleeing from the

scene. The driver, identified as Kintuck Howard, 31, is now facing charges dealing with destruction of private property and DWI. Gallup Police Officer Domenic Molina said he was dispatched to the house on the 2700 block of Mazon Avenue on June 29 in connection with a car crashing into a house. When he got there, he found a vehicle crashed into the west side of the

Kintuck Howard crashed into a residence on Mazon Avenue, shaking up the residents and causing plenty of damage, before taking off on foot. Photo Credit: Courtesy

Kintuck Howard

building and had gone partially into the house. By the time he arrived, however, the driver was not there. He met with the owner of the house, Damien Phillips, who said he was awoken by a loud bang about 2:44 am, and saw that the wall to his bedroom was caved in. He said he went outside and saw the driver trying to back out so he pointed

his gun at the man and told him not to go anywhere. He then went back inside the house to get clothes on, but when he went back outside the driver was running south, away from his house. He gave police a description of the man. At the same time, Molina talked to a witness who said he saw the man fleeing and went in pursuit of him but lost him in the open field.

A preliminary investigation indicated that the driver lost control of his vehicle on the top of the hill, ran a curb and then struck the house. Police were later directed to Howard’s residence by the tow truck driver who recognized the vehicle and knew the owner. Howard was charged with DWI and leaving the scene of an accident.

The homeowner sent this pic of what the damage looks like from the inside of the home that was struck by an alleged drunk driver. Photo Credit: Courtesy

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Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

NEWS


State Police officer busted for trafficking drugs OFFICER DANIEL CAPEHART ON ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE

To this end, the complaint alleges that on June 15, Capehart initiated a “flirtatious” “texting” relationship with a 16-year-old female who was a passenger in a friend’s vehicle, which was the subject of a traffic stop. After Capehart allegedly agreed to dismiss the friend’s citations, Capehart allegedly sent a number of text messages to set up two clandestine deliveries of marijuana to the minor on June 21 and 23.  The complaint alleges that unbeknownst to Capehart, the minor had turned her cellphone over to a SJCSO detective on June 19, and Capehart allegedly had been communicating with the SJCSO detective instead of the minor. According to the complaint, investigators conducted surveillance as Capehart allegedly left the marijuana at the designated drop locations as discussed in the text messages, and collected the marijuana after Capehart departed from the areas. According to the complaint, a confidential source, known to Capehart as a methamphetamine user, informed the investigators that Capehart had been texting her for approximately

nine months and that Capehart had contacted her by text as recently as June 5. The source reported that the texting relationship with Capehart also began with a traffic stop and was sexual in nature. The source permitted an FBI Special Agent to take control of her cellphone and pose as the source beginning on June 27.  The complaint alleges that during text messaging on June 28, between the FBI Special Agent posing as the source and Capehart, the FBI Special Agent asked Capehart if he could “make me happy or vice versa,” and Capehart allegedly responded “if you know someone I can bust tomorrow then it makes my job easy. Whatever I get I just split it.”  After the FBI special agent sent text messages to Capehart setting up a sting, the investigators put a plan into place to have an undercover officer, posing as a methamphetamine dealer and carrying 24 grams of methamphetamine, accompany the source to the SunRay Casino in Farmington.  According to the complaint, on the night of June 28, while the undercover officer and the source were driving to the casino, Capehart allegedly executed a traffic stop on the undercover officer’s vehicle, arrested the undercover officer, and seized the methamphetamine.  In subsequent text messaging, Capehart allegedly told the FBI special agent, whom he believed to be the source, that he would arrange for her to get her share of the methamphetamine after he booked the drug dealer.  In the early hours of June 29, investigators conducted

sur veilla nce a s Capeha r t allegedly drove from the San Juan County Detention Center to a park in Bloomfield, and walked into and out of the bathroom area in the park. After Capehart departed the area, investigators went into the bathroom area and found a plastic container containing approximately 5.7 grams of methamphetamine.  The description and location of the container were consistent with information Capehart allegedly previously sent to the FBI special agent, whom he believed to be the source, by text message. Investigators arrested Capehart shortly thereafter at the Farmington office of the NMSP. “As guardians of our communities, police officers have a solemn trust and responsibility to uphold the law. Any suggestion that an officer has breached that trust demands prompt action,” U.S. Attorney John C. Anderson said. “My office will work closely with FBI, NMSP, SJCSO, and HIDTA Region II Narcotics Task Force to ensure that any violation of the public trust is addressed swiftly, thoroughly and in accordance with law.” “The majority of law enforcement officers perform their duty with dedication and integrity, putting their lives on the line every day to keep our communities safe,” said Acting Special Agent in Charge Maxwell D. Marker of the FBI’s Albuquerque Division. “It is a sad day when the FBI and our partners investigate someone accused of betraying their solemn oath to uphold the law, but it is a task we perform thoroughly and vigorously because the public must be able

“We have been very fortunate, with events crashing all over the country that ours has been growing and maintaining, and everybody loving [it],” he said. The event happens only once a yea r, so Peterson encourages everyone to go and enjoy the festivities. Visitors suppor t the

Manuelito’s Children Home via parking fees and concessions. Wild Thing has been the biggest annual fundraiser for the home, Peterson said. “Take the family and go out and enjoy the thing,” he said. Advanced tickets can be purchased at Castle Furniture, T&R C-Store, T&R Feed, and Rico

Auto Complex with adult tickets $19 and $22 for Friday and Saturday, respectively, and $8 for children’s tickets. Tickets at the gate will cost $25 for adults and $10 for children ages 6-11. F o r m o r e i n fo r m a tion , vi sit Wild T hing Championship Bullriding Facebook page.

Staff Reports

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L BUQU E R QU E – U.S. Attorney John C. Anderson, Acting Specia l A gent i n Charge Maxwell D. Marker of the FBI’s Albuquerque Division, New Mexico State Police Chief Pete Kassetas, San Juan County Sheriff Ken Christesen, and Director Kevin Burns of the HIDTA Region II Narcotics Task Force announced that a NMSP officer has been arrested and is charged with violating federal drug laws. N M SP O f f icer D a n iel Capehart, 33, of Bloomfield, N.M., was arrested by the FBI, NMSP, San Juan County Sheriff’s Office, and HIDTA Region II Narcotics Task Force on June 29, 2018. At the time of his arrest, Capehart was assigned to patrol duty in Farmington and San Juan County, N.M.  Upon arrest, Capehart was placed on administrative leave.  Capehart made his initial appearance in federal court in Farmington, N.M., this morning before U.S. Magistrate Judge B. Paul Briones on a criminal complaint charging him with distribution of marijuana and methamphetamine. Capehart remains in custody pending a preliminary hearing and a detention hearing, both of which are scheduled for July 5, in federal court in Albuquerque. The criminal complaint generally alleges that Capehart abused his position as a law enforcement officer by stealing quantities of drugs seized during arrests and giving the drugs to females with whom he was interested in pursuing romantic or sexual relationships.  

WILD THING | FROM PAGE 4 Peterson said. It has been the support of the community that has allowed Wild Thing to last for 25 years, along with getting sponsors to help put on the event every year, Peterson said. NEWS

Daniel Capehart

to trust their protectors. We hope this arrest sends a clear message that misconduct by any law enforcement officer or any public official will not be tolerated.” “The State Police is fully cooperating with the FBI in their investigation and we look forward to justice being served,” said New Mexico State Police Chief Pete Kassetas. “Police officers take an oath to uphold the law and any violations of that oath are unacceptable.” “The vast majority of law enforcement officers fulfill their duty with integrity and honor,” said San Juan County Sheriff Ken Christesen, “The small fraction that does not will not be tolerated in San Juan County or the State of New Mexico.” “Police officers are entrusted by the citizens of New Mexico to uphold their oath with limited supervision.  It is always unfortunate when law enforcement officers have to investigate one of their own,” said Director Kevin Burns of the HIDTA Region II Narcotics Task Force. “We are pleased with the hard work of our task force officers and our collaboration with the FBI on an investigation to uphold the integrity of our profession.” If convicted on the marijuana distribution offenses, Capehart faces a statutory maximum penalty of five years of imprisonment. If convicted on the methamphetamine distribution offense, Capehart faces a statutory maximum penalty of 20 years of imprisonment.  Charges in criminal complaints are merely accusations and defendants are presumed innocent unless found guilty in a court of law.

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Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018

9


Weekly Police Activity Reports Staff Reports

FLAT OUT OF LUCK 7/1, Gallup The arrest of C a l b e r t Hender son bega n with t he Ga l lup Pol ice a nd ended with t he Ga l lup Police after some assistance from the McKinley County Sheriff’s Office. The first report came in near midnight Sunday of a driver speeding and running red lights. The reports coming into Metro Dispatch said the driver pulled into the Continental Divide Electric parking lot on State Highway 602. Gallup Police were sent to investigate and found the vehicle with a front flat tire, but before they could check on the driver, he sped away south on Highway 602. The police officers reported in, and said the driver appeared

to be highly intoxicated. He was going about 48 miles per hour and driving recklessly. Police officers reported that during the chase, the driver swayed over the center line and almost collided with three oncoming vehicles, one of them a tractor trailer. By this time, Johnson Lee, a McKinley County deputy had joined the chase, reporting that police were now saying the driver was going 88 miles per hour and was having problems controlling his vehicle. The chase ended when the driver collided with a wire fence and got stuck in the dirt. Henderson, 36, of Albuquerque was then placed under arrest by the Gallup Police on DWI and aggravated fleeing charges.

