Page 1

COMPLIMENTARY TAKE ONE!

Local writer pens anthology.10

WNMU kicks off graduation season. 7

VOL 1 | ISSUE 5 | MAY 8, 2015

Feature Story:

MULTICULTURAL ROOTS Hispanic seniors share nostalgic Gallup past.3

Film Review: ‘Hot Pursuit’ to cool moviegoers.12


WHO HAVE YOU LOVED THE LONGEST?

3

Day Sale

Thursday, Friday & Saturday

What are you giving her

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1308 Metro Ave. 505-863-9559 2

Friday May 8, 2015 • Gallup Sun

NEWS


NEWS Celebrating Gallup Hispanic Culture: THREE SENIORS SHARE MEMORIES OF YESTERYEAR Story and Photos by Marley Shebala Sun Correspondent

T

here was a time when Gamerco was bigger and more affluent than Gallup. There was also a time when the Gallup High School mascot was the tigers and not the Bengals. And there was a time when milk was bottled in glass and delivered to your front door. Huge blocks of ice were also home delivered. Those are some of the memories of three life-time residents of Gallup, who are all in their late 70s. Archie Baca, who is the former owner of Jerry’s Café and current owner of Don Diego’s restaurant, remembered the words of his late dad, Diego Baca, when he told him that he was getting married and moving back to Gallup. His dad, and mom, the late Margaret, had moved from Gallup to Grants, where his dad delivered bread for Rainbow bread company to the eastern part of the Navajo reservation, which was had unpaved roads like most of the state and country. “I remember when I told my dad that I was getting married and moving back to Gallup,” he said. “He was really happy. He told me that Gallup was the place to make a living for me and my children. He was right. Gallup is a great place.” Archie said Gallup also continues to be a place of mixed cultures. “As a kid growing up here it didn’t matter what you were,” he remembered. “We all played together.” A rch ie wa s bor n i n Springerville, Ariz., where he remembered roaming “free” on the land. He also remembered that his family’s home lacked electricity and running water. But they had an outside water well. There was also a river near his family’s home.

NEWS

Melba Chavez-Jarzomkowski said that school buses didn’t exist when she attended school in Gallup.

“We had a great life,” he recalled with a huge smile. “We were free to go anywhere as long as we didn’t break any house rules.” And one of the core house rules was school. “School was a must,” he said. But that didn’t include high school because not everyone had the opportunity to attend high school. “Graduating from high school was a plus,” Archie said. And he said if your family was wealthy, you would attend college. H i s fa m i ly event u a l ly moved to Gallup when he was still a boy. He recalled one day in 1945, when he was playing with a bunch of his friends in the area where Junker Bridge is now. “All of a sudden, we heard sirens a nd bells r inging,” Archie said. “We got kind of scared and we ran home because we didn’t know what was going on.” When he got home, he found

Johnny Espinosa remembered that Gamerco was bigger than Gallup.

out that the sirens and bells were ringing to announce the end of World War II. As he talked about more boyhood memories he looked around his restaurant and said that his friends were Hispanics, Indians, Anglos and other races. Gallup was a mixture of cultures he said and it continues to be that way today. “Of course, there were and are rivalries but people get along,” he said. On the walls of Don Diego restaurant are beautiful colored photos of the Navajo Code Ta lker s a nd you ng Navajo teens carrying a huge American flag. Most of the restaurant patrons are Navajo people. Cecil Baca, Archie’s son, said that he loves listening to the cultural stories shared by their Navajo customers. Archie and Cecil said that some of their Navajo customers are now the adult-grandchildren of former Navajo customers who have “passed on.”

The color photos, which are from the annual InterTribal Indian Ceremonial spark another memory from Archie. “I remember when the Navajo people would come to the Inter-tr iba l India n Ceremonial in covered wagons,” he said. “It was a beautiful sight.” Archie lamented the relocation of the ceremonial ground to Red Rock State Park, which is about 10 miles east of Gallup, because it took a lot of business away from the downtown area. The mall and large retail businesses have also taken business from downtown but at least there’s an effort to revive the downtown area, he added. “Gallup has gone through a lot of changes and so has our way of life,” he said. The way of life that Archie remembered was kids spending most of the day playing outside instead of indoors watching television and, or playing electronic games. He also remembered riding with dad as his dad delivered

bottled milk to the front doors of homes. His dad would have to make milk deliveries really early during ceremonial time to avoid all the traffic, Archie said. And he said when our family and other families went shopping, we didn’t take what we wanted off the shelves. We’d tell the store clerk behind the store counter the item on the shelf that we wanted and the clerk would get it for us, Archie explained. He sighed and said Gallup has its ups and downs but it’s still a great place to live. It was May 5 when the Gallup Sun interviewed Archie and May 5 is Cinco de Mayo. One of the downtown business was hosting a Cinco de Mayo celebration but not the Don Diego restaurant. A rchie said that Cinco de Mayo is a celebration for Mexico. “We’re from over here,” he said. “We respect the people of the Mexico that way.” He added that the food served at Don Diego is New Mexican food and not Mexican food. “There’s a difference,” he emphasized. At the North Side Senior Citizen Center, a few of the people wished each other a happy Cinco de Mayo day. Johnny Espinosa was one of them. Espinosa, who lived in the same area of Gallup where he spent his childhood, said Gallup never celebrated Cinco de Mayo. When Gamerco was bigger than Gallup, Gamerco would host an annual 16 th day of September celebration, he said. Espinosa explained that Sept. 16 marked the day when Mexico began its fight for its freedom from Spain. But he said when the five coal mines closed that surrounded Gamerco and Gallup,

HISPANIC CULTURE | SEE PAGE 4

Gallup Sun • Friday May 8, 2015

3


HISPANIC CULTURE | FROM PAGE 3 Gamerco stopped having the annual September event, which included a contest that involved contestants loading coal. The contestants, who were coal miners and a mix of cultures, that loaded the coal first won, he said. He also sadly recalled that the Gibson coal mine fire killed a lot of Chinese because it was mostly Chinese men that worked there. Espinosa said that Gamerco also had a swimming pool before Gallup. He said that Gallup got its name from a railroad paymaster named Gallup. He couldn’t remember the first name of Gallup. He remembered, “People would ask each other, ‘Where you going?’, and they’d say, ‘Going to Gallup.’” And when he heard that the Gallup Sun had interviewed Archie Baca, he smiled and said that he played high school baseball and football against Archie. Espinosa also remembered that the Gallup High School mascot was the tigers and not the Bengals. The ma scot na me wa s changed because there were a

lot of other high schools that had the tigers as their mascot, he said. “We figured that Bengals were bigger than tigers,” he added with a laugh. “We played in the dirt and the field was lined with white lime. You’d get a face full of lime if you fell on the line,” he said. Espinosa also remembered that the Gallup high school football field was the ceremonial grounds. And when the football game was in Grants, it was played in the rodeo grounds, he said. “The last game of the season was at Fort Wingate and there was four inches of snow,” he remembered. “We froze! We were covered in mud.” Espinosa said he still has a photo of himself from that game. Melba ChavezJa r zom kow sk i, who wa s listening to Espinosa, said she remembered walking to school in the snow. There were no buses and our family car was used to get our parents to work, she said. Espinosa said that he had to walk cross the railroad tracks to get to school and if the train

was going across the tracks, he’d be late to school. “I’d tell the teacher about the train and some days, I’d get the paddle or I’d get an excused tardy,” he said. Chavez-Jarzomkowski said she lived on the south side of Gallup and so she didn’t have to walk across the train tracks. Her childhood memories of Gallup included the home delivery of a huge block of ice, which her parents put in the ice box or refrigerator. Her parents also had to put a huge pan under the ice box to catch the water that dripped from melting block of ice. She and her parents moved to Gallup after she was born in Cubero, N.M., which is near the Pueblo of Laguna. After she explained that her family considered themselves Spanish and not Mexican or Hispanic, Espinosa said that his late parents both came from Mexico. “I’m not sure why some people don’t like to be called Mexican,” he said. “There are no pure blood Spanish people. When the Spanish came over here, they didn’t bring their women. They were with women from here, American Indian women, and that’s the Mexican people.”

