Page 1

FREE TAKE ONE!

Navajo Veterinarian Program.8

Mad Max Delivers. 19

VOL 1 | ISSUE 6 | MAY 15, 2015

Faces of Rescue Community members saving lives See pages 3 & 6


WNMU-GALLUP SUMMER 2015 Course Schedule

Course Cancella on: The university reserves the right to cancel course not selected by an adequate or not suitably staff by qualified faculty

CRN

CODE

COURSE TITLE

30292 EDUC534 Integration of Technology into Curriculum

DATES

TIMES

CR

INSTRUCTOR

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Dr. Manuel Bustamante

RM

MA-EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 30317 EDL525

Education in a Pluralistic Society

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Dr. Alexandra Neves

30475 EDL526

Education Leadership Public Domain

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Isaac Brundage

30474 EDL561

School Finance and Budgeting

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

STAFF

30235 COUN532 Program Development and Management

6/1 to 6/30/2015

T,W,R

5:30pm - 9:15pm

3

Lynnette Cuellar

30505 COUN578 Topics In Counseling

6/1 to 8/4/2015

M

5:30pm - 9:15pm

3

Staff

ITV-B

30506 COUN527 Assessment of the Individual

7/6 to 8/4/2015

T,W,R

5:30pm - 9:00pm

3

Staff

ITV-B

MA-COUNSELING D

MAT-TEACHING ELEMENTARY/SECONDARY EDUCATION 30105 EDUC503 Action Research

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Dr. Barbara Taylor

30104 EDUC574 Classroom Assessment

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Dr. Margarita Wulftange

3

Roberta Marquez

MAT-TEACHING ELEMENTARY/SECONDARYEDUCATIONWITH TESOL OR BILLINGUAL ENDORSEMENT See online course schedule for all TESOL/BLED courses at http://www.wnmu.edu > class schedule > online anywhere

MAT-TEACHING SPECIAL EDUCATION 30309 SPED508

Introduction to Exceptional Children

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

30252 SPED454

Evaluation & Assessment Exceptional Children

7/6 to 8/4/2015

M,T,W,R

3:30pm-5:50pm

3

Mary Lindenmyer

C

30253 SPED554

Evaluation & Assessment Exceptional Children

7/6 to 8/4/2015

M,T,W,R

3:30pm-5:50pm

3

Mary Lindenmyer

C

30464 CJUS480

WKSP: NM Search and Seizure Law

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Curtis Hayes

30033 CJUS481

SL: Internship in Criminal Justice

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Curtis Hayes

30327 CJUS581

Internship in Criminal Justice

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Curtis Hayes

30131 SWK101

Introduction to Social Welfare and Social Work

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Louise Ortega

30485 SWK102

Ethics in SWK/Human Services

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Becky Brandsberg-Herrera

30484 SWK300

Human Behavior and the Social Environment I

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Eric Moore

30132 SWK320

Diversity in Social Work Practice

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Jeanine Jones

30287 SWK406

Social Work In School Setting

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Leslie Cook

30419 SWK491

Social Work Field Placement Seminar I

6/1 to 8/4/2015

M

30136 SWK492

Social Work Field Placement I

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

BAS-CRIMINAL JUSTICE

BSW-SOCIAL WORK

4:00pm to 5:00pm

1

Eric Moore

6

Eric Moore

ITV-A

30417 SWK498

Social Work Field Placement Seminar II

6/1 to 8/4/2015

M

1

Eric Moore

30138 SWK499

Social Work Field Placement II

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

6

Eric Moore

30133 SWK501

Cultural Competency in SWK Practice

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Jeanine Jones

30298 SWK506

Social Work In School Setting

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Rachael Richter

30486 SWK511

Generalist Social Work Practice

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Rachael Richter

30487 SWK610

Administration/Supervision

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Rachael Richter

30391 SWK581

Foundation Field Practicum

6/1 to 8/4/2015

T

4:00pm-5:00pm

3

Leslie Cook

ITV-A

30396 SWK582

Foundation Field Practicum II

6/1 to 8/4/2015

T

4:00pm-5:00pm

ITV-A

30488 SWK651

SWK Clinical Intervention Assessment

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

5:00pm to 6:00pm

ITV-A

MSW-SOCIAL WORK

6

Leslie Cook

3

Patricia West-Okiri

30420 SWK681

Advanced Field Practicum I

6/1 to 8/4/2015

W

5:00pm-6:00pm

1

Staff

ITV-A

30422 SWK682

Advanced Field Practicum II

6/1 to 8/4/2015

W

5:00pm-6:00pm

6

Staff

ITV-A

30489 SWK630

Rural Social Welfare Policy

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Eric Moore

30496 SWK510

Human Behavior or Social Environment

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Louise Ortega

30134 SWK520

Understanding Rural Community

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Rachael Richter

30492 SWK540

Foundations of Research Methods

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Dr. Beth Walker

30494 SWK580

WKSP: Advance School SWK Practice

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Leslie Cook

30339 SWK621

Rural Community Organization and Development

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Patricia West-Okiri

Western New Mexico University – Gallup 2055 State Road 602, Gallup, NM 87301 (505) 722-3389 ggsc.wnmu.edu 2

Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup Sun

NEWS


NEWS Partnering saves lives: Rez Dawg a lifeline to Gallup’s unwanted pets Rachael Merilatt Sun Correspondent

T

he Gallup-McKinley Cou nt y Hu ma ne Society is in a class of its own. Not only does it serve the entire west central New Mexico community, it’s the only shelter in the area. Responsible for everything from receiving animals in Gallup and the surrounding areas to proving low cost spay and neuter clinics up to three times a week, things can get pretty hectic. K r i s Gr uda , t ra n spor t coordinator and foster for the shelter, has been with the organization for three years. She explained that while the animals receive proper care once they come into the facility, such as being vaccinated, assessed for adoption suitability and spayed or neutered, space is often limited.

Fostering and adoption is a crucial part of not only GMHS’s ability to care for new rescues who need treatment, but animals who are ready for adoption. Sadly, if the pets are not able to be fostered, adopted or taken by a rescue organization, they are euthanized. “That’s the hardest part, not being able to save all of them,” Gruda said. One positive is that the save rate has steadily increased over the past few years, which shows promise. The assistance of a rescue organization can make a huge impact. A prime example is Tuffy, an injured dog who the community had trouble bringing in for treatment. When he was finally brought in, the injury was much worse than originally thought. “His leg was in terrible shape with a wire wrapped so tightly that it had cut through

the skin and tissue, almost to the bone,” she said. Unfortunately, Tuffy had to have one of his legs amputated from the injury. An Arizonabased rescue organization took him in, and he was eventually adopted. For this reason, the the shelter has implemented a transpor t program, which works with several rescue organizations to find the animals at GMHS homes in other cities and states, including Albuquerque, Colorado, Utah and Arizona. “There are many more lives saved with this program,” Gruda said. It also creates vacancies for more rescued pets to be housed in the humane society’s facilities. One such orga nization is Rez Dawg Rescue, Inc. in Colorado. Founded by Angela Cerci, a former New Mexico r e s ide nt , t he no n - pr of it

Gallup-McKinley County Humane Society’s 2014 Statistics: GMHS performed more than one thousand spays and news for low income pet owners.

organization provides transport services, medical care, adoption services, free and low-cost spay/neuter services and education programs.

Rez Dawg provides transports to Colorado for shelter

UNWANTED PETS | SEE PAGE 7

In a last minute decision, Popper was chosen to ride out on the May 1 Rez Dawg transport to Colorado. Thirty lucky dogs and pups made the trek. Tuffy was rescued by the Gallup-McKinley County Humane Society and adopted in Arizona.

NEWS

Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015

3


City selects skateboard park location By Babette Herrmann Sun Editor

I

f you travel downtown enough these days, you’ll spot them here and there, skateboarders jumping off concrete curbs with precision, and spinning in circles with seeming confidence. While still in the early planning stages, local skateboarders will get a concrete playground of their own, in the east parking lot of the Gallup Cultural Center. City Councilors were presented with three possible locations and voted in favor of the downtown location May 12. It was with some persuasion, a generous $50,000 pledge from William McCarthy, CEO of Southwest Indian Foundation. The city has about $10,000 in funds, a nd Rep. Patt y Lundstrom secured $40,000 for the park during the 2014 legislative session. And the generosity didn’t end there. During the announcement phase of the city council meeting, Councilor Yogash Kumar,

pledged another $5,000, bringing the total earmarked for the project, up to $105,000. The park even has the blessings of the Business Improvement Distr ict. Local business owner Louis

park could even host regional skateboard competition, which “would be a very positive step.” A not her locat ion considered was Ford Drive and Montoya Intersection, at the west end of “We the People Park.” Locations near the Larry Bryan Mitchell and Harold Runnels Recreation Complex were also on the radar.

Young skateboarders, who declined to give their names, at Gallup Skate Park, north of Gallup Fitness Center.

Bonaguidi lauded the site. “This site is highly visible,” he said. “Skateboarders tend to gravitate downtown.” BID Executive Director Francis Bee said the skate

The parking lot, east of the Cultural Center, is getting a skateboard park. Photo Credit: David Tom

Discover the

Credit Union

Difference!

Tse Bonito Branch Now Open 1584 Highway 264 Tse Bonito, NM 87301

Lobby Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 8:30am - 5pm Wednesday 9:30am - 5pm Friday 8:30am - 6pm Saturday 9am- 2pm

Drive Thru Hours Monday- Thursday 7am - 5pm Friday 7am - 6pm Saturday 9am- 2pm

firstamerican.org (800) 759-9442

4

Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup Sun

Federally Insured by NCUA

Adult Detention Center faces funding shortfall By Babette Herrmann Sun Editor

T

he Bureau of Indian Affairs decision to send pr i soner s to Yu ma , A Z i nstead of McKinley County Adult Detention Center has left the city and McKinley County in a projected financial bind moving into fiscal year 2016. McKinley County Finance Director Sara Keeler presented the news to the City Council May 12. She said the total deficit is about $1.3 million. And the city’s share is 30 percent of the deficit, which equates to more tha n $3 million. “This is a disaster,” said Mayor Jackie McKinney. County Manager Bill Lee said the jail houses an average of 180 to 190 inmates per day and has a capacity to hold 326. There’s no extra compensation for housing inmates from the area, but contracts can bring in extra money to help offset the $80 it cost to care for inmates. Councilors discussed the possibility of introducing diversion programs to cutting back on jail staff. Councilor Allan Landavazo questioned the future of the facility. “At what point do we drop to before we say it’s not affordable anymore?” E ve n C ou nc i lor F r a n

Palochak expressed doubt about the jail’s sustainability. “Maybe this is a business we cannot sustain,” she said.

County Manager Bill Lee

There were no clear answers, except to explore other avenues. Lee had said the motivating factor for BIA moving their inmates to Yuma is the rehabilitation programs they offer to inmates. “That request to visit and learn about the facility was denied,” Lee said. But, he explained that the Yuma jail offers anger management, 12-step meetings, counseling and job training so the inmates can go straight into a job upon release from jail. Another revenue enhancing concept was to bring in and house high-risk offenders. Lee sa id t hat t he Ja i l Authority Board doesn’t want to accept dangerous inmates to the area. Meanwhile, the county will explore other options to draw in revenue.