AGGRAVATING BREAKIN 7/1, Tse Bonito T he McK i n ley Cou nt y Sheriff’s Office is investigating the theft of a vehicle that also included the burglary of the home owner’s house.

Deputy Jasmine Jaramillo was dispatched to the house in the Tse Bonito area Monday night where she met Alvina Tsosie who said she had been gone most of the day and arrived back home at 7:30 pm to find her pet pit bull scared and wanting to go outside. She also discovered that her door hinge was broken, and the porch drywall was caved in. She told police that she believes the thief kicked her dog into the wall. As she went around her house, she discovered items thrown on the floor and some of her property missing. Also missing were the keys to her Chevy Tahoe. When she went outside, she discovered that her car was also missing. By t he ti me Ja ra m i l lo arrived, Tsosie had found that she was also missing some jewelry and an Xbox 30. A neighbor didn’t report seeing anything suspicious during the day, but did say she saw the Tahoe parked on the driveway about 4 pm. There are no suspects at

this time.

GIVE ME YOUR MONEY 6/29, Thoreau A Thoreau ma n wa s arrested after he aggressively went after a woman when she refused to give him money. Delbert Saunders, 59, was charged with assault against a household member and battery. McKinley County Sheriff Deputy Johnson Lee said he was dispatched to the house about 7:30 pm on June 26. When he got there Rashid Sandoval was holding Saunders down on the ground with Priscilla CheeBoyd standing by and reportedly yelling at Saunders. He placed Saunders in his unit and asked him what was going on. Lee said Saunders replied that he had been arguing with Chee-Boyd because he wanted his money and she wouldn’t give it to him. He explained that she gets money every month, and is supposed to give it to him. When he asked Chee-Boyd about this, she said that when Saunders came home, he began asking for money and she told him she didn’t have any. She said he then began walking toward her aggressively and she became scared he was going to hit her. She told

him to leave and as he turned to leave, he picked up her phone and began yelling at her that he was going to come back and shoot her and Sandoval. He then turned as if he planned to go after her again and she said that is when Sandoval showed up and got him on the ground. She said Saunders continued to yell that he was planning to come back and shoot both of them. Lee asked her if Saunders had a gun, and she said yes, but when they looked for it they couldn’t find it. At that point, Saunders was arrested and transported to the county jail.

FIRE DEPARTMENT THEFT 6/26, Navajo Estates On June 26, the McKinley C ou nt y S he r i f f ’s O f f ic e received a report of items missing from the Navajo Estates Fire Department. Tony Watchman, the district chief for the station, said the items were listed on the inventory when it was prepared last year but they could not be found when this year’s inventory was taken. Repor ted missing were three SCBA’s, valued at $5,000 each and a generator valued at $2,000. Watchman said none of the volunteer firefighters had left disgruntled during the year. At the present time there are no suspects.

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Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

NEWS


WEEKLY DWI REPORT Staff Reports Jodelle Bitloy June 16, 12:06 am Aggravated DWI Gallup Pol ice L t . F r a nc ie Martinez was on r eg u l a r patrol when he observed a vehicle without its headlights on at night. Martinez began following the vehicle and observed it running through two red lights and conducted a traffic stop. The driver was identified through an Arizona ID card as Jodelle Bitloy, 32, of Window Rock, Ariz. Martinez observed signs that Bitloy was intoxicated, including slurred speech and staggering when she tried to walk. When asked to perform field sobriety tests, she said she didn’t think she would be able to do so, but agreed to try. However, halfway through the tests and already having problems, she stopped the tests and was arrested for DWI and was transported to the police station where she agreed to take breath alcohol tests. She provided two samples of .21 and .20. Wilbur J. Johnson June 10, 3:29 pm 4th DWI Gallup Patrolma n Luke Martin was on regular patrol at the intersections of Will S t r e e t a nd U.S. Highway 66 when he observed a vehicle turn west on Highway 66 failing to yield to incoming traffic. Martin said he had to come to a complete stop to avoid a collision. He then turned around and made a traffic stop. As the driver pulled into a parking lot of a nearby business, Martin said he observed one of the occupants throw a beer can out the window. T he d r iver, ident i f ie d a s Wilbur Johnson, 61, of Crownpoint was not able to show him a driver’s license or current insurance card. Martin also said he observed NEWS

s i g n s t h a t Joh n s o n w a s intoxicated. Johnson said that while he had difficulty hearing, he would do the standardized field sobriety tests, which he performed poorly on. He then agreed to take a portable breath test which gave him a level of .14. When Martin checked with Metro Dispatch, he learned that Johnson had three prior DWIs and was on the felony DWI list. He was then arrested, and as he was being placed in the police unit, Martin discovered he had an open bottle of Yukon Jack whiskey that was three-fourths full. He was then taken to a local hospital for a DWI blood draw and then transported to the county jail. Calvin Begay June 9, 9:03 pm Aggravated DWI McKinley C o u n t y S h e r i f f Deputy Josie Bowman said she was on DWI saturation patrol about 9 pm when she saw a vehicle going northbound on U.S. Highway 491 with no headlights on. Bowman said she turned her u n it a rou nd a nd got behind the vehicle to make a traffic stop, but when she turned on the siren, the driver at first ignored it and kept driving. The driver kept going for about a mile then finally stopped. Bowman said when she first approached the driver, identified as Calvin Begay, 52, of Fort Defiance, he was asked to turn on his headlights. Instead, he turned on his windshield wipers several times. He was not able to turn on his headlights. He said he was coming from the Fire Rock Navajo Ca sino a nd Bow ma n sa id she could smell the odor of intoxicating liquor coming from inside the vehicle. Begay admitted that he had a couple of beers while at Sky City watching the races earlier in the day. When asked if he could take a field sobriety test, he said he had a bad ankle so Bowman

did the tests which did not require walking. One of the tests was to count backwards from 67 to 47, but he continued counting to 42 and was arrested for DWI. He then refused to take a breath test. Raynold Begay June 7, 12:33 am 2nd DWI McKinley C o u n t y S h e r i f f D e p u t y Cl ay t on Etsitty said he wa s on r o u t i n e patrol on New Mexico Highway 602 when he noticed a car approaching him speeding. He clocked him going 73 miles per hour. Etsitt y sa id he tur ned around and did a traffic stop. When the vehicle stopped, the driver, identified as Raynold Begay, 31, of Pine Hill got out of the car. He was told to get back in. He approached the driver

from the passenger side and told him to roll dow n the window. When it was rolled down, Etsitty said he could smel l t he odor of i nt ox icating liquor coming from inside. Etsitty then asked Begay to get out of his vehicle and walk over to his unit. As he did, Etsitty said he observed Begay swaying. He asked if he had anything to drink that day and Begay admitted that he had been drinking earlier in the day. When asked if he would do a field sobriety test, Begay said he had sprained his left ankle, so alternative tests were given which he failed. He was then placed under arrest for DWI. Later he was give breath alcohol tests during which he posted two samples of .09. Wendy Talley June 7, 6:01 pm Aggravated DWI McKinley County Sheriff Chief Investigator Merle Bates said he was driving on Philipin Avenue when he noticed the vehicle in front of him abruptly go into the opposite lane of traffic. He conducted a traffic stop. He went up to the driver’s

side window a nd t a l ke d t o T a l l e y, 21, of Twin Lakes, who said she wa s i n t he pr o c e s s of learning how to drive. Bates said he wa sn’t sat i sf ied w it h her answer and asked her to get out of the vehicle. W hen a sked i f she had anything to drink that day, she admitted drinking earlier in the day. She agreed to take field sobriety tests, wh ich she fa iled a nd wa s arrested for DWI. Later, she agreed to take a breath alcohol test and posted two samples of .18. ATTENTION NEWS HOUNDS!

Have a news tip? Want to write up a guest submission for the paper? Email us at: gallupsun@gmail.com

Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018

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Train tanker carrying hydrochloric acid derails in west Gallup

HAZMAT CREWS CLEANUP THE SMELLY MESS Staff Reports

O Emergency crews gather to assess a tanker leaking hydrochloric acid, after it derailed in Gallup off Highway 66, east of Virgie’s Restaurant June 2. Photo Credit: Knifewing Segura

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Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

n Ju ne 2, Ga l lup Police Department received a call about a lone dera i led tanker leaking hydrochloric acid, east of Virgie’s Restaurant on Highway 66. Ga llup Police Lt. Er in Toadlena-Pablo said the call came in at about 4:48 pm, and a hazmat crew from Belen was tasked with cleaning up the area.

Roads in the immediate area were closed, and eastbound trains were backed up for miles. Westerly winds were favorable in helping to dissipate the noxious fumes. BNSF officials took over the scene after police secured the area. Toadlena-Pablo said she hasn’t received any updates from BNSF officials on what caused one tanker to derail from the tracks, or where the rest of the train was at for that matter.