Archie Baca, owner of Don Diego’s restaurant, shared family and boyhood memories of Gallup.

He added that his boyhood friends, high school classmates, especially team mates and rival sports teams, consisted of all kinds of races. Sam Florence, a Navajo elder sitting at a nearby who was listening to Espinosa,

teased him and said he was a better football player than Espinosa. F lorence s a id he met Espinosa in high school in 1952.

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Friday May 8, 2015 • Gallup Sun

NEWS


GPD cracking down WEEKLY DWI REPORT on public drinking By Kimberly A. Gaona Sun Correspondent

By Kimberly A. Gaona

T

he G a l lu p Pol ic e Department recently re-instituted a new way of catching individuals that drink in public. Unless there are warrants or exigent circumstances, the offenders are taken to Gallup Detox or released and then later summonsed into court. • Davey Cooeyate, 36, of Zuni, was found pouring beer into a cup in the downtown walkway. • Jefford Baker, 52, of Gallup, was seen drinking behind El Dorado on West 66. • A lv in Willie, 53, of Gallup, and Felix Nelson, 31, of Vanderwagen, were seen drinking just off of South Second Street.

Gallup Sun Publishing, LLC Publisher/Editor Babette Herrmann Correspondents Kim Gaona Tom Hartsock Melinda Sanchez Marley Shebala Design David Tsigelman The Gallup Sun, published Fridays, is not responsible or liable for any claims or offerings, nor responsible for availability of products advertised. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305 www.gallupsun.com Find us on Facebook and Twitter Phone: (505) 728-1640 Fax: (505) 212-0391 gallupsun@gmail.com Letter to the editor/guest column ACCEPTED BY EMAIL ONLY. State full name and city/town. No pen names. ID required. All submissions subjected to editor’s approval. Guest columnists, email Sun for submission requirements.

NEWS

Police are cracking down on folks caught drinking in public, which often leads to becoming drunk in public, as seen in this photo, an offense not punishable by law under New Mexico state statute. Photo Credit: Courtesy photo

• Emilena Wilson, 32, of Sanders, Ariz. was found drinking a “clear colored liquid from a vodka bottle” on the curb at Home Depot. She was taken to detox and put on hold so that she could later be booked into jail for an outstanding warrant for a probation violation. • Nathan Yazzie, 28, and Shane Dennison, 21, both of Gallup, were seen drinking vodka at Home Depot and will be summoned to court. • Jeremiah James, 27, of Gallup and Ross Anderson, 42, of Churchrock were seen drinking on the north side of Gallup in the area of Wilson and North Second Street alleyway. After finishing his drink, Anderson was seen by officers going to the bathroom in public and leaving his beer container behind. James was summonsed for drinking in public. Ross was also summonsed for drinking in public, but he will also have to answer to the charges of lewd, immoral or obscene acts and littering. A ll of the people summonsed will have to appear at Municipal Court, in Judge Grant Foutz’ chamber.

Loren Eric John, 30, Sheep Springs, NM A f t e r striking another vehicle and leaving the scene of the accident , Joh n was pointed out to Officer Justin Benally for driving away with no headlights on. Benally stopped the vehicle and found the driver to be showing signs of intoxication as well as having at least one open container of beer inside his vehicle. John was booked into McKinley County Adult Detention Center April 24, on his second charge of driving while intoxicated among other multiple charges. Charmaine Montoya, 25, Mentmore, NM Mont oya wa s ch a rged with her first Driving While Intoxicated after she backed into a marked Gallup Police vehicle April 26. That same

v e h i c l e housed a suspect in a stole n v e h ic le investigation. Montoya told the arresting Officer Charles Steele that she had brought her friend to the Gallup Indian Medical Center and fell asleep, she was awoken by a security guard and didn’t see the police car due to her contacts being dried out. After further investigation, Montoya admitted to drinking a few beers. Latoya M ike, 30, Churchrock, NM Mike was arrested and taken to jail a f t er bei n g called in as a possible drunk driver April 29 in the American Heritage parking lot. Officer Chanelle Preston observed the vehicle driving erratically through the parking lot and found Mike and her

passengers to be intoxicated. Mike was booked into the jail for a DWI and suspended or revoked license. Ronald D. Russell, 44, Chambers, Ariz. Russell was spotted by Of f icer H a r l a n d Soseeah May 3 a f ter a n at tempt to lo c a t e w a s given to officers due to his arguably reckless driving in the Patton Drive/Dairy Drive area of Gallup. One citizen complained that they were almost hit head on by his vehicle. Soseeah located Russell at a dead end trying to turn his vehicle around. After field sobriety tests, Russell was arrested. He blew a .24 on the breathalyzer test, putting him three times over the legal limit for driving. Russell was charged with Aggravated DWI, driver’s license suspended or revoked, and not driving on the right side of the road. This marks his third DWI arrest.

THANK YOU ADVERTISERS Castle Furniture - 2 TravelCenters of America – 16 WNMU-Gallup – 6, 7, 10 Hilton Garden Inn – 7 M&S Shaved Ice – 1 First American Credit Union – 11 Thunderbird Supply Co. – 5 Butler’s Office Equipment & Supply – 9 Cowtown Feed & Livestock – 12 Richardson’s Trading – 15 Cocina de Dominguez – 4 Pee Wee’s Kitchen – 4 Coal Street Pub – 4 Rocket Cafe – 4 Sammy C’s – 4

Gallup Sun • Friday May 8, 2015

5


WNMU-GALLUP SUMMER 2015 Course Schedule

Course Cancella on: The university reserves the right to cancel course not selected by an adequate or not suitably staff by qualified faculty

CRN

CODE

COURSE TITLE

30292 EDUC534 Integration of Technology into Curriculum

DATES

TIMES

CR

INSTRUCTOR

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Dr. Manuel Bustamante

RM

MA-EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 30317 EDL525

Education in a Pluralistic Society

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Dr. Alexandra Neves

30475 EDL526

Education Leadership Public Domain

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Isaac Brundage

30474 EDL561

School Finance and Budgeting

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

STAFF

30235 COUN532 Program Development and Management

6/1 to 6/30/2015

T,W,R

5:30pm - 9:15pm

3

Lynnette Cuellar

30505 COUN578 Topics In Counseling

6/1 to 8/4/2015

M

5:30pm - 9:15pm

3

Staff

ITV-B

30506 COUN527 Assessment of the Individual

7/6 to 8/4/2015

T,W,R

5:30pm - 9:00pm

3

Staff

ITV-B

MA-COUNSELING D

MAT-TEACHING ELEMENTARY/SECONDARY EDUCATION 30105 EDUC503 Action Research

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Dr. Barbara Taylor

30104 EDUC574 Classroom Assessment

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Dr. Margarita Wulftange

3

Roberta Marquez

MAT-TEACHING ELEMENTARY/SECONDARYEDUCATIONWITH TESOL OR BILLINGUAL ENDORSEMENT See online course schedule for all TESOL/BLED courses at http://www.wnmu.edu > class schedule > online anywhere

