Page 1

E FRE

Milan hires new top cop. Story Page 15

VOL 3 | ISSUE 103 | MARCH 24, 2017

EXCLUSIVE MCSO DEPUTIES

FORCED TO RESIGN

Investigation leads to county’s decision. Story Page 5 Houston James Largo laid to rest. Page 20

ELVIS Starring LONNIE YANES

SATURDAY 25MARCH 7:30 PM 2017

Gallup High School Auditorium 1055 Rico St. Gallup, NM

Tickets at

Also Featuring

KYVA 103.7

(505) 863-6851 & SAMMY C’s ROCKIN SPORTS PUB & GRILLE

(505) 863-2220 TWIST AND SHOUT:

A BEATLES TRIBUTE


NEWS Park Avenue utility project progressing REPAIR IS RELATED TO 5TH AND HILL BREAK LAST YEAR director of the city’s water and sanitation department, said. “This will replace the line we’ve been experiencing problems with,” he said. Romero, hired into the job a little more than a year ago, has had to hit the ground running with frequent water and sewer line breaks throughout the city since coming aboard. A new transmission line is being put in directly in front of the area of the former Gallup Catholic High School. The

By Bernie Dotson Sun Correspondent

I

t’s considered a major utility-oriented job, and it’s going to be a few months before things get back to normal, a city official said about a repair project on the south side. The scope of the project is to install a new water transmission main from Historic Highway 66 to the Park Avenue Pump Station, Dennis Romero, 403

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CITY OF GALLUP WATER DEPARTMENT 16" WATER MAIN 5TH STREET FROM ROUTE 66 TO PARK STATION DRAWN BY: NKENNY

DATE: 03/22/2017

Courtesy of City of Gallup

4 2

Construction crews work to replace a 16-inch waterline at 5th Street and Park Avenue. Photo Credit: Knifewing Segura

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CLEVELAND CHARGED WITH MURDER The man ‘allegedly’ killed NPD Officer Houston James Largo

9

area is also home to Father Dunstan Park. “We had a 10 -inch line break in mid-March,” Romero said. “The line break was caused by an inaccurate line located on the 16-inch water line replacement project. The 10-inch line was installed in 1957 and did not take a long time to complete.” But a separate 16-inch project is a different story, Romero explained. That job requires a 16-inch line to be re-built from Highway 66 to the intersection of Fifth Street and Park Avenue. The cost to do that job is $647,000, and work crews are moving rapidly to get the job done. “ T he project bega n on Fe b. 6 a n d w i l l e n d n o l at er t h a n Ju ly 6, a s per the contract,” Romero said.

“ T he c o nt r a c t or, Ad a me Construction (Los Lunas) is moving forward very quickly and we anticipate a fast completion date.” As far as the 10-inch line goes, water was shut off for an instance and low water pressure was periodically experienced, Romero said. The 16 -i nch li ne repa ir wo r k i s c o n n e c t e d t o a September 2016 line break on F i f t h S t r e e t a nd H i l l Avenue whereby a fa m i ly wa s lef t homele s s a s t he r e s u lt of t he i nc ident . A geyser broke t h roug h t he ground and shot water more than 20 feet into the air and da maged the residence of Melissa Ramirez. The water came from the broken 16 -inch ma in. The main carries Gallup’s water

supply from tanks that hold s ome 5 m i l l io n g a l lo n s , Romero has said. The city estimates the geyser kicked out more than 1 million gallons of water, in the process flooding Ramirez’ home of 14 years. “I think everybody feels that it’s something that should never have happened,” John Sanchez, who lives around the corner from Ramirez, said. “The city’s water and sewer lines need to be replaced and needed to be replaced a long time ago.” Ga l lup Mayor Ja ck ie McKinney has said in city council meetings that the city will not abandon the repair work along 5th Street. He has vowed to assist the Ramirez fa m i ly i n wh a t ever w ay possible.

GALLUP SUN BUSINESS DIRECTORY PAGE 11! GALLUP MAN ARRESTED FOR MURDER Victim died from blunt force trauma

Friday March 24, 2017 • Gallup Sun

10 13 16 NO CAR SALES FOR LOCAL BIZ

DEMOCRATS DISSECT SESSION

City denies Jewels & Java’s permit application

NM legislative session highs and lows

VILLAGE OF MILAN ENTERS 21ST CENTURY You can't beat access to broadband services NEWS


Gallup completes election certification THREE ‘UNDER’ VOTES AMID FINAL TALLY

depa r t ment d i rec t or a nd New Mexico State University graduate who grabbed voter i nt ere s t w it h bold s t a t e ments and news conferences where he took jabs at the city’s neglect of the Gallup

By Bernie Dotson Sun Correspondent

T

here were no re a l problems with the recent elect ion for cit y cou nc i l s e a t s i n D i s t r ic t 1 o r D i s t r ic t 3 , of f ic i a l s s a id . But t her e wer e i n s t a nce s whereby nothing was m a r ke d o n a fe w b a l l o t s a nd that wa s someth i ng that came out of last w e e k ’s c a n v a s s i n g s e s sion, of f ici a l s s a id. The final vote tally was skewed a l it t le due to t he fact that there were th ree “under” votes, Ga llup City Clerk A l Abeita sa id. That me a n s t h a t t h r e e vo t e r s i n ser ted a ba l lot i nto a mach i ne, but t here wa s nothing essentially marked on the ballot. The under votes occurred a t t he McK i n le y C ou nt y Cour thouse and related to District 1. The other under vote took place at Ga llup Cit y Ha l l a nd du r i ng t he

NEWS

ELECTION | SEE PAGE 4

District 3 Councilor Yogash Kumar gets sworn in for a second term by Judge Grant Foutz March 16. Photo Credit: Knifewing Segura early voting period, Abeita said. “ T here were t h ree ba llot s t h at d id n’t h ave a nyt h i n g m a r k e d ,” A b e i t a sa id. “ That wa s conf ir med during the canvassing process.” There are 6,459 eligible voter s i n Ga llup, but just 799 votes cast in the March 14 council election, making the overall voter turnout figure at 12.37 percent, Abeita noted. Incumbents Linda Garcia

District 1 Councilor Linda Garcia gets sworn in for a second term March 16. Photo Credit: Knifewing Segura

and Yogash Kumar reclaimed their council seats. Each ran on political platforms that i n c lu d e d b e a u t i f ic a t io n , i n fra str uctu re i mprove ment , i ncrea si ng tou r ism a nd bet ter i ng dow ntow n, respectively. Kumar, an area hotelier with holdings as far away as Albuquerque, won with 301 votes to 224 for challenger Esco Chavez. Local restaurateur Angela Chavez garnered 175 votes in the District 3 race.

ESCO CHAVEZ Esco Chavez is a former cit y pa rks a nd recreation

THANK YOU ADVERTISERS Amazing Grace Insurance - 18 Bubany Insurance Agency - 6 Butler’s Office City - 9 Castle Furniture - 24 El Morro Theatre - 18 Elvis featuring Lonnie Yanes - 1 Gallup Downtown Conference Center - 4 Law Office of Barry Klopfer - 7 Mary Anne’s Tax Services Inc. - 7 Pinnacle Bank - 17 RAH Photography - 9 Rico Motor Company - 10 Small Fry Dentistry - 16 Steve Petranovich - 5 Thunderbird Supply Co. - 3 TravelCenters of America - 8

Gallup Sun Publishing, LLC Publisher/Editor Babette Herrmann Advertising Raenona H arvey Correspondents Bernie Dotson Tom Hartsock Lealia Nelson Calendar Editor Mia Rose Poris Photography Ana Hudgeons Ryan Hudgeons Knifewing Segura Design David Tsigelman On the Cover: Top Right: Milan Police Department’s new Chief of Police Pat Salazar. The Gallup Sun, published Fridays, is not responsible or liable for any claims or offerings, nor responsible for availability of products advertised. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Gallup Sun distributes newspapers in McKinley, Cibola and Apache counties. Office (By Appointment): 102 S. Second St., Gallup, NM 87301 The Gallup Sun, pending USPS number 1, is mailed weekly. Application to mail at periodical rates is pending in Gallup NM. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM. Mailing Address: PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305 www.gallupsun.com Phone: (505) 728-1640 Fax: (505) 212-0391 gallupsun@gmail.com Letter to the editor/guest column ACCEPTED BY EMAIL ONLY. State full name and city/town. No pen names. ID required. All submissions subjected to editor’s approval. Guest columnists, email Sun for submission requirements.

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2017

3


Cleveland charged with murder of NN police officer INCIDENT STEMS FROM CASAMERO LAKE DV CALL

By Bernie Dotson Sun Correspondent

K

irby Cleveland wasn’t having a good night March 11. He was irritable and making negative comments toward his wife and kids. When he went outside the family’s Casamero Lake (Prewitt) residence with a rifle, his common law wife, listed in a criminal complaint as “K.T.” sensed something wrong. “K.T. advised that on the evening of March 11, she was home watching movies with her children. Cleveland was at home as well. Cleveland was drinking. Cleveland started to get drunk and angry. He started to make mean comments to her and the children. At some point, Cleveland grabbed a

ELECTION | FROM PAGE 3 S occer Complex a nd t he Ford Canyon Senior Center. Both locales are not in use. The utilities at the senior center remain on and at an eye-popping $500 per month, a city official has said. “You k now l i fe i s l i ke a footba l l ga me,” Ch avez mused a f ter t he elect ion. “Sometimes you win, sometimes you don’t. I will probably run again in the future.” Ga rci a r a n u noppo sed a nd wo n w it h 9 6 vo t e s . Garcia joked after the elect ion t hat “it wa s a toug h r a c e .” G a r c i a’s c o u n c i l d ist r ict i ncludes Ga l lup’s Hispanic-dominated nor th side and that constituency came out in droves to show their appreciation. Garcia is Hispa nic a nd from Ga llup a nd got 37 votes from the No r t h S id e F i r e S t a t io n No. 2 and McKinley County Courthouse voting precincts. Garcia and fellow councilor Fran Palochak lead the entire city council in the number of neighborhood association meetings that take place

4

Kirby Cleveland rifle from the house and went outside. “When he left the house, K.T. called 911 to report the domestic violence situation,” a criminal complaint by W. Monty Waldron, an investigator with the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Albuquerque, in their districts about every other week. Gallup city councilors serve four-year staggered terms and earn an annual salary of $15,000. Kumar has donated nearly all of his annual salary to worthy causes since being elected in 2013. Those who took par t in t he ca nva s si ng at Ga l lup City Hall were Abeita, Gallup Deput y Cit y Clerk A l ici a Pa lacios, Municipa l Judge Grant Foutz and Gallup City Attorney George Kozeliski. Garcia and Kumar were sworn in at the March 16 city council meeting amid a food reception and before Foutz. Abeita said the city uses a n optica l sca n tabulator type machine that belongs to the McKinley County Bureau of Elections Department. The March 14 municipal election was the second time Gallup used the county machines, Abeita said. The sole problem the city had with the machines was a ballot getting hung up during the early voting period, Abeita said. The problem was solved by using the return key on the tabulator, Abeita said.

Friday March 24, 2017 • Gallup Sun

states. Cleveland, 32, is charged w it h k i l l i n g 27-ye a r- old Navajo Nation Police Officer Houston James Largo. At a March 22 court appearance in Albuquerque, a federal judge agreed that there was probable cause for prosecution. Cleveland, who was on probation for a previous charge of forcing his way into a Navajo Nation residence armed with a baseball bat in 2012, and assaulting a female, did not enter a plea and was ordered to remain jailed pending trial. Cleveland received two years in prison and three years of supervised probation for the 2012 case. According to an autopsy done at the University of New Mexico Hospital, Largo died of a gunshot wound to the right

MEETIN

GS

forehead on the afternoon of March 12. The .22 caliber bullet passed through the cerebral edema and lodged in the right occipital. The complaint states that Largo responded to the domestic violence from K.T. and near the Casamero Lake section of Prewitt. K.T. called police and later took Cleveland to a neighbor’s residence, the complaint states. Largo got on the scene as the unidentified neighbor was bringing Cleveland back home. Largo put the driver in handcuffs and that’s when Cleveland ran from the scene with Largo in pursuit. It was around 11 pm, according to information in the complaint. The handcuffed individual reportedly never heard gun shots, as he told investigators

TRAININ

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RECEPT

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that engine noise must have drowned out the sound of gun fire. The complaint states that Cleveland walked home with the .22 caliber rifle and told K.T., “I shot that police officer. You need to go help him.” A female neighbor found Largo on the ground near his police cruiser and managed to get his car keys and radio for help. The complaint does not name the female neighbor. The complaint states that K.T. and Cleveland drove to the scene and waited for police to arrive. Cleveland then walked off into the hills, states the complaint. The police found Cleveland hiding behind a big rock about a little more than a mile from the crime scene the following day. Largo was from Thoreau. He was laid to rest March 16.