Gallup looking to beautify I-40 interchanges By Babette Herrmann Sun Editor

T

o improve the lackluster entry and exit into Gallup from Interstate 40, the City Council is developing a master plan to beautify the area. Plans involve landscaping the four I-40 interchanges that run through town. MRW M La ndscape Architect drew up some plans that take advantage of existing native grass and add rock, stone features and bosque paintings intended to connect

with the multicultural demographic that comprises of Gallup. It’s in the early planning stages. But the overall concept would be similar to the interstate landscaping program between the New Mexico Department of Transportation and the city of Albuquerque. Councilors gave mostly positive feedback on the designs, and next on the agenda would be to seek public input. Once a master plan is created, city officials can submit it to NMDOT for partnership consideration. NEWS


No deal on capital outlay, Speaker says By Matthew Reichbach NM Political Report

H

ouse Republicans say there is no deal for a special session, despite reports to the contrary, leaving millions of dollars of capital outlay projects in limbo. Senate Democrats agreed to what why called a compromise deal May 7. The following morning, Speaker of the House Don Tripp issued a statement saying that there was no deal. “It is stunning that the Senate Democrat s wou ld publicly tr umpet ‘mission The deal is off for a legislative special session in Santa Fe. Photo Credit: Courtesy

Gallup Sun Publishing, LLC Publisher/Editor Babette Herrmann Correspondents Kim Gaona Tom Hartsock Melinda Sanchez Marley Shebala Rachael Merilatt Design David Tsigelman The Gallup Sun, published Fridays, is not responsible or liable for any claims or offerings, nor responsible for availability of products advertised. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305 www.gallupsun.com Find us on Facebook and Twitter Phone: (505) 728-1640 Fax: (505) 212-0391 gallupsun@gmail.com Letter to the editor/guest column ACCEPTED BY EMAIL ONLY. State full name and city/town. No pen names. ID required. All submissions subjected to editor’s approval. Guest columnists, email Sun for submission requirements.

NEWS

accomplished’ on a capital outlay deal by agreeing to their own proposal when no one else even knows the details of the proposal,” Tripp said in the statement. “It’s unfortunate that the Senate Democrats would rather govern by press releases than engage in good faith negotiations with the House and the Executive. We’ve been engaged from the beginning in efforts to compromise, but agreements must be agreed to by all parties.” “The House continues to be interested in discussing ways to reach a compromise with the Senate which requires negotiations in good faith by all parties,” Tripp continued. M a jor it y L e a der Na t e Gentry, R-Albuquerque, sent a

mocking tweet. An email and call to a spokesman for the governor in the prospective deal were not answered on Friday morning. Senate Democrats

announced they approved of a compromise deal. “The package was developed a s a resu lt of discussions with the Speaker of the House of Representatives,

and after listening to the needs of local communities, businesses, and tribal groups,” the statement read. It is the latest in a long line of accusations and acrimony between the two chambers. Gov. Susana Martinez said that she would call a special session if a deal was struck to fund capital outlay after it died in the 11th hour of the legislative session. The legislation passed the Senate without an opposing vote, but Democrats objected to a large amount of changes made by the House Ways and Means Committee. The House pa ssed the legislation on a party-line 36-32 vote with less than 20 minutes left in the session. The legislation failed to be heard in the Senate. Visit www.nmpoliticalreport.com

THANK YOU ADVERTISERS TravelCenters of America – 16 WNMU-Gallup – 2, 10, 17 M&S Shaved Ice – 1 First American Credit Union – 4 Gurley Motor Co. – 7 Thunderbird Supply Co. – 5 Butler’s Office Equipment & Supply – 9 Cowtown Feed & Livestock – 19 Richardson’s Trading – 16 Cocina de Dominguez – 6 Pee Wee’s Kitchen – 6 Coal Street Pub – 6 Rocket Cafe – 6 Sammy C’s – 6 Tip Top Nails – 17 Bill’s Reloading – 17

Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015

5


Shiprock couple committed to saving Navajo Nation dogs Rachael Merilatt Sun Correspondent

F

or Isadore “Izzy” and Yvon ne A lire, res cuing, fostering and transporting dogs are all part of being good community members. The couple began rescuing animals four years ago when they joined Shelby Davis, the director and creator of Soul Dog Rescue, whom they credit for being an integral part of controlling the stray pet population in the Four Corners area. These days, they devote a n i mpres sive a mou nt of their time rescuing and fostering stray dogs in the area for Soul Dog Rescue, some of whom may be injured or in poor shape. Any animals they find are immediately picked up and taken back to their farm in Shiprock where they a re fed, bathed, a nd vaccinated. Izzy and Yvonne work with a number of different organizations in the Four Corners area, including the La Plata County Humane Society in La

Helping to reduce the pet population: Soul Dog Rescue regularly schedules numerous spay and neuter clinics across the Navajo Nation. Photo Credit: Courtesy

Plata, Colo.; the Park Valley Shelter in Buena Vista, Colo.; Best Friends Animal Society in Kanab, UT; and several others. When it’s time for the foster dogs to be placed for adoption, Izzy and Yvonne transport them to their new temporary homes, which can be a lengthy commute. “There is a lot of drive time,” Yvonne shared. “It

really depends on where we need to go.” A n u n for tu nate pa r t of pet rescue is taking in dogs who are severely neglected or injured, which ca n lead t o u ncer t a i nt y r ega rd i n g their recover y. Izzy shared t he s t or y of A r w i n , who wa s fou nd emaciated a nd i nju red f rom a su spect ed snake bite.

“She was in a bad way,” he said. With regular feedings, comfortable surroundings and a newfound trust in people, not only did Arwin recover, but she is now a therapy dog. “That’s what [pet rescuing] is all about,” he said proudly. Nava jo nation’s Senior Animal Control Officer Stacey Daw expressed gratitude for all that Izzy and Yvonne do around the reservation to help control the stray dog population, including picking up animals that have been surrendered and can no longer be cared for. “It takes a very big heart to do this,” Daw said. “I really appreciate everything they do for me and the Animal Control department.” While the couple are committed to reducing the stray dog population on the reservation, they wholeheartedly believe that providing the community with information and resources can help to turn things around even more. “It starts with neutering and spaying,” Izzy insists. And while spaying and neutering services are costly — they can

This is a rescue from Many Farms shelter. She went to Best Friends with her litter of pups. She likes to smile.

run from $250-$300 — there are low-cost options available. Equally important are vaccinations, which are vital to

NATION DOGS | SEE PAGE 7

Dine Local

99

eac ¢ h Mon and bfor ric & T eans e ues Only !

Paying cash? ount! Receive a 5% disc

$1.25

A TOSTAD Tuesday

Cocina Dine aotminguez! de D We Serve Beer & Wine

1.50

$ nday TACO Mo

6

Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup Sun

«Locally Owned & Operated»

Cedar Hills Plaza 1648 S. 2nd St., Gallup, NM

Hwy 264 Route 12, Ste 16, Window Rock, AZ

(505) 863-9640

(928) 810-3777

NEWS


UNWANTED PETS | FROM PAGE 3 animals. They also send down regular donations to Gallup, including food, crates, leashes, toys and more. Gruda credits Cerci and the members of Rez Dawg with saving thousands of pets from the reservation and surrounding areas. Marisa Kim, a member of Rez Dawg Rescue, assists in the transport and rescue of animals. She shared that most of the animals are housed in Boulder, and there are guidelines in place for people interested in adopting the rescued animals. “Some people have a different idea than ours of what a pet owner should be,” Kim said. If the organization doesn’t think the animal will receive the proper attention and treatment it deserves, the adoption won’t be approved.

NATION DOGS | FROM PAGE 6 the well-being of all animals. Without it, dogs can suffer from a host of debilitating disease. “Parvo is very common in dogs,” Yvonne said. Parvo is a highly contagious viral infection that can cause vomiting, weight loss and lack of appetite. Dogs are also vulnerable to Distemper, a potentially fatal disease that has no cure but can be avoided

Back in New Mexico, Gruda believes that proper treatment and regular care for pets can

heavily reduce the number of stray pets in the area, with empha sis on spaying a nd

neutering. “Even though we may get 15 dogs fixed in one day, it only takes two mama

dogs to have litters that same day to undo all our efforts,” she said. GMHS put great effort into saving animals via rescue transports, spay/neuter clinics and adoption. But they also rely on the community to aid them in keeping things under control by getting their pets spayed and neutered. “ T he c ycle h a s t o be stopped, or the animals will continue to suffer because of it,” Gruda stressed. The shelter offers spay and neuter services for low income pet owners every Wednesday and some Saturdays, and are encouraged to call to set up an appointment for their pets. For more information on the Gallup-McKinley County Humane Society, visit www. galluphumanesociety.com or call (505) 863-2616. To learn more about Rez Dawg Rescue, v isit www. rezdawgrescue.org.

with regular vaccinations and checkups. Luckily, there are also affordable options for members of the public who cannot otherwise incur the costs. W hen a ske d wh a t t hey wa nted the com mu n it y t o k n o w, b o t h I z z y a n d Yv o n n e h a d t wo s i m p l e , ye t p owe r f u l s t a t e m e n t s to sha re: “If you see an animal in need, call somebody,” Yvonne urged. “You can call Soul Dog Rescue, Navajo Nation Animal

Control or your local rescue organization.” “ To me, it’s one of you r re spon sibi l it ie s a s a comm u n i t y m e m b e r ,” I z z y sa id. “ T h is is what we

choo se t o do t he help t he com mu n it y.” For more information on low-cost ser vices for cats and dogs, visit the Animal Protection of New Mexico

(ANMP) website at www.apnm. org. For information on Soul Dog Rescue, including how to volunteer and donate, visit www.souldog.org.

Cats get saved too. Sony was among the 26 cats that were transported to Colorado May 1. Photo Credit: Courtesy

Inspiring. From Every Angle. Award-winning design graces every 2015 Ford Fusion and rest assured that it is engineered to bring efficiency and stability to your journey.

701 W COAL AVE • GALLUP, NM 87301

[505] 722-6621 Puppies at the transfer point in Colorado, where we meet in Saguache, Colo. The Soul Dog van takes them the rest of the way. Photo Credit: Courtesy

NEWS

In House Financing • In House Insurance Many Other Financing Options Available Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015

7


Preventing tick borne diseases Story and Photos by Marley Shebala Sun Correspondent

T

SE BONITO, N.M. – As soon as Navajo Nation Veterinary and Livestock Program Director Glenda Davis got word about a positive human case of Bubonic Plague on the vast Navajo Reservation on May 13, she immediately contacted her Foreign Animal Disease Task Force. Davis explained that the task force was created in November 2011 in response to the high risk of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever on the reservation. She pointed to a “2015 Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Calendar” that the task force members developed and said that the members are all listed on the cover. The members are tribal veterinary and livestock program; the Navajo Epidemiology Center; the Navajo Health E duc a t ion P rog r a m ; t he Indian Community Health R e pr e s e nt a t i ve s; Nav a jo Depa r t ment of Re sou rce Enforcement Rangers; Navajo Env ironmental Protection A genc y; Nav a jo Hou si ng Authority, and the U.S. Indian Health Services. Davis explained that the plague comes from infected fleas, which are usually found on pra i r ie dogs, rabbit s, rodents and even cats. She noted that infected prairie dogs generally don’t live too long and that a warning sign of

Navajo Nation Veterinary and Livestock Program Director Glenda Davis said that services provided by the veterinary mobile unit or “Big Tess” are at a lower cost than the stationary veterinary clinics and include free rabies shots, licensing, health education, animal control, and spay and neutering.

plague infected prairie dogs is dead prairie dogs, which will be found near their barrows or homes. And so if anyone notices a “prairie dog die off”, he or she needs to report that to the Navajo Nation Fish and Wildlife Department, Davis advised. She said that the environmental health would be called in to test the fleas and to also do an insecticide treatment of the area to kill the fleas. After the test and based on the radius of the dead prairie dogs, environmental health workers will go to the nearby homes to check the people and pets, especially dogs, Davis said. She explained that dogs on the reservation are used to herd cattle and sheep and so there are times when they chase rabbits and dig up prairie dog holes.

checking on the residents and pets and providing quick kill flea and tick pet collars. There were no positive human cases of plague, she said. Davis emphasized that the plague in humans is treatable but the individual must be treated as soon as possible. The symptoms of plague in humans, which usually occur about two to six days after being bitten by an infected flea, are swelling or pain in the neck area, groin or armpit, headache, fever and possible nausea.

Pet owners need to make sure that their dogs and/or cats are free of ticks and fleas, which can easily be done by purchasing anti-flea and tick collars, shampoos and medication, she added. Dav is sa id that the vet er i n a r y a nd l ive s t ock pr og r a m i s s ue d it s 2 015 Nava jo Nation Veter i na r y Mo bi le Un it Wel l ne s s & Spay/ Neut er Schedu le, wh ich i nclude s a week ly well ness day that is held every Tuesday and includes vaccinations, dewor ming, education about tick

The pr ime goa l of the Foreign Animal Disease Task Force is to protect the people and so that’s why education about preventing foreign animal diseases is a priority, Davis said.