MAT-TEACHING SPECIAL EDUCATION 30309 SPED508

Introduction to Exceptional Children

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

30252 SPED454

Evaluation & Assessment Exceptional Children

7/6 to 8/4/2015

M,T,W,R

3:30pm-5:50pm

3

Mary Lindenmyer

C

30253 SPED554

Evaluation & Assessment Exceptional Children

7/6 to 8/4/2015

M,T,W,R

3:30pm-5:50pm

3

Mary Lindenmyer

C

30464 CJUS480

WKSP: NM Search and Seizure Law

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Curtis Hayes

30033 CJUS481

SL: Internship in Criminal Justice

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Curtis Hayes

30327 CJUS581

Internship in Criminal Justice

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Curtis Hayes

30131 SWK101

Introduction to Social Welfare and Social Work

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Louise Ortega

30485 SWK102

Ethics in SWK/Human Services

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Becky Brandsberg-Herrera

30484 SWK300

Human Behavior and the Social Environment I

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Eric Moore

30132 SWK320

Diversity in Social Work Practice

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Jeanine Jones

30287 SWK406

Social Work In School Setting

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Leslie Cook

30419 SWK491

Social Work Field Placement Seminar I

6/1 to 8/4/2015

M

30136 SWK492

Social Work Field Placement I

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

BAS-CRIMINAL JUSTICE

BSW-SOCIAL WORK

4:00pm to 5:00pm

1

Eric Moore

6

Eric Moore

30417 SWK498

Social Work Field Placement Seminar II

6/1 to 8/4/2015

M

1

Eric Moore

30138 SWK499

Social Work Field Placement II

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

6

Eric Moore

30133 SWK501

Cultural Competency in SWK Practice

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Jeanine Jones

30298 SWK506

Social Work In School Setting

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Rachael Richter

30486 SWK511

Generalist Social Work Practice

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Rachael Richter

30487 SWK610

Administration/Supervision

6/1 to 6/30/2015

ONLINE

3

Rachael Richter

5:00pm to 6:00pm

ITV-A

ITV-A

MSW-SOCIAL WORK

30391 SWK581

Foundation Field Practicum

6/1 to 8/4/2015

T

4:00pm-5:00pm

3

Leslie Cook

ITV-A

30396 SWK582

Foundation Field Practicum II

6/1 to 8/4/2015

T

4:00pm-5:00pm

6

Leslie Cook

ITV-A

30488 SWK651

SWK Clinical Intervention Assessment

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Patricia West-Okiri

30420 SWK681

Advanced Field Practicum I

6/1 to 8/4/2015

W

5:00pm-6:00pm

1

Staff

ITV-A

30422 SWK682

Advanced Field Practicum II

6/1 to 8/4/2015

W

5:00pm-6:00pm

6

Staff

ITV-A

30489 SWK630

Rural Social Welfare Policy

6/1 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Eric Moore

30496 SWK510

Human Behavior or Social Environment

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Louise Ortega

30134 SWK520

Understanding Rural Community

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Rachael Richter

30492 SWK540

Foundations of Research Methods

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Dr. Beth Walker

30494 SWK580

WKSP: Advance School SWK Practice

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Leslie Cook

30339 SWK621

Rural Community Organization and Development

7/6 to 8/4/2015

ONLINE

3

Patricia West-Okiri

Western New Mexico University – Gallup 2055 State Road 602, Gallup, NM 87301 (505) 722-3389 ggsc.wnmu.edu 6

Friday May 8, 2015 • Gallup Sun

NEWS


Graduates honored at WNMU–Gallup ceremony Rachael Merilatt Sun Correspondent

W

estern New Mexico University Gallup honored 26 graduates at their spring 2015 commencement ceremony May 2. The event was held at 10 am in the Kenneth Holloway Auditorium at

Western New Mexico University – Gallup 2055 State Road 602 Gallup, New Mexico 87301 Bachelor & Graduate Degree Completion Programs Phone: 505-722-3389 Fax: 505-722-3195 Website: www.wnmu.edu

Gallup High School. Dr. Linda Hoy, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs, presented 23 students with bachelor and master degrees in a variety of subjects, including Early Childhood Education, Social Work, Criminal Justice and Counseling. The remaining three students received alternative licensure certifications in Education.

1530 West Maloney Ave Gallup, NM 87301 TEL: (505) 722-9600

Eli Johnson speaks at WNMU Commencement Ceremony as he receives the top academic award for his Master of Social Work degree.

WNMU Professor Curtis Hayes and Dr. Linda Hoy honor graduates during the May 2 ceremony. Photo Credit: Tom Hartsock

David Palenschat speaks as he is presented with the top academic award for his work in Special Education-Alternative Licensure.

G r a d u a t e s J o l e n e Ya z z i e , D a v i d Pa len sch a t , a nd El i Joh n son s poke a t the ceremony on behalf of each program. Professor Curtis Hayes, Dr. Beth Walker, and Assistant Professors Jeanine Jones and Roberta Marquez presented the 18th Annual Distinguished Graduate awards, which honors exceptional students who excel in academic excellence. The Desert Community School of Arts String Group Orchestra performed several times, including a rendition of the national anthem.

Class of 2015 WNMU Graduates The following 26 students at Western NM University-Gallup received diplomas or certification last Saturday, May 2, at the Kenneth Holloway Auditorium on the campus of Gallup High School. Bachelor of Applied Science in Criminal Justice – Danielle Lynch and Ladera Storer. Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education – Shauntae Jim. Bachelor of Social Work – Shana Arviso, Amelda James, Janell Laughlin, Marilyn Reeves and Sheena Sandoval. Master of Social Work – Eli Johnson and Surphina Oyebi. Master of Arts in Counseling – Katrina Carpenter, Bernice Yazzie, Jolene Yazzie and Sharon Yazzie. NEWS

Master of Arts in Educational Leadership – Erin Easley and Renee Aarons-Cooke. Master of Arts in Teaching-Elementary – LeeAnne Arnold, Chrisopher Hall, Tarah Hall and Grant Rogers. Master of Arts in Teaching-Special Education – Nancy Adams, Sean Shiel and Maria Gloria Tabar. Certificate of Completion-Elementary Education Alternative Licensure – Cory Williams. Certificate of Completion-Secondary Education Alternative Licensure – Philip Frederickson. Ce r tificate of Completion- Special Education Alternative Licensure – David Palenschat.

Mother's Day Brunch May 10 10 am - 2 pm

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Reservations Suggested Call (505) 722-9600

Gallup Sun • Friday May 8, 2015

7


OPINIONS Schaller conducts his own curbside recycling ‘analysis’

By Joe Schallar Guest Columnist

I

have been following the numerous city meetings on curbside recycling since last summer, asking questions, taking notes, following up with extensive research and even providing a condensed feasibility study from previous articles I have written in local publications. I recently discovered the Susta inable Ga llup Boa rd already reached a curbside de c i s ion s e ver a l mont h s ago. Since neither the city council nor SGB will grant me twenty minutes speaking time, I am presenting my

comprehensive analysis in writing. I was formerly a Sierra Club hippie on a spiritual quest to save the planet in the 1970s and 1980s. In 1975 I studied wind energy at EWSC. In 1985 I instructed GHS sophomores on the ‘greenhouse effect’. In the 1990s I decided to study the science and economics of ecology as well as the history of the green culture, so I removed the blinders of faith, bid farewell to the romantic world of the Sierra Club congregation and became an environmental investigator, watchdog, whistleblower and free market environmentalist. Since then I have put in considerable time investigating issues rather than relying on politically correct dogma, and have written several articles in local publications over the past decade exposing the corruption of the green culture, such as my study on indoor air

pollution from wood and coal burning stoves which is considered by the World Health Organization as the greatest environmental health hazard in the world as well as the Navajo Nation. That deadly respiratory hazard is caused by lack of access to affordable energy and is largely ignored by green activists in favor of an anti-industry, anti-energy campaign, and when I say green activists I include the Ga l lup Independent. I have also written articles concerning renewable energy, and years ago even debated on public radio with SGB chairman on that topic yet despite my ex p er t i s e w a s never invited onto the Sustainable Energy Board, which indicates to me a lack of intellectual honesty and diversity… so, I have experience on both sides of the green movement. I understand the green politics, bureaucracy, big business,

MADAME G

eco-activism, and the psycho-social dynamics of the green culture and what motivates them. I have no skin in the game other than truth and justice. I have attended five meetings on curbside recycling and have some issues. The first is with CDM Smith. They have a profit motive and are essentially salesmen selling us a service and product. They specialize in implementation rather than feasibility and it was their implementation report which was used as a feasibility study. A feasibility study is supposed to investigate the pros and cons of an investment however only the benefits have been explored. The McKinley Recycling Council offered only a simple community survey of 146 responders to the Sustainable Energ y Boa rd before the implementation process was initiated.