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MCSO: Two deputies resign; three suspended SILVERSMITH DROPS THE HAMMER ON RANGEL, NORIEGA

By Bernie Dotson Sun Correspondent

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wo of the three deputies involved in a physical altercation in January in Gallup are no longer employed with the McKinley County Sheriff’s Office, officials said. Three others were suspended for a time period to last no more than 45 days. McKinley County Sheriff Ron Silversmith confirmed in a carefully worded written statement to the Gallup Sun March 22, that termination letters were prepared for Richard Rangel and A.J. Noriega, but, the one-page letter states, “… pursuant to policy and past practices we have accepted resignation in lieu of termination from each.” T h r e e ot her deput ie s received suspensions without pay from between 30 to 45 days, Silversmith wrote. Those

MCSO Sheriff Ron Silversmith deputies are Joey Guillen, Monty Yazzie and Johnson Lee. The annual salary amounts of each of the five deputies in question was not available at press time. Silversmith continues in the letter that the appropriate personnel actions were taken and the McKinley County Sheriff’s Office will continue to provide transparent and professional

services to the citizens of McKinley County. “I, as the sheriff of McKinley County, would like to thank the community for their patience and understanding with the constitutional due process requirements of these types of actions,” Silversmith wrote. “The laws and processes a local government must take for these types of situations require lengthy and thorough investigation; and due process meetings to come to the appropriate conclusions.” Guillen, Lee and Rangel were initially placed on paid administrative leave in early January as a result of the reported altercation. They were reinstated Jan. 23 by Silversmith who, along with McKinley County Attorney Doug Decker, revealed ongoing county and state investigations at the time. Both investigations are complete. The state investigation,

conducted by the New Mexico State Police, was initially turned over to McKinley County District Attorney Karl Gillson, but was farmed out to the San Juan County District Attorney’s Office as to avoid conflicts of interest. A call to the San Juan District Attorney’s Office in Aztec was not immediately returned this week. The Gallup Sun plans to submit a New Mexico Public Information Act request to the San Juan County District Attorney’s Office for a copy of the completed state police report. Reportedly, Guillen, Lee and Rangel were involved in the beating of Cody Bitsilly, 23, at Noriega’s residence and during a party. A Gallup police officer, five-year veteran Clarissa Morgan, transported Bitsilly to a local hospital. Bitsilly was subsequently flown to an Albuquerque hospital due to the extent of his injuries,

which entailed bleeding of the brain. Morgan was not placed on administrative leave of any kind, city police have said, instead, she took a personal leave of her own volition. The reasons behind Bitsilly getting beat up are not clear, but the county report states that Bitsilly assaulted Rangel’s girlfriend, which prompted physical action from Rangel and at least one other deputy attending the party. It is not immediately clear how Yazzie’s name surfaced as his name was not part of the original information given to the Sun by Silversmith regarding the matter. But Yazzie did attend Noriega’s party. Guillen is a U.S. Navy veteran and near 20-year member of the MCSO. Noriega’s name is a constant in day and night MCSO police reports, and Rangel, 20, was a superstar basketball player at Gallup High School before joining MCSO.

McKinley County releases MCSO deputy-involved fight report By Bernie Dotson Sun Correspondent

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he investigative report related to the three disciplined deputies at the McKinley County Sheriff’s Office gives a scathing run down of what happened to Cody Bitsilly the night of Jan. 6 at a party near Hill Avenue and reportedly at the residence of former sheriff’s deputy A.J. Noriega. The report, done on behalf of McKinley County, was done by Universal Investigation Services of Albuquerque and is dated Feb. 9. The Gallup Sun obtained the report this week. The name of the person who completed the report is Doug Shawn, who is identified in the eight-page document as a chief investigator with the firm. Two reports about the January incident are now complete. Another report, done by the New Mexico State Police, was not available by press time. “On Jan. 9, 2017, Ella Howard NEWS

initiated a verbal complaint on behalf of her son, Cody Bitsilly, regarding an alleged assault/battery that occurred between Jan. 6 and Jan. 7, “ Shawn writes in the opening pages of the report. “Ms. Howard subsequently provided a written complaint on Jan. 10. Ms. Howard alleged her son was assaulted at the residence of off-duty MCSO Deputy Arnold (A.J.) Noriega and by off-duty MCSO Deputy Richard Rangel.”

THE NUTS AND BOLTS OF UIS REPORT Shawn states in the report that various policies and procedures were violated by the MCSO deputies that were present at the party. MCSO personnel interviewed for the report were Lt. James Maiorano, Deputy Johnson Lee, Deputy Monty Yazzie, Deputy Joey Guillen, Noriega and Rangel. The latter two deputies have since resigned.

The repor t states that Maiorano is a witness and accepted the complaint from Howard; calls Lee and Yazzie witnesses who attended the party; labels Guillen a person at the party who “struggled” with Bitsilly and assisted in the removing of Bitsilly from the property and with the placing of an injured Bitsilly in a Gallup Police Department vehicle driven by GPD Officer Clarisssa Morgan. It also states that Noriega provided alcohol at the party and assisted in the removal of Bitsilly from the party and made the call to GPD for the Bitsilly removal. The report states that Rangel “punched” Bitsilly and reportedly consumed alcohol at the party. Shawn states in the report that there were eight civilians attending the party, which included girlfriends and relatives of the deputies. All but one civilian witnessed Makayla Garcia, listed in the report as the girlfriend of Rangel, get attacked

by Bitsilly. The report does not state the nature or details of the attack by Bitsilly upon Garcia. The report continues with an admission by Rangel that he, indeed, struck Bitsilly in the face after Bitsilly assaulted Garcia. “Other witnesses at the gathering that saw Rangel strike Bitsilly, included Lee…,” the report states. “The others saw Deputy Lee holding Rangel back, but not the punches,” the report reads. “Based on admissions and statements, there is evidence that Deputy Richard Rangel punched Cody Bitsilly multiple times.”

The report alludes that Rangel’s punches were from a defensive nature and not punches that came at Bitsilly for no apparent reason. The separate report done by the State Police Department made its way to the McKinley County District Attorney’s office for possible criminal charges. To date no such charges have been filed in the incident by the McKinley County District Attorney. Decker has said the cost for UIS to do the report is between $2,000 and $3,000.

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2017

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Child sexual abuser pleads guilty in federal court Staff Reports

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Shiprock man sentenced to 10 years for shooting woman Staff Report

L BUQU ERQU E – Patrick Begay, 43, an enrolled member of the Navajo Nation who resides in Churchrock pled guilty March 17 in federal court in Albuquerque, to an abusive sexual contact charge. The plea agreement recommends that Begay be sentenced within the range of 144 to 216 months in federal prison followed by a term of supervised release to be determined by the court. Begay will also be required to register as a sex offender. Begay wa s a r rested in November on a four-count indictment charging him with sexually abusing a child under the age of 12 from November 2013 through December 2015, and engaging in sexual contact with a child under the age of 12 on Jan. 6, 2016. According to the indictment, Begay committed the offenses on the Navajo Indian Reser vat ion i n McK i n ley County. During the proceedings, Begay pled guilty to Count 4 of the indictment charging him with abusive sexual contact with a child. In entering the guilty plea, Begay admitted that on Jan. 6, 2016, he engaged in sexual contact with the victim, who was then nine years old. Begay further admitted that he repeatedly sexually abused the victim from the

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Patrick Begay time she was seven years old. Begay remains in custody pending a sentencing hearing, which has yet to be scheduled. This ca se wa s investigated by the Gallup office of the FBI and the Navajo Nation Department of Public Safety. Assistant U.S. Attorney Nicholas J. Marshall is prosecuting this case as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice (DOJ) to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. L ed by Un it ed St a t e s Attorneys’ Offices and DOJ’s Cr imina l Div ision’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Sect ion, P roject Sa fe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.

L BUQU ERQU E – Norman Yazzie, 56, an enrolled member of the Navajo Nation who resides in Shiprock, N.M., was sentenced March 21 in federal court in Albuquerque to 10 years in prison followed by four years of supervised release for discharging a firearm during a crime of violence. Yazzie was arrested in May 2016 on a criminal complaint charging him with assault and firearms offenses on April 29, 2016, on the Navajo Indian Reser vation i n Sa n Jua n County. According to the complaint, Yazzie shot the victim with a rifle in the forehead and the knee, causing her to suffer serious bodily injury. Yazzie subsequently was i nd icted on May 24, a nd

charged with assault with a dangerous weapon, a rifle, with intent to do bodily harm, assault resulting in serious bodily injury, and discharging a firearm during a crime of violence. According to the indictment, the offenses took place on April 29 in San Juan County. On Nov. 16, Yazzie pled guilty to discharging a firearm during a crime of violence. In entering the guilty plea, Yazzie admitted that on April 29, he shot the victim in the head and knee with a rifle. This case was investigated by the Far mington office of the FBI and the Navajo Nation Div ision of Public Safety. Assistant U.S. Attorney Novaline D. Wilson prosecuted the case as part of the Tribal Special Assistant U.S. Attorney (Tribal SAUSA) Pilot Project in the District of New Mexico,

which is sponsored by the Justice Department’s Office on Violence Against Women under a grant administered by the Pueblo of Laguna. The Tribal SAUSA Pilot Project seeks to train tribal prosecutors in federal law, procedure and investigative techniques to increase the likelihood that every viable violent offense against Native American women is prosecuted in either federal court or tribal court, or both. The Tribal SAUSA Pilot Project was largely driven by i n pu t g a t h e r e d f r o m a n nua l t r iba l con su lt a tions on v iolence aga i nst women, and is another step in the Justice Department’s on-going efforts to increase engagement, coordination and action on public safety in tribal communities.

Breadsprings man sentenced for DWI-related death Staff Reports

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LBUQUERQUE – Bra ndon Bob Lincoln, 30, a n en rol led member of the Nava jo Nation who r e s ide s i n Br e a d s pr i n g s , N.M., was sentenced March 21 i n fe d e r a l c ou r t i n

A lbuquerque to 37 months in prison for his involuntary ma n slaug hter conv ict ion. L i ncol n w i l l be on supervised release for three years after completing his prison sentence. Lincoln was arrested in Ma rch 2016, on a cr imina l complaint charging him with

involuntar y manslaughter. According to the complaint, Lincoln killed a Navajo man when he crashed his vehicle on Ma rch 20, 2016, on the Navajo Indian Reser vation in McKinley County. At the

BREADSPRINGS | SEE PAGE 9

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WEEKLY DWI REPORT Staff Reports The legal limit is .08. Betty Joe March 19, 10:42 pm 7th DWI, Aggravated Joe, 63, of Window Rock wa s arrested for her seve n t h DW I this past weekend. She already had a suspended license; however, that didn’t stop her from taking to the road after drinking 30 bottles of Budweiser that day, according to her testimony in the report. Perhaps unsurprisingly, she crashed her vehicle eastbound on Interstate 40 around the 30 mile marker. She stated to a responding deputy that she had planned to kill herself, at the same location her brother had perished, at a location on I-40. Her slurred speech, and odorous breath verified to responding McKinley County Sheriff’s Office Task Force Supervisor Tammy Houghtaling that the suspect was indeed currently drunk. The deputy asked if she was injured, to which the drunk driver responded by lifting her shirt up and shaking her belly at the deputy cryptically. Houghtaling called an ambulance. Med Star EMTs checked her out and asked her if she wished to be transported to the hospital, but Joe refused. She also refused field sobriety testz, stating that “I’m drunk, and I know I’m going to be arrested anyways.” The deputy had her transported to the hospital in order to have her checked for the suicidal statements. She was cleared, and the hospital also requested that she come back for a mental evaluation. She blew .23/.22 during the breath tests. Kristie Willis Mar. 15, 8:48 pm 2nd DWI, Aggravated Gallup Police Department Of f icer Joh n Gon za les responded to a call from a concerned citizen who reported a possible drunk driver at Allsups, 1801 South 2nd St. in Gallup. Gonzales located the truck and turned on his lights, NEWS

ge t t i n g out of h i s patrol ca r. The vehicle took off as the officer approached the dr iver. According to the report, the officer followed the vehicle, with his lights flashing. The vehicle then pulled into the Amigo car dealership at 1900 S. 2nd St. Once again, the officer got out and approached the vehicle. He found Willis in the driver’s seat. When asked why she drove away, Willis replied that, “I was trying to find a clear place to stop.” The woman passed her driver’s license to the officer, and admitted to having a few beers. Willis agreed to perform the field sobriety tests, but advised that her right leg was numb, due to diabetes. As Willis failed each test, she admitted to the officers she could not perform them. “I had too much to drink,” she said, according to the report. She blew 0.17/.017. Dewayne Sheldon Williams Mar. 14, 6 pm Aggravated DWI A minor accident, at Verdi Drive a nd A z t e c Avenue was probably preventable, if only the driver of one of the vehicles had the common sense to sober up, before getting behind the wheel. GPD Officer Joe Roanhorse assisted other officers at the scene. He questioned one of the drivers, Williams, 26, who was suspected of intoxication, according to the report. Sheldon admitted to drinking a can of “Fosters,” and couldn’t

WEEKLY CRIME BLOTTER

pass the officer’s initial tests. He refused to take the full field sobriety tests, and stated “No, I want my lawyer present.” Sheldon was placed under arrest, based on his refusal, and booked for aggravated DWI. Officer Harland Soseeah took over the accident investigation. No breath test result is listed in the report. Kanan Clark Mar. 11, 9:01 pm Aggravated DWI Clark, 23, was stopped by O f f ic er F ra ncis Collins, and Officer Dominic Mol i na of t he Ga l lup Police Department after he was spotted driving recklessly up on the curb along Highway 66, heading east, according to the report. The pursuit lasted until the vehicle rolled to a stop at 1203 E. Hwy. 66 near the Church’s Chicken restaurant. The suspect exited the vehicle quickly, and emitted a strong odor of alcohol in the presence of the officers. Reportedly behaving like a drunk person, and speaking with slurred speech, he kept handing Molina a Walmart Gift Card whenever they asked for his driver’s license. He would not answer the officer’s questions. Collins decided to conduct the field sobriety tests, but wished to find a safer place to do so. He escorted the suspect to the parking lot of the Church’s Chicken. Clark failed the majority of the tests, and was placed under arrest. He blew .22/.25/.23 at the Gallup police department.