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A BNSF hazmat crew came from Belen to begin the cleanup of hydrochloric acid, slowly leaking from a derailed tanker June 2. Photo Credit: Knifewing Segura

Former Sun cops reporter found deceased in home Staff Reports

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h e G a l lu p Pol ic e Department is i nvestigati ng t he death of two indiv idu a l s who wer e fou nd dead this past weekend at 613 West Hill Ave. They have been identified as Richard Boss, 62, address unknown, and Naomi Chan, 38, of Gallup. Chan worked as a police reporter for the Gallup Sun for a brief period in 2017. She had moved to the area from Washington state, and was an aspiring writer. Medical personnel and

police detectives were called to the scene about 12:23 pm June 30. Police said the bodies were found by a caretaker who came by the house. When police inspected the home, they found that Chan had died some time a fter Boss, but no information has been made public as to the reason for this. How the two were connected isn’t clear either. The State Police Crime Lab out of Las Cruces was called in to help process the scene. Police are still trying to determine the cause of death. Foul play has not been ruled out. NEWS


OPINIONS Baked in success: Ruidoso bakerycafe rises with SBA 504 loan By Damon Scott, Finance New Mexico

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f you whisk together hard work and passion and then throw in an effective loan program, your chances for small business success will likely be high. Those ingredients came together in Ruidoso, where Steven and Marie Gomez

operate t he Cor ner stone Bakery & Cafe. Cornerstone serves up a wide variety of bakery items — cookies, muffins, pies, cakes, and New Mexico traditional goods such as biscochitos — along with catering that supplements the full breakfast and lunch menu. The Gomezes were long-time loyal customers

of the cafe before buying the business in 2010. “I am a realtor by trade and had planned on owning this business as a hobby,” said Steven. “It only took me about six months to realize that this was much more.” The couple threw themselves into the business, building on the core capabilities

MADAME G

that had made it a success. And then, four years of double digit sales growth made it clear that they needed more space. “We felt like we were at a point of diminishing returns,” said Steven. “We had many locals who no longer would try to get in because the wait for a table was too long.” The couple found a building

at 1712 Sudderth Drive and started looking for financing options.

INGREDIENT FOR GROWTH The Gomezes learned about

RUIDOSO | SEE PAGE 14

GUIDE TO THE STARS WEEK OF JULY 9

Enjoy a restfully out of balance Last Quarter Moon on July 6. This is a time for discomposure. Each month we are faced with the “in-between” moments between the waxing and waning moons. Madame G recommends that you sit back and enjoy the process. When you’re committed to the outcome, you lose the journey. You need both to succeed, whatever that means for you.

ARIES (March 21-April 19)

CANCER (June 21-July 22)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.22)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Focus on yourself. You have much to gain and offer. Don’t lose yourself in the process of improvement. You’re capable of more than you think. This is the time to put thought and focus into your intentions. In order to live the life of your dreams, you must put thoughts and work into it. There is no way around putting in the work. You must do, in order to get there. Keep trying.

Heartache takes many forms. It can be in the shape of rejection at work or play. We pretend that these things don’t matter, but they do. However, your worth is not determined by how many people acknowledge you or even praise you. Fame and popularity are fickle friends. They won’t stick around when the going gets tough or when you have a tummy ache.

What is to be done? If you don’t know, don’t worry—no one does. Now is the time to enjoy what we have and learn from our mistakes. Instead of digging deep into what we already know, consider expanding outward. You don’t have all the answers and you’re definitely not always right. It would be wise to consult with your colleagues and peers. Ask for the truth.

Don’t lose yourself in the job. You have a whole beautiful life to live. You may require it for money or significance, but you are more than the career. Instead of focusing on all the work stuff, what about the other part of your life? Kids out of the house? Great! Make a workout room or an art room or both. Don’t be a slave to what you’ve always known. Set yourself free for once.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

When you say “no” to one thing, you’re saying “yes” to something else. It’s probably something that you want to do as well. You don’t need to keep running towards the status quo, if it’s not working for you. You have everything to find the best position for yourself that you can. All it takes is a little effort and forward momentum, to create the luck that you want to see. Go NOW!

“Never give up! Never surrender!” That’s from the cheesy film: Galaxy Quest. It’s fun and describes this week well. Don’t assume you know everything about anything. Even the things you have always seen will have secrets hidden beneath their depths. You may find that your parents, bosses, and coworkers have incredible stories to tell. Keep digging. Life is full of gems.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

Stop guessing! You don’t know what’s around the corner and that’s a good thing. It’s brand new and totally bright. Madame G recommends that you put down the map and open up iTunes. Rework how you go to work. Shake up the status quo of your own life by taking time to simmer and think about what makes you tick. All we have is a little moment in time. Enjoy!

“All the good doctors are in the Gulag. If there are any doctors in Moscow, they’re not good doctors.” If you haven’t seen the “Death of Stalin,” Madame G recommends it. It’s an intensely dark comedy with Steve Buscemi. If you’re not a fan of dark comedy, take a long walk and enjoy the sunshine. Now is the most important time in your life because we are here, now. Enjoy!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

What’s the purpose of life? If you don’t know the answer, you’re in good company. Many people are searching. But, you’ve discovered something priceless—yourself. You have all the answers in your heart and soul. There is no reason to put more focus into those that don’t care about your future. Instead focus on the ones you love and who love you in return. That’s enough! It is.

“Because I’m the boss (or parent)” is not a good response. This is a sign of a bad boss! This is also the worst form of parenting—you’re kids are NOT listening to you. If you believe “might, make’s right,” you’ll encounter problems with those around you. That is the language of dictators not leaders. People in a free nation, of free people, don’t follow dictators. We revolt.

Supposedly, it takes ten thousand hours to become proficient at something. There is a great deal of debate about what type of hours, whether focused or any type will do. But all that aside, what are you a pro at? Everyone has that one little thing that they’re good at. Maybe their friends seek them out for editing advice or research. Whatever the case, find yours. The world needs you.

So, this is life. You may be a bit surprised by what you’re finding. It’s not all orange groves and clover. But, that doesn’t have to be a bad thing. We have regrets in our lives and it’s best we learn to live with it. However, if you’re stuck in regret, you have only one option: keep trying. Go out and try to do something interesting. It’s better to regret the first half, than the last. GO!

OPINIONS

Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018

13


Seven Habits of the Self-Aware Leader

RUIDOSO | FROM PAGE 13 New Mexico-based Enchantment Land Certified Development Company through their long-time banker at First National Bank in Ruidoso. Other banks had turned the couple away because of the “higher risk of [loaning to] the restaurant industry,” Steven said. Deborah Romero, senior commercial loan officer at First National Bank in Alamogordo and a participant of the loan committee, said that by partnering with ELCDC on the U.S. Small Business Administration’s 504 loan, the bank was able to mitigate risk and do the loan. The SBA 504 is designed to assist with financing fixed assets. Funds can be used for small business expansion and improvements — things like construction and the purchase of commercial real estate or equipment. ELCDC specializes in helping small businesses navigate the SBA 504 loan program. The nonprofit organization typically provides 40 percent of the loan total, the bank provides another 50 percent and the borrower comes up with 10 percent. Loan terms are 10, 20 or 25 years, depending on what it is being financed, and are designed to allow the business to retain working capital. Don Panagrossi, who has been helping ELCDC customers navigate the 504-loan process since 2002, said the SBA’s portion of the financing includes a long-term and a fixed rate. “Those are just two features that make the SBA 504 loan program so attractive to businesses from small villages like Ruidoso to larger metros like Albuquerque,” he said. Romero said the financing partnership between First National and ELCDC worked well. “It was a good working relationship,” she said. As a result, “Cornerstone is doing really well.” Besides helping Cornerstone grow into a new space, the loan allowed the cafe to offer more to its customers. The business now employs 40 full-time workers — about double the number at the previous location — and the new drive-thru

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Business owners see dream come true via the SBA 504 loan. Photo Credit: Finance New Mexico

eadership McKinley, class of 2018, shares seven must-do habits to move your leadership to the next level. Developing self-awareness and knowing your team means forging connections that count. Self-aware leaders are more effective because they foster communication and invite feedback, make efforts to inform themselves and others, synthesize ideas, and take action. It’s TIME to become selfaware and move your leadership to the next level! P a r t 7 : Encouraging Others Contributor – Kaytaundra Francisco “ D o n ’ t j u s t

ba r g a i n for s ucce s s . Pay t he pr ice” -I sr a el more Ay ivor Individuals who are serious about leading others find ways to push their teammates to succeed; and along with that, they teach others to accept any failures that may come. Allowing teammates to have a sense of ownership in projects or jobs results in an even better product. When people take pride in what they are doing, they have more determination, and are likely to give 100% (or more!) to the task. Part 7 of 7 in a series of ar ticles from GallupMcKin l e y C h am be r of Commerce Leadership McKinley class participants.

BORDER | FROM PAGE 7

ripping families apart is not American. Balderas joined those attorneys general in filing a lawsuit against the federal government, and fighting for the human rights of families fleeing violence and persecution. That lawsuit demands that the practice of family separations be made illegal, and that all children that have been separated from their families be returned immediately.

window and online ordering have increased customer convenience. “The loan and space will allow us to continue to grow for many years to come,” said Steven. To learn more about ELCDC and the SBA 504 loan, visit www.elcdc.com. Reach a First National Bank lender at www. fnb4u.com. For sweet and savory food from Cornerstone Bakery and Cafe in Ruidoso, visit www.cornerstonebakerycafe.com. Finance New Mexico connects individuals and businesses with skills and funding resources for their business or idea. To learn more, go to www.FinanceNewMexico. org

from basing reunification on withdrawal of asylum claims, agreement to leave the country, or monetary payment; and confirms that detention of families by the federal government is illegal. Balderas also recently led the charge among 21 other AG’s within the U.S., to tell President Trump and AG Sessions, that

STAY UPDATED Attorney General Hector Balderas, seen here talking to a woman just beyond the scope of a camera, traveled to Sunland Park, N.M. July 2 to meet with officials from both sides of the border to discuss the need for President Donald Trump’s administration to focus its efforts on stopping dangerous criminals from entering the country rather than separating families seeking asylum in the United States. Photo Credit: Courtesy

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Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

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COMMUNITY Diné Pride Festival caps off ‘Pride Month’ LGBTQ COMMUNITY CONVERGE IN WINDOW ROCK