That was the official ‘feasibility study’, 146 responses to a questionnaire out of 6,000 Gallup households. Seriously? That’s like a small church congregation of eco-activists making policy decisions for the city. As far as feasibility studies go we already have a city manager, who was left out of the initial process, and a sanitation director who was also absent. They are paid quite well to be experienced and knowledgeable in their areas of expertise. We also have nearly 30 years of national curbside recycling success or failure to draw from, yet the feasibility was determined by a simple local survey. The CDM report examines hand-picked curbside programs of Farmington, Silver City, Las Cruces and Laramie WY with no mention of profitability or unintended costs. Part 1 in a 3 part series. Continued next week.

GUIDE TO THE STARS WEEK OF MAY 1-7

ARIES (March 21-April 19)

CANCER (June 21-June 22)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.22)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Enjoy basking in the glow of your happiness this week. Times have been tough the last couple of weeks, and you were really sinking into a gloom, zombie type state – just going through the motions of life, and basically sucking the life out of the party. Now this has passed, share your happiness with others. Go bowling for fun.

Feeling a bit fearless this week? If you never thought about skydiving or tightrope walking as an extra curricular activity until this week, you know that you have shifted gears internally to take some calculated risks. Try some less drastic activity like playing tetherball or old school Tetris.

Balancing your scales, well it’s a delicate balancing act. You have a social engagement coming up and it’s one that you probably should bring a date or mate to. But don’t distress single scales, hit up that guy or gal pal to attend that wedding, graduation or some other gathering, to in essence, be your pseudo-date. You will make some new friends this week.

With Mercury entering its pre-retrograde shadow, you’ll want to take a break from the tech gadgets and focus on the romance department. Spend time with your mate or make time to meet someone new. You’re so analytical; you forget that you can have a relationship that doesn’t involve your smart phone and a lesson plan. Watch the movie “Her.” Don’t be tech creepy.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

I insist that you stop watching those “Real Housewives” variety of reality garbage or the booty-obsessed “Kardashians.” It’s high time you see a mind-tingling flick. Think El Morro Theatre. Yes, I am promoting local stuff to do, but you need a good kick in the mind to keep that stinger sharp, and they feature movies in which people talk to each other without all the glitter and tight dresses.

This weekend drop your plans of whacking or torching those pesky weeds. Time to turn up the romance or make plans with family, like going to the movies or a picnic. Something where everyone can bond like the “Brady Bunch.” Guys, be more traditional in the romance department. Ladies may claim to not like flowers, but trust me, they do.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) For you, this week is like Valentine’s Day every day! With the full moon in Scorpio, you will spend much of the week trying to mesmerize and win over your mate with your romantic wiles and wicked good looks. Don’t go overboard with the flowers. Be different: try buying some dual pogo sticks or go on an adventure you love nut. Bounce around a bit.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Hey puss n’ boots, you often feel like you have no talent to share with the world when you actually do? Look at your career and be proud of the skills you bring to the daily grind. Still feeling talentless? Learn something new, like paint by numbers or weight lifting. If you’re feeling ambitious, take up square dancing.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

If you’re not spending time working out, or getting minimal exercise, such as walking to the second bathroom instead of your first, you best get started. As an active creature at heart you deserve to carve out some “me time.” Also, you need to feel confident as strut your stuff around Gallup in your summer garb.

The planet Neptune in your space has you feeling a bit sprightly in your step. Only time will tell if this pleasant feeling is a passing phase or if the king of the seas is tricking you into feeling overly confident. It’s up to you to brace yourself for the incoming tides by preparing yourself for life’s low and high tides.

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Friday May 8, 2015 • Gallup Sun

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Anything goes this week. Meaning, just go with the flow and everything will turn out fine or how it’s intended to work out. If you don’t resist, you’ll feel magical, like Alice in Wonderland, or Gallup in this case. Life is about enjoyment, not lamenting over your messy house. Embrace what you have.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Trust me, you have no problem being dreamy and going with the flow, ‘er, well most of the time. It’s high time you get out the notepad and start a “to do list” and quit procrastinating. Those boxes that have been sitting your spare room for a year are not going to empty themselves out. Take off the rose colored glasses and get real Pisces!

OPINIONS


COMMUNITY Birdhouse auction showcases artists, philanthropic spirit By Melinda Russell Sun Correspondent

O

nce again, Gallup proves itself to be a multi-talented community. The 8th Annual Birdhouse Auction sponsored by the Ups and Downs team from the American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life hosted a fun and quality event at Sammy C’s May 3. Over 60 people gathered to take part in the fun when the auctioneers, Joe Hibbard, John Hornbeck and Patrick Moore got the evening under way. “Who’ll give me 20? 20? 20?” was the starting call for many of the sales. Some, quickly developed into bidding competitions and turned into big donations for the American Cancer Society. Gallup High School science teacher, Mary Ann Seslar was inspired by a photo of an old watch. She started creating a steampunk birdhouse by assembling copper pipe, broken toy gears, clock dials and lenses to give them new life in an 1880’s futuristic fashion that raised $ 275.00 for the charity. Seslar explained her mother is an 8 year breast cancer survivor.

Participation “is my way of helping somebody else’s mother,” she said. “I know this group will get the money to the right place.” Tom Hall taught in Gallup for 30 years and has recently retired in Albuquerque. He comes back to the auction every year and with good reason. “It is a great cause, and it’s sort of fun to do,” he said. Hall has participated by making birdhouses for the auction seven years. This year’s entry was a beautiful prefabricated birdhouse standing about 2-feet tall. Hall added rock work, copper and turquoise patina to make the sculpture stand out. It was a crowd favorite causing the biggest of the evening’s bidding wars. In the end, Jeannie Colaianni prevailed with a bid of $330.00 for “CopperRoofed Beauty.” “I love the architecture, the rustic look,” she said. Gallup High School art teacher, Debbie Thomas was on hand to watch the handy work of her students go up for bid. Eleven Gallup High School art students donated ceramic and wooden originals to the auction. Some of the youth also donated their time,

Proud winner, Jeanie Colaianni, displays her CopperRoofed Beauty after winning the hottest bidding war of the evening. Photo Credit: Melinda Russell

helping to show the artwork during the auction. Linda Shelton, event coordinator, said they have several people who have created birdhouses every year for the auction. Kathe Noe, Debbie Thomas, Anita Palenschat and John

Wells are few of those dedicated community members. Other popular works were “Where’s da Sheep,” by Ir ving Bahe, and “Monarch” by Ambrose Begay. People were happy to bid on works by lesser known artists as well. Six-year-old Mary Helen Brown has contributed her artwork the past 3 years. Artists range from extremely talented to beginners. There were a total of 88 birdhouses donated this year – a birdhouse available for nearly every taste and interest. There was also a quilt donated by Mary Pacey from Olathe, Kansas. This is the third year she has made and donated a quilt for the auction. According to Shelton, Sammy C’s has been the official venue for the event all eight years. “I love Sammy Chioda,” she said. “He has been so good to Relay for years. He’s just the nicest man.” This year’s auction netted about $5,700. You can view the 2015 selection of bird houses at www.gallupbirdhouses.com. If you would like to create one for next year, contact Linda Shelton at (505) 722-2175 or email: adnil.notlehs@gmail.com.