DWI REPORT | SEE PAGE 8

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BABY DADDY KNIFED 3/7, GALLUP A woman was arrested for stabbing earlier this month over learning of GPD Officer F ra ncis Collins was called to a report of a stabbing at 413 Vega Ave March 7. The victim, wearing blue jeans, and a tank top, met the officer outside of the house. The officer noticed he was bleeding, heavily. His right arm was wounded. He was having a hard time standing up, and the officer noted he was probably drunk, judging by the scent of alcohol coming from his breath. The victim claimed that he had “fallen on a knife,” according to the police report, and asked for a lighter from the officer to light his cigarette, repeatedly, the report also states. The officer advised the victim to keep pressure on his wound, and Collins called for an ambulance. Metro Dispatch had already called for one earlier and it was then that the officer heard sirens coming in the distance. With the EMT’s on their way, Collins decided to check the house with a fellow officer, even though the victim had stated that there was no one else in the house and that the knife wound was an accident, the officers wanted to be sure nothing suspicious was going on. The heavy odor of alcohol and food was present as they entered the domicile. Blood was everywhere, including the

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living room, and the kitchen. The report states that there was a “Huge amount of blood on the kitchen floor.” Officers couldn’t locate a bloody knife, and all of the knives in the kitchen were suspiciously clean. The officers left the house, and got in their vehicles, preparing to leave. Suddenly, they heard noises erupting from the backyard of the house. Rushing to check it out, they found a Renee Deweese, 38, and another witness here. Collins questioned Deweese about what had happened to the victim. It was then that Deweese allegedly admitted, “I stabbed him.” C ol l i n s i n q u i r e d why she had done such a thing. According to the report, the victim had admitted to having a 4-month-old son. She had begun drinking after the apparently shocking confession, and out of anger, stabbed him. She claimed she had used a steak knife from Applebee’s to attack him. Officers placed the violent individual under arrest, and transported her to jail. The victim was treated for his wound and was sent home with stitches and a tetanus shot, according to the report. Deweese was charged with aggravated assault and battery with a cutting instrument. She bonded out of McKinley County Adult Detention Center on a $3,000 cash or surety bond March 10.

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Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2017

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Dismissal in Carter v. Washburn staves off challenge to ICWA Staff Reports

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I NDOW ROCK , Ariz. — District Court of Arizona issued an Order in Carter v. Washburn, dismissing a complaint filed by the Goldwater Institute challenging the constitutionality of the Indian Child Welfare Act March 16. The Goldwater Institute filed a Complaint alleging that specific provisions of ICWA were unconstitutional due to their reliance on the child’s enrollment or eligibility for enrollment in an Indian tribe. A mong those provisions were the provisions related to Adoptive Pla cement P reference, J u r i s d i c t i o n -T r a n s f e r, a nd Hig her Ev identia r y Standards for Termination of Parental Rights. W h i le t he Compla i nt or igina lly na med the U.S. Depa r tment of I nter ior

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a nd A r i zon a Depa r t ment of Ch i ld Sa fet y, bot h t he Navajo Nation and the Gila R iver I nd i a n Com mu n it y i nt er vened ba s ed on t he fact the Complaint named children from both tribes as plaintiffs. The Order dismissed the ca se for fa i lu re to st ate a cla im. The Cour t held that even though Goldwater had mu lt iple oppor t u n it ie s t o a mend t hei r Compla i nt , t hey f a i le d t o do s o i n a way that demonstrated they had sta nding. The Cou r t held Pl a i nt i f fs h a d not presented facts to demonstrate they had su ffered a concret e a nd pa rticularized injur y traceable t o t h e I C WA p r o v i s i o n s they were cha llenging. “The Indian Child Welfare Act must be protected for the benefit of our children. We w ill continue to advocate for our foster children to be placed with Navajo families,

Friday March 24, 2017 • Gallup Sun

“Vice P resident Jonat ha n Nez said. “ICWA was created for the protection of native children and to this end, we will continue to advocate for it in these types of custody cases.” Te r r e l e n e M a s s e y, Executive Director of the Division of Social Ser vices s a id t he e nt it y s he r e p re sent s look s for wa rd to continuing to work with the states on how to improve ser vices being provided to children and families in the child welfare systems.    “ The Nava jo Nation is ver y pleased with the outcome of this case, and we are proud of the work our Navajo Nation Department of Justice Attorneys did in secu r i ng t h i s d i sm i s s a l,” noted At tor ney Genera l Ethel Branch. “Children are the most important resource to t he Nava jo Nation. Wit hout ou r ch i ld ren we have no future.”

DWI REPORT | FROM PAGE 7 Bernard E Long Mar. 11, 2:39 pm 3rd DWI, Aggravated L o n g , 31, was stopped by Officer Chaz Troncoso, of the Ga llup P o l i c e Department, after being tipped off by a concerned citizen who noticed a possible drunk driver. The witness wanted to make sure the driver was caught, so they tailed him, in their own vehicle. “You caught me,” slurred Long, after officers stopped the vehicle at 1717 W. 2nd St. His bloodshot, watery eyes, and odorous breath were signs he was indeed intoxicated. The report also states that he admitted to drinking a 4-pack of Budweiser. Long decided to further admit to officers he had drugs on him, and dumped a bag of marijuana out of his boot in front of the officers. They began field sobriety tests. He could not put his feet together while standing, for the first test. He refused any further test, according to the report. He was placed under arrest, and officers discovered at that time, an outstanding warrant for his arrest on another charge. He began spitting, yelled racial slurs repeatedly, and directed profanity at the officers, the report states. He was also cited for possession of a prohibited substance, lack of a driver’s license, and lack of registration. No breath test results were recorded in the report. Ryan Hosteen Feb. 26, 1:05 am 2nd DWI Deputy Joseph Begay of McKinley C o u n t y Sher i f f ’s O f f i c e , located a vehicle reported for speeding at the intersection of State Highways 118 and 566. The deputy proceeded to follow the vehicle for a while to determine if it needed to be stopped for investigation. The driver crossed across the double yellow line three times, which indicated that they might be intoxicated. Begay ma de t he stop, and approached the vehicle, watching as it bobbed up and

down. The driver, Hosteen, 29, was trying to crawl into the back seat. When asked what he thought he was doing, the driver stated “I wasn’t driving.” There was no one else in the vehicle, according to the report. The deputy told the man sitting in the backseat of his own car that he had already observed him in the driver’s seat. It was then that Hosteen sheepishly admitted he already received a DWI, and didn’t want to be caught driving drunk again. He refused to take field sobriety tests. “I already failed the test” he stated, according to the deputy’s report. Hosteen was also cited for driving with a suspended license, driving without insurance, and open container. He blew .15/.15. Kamra Frank Feb. 13, 1:12 am DWI G P D O f f icer D a r i u s Johnson stopped b e h i n d a sta lled veh icle a t 800 Gomez Dr. in Gallup to investigate. Two drunken adults, including one who was later discovered to be the drunk driver, Frank, 31, were stranded on the side of the road with a bent axle and a flat tire. They were accompanied by a female child, 7. The adults were milling around the vehicle as Johnson approached to see if he could assist. They tried to dismiss the officer immediately, stating that they did not need any help, and they were just having vehicle problems. The adults appeared intoxicated, and the officer noticed that there were several bottles of hard liquor and beer strewn around the inside of the car. The officer inquired to find out if they needed medical attention, before conducting field sobriety tests. Both adults failed. Frank began crying profusely and argued with the officer, according to the police report. Frank stated that her son, a child, was in the back of the vehicle. The child could not be located for reasons not listed in the report. After refusing to finish the tests, Frank began assaulting the plexiglass cage inside the squad car, violently. She had been arrested for refusal to perform the field sobriety tests. She admitted to driving the vehicle, and hitting the curb, causing the tire to blow out. She blew .20/.19. NEWS


Federal Court Gallup murder suspect jailed rejects NGS federal haze plan By Bernie Dotson Sun Correspondent

Staff Reports

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I N DOW ROCK , Ariz. — On March 2 0, t he Un it ed States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit issued an Order denying all of the petitions challenging the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Federal Implementation Plain for the Navajo Generating Station. The Ninth Circuit found that the USEPA’s decision was within its discretion, and the FIP is consistent with the requirements of the Clean Air Act to reduce regional haze. The FIP was originally promulgated with the help of

BREADSPRINGS | FROM PAGE 6 time of the cra sh, Lincoln was driving under the inf luence of alcohol. L i ncol n subsequently wa s i nd icted on Apr i l 26, 2 016 , a n d c h a r g e d w i t h i nvolu nt a r y ma n slaug hter. On Oct. 5, Lincoln pled g u i lt y t o t he i nd ic t me nt

various NGS stakeholders, known as the technical working group. The TWG’s goal was to balance environmental regulation with the benefits—jobs, revenue, and power—that NGS provides. The Navajo Nation intervened in this case, on the side of the USEPA, because the Nation wanted the FIP to be upheld. The Nation has an interest in the continued operation of NGS because it provides important revenue and jobs for the Navajo people. The Nation wanted the FIP to be upheld in order to prevent a potential shutdown of NGS, which would lead to many Navajo people losing their jobs. without the benefit of a plea agreement. Th is ca se wa s i nves t i g a t e d by t he Nor t he r n Pueblos Agency of the BIA’s Off ice of Justice Ser v ices and the Crownpoint office of the Nava jo Nation Div ision of P ublic Sa fet y. A s s i s t a n t U. S . A t t o r n e y Joseph Spindle prosecuted the case.

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Gallup man rema i ned ja i led M a r c h 17 a t t he McK i n ley Cou nt y Adu lt Detention Center o n a $2 5 ,0 0 0 c a s h b o nd that relates to murder and t a mper i ng w it h ev idence cha rge s, a ccord i ng to a n arrest warrant. According to the warrant, Da n iel Ma r t i nez, 42, who goes by various aliases, such as “’A r temo’ or ‘A r temio’... did kill Jose Alfredo Morales and did destroy hide or place with the intent to prevent apprehension or prosecution, “ the arrest affidavit, in part, reads. B ot h c r i me s a r e felo nies and punishable by life i n pr i son t a ken t oget her. T he m at t er st em s f rom a Nov. 9 incident in which a relative went to the trailer home of Mor a le s loc at ed at Chaparral Mobile Home Pa rk, 1501 W. A z tec Ave., and observed Morales in his

Daniel Martinez bedroom and that he wasn’t mov i n g. He w a s cover e d in bla nkets a nd wa s ly ing in a pool of his own blood. The Off ice of the Medica l Investigator confirmed that he had been decea sed for nearly a week. According to an an eyewitness report, on Nov . 3, Mor a le s wa s wa l k i n g by Martinez, who was parked in front of his trailer. Morales a l leged ly got i nto a “ verb a l c o n f r o nt a t io n a b ou t

‘Artemo’s’ dogs’” that were his car when Martinez struck Morales in the head, causing him to fall backwards and hit the back of his head on the sidewalk. T he eyew it nes s, see ing what happened, helped M a r t i n e z c a r r y Mo r a l e s into his trailer and onto to the couch, where he likely died from his injur ies. No one called paramedics. And when his body was discovered, it was apparent that he was moved to the bedroom, accord i ng to t he forensic report. The arrest warrant suggests that Martinez went back to the home to move a nd cover Mor a le s’ body with blankets in an attempt to conceal the incident. There was no listing of an attorney in jail records for Martinez, who has about 10 aliases that he goes by, and is a known drug dealer, Ga llup Police Depa r tment public infor mation officer Capt. Marinda Spencer refer e nce d f r om t he a r r e s t warrant.

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Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2017

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Gallup Council denies used car lot request APPELLANT CAN APPEAL TO DISTRICT COURT

“ T he i nd iv idua l had a hearing before the planning and zoning commission for a conditional use permit to sell vehicles at that location,” City Attorney George Kozeliski explained after the meeting. “He was appealing the planning and zoning decision. He can now appeal to District Court since the city council affirmed the planning and zoning decision. What he wants to do is sell used cars at his place of business and there is simply no room to do it.” Strain told council members that after hearing testimony and findings of fact and conclusions of law that the planning and zoning commission denied the request for a conditional use permit by a 4-1 vote. Based on Gallup’s land development standards, and the building’s square footage, seven parking spaces, inclusive of one handicapped parking space, are required, Strain explained. The requirement for parallel parking is nine feet for parking and 25 feet for a driving lane.

By Bernie Dotson Sun Correspondent

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he Gallup City Council unanimously denied a local business owner a request on appeal to set up a used car lot at a location along West Historic Highway 66 and near the heart of downtown. The action took place during a public hearing at the March 16 city council meeting and after the city’s planning and zoning department denied a similar request. G a l lu p P l a n n i n g a n d Development Director C.B. Strain introduced the matter to council members, saying Nafiz Abusufiah, the appellant, petitioned the planning and zoning commission Jan. 11 to consider the approval of a conditional use permit to operate an automobile and truck sales business. The property in question is Jewels & Java, located at 100 W. Historic Highway 66 and directly next to the GallupMcKinley County Chamber of Commerce.

Jewels & Java, located at 100 W. Highway 66, was denied a permit to sell vehicles in their parking lot. Photo Credit: Knifewing Segura Chamber Director Bill Lee testified that space is already tight and tough for big and small vehicles to maneuver around the chamber parking lot. An easement component came up during discussions, also. “The area behind the chamber gets used quite a bit,” Lee

said. “It’s very tight for us.” Attorney William Stripp of Ramah argued on behalf of Abusufiah, saying that there was sufficient space for parking and that the proposed used car business wasn’t one akin to Gurley Motors or something big and extensive along those lines. “There is no evidence that

it (the used car business) will create a public hazard or nuisance,” Stripp said. “This will not undo traffic conditions. His other businesses are in decline,” Stripp said, noting that Abusufiah planned to

USED CAR | SEE PAGE 21

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OPINIONS Supplier financing leverages trusted relationships By Finance New Mexico

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endors who supply products to retailers don’t always have the capital needed to fill a large order. If the vendor can’t get the money — or can’t spend all its capital delivering a big order it has to wait 90 days to be paid for — it misses a chance to increase its profits and expand demand. This is a common situation for many startups and small businesses that can’t borrow

from traditional banks or even nonprofit community development loan institutions because the business principals have no track record, uneven credit histories, scant collateral or unclear citizenship status. Some commercial lenders serve this market by offering invoice factoring, purchase order financing or asset-based lending. But if the producer is lucky enough to manufacture a product in high demand, the retailer itself might be willing to finance the order. This

type of “nurture capital” helps smaller producers scale up to demand in ways that benefit the retailer and producer.