TRIBAL FAIR AND PLAGUE She recalled that a couple of years ago that a prairie dog die off was reported between St. Michaels and Fort Defiance and it was about two weeks before the annual Navajo Nation Fair in Window Rock. There wasn’t enough time to stop the fair and so the tribal veterinary and livestock program partnered with Indian Health Services and conducted an investigation, she said. Davis said the fleas tested positive for the plague and so staff went house to house NNVLP office specialist Meranda Laughter, 31, of Naschitti, N.M., said that after working for the NNVLP for more than three years, she’s decided to continue working and to go back to school to become a veterinary assistant technician, which she’ll earn at the end of June.

According to an April 7 news story published in the medicaldaily.com, public health officials reported that fleas collected in Picture Canyon, a popular hiking area that is northeast of Flagstaff, tested positive for the plague.

PLAGUE AND RMSF ALERT

Long time Navajo Nation Veterinary and Livestock Program senior extension agent Harold Blacksheep explained the importance of the proper care of horses, which includes their teeth. Blacksheep was assisting with x-rays of the horse’s left hoof at the NNVLP in Tse Bonito, N.M., on May 13, 2015.

8

Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup Sun

Dav is sa id that the reservation-wide plague alert will also include the Rocky Mou nt a i n Spot t ed Fever because it’s carried by ticks and the weather is getting warmer.

products, rabies and animal licensing, and first come first serve appointments for spay or neutering surgery. Some people buy over the counter anti-flea and tick treatments and so they need to understand that they must read the label because some treatments are only for dogs or cats or only for puppies or kittens, she explained. A nd Dav is said people need to understand that they need to protect themselves, especia lly their children,

BORNE DISEASES | SEE PAGE 10 NEWS


WEEKLY CRIME BLOTTER By Kimberly Gaona All citizens need to be watch i ng t hei r proper t y, especially their mailboxes as thieves are stealing checks from incoming and outgoing mail in order to rewrite them and cash them for larger amounts. Gallup Police Capt. Rick White said that this has been going on for several weeks now and they need the public’s help to catch the culprits. “Anybody who sees anyone tampering with mail needs to call the police,” he said. “They are going into mailboxes and altering checks, going into banks and attempting to cash them.” White said it would be a good idea for citizens to mail checks by going directly to the post office and not leave them in the mailbox. “Not only this crime, but car burglaries, residential burglaries, [the citizens] have got to be our eyes and ears out there for us,” White said. Any and all suspicious activity can be reported to Metro Dispatch at (505) 722-2231 or (505)722-2002. Emergency calls for service should always be directed to 911. Anyone with information on any unsolved crimes can report their knowledge to the Gallup Police Department Detectives at

(505) 863-9365 or Crimestoppers at (505) 722-6161 for anonymous tips and a possible reward.

EAST SIDE BUSINESS DISTRICT Cheya nne C h e s t e r, 21, Ga llup wa s arrested May 8 after it was repor ted that she pulled out a gun at Blue Spruce Lodge, “racked it a couple of times in front of them,” and pointed it at two males in the room with her. According to GPD Officer Chanelle Preston’s report, the 40 caliber Smith and Wesson was located in the backpack Chester was carrying. She was arrested for aggravated assault with use of a deadly weapon.

SOUTH SECOND STREET AREA GPD Officers responding to a domestic call on Marcy Lane found two females in a physical altercation. As with police calls sometimes do, the situation quickly changed from a domestic to an arrest on the third female who was found drinking and in charge of her three young children. Heather Williams was found to be too intoxicated to properly care for

her children by Officer Charles Steele and was arrested for abandonment of children (ages 5, 4 and 2).

WEST SIDE BUSINESS DISTRICT Margina Antonio, 49 of Lupton, Ariz.; Robertson Chee, 40, of Gallup; and Eugene Silversmith, 48 of Lupton, Ariz were charged with Drinking in Public in the area of El Dorado on West 66, they will have to appear in court to answer for the charges.

YAHTAHEY, N.M. McKinley County Sheriff’s Office was called to the area of Tso Drive to handle an assault. Deputies were told that a neighbor had threatened them with an ax. Deputy Lorenzo Guerrero met with the alleged assailant who was intoxicated but said that there was not an ax in his hand and that this is an ongoing neighbor dispute.

HASSLER VALLEY Gallup Police and McKinley County Sheriff’s Office located possible narcotics at the Juvenile Detention Center. The substance was described as a white crystal substance and the person(s) who brought the possible drugs into the facility are unknown.

WEEKLY DWI REPORT By Kimberly Gaona T i n a C a l a v a z a , 3 7, Gallup, N.M. Calavaza was arrested May 5 after a vehicle crash in the area of Day Street and West Highway 66. Ca lava za a d m it ted to d r i n k i ng 9 9 bananas and taking prescription medication. She was booked into the jail for DWI and for turning movements. C h e r y l B e g a y, 3 3 , Vanderwagon, N.M. B e g a y w a s s e e n by Ga l lup Pol ice Officer Harland Soseea h traveling at almost 10 pm on May 9 without head lights. After a roadside breath test results showed Begay at a .20 and she failed several other field sobriety tests, she refused to take the breath test and was charged with aggravated DWI, driver’s license suspended and/ or revoked, no insurance and the original headlight violation. Gregory John Brecklin, 53, Corpus Christi, TX A good citizen called and reported the poor driving of

Breck lin May 9 after she witnessed him driving another vehicle off t he roa dway. Breck l i n wa s cha rged w it h Aggravated DWI, driver’s license required and open container. T h o m a s B r ow n , 5 5, Gallup, N.M. Brown was arrested on May 7 after he reportedly ran a red stop light and almost h it t he GPD unit driven by Officer Timothy Hughte. He was charged with Aggravated DWI, Suspended Driver’s License, not obeying traffic control devices, no insurance, no registration and open container. Derak Gene, 25, Yahtahey, N.M. Gene was found asleep behind the wheel of his running vehicle on the sidewalk of Munoz Overpass May 2 at about 4:16 am. Officer Chaz Troncoso removed the vehicle’s key’s prior to waking Gene up. Gene, who later gave a breath sample, blew a .18 and was charged with Aggravated DUI, open container and stopping, standing or parking in places prohibited.

Police: Robbery suspect still at large By Kimberly A. Gaona Police are asking for the public’s help in finding a man that robbed a local gas station at gunpoint. The unidentified man failed to score any cash from an attempted robbery at Little Caesar’s pizza, but about12 minutes later, that same man allegedly got away with an undisclosed amount of cash from the Conoco gas station on West Highway 66 on May 4. Initial reports could not confirm that that the two incidents were connected, however, video surveillance does confirm that the same man was located at both places during the time the attempted robbery and robbery took place. The man is described as an Hispanic male of light complexion, with a goatee, approximately 5’6” to 5’8” tall and in his 30s or 40s. He showed both of his victims a small black handgun. According to Gallup Police Capt. Rick White, based on video NEWS

Robbery suspect still at large. Photo Credit: Courtesy

surveillance, the man walked into Little Caesar’s pizza at 2:42 pm, walked up to the counter, leaned on it while producing the gun and started talking to the clerk. The female clerk was seen walking away from the man to the back, and then two customers walked into the business causing the suspect to leave the area. GPD are currently searching for other video evidence which might produce leads to a vehicle description. At 2:54 pm, the same man walked into Conoco gas station on the west side of Gallup, wearing the same black

hoodie over a light colored shirt. The hood was over his head and it appeared that he was wearing a baseball cap under the hood. The man is again holding a small black handgun and this time he made off with an undisclosed amount of money from the business. The man had left the area and GPD had the area sealed off and were searching for evidence by the time the school district let out. Chief Manuelito Middle School and Gallup High School are nearly a mile away from the business. Gallup Police Detectives are working hard to identify the man and are asking for the public’s assistance in the manner. “He looks local, we’re thinking he is local,” White said. Anyone with information is asked to contact GPD Detectives at 505 863-9365. For anonymous tips, citizens can contact Crimestoppers, which is offering a reward up to $1,000 (505)722-6161. Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015

9


BORNE DISEASES | FROM PAGE 8 from infected ticks and fleas by wea r i ng a nti-tick a nd f lea products, keeping dog houses and wood piles away from their homes, cleaning their yards of old furniture, mat t res ses a nd veh icles, dressing appropriately when working outdoors, and fencing in your yard to keep roaming dogs away. She noted that if an owner has protected his or her dog from ticks w ith a nti-tick products, a feral or roaming dog that is carrying infected ticks can spread the infected tick to your yard or home site. Accord i ng to the 2015 RMSF calendar, a female tick with the bacteria can lay 3,000 eggs already infected with the scourge and ticks can be smaller than a speck and as large as a raisin.

TICKS AND ROAMING DOGS Davis said that a photo in the calendar is of a feral or roaming dog from the western

p a r t of t h e r e s e r v a t io n that has ticks covering its u nder b el ly a nd a r mpit s , lodged between its toes and all over its ears. She sa id that this yea r is the th ird RMSF sea son for the reser vation, which means that the tribal animal cont r ol pr og r a m w i l l b e conduc t i ng it s volu nt a r y surrender program for dogs and cats. Davis noted that the animal control program and veterinary and livestock program work with off-reservation animal orga nizations a nd a nimal hu m a ne g r ou p s fo r t he adoption of the dogs and cats coming from the voluntary surrender project. But she said the concern of the tribal programs is that the organizations and groups understand that they must prov ide treatment for the reser vation small animals to prevent tick diseases and infestation of an environment that is free of infected ticks. Davis said that last year, the animal control program removed about 11,000 dogs from the reservation.

“That’s just like a drop in the bucket,” she said. Accord i ng to t he 2015 R M SF c a le nd a r, one un-neutered male dog and one un-spayed female dog will produce a total of 67,000 dogs over six years. Davis picked up the 2015 RMSF calendar and pointed out how it is packed with educational information about how to check yourself and your children for ticks, what a tick looks like, why you shouldn’t quash a tick when you find one, and why spay and neutering also prevents outbreaks of the RMSF, Davis said. She added that everyone needs to get into the habit of checking themselves for ticks and fleas. “We are up against nature and nature has made it where ticks will survive,” Davis said. “And we’re pretty much trying to just protect our animals on the Navajo Nation, whether it’s l ivestock, compa n ion a n ima ls, pets. We have a tribal veterinarian that takes care of our zoo. And so our zoo animals are all taken care of.”

NNVLP extension agent one Patrina Begay, 24, of Ganado, Ariz., and veterinarian Kelly UpshawBia, 37,of Fort Defiance, Ariz., are part of the small but committed staff that serves the Navajo Reservation. Upshaw-Bia is one of two tribal veterinarians and she feels the need for more tribal veterinarians. She smiled and said that customers could help her and the staff by calling the NNVLP first because walk-ins can wait for a couple of hours. And some people think they can just drop off their pet or animal and come back later, she said. But would you drop off your child at the hospital?

Dems in Congress pushing for $12 min wage By Matthew Reichbach NM Political Report

W

ASHINTON, D.C. – Congressional Democrats, including all four Democrats in the New Mexico delegation, are pushing for a $12 minimum wage.