Road Trip BONUS EDITION! Story and Photos By Melinda Russell Sun Correspondent

D

o you realize the first National Park was designated in 1872? The Yellowstone National Park Act set aside over 2 million acres of land in Montana and Wyoming for the park. Since then, over 400 national parks have been created and preserved. There are more than 25 national parks and monuments close enough to Gallup to be visited overnight or in a weekend. I asked several UNM students where they will go this summer if they get the chance. Amanda Livingston said she will take a 4 day trip to Las Vegas so she can relax before working hard this summer. Sheldon Rodriquez

COMMUNITY

wants to make it to Sand Diego. And brother and sister Sam and Fabian Vicenti want to go to Denver and San Diego respectively. Hmm, I think we have a beach theme developing. It seems, nobody wants to road trip in New Mexico. When polled, 5 out of 37 UNM students ranging in ages from 17 to 70 said they have not visited any New Mexico National Parks. In the poll, 25 respondents report visiting El Mor ro Nationa l Monument while not one has visited Capulin Volcano, Fort Union or the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monuments. We New Mexicans have, at our fingertips, the privilege of experiencing and exploring some of the most beautiful and most historic wonders of nature in the world. National Parks are extremely

Brother and sister, Fabian and Sam Vicenti want to travel but are unsure of their plans.

inexpensive to visit. Why don’t we take time to visit these national treasures? This reporter is just as guilty as the rest. I have lived in Gallup over 35 years and I have never seen the Grand Canyon. The last time I visited Chaco Canyon I was in my teens, 37 years ago. I have seen the Bunker Hill and the Puget Sound but I have never

ROAD TRIP | SEE PAGE 11 Gallup Sun • Friday May 8, 2015

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Local Author Pays homage to Gallup, childhood in book series Rachael Merilatt Sun Correspondent

I just had a natural progression, just wanted to start writing more, so it kind of progressed to the short stories.» - Micah Cabrera

W

hen Micah Cabrera discusses Gallup, New Mexico, he person if ies the definition of hometown pride. In fact, his admiration of the town is so strong that it is the setting of a children’s book series authored by Cabrera called “Pepito and his Little Donkey Cito.” The main character, Pepito, lives with his family in Gallup and explores a number of important topics that he hopes readers, particularly residents of Gallup, will enjoy and appreciate.

EARLY YEARS AND INSPIRATION Born in Gallup in 1955, Cabrera’s family moved to California the following year so his father could pursue a career in banking. However, Gallup remained a constant in his life in several ways. As a child, his father would regale his children with tales of a child named Pepito and his donkey, Cito. “He used to gather us in the bedroom on Saturday mornings and tell us these stories,” he remembers fondly. “They always took place in the town of Gallup, his hometown.” The New Mexico native also recalls his family’s annual summer trips to Gallup in the 1960s with endearment, describing it as “magical.” “We fell in love with the place as kids, playing with our cousins and roaming around the hills of the

Western New Mexico University – Gallup 2055 State Road 602 Gallup, New Mexico 87301

Bachelor & Graduate Degree Completion Programs Phone: 505-722-3389 Fax: 505-722-3195 Website: www.wnmu.edu

10

Gallup local John “Micah” Cabrera plans on releasing six more books in the “Pepito and his Little Donkey Cito” series.

North Side,” he said. “Ever since then, when I was a child, I always wanted to come back here.” Va r ious circu msta nces delayed him from moving back. Eventually, Cabrera and his family relocated to Gallup in 2000, and have been residents ever since. Writing has always been a pastime of Cabrera’s, so much so that he found a way to jot down stories while working in an oil field. Unfortunately, his early writings were done on paper and were eventually lost. He continued to hone his writing skills by penning cigar reviews for the Tee Pee Smoke Shop in Gallup. The desire to write increased so much that he knew it was time to do more. “I just had a natural progression, just wanted to start writing more, so it kind of progressed to the short stories.” W h i le he h a d t rouble recalling details about the stories from his childhood, he always remembered Pepito. He decided to create a series of fictional short stories that were inspired by his family. Ironically, some of the ideas for the newer “Pepito” stories came from his father. “Every time I need an idea for a story, I call him,” he revealed.

PEPITO AND HIS LITTLE DONKEY, CITO Set in 1960s Gallup, “Pepito and his Little Donkey Cito” follows Pepito, Cito, Mama Tina, Grandpa Juan and a host of other family members and friends. The stories take place from Pepito’s perspective,

Friday May 8, 2015 • Gallup Sun

and the young boy’s wideeyed excitement for the world around him makes for an engaging, heart-warming read.

Pepito as his grandmother, affectionately named “Mama Tina”, opens a tamale business in Gallup. Like the previous book, the story is a recollection of how Cabrera’s own grandmother, Tina, opened a tamale restaurant in Gallup nearly 50 years ago, which now operates under the name Erlinda’s Tamales, which will serve as the plot of another Pepito book in the future. When asked about his tar-

months. Upon completion, he wants to compile all ten books into an anthology and have them published in print. Most impressive is the fact that he doesn’t use any outlines or pre-written ideas; it all comes from his mind. “I just look at a blank page and start coming up with something, and that’s how it goes. Thank goodness they’re just short stories,” he says with a chuckle. His family and friends are very supportive of the Pepito series, which, in turn, encourages his writing endeavors. After the Pepito series is completed, he would like to work on a semi-autobiographical novel that would include some of the events that have

“Pepito and his Little Donkey Cito” is available for digital download on Amazon.com. Photo Credit: Courtesy

To d a t e, Ca brer a h a s released four titles in the “Pepito” series: “The Circus Comes to Gallup”; “Pepito Shelters the Homeless”; “Pepito Discovers His Roots” and “Tina’s Tamales is Born.” The first installment finds Pepito in amazement as the Circus comes to town, while introducing the readers to the characters and setting. In Pepito Shelters the Homeless, Pepito discovers a way to help the less fortunate citizens of Gallup by bringing the community together. Pepito Discovers His Roots has Pepito learning about his lineage on his mother’s side of the family, influenced by his maternal family history. The latest release, “Tina’s Tamales Is Born,” follows

get audience, he shares that he would like to see people of all ages reading “Pepito and his Little Donkey Cito.” He passes on the good principles and morals given to him by his father to Pepito, and thinks everyone could benefit from it. Cabrera also has the residents of Gallup in mind when writing the series. “I think people reading these, especially from the town of Gallup… can see the natural progression of things that might cross their minds and make things better, hopefully some lasting changes.”

WHAT’S NEXT? Having received a significant amount of local attention for the Pepito series, Cabrera plans to write and release six more books over the next few

transpired in his life, like losing his wife and having to raise five children. “I think it would make a good book, a very inspirational book.” When he isn’t working on a story, he enjoys practicing photography and acrylic painting. A cigar enthusiast, he continues to write cigar reviews, and meets up with his friends at Sammy C’s in Gallup every Wednesday night. “I still have two boys that live with me at home,” he shared, “so that keeps me tied up most of the time. The “Pepito and his Little Donkey Cito” books are available on A mazon.com. For updates on Micah Cabrera’s future releases, like his facebook page at www.facebook. com/michaswritings. COMMUNITY


First American Credit Union expands to Tse Bonito By Julia Tena For the Gallup Sun

F

irst American Credit Union, headquartered in Casa Grande, AZ, recently opened a new branch in Tse Bonito, NM. Originally chartered in 1962 on the Navajo Nation, the credit union has grown to over 21,000 members in both Arizona and New Mexico. This is the second location in New Mexico for the working cooperative after they acquired the former Thunderbird Credit Union in Gallup in 1994.