MONEY TO GROW Most suppliers — whether producers or their representatives — welcome the exposure that comes with getting their product carried by a large retailer. But these

FINANCING | SEE PAGE 14

MADAME G

Desert Blends of Taos, N.M. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Desert Blends

GUIDE TO THE STARS WEEK OF MARCH 24

Enjoy the promise of stillness during the New Moon on March 27. Venus parallel’s Uranus from March 27-28 signifying a sense of adventure where your romantic entanglements are concerned. A combination like this will allow you some time to enjoy the moment right before you ask your crush out, or hit send on your manuscript. Madame G says enjoy and good luck!

ARIES (March 21-April 19)

CANCER (June 21-July 22)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.22)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Hanging off the edge of a cliff? Maybe you’re hanging on by a thread. It could be that you won’t let go of a past that’s tormenting you. At some point, you need to say: Fuck it! Not everything or everyone is worth hanging onto. Sometimes, you must let go in order to be free. This no easy task, but it’s the most important thing you’ll ever do. Don’t look down. Go forward.

There’s a saying, wherever you go, there you are. You may think it’s ridiculous. And it is. But, simplicity has a profound way of shaking us up. Where are you? You may not have everything you want or everything you think you need. You may not be who you want to be. But, you are where you are, and that’s an awfully good start. In order to change just take a step. Go ahead. Be.

Your life may feel a little stagnant. And you really only have one person to blame. No, it’s not you or your kids. It’s just life. Stop feeling guilty and stop wasting time blaming yourself. It’s fine that you’re tired and a little worn down. This too shall pass. You’ll get up and dust yourself off again. Just give it some time. Berating yourself doesn’t help. So, get outside and have fun.

Mark Manson wrote a profoundly freeing work entitled: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck. The point is not indifference. In fact, if you’re indifferent you’re a coward. No, the key to life and the art of not trying means not caring about unimportant things. Go ahead, care about what’s important and not what’s not. Give up changing the world. Be happy instead or you know, not.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Are you a good witch or a bad witch? What do you see? In the end, good and bad may just be a matter of opinion. You won’t have all the answers all the time. You can’t win everyone over. This is your life. You must live it accordingly. No one will get all the credit. Only you will get the blame for a life poorly spent. And in turn, don’t judge others so harshly. Try it.

What’s important? It’s easy for others to want you to get wrapped up in their latest diversion. This just takes away from what you want. If you love what they love, then by all means jump in. If you have doubts, or you just don’t want to, you may want to reconsider. There is a very good rule of thumb for following others. If it’s not a ‘HELL YEAH’! It’s a no. Have fun.

Yoda said: “Do. Or do not. There is no try.” Stop trying. This doesn’t mean you should give up or veg out on the couch all day. It does mean you should let the guilt and anger go. You haven’t done it yet. Get out there and run your 5K, 13K, or full marathon. Lose 50, 100, or 150 lbs. Write that novel or get that degree. Whatever the case, you’re holding back. Cut the cord. GO!

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

What’s your favorite memory? Even if it’s only a feeling figure out what makes you happy. This isn’t the time for second guessing or worrying about the details. Savor your moments. Recognize where they come from. Hand out acknowledgements to those who treat you well. Lavish them with affection. In every moment, say thank you. And gratitude will follow. Do it now.

Mel Robins is a motivational speaker and writer of a new book entitled: The Five Second Rule. She’s also a political news anchor on CNN. In a TedTalk, she gave an excellent piece of advice: “you’re never going to feel like it.” You’re never going to feel like losing weight, moving on, getting up, or getting your degree. It’s not about your feelings. Just get up and do it. Fail up!

Are you looking for a sign? Maybe you’re waiting for God, gods, or some goddesses to descend from the heavens and provide inspiration. You may even look for meaning or a muse to spring out and kick you in the ass. You may want to hold your breath. Because it’s never going to happen. Stop waiting. Start going. You don’t need anything, but what you have already. Enough.

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Friday March 24, 2017 • Gallup Sun

Stop staring ahead. You can’t overanalyze everything to death. All you’ll do is prevent yourself form taking action. This is the time for taking the lead and heading forward into the great unknown. You’ve mapped and planned. You’re good to go. The only thing you may want to do is enlist the help of some friends. A quest is always more fun with friends or adopt a dog. Yay!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Everything comes to end. You’re heading out on a new journey and it’s terrifying. Don’t worry about what you don’t want. Just be grateful for what you have. This is the life you have and it’s not going to be better or worse than this. Be grateful, you’re here. You have the chance to experience and learn. Take advantage of every step with open arms. Bon voyage! OPINIONS


Democratic organization outlines 2017 NM Legislative Session By NM Democrats

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n the most critical issues facing the Senate, including balancing both the FY17 and FY18 budget, the chamber acted in a bipartisan fashion to address the fiscal crisis in a responsible way that demonstrated the unity that continues to exist within the chamber. Left with no easy solutions, legislators were called to make several difficult decisions necessary to the financial future of our state. Through bipartisan collaboration, the Senate was able to produce a sensible and balanced approach to our budget, all while continuing to pass legislation important to our communities and to the state. While this memo could not possibly reflect the entirety of the work of the New Mexico Legislature during the legislative session, it looks to highlight some of the key accomplishments upon its completion.

SOLVING IMMEDIATE FY17 FISCAL CRISIS & MINIMIZING CUTS TO PUBLIC EDUCATION

Gov. Susana Martinez The legislature faced an immediate fiscal crisis upon beginning the session. On the second day of the session, the Senate moved quickly to balance our state’s checkbook in a way that earned the approval of an overwhelming bipartisan majority of the Senate. The Senate passed four bills that addressed our seventy-million-dollar deficit and rebuilt our reserves. Unfortunately, Governor Martinez line-item vetoed parts of the solvency OPINIONS

package and left the state with an irresponsible level of reserves which once again jeopardized our credit rating and left the Legislature with an even bigger challenge when addressing the coming year’s budget.

RESPONSIBLE FY18 BUDGET THAT PREVENTS CUTS TO CRITICAL STATE SERVICES T he L eg i sl at u re c a me together to pass a responsible budget and recurring revenue package that prevented further cuts to public education, the various public safety departments, and other critical state services. Once again, the Senate worked in a bipartisan fashion and a majority of Republican Senators voted with their Democratic colleagues to put forth two bills, HB2 and HB202, now on the Governor’s desk, that lay out a practical, long-term spending framework necessary for the success of our state.

MEANINGFUL TAX REFORM A major bipartisan accomplishment of the 2017 session was the passage of the most far-reaching tax reform in 13 years. HB 191, which was amended and improved significantly by the Senate, initiates a comprehensive overhaul of our tax system, closing special interest loopholes, modernizing our complex revenue collection process, and reducing the ‘pyramiding’ of business taxes.  The result of the Senate’s work will make our state tax system more fair and stable in the future.

Rep. Jim Smith The Legislature passed the most expansive package of broadband legislation in New Mexico history. Broadband expansion has been proven to create jobs and is the number two concern among New Mexico businesses according to an interim Jobs Council report. Two of those bills have now been signed into law. HB 113, by Representative Jim Smith and Senator Daniel Ivey-Soto, will create a statewide broadband network and implement a model proven to increase internet speeds and attract the private providers needed to bring new infrastructure to underserved communities. The second bill, HB 64 by Representative Jim Trujillo and Senator Jacob Candelaria, would significantly reduce the costs of new broadband network construction through partnerships between local governments and broadband providers. A nother set of bills by Senate Majority Whip Michael

CREATING JOBS & EXPANDING ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY After addressing the immediate budget crisis facing the state, Democrats in the Legislature made creating jobs and expanding economic opportunities for New Mexico families a priority.

telecommunications framework by lifting regulatory barriers preventing investment while maintaining consumer protections. Senate Bill 308 creates a dedicated broadband fund from the existing and outdated Universal Service Fund to make broadband attainable for all New Mexico families. The now outdated fund was originally created to provide telephone service to rural parts of New Mexico where doing so would come at high costs. SB 24, a bill that would have that would have streamlined current statutes to facilitate local government investment in broadband infrastructure, was vetoed by Governor Susana Martinez. The bill was passed with only one dissenting vote in either chamber. The Legislature passed two bills that would have allowed New Mexico to capitalize on the $600 million industrial hemp industry. In particular, SB 6 by Senator Cisco McSorley put forward a narrowly tailored approach to beginning the research and development needed to bring jobs to our manufacturing and agricultural industries. In the opinion of legal counsel to the legislature, this bill is now law. Senator Joseph Cervantes passed significant capital

Sen. Joseph Cervantes

Sen. Michael Padilla Padilla are now awaiting signature from the Governor. SB 53 represents a renovation in our

outlay reform legislation that would improve how our state invests in capital outlay projects to ensure that projects are maximized in a way that will create jobs and boost the state economy. SB262 would help prioritize the most urgent infrastructure projects and make sure funds go to projects

that are ready to begin as soon as they are funded. With strong bipa r tisa n agreement, the Senate passed a long-overdue pay raise for working people in New Mexico by raising the state minimum wage to $9 per hour from the current $7.50. Raising the minimum wage is good for our economy.  More than 600 economists have affirmed that increasing the minimum wage will help stimulate the economy and spur job creation, since low-wage workers now will have more earnings to spend. Senator Clemente Sanchez’s SB 386 was supported by both business organizations like the A lbuquerque Cha mber of Commerce and labor unions like AFSCME Council 18.

KEEPING OUR FAMILIES SAFE After a request for emergency funding was rejected by the Governor’s Board of Finance, the courts were left without enough money to fund jury trials and keep their doors open through the end of the fiscal year. This created a constitutional crisis that threatened the public safety of our communities. Had the legislature not acted, juries would have remained unfunded, criminal cases would have been dismissed, and some criminals would have walked free. Despite two vetoes of appropriations that would have kept the courts running, the Legislature ultimately passed a $1.6 million appropriation that adequately funds the courts through the end of the fiscal year. Senator Joseph Cervantes passed Senate Bill 259 to give courts the ability to order domestic abusers to relinquish all firearms in their possession for the duration of any protective order. If enacted into law, this bill would assure protection for victims of domestic violence and remove the risk of firearms in dangerous family situations.

DEMOCRATIC | SEE PAGE 14

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2017

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DEMOCRATIC | FROM PAGE 13

EXPANSION OF CIVIL RIGHTS PROTECTIONS The Legislature passed

Sen. Jacob Candelaria SB 121 by Senator Jacob Candelaria and Representative A ndres Romero which, if signed, would protect children by prohibiting the practice of conversion therapy by licensed mental health providers with minors under the age of 18. Senator Candelaria also passed Senate Bill 120 which would allow transgendered New Mexicans to amend their birth certificates to reflect the gender they identify with, without the requirement that they undergo costly gender reassignment surgery, a procedure out of reach for most people.

OVERHAUL OF CAMPAIGN FINANCE SYSTEM & ETHICS REFORM In a historic moment for the Legislature, the bipartisan House Joint Resolution 8, by Representative Jim Dines, Senator Jeff Steinborn, Representative Nathan Small, a nd R e pr e s e nt a t i ve Bi l l McCamley, would create the framework for an Independent Ethics Commission to oversee the ethical conduct of public officials and serve as a forum

FINANCING | FROM PAGE 12 opportunities can be exploited only if the producer is able to ramp up operations to fill a large order, which usually requires an infusion of capital for materials and labor. The producer usually needs a loan if the order is so large that it temporarily drains company resources, including

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Sen. Peter Wirth where questions and dilemmas regarding ethics can be addressed to prevent inadvertent unethical conduct. The Legislature passed SB 96, a major overhaul of election law sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Peter Wirth and Representative Jim Smith. It would require greater transparency from large independent donors by requiring public disclosure of as much information about the campaign spending of PACs and other non-candidate campaign participants as can be compelled without crossing the constitutional boundaries established by the courts. Senate Majority Leader Peter Wirth also passed SB 97, which would create a voluntary public financing system for the Supreme Court, Appeals Court judges, and PRC commissioners. The shift would allow candidates to focus on the issues instead of collecting money from well-connected special interests.

PROTECTING ACCESS TO HEALTHCARE Senator Papen’s SB 217, if signed into law, will guarantee that behavioral health and other health care providers who stand accused of fraud will receive their due process rights, the opportunity to review the allegations made against them, and the chance to respond in an administrative hearing and in district court. those earmarked for payroll and other fixed expenses. In some cases the company has to replace or reconfigure its machinery to meet mass-production needs, or it has to tweak the product to fit its new market. Whatever the incentive, some New Mexico businesses consider access to capital a community development issue and are willing to lend

Friday March 24, 2017 • Gallup Sun

Sen. Mary Kay Papen Senator Steinborn’s SB 354 would require the State to more vigorously negotiate with pharmaceutical drug manufacturers for lower prices, saving taxpayers potentially up to $100 million per year, and freeing up needed resources for public education and other essential services. I f H B 157, s pon s ored by Representative Debbie A r m s t r o n g a nd S e n a t or Michael Padilla, if signed into law, a key health care goal of firefighters and paramedics across the state will be met by adding Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) to the existing list of diseases, such as cancers, hepatitis, and tuberculosis, already presumed to be proximately caused by employment as a firefighter.

would ensure that pregnant women in the workplace can continue to do their jobs and support their families by providing access to reasonable accommodations for needs arising out of pregnancy. The legislation, which was sponsored by Representative Gail Chasey and was sponsored on the Senate Floor by Senator Linda Lopez, will allow workers to maintain a healthy pregnancy while still remaining active, productive employees. New Mexico currently has the nation’s worst rape kit backlog, leaving thousands of New Mexicans waiting for justice. To address this, the Legislature has passed Senator Mimi Stewart’s SB 475 which would put policies in place for rape kits to be sent for processing in a timely manner.