Roddy Kanuho, left, and his partner Carnelise Henry, right, attend the first LGBT+ Pride event held on the Navajo Nation June 30 in Window Rock, Ariz. Photo Credit: Cayla Nimmo By Cody Begaye Sun Correspondent

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I N DOW ROCK , A r iz. – June is desig ned P r ide Mont h , a t i me when people under the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer – or in shorter terms – the LGBTQ banner, honor the Stonewall riots of 1969, a tipping point for the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States, and a time to remember those lost to hate crimes and HIV/AIDS. Despite the shifts in cultural and societal standards, LGBTQ people still feel there’s work to be done in terms of equality, but nonetheless they are proud of the strides they have made. On June 30, the Coalition for Diné Equality hosted Diyingo ‘Adaanitsíískéés, a Diné Pride Festival. With the theme of “Diyin ‘Adaosiskéés,” or “I am a sacred being,” and the hashtag of #WeAreSacred, the festival at Veterans Park drew crowds of family, friends, and supporters to watch song and dance performances and hear the stories of prominent LGBTQ Diné people. COMMUNITY

Visitors could also visit booths that gave out information about HIV/AIDS as well as the marriage laws currently in place. Founded in 2013, Diné Equality’s goal has been to work towards a more inclusive Navajo Nation. The coalition’s efforts include advocacy for the transgender community, brave spaces programs for schools, LGBTQ youth suicide prevention, and holding tribal leaders accountable. Alray Nelson, the lead organizer for Diné Equality, said during the festival that the movement really began stirring when rumors of laws that discriminate against LGBTQ people began to emerge. One such law is the Diné Marriage Act, passed in 2005, which nullifies and prohibits the marriage of persons of the same sex on the Navajo Nation. “[It is] historic for us to be standing in Window Rock,” Nelson said to the crowd. “[We] need to hold tribal leaders accountable that may discriminate against this community.” This was the first time that such an event was held at the Navajo Nation capital. The theme running through

many of the words spoken at the various panels and presentations was that a unified community will be the way that further progress for equality is made. To that end, LGBTQ people were told to be proud of who they are. “You’re worthy, always be yourself,” Zachariah George, known as Mr. Navajo for his

public speaking and songs in the Navajo language, told the festival crowd. Mattee Jim, LGBTQ leader and trans advocate, embraced her role as one of the headliners of the festival. “You are my family,” Jim said to the crowd. On June 29, Jim was one of the moderators at the LGBTQ Symposium, held at the Navajo Department of Transportation in Tse Bonito, N.M., which hosted a number of panels where LGBTQ Diné spoke of their experiences and answered questions from an audience. Trudie Jackson, Navajo Nation presidential candidate and LGBTQ leader, was one of the speakers in the panel “Our Diné Trans Community”. Jackson argued that the policies in place should be re-evaluated, such as who wrote them and when they were written, and if there was fair representation by the LGBTQ community during that time, because laws should evolve as the community does. “In order for my voice to be heard, I have to be at the table,” Jackson said during the panel. The audience asked questions about what challenges trans people faced on and off

the reservation, what they are doing to work through challenges, and how they incorporate traditional Diné values into their lives. While trans people may have the support of friends and family, Jackson admitted that it can be difficult to relate to people who don’t fully grasp her concerns. “It’s really hard to share what I am going through with my siblings because only another trans individual will understand,” Jackson said. T he pa nel broug ht up notions about trans people being overly sexualized, and not seen as real people, or that trans people are just pretending to be a specific sex. Speakers emphasized that how one acts or behaves is a choice made by that person. Moreover, the hosts insisted that LGBTQ people need to remember that they are free to speak up because of the contributions of people who came before them. “Always remember the pioneers who fought for us to be able to express ourselves,” Jackson said.

DINÉ PRIDE | SEE PAGE 17

Mattee Jim presides as the master of ceremonies over the LGBT+ Pride event in Window Rock, Ariz. June 30. Jim is a noted indigenous transgender activist and leads talks promoting the health and wellness of transgender individuals. Photo Credit: Cayla Nimmo Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018

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PERSPECTIVE

Don – Vietnam Vet – Part Two - March 7, 2011 By Richard Kontz

Continuing a 7-part special by Richard F. Kontz on a Vietnam Vet he met while running the Bread of Life Christian Bookstore in 2015 through mid-2011. o, after that first initial contact with Don I knew the following things:  A - He was a recovering alcoholic; B - He had previously worked in recovery ministry in Farmington for several years; C - He had been in prison; and D – He had been in military service. You know when I used to travel a lot throughout the United States attending and speaking at various conferences related to mortgage financing and housing one thing I noticed is everyone tended to introduce themselves via “business cards”, and they

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always wanted to know who you worked for and what you did. Also, as a conference speaker you had to have an “outstanding resume” with a lot of “initials” like PHD, BA, MA, etc., behind your name.  Most of the time I didn’t have business cards and I noticed that would really throw people off.  The only reason I point this out is we tend to rely on our “position, our titles, our status, and our “outstanding resumes” for our identity and if you don’t have those you are sometimes considered by people to be nothing.   What would Don’s Business Card status be?   I mean what would his business card and resume say:  Don Smith [not his real last name] - Title:  Recovering Alcoholic - Prior work experience: Volunteer helper with street ministries; Veteran; and Convicted Criminal.   

Over time Don would come in the store and look at different products and sometimes he would ask the sales clerks the cost of a bible [say a Thompson’s Chain Reference Bible] and they would accommodate him and

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Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

answer his question but really no one expected him to ever buy one [given of course his look, his dress and where he currently lived-NCI]. Also, I had more and more small talk with Don and I began to notice a change in Don and in myself.   He cut his hair to a shorter length and kept it well groomed.  He began to come in every now and then with slacks and a nice white shirt instead of faded jeans and a t-shirt.  One day he walked in and purchased several tracks and other small ministry items and he put them in a brief case and as was normally the case he would say “Oh, Man I am late - I got to go – my appointment at the VA” and he would rush out.   I noticed this time he looked at his watch when before he would always ask the time since he didn’t have a watch.  With me, I must admit, I finally began to see him as “someone worth knowing”.   He still had a scary look about him, but he seemed “decent” now [Man, talk about how prejudice we can be based how someone dresses and/or looks].   Even the sales clerks began to say “you know he looks nice” not so much as a “hey I like him” but more as an “observation”.    He did look nice considering how he looked before.   We had all seen the change and we grew to not worry about him being in the store and constantly watched. So, one day he did come in the store and he did buy his $85

Thompson’s Chain Reference Bible and he was like a child who was looking at a “double scoop” Ice cream cone. He carefully placed it in his brief case and left the store.   One day it was about time for me to take a lunch break and he was in the store so I went up to him and said “Hey, Don, I got to go to lunch – you want to join me??”   He looked at me with those “searching eyes”, and then said “Well, Rich I would but I don’t have any money”.  I said “Don I am inviting you to have lunch with me – my treat”.   He said “Okay, if you don’t mind – I mean I know you have all these people [meaning the street people and the NCI clients] always hitting you up for money and a free lunch, I don’t want be like that.”  Again, he looked at me with those “searching eyes”.   And, I said “Come on Don, I consider you to be my friend so let’s go”.    And, then we walked out of the store and walked to a nearby Restaurant.  As we walked to the restaurant I realized something about Don – He “was” my friend and someone who I did want to spend time with and have lunch with.   We had both come a long way in our relationship.  Part 1 appeared in the Gallup Sun’s June 29 edition, visit gallupsun.com Written by:  Richard F. Kontz.  If you wish to comment I can be reached at rmkontz@q.com COMMUNITY


Renowned artist Armando Alvarez walks on Staff Reports

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r ma ndo A lva rez Compean, who lived in Gallup for more than 20 years, d ied Ju ne 1 i n Desca nso, Calif. He was 79. Born in Mexico, he came to the United States at an early age and worked as a businessman for many years in Brownsv ille, TX before starting a career as a painter. He came to Gallup to visit his brother, A lex A lvarez, who was a golf pro here, and decided to stay. While here he married his third wife, Gaye Brown, who worked as a writer and copy editor for the Gallup Independent. A year after coming here, he secured a contract with the City of Gallup to build a sculpture to ref lect the nature of the city a nd its people. The $100,000 contract resulted in the creation of the “We the People” sculpture that is now a park on Maloney Avenue. He was also the creator of the sculpture that now rests in front of the Gallup Independent.

Over his life, he produced hundreds of paintings and more tha n a dozen ma jor sculptures that now reside in museums and buildings all over the world. According to his website, here are a few of the biggest: • “Wall of Honor,” a $37,000 steel scu lptu re at t he New Mexico State Police Academy. • “ L a P uer t o del S ol ,” a $100,000 steel sculpture done in 1997 for the city of Tome, NM. • “ The Miners,” a $55,000 steel sculpture that was done i n 19 9 9 a nd now resides in Raton, N.M. • “Watering Place,” a $73,000 steel sculptu re done on 2000 for the New Mexico Farm and Ranch Museum in Las Cruces. • “Los A ros de Longmont” a $10 0 , 0 0 0 s t e e l a n d By z a nt i ne sc u lpt u re i n Longmont, CA. • A steel and Byzantine glass mosaic for $30.000 that now resides in the entrance arch for the Los Angeles Zoo. The family plans to hold a private memorial service sometime in the future.