Western New Mexico University – Gallup 2055 State Road 602 Gallup, New Mexico 87301

Bachelor & Graduate Degree Completion Programs Phone: 505-722-3389 Fax: 505-722-3195 Website: www.wnmu.edu

10

W it h b ot h t he Hou s e a nd Senate controlled by Republicans, it is very unlikely that a minimum wage increase would pass during the current Congress. However, the push could be an attempt to bring the wedge issue up in time for the 2016 elections. In addition to increasing the minimum wage to $12 by 2020, the legislation would index the minimum wage to inflation. Senators Udall and Heinrich are among the  co-sponsors of the Senate version of the legislation, introduced by Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash. The two made the announcement in a press release earlier this week. Udall said in a statement that the legislation would help a quarter of a million New Mexicans get more money. “The minimum wage was supposed to be a floor to ensure Americans receive fair wages for hard work,” Udall said in a statement. “But today, thousands of New Mexicans are struggling

Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup Sun

to support their families on the minimum wage. The wage has not kept up with inflation, and it’s holding back New Mexico families and our economy.” Heinrich said that it would make sure families “have more money in their pockets to contribute to the local economy.” “No one who works hard in a full-time job should have to

live in poverty. Yet far too many New Mexicans are struggling to make ends meet,” Heinrich said. “Raising the minimum wage is critical to working families and will contribute to i mprov i ng ou r st ate’s economy.” A compa n ion piece of legislation was introduced in the House by Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., also has the

support of two New Mexicans in Washington D.C. Both Rep. Ben Ray Luján and Michelle Lujan Grisham are among the cosponsors of the legislation. “New Mexico’s workers want to receive a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work. They want to work hard so they can send their children to college and save for a dignified retirement,” Luján said in a statement. “Yet at today’s minimum wage, many full-time workers and their families have to work two or three jobs just to get by. Raising the minimum wage will reward hard work, grow opportunities, and strengthen our economy.” Luján has more attention on him than before, as he heads the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. R e p. S t e ve Pe a r c e i s the lone Republican in the congressional delegation and has voted against minimum wage increases in the past. NEWS


Consolidating and cashing in on medical marijuana By Joey Peters NM Political Report

M

arijuana legalization is likely far off in New Mexico, but you wouldn’t know it from the way some businesses are acting. Recent news of a Canadian company’s encroachment into Santa Fe spawned backlash from those critical of an out-ofstate, out-of-country company attempting to get a piece of New Mexicos’ medical marijuana industry. Last month, Toronto-based Nutritional High announced that it would be acquiring 51 percent of shares from and assuming management operations of Sacred Garden, a Santa Fe nonprofit medical marijuana producer that’s been operating for nearly five years. The plan drew immediate backlash from patient advocates and others in the industry. “We don’t need the money that comes in the program going out of state, yet alone out of the country,” Tim Scott, president of New Mexico Cannabis Patients Alliance, told New Mexico Political Report. The criticism even may have put speed bumps in front of the deal. At one poi nt , r u mor s abounded that the acquisition was falling through. In an interview with New Mexico Political Report earlier this week, Sacred Garden President Zeke Shortes acknowledged that the deal was experiencing “significant roadblocks.” “I think the [Department of Health] is experiencing a lot of backlash from patient groups,” Shortes said. “They’re very interested in covering their ass. I think it has more to do with that than anything.” DOH did not respond to requests for comment for this story. Nutritional High CEO David Posner later maintained everything was still on track. “We’re still moving forward with due diligence,” Posner said. “I haven’t stopped moving forward. I only want to do something that’s right, both for my shareholders and the company I’ll be working with, Sacred Garden.” But Nutritional High’s pending acquisition is just one example of consolidation currently taking place in New Mexico’s NEWS

medical marijuana industry. Currently, Arizona-based Ultra Health is in a proprietary agreement with New Mexico Top Organics, one of the state’s 23 licensed medical marijuana nonprofits. Consolidation isn’t limited to out-of-state companies looking for a stake in New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program. Reynold Greenleaf & Associates, an Albuquerque-based business formed last year, currently manages both Medzen Services and R. Greenleaf Organics. Though both Medzen and R. Greenleaf operate as nonprofits, Reynold Greenleaf & Associates is a for-profit management consulting business. Some question whether the state’s Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act, which established the state’s medical marijuana program in 2007, allows such acquisitions. For one, state law requires that all organizations selling medical marijuana be licensed nonprofits. Only 23 nonprofits currently operate in the state—a small pool to consolidate in the first place. State law also requires all marijuana for the medical program be grown in New Mexico, meaning that out-of-state companies can’t ship cannabis here for sale. And while other businesses can’t directly takeover medical marijuana nonprofits, they can take charge of any of the nonprofits’ management operations. Scott calls it a loophole. “You cannot buy or sell a [medical cannabis] producer,” he said. “But they’ve started creating management companies. A management company can come in and assume control.” While not all management acquisitions are controversial in the medical marijuana community—Scott said he thinks R. Greenleaf is operating well— they do raise a possible future where just a handful of companies control the state’s medical marijuana industry.

FEAR OF A MARIJUANA MONOPOLY Leonard Salgado, Ultra Health’s director of New Mexico operations, said the company’s deal with Top Organics amounts to helping it position for the future. Salgado noted how

quickly the marijuana industry is evolving. “We’re so close to Colorado geographically,” Salgado, who would not disclose more details about the deal because the terms are confidential, said. “Who knows when we will be migrating to that model?” Others see a darker side to these kind of business relationships. Josh McCurdy, a medical marijuana patient in Ruidoso, said he thinks the management trend is nothing more than businesses jockeying for when New Mexico eventually goes the route of Colorado and several other states. “They’re looking to gear up to go recreational,” McCurdy said. “That’s why everybody is consolidating and trying to be the bigger or better place, that way they can ride the wave.” McCurdy himself experienced the downside of limited competition in the industry in 2013. When McCurdy became a patient, he had what he called a rough experience with marijuana from Compassionate Distributors in Ruidoso, the only medical marijuana producer in the area. He soon wrote a formal complaint about the quality of Compassionate Distributors’ marijuana. “When it began to burn the cannabis started to pop, crackle and tasted harsh and like chemicals,” McCurdy wrote. “I knew then that the medicine was not flushed properly.” De spit e t he fa ct t h at McCurdy’s letter wasn’t completely critical—he also wrote praises of one of the nonprofit’s clerks for being “always so friendly and just a pleasure to purchase from”— Compassionate Distributors stopped let t i ng h i m buy marijuana. “We will be removing you from our list of patients,” Mandy Denson, an attorney for Compassionate Distributors, wrote back to McCurdy. “While we appreciate the feedback, we run a very small operation. When it becomes clear that a patient relationship will only cause stress and negativity for those who work here, especially when unfounded, we exercise our right to refuse service policy.” McCurdy fears this mentality will become commonplace if just a few producers control

New Mexico’s future marijuana market. “If these places consolidate all together in a monopoly, we won’t have strain variety,” he said. “When you get big money into anything, the compassion is out.”

INFLUX OF CASH Nutritional High, which formed last year, rejects the notion that it’s some sort of corporate titan trying to take over the local industry. The Toronto-based company, which doesn’t operate in Canada, is in the process of starting a dispensary in Colorado and has a pending application for a dispensary in Illinois. The company currently specializes in edibles designed by Le Cordon Bleu-trained chef Melissa Parks. The goal, Posner said, is to create a national brand of edibles. When looking to branch into New Mexico, his company became particularly interested in Sacred Garden’s growing and extraction process. Nutritional High taking control of management will give Sacred Garden an influx of money to up its growing practices as the state expands the number of plants producers are allowed to grow. The increased money will also help Sacred Garden’s products keep their THC levels consistent— a problem with edibles in New Mexico and other states. Posner said the business model will focus on delivering high quality products to patients. “It’s not a corporate mentality that wins in this industry,” he said. Likewise, Shor tes said that the deal will allow Sacred Garden to lower prices for patients. “We can’t move forward and get into a better place from a cultivation perspective unless we have an infusion of cash,” Shortes said. A s a pa r t of the dea l, Nutritional High will create a company called Zephyr to take over management of Sacred Garden. Shortes, according to an official announcement released last month, will be employed by Zephyr and make $180,000 a year. Willie Ford, executive director of Reynold Greenleaf & Associates, criticized the setup as “profiteering.”

“If Zeke is employed by the nonprofit, his management services should be with the nonprofit,” Ford said, referring to Sacred Garden. Until recently, Ford served as executive director for R. Greenleaf Organics, one of the state’s licensed nonprofit medical cannabis producers. Now that he has a role in a for-profit management company, Ford is no longer an employee of the producer, though he still serves on its board. Reynold Greenleaf’s management of two producers allows both R. Greenleaf and Medzen to split the cost of management from one company. “Each nonprofit pays less money for the value they get,” Ford said. “That is how it’s supposed to be done.”

‘MORE HEADACHES’ Shortes, for his part, said the dea l with Nutr itiona l High is purely for expanding Sacred Garden’s services to its patients. State and federal regulations of the program have limited Sacred Garden’s operations over the years. Because it produces and sells a substance that the federal government classifies as a Schedule 1 illegal substance, Sacred Garden isn’t subject to the same federal tax exemptions as other nonprofits. This, coupled with a $90,000 annual renewal fee for a medical cannabis license and a cap of 450 plants, has left Sacred Garden limited with what it can do, Shortes said. He estimated that Sacred Garden owes both him and his wife Kelly $1 million. “We haven’t been doing this to make money,” he said. “If we were, we’ve been terrible business people.” In an industry that is already faces more scrutiny than most, Shortes said backlash over his tentative deal with a Canadian company has only lead to more headaches. “All I was trying to do was get some funding where we can get into a better facility and get into more production,” he said. “I definitely wouldn’t do this over again because of all of this distraction.” Though Shortes said terms of Nutritional High’s deal with Sacred Garden may not stay the same as originally envisioned, the deal is still scheduled to finalize at the end of May. Visit: www.nmpoliticalreport.com

Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015

11


Ready for the future 212 STUDENTS GRADUATE FROM UNM-G

By Tom Hartsock Sun Correspondent

U

NM-Gallup held a ceremony Saturday, May 9, 2015 in the Miyamura High School gymnasium for 212 students at a variety of levels, from GED Certificate earners through Master of Arts programs. These students included 15 graduates of Middle College High, five of whom earned their high school diploma and an additional certificate or associate’s degree.

Brianna Guillen will complete her Dental Assisting Certification this summer, while Raven Bright, Joshua Davis, Anthony Leekity and Alessandra Vitali earned their Associate’s degrees in Liberal Arts. Bright, Davis and Vitali distinguished themselves With Honors of the eleven recipients in that department. Other certification areas of study were: Construction Technology; Cosmetology/ Barbering; Drafting Technology; Early Childhood

Multicultural Education; Health I n for m at ion Tech nolog yCoding; Huma n Ser v ices; Information Technology; and Welding Technology. Associate of Arts degrees were granted in: Art Studio; Busi ness Ad m i n istration; C r i m i n a l Ju s t ic e; E a r l y C h i ld ho o d Mu lt ic u lt u r a l Education; Human Services; Pre-Business Administration; Pre-Professional Education; and Psychology. A s s o c i a t e of A p pl ie d Science degrees were honored

in: Administrative Assistant; Aut omot i ve Te c h nolog y ; Collision Repair Technology; Constr uction Technology; Cr i m i na l Ju st ice; Desig n and Digital Media, General Business; General Studies; Legal Assistant; Tribal Court A d v o c a t e ; a n d We l k i n g Technology. A s s o c i a t e of S c ie nc e degrees were granted in: Health I n for m at ion Tech nolog y ; Medical Laboratory Technology; Nursing; and Science.

Bachelor degrees included students in: Business Ad m i n istration; Busi ness Administration-Accounting; Business Ad m in istrationOperations and Marketing; Business Ad m in istrationFinance; and Liberal Arts, while Bachelor of Science deg re e s were e a r ned i n Elementary Education and Post Masters Education Specialist. Ma ster s of A r t s deg rees were offered in Elementary Education and Secondar y Education.

Brianna Jo Mortensen, in next year’s senior class at Mid College High School, delivers a pitch-perfect rendition of the national anthem after the presentation of the colors last Saturday at the UNM-G graduation ceremony.

The Presentation of Colors was handled by members of the UNM-Gallup Student Veterans Association.

This graduate believes that her success is not just for the family gathered in the Miyamura High School gymnasium.

12

Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup Sun

In attendance were the entire Gallup McKinley County School Board and the Superintendent of Schools. This picture catches Superintendent Frank Chiapetti looking over the program and board member Joe Menini on the right. The lady on the left was not identified.