ENSURING OUR STUDENTS RECEIVE THE HIGHEST CALIBER OF EDUCATION

RESPECTING NEW MEXICO WOMEN The Legislature ha s passed the Pregnant Worker Accommodation Act which Sen. Carlos R. Cisneros

Sen. Mimi Stewart to producers that supply what their customers want.

SUPPORT FOR HOMEGROWN PRODUCERS Whole Foods Market has a local producer loan program that extends credit to vendors who have collateral but lack capital. The company provides up to $25 million in low-interest

In addition to producing a budget that fulfills the state’s obligation to provide the best education for our students, and the recurring revenue necessary to prevent what would have otherwise been devastating 5-7% cuts, the Legislature also passed several pieces of legislation that would have helped support our students loans to independent farmers and food artisans in the communities where it operates. La Montañita Coop also f ina nces capita l- strapped vendors who keep it stocked with fast-selling products. Instead of requiring collateral, the co-op manages a pool of money sustained by contributions from members and other investors and deposited into an account at Nusenda Credit

and their families. Legislators this session have passed SB 462, a capital outlay bill by Senator Carlos Cisneros, that dedicates $46 million to replenish critical funds taken from school districts and charter schools, putting public schools on sounder financial footing. A l r e a d y, G o v e r n o r Martinez has chosen to veto several pieces of legislation that would have improved the quality of education our students receive. For example, SB 64 by Senator Mimi Stewart would have lifted the sunset clause on our Public School Capital Outlay Council’s ability to invest in broadband infrastructure statewide allowing New Mexico to ma ximize E -rate matching from the federal government so New Mexico schools can provide our students with necessary broadband infrastructure. Other important education legislation is still awaiting Governor Martinez’s signature. Representative Sheryl Williams Stapleton’s HB 125, which was sponsored on the Senate Floor by Senator Howie Morales, passed with bipartisan support would finally develop a system for evaluating our teachers and principals that relies less heavily on students’ scores on controversial standardized tests. If it is signed into law, HB 125 would convene a council of top educators broadly from across New Mexico to create a new teacher evaluation method that is both fair and effective. SB 420, Lottery Scholarship Gap Year legislation, was passed with bipartisan support by the Legislature.  Sponsored by Senator Bill Soules, it would allow students to take up to 16 months off before beginning college, and still qualify for the state Lottery Scholarship assistance. It also extends the scholarship to students who enlist in the military and begin service within 4 months of graduation. Union. The LaM Fund Loan Advisory Committee decides which loans to make, often based on established relationships with the provider. According to the co-op’s website, “the La Montañita (LaM) FUND is a member funded micro-lending program designed to grow the local

FINANCING | SEE PAGE 16 OPINIONS


COMMUNITY Milan hires Pat Salazar from MCSO NEW CHIEF PLANS UPGRADES FOR THE DEPARTMENT

otherwise charming and clean little police station. Salazar then explained he is already planning on erecting a new police department for the officers already in Milan and the four new officers he’s headhunting.

By Naomi Mercedes Chan Sun Correspondent

M

ILAN – Like the set of “True Detective” or “The Streets of Sa n Fra ncisco,” the Milan Police Department headquarters is reminiscent of a police headquarters from a 1970s-era TV police show. Despite cramped headquarters, the roughly dozen cops make it work. While the new Chief of Police Pat Salazar takes note of functional aesthetics of the MPD, he’s focusing his energy on boosting morale and bringing the staffing count to 15 full-time officers. In a way, Salazar has come full-circle. He got his start in law enforcement in Milan in 1995, working there for five years alongside a K9 working dog Themis. Salazar also hails from Milan, but spent the bulk of his law enforcement career working in Gallup. He recently retired from the McKinley County Sheriff’s Office as lieutenant in charge of the narcotics division. Prior to joining the MCSO, he worked for the Gallup Police Department for about 20 years. He also had a brief stint working for the New Mexico Motor Transportation Police before moving on to the Pueblo of Acoma Police Department, working there for two years. He got the job at the GPD, by happenstance. While working for Acoma he did a good deed, but nothing out of the ordinary in this realm of public service. While on patrol, Salazar pulled over to help a man who had a flat tire on his boat trailer. “I always keep my tools with me for fixing tires in the back of my patrol car,” he said. “After I changed the tire he comes up to me and he goes, ‘How would you like to come work for me?’ It turns out he was the Chief of Gallup PD, Chief Stanley.” Salazar said that he immediately went to work in narcotics and investigations for GPD. “Gallup was very, very, busy and understaffed,” he said. “We had a very good record of putting people in prison though.” So does Milan have a drug problem? Like most communities, methamphetamine and opiate abuse is on the rise across the country, and Salazar hopes his experience and skill set will help net more drug offenders. He reflected on the camaraderie that COMMUNITY

SALAZAR MOVES ON WITHOUT COMPANION

Pat Salazar was recently hired as the Village of Milan’s new chief of police. Salazar recently retired from the McKinley County Sheriff’s Office as lieutenant and primarily handled drug investigations and busts. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Pat Salazar was forged between officers and deputies of the different law enforcement entities within McKinley County that often cross paths in the line of duty. “G a l lu p Pol ic e D e p a r t me nt , McKinley County Sheriff, and Navajo Police Department all work very closely together,” he said. “That’s why at that time, after I had left for MCSO, we started to help GPD reform their narcotics department along with the DA (district attorney).” Salazar explained that the MPD, GPD, FBI, and MCSO are working closely together in the area to up the ante on drug arrests within the next year. In his new position, it’s not all about investigative operations, however, as Salazar explained.

He’s working on streamlining processes around the Milan headquarters, and bringing the department into the 21st century by digitizing all of the paperwork a police department can generate. He explained that this will save precious time, otherwise, wasted hunting down paperwork – precious time that can be applied to patrols and investigations. It will also offer a valuable database officers can search quickly for operations support. MPD sits adjacent to a large plot of land owned by the Village of Milan, the location of choice for a much needed larger, updated building. “Maybe this will be turned into a museum someday,” he foreshadowed, gesturing around at the outdated, but

One of the things Salazar will miss the most about his time at MCSO is his K9 companion, a chocolate lab named Cedar, a trained narcotics agent. He has another 3 to 4 years of service left, and the MCSO said they can’t afford to let go of him yet. “I had him for four years, so my family is very upset,” Salazar said. “At first they told me I could keep him but then I got a call from HR (human resources) saying I couldn’t.” When asked what would become of the dog, after he was allowed to retire in an estimated four years, he smiled sadly and guessed, “He’ll probably go home with the most recent deputy in charge of him.” Similar stories are found nationwide and it’s always a difficult transition for both the dog and officer. “I really wanted to give him the dog,” MCSO Sheriff Ron Silversmith said. “I couldn’t because it’s the property of the county and ultimately the taxpayers … my hands are tied. I tried though, I had her assessed and checked for problems. The dog is in good health according to our veterinarian and was finally assessed in the thousands of dollars. We just can’t afford to let him go right now.”

APPLICANTS FOR THE JOB Marcela Sandoval, the Village of Milan Manager, who announced the hiring, said that they only had four applicants vying for the job. The other applicants were Tomas Archuleta, Adrian Molina, and James Johns. Salazar was looking forward to retirement in July. This was before fellow officers, friends and citizens of Milan pleaded with him to take on the top position, so the area could benefit from his wisdom and experience. When asked when he was finally going to retire, he replied, “Now? Never! I’m going to work until I can’t,” he laughed.

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2017

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Faster Internet connections come to Cibola County SACRED WIND WIRES THE VILLAGE OF MILAN, GRANTS

By Bernie Dotson Sun Correspondent

T

he hot Internet access technology that delivers connection speeds many times faster that dial-up phone connections over the same type of wiring, made its way to the Village of Milan and Grants late last year. Broadba nd is the new “thing” in those parts of Cibola County. Users can talk on the telephone without breaking their Internet connections. “(Broadband) is simply high access speed to the Internet,” John Badal, chief executive officer at Sacred Wind, said. Sacred Wind installed the service at an undisclosed price. “Download capacity, or speeds, enable customers to retrieve files, information and videos,” Badal said. “Speeds enable people to send out such files, information or videos.” In explaining how broadband came to Cibola County, Badal said the Cibola County Econom ic Development

Sacred Wind CEO John Badal. Depar tment and the state Department of Information Technologies, held a conference in Grants in 2013 during which the issue of lack of broadband throughout Cibola County was a primary topic with the various working groups. Marcela Sandoval, manager of the Village of Milan, attended the conference. “Several broadband and other companies attended the conference, but no one offered solutions to the delivery of broadband to the area except Sacred Wind, recommending a federal U.S. Department of Agricultural grant,” Badal said.

Badal said that for about a year after the conference, Sacred Wind and the Village of Milan worked on the grant, and when the application failed, the Village used what it had learned through the application process to issue a Request For Proposals for fiber optic connectivity to Milan’s anchor institutions, including its industrial park. “Sacred Wind won the (RFP) and within a few months had connected Milan’s administrative building and police department, its industrial park, Courthouse and new community computer center,” he said.

MILAN – A SMALL COMMUNITY MODEL With respect to small communities, Milan serves as a model for one of the most “wired” small towns in New Mexico, Badal said. Not a lot of small towns can really afford the service. “Because the traditional Here’s what a broadband antenna looks like. Photo Credit: Sacred Wind

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providers of broadband in any city – the local telecom company, the local cable TV company, national mobile wireless carries – by pass smaller, rural towns due to the lack of a sound business case, Milan needed to find a different type of business plan and partner,” Badal said. “Sacred Wind built a fixed wireless network surrounding all of Milan and Grants and now provides the highest speed broadband anywhere available in Cibola County.”

MILAN LOVES BROADBAND “We had a g reat need because we did not have any

FINANCING | FROM PAGE 14

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Friday March 24, 2017 • Gallup Sun

food system and strengthen the local economy. It provides an opportunity for members of La Montañita Food Co-op to support farms, ranches, value-added producers, and other food system endeavors and related businesses in the La Montañita foodshed region.”

reasonable broadband service in Milan,” Sandoval, the Village manager, said. “We did a survey and it was found that this would be a worthwhile venture. They (Sacred Wind) agreed that they would offer reasonable rates.” Sandoval said she couldn’t comment on the number of subscribers currently served by Sacred Wind in Milan, but said the amount is “substantial.” Those residents in Milan who do receive the new broadband are pleased. “I like it and it goes fast and helps me do my homework,” Jerry Hernandez, 15, a student at Grants High School, said. “There really is a difference in speed.” In return, member-investors earn dividends from loan fees charged to borrowers, and the credit union reaps a small annual percentage of the value of outstanding loans. Finance New Mexico connects individuals and businesses with skills and funding resources for their business or idea. To learn more, go to: www.FinanceNewMexico.org COMMUNITY


NMSU initiative spurs awareness, education about binge drinking

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AS CRUCES – Local television networks throughout New Mexico and southwestern Texas will begin broadcasting a series of “Aggies Winning Choices” public service announcements promoting awareness and education about the dangers of binge drinking and encouraging smart decision-making and harm-reduction techniques among college students. The project, fu nded by a NCAA Choices grant, will deliver harm-reduction messages to col lege st udent s with the intention of reducing the incidence of binge drinking. Binge drinking is when a man consumes 5 plus drinks or a woman consumes 4 plus drinks in a two-hour period.

Last year, over 1,825 college students died from alcohol-related injuries. Aggies Winning Choices is a public health initiative to reduce the incidence of binge drinking among undergraduate students across New Mexico. The project is one of many on college campuses which aims to reduce binge drinking by 15 percent among undergraduate students over a threeyear period. “These PSAs really speak to the undergraduate population through relevant messaging, content, and delivery” Sophia Sepp, a NMSU dual-degree Master of Public Health/ Master of Social Work student, said. The PSAs highlight community resources available to students a nd promote

making smart choices, not being a bystander, and drinking responsibly. Students featured in the PSAs represent diverse populations from including

male and female athletes, international students, undergraduate students and graduate students. V i s i t : w w w .

winningchoices.org or contact Dr. Satya P. Rao, PhD, MCHES at: (575) 635-6265, or email: sakrishn@nmsu. edu

Seattle songstress Jill Cohn dazzles Gallup 90-MIN. SET PART OF NATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH TRIBUTE

By Bernie Dotson Sun Correspondent

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hen folk guitarist Jill Cohn gave Amy Roanhorse of Window Rock, Ariz., a free CD featuring music recorded over the years, an instant relationship was born. Cohn’s Gallup performance earlier this month at the Octavia Fellin Library was the first time each of the women met. “I was just blown away,”

Roanhorse, 29, said. “I loved it (the CD). I loved the gesture.” The Seattle-born Cohn is a contemporary folk solo artist who performed March 6 at Fellin as part of the library’s c e le br a t io n of Na t io n a l Women’s History Month. The month runs through March and highlights the contributions of women in world society. Cohn played a captivating 90-minute set that featured songs about relationships, spiritualty, love, places that she’s traveled and family. In

Folk singer Jill Cohn. Photo Credit: www.jillcohn.com

“I think some of the easiest songs to sing and write about are about family and relationships,” Cohn said. “They are topics that everyone can relate to.” A full-time musician since 1999, Cohn opened the set with a tune from her most recent CD entitled “Heartstrings Touching Ground,” a diverse release in both subject and music, Cohn told the 15 or so people that came out to see the free show. The release gets into touchy subjects like immigration and

a general sense, Cohn’s songs pay homage to folk mainstays

JILL COHN | SEE PAGE 22

like Joni Mitchell and Sarah McLachlan.