Armando Alvarez Compean, in front of one of his most recent paintings, “Geno Trail” 2015, acrylic on linen canvas, 78” x 120” (198 x 305 cm). Photo Credit: www.armandoalvarezcompean.com/home.html

Drag performer Sister Navajo of the Grand Canyon Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence prepares for her performance of “This is Me,” a song from the movie “The Greatest Showman,” at the first Navajo Nation LGBT+ Pride rally held in Window Rock, Ariz. June 30. Photo Credit: Cayla Nimmo

DINÉ PRIDE | FROM PAGE 15 The symposium also drew the support of Navajo Council Delegate Nate Brown. Per the coalition’s site, key members of COMMUNITY

the council will be sponsoring legislation drafted by the coalition to revamp tribal law and ensure no one is discriminated against based on their sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression.

“We have a duty, we are duty bound to help each other,” Brown said in one panel. For more information about Diné Equality, visit https://www.equalitynavajo. org/

Advertise in the Sun! Call for Great Rates & Ad Specials today. (505) 722-8994

Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018

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‘Creating Memories’ Scam alert: RMCHCS patients receiving ‘false calls’ Staff Reports

Families watch the city fireworks display from their trucks parked in the empty lot off State Highway 602 and Nizhoni Boulevard in Gallup July 4. Photo Credit: Cayla Nimmo

From left, Zaiden Begay, Trevon Skeets and Makayla Skeets play with sparklers on the Fourth of July while waiting for the city of Gallup’s fireworks show to begin from the parking lot of Ellis Tanner Trading Co. Photo Credit: Cayla Nimmo

noun

AM-BI-TION Believing in you.

GALLUP 107 E. Aztec Ave., 505.722.4411 Walmart: 1650 W. Maloney Ave., 505.863.3442 1804 E. Aztec Ave., 505.722.0300

nmpinnbank.com 0418_NM_AMBITION_4C_5925x24894_AD.indd 1 18 Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

4/5/18 10:47 AM

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ehoboth McK inley C h r i s t i a n He a lt h Care Services has just learned of a scam that targets RMCHCS patients with false telephone calls. Caller ID shows that the phone call is from RMCHCS, when in fact, scammers are hoping to perpetrate a scam on the recipient. Somehow hackers are now able to plug in any phone number and contact people under false pretenses. These incidents are occurring across the country and often show familiar or important sources such as hospitals

or police departments when they are actually coming from un-reputable marketers wanting to sell something or extract personal information. RMCHCS is very sorry that our community has been hit by these scams. Federal Communication officials as well as our telephone provider have been notified and are working to eliminate this new threat to your security. Please report these incidents and do not give out any personal information. When in doubt, you should call RMCHCS directly to ascertain the validity of phone calls you might receive.

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Ant-Man and the Wasp lacks a powerful sting RATING: «« OUT OF «««« RUNNING TIME: 125 MINUTES By Glenn Kay For the Sun

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ep, this week I’m going to be Mr. Grumpy about the latest chapter in the Marvel Universe, Ant-Man and the Wasp. The movie certainly provides all the comic book movie story beats and action you’d expect, but the material isn’t nearly as sharp this time out. Thankfully, the talented cast of this superhero feature manage to eke out a few laughs almost purely on charm. However, there isn’t a whole lot else to recommend about this clumsy and haphazard sequel. Set before the events of Avengers: Infinity War, Scott Lang aka Ant-Man (Paul Rudd) is about to finish a house arrest sentence after causing a big ruckus in the last Captain America movie. Estranged from scientists-turned-fugitives Dr. Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) and daughter Hope Van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly), the trio are forced back together when Lang begins having visions of Pym’s wife, Janet (Michelle Pfeiffer). Pym and Hope believe that she may be trying to communicate from the Quantum Realm, an alternate dimension in time and space where she was lost years earlier. The team decide to find her, but their valuable

A scene from “Ant-Man and the Wasp.” Wasp (Evangeline Lilly) and Ant-Man (Paul Rudd) flying hijinks, and amazing special effects doesn’t succeed in overcoming a weak plotline. Now playing. Photo Credit: Marvel/Walt Disney studios technology is stolen by Ghost (Hannah John-Kamen), a dangerous figure who can phase through matter. There’s an awful lot to juggle here and my synopsis doesn’t even come close to covering the incidental characters. They include a sinister black market dealer (Walter Goggins), Pym’s adversarial ex-friend/professor (Lawrence Fishburne), Lang’s familial relationships and an FBI agent (Randall Park) determined to catch the lead breaking his parole, not to mention the protagonist’s ex-criminal buddies like Luis (Michael Pena). All of this extraneous material bogs things down a bit. No wonder five different writers are credited with the screenplay. It’s a bit of a dog’s breakfast.

Another factor that stood out was the broad approach to humor. There isn’t as much wit or zip to the interplay. Early on, it is funny to watch a bored Lang try to pass time while under house arrest. Later in the film, a truth serum (of sorts) is introduced, leading to argument about what exactly it is; this also results in an amusing flashback narrated by Luis. So, the charismatic cast do earn a few laughs. Still, much of a film deals in bad puns, awkward one-liners and less-than-hilarious gags, like an ant grown to the size of a human being and eventually cleaning and playing video games. As expected, the digital effects work is impressive and the concept itself should allow plenty of opportunity to

experience familiar things from a completely different perspective. Yet these opportunities are also wasted. The camera simply follows the characters as they shrink and then expand to avoid capture. Little toy cars (carried around in a Hot Wheels case) are used in the streets and even Pym’s lab building is shrunk, carried around and then expanded back to regular size in empty lots in downtown San Francisco. I’m not sure how someone wouldn’t notice a brand new building next to them or pay no mind to gunfights and car chases occurring through the downtown area, but logic isn’t this film’s strong suit. This may sound harsh, but when you can’t help but think about these things as events unfold, it isn’t a great sign.

The film is genial enough popcorn entertainment, but doesn’t tell a story that takes advantage of the unique scenarios that could occur to a person with such unusual abilities. It’s too busy trying to deliver big action and thrills than do something unique, like turn small, familiar environments into massive and dangerous arenas. And for those wondering, there are two post-credits scenes, one of which depicts what happened to Lang after the arrival of Thanos. However, there isn’t much sting to the proceedings in general. I’m sure I’ll be in the minority on this one, but there is little going on in Ant-Man and the Wasp that will stick in the mind after the credits start rolling. Visit: CinemaStance.com 207 WEST COAL GALLUP 505.863.1250 www.elmorrotheatre.com Facebook @elmorrogallup

WE READ. WE TALK. WE WATCH.

This is a FREE event

MOVIE TICKETS $5 AT ALL TIMES CHILDREN 12 AND UNDER FREE WITH ADULT FOR FILMS

In Conversation with Local Film Makers Fri, Mon-Thurs @ 6PM JULY Sat@ 6PMTheatre & Sun @ 1, 4:30 & 8PM 6-12 El Morro Animated Short Film, Monster Slayer - 2:30 p.m. Q&A - Monster Slayer, Film Production Crew - 2:50 p.m. Feature Length Film, A Thief of Time - 3:15 p.m.

Free Event with Octavia Fellin Public Library Saturday, July 7th, 2018

COMMUNITY

Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018

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DVD/Blu-ray Roundup for July 6, 2018 By Glenn Kay For the Sun

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elcome to a look at highlights coming your way on Blu-ray and DVD. This time out, there are a ton of releases arriving in a wide variety of genres, meaning there should be something for everyone. So if you can’t make it out to the movies this week, be sure to give one of these titles a try!

BIG NEW RELEASES! 7 Days in Entebbe - This US/UK drama is based on the 1976 terrorist hijacking of an Air France flight on it s w ay from Tel-Aviv to Paris. It tells of the work of an elite commando team sent in by the Israeli government to rescue the hostages and eliminate the threat. The press were not taken with the end result. While about a quarter of reviewers wrote that the film was decent and appreciated the attempts not to sensationalize events, most commented that while serviceable, there was simply nothing memorable about this adaptation. It stars Rosamund Pike, Daniel Bruhl, Eddie Marsan and Ben Schnetzer. Alex & the List - A friendly, u n a s s u m i n g dog t r a i ner believes he’s found the woman that he wants to spend the rest of his life with. However, the lovely lady surprises him with a “list” that Alex must complete before marrying her. Confused and feeling insecure about their relationship, he attempts to tick off the boxes, but also begins to question her priorities. This romantic/comedy only received a limited release. There aren’t many notices available, but the ones that have appeared are poor. One critic suggested the lead was written so dimly that the movie irritated them. The cast includes Patrick Fugit, Karen Gillan, Jennifer Morrison, Eddie Kay Thomas and Michael Nouri. Another WolfCop - A policeman who also happens to be an alcoholic and werewolf must save his hometown from a businessman who promises to open

a brewery and hockey arena in the area, but has more nefarious intentions. This low-budget independent horror/comedy is a sequel to 2014’s WolfCop. Critics actually gave it decent marks. A few did complain that even being intentionally bad didn’t make it any easier to watch, but the majority found it entertainingly ridiculous with enough bad jokes to make it a fun little B-movie. It features Leo Fafard, Yannick Bisson, Amy Matysio and Jonathan Cherry. Beir ut - This drama involves a US diplomat in Beirut. In addition to his daily work, he and his wife take care of a young Palestinian boy. Unfortunately, the CIA arrive, pulling the youngster aside and pressing him for information about a brother. The diplomat must fight to figure out what is going on and retrieve the boy. Reviewers gave this feature decent notices. There were a few who suggested it was too old-fashioned and simplistic, but most were impressed with the performances and found it to be an engaging and effective thriller. The movie stars Jon Hamm, Rosamund Pike, Mark Pellegrino, Dean Norris and Shea Whigham. Blockers - After a trio of couples learn that their daughters have made a pact to lose their virginity at a high school prom, the adults decide to head out and put a stop to the romantic activities. Along the way, the parents get themselves into comic situations and their own hang ups are revealed. This wacky comedy earned positive reviews from many. There were a few who stated that the movie ran out of gas as it progressed, but far more complimented it, suggesting that there was plenty of funny material on display and the story had a lot of heart. The cast includes Leslie Mann, Ike Barinholtz, John Cena, Kathryn Newton and Gary Cole. The Cured - After a virus i n fe c t s t he world a nd tu r ns ma ny into zombie l i ke c a n n i bals, v io lence erupts. Thankfully, a cure is suddenly found, returning many of those affected back into normal humans. One young man trying