The credit union purchased this location from Bank of America after the bank closed its branch in 2014. The working cooperative remodeled the facility and now provides a 4-bay drive-up service, walk-up ATM, safe deposit boxes and an Internet Café. “We have laptops set up so members can research their own accounts,” Regional Branch Manager Becky Apel said. “They are also open inside from 9-2 pm on Saturdays in Gallup and Tse Bonito.” Drawing from the history and pride of the nearby

ROAD TRIP | FROM PAGE 9 taken time to see the wonders around me. This summer, I want to take you on a few road trips with me. We will start by

the wonders of the road and share some of the personal adventures as well. On the next trip, we (me and three friends) will travel by

communities, the interior depicts cultural tones accented by three life cycle images surrounding the credit union’s vault. The building, which will be dedicated to Joseph R. Hardy for his many years of distinguished service to First American, opened its doors in Mid-April and looks to have a formal dedication in the coming months. F i r st A mer ica n Cred it Union, who lives the “people helping people” philosophy, has invested over $100,000 in community partnerships since 2011. The credit union, who employs over 50 employees, offers a variety of financial solutions to its membership — from personal loans to business and insurance services. The credit union thanks the community for its continued support and invites them to visit their new location. Visit First American Credit Union Tse Bonito branch at: 1584 Highway 264, Tse Bonito, NM. (800) 759-9442. Melinda Russell contributed to this story.

Allen J. Blacksheep Jr. and Member Relations Representative Stevie Hudson.

Cultural tones accented by three life cycle images surround the credit union’s vault. Photo Credit: Courtesy

Discover the UNM-Gallup student Sheldon Rodriquez would like to make it to San Diego this summer.

taking a 4 day trip starting in Albuquerque and flying to Boise, Idaho where I will meet my soon-to-be grandchildren and daughterin-law. Wow! We will travel through 9 states and 1944 miles before we get to Clarksville, Kentucky. This is going to be an interesting 30 hour drive. Along the way, I hope to show you some of

way of Grand Canyon Railway to see one of the most visited wonders in all the world, the Grand Canyon. I hope you will come along for the ride. I’m sure it will get interesting in ways I can’t foresee. You might ride along with other reporters during the summer as well. Don’t miss out! There are adventures on the way!

Amanda Livingston, science major at UNM-Gallup is planning a road trip to Las Vegas, Nevada before she starts work this summer.

COMMUNITY

Credit Union

Difference!

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Drive Thru Hours Monday- Thursday 7am - 5pm Friday 7am - 6pm Saturday 9am- 2pm

Lobby Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 8:30am - 5pm Wednesday 9:30am - 5pm Friday 8:30am - 6pm Saturday 9am- 2pm

firstamerican.org (800) 759-9442

Federally Insured by NCUA

Gallup Sun • Friday May 8, 2015

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‘Hot Pursuit’ lacks comedic sizzle By Glenn Kay For the Gallup Sun

RATING «« OUT OF 4 STARS

H

ere’s a rather unfortunate situation. While every cast member of the new comedy Hot Pursuit is funny, the end result is a mediocre collection of hit-and-miss gags. It delivers a few chuckles during its short running time, but is the type of film that will be completely forgotten when you arrive back home. Cooper (Reese Witherspoon) is a stiff and officious cop assigned with providing police protection to a man testifying in a high profile drug-trade trial. When mysterious mercenaries show up and fire rounds, Cooper escapes with the witness’ wife, Daniella (Sofia Vergara). The two heroines go it alone when they learn that they may be the targets of not only the crooks, but corrupt policemen as well. This bickering duo form a camaraderie of sorts as they attempt to survive on the run and evade capture. Unfortunately, early scenes with Cooper do little to inspire audience sympathy. While audience members are repeatedly told that the main character is a cop who just caught a bad break or two, the evidence on display suggests otherwise. She can’t seem to do anything properly (be it use her weapon or climb out a window). That is, except repeat police code rules and regulations. It’s not an

Reese Witherspoon stars in ‘Hot Pursuit’ which opens in theaters May 8. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

engaging character trait and Cooper ultimately comes off as too incompetent to root for. This isn’t the fault of the performer. In general, the cast are let down by a script that doesn’t give them much opportunity to develop their roles or get into outrageous situations. Instead,

it goes for the easy breast gag, menstruation joke or slapstick pratfall. And that’s only part of the problem. They’re forced to behave and deliver the material in such an exaggerated manner that several segments don’t feel particularly relatable or believable. There are also a few ill-timed gags featuring

accidental police brutality that are supposed to elicit laughs, but fall incredibly flat. That isn’t to say that there are no laughs to be had. The movie opens with an entertaining sequence showing Cooper essentially being raised to adulthood in the back of a police cruiser. Comics Mike Birbiglia and Jim Gaffigan also appear briefly in individual scenes, generating some chuckles as a fearful blind date and a country bumpkin. And the two leads dole out a funny barb here and there. Together, they earn the film’s biggest chuckle by donning a ridiculous disguise in order to sneak past a driver checkpoint. However, the movie doesn’t produce enough laughs to merit a recommendation. The very small-scale climax feels particularly uninspired and routine, almost as though it was hashed together at the last moment. It’s really too bad, because the two stars have been very amusing in other projects. But simply pairing them up and hoping for the best has resulted in a bland effort. As buddy pictures go, Hot Pursuit generates little in the way of comedic sizzle. Visit www.cinemastance.com to check out the latest film and DVD/ Blu-Ray reviews!

Go to www.gallupsun.com to see the latest reviews on new DVD/Blu-Ray releases!

PETS OF THE WEEK IT’S KITTEN SEASON! We have a lot of cute kittens, adoption fee is $55. We are running a special on adults cats for $25. We have a great selection of adult kitties looking for their fur-ever home!

Take home a sweet new kitten today.

PUPPY! Bear is a male puppy who is very friendly and needing a home to love him, he is about 3 months old. #6050. The Humane Society is bursting at the seams with great full grown dogs as well. Stop by for a visit!

Bear is anxious to go home with you!

Visit and adopt one of these deserving furry friends at Gallup-McKinley County Humane Society: 1315 Hamilton Rd #B, Gallup, NM. Information: (505) 863-2616. 12

Friday May 8, 2015 • Gallup Sun

COMMUNITY


SPORTS 360 Playing and Coaching, it’s in his blood By Tom Hartsock Sun Correspondent

A

1993 g ra duate of Gallup High, Brian Silva took h is diploma and baseball skills to Seminole Junior Col lege i n Ok la homa for

That move was not totally unexpected since one of his coaches in Connie Mack summer ball was Mickey Menapace, whose story was on these pages recently. Br ia n ha d ot her good coaches as he worked his way up from the Gallup T-Ball start,

Miyamura High School softball coach Brian Silva shares baseball past and coaching present. Photo Credit: Tom Hartsock

two years, where his team missed the World Series by just a game. Returning to New Mexico for a try at NMJC, that didn’t work out well for him, he finished his college years in Portales as a Greyhound.

including the legendary-like Johnny Espinosa – many stories have been written about him – his dad Ron Silva, Doug Howes, and in high school, Rob Hollis and Ed Matlosz. But it was Mickey, and his