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Seattle folk artist Jill Cohn performs at thee Octavia Fellin Library on March 6. Library Director Mary Ellen Pellington said she’ll look into a future performance by Cohn at the El Morro Theatre. Photo Credit: Courtesy COMMUNITY

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Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2017

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‘Life’ delivers old school, creature-feature chills RATING: ««« OUT OF 4 RUNNING TIME: 104 MIN. By Glenn Kay For the Sun

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ometimes, science-fict ion ca n cha l lenge viewers with brave, visionary ideas about the future and our place as humans in it. Life boasts an impressive cast and early ads for the feature might suggest a heady, thoughtful science-fiction feature about the significance of discovering life on another planet. However, that’s not at all what this film is really about. This is a slickly produced monster-movie, pure and simple. It follows the horror genre formula from beginning to end, with characters desperately attempting to stop being consumed by a strange, tentacle-spewing creature with a nasty disposition. The plot involves a small group of astronauts orbiting Earth on the International Space Station. Specifically, doctors David Jordan (Jake Gyllenhaal) and Miranda North (Rebecca Ferguson), scientist Hugh Derry (Ariyon Bakare), technician Roy Adams (Ryan Reynolds) as well as ship crew Kat (Olga Dihovichnaya) and Sho Kendo (Hiroyuki Sanada). After recovering a space probe from Mars, the group discover a single-celled organism in

a soil sample. At first they’re excited about finding the first life form from another planet. Unfortunately for the characters, this movie isn’t called “A Promising and Beneficial Space Discovery.” Instead, the specimen awakens, begins growing and attacks the crew for sustenance. Yes, it’s pretty clear from the get-go that this isn’t exactly an exercise in restraint or deep-probing questions about our place in the universe. Even the score seems unnecessarily grandiose for a small group of people trapped in an enclosed space with a monster. The movie also appears to borrow elements from titles like Alien. Yet somehow, while following all of the expected conventions, it still manages to add a wrinkle here and there that provides thrills and chills along the way. Swedish director Daniel Espinoza (Safe House) has handled action scenes in the past and he does so again more than efficiently. He opens the movie with a long, elaborately staged master shot that introduces all of the leads, moves through the many ship environments and introduces the incoming space probe. It’s an impressive beginning, hinting that there is a bit more technical skill on display than in a typical genre feature. The tight enclosures and angles help maintain a consistent level of tension throughout the proceedings. This is very apparent during

Ryan Reynolds plays technician-turned-alien hunter Roy Adams in the spine-tingling sci-fi thriller ‘Life.’ Now playing. Photo Credit: Sony Pictures an extremely tense fight early on in a science lab between alien and crew member and several encounters with the alien throughout. And when the organism moves around the ship, it does so in an unique way, using zero gravity and bouncing off of walls. The creature itself is unique and does some pretty disturbing things to wipe out its human prey. And while the final scene didn’t deliver as big a surprise as intended, it still managed to

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plant a devious grin on my face. The movie is also elevated by its strong cast. This may be some silly stuff, but the performers are all fully committed to the material and attempt to give their characters a little more nuance than one would expect. And there are some allusions to the survival instinct that may make one consider their own propensity for consumption as well as the cost to and fear from those being devoured. Ad m it t e d ly, t h a t l a s t

comment is a bit of a stretch; this is a simple scare movie through and through. But those contented with straight-forward thrills and the occasional gross-out moment will find that the film effectively delivers the goods. Life is far from a classic, but horror fans will discover that with little more than a new coat of paint, the old-fashioned creature-feature can still produce a good-natured jolt now and again. To read more awesome movie reviews, visit: www. cinemastance.com 207 WEST COAL GALLUP 505.863.1250 www.elmorrotheatre.com Facebook @elmorrogallup

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DVD/Blu-ray Roundup for March 24, 2017 By Glenn Kay For the Sun

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elcome back yet again for another edition detailing Blu-ray and DVD highlights coming your way. It’s a remarkably busy week, jam packed with features both new and old. So if you can’t make it out to the movies this week, be sure to give one of these titles a try!

BIG NEW RELEASES! Assassin’s Creed - Once again, a hugely popular video game is tra nslated t o t he big screen. This a dapt at ion i nvolve s a man who is taken by a myster iou s c orporate entity with ties to the Templar Knights. He’s placed into a machine that can help him travel into an ancestor’s memories, where he is instructed to find information leading to a genetic code. Unfortunately, reviews were poor for this action picture. Many complained that despite the excellent cast and impressive visuals, the story was a jumbled mess with little in it to engage viewers. It stars Michael Fassbender, Marion Cotillard, Jeremy Irons, Brendan Gleeson, Charlotte Rampling and Michael Kenneth Williams. The Autopsy of Jane Doe This independent horror film is about a father and son team of coroners who get an unusual arrival at the morgue - a perfectly preserved body whom they are informed is the victim of a brutal and violent murder. As they begin an autopsy to identify her and get to the bottom of what happened, eerie questions are raised that put the team in mortal peril. Critics gave this feature (from Trollhunter director Andre Ovredal) high marks. They stated that it effectively created a sense of dread from the very beginning and built the tension to a fever pitch by the climax. It features Emile Hirsch, Brian Cox, Ophelia Lovibond, Michael McElhatton and Olwen Catherine Kelly. COMMUNITY

Bakery in Brooklyn - After their aunt passes away, two cousins find themselves inheriting a French bakery on the brink of foreclosure. Tension rises when the two women discover that they have very different ideas as to how to run the business. One wants to keep things traditional, while the other fights to put a modern spin on their products. This small comedy didn’t overwhelm the press, who were split on the feature, with a few more giving it negative notices. Some found it sweet enough to earn a pass, but most commented that it was bland and forgettable fluff, reminiscent of a TV-movie of the week. The cast includes Aimee Teegarden, Krysta Rodriguez and Griffin Newman. Evolution - Set in a strange alternate reality, a boy lives in a seaside village exclusively populated with women and children. He receives a shock when after going for a swim and discovering a body floating in the water. When his guardian dismisses the finding, the youngster develops suspicions that all is not as it should be and attempts to investigate the incident in more detail. This French-language, France/ Belgium/Spain co-production earned solid reviews. Many commented that it was a simple tale, but that the strange, dreamlike mood created made it compelling. Max Brebont, Roxane Duran and Julie-Marie Parmentier headline the film. Fire at Sea - This Academy Award-nominated documentary follows refugees from Africa and the Middle East as they arrive at the tiny Italian island of Lampedusa, roughly 150 miles south of Sicily. The leisurely-paced feature shows the typical village life of its residents as well as the struggles new arrivals face both in traveling to and being processed into the countr y. Overall, the feature earned very good notices. Most appreciated the slice-of-life approach and were impressed by seeing events (even mundane ones) that give an honest and accurate picture of locals, rescue workers and immigrants. F ran k e n st e in Creat e d Bikers - After meeting his end, an outlaw biker finds himself rising from the grave and becoming addicted to the chemical that resurrected

him. The strung-out, undead lead must do the bidding of two nasty scientists to keep him going. Unfortunately, his old enemies, including a rival gang, bounty hunters, a crazed ex-girlfriend and the police, go on the hunt for him. There aren’t any reviews for this low-budget, horror/sci-fi/action B-movie, so curious parties will just have to give it a spin without knowing the details. It features Jeff Bryant, Laurence R. Harvey, Tristan Risk and Ellie Church. I n Dubious B a t t l e Based on John Steinbeck’s 1936 novel of the same n a m e , this tale involves a group of workers in Depression-era California. Frustrated with their poor working conditions, they begin to strike against their employers. The film deals with their efforts on the picket line as well as the personal struggles they face standing against the farm owners. Critics seemed to have wildly different opinions on the finished product. A few thought that it was an important story that showed growth on the part of its star/director James Franco. However, more called it a well-intentioned but unconvincing feature that falls flat. It stars Franco, Nat Wolff, Vincent D’Onofrio, Selena Gomez, Analeigh Tipton, Sam Shepherd, Robert Duvall, Ed Harris and Josh Hutcherson. A Kind of Murder - Set in New York in the 60s, this thriller tells the story of a married architect who become obsessed with an unsolved murder. He begins his own investigation, which draws the attention of the responsible party, leading to danger and intrigue. Based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith (Strangers on a Train, The Talented Mr. Ripley), this adaptation didn’t impress critics. While a few thought it was intriguing enough to recommend even if it didn’t fully work, more believed that the story was weak and that the character motivations lacked believability. It features Patrick Wilson, Jessica Biel, Haley Bennett and Vincent Kartheiser. L iv e B y Ni ght - T h is

Prohibition-set gangster flick made a quick trip from movie theaters to rental shelves (about two months, if memory serves). It involves a lower-tier Boston mobster who takes a position heading his outfit’s expansion into Florida. While there, he must contend with corrupt government officials and rival outfits. Critics weren’t taken at all with this crime film. A few gave this lavish production a pass as being pulpy fun, but many more thought it missed the mark and that the screenplay didn’t do enough to make its lead character charismatic or compelling. It stars Ben Aff leck, Elle Fanning, Brendan Gleeson, Zoe Saldana and Sienna Miller. Miss Sloane - A cold, calculating and ruthless lobbyist in Washington who will do anything to win suddenly develops a conscience when she accepts an offer to assist a group fighting for stricter background checks on gun owners. Her methods shock and surprise the organization, but begin to get results - what follows is a lengthy battle between two opposing political groups. The movie earned good reaction and reviews. Some found the main character difficult to like and the plotting predictable, but more were impressed with the commanding work of star Jessica Chastain. It also features Mark Strong, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Alison Pill, Michael Stuhlbarg, Sam Waterston and John Lithgow. Sing - This feature from the animation house behind The Secret Life of Pets and Despicable Me is set in a world filled with humanoid animals. A struggling theater producer decides to create a talent show competition to entice patrons. Amateurs from all over attempt arrive and compete and win the top pr ize. The mov ie was a hit and earned decent, if unspectacular rev iews. Some complained that it was hastily slapped together and didn’t compare to the other animated offerings out there, but others called it a nice, if not particularly memorable, diversion that would entertain kids. The voice talent includes Matthew McConaughey, Reese Witherspoon, Seth MacFarlane, Scarlett Johansson, John C. Reilly, Taron Egerton, Jennifer Sauders and Jennifer Hudson. Tower - In August of 1966, a

gunman climbed the University of Texas clock tower, opening fire and killing 16 people. This unusual documentary retells the story as it happened using interviews with those at the scene, using stylized animated sequences that recreate the events. This unusual technique seems to have impressed reviewers; they were very positive about the film. While they admitted the movie offers no answers for the shooting itself, all felt that the animation did an excellent job of recreating the terror and drama of the situation and detailing the heroism of the various individuals involved in the tragedy.

BLASTS FROM THE PAST! What an incredible week for classic titles arriving in high definition! Olive Films have several titles of note, all of which are arriving on Bluray for the very first time. Blast-Off (1967) (which was also released under the titles Those Fantastic Flying Fools and Jules Verne’s Rocket to the Moon) stars Burl Ives as Phineas T Barnum a man attempting to finance the first ever flight to the moon. Unfortunately, they encounter many problems both with the project and saboteurs leading to plenty of laughs. T he Cardinal (1936) is a British depicting troubles facing Cardinal Giovanni de Medici from Florence, Italy. In this story, set in the 1500s, his brother is wrongfully accused of murder, but the man of the cloth finds that he is not allowed to break his vows in order to offer information that would prove his sibling’s innocence. They also have a Blu-ray of The Delinquents (1957), the first film from famed director Robert Altman (MASH, Nashville, McCabe and Mrs. Miller, The Player, Gosford Park). It’s a pulpy effort about a teen who gets caught up with the wrong crowd when the gang escalates their criminal activities to include kidnapping. Ph a e dr a (1962) is t he g lobe -t rot t i ng stor y of a doomed romance between the title character and her stepson. Viewers will see stars Melina Mercouri and Anthony Perkins

DVD REVIEW | SEE PAGE 21

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2017

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GALLUP SUN SPORTS CORNER

Community honors champions VALLEY PIRATES CHAMPIONSHIP CELEBRATION Story and photo by Stuart Noggle For the Sun

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ANDERS, Ariz. — The Valley of the Pirates was flooded with blue and gold spirit March 11 as local fans lined the highway to congratulate the Arizona 2A Girls State Basketball Champions. The tea m wa s ca r r ied through town in a parade held in their honor. Arizona Department of Transportation, Apa che Cou nt y Sher i f f ’s Department, Puerco Valley Fire District, Sanders Unified School District, and the Navajo-Hopi Honor Riders led the procession as community members cheered the Lady Pirates. The parade ended at Valley

High School with a parent-organized community dinner. Back-to-back gold trophies were prominently displayed for all too see. Valley High Senior, Shevelle Six, said, “I’m proud to wear the number forty-two on my back and the name ‘Pirates’ across my chest.” Taniah Thompson, also a senior, was overwhelmed by the show of support; she said, “It sends tingles up my spine every time people say, ‘You’re a state champion!’” Parents, fans, and dignitaries were in attendance to offer words of wisdom to the star athletes. Pirate alumnus Raymond Sm it h Jr., Nava jo Nation Council Delegate, and Larry Noble, Navajo-Hopi Honor Rider, expressed thanks for the

girls hard work and dedication. Doyel Shamley, Apache County supervisor, presented certificates acknowledging

the Lady Pirates’ tremendous accomplishment. The celebratory day was concluded as proud parents and fans snapped

photos w ith the Sa nders Champions; everyone looked forward to next season and the promise of a three-peat.