20 Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

to restart his life and reconnect with family becomes ostracized by locals and is forced to deal with the horrific actions he took while under the zombie influence. The movie earned decent reviews. There was a percentage who just didn’t care for the downbeat tone, but more appreciated the unique spin on a zombie narrative and liked some of the themes it attempted to explore. It stars Ellen Page and Sam Keely. T he Female Brain - A neuroscientist conducting research on the female brain begins to observe the relationships of her friends to get more insight. She witnesses one couple whose careers are getting in the way of their relationship, another whose marriage is stuck in a rut and another who only seems to want to change her partner. When the scientist meets a new man, she tries to apply what she’s learned. Notices weren’t very good for this independent comedy. A few called it cute, but most thought it didn’t nail down the tone or what it was trying to say effectively. The cast includes Whitney Cummings, Alysia Reiner, Cecily Strong, Chris D’Elia and Sopha Vergara. Finding Your Feet - This UK production is a comedy/ romance about a woman who discovers that her husband of 40 years has been having an affair. She decides to start over, moves in with her free-spirited sister and joins a community dance class. This leads to new directions and possibilities. Reaction was generally positive towards this quirky film. There was some grumbling that it followed too many genre tropes and offered little that was new, but most felt that the cast was so talented that they managed to make something amusing out of the familiar material. Imelda Staunton, Timothy Spall, Joanna Lumley, Celia Imrie, David Hayman and John Sessions headline the feature. Is m a e l’s Gh ost - T h is F rench-la nguage a r t f ilm involves a woman who runs away from her boyfriend without notice. 20 years later, she returns and reintroduces herself to her old flame, who is now married and is a director readying his next film. Tensions rise to the surface as relationships come under scrutiny. Critics were ultimately split on this drama. About half suggested

that it was pretty and the cast were good, but that the director of the film made too many references to his previous works and that the characters were not relatable. Others found it so unusual that they couldn’t forget it. It stars Marion Cotillard, Mathieu Amalric and Charlotte Gainsbourg. Journey’s End - Set during WWI. this drama involves a group of soldiers stationed in the trenches north of France. With German forces surrounding and closing in on them, the fearful commander and his men struggle with their thoughts as they await their inevitable fate; some try to remember happier times, others escape into drink. This UK production earned mostly compliments from the press. A few said it was heavyhanded, slow and unpleasant to watch, but the majority called it a thoughtful, tragic and extremely well acted drama. The cast includes Sam Claflin, Paul Bettany, Toby Jones, Asa Butterfield and Tom Sturridge. T he Jurassic Games With Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom topping the box-office, it’s inevitable for a few B-movies to try to step in and profit from the popular subject of dinosaurs on the rampage. This tale involves death row inmates who are forced into a fight for survival against the menacing creatures on a virtual reality landscape. Naturally, if they die in the game, their lives end. Reviewers actually appeared to be amused with this goofball effort. They suggested you wouldn’t be surprised by anything you saw, but admitted that for B-movie fans, it was amusing enough to earn a pass. It features Ryan Merriman, Perrey Reeves and a lot of CGI dinos. The Lullaby - This South African horror flick involves a teenage mother struggling with post-partum depression. She heads home with the newborn to stay with her mother, but begins suffering from anxiety and becomes paranoid that someone or something is trying to harm her baby. She soon believes that a supernatural force is stalking her. This effort earned more positive reaction than negative. There was a group who felt that the film didn’t make enough of its interesting premise and eventually went off the rails, but more thought that while it was a bit blunt in execution, it delivered

the creepy goods and would entertain horror fans. Reine Swart and Brandon Auret headline the film. Midnighters - A couple driving home after celebr a t i n g New Yea r’s Eve accidentally run down a pedestr ia n. The pair decide to cover up the crime, throwing the body into the back seat. However, they find their attempts to get rid of the body unfurling and their lies being exposed as more and more complications arise. Critics were kind towards this low-budget thriller. A few couldn’t buy in to the plot’s twits and turns, but far more called it a nice surprise that generated a lot of suspense and harkened back to 80s thrillers like Blood Simple. It stars Alex Essoe, Perla Haney-Jardine and Dylan McTee. Submission - In this drama, a married college professor goes through something of a mid-life crisis after realizing that he doesn’t like his colleagues or teaching students that he feels are unworthy. His attitude changes when he begins mentoring a talented young woman in his class who also takes an interest in him. Things get complicated when the two begin a relationship. This film divided reviewers. Half thought the subject matter was poorly handled given recent news events, while others thought the performers were great and that what occurred onscreen allowed for plent y of d i scu s sion after the credits rolled. The cast includes Stanley Tucci, Addison Timlin, Kyra Sedgwick and Jeanne Garofalo. Where is Kyra? - A woman caring for her ill mother loses her job and struggles to make ends meet on her mom’s pension. As time passes, the situation gets even worse, forcing the caregiver to take extreme and dangerous measures to try and keep her home. The press gave this drama high marks. A couple disliked the tone and found it too bleak throughout, but almost all were very impressed with the lead performance and thought it displayed just how quickly a life can fall apart when a system isn’t in

DVD REVIEW | SEE PAGE 21 COMMUNITY


DVD REVIEW | FROM PAGE 20 place to help them through tragedy. The movie features Michelle Pfeiffer, Kiefer Sutherland and Suzanne Shepherd.

BLASTS FROM THE PAST! Some interesting older releases are getting a high definition upgrade. First though, I should note that two recent Arrow Video releases, Akio Jissoji: The Buddhist Trilogy box set and The Last House on the Left (1972) were delayed and are now making their official debuts on Blu-ray. They also have T h e Complete Sar tan a a r r iv i ng on Blu-ray. These were a series of Spaghetti westerns that came along as a result of the success of the Man With no Name trilogy and even incorporates James Bond-like elements. Don’t worry though, Sartana features plenty of gunslingers, for the black cape-wearing title character (that can’t have been fun to

wear in the desert) to fend off. The set collects 5 of the films with new 2K restorations. The titles are If You Meet Sartana, Pray for Your Death (1968), I Am Sartana, Your Angel of Death (1969), Sartana’s Here... Trade Your Pistol for a Coffin (1970), Light the Fuse... Sartana Is Coming (1970) and Have a Good Funeral My Friend... Sartana Will Pay (1970). I must say, those are pretty awesome titles for westerns. I’d watch those in a second and set includes film critic audio commentaries, interviews with some of the directors, writer, actors and plenty more extras. In fact, there more bonuses than can be possibly listed here. If you like these types of flicks, this is your lucky day. Criterion have a Blu-ray box set of their own. It’s called Dietrich and Von Sternberg in Hollywood and includes the titles Morocco (1930), Dishonored (1931), Shanghai Express (1932), Blonde Venus (1932), The Scarlet Empress (1934), The Devil Is a Woman (1935). Marlene Dietrich enthusiasts will be pleased. Kino have some interesting dramas as well. They include the TV-movie, The Jericho Mile

(1979) about a convict turned Olympian. The distributor also have Personal Problems (1980), described as a meta-soap opera from the director of Ganja and Hess (1973). It arrives for the first time in its complete form. Finally, they are releasing a Blu-ray of the running biopic, Prefontaine (1997) with Jared Leto as the title character. Finally, Code Red have a DVD of the Italian horror flick, Devil Fish aka Monster Shark (1984). It’s about a hungry fish eating swimmers off of the Florida coast and comes with an audio commentary with the movie’s star. The release might provide B-movie fans with some good fun.

YOU KNOW, FOR KIDS! If you like Barney, you’re in luck. Otherwise, it’s a pretty slow edition for kid-friendly fare. B a r n e y: B i g Wo r l d Adventure - The Movie (2011)

ON THE TUBE! And here are the week’s TV-themed releases. Delicious: Series 2 Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER:

Teacher, Pre-College Programs (REQ5283) UNM Gallup’s newly grant funded TRIO Upward Bound (UB) program provides academic support services to first-generation and low-income high school students enrolled in the Gallup-McKinley County School District. The TRIO Upward Bound program consists of a 6-week summer program in addition to academic year services to prepare selected high school students for post-secondary curriculum by focusing on academic success and academic preparation. The overall goal of TRIO Upward Bound is to promote high school graduation and post-secondary enrollment. UNM Gallup is in search of two (2) enthusiastic individuals to fill the Teacher, Pre-College Program (UB Teachers) positions which are essential to the success of the program to prepare students for post-secondary education. The positions will report to the Student Program Specialist for the TRIO Upward Bound project. The UB Teachers will develop lesson plans, implement, and evaluate curriculum designed to enhance and supplement required secondary completion outcomes; assist in program recruitment and retention; provide classroom instruction; work with others to present on specific topics or concepts; implement success initiatives through advising, coaching and supporting students through one-on-one and group sessions which may involve developing content and facilitating sessions on non-academic areas of financial and economic literacy, identifying learning styles, techniques to support study habits, scholarship letter writing, etc.; participating in program activities outside of the traditional learning environment for such activities as transfer and enrichment trips, etc.; conduct needs assessments, oversee academic monitoring initiatives, and create an environment for growth and development; assists in the implementation of project specific services, planning and assessment efforts; coordinate academic component of developing curriculum, teaching and supervising tutors and support staff. UB Teachers will work collaboratively with students, parents/guardians, faculty, staff and community partners to ensure student success and program objectives; program services and activities may require flexible schedules, including evenings and weekends. This is a benefits eligible position. The University of New Mexico provides a comprehensive package of benefits including medical, dental, vision, and life insurance. In addition, UNM offers educational benefits through the tuition remission and dependent education programs. TO APPLY: For complete information including closing dates, minimum requirements, and instructions on how to apply for this or any UNM position, please visit our website at