Connie Mack team, that probably had the most influence. That team captured two state titles, and a Regional too, during Brian’s time on the field. Silva also had a prime oppor t u n it y t o ba ck up Mickey’s decision in one game in the regional to not just start him at pitcher, but also to list him as the clean-up batter. Brian responded to the jeers and sneers of the other coaches by crushing the ball over the fence in his first at-bat, then threw an excellent game from the mound. When his playing days were finished at Eastern NM, Brian returned home to work with his dad at Gallup Fire Extinguisher Company, and concentrated more on real life, supporting his wife Deanne and daughters Katlynn, Shelby and Ryleigh. He also too the reins of the Patriot nine after Larry Macias stepped down from coaching. This is his sixth year as the head coach and only the second time his players have missed the

state tournament. They finished second in state one year, losing to Piedra Vista in 2010. “I enjoyed playing baseball,” Brian said in an earlier interview. “Now there are mortgage payments, car payments, insurance and all the rest of the things that come from being a husband and a father. I had a chance to join an Independent League team, but decided against it.” Not that he’s given up the sport entirely. Even with a large staff of helpers for the high school team – Phil Gutierrez, Robert Rodrigues, Anthony Vinson, P.J. Gutierrez, Brian Poyer and Jeff DeArmond – to help during the season, the job requires a lot of time, and travel. “My players take more than a couple of swings every day,” Silva explained. “There are a lot of hand drills, machine and manual skills for them to get better at each year. It takes a lot of work. “We have four seniors on the team this year, I leave it up to them (to continue on with

baseball and/or college). We work with Marty Chavez at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix. He’s also a Gallup boy. We set up tryouts for the players and between us we have a lot of good baseball friends around Arizona and New Mexico.” Brian still finds time to spend time with his wife and three girls, working with Miyamura freshman, Katlynn, pitcher and hitter on her swing as he has since she was five. The two younger girls are on his U-12 Sliders traveling softball team, visiting Albuquerque, Farmington, Ruidoso, Socorro and Las Cruces during the summer. And then there is the business as well, which keeps him plenty busy year-round. And his friends still in Gallup, most of whom have played with him in years past, like Gallup head coach Anthony Sanchez. “I have to thank all the fans that come out to watch us play,” Brian says in a final note. “They never quit on us and it helps drive the players in every game.”

Sports Scoreboard APRIL 28, 2015

GHS Soft 2, Bloomfield 4 MHS Base 2, Piedra Vista 15 RCHS Soft 18, Newcomb 0 RCHS Soft 27, Newcomb 2 RCHS Boys’ Tennis 4, Grants 5 IND. Glenn Ratmeyer/Lance McMullin (L) 8-9 (2-7); Gil Alvarez/Max Faz (W) 8-1; Sam Faz/James Byker (L) 5-8; Ratmeyer (L) 1-6, 7-5, 5-7; Max Faz (L)2-6, 3-6; Byker (L) 6-3, 2-6, 7+10; SPORTS

Alvarez (W) 6-0, 6-4; McMullin (W) 6-2, 6-1; Sam Faz (W) 7-5, 6-3.

APRIL 29, 2015

RCHS Soft 19, Shiprock NW 3 RCHS Soft 19, Shiprock NW 1

APRIL 30, 2015

GHS Baseball 0, Farmington 9 WHS Base 0, Shiprock 21 WHS Base 1, Shiprock 13

MAY 2, 2015

MHS Base 16, Gallup 0 MHS Soft 3, Piedra Vista 13 MHS Soft 1, Piedra Vista 11 Scores in this column are for Gallup, Miyamura, Rehoboth and Wingate High schools, the area high schools covered at this time. These four schools are color coded for easier reference while schools outside of our coverage area are always in black. The Gallup Sun encourages coaches in all sports at these schools to submit their scores weekly, no later than Wednesday. Call 505-236-9029 or e-mail info to gallupsports@ msn.com.

Gallup Sun • Friday May 8, 2015

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This Week in Sports MAY 9, 2015

MHS Softball vs Artesia, Noon MHS T & F @ Aztec (District) RCHS Softball in State Playoffs (TBA) WHS T & F @ Shiprock (District) ROD CAREW LEAGUE (T-BALL) 9am Astros vs. Tigers 10am Yankees vs. White Sox 11am Rockies vs. Giants NOON Pirates vs. Dodgers 1pm Red Sox vs. Cubs 2pm Angels vs. Diamondbacks ROBERTO CLEMENTE (@ INDIAN HILLS) 9am Indians vs. Yankees 11am Mets vs. Cardinals 1pm Red Sox vs. Twins ROBERTO CLEMENTE (@ STAFIE FIELD) 9am Marlins vs. Dodgers 11am Padres vs. Angels 1pm Reds vs. Tigers U-8 SOFTBALL (@ FATHER DUNSTAN) 2pm Padres at Rockies 4pm Angels at Giants WILLIE MAYS

(@ STAFIE FIELD) 6pm Angels vs White Sox 8pm A’s vs D-Backs U-10 SOFTBALL (@ FATHER DUNSTAN) 10a Bruins vs. Ducks NOON Grey Hounds vs. Mustangs U-14 SOFTBALL (F.C. SOFTBALL FIELD) 10am Diamondbacks vs. Giants

MAY 11, 2015 ROD CAREW LEAGUE (T-BALL) 6pm A’s vs. Indians 7pm Braves vs. Cardinals ROBERTO CLEMENTE (@ INDIAN HILLS) 6pm Dodgers vs. Yankees U-8 SOFTBALL (@ FATHER DUNSTAN) 6pm Padres at Dbacks WILLIE MAYS (@ STAFIE FIELD) 6pm Rangers vs Nationals U-12 SOFTBALL (F.C. SOFTBALL FIELD) 6pm Braves vs Yankees PEE WEE REESE

(PEE WEE REESE FIELD) 6:00 Braves vs Yankees SANDY KOUFAX (MICKEY MANTLE FIELD) 6pm Tigers vs. Yankees

MAY 12, 2015 ROD CAREW LEAGUE (T-BALL) 6pm Yankees vs. Tigers 7pm Rockies vs. Astros ROBERTO CLEMENTE (@ INDIAN HILLS) 6pm Mets vs. Indians WILLIE MAYS (@ STAFIE FIELD) 6pm White Sox vs Pirates U-10 SOFTBALL (@FATHER DUNSTAN) 6pm Wildcats vs. Frogs PEE WEE REESE (PEE WEE REESE FIELD) 6pm A’s v Red Sox U-14 SOFTBALL (F.C. SOFTBALL FIELD) 6pm D-backs vs. Trojans

MAY 13, 2015

ROBERTO CLEMENTE (INDIAN HILLS) 6pm Padres vs. Dodgers U-8 SOFTBALL (@ FATHER DUNSTAN) 6pm Rockies at Dodgers WILLIE MAYS (@ STAFIE FIELD) 6pm White Sox vs Dodgers U-12 SOFTBALL (F.C. SOFTBALL FIELD) 6pm Giants vs D-Backs PEE WEE REESE (PEE WEE REESE FIELD) 6pm Yankees vs Dodgers SANDY KOUFAX (MICKEY MANTLE FIELD) 6pm Giants vs. Reds

MAY 14,2015 ROD CAREW LEAGUE (T-BALL) 6pm Angels vs. Dodgers 7pm A’s vs. Cubs ROBERTO CLEMENTE (@ INDIAN HILLS) 6pm Red Sox vs. Cardinals

ROD CAREW LEAGUE

(T-BALL) 6pm Pirates vs. White Sox 7pm Red Sox vs. Giants

WILLIE MAYS (@ STAFIE FIELD) 6pm Pirates vs A’s

U-10 SOFTBALL (@FATHER DUNSTAN) 6pm Seminoles vs. Bruins PEE WEE REESE (PEE WEE REESE FIELD) 6pm Rangers vs A’s U-14 SOFTBALL (F.C. SOFTBALL FIELD) 6pm Giants vs. Yankees

MAY 15, 2015 GRADUATION – NO GABSC GAMES GHS T&F @ State Meet (Albuquerque) MHS T & F @ State Meet (Albuquerque) RCHS T & F @ State Meet (Albuquerque) WHS T & F @ State Meet (Albuquerque) Schedules ae only for one week at a time. Times and locations may change for a variety of reasons. Please contact your school to confirm the dates and times. ONLY the four schools from our coverage area appear in this schedule: Gallup, Miyamura, Rehoboth Christian, and Wingate, and these are color-coded for easier reference. The summer league games are included by age groupings, in red.