Navajo girls winning basketball teams honored at rallies NAVAJO PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT VISIT SHIPROCK

Staff Reports

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HIPROCK – President Russell Begaye told the Shiprock Lady Chieftains that their 4A State Championship contributes to the momentum that is moving the Navajo Nation forward toward bringing about positive change. “The pride out here is phenomenal. It translates from high school sports and unto areas like community and business development,” Begaye said. “We feel the momentum in the spirit of wanting to see change and make things happen.” Begaye and Vice President Jonathan Nez joined Navajo Honor Riders in escorting the Shiprock’s Championship Lady Chieftain basketball team to a tailgate rally held at the Shiprock Youth Complex on Sunday, Mar. 19. Nez congratulated the Shiprock Lady Chieftains and

President Begaye and Vice President Nez stand with members of the 4A State Champion Shiprock Lady Chieftains at a rally held on Sunday, Mar. 19. Photo Credit: OPVP Pressroom Tohatchi Lady Cougars for winning basketball championships and not giving up, even when they were down by double digits during the championship games. “We can learn a lot from these young ladies. Talk about sheer heart and determination. They never gave up and I

20 Friday March 24, 2017 • Gallup Sun

appreciate these young ladies for modeling self-determination for us during the state basketball championship,” Nez said. He noted that two Arizona teams, St. Michaels and ValleySanders, and two New Mexico teams, Shiprock and Tohatchi, from the Navajo Nation brought

home championship trophies with the strong support of Navajo fans. The Shiprock Lady Chieftains took the coveted 4A blue trophy by defeating the number one Hope Christian Lady Huskies, 47-42. The Tohatchi Lady Cougars

defeated the number Eunice Lady Cardinals, 57-50 for the 3A New Mexico State Girls basketball title. Bot h Begaye a nd Nez also traveled to Tohatchi on March 18 to celebrate the Lady Cougar’s state championship and participate in the parade. “It was a sight to behold, to be there and witness a comeback by both teams. The girls displayed their heart in wanting the win. With the crowd backing them up, it brought together elements that produced championships for both communities,” Begaye said. Nez said all teams set a great example of striving for their goals and aspirations.  President Begaye extended h i s appreciat ion to Vice President Nez’s support of wellness efforts and the support of all Navajo Nation staff and Division Directors for wanting to make the Nation successful. COMMUNITY


DVD REVIEW | FROM PAGE 19 travel to Paris, London and Greece before things go awry. Finally, Won Ton Ton: The Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976) is wacky spoof inspired by the films of animal star Rin Tin Tin. In this tale, the talented dog becomes a sensation on the big screen, inspiring a Hollywood matinee idol to try and take revenge on the pooch. It’s filled with stars like Bruce Dern, Madeline Kahn and is filled to the brim with celebrity cameos. Arrow Academy have one of the my favorite foreign language films arriving in an impressive package. Cinema Paradiso (1988) is an incredible mov ie about a young boy’s love of cinema and the impact that they make over the course of his life. The Italian production won Best Foreign Language Film at the Oscars. This new Blu-ray includes two versions of the film (the Cannes cut and Director’s Cut) transferred directly from the original camera negative, director audio commentary, documentary on the production, interviews with cast members and many other extras. Property is No Longer a Theft (1973) from the same company was announced on this page a couple of weeks ago, but it’s release was delayed. You’ll now find it available. If you ask me, Robocop (1987) is one of the best movies of the 80s. Great action and deeper themes of a man being turned into a corporate product. Shout! Factory must

CRIME BLOTTER | FROM PAGE 7 1 am. A concerned citizen called the police. Gallup Police Department Officer John Gonzalez was dispatched to the scene. T h e suspect, Donavon Tsosie, 30, was found inside the lobby, drunk. The officer managed to place him in the back of his squad car, at which point, Tsosie began punching the inside of the vehicle. He was placed in handcuffs to restrain him, and was transported to McKinley County Adult Detention Center. There was already an outstanding warrant for his arrest, COMMUNITY

know there a r e s er ie s completists out t her e , because t h e y ’r e of fer i n g a Collector’s Ed ition of t he follow-up, Robocop 2 (1990). This Blu-ray features all sorts of new features never before seen. They include a 2K scan of the movie, two audio commentaries, as well as numerous featurettes with interviews and behind-the-scenes footage. They’ve also included publicity materials for the movie. As if that wasn’t enough, you can also pick up a Collector’s Edition of Robocop 3 (1993). Again, it comes with two new commentaries and several newly created bonus features on the production as well as trailers and ads. To be brutally honest, neither of these sequels come close to matching the brilliance of the original, but at least you can now own them all on Blu-ray with the best possible picture, sound and bonus features. Criterion have a personal favorite arriving on Blu-ray. Being There (1979) from director Hal Ashby (Harold and Maude) stars the incomparable Peter Sellers as a slow-witted gardener who accidentally finds himself wandering into high society. Soon, his every word on horticulture is misinterpreted as metaphor by the power players around him and he quickly rises within the ranks of the Washington political scene. It’s an incredible

comedy with a hint of melancholy at the state of the world that is well worth any cinema fan’s time. Besides an incredible new 4K transfer, this release includes a bevy of extras like a documentary on the making of the film, promo interviews from its original release, deleted scenes, outtakes, the original ending and many other bonuses. I’ll definitely be picking this one up. They also have Multiple Maniacs (1970), the second feature from quirky director John Waters (Pink Flamingos, Hairspray, Cry-Baby, Serial Mom). This one ha s a lso received a 4K transfer so one can enjoys its... well.. grosser elements with the sharpest image possible. It also includes a new commentary with Waters and interviews with several of the surviving cast members among other extras. Kino are also putting out some fascinating titles on Bluray. They have the hard-to-find Chamber of Horrors (1966), about a one-handed maniac who uses detachable devices on the end of his wrist to attack his victims. A Game of Death (1945) is yet another adaptation of the popular story, The Most Dangerous Game, in which a wealthy madman hunts a human on his isolated island. A Great Wall (1986) aka The Great Wall is A Great Wall is a well-regarded comedy about a computer programmer who gets passed up for a promotion. In frustration, he takes his family to mainland China to visit relatives, leading to a culture clash. Bela Lugosi fans can now own Invisible

Ghost (1941) on Blu-ray, which features the actor as a man driven to kill after seeing his dead wife outside his window. Interestingly, Kino also have the Alfred Hitchcock thriller Lifeboat (1944) about a group stranded at sea on a lifeboat and of course, one of them is a murderer. K i n o appea r to have put some extra effor t i nto their release of the cult 80s f lick, Tee n Witch (1989). It’s about an outcast high school student who is granted magical powers and attempts to use them to gain popularity at school. The Bluray comes with a commentary track featuring the star, as well as numerous lengthy interviews with cast members and a theatrical trailer. If you’re a fan of the feature, you’ll be happy with this release. Finally, Warner Archive are making some out-of-print titles available once again on DVD via special order through their website. This includes the effective Australian chiller Dead Calm (1988), which stars Sam Neill and a very young Nicole Kidman and a couple on a boat who are targeted by a psychopath. You can also buy some “bad movie night” with the horrendous When Time Ran Out... (1980). It’s an Irwin Allen disaster flick about a Hawaiian volcano that erupts, putting the lives of characters played by Paul Newman, Jacqueline Bisset, Red Buttons, Pat Mor it a a nd Bu r ge s s

for failure to pay fines.

USED CAR | FROM PAGE 10

Kozeliski noted that another issue with everything was the access and utility easement behind the chamber building. “They want to park vehicles there as well,” Kozeliski said. “That is not allowed. The problem is that the chamber of commerce sub-divided the property in 2001 and made this lot subject to access easements. They then sold the lot, so the property is subject to a lot of easements,” one of which is where the city has a sewer line, Kozeliski said. Kozeliski continued, “The city owns everything to the east which is part of the old train station that is subject to a number of restrictions because of the funding used and the agreements the city made when the train station was remodeled

NOT A SUGGESTION 3/5, GALLUP Benjoe Cayaditto ran afoul of the law when he made contact with a female with an order re s t r ic t i n g him from being near her. Cayaditto cooperated with GPD Officer Clarissa Morgan, who was sent to a residence, where he was found. It was the victim’s home, at 517 S. Clark St. He stated to officers that “he was just arguing with his wife.” He was arrested and transported to jail for violation of a restraining order.

close an existing frozen yogurt business, and keep an Indian jewelry trade shop. Councilor Linda Garcia asked Abusufiah if the yogurt and jewelry businesses would continue alongside the used car sales. “Would the other businesses continue with the car sales?” Garcia asked. “How many employees would you have?” Abusufiah said the jewelry business would most likely stay, but the frozen yogurt side of the operation would go. He said the businesses already up and employs three people, mostly family members, but more regular employees would be added once the car lot opened.

Meredith in danger. It’s really, really, really bad but might provide some yuks to people in the right frame of mind.

YOU KNOW, FOR KIDS! Here are some titles that small fry may enjoy. Batman: The Brave and the Bold: Season 3 (Warner Archive Blu-ray) Pokemon the Movie 19: Volcanion and the Mechanical Marvel Sing Teenage Mutant Ninja T ur t l e s: Supe r S hred d e r (Nickelodeon)

ON THE TUBE! A nd here a re t he T V releases for the week. Batman: The Brave and the Bold: Season 3 (Warner Archive Blu-ray) The Brokenwood Mysteries: Series 3 Death Valley Days: Season 3 Frontline: Exodus (PBS) Independent Lens: Birth of a Movement (PBS) Insecure: Season 1 Master of None: Season 1 Military Medicine: Beyond the Battlefield (PBS) Newsreaders: Season 1 (Warner Archive) NOVA: Ultimate Cruise Ship (PBS) People Just Do Nothing: Complete Seasons 1-3 T he Untouchables: The Complet e Col lec t ion (42 Episodes of 1993-1994 Series) When Calls the Heart: The Heart of Faith (Hallmark) Wolf Creek: Season 1 about 20-25 years ago. We cannot sell. The chamber of commerce wanted to buy the same parking lot years ago and we could not sell it to them.” St r ipp lef t t he publ ic hearing abruptly alongside Abusufiah and some family members that spoke during the public hearing. He did not say if he’d take the matter to District Court, but Stripp has a reputation as being an attorney for the people. “District Court can hear the case de novo, just like the city council did,” Kozeliski said. “(Mr. Stripp) can only go to District Court now and appeal the council’s decision.” As of press time, there was no record showing that Abusufiah had file an appeal in District Court.

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2017

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High School Sports Scoreboard

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Bowers Levier. The Court at that time shall determine that the duly appointed, qualified and acting administrator has fulfilled the duties assigned; the heirs be determined; the Estate be assigned to the persons entitled thereto; the costs be determined and ordered paid; the administration of the Estate be closed and the administrator, Delaine Levier be finally discharged and released from further liability of the Estate of Jay Bowers Levier. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto affixed my official signature and seal of the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation District Court this 17th day of March 2017. _____________/S/___________ ___________ Corinne Lange, Judicial Administrator PBPN District Court 11444 158th Road Mayetta, KS 66509 866 966 2242

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IN THE PRAIRIE BAND POTAWATOMI NATION DISTRICT COURT POTAWATOMI RESERVATION MAYETTA, KANSAS IN RE ESTATE OF: ) ) Case No 2016-PB-0009-PT JAY BOWERS LEVIER ) DOB 05/07/1975 ) Decedent. )

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$5 PER WEEK FOR EACH ITEM: TEXT BOX, HIGHLIGHT, ALL CAPS, PIC/LOGO GALLUP BENGALS Varsity Baseball (1-8) 3/18: Gallup @ Los Lunas 1-18 3/16: Laguna Acoma @ Gallup 2-10 3/11: Kirtland @ Gallup 9-1 Varsity Softball (3-3) 3/14: Shiprock @ Gallup 5-19 Shiprock @ Gallup 10-17 3/11: Santa Fe @ Gallup 2-17 MIYAMURA PATRIOTS Varsity Baseball (5-6) 3/18: Miyamura @ Clovis 1-9 3/17: Miyamura @ Goddard 0-10 3/16: Navajo Pine @ Miyamura 0-16 Silver @ Miyamura 2-3 REHOBOTH CHRISTIAN LYNX Varsity Softball (2-1) 3/18: Capital vs. Rehoboth 5-12

JILL COHN | FROM PAGE 17 economic inequality. The songs “Honey Dear” and “Missouri” from “Heartstrings” inspired Roanhorse to tap her toes and move her head up and down to Cohn’s coffee shoplike beat. “I think she is a pure folk singer,” Jacqueline O’Mara, 45, of Gallup said. “It fits right in at a coffee shop atmosphere or small indoor venue. It would even be appropriate in a book store.” Cohn’s music has shared the stage with superstars such as the Dave Matthews Band, Jewel, Cheryl Wheeler and Dave Bromberg, among others. In 2016, Cohn was a featured guest artist on Nebraska Public Radio and

3/18: Rehoboth vs. Santa Fe Indian 0-1 3/17: Rehoboth vs. Navajo Prep 8-3 WINGATE BEARS Varsity Baseball (2-3) 3/18: Questa @ Wingate 10-5 Navajo Prep vs. Wingate 13-0 3/17: Capital vs. Wingate 10-0 3/14: Navajo Pine @ Wingate 4-15 Navajo Pine @ Wingate 7-11 Scores and overall standings feature Gallup, Miyamura, Wingate, and Rehoboth high school varsity teams only, via maxpreps.com. Other high schools are welcome to submit scores and standings. Submit up-to-date varsity team scores/standings by Wednesday to: gallupsun@ gmail.com South Dakota Public Radio’s live broadcasts. “Heartstrings Touching Ground” was produced by the Grammy-award winning Malcolm Burn whose production credits include Bob Dylan and Daniel Lanois – the latter who has worked with rock mega-group U2 over the years. Gallup Library Director Mary Ellen Pellington said Cohn performed about a little more than a year ago at Fellin and was a hit with library patrons. She said she’ll look into possible future performances by Cohn at the el Morro Theatre, since people seem to like Cohn’s music. “The people that came out both times she was here really liked her, liked her music,” Pellington said. “(Jill Cohn) is a very good musician.”