Season 5 G r imm: The Complete Collection The Jericho Mile (Kino, TV-movie 1979)

New Girl: The Final Season P s y c h: T he C omple t e Collection Top Gear America: Season 1

CLASSIFIEDS GALLUP SUN ARCHIVES Need a past issue? $2.00 per copy. Note issue date and send check or M.O. to: Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM 87305. Subject to availability. *** The Gallup Sun has an immediate opening for a reporter to cover general assignment stories. Also looking for summer sports photos/coverage and someone to cover sports in Gallup for the new school year. Submit cover letter, resume, and five published clips, or links to stories, to: gallupsun@gmail.com *** MODELS WANTED *** Female, 18-30 yrs of age No Experience Necessary 4 Audition Dates: Sat. Aug. 18th & 25th Sat. Sep. 1st & 8th For more info, call Vince 505-722-4323 ext. 1022 at Thunderbird Supply HOMES FOR RENT 2 bedroom unfurnished apartment 1 bedroom unfurnished house No pets. One year lease required. Call before 7 pm (505) 8634294 *** Nice 2 BR House for Rent. $850 Mo. Utilities included. Washer/Dryer. Great location. Credit & Background Check. Call for Apt. 505-979-2428. PLACE YOUR REAL ESTATE AD HERE! FIRST 25 WORDS FREE. LOGO and/or PHOTO $5 EACH. APPEARS ON

GALLUPSUN.COM FOR FREE! EMAIL: gallupsun@gmail.com CALL: 505-722-8994 LOST PETS Did you lose a pet? Advertise your lost baby for FREE. Send pic and text. Deadline for submission Tuesday 5 pm. Email: gallupsun@gmail.com MOBILE HOMES MOBILE HOME SPACES Mobile Home Spaces – Single wide – any size $215/mo. Double Wide $265/mo. Call Mike 505-870-3430 or Carmelita 505870-4095. MUSIC LESSONS Piano, Violin, Cello, Classical Guitar, Saxophone, Drums, Trombone, Trumpet. Doug Mason, BA - Music Ed. (479) 214-1764 LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF ORDINANCE PASSAGE BY TITLE AND SUMMARY ORDINANCE NO. S2018-2 PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the governing body of the City of Gallup, New Mexico, at its regular meeting of June 26, 2018 passed, adopted and approved the following entitled Ordinance: An ordinance authorizing the city of Gallup (“borrower”) to

CLASSIFIEDS | SEE PAGE 22

https://unmjobs.unm.edu or call (505) 863-7605 or (505) 863-7557. UNM Gallup Human Resources, 705 Gurley Ave., Gallup, NM 87301. EEO/AA/Minorities/Females/VETS/Disabled/and Other Protected Classes COMMUNITY

Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018

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CLASSIFIEDS WEEKLY RATES

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FIRST 25 WORDS: FREE! (4 consecutive weeks max.)

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EXTRAS – $5 PER WEEK, PER ITEM: TEXT BOX, HIGHLIGHT, ALL CAPS, BOLD, AND/OR PIC/LOGO Free classified: Limit one free ad per customer only. Second ad starts at $10, per 25 words.

EMAIL: GALLUPSUN@GMAIL.COM DUE: TUESDAYS 5 PM

CLASSIFIEDS | FROM PAGE 21 enter into a loan agreement with the new mexico environment Department (“nmed”) for the purpose of obtaining project loan funds in the principal amount of $2,240,00 plus accrued interest; designating the use of the funds for the purpose defined in the most current project description form as approved by nmed; declaring the necessity for the loan; providing that the loan will be payable and collectible solely from the city of gallup water and wastewater enterprise funds (“pledged revenues”); prescribing other details concerning the loan and the security therefore.

GIVEN that a meeting of the governing body of the City of Gallup, New Mexico will take place on Tuesday, July 24, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at Gallup City Hall, 110 West Aztec Avenue, Gallup, New Mexico; to consider final approval of the following entitled Ordinance: AN ORDINANCE ENACTING A NEW TITLE 2, CHAPTER 4 OF THE CITY OF GALLUP CODE CREATING THE “KEEP GALLUP CLEAN & BEAUTIFUL” BOARD FOR THE PURPOSE OF ENHANCING LOCAL LITTER CONTROL, BEAUTIFICATION PROGRAMS AND APPLYING FOR GRANT FUNDING THROUGH THE NEW MEXICO CLEAN & BEAUTIFUL PROGRAM.

The purpose and subject matter of the Ordinance is contained in the title. A complete copy of the Ordinance is on file in the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall.

The purpose and subject matter of the Ordinance is contained in the title. A draft copy of the Ordinance is on file in the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall.

CITY OF GALLUP, NEW MEXICO By: /s/ Alfred Abeita II, City Clerk

CITY OF GALLUP, NEW MEXICO By: /s/ Alfred Abeita II, City Clerk

PUBLISH: Friday, July 6, 2018

PUBLISH: Friday, July 6, 2018

*** LEGAL NOTICE

*** NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Self-Stor-

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY

Place an tribute in the Gallup Sun It will last the whole week and forever on GallupSun.com Easy form to fill out. Short form FREE! Artistic, customized tributes available. Phone: (505) 722-8994

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22 Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

age Lien Act of the State of New Mexico, Section 48-11-7, that the following personal property will be sold or otherwise disposed of in order to satisfy a lien for delinquent rent and other related charges. The personal property is located at ADOBE SELF-STORAGE, 1708 South Second Street, Gallup, New Mexico. Unit Number: 201 Name and Last Known Address of Occupant: Rita Lorenzo c/o P. O. Box 252 Ramah, NM 87321 Description of Personal Property: Table, fishing poles, blankets, electric floor cleaner, and numerous bags and boxes of items unknown. Unit Number: 218 Name and Last Known Address of Occupant: Jonathan Frechette 140 Russ St., Apt. N-111 Hartford, CT 06106 Description of Personal Property: Army style cot, wicker chairs, wooden chairs, end tables, old snow skis, brief case, small tool box, antique picture frame, moving dolly, paintings, and numerous tote boxes and boxes of items unknown. Unit Number: 309 Name and Last Known Address of Occupant: Melody West 3205 Ciniza Dr. Gallup, NM 87301 Description of Personal Property: 3 baby strollers, 2 treadmills, 3 ice chests, bed frame, 2 trunks, lamp, baby car seat, golf clubs, bedding, and numerous bags and boxes of items unknown. Unit Number: 445 Name and Last Known Address of Occupant: Esmerelda Tapaha c/o P. O. Box 142 Round Rock, AZ 85048 Description of Personal Property: Table, tires, toys, stuffed animals, speakers, and numerous bags and boxes of items unknown. The sale or disposition of the above property will be held on Tuesday, the 17th day of July, 2018, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., at ADOBE SELF-STORAGE,

1708 South Second Street, Gallup, New Mexico. The property can be viewed at 9:00 a.m. the day of the sale. The property is subject to the Occupant redeeming the lien prior to the sale. This Notice is being published once a week for two (2) consecutive weeks. 1st Publication day, June 29, 2018 2nd Publication day, July 6, 2018

Fri Fri-

*** NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Self-Service Storage Lien Act of the State of New Mexico, Section 48-117, that the following personal property will be sold or disposed of in order to satisfy a lien for delinquent rent and/ or other related charges. The personal property is located at Aztec Self Storage, 261 N. Hwy 491 Gallup, New Mexico 87301. Last Known Address of Tenant: Loria Carter P.O. Box 7784 Shonto, AZ 86054 Bow & arrow, chair & table, sewing machine, vacuum, lamp Gloria Billy P.O. Box 4261 Window Rock, AZ 86515 Furniture, grinder, speakers, dishes, couches Madeline Duboise P.O. Box 874 Gallup, NM 87305 Dresser, laptop, household items The sale or disposition of the above property will be held on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 at the hour of 10:00 A.M. at 261 N. Hwy 491, Gallup, New Mexico. Items may be viewed on the day of sale only. The property is subject to the Occupant redeeming the lien prior to the sale. *** ADVERTISEMENT BIDS