NEWS


The dignitaries on stage during Dr. Dyer’s speech to the graduates.

UNM-G Advisory Board President Ralph Richards speaks to the large crowd at Miyamura High School.

The students wait for the final piece of graduation, the presentation of GED’s, High School diplomas, Associate and Certificate programs, and Bachelor and Graduate degrees.

Another decorated mortarboard, obviously on the head of a teacher.

NEWS

Executive Director Dr. Christopher Dyer makes his remarks to the students and large audience.

Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015

13


OPINIONS Schaller conducts his own curbside recycling ‘analysis’

By Joe Schaller Guest Columnist PART 2 Program efficiency is meaningless unless taken in context of costs, as many communities have learned. Section 5.2 is titled ‘Benefits of curbside programs’ yet there is no section or mention in the report of drawbacks or historical unintended consequences. It is a report I would expect of a used car or solar panel salesman avoiding any harsh realities which may scare off the customer. My own condensed feasibility report which drew upon international scientific studies was offered at

the first curbside meeting last summer, and then ignored - no intellectual curiosity by the Recycling Council nor City Council, no interest in investigation, no phone calls from Mr. O’Hara or Mr. Bright. Up until now there has been mostly a one sided positive portrayal of curbside by CDM, MCRC and SGB. The SGB openly stated in March that they seek a “recycling victory” as an initial step in their green crusade, but this shouldn’t be about chalking up victories by moral busybodies for elitist political causes, it should be about doing what’s right for the commoners of Gallup, here in one of the most impoverished regions in the nation. What I have primarily heard in numerous city meetings is misinformation by omission and a stunning lack of knowledge from CDM and green activists topped off with willful ignorance.

A city councilor even conceded that we’ll give it a try for a few years and see if it works. Isn’t that the purpose of a feasibility study? Where’s the SGB on this? They appear to be avoiding a dialogue, conversation or debate with any who may disagree with their green political agenda. There is so much more that needs to be said and if no one else possesses the time, knowledge and determination than I will take it upon myself to hopefully save the citizen taxpayers millions of dollars rather than the current ‘try it and see what happens’ approach. * * * C r e d i bi l it y i s s u e s . For instance CDM spokesman Thomas Parker was not aware of the 1.2 million dollars the city of Albuquerque was annually subsidizing for the processing of recyclables, according to A lbuquerque director of waste management Jill Holbert. Those subsidies were not included in

waste disposal bills nor were the quota penalty subsidies paid to Friedman Recycling. This is a major problem with most green projects as well as many government projects, the hidden costs which are never reported to taxpayers. The heav ily subsidized solar panel industry’s checkered history of fraud and corruption is a good example. How many unintended costs of curbside recycling will Gallup encounter, particularly when Friedman Recycling experiences revenue problems? CDM and the Recycling Council were also not aware of the decline of curbside recycling programs nationally from 9,700 in 2001 to over a thousand less in 2011 due to unsustainability. The lack of diversity and knowledge displayed by the Recycling Council and Sustainable Gallup Board is a credibility concern. ***Mr. Parker often cited Seattle’s 27 year curbside

recycling progra m a s the national model of efficiency. It is so efficient their disposal rates have doubled over the past decade. That was after curbside went from voluntary to mandatory due to the decrease in recycling participation, which commonly occurs with curbside programs. In 1991 Seattle’s cost per household per month for curbside was $1.71 and their monthly garbage rate $10.60. Today Seattle’s average residential solid waste bill for a family of four has risen to $43.00 a month for a recycling bin plus a small waste bin and locked in to rise another $10.00 over the next 5 years to $53.00. That’s way above the $15.00 national average. Efficiency means little unless in context of costs and Seattle’s lofty status in the green culture becomes a study in blind faith. Part 2 in a 3 part series. Continued next week.

Promoting the Dine Holistic view of the world: Humane education

PREVENTING BULLYING AND ANIMAL NEGLECT TO BUILD A KINDER COMMUNITY

By Christine M. Schwamberger Since time immemorial, the Navajo have respected, honored and protected the four sacred elements of life: air; light/fire; water and earth/pollen. The Diné have a duty and sacred obligation to respect, preserve and protect all that was provided them; and they are designated as stewards for their animal relatives. u l ly i n g h a s be en making regular headlines, been blamed for suicides, and is of great concern to schools today. Local schools have regulations prohibiting bullying and have signs designating “BullyingFree Zones”. Another problem is the epidemic of abandoned and starving cats and dogs wa nder i ng the streets of Gallup, and surrounding communities. Dead dogs and cats “litter” our local streets, demoralizing residents and tourists alike. Recently, it was feared

B 14

that abandoned, starving dogs had killed homeless people north of Gallup. But, you may ask, what do these things have in common? Aren’t these two completely different problems? These problems are both symptoms of the need for more consideration and responsibility in our community. But like most things, consideration and responsibility must be taught. We need a special focus in our educational system to foster more consideration for the members of our community, including our fellow students, and our dogs and cats. After all, dogs and cats are also members of our community. And the type of consideration and responsibility that is needed is

Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup Sun

called “empathy.” Empathy is the act of putting yourself in someone else’s shoes, or paws, as the case may be, and feeling what the other is feeling. Studies have found that empathy acts to prevent aggression and violence, especially for children and teenagers. Using the plight of animals as an example, empathy leads children and youth to feel more personal distress at the sight of abandoned, neglected or abused animals, and makes them want to help. The children’s care and concern for the animals can then be extended to other children, and to the natural environment. This holistic approach to the world closely parallels the Navajo cultural traditions of Beehaz’áanii and Ké, which teach enhanced duties to respect, preserve and protect all that was provided in the natural world, and to be stewards for animal relatives. Therefore, humane education can easily be adapted to meet Navajo traditional curricula in schools.

Humane education is a very efficient vehicle for accomplishing many things at once by focusing on the needs of animals in a fun way. Humane education not only teaches empathy, which prevents bullying, it also teaches Common Core requirements (English / La nguage Arts, Applied Mathematics and Science, etc.), and teaches Pillars of Character (Respect, Responsibility, Kindness and Citizenship). There are many free lesson plans on the internet, free teaching materials such as coloring books, activity sheets and newsletters can be ordered, and films are available for loan or purchase. There are lesson plans and activities for all grade levels, kindergarten to high school. The work of the Southwest Humane Education and Pet Care Initiative (SHEPCI) is to introduce humane education to the Gallup area, and surrounding Native American communities, by contacting school administrators and teachers,

administrators of other community organizations, creating a network of support, presenting workshops, and organizing humane education activities and events. Two groups will come to the Four Corners area to conduct workshops on humane education teaching techniques: the Association of Professional Humane Educators (APHE) and Animal Humane. SHEPCI is compiling a contact list of interested persons who will be notified when these workshops take place. To get on the workshop contact list, to help promote humane education at your school or organization, to get free humane education lesson plans and materials, and for more information contact: Christine Schwamberger at (503) 997-0991, or schwamberger@earthlink.net. Christine M. Schwamberger is President of the Southwest Humane Education and Pet Care Initiative (SHEPCI), which is currently filing for 501(c)(3) nonprofit status. OPINIONS


Parent unhappy with principal switcheroo TO THE GALLUP MCKINLEY SCHOOL BOARD:

I

t has come to our attention that you have recently made and are making huge changes in staffing some of the schools. We realize that some of these changes may be necessary or for the good of the schools, however we are unable to see the benefits of changes being made at and affecting Roosevelt Elementary. As parents and grandparents of students at Roosevelt Elementary we are disappointed and very upset with some of the changes you are making. We are a tiny school compared to most in the district and we realize that Roosevelt Elementary will eventually be dissolved in another few years but it is a very family oriented school and we would like to keep it that way for the remainder of the schools existence. The staff is wonderful with our children. We have only had Ms. Arthur for eighteen months but in that time she has come to know each child by name, she knows many of the family members attached to the children and she has been very active in supporting the staff and students. She has done a brilliant job with finding ways to stretch

the limited funds provided so that the teachers can have adequate supplies to use in instructing our children. When you come in and make changes to a school that has such close bonds you cause a damaging ripple effect. First the whole staff has to to take extra time away from their students as well as their personal life to build new relationships and figure out new personality dynamics. Second, most of the students here at Roosevelt have been coming to this school since preschool. They are familiar and comfortable with the staff. And because Ms. Arthur has dedicated herself to her position at Roosevelt, our children trust her and the staff. Many of the students have a hard time with change and have difficulty trusting others. The whole staff at Roosevelt has worked hard to build a safe, nurturing environment for our children. Third, it affects our families as a whole. Those of us who have children with trust issues or difficulty with change will have a much harder time adjusting when the school year starts. They will be missing people they have already built a connection with and will have to have to start from scratch in building

MADAME G

relationships and trust. We are asking that you let us keep Ms. Arthur and all current staff at Roosevelt Elementary. We would like the school to maintain its closeness among staff, family and students, and

for our children to look forward to coming back in the fall to a principal and staff that they know and trust. Sincerely, Bathia Ose Gallup, NM

GUIDE TO THE STARS WEEK OF MAY 15-21

ARIES (March 21-April 19)

CANCER (June 21-June 22)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.22)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

You’re feeling full of bright ideas these days. Maybe you want to interview someone famous, like Patrick Moraz, the keyboardist for the Moody Blues. Yes, the iconic 70s band with the curly-haired keyboardist, and dreamy rock ballads. Madame G, hee hee (blush) is showing her age. But, you need to go in a unique direction this week.

It looks like your calendar is packed with social events. Attend the ones that mean something to you personally and not just to people please. It’s okay to put on the sweats and stained T-shirt and veg in front of the tube. Your call. BTW, you will not win the lottery and retire a millionaire, but you may score a few bucks on a scratcher.

You know you feel best when the scales of life are in harmony. Throw one of those off and you’re in shambles. Start by narrowing down your tasks. No need to go to Pilates and Zumba class in one day. No need to go clubbing every weekend. You can do pizza and a movie or just chill for a night. Balance … think balance.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Yeah, you’re sexy and ya know it! If you’re a kid, you’re looking cute, okay? I don’t want to leave anyone out. You have heads turning with your smile, flowing hair and confidence that oozes from your pores. It’s high time for Capricorn to step out into the night and check out the activities around town, even if it’s just walking down the street and showing off!

TMI = Too Much Information. You’re usually the strong one, bullish and full of pride. Nothing bothers you, not even your Uncle Martin flashing his stained dentures to scare the kids. But, lately you’re a tad sensitive to people telling you too much information. You don’t want to know that your friend has bunions on her feet or that auntie has a uni-brow and tells you about her painful waxing . TMI …. Just TMI.

Like most kitties, your attention span seems to gravitate all the time. But maybe you need to go within and delve into your most inner self. It could be spiritual or practical, but it needs to be focused. I know you’re tempted to chase that ball of yarn and get all tangled up in it because it’s fun. Resist the temptation. Find your inner swami.

Triage alert! Not a medical triage, but a psychological one. You don’t mind getting in the mix and expressing your views, but maybe you should step away once in awhile. Assess which drama deserves your attention. Or, just shop to please your palate. Go buy that blender you have always wanted and make smoothies or Margaritas for you grown-ups.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

The warmer weather could be the reason your nights are filled with strange dreams, such as falling or meandering through a strange land with strangers that are your friends. It’s a tad weird for the dreamy, but practical Gemini. Madame G says journal those experiences you encounter during your slumber, and get a dream book so you can have some fun analyzing your incredibly freaky dreams.

Amore! Virgo the planetary alignment shows me that you want to eat, explore, feel and touch – experience all the joy life has to offer. But indulging in vices only leads you back to the gym, begging the treadmill through tears and sweat to lose weight. If you don’t care about that sort of thing, then indulge with passion. Little Debbie snacks are not for everyone.

It’s your week Sag! Just roll with it and bask in the spotlight. You did something good, something powerful. Maybe you saved a puppy or kitten in peril. Or, maybe you held a door open for an elder or two and it started an insightful conversation. Whatever you did, it calls for a hot stone pedicure. Yes, it feels a little creepy, but you get used to it.