22 Friday March 24, 2017 • Gallup Sun

EMAIL : GALLUPSUN@GMAIL.COM DUE: TUESDAYS 5 PM AD RUNS 4 WEEKS, UNLESS SPECIFIED GALLUP SUN ARCHIVES Need a past issue? $1.50 per copy. Note issue date and send check or M.O. to: Gallup Sun, PO Box 1212, Gallup, NM 87305. Subject to availability. HELP WANTED Installers needed for fiberglass insulation installation (residential & commercial). Piece work. Experience preferred, but will train. Valid NM DL, clean driving record a must. 401k matching available. Applications may be obtained and submitted in person at 1130 Bosque Farms Blvd., Bosque Farms, 87068 at 7 a.m. Monday - Friday. Preference given to Navajo candidates. YOUR BIZ HERE! Looking for some help? Why not put a shout out in the Sun! First 25 words are FREE! Email it on over to: gallupsun@gmail.com HOMES FOR SALE Want a getaway! Cabin for sale in the Zuni mountains 20 minutes from Grants, NM 1.5 acres, $78k 505-240-2112 Newly renovated, 5 BR, 2 BA. Huge fenced backyard. 1412 S. Cliff, $182,500 Homeowner Financing available. Call 505870-7754 PLACE YOUR REAL ESTATE AD HERE! FIRST 25 WORDS FREE. LOGO and/or PHOTO $5 EACH. APPEARS ON GALLUPSUN.COM FOR FREE! EMAIL: gallupsun@gmail.com CALL: 505-728-1640 HOMES FOR RENT Small two bedroom unfurnished house for rent One year lease required. No pets. Call 863-4294 before 7 pm for

information. 2 & 3 BR MH’s with washer/ dryer for rent. $570 to $670 plus deposit. Credit Check and Police Check. Quiet and safe. White Cliffs, 4 miles east of Gallup; Call Carmelita 505870-4095

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND ALL PERSONS CONCERNED ON HEARING FOR FINAL SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE OF JAY BOWERS LEVIER YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the last date for filing claims against the Estate of Jay Bowers Levier shall be May 10, 2017. Claims of creditors shall be filed in duplicate to the court and shall be itemized correctly and in full, shall be signed under oath by claimant, and shall make investigation of its validity. Untimely claims shall not be approved for payment from the estate. YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that a final settlement hearing and determination of heirship shall be held on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 1:00 p.m., on the Estate of Jay

Mobile Home Spaces – Single wide – any size $205/mo. Double Wide $260/mo. Call Mike 505-870-3430 or Carmelita 505870-4095. SERVICES Need non medical transport? We provide low cost transport within Four Corners area. For more info please call 505-7136628 We provide all cleaning services at very affordable prices. Move in / move out; commercial /residential. Call: 505-713-6628 VEHICLE SALES FOR SALE BY OWNER: 2014 Toyota Prius V, very good condition, 36,000 miles. Must sell, leaving country. $14,000. Clean Title. Call/Text 505-339-7487

MAIL DELIVERY 1 year subscription. Send check for $59.95 to:

Gallup Sun Publishing PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305

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COMMUNITY CALENDAR MARCH 24 - 30, 2017 FRIDAY March 24 FREE COMPUTER CLASSES IN MARCH! 10:30 am -12:30 pm, Job Search with Technology: The library is offering free computer training throughout the month. Class size is limited to 10 participants per session. Registration is required, (505) 863-1291 or email libtrain@ gallupnm.gov or visit the front desk of the library. Octavia Fellin Public Library, 115 W. Hill Ave. GET UP AND GAME (ALL AGES) Join us for family-friendly video games every Friday afternoon. 4 pm at the Children’s Branch, 200 W. Aztec Ave. SATURDAY March 25 NO URANIUM MINING RALLY AND SUPPORT GATHERING Noon to 4 pm: rally and support gathering for NoDAPL, No Uranium Mining in Church Rock and Crownpoint, Stand for Indigenous Rights at the Gallup Cultural Center. Bring your signs, banners, posters, and prayers. 201 E. Hwy. 66 OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Overeater’s Anonymous 12step meetings. Held every Sunday at 6 to 7 pm at the Hozho Center, 216 W. Maloney Ave. Open to anybody who has a desire to stop compulsive eating. Contact info. (505) 307-5999, (505) 721-9208, or (505) 870-1483. SUNDAY March 26 FARMWORKER OPPORTUNITY PROGRAMS LONG-SLEEVED SHIRT DRIVE Help New Mexico, a nonprofit dedicated to creating self-sufficiency and promoting economic opportunities to strengthen families throughout the state, will be working directly with communities to spread awareness about AFOP’s drive and about National Farmworker Awareness Week, also taking place from March 26-31. Drop off at 601 West Aztec Ave. CHURCH OF THE HOLY SPIRIT Join us for the Holy Eucharist at 10:30 am. For more information, please call (505) 863-4695. Location: 1334 S. Country Club Dr. TUESDAY March 28 MAKER’S CLUB (AGES 6 AND UP) A club for kids interested in science, math, building, and inventing. Each week features a different challenge, project, or experiment. Starts: 4 pm. Children’s Branch, 200 W. Aztec Ave. This week: Binary CALENDAR

Decoding HERSTORY MONTH FILM SERIES 3:30 – 6 pm in the UNM_G Zollinger Library Conference Room, Iron-Jawed Angels. UNM-Gallup, 705 Gurley Ave. (505) 863-7500 WEDNESDAY March 29 TODDLER TIME (AGES 2 TO 4) An active and energetic program for toddlers, featuring music, movement, rhymes, and stories. Starts: 10:30 am. Children’s Branch, 200 W. Aztec Ave. Free WOMEN’S RESOURCE FAIR AND OPEN-MIC READ-OUT Additional presentations by Planned Parenthood and Indian Health Services. Noon – 4 pm in Gurley Hall Commons, UNM-Gallup, 705 Gurley Ave. (505) 863-7500 MARCH FILM SERIES: GIRL POWER 5:30 pm: popcorn is provided. This month celebrates women’s history month, honoring trailblazing women. Octavia Fellin Public Library, 115 W. Hill Ave. Film: Frida THURSDAY March 30 CRAFTY KIDS (ALL AGES) Fun crafts for the whole family. Starts at 4 pm. Children’s Branch, 200 W. Aztec Ave. This week: Pool-noodle poodle sculptures MONTHLY MEETING WITH COUNCILOR LINDA GARCIA 6:30 pm: The District 1 councilor will be there to listen to concerns. Complaints and compliments welcome. Call Linda at (505) 879-4176 with questions. Northside Senior Center, 607 N. Fourth St. ONGOING ARTSCRAWL ArtsCrawl is held the second Saturday of every month from 7 to 9 pm, downtown Gallup. BABY AND YOU Rehoboth McKinley Christian Health Care Services is offering childbirth education classes the first Saturday of the month beginning Jan. 7. Classes are from 9 am to 1 pm in the RMCH library, second floor. Classes are free. For more information, call Women’s Health unit at (505) 863-7026. CITY OF GALLUP’S SUSTAINABLE GALLUP BOARD Meets on first Monday each month from 3:30 to 5 pm at the Octavia Fellin Library. Community members concerned about conservation, energy, water, recycling and other environmental issues

CALENDAR

are welcome. Call (505) 7220039 for information. COMMUNITY PANTRY The Hope Garden offers organic produce for sale from 10 am - noon, Tue – Fri., 1130 E. Hassler Valley Road. All funds go to helping feed local folks. Call (505) 726-8068 or when visiting, ask for Vernon Garcia. FRIDAY NIGHT HOOTENANNY Gallup’s longest-running live show! Every Friday night from 7 - 9 pm. Camille’s Sidewalk Cafe, 306 S. Second St. GALLUP-MCKINLEY COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY Wednesdays are low-cost Spay and Neuter Days, at the Gallup-McKinley County Humane Society. For more information, please call (505) 863-2616, or email: gmchumanesociety@gmail.com. Location: 1315 Hamilton Rd. GALLUP SOLAR The nonprofit, Gallup Solar, is hosting free Solar 101 classes about all things related to off-grid solar systems on the first three Wednesdays of each month, 6 - 7 pm, at 113 E. Logan Ave. All welcome any week. No registration required. For info call: (505) 728-9246. GALLUP SOLAR Gallup Solar is hosting free classes about all things solar Wednesdays from 6 – 8 pm at 113 E. Logan. Call (505) 7289246 for info on topics and directions. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY  Habitat for Humanity yard sales are held every Saturday, 9 am – noon on Warehouse Lane, weather permitting. Volunteers wishing to serve on construction projects may sign up there or call (505) 722-4226. OPEN-MIC NIGHT Wednesdays: Local talent takes center stage from 7:30 - 9:30 pm at Coal Street Pub, 303 W. Coal Ave. (505) 7220117. RECYCLING COUNCIL McKinley Citizens Recycling Council is a local nonprofit working to increase recycling through education, community outreach, and partnership with local government agencies. MCRC meets the first Saturday of the month at 2 pm, at Red Mesa on Hill St. For more information, please call (505) 722-5142 or visit Recylegallup.org. SUPPORT EARLY LANGUAGE AND LITERACY FOR SCHOOL SUCCESS! Gallup McKinley County

Schools is currently recruiting pregnant women and teens in McKinley County with children from birth to 5 years of age. There are no income guidelines and services are free to ALL community members. Learn more about this opportunity by contacting BeBe Sarmiento at (505) 721-1055. SAVE THE DATE CPE MURAL CONTEST Crownpoint Elementary School’s ready to put a personal touch on the walls. Help them make the school fantastic! Entries must be submitted by March 31 to the school office. For entry guidelines and info, tfraizer@gmcs.k12. nm.us. MCKINLEY CITIZENS’ RECYCLING COUNCIL MEETING April 1, 2 pm: The public is encouraged to attend to learn about recycling opportunities in our region, updates on residential Gallup curbside recycling, the April 15 Trashion Show, plans for recycling outreach and more. For more information, call Gerald / Millie (505) 722-5141 or Linda  (505) 905-5966. Red Mesa Center, 105 W. Hill Ave. FREE COMPUTER CLASSES IN APRIL! The library is offering free computer training throughout the month. Class size is limited to 10 participants per session. Registration is required, (505) 863-1291 or email libtrain@gallupnm.gov or visit the front desk of the library. Introduction to Computer Skills, April 1, 2 – 4 pm; Introduction to the Internet, April 11, 3-5 pm; MS Word for Beginners, April 14, 10:30 am-12:30 pm; Internet II, April 18, 3- 5 pm; MS Word Intermediate Course, April 21, 10:30 am – 12:30 pm; Advanced Facebook, April 25, 3 - 5 pm; PowerPoint for Beginners, April 28, 10:30 am – 12:30 pm. Octavia Fellin Public Library, 115 W. Hill Ave. MAKERS CLUB (AGES 6 AND UP) Tuesdays at 4 pm: For children interested in building, creating and mess-making. Every features a different project or experiment related to science math or engineering. April 4, Color Changing Slime; April 11, Magnet Madness; April 18, Lego Challenge; April 25, Paper Engineering. Children’s Branch, 200 W. Aztec Ave APRIL FILM SERIES: BASED ON A TRUE STORY Wednesdays at 5:30 pm, pop-

corn provided. April 5: Sully; Apr. 12: Deepwater Horizon; April 19: War Dogs; April 26: The Social Network. Octavia Fellin Public Library, 115 W. Hill Ave. CRAFTY KIDS (ALL AGES) FAMILYFRIENDLY CRAFTS FOR ALL SKILL LEVELS. Thursdays at 4 pm: April 6, Craft Stick Spring Garden; April 13, No-Sew Sock Bunny; April 20, Toilet Paper Roll Bird Feeder; April 27, Lunchsack Animal Puppet. Children’s Branch, 200 W. Aztec Ave. 2017 GALLUP AUTHORS FESTIVAL: “UNITY THROUGH DIVERSITY” April 7, 6 pm and April 8, 4 pm. This year’s festival will host 38 southwest authors, including Simon Ortiz, Jason Yurcic, Laura Tohe, CB McKenzie, Mark Rudd and Jessica Helen Lopez. Authors will be available throughout the festival to discuss their works and sign books. Octavia Fellin Public Library, 115 W. Hill Ave. UNM-G COLLEGE SEMINAR 3 - 4 pm, April 20; 10:30 - 11:30 am, May 12: Learn time management, self-awareness, self motivation, effective study skills and beyond. Call (505) 863-7706, UNM-Gallup, 705 Gurley Ave. NEW REHOBOTH HIGH SCHOOL GROUNDBREAKING On May 8, the school officially breaks ground and dedicates the building project to God. (505) 863-4412, rcsnmorg. 5TH ANNUAL TEEN FILM FESTIVAL: THROUGH THE LENS Octavia Fellin Public Library will hold its annual Teen Film Festival at El Morro Theatre on April 29. Submissions are to be no more than 7 minutes and are due April 1. For more information call (505) 726-6120 or e-mail childlib@ gallupnm.gov. NATIONAL SEAL OF BILINGUAL PROFICIENCY TEST Oct. 7, and Nov. 4: There’s no fee to take this proficiency assessment for graduating high school. High school seniors may participate in the Navajo Nation Bilingual Proficiency test held at the Department of Dine Education Building, Window Rock, Ariz. Call (928) 871-7660 for more info. Navajonationdode.org. To post a nonprofit or civic event in the calendar section, please email: gallupsunevents@gmail.com or fax: (505) 212-0391. Deadline: Monday at 5 pm.

Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2017

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Gallup Sun • Friday March 24, 2017  
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