FOR

CINIZA DRIVE IMPROVEMENTS

for construction of CITY OF GALLUP CINIZA DRIVE IMPROVEMENTS until the hour of 2:00 p.m., local time, July 24, 2018 at the office of the Procurement Manager at City Hall, 110 West Aztec Avenue, Gallup, New Mexico. Bids will be opened, read and tabulated at that time. No bids will be received or considered if received after the time stated above. This project is located on Ciniza Drive between Toltec Drive to Vanden Bosch Parkway. Improvements of Ciniza Drive shall include removal of existing 6-inch curb and gutter, 4-foot sidewalks, existing residential mailboxes to the extent shown. Contractor shall reconstruct Ciniza Drive including installing new 8-inch water and sewer lines and 10inch sewerline as shown, 6 inch curb and gutter and 5 foot sidewalks. Contractor shall also install new residential mail boxes as detailed in location as directed. It shall be the demolition of the existing curb and gutter, sidewalks, and asphalt pavement, in addition to the abandonment of the existing water and sewer lines. New installation shall include new curb and gutter, sidewalks, asphalt pavement, basecourse, 8-inch waterline, fittings, 8-inch and 10-inch sewerline, manholes, and mailboxes. Plans, Specifications and Bidding Documents may be examined at the office of the Purchasing Director 110 West Aztec, Gallup, NM 87301, (505) 863-1334. Additional information regarding this bid may also be viewed at www.GallupNM.gov/bids. Plans, Specifications and Bidding Documents may be obtained from DePauli Engineering and Surveying, LLC, 307 S. 4th Street, Gallup, New Mexico 87301, (505) 863-5440, upon deposit of $250.00, all of which will be refunded upon return of the documents within ten (10) days after bid opening. /s/

Jackie McKinney, Mayor

Publication Date: Friday, July 6, 2018

CITY OF GALLUP Formal Bid No. 1817

MAIL DELIVERY

Notice is hereby given that the City of Gallup, New Mexico will receive sealed bids

Gallup Sun Publishing PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305

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COMMUNITY CALENDAR JJULY 6-12, 2018 FRIDAY, July 6 MEDIA LAB 2-3pm @Children’s Branch. This week: YouTube videos, podcasts, and short films. Call (505) 726-6120 or childlib@gallupnm.gov SATURDAY, July 7 TOUR DE REZ July 7-9, there will be a ride to the North Rim, Grand Canyon crossing and a bike ride from Desert View to Cameron. It will conclude with some trail service at LCR Tribal Park. CHRISTMAS IN JULY Tse Ho Tso Kateri Circle presents “Christmas in July craft and taco sale.” Vendors: tables $20 per table. Tables and chairs will be provided, first come, first served basis. Call Veronica Yellowhair (928)310-2450. 9am-5pm, St. Dominic’s Hall, Fort Defiance, Az. ` STORY TIME (AGES 2-4) 11am@ Children’s Branch. An active and energetic program for toddlers, featuring music, movement, rhymes, and stories. GALLUP BIG READ (AGES 2-4) 2-8pm @Children’s Branch. An active and energetic program for toddlers, featuring music, movement, rhymes, and stories. TUESDAY, July 10 MAKER ZONE (6 AND OLDER) 4-5pm @Children’s Branch. We provide supplies, you supply the ideas. Free. WEDNESDAY, July 11 STORY TIME 10:30am @Children’s Branch. An active and energetic for toddlers, featuring music, movement, rhymes, and stories. WEDNESDAY NIGHT FILMS 5:30-7pm @Main Branch. Popcorn served. This week’s film: TBA. THURSDAY, July 12 CRAFTY KIDS 4-5pm @Children’s Branch. Fun crafts for the whole family. This week’s activity: TBD. CALENDAR

ONGOING LIFE’S HEALING CHOICES Freedom from any addiction, 8 weeks/8 biblical truths. Starts Tuesday, June 12, 6:30 pm, Journey Church Gallup, 501 S. 3rd St. (free of charge to attendees. Ends July 31. Info. (505) 870-0905. CITY OF GALLUP’S SUSTAINABLE GALLUP BOARD Meets on the first Monday from 3-5 pm at the Octavia Fellin Library. When those Mondays are holidays, the meetings are on the following Monday. Community members concerned about conservation, energy, water, recycling and other environmental issues are welcome. Call (505) 7220039 for information. CHURCHROCK CHAPTER Churchrock Chapter is now accepting toy donations for the Christmas toy drive until Wed. Dec. 20. The toys will be distributed at the annual community Christmas dinner on Thursday Dec. 21. Please drop off an unwrapped toy for distribution at Churchrock Chapter. Let’s spread the Christmas cheer by giving. Call (505) 4882166. Churchrock Chapter Administration. CO-DEPENDENTS ANONYMOUS Meets Wednesday, 6-7 pm, at First United Methodist Church, 1800 Redrock Dr. (in the library). All are welcome. COMMUNITY PANTRY The Hope Garden offers organic produce for sale from 10 am-noon, Tue - Fri., 1130 E. Hassler Valley Road. All funds go to helping feed local folks. Call (505) 7268068 or when visiting, ask for Vernon Garcia. FRIDAY NIGHT HOOTENANNY Gallup’s longest-running live show! Every Friday night from 7-9 pm. Camille’s Sidewalk Cafe, 306 S. Second St. GALLUPARTS gallupARTS is pleased to announce Dine photographer Hannah Manuelito is the Summer 2018 Native Artist-in-Residence. Her work includes portraits celebrating Dine women

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will be available May-July.

or (505) 870-1483.

GALLUP-MCKINLEY COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY Wednesdays are low-cost Spay and Neuter Days, at the Gallup-McKinley County Humane Society. For more information, please call (505) 863-2616, or email: gmchumanesociety@gmail.com. Location: 1315 Hamilton Rd. GALLUP SOLAR Gallup Solar is hosting community conversations about all things solar Wednesdays from 6 to 8 pm at 113 E. Logan. Call: (505) 728-9246 for info on topics and directions. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY  Habitat for Humanity yard sales are held every Saturday, 9 am-noon on Warehouse Lane, weather permitting. Volunteers wishing to serve on construction projects may sign up there or call (505) 722-4226. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY - WORK SESSIONS Habitat for Humanity work sessions held each week. Volunteers to serve on decision making meetings or wish to volunteer at or help fund construction projects. Call Bill Bright at (505) 722-4226. MCKINLEY COUNTY HEALTH ALLIANCE McKinley County Health Alliance convenes on the second Wednesday of the month from 11 am-1pm at the New Mexico Cancer Center across from UNM-Gallup. Everyone is welcome to attend and engage in discussions about health, education, economic, and environmental inequities and to help facilitate change in those systems. Call (505) 906-2671. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Overeaters Anonymous 12step meetings. Held every Saturday at 10 am. The First Methodist Church, 1800 Red Rock Drive. Open to anybody who has a desire to stop compulsive eating. Contact info. (505) 307-5999, (505) 721-9208,

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT Rehoboth McKinley Christian Health Care Services is responding to the current pertussis (whooping cough) outbreak in western New Mexico. As of May 15, there have been 122 cases of pertussis in New Mexico. Anyone concerned that they may have “whooping cough” may visit the clinic Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm. No appointment necessary! Call (505)863-1820. RECYCLING COUNCIL McKinley Citizens Recycling Council is a local nonprofit working to increase recycling through education, community outreach, and partnership with local government agencies. MCRC meets the first Saturday of the month at 2 pm, at Red Mesa on Hill St. For more information, please call (505) 722-5142 or visit Recylegallup.org. RECYCLING DEPOT The Recycling Depot will now be open from 12-1:30pm on the first Saturdays of the month. Educators and artists are encouraged to come by and see what’s available. Volunteers will accept some items, such as paper towels and toilet paper rolls. This is a free service of the McKinley Citizen’s Recycling Council. Call (505) 722-5152. RELAY FOR LIFE RAFFLE For the next three weeks, you could win a 2018 Jeep Cherokee Summit, two round trip first class airline tickets to anywhere in the world, or $5,000. The American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life of Gallup is selling these raffle tickets for $25 each or five for $100. Call (505) 297-9515 or (505) 862-1457. SAVE THE DATE SWAP MEET AND FARMER’S MARKET On July 14, there will be a Fence Lake “Swap Meet and Farmer’s Market.” Feeling festive? Join our Christmas in July theme! 9am-3pm, Fence Lake Community Center, 2124 NM Hwy. 36, Fence Lake,

NM. Vendor fee: $10 (tables provided inside only). Call Kathleen Gibson (505)7882256. GALLUPARTS On July 14, gallupARTS is proud to present Challenge Gallup: A Native Artist Group Show for Social Justice” ART1213 Gallery. Opens on Saturday July 14, from 7-9pm (closes Aug. 4). Call (505) 488-2136. GALLUPARTS ANNOUNCES ARTSCRAWL LINEUP The entire 2018 lineup is outlined below: Hand July 14 – Up in the Air; August 11 – Road Trip; September 8 – On the Wild Side; October 13 – Sixth Sense; November 10 – In Black & White; and December 8 – Let’s Have a Ball. ST. KATERI TEKAKWITHA FESTDAY MASS On July 14, the feast day of Kateri Tekawitha, the first canonized Native American Catholic Saint is celebrated each year in the Diocese of Gallup. Pueblo drummers and singers provide music throughout the Mass, followed by a procession with dancers from Acoma Pueblo. Call Suzanne Hammons (505) 863-04406. INTERFAITH GROUP On July 17, the Gallup Interfaith Community will meet at 6:30pm. Aong other topics, the discussion will continue on our local response to the NM Poor People’s Campaign. Bring food for a shared meal. All are welcome in friendship and community. Call Steve Rogers (505) 870-1942 or Anna Rondon (505) 8793666. Westminster Presbyterian Church, 151 State Hwy (Boardman Drive near Orleans Manor Apartments). SBDC WORKSHOP On July 24, there will be a SBDC workshop: Dynamic Solutions for Everyday Business Challenges. 9am12pm, Gallup Chamber of Commerce (Meeting Room) 106 W. Hwy, 66. To post a nonprofit or civic event in the calendar section, please email: gallupsunevents@gmail.com or fax: (505) 212-0391. Deadline: Monday at 5 pm.

Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018

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24 Friday July 6, 2018 • Gallup Sun

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Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018  
Gallup Sun • Friday July 6, 2018  
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