Fun Memories: Big Brothers Big Sisters Gal-A-Bowl Luau Fundraiser The bowling fundraiser, held May 2, raised more than $140,000 to benefit the Big Brothers Big Sisters local mentoring program. To learn more about how you can help, call (505) 728-8356 or (505) 728-2120.

e es a banker’s techniqu Christina Martinezer usit is the number of strikes . for counting, wheth ny pins left standing she rolled or how ma

s s concentrate Gwyn Hoskin

Cynthia Cliffor d, just hangin g out and look ing good!

D’Amari Money, just another Gallup cutie having a great time!

14

Friday May 8, 2015 • Gallup Sun

roll. on her next

Iris Bekis, left, and Rebecca Ostrovsk y the fundraiser paperwork. handle

SPORTS


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MAIL DELIVERY

DELIVERY DRIVER Gallup Sun is hiring independent contractor newspaper delivery drivers for the following routes: -Grants/Milan-Acoma-Laguna -West Gallup-Navajo-Ganado Send work history/resume to: gallupsun@gmail. com

FREE CLASSIFIEDS!

Place a standard FREE classified in the Gallup Sun! Runs four weeks. Email classified to: gallupsun@gmail.com

HOUSE FOR RENT

Gallup, NM Great Downtown Location

2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Call Patricia 505-879-7611

INTERNSHIPS Gallup Sun is looking for English or Journalism students and photographer interns. Must be deadline driven and detail-oriented. Email resume: gallupsun@gmail.com

REPORTER Gallup Sun is looking for an experienced freelance reporter to cover Gallup city/county/education news. Will consider candidates from outside of the area. Send resume and clips to: gallupsun@gmail. com

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED! FREE STANDARD CLASSIFIED (ONE PER CUSTOMER, MAXIMUM OF FOUR ISSUES)

ANY BOLD TEXT, TEXT BOX, YELLOW HIGHLIGHT OR LOGO/PIC $5 EACH, PER WEEK

1 year subscription. Send check for $49.95 to:

SEND SPECIFICATIONS & CLASSIFIED TO: GALLUPSUN@GMAIL.COM OR FAX (505)212-0391

Gallup Sun Publishing PO Box 1212 Gallup, NM 87305

DEADLINE MONDAYS 5 PM. EMAIL/FAX SUBMISSIONS ONLY.  PAYMENT DUE IN ADVANCE. ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR MAY 8-15, 2015 FRIDAY MAY 8 FREE LEGAL FAIR Where: Larry Brian Mitchell Recreation Center 700 Joseph M. Montoya Blvd., Gallup, NM, 87301. Attorneys to provide advice from 12 pm until 4 pm. Microsoft Word 2010: An Intermediate Course Octavia Fellin Public Library, 2 pm - 4 pm. Registration required. To register call: (505)863-1291; or email: libtrain@gallupnm.gov; or visit the front desk of the library. 115 W. Hill, Gallup.

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY NEEDS VOLUNTEERS Volunteers are needed for one or more part day construction or support sessions. No experience required. Yard Sales are closed for Winter. If you have household items to donate or wish to volunteer, call Bill Bright at (505) 7224226.

CLASSIFIEDS

SATURDAY MAY 9 MOTHER/DAUGHTER CROCHET AND TEA Octavia Fellin Public Library will host a Mother/ Daughter Crochet time with Lenore Chavez from 1 pm to 3 pm. Chavez, who has taught crochet for the local seniors, will lead a basic class on making pot holders. Some crochet experience is recommended. Must provide own supplies (any color Red Heart yarn and a H or I size needle). Tea and treats will be served. Class is limited to 8 pairs, registration is required. To register contact: mdchavez@ gallupnm.gov or call: (505) 863-1291. 115 W. Hill, Gallup.

CALENDAR

at Sammy C’s, 107 W. Coal or Millennium Media, 3rd & Aztec, second floor. El Morro Theatre, 207 West Coal Ave.

SUNDAY MAY 10

DOUBLE FEATURE: PADDINGTON BEAR/ DISNEYNATURE ‘BEARS’ Join us for a special Mother’s Day presentation. Paddington is a 2015 animation comedy based on the famous literary character. Rated PG. This will be followed by a Disneynature feature, “Bears.” Rated G. Showing at 2 PM. 207 West Coal Ave. $5 (cash only).

MONDAY MAY 11

14TH ANNUAL CELEBRACIÓN CINCO DE MAYO

EL MORRO THEATRE PRESENTS ‘INTO THE WOODS’ (2014)

See New Mexico’s own Roberto Griego y Nuevo Sonido perform beloved classics. Doors open at 6 pm. Show starts at 7 pm. $20 in advance; $30 at the door. Tickets can be purchased

Into the Woods is a modern twist on the beloved Brothers Grimm fairy tales, intertwining the plots of a few choice stories and exploring the consequences of the characters’ wishes and quests.

Rated PG. 207 West Coal Ave. Showings at 6 pm and 8:30 pm. May 11-14. $5 per ticket (cash only).

at 113 E. Logan Ave, Gallup. Contact by email: gallupsolar@ gmail.com or call (505) 7262497.

*WINDOWS 8.1 TRAINING

THURSDAY MAY 14

Octavia Fellin Public Library, 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm. Registration required. To register call: (505)863-1291; or email: libtrain@gallupnm.gov; or visit the front desk of the library. 115 W. Hill, Gallup.

SECOND THURSDAY DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP

TUESDAY MAY 12

CITY COUNCIL 6 PM Agendas will be available at least seventy-two (72) hours prior to each meeting. 110 West Aztec Ave.

LIBRARY MAY FILM SERIES Featuring “Lucy.” Wednesday nights at 5:30 pm – popcorn provided. 115 W. Hill, Gallup.

WEDNESDAY MAY 13 GALLUP SOLAR MEETING Gallup Solar holds meeting the first three Wednesdays of the month from 6 pm - 8 pm

Name: Second Thursday Diabetes Support Group Time: 5:30 pm - 7 pm . For all people who suffer from Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes. Church of the Holy Spirit 1334, Country Club Drive in Gallup

FRIDAY MAY 15 RUN FOR THE WALL Annual cross country motorcycle ride arrives in Gallup as it heads towards the Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial Mall in Washington, DC. Information: www.rftw.org Email calendar items by Monday 5 pm to: gallupsunevents@gmail.com

Gallup Sun • Friday May 8, 2015

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R

Travel Centers of America Visit Our Restaurant, General Store,TA Truck Service & TA Motel

Visit our general store for a wide selection of snacks and drinks, trucker gear and DVDs

I-40, Exit 16 (Hwy 66) 3404 W Highway 66 Gallup, NM 87301

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Friday May 8, 2015 • Gallup Sun

(505) 863-6801

NEWS

Gallup Sun • Friday May 8, 2015  
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