OPINIONS

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Fire up the grill this weekend Aquarius. You’re due for some fun in the sun that is if the sun behaves like the sun and stays out of the clouds. Anyway, it’s time to hold the ones closest to you, well, even closer. Now, it doesn’t mean that you get to sneak off to do some work in your snazzy home office, it means spending quality time chillin’ and a grillin.’

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Pisces, you have got it made. One minute you’re the voice of reason; but, when the going gets tough – Poof! – you vanish and do whatever you feel like doing, which can range from playing Grand Theft Auto to napping. Your excuse is simple: There are the two fishies swimming in opposite directions. Because of this, you lack selfcontrol.

Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015

15


COMMUNITY Udall to protect Chaco Canyon, prioritize local services Staff Report

W

ASHINGTON, D.C. – During a hea r i ng of t he A ppropr i a t ion s Subcommittee on Interior, Env ironment a nd Related Agencies, on which he serves as the lead Democratic member, U.S. Senator Tom Udall pressed Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Director Neil Kornze about concerns New Mexicans have raised about oil and gas leasing near Chaco Canyon and about a possible BLM proposal to merge the New Mexico and Arizona state offices May 13. Udall, a n advocate for responsible oil and gas development, wrote to Secretary of Interior Sally Jewell, asking her to send top-level officials to New Mexico to hear from the community about how oil and gas development could impact the Chaco Culture National Historical Park and

archaeological sites associated with the ancient Chaco people as the BLM works on a new Resource Management Plan for the area. At today’s hearing, Udall reminded Kornze of the letter and again asked for the Interior Department to “take a personal look at this issue and come to New Mexico to hear the concerns of our constituents.” In response, Kornze committed to working with Udall to ensure that oil and gas leasing near this iconic site is handled with the utmost consideration of Chaco Canyon’s archaeological value. As BLM completes its new Resource Management Plan for the San Juan Basin, Kornze said the agency will make sure to take increased potential for shale oil and gas production near Chaco into account. Udall said at the hearing: “Chaco Canyon is critically important to my state as an

The great kiva in the plaza of Chetro Keti. The Chacoan people began in the mid 800s and lasted more than 300 years.

incredibly rich cultural destination, as well as a sacred place to the tribes of the southwest. But as you know, Chaco Canyon is situated right in one of the most productive oil and gas production areas in the country. It appears that many

new leases are getting closer to the Chaco Culture National Historical Park, which really concerns me.” Udall also reminded Kornze that he and many others in New Mexico believe a possible BLM proposal to merge the New

Mexico and Arizona state offices could negatively affect the state. “I am very skeptical of this idea,” Udall continued. “Having a state director in New Mexico focused on New Mexico’s many unique public lands issues - has served us well for decades. Many New Mexico stakeholders, including former bureau managers, are concerned that a merger would mean less [time] for a state director to focus on New Mexico, and I share those concerns.” Kornze told Udall that “no decisions have been made” on the merger and that BLM is committed to prioritizing local services for New Mexicans. The hearing was part of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Env ironment a nd Related Agencies’ ongoing work to hear testimony and question agency officials in preparation for drafting legislation to fund the BLM and other agencies for Fiscal Year 2016.

Save Big with a SMART Toilet By Melinda Russell Sun Correspondent

E

lizabeth Barriga, Water Conser vation Coordinator for the City of Gallup, may be soft spoken but her passion for her job is evident. Barriga is a California girl but has lived here in Gallup for 10 years. Her background is

"Come to Where the Indians Trade" Indian Jewelry Capital of the World in the Heart of Indian Country

RICHARDSON'S TRADING CO. & CASH PAWN Est. 1913

100 Years of Continuous Service 6 Days a Week VisitrTe hSetore Treasu

222 W. 66th Ave, Gallup, NM 87301

(505) 722-476 2

16

Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup Sun

in landscape architecture. She has an abundance of information available to Gallup city residents who are concerned about saving on their water bills and saving Gallup’s water supply. You may not consider toilet discussions exciting or even in good taste but the City of Gallup has a deal you cannot refuse. They are giving away energy saving toilets – 100 of them! The city received the toilets as a result of a grant. She says it is easy to apply to receive the grant. You can call 863-1393, visit Utilities Engineering at 230 S. 2nd Street, or make an appointment for them to come to you. Yes! They make house calls. The only prerequisite to qualify for the program is that the toilet you are replacing must be over 20 years old and it must be a 3.5 gallon commode. When Barriga processes your application, she can help you figure out if you qualify or not. The SMART Toilet Distribution is a first come, first serve grant that will be over when the toilets are gone. Not only can you get a new toilet free of charge, you can also receive credit against your utility bill for the cost of installation. The details for this program can be found online at www.gallupnm.gov and type in Smart Toilet in the search box. Barriga told a story about a lady who ha d 2 leaky toilets. She used over 40,000 gallons of water in 1 month. It was very expensive and wasteful. “Toilets are the easiest way to reduce water waste in our homes,” said Barriga explaining that the problem could be as simple as a small flapper! The Water Conservation office also has information regarding “gray” water redirection that reuses bath and

Elizabeth Barriga, Water Conservation Coordinator for the City of Gallup has a deal you can’t refuse. Free toilets! Photo Credit: Melinda Russell

dish water and rainwater harvesting. Other rebate programs available from the City of Gallup include transitioning from grass to xeriscape, high efficiency clothes washers and rain barrels for water collection. Bill Bright, Chairman of the Sustainable Gallup Board encourages residents to take advantage of all the conservation remedies they can. “The #1 step that we can tell everybody is conservation: the shower, the tap. Start now, conserving water and power.” He added, “Water and energy are connected. Even if you aren’t concerned about conservation or the environment, you can benefit immediately by saving on your utility bills.” COMMUNITY


Sen. Heinrich to introduce ‘tech-transfer maturation program’ bill Staff Report

W

ASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Senators Martin Heinrich, D-N.M. and Michael Bennet, D-Colo. introduced legislation to launch a new National Laboratory Te c h n o l o g y M a t u r a t i o n Program (NLTMP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to facilitate successful commercialization of laborator y-developed technologies and boost regional, technology-driven economic impacts. The bill, S.1259, the National L a b o r a t o r y Te c h n o l o g y M a t u r a t ion Ac t , w i l l be considered during a hearing in the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on June 4. Under t he Nat iona l L a b o r a t o r y Te c h n o l o g y Maturation Program, small busi nesses w ith licensed technology from a national laboratory could apply for a voucher for up to up to $250,000 to purchase assistance from lab scientists and engineers to mature the technology and further develop products and services until they are market-ready or sufficiently

Photo Credit: Courtesy

developed to attract private investment. Small businesses with vouchers could also use their local lab’s special equipment, facilities, partner on a commercial prototype, or perform early-stage feasibility or later-stage field testing. «Connecting New Mexico small businesses with scientists

a nd eng i neer s at Sa nd ia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory can spur innovation, boost our private tech industry, and create jobs,» said Sen. Heinrich. «By providing a steady stream of technologies that could yield dividends in commercial m a r ke t s , we c r e a t e a n

environment that strengthens our economy while encouraging future innovators to discover the next breakthrough idea.» «NREL is a driving force of Colorado’s innovation economy and is helping small businesses throughout our state through its pilot technology transfer program,» said Sen. Bennet. «Expanding this program will allow more small businesses to take adva ntage of the resources and expertise at NREL and other national labs. This type of investment will help spur more innovation and boost our competitiveness in the 21st century economy.» A Brookings Institution repor t la st September suggested a voucher program for local businesses could help connect national laboratories with their regions and support innovation a nd economic growth. The report indicated that the labs should «embrace a new mission that includes more active engagement with regional innovation systems within which they are located.» Under the NLTMP, each national laboratory could apply to DOE for up to $5 million per year to pay the cost of the vouchers. The bill authorizes NLTMP for

five years to provide sufficient time to demonstrate a return on the investment, including such factors as increased licenses to small businesses, jobs created or retained, increased sales, and subsequent funding attracted or leveraged. Individual projects could r e c e i ve vouc he r s u p t o $250,000. All proposals would be reviewed by a board made up of both technical and business members, with representation from the commercial market. Throughout the duration of a project, interim progress toward commercialization milestones would be tracked and measured. Each laboratory would be required to submit a report to DOE annually on their implementation of the program, and DOE will submit a report to Congress after five years summarizing the results of the program and proposing possible improvements to it. In March, DOE’s Office of Energ y Eff iciency a nd Renewable Energy launched a small pilot program that will select three to five national labs to participate in a voucher program for small businesses focused only on renewable energy and energy efficiency.

Here's My Card

Western New Mexico University – Gallup 2055 State Road 602 Gallup, New Mexico 87301 Bachelor & Graduate Degree Completion Programs Phone: 505-722-3389 Fax: 505-722-3195 Website: www.wnmu.edu

Bill's Reloading Supplies Bill Peterson, Owner

Annual Shop Local Coupon & Ad Book Returns January 2016!

Advertise in 'Here's My Card' Business Directory 603 W 66 Gallup, NM 87301 505-863-5820 billsreloadingsupplies@yahoo.com

COMMUNITY

Email: smartycatpublishing@gmail.com www.smartycatpub.com

Great rates! Call Today.

(505) 728-1640

Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015

17


DVD/Blu-ray roundup: May 15, 2015

I

t looks like another busy week with plenty of DVD and Blu-ray options for all renters/purchasers. As always, be sure to click on any links to read more detailed reviews. So if you can’t make it out to the movies this week, be sure and give one of these titles a try!

BIG NEW RELEASES!

being too bizarre and eccentric to be enjoyed. Now viewers can make up their own minds. Johnny Depp, Gwyneth Pa ltrow, Ewa n McGregor, Olivia Munn, Jeff Goldblum and Paul Bettany headline the film.

Blackhat - Michael Mann is a well-regarded director famous for titles like Collateral, The Insider and Heat, but his latest big-budget effort flopped at theaters. It tells the tale of Hong Kong and US agents using a convicted computer-genius to help them hunt down an international cyber-hacking ring. While there were a few positive notices here and there, critics were generally disappointed as well. Most disliked the shaky camera style and found the story unremarkable. It stars Chris Hemsworth as the hacker, as well as Tang Wei and Voila Davis. Mortdecai - Another movie that didn’t fare well at the box-office was this international comic adventure about a rogue out to find a painting that details the location of a treasure. Hot on his tail are various thugs and criminals. Critics were tepid about this trip around the globe. While they admitted that it was occasionally funny, they criticized the characters for

18

Tracers - In this action/ thriller, Taylor Lautner plays New York city bike messenger who meets a young woman and joins an underground parkour outfit. He is soon ensnared and forced to partake in a dangerous operation that could cost him his life. Reviewers found the story was so cornball and the dialogue so poor that they just couldn’t recommend it, but they did compliment the movie’s impressive fight choreography. Marie Avgeropoulus co-stars.

BLASTS FROM THE PAST!

Still Alice - Julianne Moore won an Oscar for her portrayal of a professor who contracts A ltzheimer’s Disea se a nd struggles as the effects begin to take hold. On the whole, the press liked the film. They really raved about the star’s performance, saying her understated work captured the inner turmoil and horror of memory loss and dementia. They also wrote that the film didn’t resort to sentimentality to make its point. Sounds like an excellent drama, although viewers may have to prepare themselves for the emotionally heavy subject matter. It also features Alec Baldwin, Kristin Stewart and Kate Bosworth.

Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup Sun

K i no L orber ha s some curiosities coming your way on Blu-ray, including a couple of Roger Corman classics starring Ray Milland. In Premature Burial (1962), he plays an artist both obsessed

and terrified of being buried alive. X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes (1963) is a nifty little flick about a scientist who gives himself the power of x-ray vision. However, the ma n soon finds there a re plenty of side-effects to this gift as the condition grows stronger and he struggles with being able to see through just about anything. On the action front, The M c K e n z i e B r e a k (19 70) takes a well worn concept and gives it a bit of a spin. The WWII story deals with German POWs attempting to make a break from a Scottish pr ison camp - Brain Keith stars. Fans of Sidney Poitier will be happy to see two Blu-rays featuring one of his most memorable roles. They Call Me Mr. Tibbs! (1970) is a spin-off from In the Heat of the Night (1967) with the actor reprising his role as a detective, now stationed in San Francisco. In this story, he investigates the murder of a street preacher. The Organization (1971) is Poitier’s final feature as Tibbs, in which he examines and then helps out a group of revolutionaries who steal millions of dollars worth of heroin in order to keep it from reaching the public. As expected, Tibbs learns that there may be sinister elements on his own police force attempting to frame the kids. Ma r ti n i Enter ta i n ment and Olive Films are delivering Satan’s Blade: 30th Anniversary. This long out-ofprint 1984 slasher is set at a ski lodge that comes under assault from a resident possessed by an evil spirit. Those with a taste for Friday the 13th style mayhem will probably want to give it a look. On the classier end of the spectrum, Criterion have a Blu-ray of the Depressionera dra ma Make Way For Tomorrow (1937). It follows a retired couple who lose their home, only to find their grown up children unable to afford the cost of putting up

both of them. The pair must sepa rate a nd spend t hei r days with indiv idua l children, but find adapting to their new lifestyle difficult. It’s a greatly admired movie now regarded by many as a masterpiece and the disc contains not only a restoration of the film, but comments from filmmakers and historians on its importance. Cohen Media Group are distributing the Alfred Hitchcock thriller Jamaica Inn: 75th Anniversary (1939). It’s an early title from the director starring Maureen O”Hara and Charles Laughton that involves a group of crooks causing profitable shipwrecks off of the coasts of the English Cornwall district. Stay As You Are (1978) is a Spanish /Italian romance i nvolv i ng a love a f fa i r bet ween a you ng wom a n a nd a n older ma n. It features Nastassja Kinski and Marcello Mastroianni - Cult E pic s a r e r e le a s i n g t h e Blu-ray.

YOU KNOW, FOR KIDS! Here’s a listing of what’s coming out from the wee folk in your home.

Batman Unlimited: Animal Instincts Donkey Kong Country: The Complete 1st Season Reading Rainbow: If You Give a Mouse a Cookie (PBS Kids) Transformers Rescue Bots: Return of the Heroes COMMUNITY


MAD MAX: FURY ROAD Is a Nitro-Charged Thrill Ride By Glenn Kay For the Sun

RATED: R RUNNING TIME: 120 MINUTES «««« OUT OF 4 STARS

W

ell, it’s hard to imagine another action film of this or any year in recent m e m o r y t o p pi n g t h e adrenaline-pumping, motor-charged, post-apocalyptic world of Mad Max: Fury Road. Some 30 years after the last movie featuring the character, everything has been updated and to some extent reinvented. Regardless, the end result is just as strong - it’s a nitro-charged thrill ride. That’s not to say that director George Miller (Mad Max, The Road Warrior, and curiously enough, Babe: Pig in the City) hasn’t thrown a few new wrinkles into the mix. This is essentially a two hour chase that begins mere seconds after the opening narration and doesn’t let up until the final scene. It is a bold approach is one that could have easily numbed the audience. Max (Tom Hardy) is still a loner in the wasteland, struggling to simply survive and haunted by the memory of his deceased family. When he’s taken prisoner by a society controlled by ruthless dictator Immortan Joe

(Hugh Keays-Byrne), his only instinct is to break free. But events take a more complicated turn when he crosses paths with Imperator Furiosa (Charlize Theron), one of Joe’s ranks attempting to escape with precious cargo. While the two don’t trust each other, they soon realize they need one another to survive the horde. If you’re familiar with previous movies in the series, rest assured. Digital effects are in use at times, but there are still plenty of real thrills and stunts. Everything about the pursuits is amplified to the tenth degree. There are multiple roving gangs with more cars, not to

mention some stunning vehicular carnage. In fact, each gang appears to have its own specific kind of sense of style, almost as if the engines themselves are their own characters. It’s all shot in a colorful desert landscape. As expected, this is a director who knows how to shoot action. It’s cut together brilliantly, with characters moving over and under cars in an exciting and dynamic fashion. Heck, they even hop from vehicle to vehicle and use poles to move the distances between with thrilling abandon. Despite multiple characters all doing separate things in a crazy chase, every movement is clear and easy to follow. Truthfully, it may be a little overwhelming at first. The action is grand from the outset and we’re placed right in the middle of it, with only basic information about the participants. It’s gorgeous to watch and well put together, but the first act doesn’t feature much of an emotional hook. However, a funny thing happens as the movie progresses. Brief conversations and actions allow us into the heads of these people. In the end, they are simple but relatable figures and over the second act we get to know and (in some cases) even like the characters. Early on, Max has a selfish survival instinct, but this changes as he spends more ti me w ith i n h is party (and just to make the message clearer, becomes more human as he removes a mask affixed and covering

his face). Furiosa has her motivations for escaping clarified too, and even the supporting characters become interesting. There’s a sickly “WarBoy” na med Nux (Nicola s Hoult) desperate to please his leader and willing to do anything to prove his worthiness. Even within his society, he has to contend with violent co-workers out to steal his thunder. Viewers watching will find that the movie actually manages to build more tension, drama and pathos as it develops. By the blood-pumping finale, it has completely worked its spell. Of course, helping alleviate some of the intensity are some equally radical moments of humor interspersed amidst the chaos (particularly funny is a moving vehicle with a guitar-player and drummers adding a musical score within the film during their hunt). It is clear that director Miller is a fan of samurai and western film archetypes - applying them to Max and a fantastic, unreal world in a consistently dazzling fashion. Not only has he succeeded, but he’s experimented and made a few brave alterations to the formula that should excite audiences in entirely new ways. What starts as a merely solid action film ends up a fantastic one. Mad Max: Fury Road is a resounding success, an epic thrill-ride that will set a new standard for action. To read more of Glenn Kay’s movie reviews, visit www. cinemastance.com

PETS OF THE WEEK WE LOVE HUGS! Pepper, Doc and Moo are three adorable puppies looking for nice homes, about 10 weeks old. We also have a nice selection of mature dogs looking for a second chance.

Adopt Me!

ADOPT ME! Tux is a friendly female kittens about 3 months old. Come check out our assortment of playful kittens and loving cats.

So Cute!

Visit and adopt one of these deserving furry friends at Gallup-McKinley County Humane Society: 1315 Hamilton Rd #B, Gallup, NM. Information: (505) 863-2616. COMMUNITY

Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015

19


SPORTS 360 Bowling tournament raises funds for scholarships Story and Photos by Tom Hartsock

O

ver 2 0 0 b owler s participated in the Eighth Annual Willie ‘ I c e m a n’ K n i g h t Bowling Tournament on May 9-10 at Gal-A-Bowl. They were registered in three divisions: Red, White and Blue and were allowed to participate in more than one division, according to their season’s averages. Winning the Red Division was the team of Cathy Mitchell and Donna Gonzales, while second place went to Karmela Kinsel and Roger Kinsel. Sheila Canete and Ed Canete took third, and Alex Patterson and P.J. Montoya were fourth. In the W hite Div ision, Serenity Smith and Joe Quicero placed first, Zach Beasley and Cory Gonzales were second, Ranee Cleveland and Nolan Kelly were third, and Peter Gonzales and Mitch Green were fourth. Ed Ca nete a nd Cor y Gonzales were first in the Blue Division, while Ray Spencer and Gary Pinto placed second. Jerry Pinto and Aaron Jim were third, and David Rukstelis and Cory Gonzales placed fourth. Cash awards for the above finishers totalled $1,254. Forty-two local merchants donated raffle prizes for this tournament. The donations for the tickets almost wholly paid for the three $1,500 scholarships

Scholarship Award winners & parents – From left Lana Yazzie, Gilbert Charley (rear), Astrid Gonzaga, Kyrene Josafat, Arlie Josafat, Ronald Josaphat. Gilbert Charley, Astrid Gonzaga and Kyrene Josafat were the recipients of the $1,500 scholarships awarded by the Willie ‘Iceman’ Knight Bowling Tournament.

earned by three high school seniors who have had a 3.0 GPA during their last four years and who also have participated in a bowling league for two consectutive years. The students honored this year, all from Rehoboth Christian High School, are Gilbert Charley, Jr., Astrid Gonzaga and Kyrene Josafat. The generosity of the bowling public and Gallup merchants is well-known through this and other fund raising

tournaments, and Jacki Knight Ryan, Chairperson for this tournament, summed it up best in a letter she forwarded for inclusion in this article, which reads in part: “The Willie ‘Iceman’ Knight Bowling Tournament extends our heartfelt appreciation and gratitude to all of this year’s tournament participants, volunteers and supporters along with the generosity of supporting Gallup area businesses,

making it possible this year and past years to fund scholarships for 19 deserving young graduating men and women from area high schools totaling $23,000.00. Past recipients of Willie Ic e m a n K n i g ht B owl i n g Tou r na ment schola r sh ips are, alphabetically: Damian Abeita, James Farrell, Brian Ford, Caitlin Harrison, Celeste Knight, Jennifer Knight, Scott K n ig ht, Shelby Ma r ti nezMathews, Jonathan Matajcich,

Amanda Newman, Sean Notah, Courtney Spencer, Jessica Swatzell, Dustin Wyatt, Travis Wyatt, and Phillip Young. On behalf of the Knight family and tournament director Pete Chiapetti, we would like to express our gratitude and thanks to all who have contributed to the success of this scholarship program and helped honor the legacy of Willie Knight . You will be forever in our hearts, Iceman!”

Sports Scoreboard THURSDAY, MAY 7

RCHS Softball 12, Navajo Prep 1 RCHS Softball 13, Navajo Prep 3

FRIDAY, MAY 8 GHS Softball 0, Valencia 10 The bitterly cold weather didn’t stop this crowd from gathering at Ford Canyon Park to watch the Miyamura softball team take on the Artesia Lady Bulldogs.

20 Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup Sun

SATURDAY, MAY 9 MHS Softball 4, Artesia 19

RCHS – Senior Shelby Peterson wins State 3A championship in 100-meter Hurdles in 16.46 seconds. Girls’ team finished 12th with 16.50 points. Scores in this column are for Gallup, Miyamura, Rehoboth and Wingate High schools, the area high schools covered at this time. These four schools are color coded for easier reference while schools outside of our coverage area are always in black. The Gallup Sun encourages coaches in all sports at these schools to submit their scores weekly, no later than Wednesday. Call 505-236-9029 or e-mail info to gallupsports@msn.com.

SPORTS


This Week in Sports MONDAY - MAY 18

ROD CAREW LEAGUE (T-BALL PARK) 6pm Braves vs. D-backs 7pm Cardinals vs. Indians ROBERTO CLEMENTE (INDIAN HILLS PARK) 6pm Reds vs. Angels U-8 SOFTBALL (FATHER DUNSTAN PARK) 6pm Padres at Angels WILLIE MAYS (STAFIE FIELD) 6pm D-Backs vs Yankees PEE WEE REESE LEAGUE (PEE WEE REESE FIELD) 6pm Braves vs Dodgers U-12 SOFTBALL (F.C. SOFTBALL FIELD) 6pm Braves vs Giants SANDY KOUFAX LEAGUE

(MICKEY MANTLE FIELD) 6pm Giants vs. Yankees

TUESDAY - MAY 19 ROD CAREW LEAGUE (T-BALL PARK) 6pm Rockies vs. Tigers 7pm Pirates vs. Yankees ROBERTO CLEMENTE (INDIAN HILLS PARK) 6pm Tigers vs. Twins WILLIE MAYS (STAFIE FIELD) 6pm A’s vs Dodgers U-10 SOFTBALL (FATHER DUNSTAN FIELD) 6pm Seminoles vs. Mustangs PEE WEE REESE LEAGUE (PEE WEE REESE FIELD) 6pm Red Sox vs Rangers

U-14 SOFTBALL (F.C. SOFTBALL FIELD) 6pm Yankees vs. D-backs

WEDNESDAY MAY 20 ROD CAREW LEAGUE (T-BALL PARK) 6pm Red Sox vs. Astros 7pm Angels vs. White Sox ROBERTO CLEMENTE (INDIAN HILLS PARK) 6pm Mets vs. Yankees U-8 SOFTBALL (FATHER DUNSTAN PARK) 6pm Nationals at Giants WILLIE MAYS (STAFIE FIELD) 6pm Nationals vs D-Backs PEE WEE REESE LEAGUE

(PEE WEE REESE FIELD) 6pm Braves vs A’s U-12 SOFTBALL (F.C. SOFTBALL FIELD) 6pm Pirates vs D-Backs SANDY KOUFAX LEAGUE (MICKEY MANTLE FIELD) 6pm Reds vs. Tigers

THURSDAY – MAY 21 ROD CAREW LEAGUE (T-BALL PARK) 6pm A’s vs. Giants 7pm Braves vs. Dodgers ROBERTO CLEMENTE (INDIAN HILLS PARK) 6pm Padres vs. Marlins WILLIE MAYS (STAFIE FIELD) 6pm Angels vs Yankees

U-10 SOFTBALL (FATHER DUNSTAN FIELD) 6pm Bruins vs. H. Frogs PEE WEE REESE LEAGUE (PEE WEE REESE FIELD) 6pm Red Sox vs Dodgers U-14 SOFTBALL (F.C. SOFTBALL FIELD) 6pm Trojans vs. Giants Schedules ae only for one week at a time. Times and locations may change for a variety of reasons. Please contact your school to confirm the dates and times. ONLY the four schools from our coverage area appear in this schedule: Gallup, Miyamura, Rehoboth Christian, and Wingate, and these are color-coded for easier reference. The summer league games are included by age groupings, in red.

New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez and U.S Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Announce Settlement on Nuclear Waste Incidents

T

h e De par tme nt of Energy and the State of New Mexico Agree to Projects for Safer Roads, Improved Water Infrastructure, and Enhanced Emergency Response in New Mexico WASHINGTON, D.C. — New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez and Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz released the terms of a $73 million settlement of the State’s claims against the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors related to the February 2014 incidents at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, including the associated activities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on April 30. “ The Depa r tment of Energy and the State of New Mexico have worked together to identify projects at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Los Alamos National Laboratory that are mutually beneficial and do not detract from cleanup at these sites,” said Secretary Moniz. “I am pleased that we were able to find a solution that will allow the Department to focus on resuming operations at WIPP SPORTS

and improving our waste management operations, while providing benefit to the environment and to local communities in New Mexico.” “This agreement underscores the importance of WIPP and LANL as critical assets to our nation’s security, our state’s economy, and the communities in which they operate,” said Governor Martinez. “The funds we will receive through the agreement will be used to continue ensuring the safety and success of these important facilities, the people who work there, and their local communities. I commend the Department of Energy for taking responsibility, and we look forward to continuing to work with the federal government to ensure the safety and success of LANL and WIPP.” Under th is agreement, instead of paying fines DOE will provide support for a variety of mutually beneficial and critical projects that will protect local communities and better safeguard transportation routes in New Mexico and around DOE sites, which will improve the safety and security of nuclear materials and the designated roads on which they travel.

• These projects, estimated at a total value of $73 million, include approximately: • $34 million to improve roads a nd tra nspor tation routes around the WIPP site in Southeastern New Mexico; • $12 million to improve transuranic waste transportation routes in and around Los Alamos; • $10 million to upgrade critical water infrastructure in and around Los Alamos; • $9.5 million to build engineering structures and increase monitoring capabilities around LANL to better manage storm water flows;

• $5 million to construct an emergency operations center in Carlsbad and provide enhanced training for emergency responders and mine rescue teams; and, • $2.75 million to fund an independent triennial compliance and operational review. • The agreement further provides for DOE and its contractors to implement the necessary corrective actions at both facilities in order to ensure safe and sustainable continued operations. In December, NMED issued two Administrative Consent

Orders to DOE that asserted 31 violations at WIPP and LANL in December 2014, resulting in NMED’s request for $54,350,899 in civil penalties. Today’s Settlement Agreement resolves those Consent Orders as well as any other potential DOE and DOEcontractor liabilities to the State of New Mexico arising out of the February 2014 events at WIPP. The agreement signed by NMED, DOE, Los A lamos National Security and Nuclear Waste Partnership today will bind the Parties’ execution of a more detailed implementation plan in the weeks to come.

Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015

21


Gallup Sun Presents: ‘Tribute to a Veteran’ $30 Per Tribute Half the proceeds go to help Veterans Helping Veterans to further their mission of helping the veteran in need.

Your Name: _______________________________________________ Phone #:____________________ Email: ________________________ Veteran’s Name:_____________________________________________ Military Branch:_____________________________________________ Years of Active Duty: _________________________________________ Theater of Operations (Optional): _______________________________ Valor-Oriented Commendations:________________________________

22

Photos must be scanned in a JPEG format and emailed to: gallupsun@gmail.com Deadline for all submissions May 22, 2015. Gallup Sun • PO Box 1212 • Gallup, NM 87305 We accept checks, major credit cards and cash payments upon time of order. For more information call: (505) 728-1640. Each tribute will be placed in the in the May 29,Sun 2015 ‘Tribute to a Veteran’ section in the Gallup Sun Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup SPORTS


CALENDAR COMMUNITY CALENDAR MAY 15-21, 2015 FRIDAY MAY 15 Habitat for Humanity is in need of volunteers for one or more part day construction or support sessions. No experience required. Yard Sales are closed for Winter. If you have household items to donate or wish to volunteer, call Bill Bright at (505) 7224226

SATURDAY MAY 16 PIPES AND BRASS JUBILATION: BACH TO BRITTEN A classical music concert featuring organ and trumpet, with Julia Thom and Mick Hesse of Farmington, NM. Included will be works by J.S. Bach, Vivaldi, Charpantier and Hovanhess. Donations will go to local ministries for the homeless. Time: 4 pm-5 pm. Church of the Holy Spirit 1334 Country Club Drive in Gallup.

DAWN ‘TIL DUSK 2015 Dawn ‘til Dusk 12Hour Mountain Bike Race! Registration is capped at 600 racers and solos capped at 150, so register early to guarantee your slot! http:// www.ziarides.com

THURSDAY MAY 21 Neighborhood Meeting with Councilor Fran Palochak, District 4 We invite residents of the Western Skies and Sky West areas to meet with Councilor Fran Palochak at our neighborhood meeting beginning at 6 pm. Councilor Palochak will be there to listen to your concerns. It’s a great opportunity to share ideas and we welcome your compliments and complaints. Please join us and feel free to bring a friend or two. Gallup Fire Department Station #4, 707 Rico Street. Email calendar items by Monday 5 pm to: gallupsunevents@gmail.com

MAIL DELIVERY

1 year subscription. Send check for $49.95 to: Gallup Sun Publishing PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305

CLASSIFIEDS CHURCH PEWS FOR SALE 10 feet wide, $250 each or $1500 for all 7. Cash and carry. Call 505-863-3088 to arrange meeting.

HOUSE FOR RENT Gallup, NM Great Downtown Location 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Call Patricia 505-879-7611

DELIVERY DRIVER

INTERNSHIPS

Gallup Sun is hiring independent contractor newspaper delivery drivers for the following routes: -Grants/Milan-Acoma-Laguna -West Gallup-Navajo-Ganado Send work history/resume to: gallupsun@gmail. com

Gallup Sun is looking for English or Journalism students and photographer interns. Must be deadline driven and detail-oriented. Email resume: gallupsun@gmail.com

FREE CLASSIFIEDS!

Gallup Sun is looking for an experienced freelance reporter to cover Gallup city/county/education news. Will consider candidates from outside of the area. Send resume and clips to: gallupsun@gmail. com

Place a standard FREE classified in the Gallup Sun! Runs four weeks. Email classified to: gallupsun@ gmail.com

REPORTER

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED! FREE STANDARD CLASSIFIED (ONE PER CUSTOMER, MAXIMUM OF FOUR ISSUES)

ANY BOLD TEXT, TEXT BOX, YELLOW HIGHLIGHT OR LOGO/PIC $5 EACH, PER WEEK

SEND SPECIFICATIONS & CLASSIFIED TO: GALLUPSUN@GMAIL.COM OR FAX (505)212-0391 DEADLINE MONDAYS 5 PM. EMAIL/FAX SUBMISSIONS ONLY.  PAYMENT DUE IN ADVANCE. ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED.

Governor announces ‘True Summer Reading Challenge’ Staff Report

A

lbuquerque, NM — G ov. Su s a n a Martinez announced May 13 the 2015 New Mexico True Summer Reading Challenge, designed to help prevent students from losing reading proficiency during the summer. “Our cha llenge is simple: read more books during your summer vacation, and you can earn some amazing prizes,” Governor Martinez said. “When our students read over the summer, they are better prepared for the upcoming school year. Everyone loves a challenge, especially when there are prizes. This is a winwin for students, parents, and teachers.” The New Mex ico Tr ue Summer Reading Challenge is open to all New Mexico elementary school children, ages 5 through 12. All students who submit a completed CLASSIFIEDS

log showing that they read six books will receive a New Mexico True bookmark and a certificate recognizing their accomplishment. Students who read 12 or more books and submit a short essay explaining why they love New Mexico will receive a New Mexico True bookmark, a certificate recognizing their accomplishment, and have their name entered in the random drawing for one of the following Grand Prizes:

• All-expense-paid family vacation to Disney’s Animal Kingdom in Orlando, Florida (1 reader) • Hot air balloon ride with Governor Martinez and First Gentleman Chuck Franco, as well as four tickets to the Albuquerque Balloon Museum (2 readers) • Family of four stay at Hotel Albuquerque, tickets to both the High Noon History Tour and the Ghost Tour of Old Town, and tickets for Sandia Peak Tramway rides (1 reader) • Two tickets to ride the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad (1 reader) • An adventure as a junior zookeeper for a day at the ABQ BioPark Zoo (4 readers) • Meet a Lobo head basketball coach, receive free tickets to a Lobo basketball game, take part in a center-court ceremony at WisePies Arena aka The Pit, and receive an autographed Lobo basketball (3 readers) • Meet a n Aggie head

ba sketba ll coach, receive free tickets to an Aggie basketball game, take part in a center-court ceremony at The Pan-Am Center, and receive an autographed Aggie basketball (3 readers) • Fa m i ly fou r-pack of admission tickets for the 2015 New Mexico State Fair and to a concert or rodeo event at Tingley Coliseum • Fossil-digging adventure with the state’s paleontologist and a behind-the-scenes tour of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History (2 reader) • An admission pass for 16 museums and monuments across the state (200 readers) These prizes are made possible by the State of New Mexico and its partnership with: the City of Albuquerque, the ABQ Bio Park, the Greater A lbuquerque Cha mber of Commerce, the Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce, Comcast Internet Essentials, Sandia Peak Tramway, Ghost

Ranch, Heritage Hotels & Resorts, Tours of Old Town, Great Southwest Adventures, Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad, X-Treme-Lee Fun Ba l loon Advent u re s, t he University of New Mexico Athletic Depa r tment, the New Mexico State University Athletic Department, and R & C Sumthins. The New Mexico True brochure and reading log will be distributed to students at public schools throughout the state. It is also available at all local libraries or can be downloaded and printed from the Public Education Department’s website. Entries must be postmarked by July 31, 2015. Participating students must be New Mexico residents, and eligibility will be verified for any Grand Prize winner. For a complete listing of the eligibility requirements and rules regarding the challenge, please visit the Public Education Department’s website.

Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015

23


R

Travel Centers of America Visit Our Restaurant, General Store,TA Truck Service & TA Motel

Visit our general store for a wide selection of snacks and drinks, trucker gear and DVDs

I-40, Exit 16 (Hwy 66) 3404 W Highway 66 Gallup, NM 87301

24 Friday May 15, 2015 • Gallup Sun

(505) 863-6801

CLASSIFIEDS

Gallup Sun • Friday May 15, 2015  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you